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Title: Diary of Samuel Pepys — Complete 1662 N.S.
Author: Pepys, Samuel, 1633-1703
Language: English
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*** Start of this Doctrine Publishing Corporation Digital Book "Diary of Samuel Pepys — Complete 1662 N.S." ***

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                THE DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS M.A.  F.R.S.

            CLERK OF THE ACTS AND SECRETARY TO THE ADMIRALTY

   TRANSCRIBED FROM THE SHORTHAND MANUSCRIPT IN THE PEPYSIAN LIBRARY
MAGDALENE COLLEGE CAMBRIDGE BY THE REV. MYNORS BRIGHT M.A. LATE FELLOW
                      AND PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE

                              (Unabridged)

                      WITH LORD BRAYBROOKE'S NOTES

                        EDITED WITH ADDITIONS BY

                        HENRY B. WHEATLEY F.S.A.

                          DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS.

                           1662 N.S. COMPLETE

1661-62.  January 1st.  Waking this morning out of my sleep on a sudden, I
did with my elbow hit my wife a great blow over her face and nose, which
waked her with pain, at which I was sorry, and to sleep again.  Up and
went forth with Sir W. Pen by coach towards Westminster, and in my way
seeing that the "Spanish Curate" was acted today, I light and let him go
alone, and I home again and sent to young Mr. Pen and his sister to go
anon with my wife and I to the Theatre.  That done, Mr. W. Pen came to me
and he and I walked out, and to the Stacioner's, and looked over some
pictures and traps for my house, and so home again to dinner, and by and
by came the two young Pens, and after we had eat a barrel of oysters we
went by coach to the play, and there saw it well acted, and a good play it
is, only Diego the Sexton did overdo his part too much.  From thence home,
and they sat with us till late at night at cards very merry, but the jest
was Mr. W. Pen had left his sword in the coach, and so my boy and he run
out after the coach, and by very great chance did at the Exchange meet
with the coach and got his sword again.  So to bed.

2nd.  An invitation sent us before we were up from my Lady Sandwich's, to
come and dine with her: so at the office all the morning, and at noon
thither to dinner, where there was a good and great dinner, and the
company, Mr. William Montagu and his Lady (but she seemed so far from the
beauty that I expected her from my Lady's talk to be, that it put me into
an ill humour all the day, to find my expectation so lost), Mr. Rurttball
and Townsend and their wives.  After dinner, borne by water, and so to the
office till night, and then I went forth, by appointment, to meet with Mr.
Grant, who promised to meet me at the Coffee-house to bring me acquainted
with Cooper the great limner in little, but they deceived me, and so I
went home, and there sat at my lute and singing till almost twelve at
night, and so to bed.  Sir Richd. Fanshaw is come suddenly from Portugall,
but nobody knows what his business is.

3rd.  Lay long in bed, and so up and abroad to several places about petty
businesses.  Among others to Tom's, who I find great hopes of that he will
do well, which I am glad of, and am not now so hasty to get a wife for him
as I was before.  So to dinner to my Lord Crew's with him and his Lady,
and after dinner to Faithorne's, and there bought some pictures of him;
and while I was there, comes by the King's life-guard, he being gone to
Lincoln's Inn this afternoon to see the Revells there; there being,
according to an old custom, a prince and all his nobles, and other matters
of sport and charge.  So home, and up to my chamber to look over my papers
and other things, my mind being much troubled for these four or five days
because of my present great expense, and will be so till I cast up and see
how my estate stands, and that I am loth to do for fear I have spent too
much, and delay it the rather that I may pay for my pictures and my
wife's, and the book that I am buying for Paul's School before I do cast
up my accompts.

4th.  At home most of the morning hanging up pictures, and seeing how my
pewter sconces that I have bought will become my stayres and entry, and
then with my wife by water to Westminster, whither she to her father's and
I to Westminster Hall, and there walked a turn or two with Mr. Chetwin
(who had a dog challenged of him by another man that said it was his, but
Mr. Chetwin called the dog, and the dog at last would follow him, and not
his old master, and so Chetwin got the dog) and W. Symons, and thence to
my wife, who met me at my Lord's lodgings, and she and I and old East to
Wilkinson's to dinner, where we had some rost beef and a mutton pie, and a
mince-pie, but none of them pleased me.  After dinner by coach my wife and
I home, and I to the office, and there till late, and then I and my wife
to Sir W. Pen's to cards and supper, and were merry, and much
correspondence there has been between our two families all this Christmas.
So home and to bed.

5th (Lord's day).  Left my wife in bed not well .  .  .  and I to church,
and so home to dinner, and dined alone upon some marrow bones, and had a
fine piece of rost beef, but being alone I eat none.  So after dinner
comes in my brother Tom, and he tells me how he hath seen the father and
mother of the girl which my cozen Joyces would have him to have for a
wife, and they are much for it, but we are in a great quandary what to do
therein, L200 being but a little money; and I hope, if he continues as he
begins, he may look out for one with more.  To church, and before sermon
there was a long psalm, and half another sung out while the Sexton
gathered what the church would give him for this last year.  I gave him
3s., and have the last week given the Clerk 2s., which I set down that I
may know what to do the next year, if it please the Lord that I live so
long; but the jest was, the Clerk begins the 25th psalm, which hath a
proper tune to it, and then the 116th, which cannot be sung with that
tune, which seemed very ridiculous.  After church to Sir W. Batten's,
where on purpose I have not been this fortnight, and I am resolved to keep
myself more reserved to avoyd the contempt which otherwise I must fall
into, and so home and six and talked and supped with my wife, and so up to
prayers and to bed, having wrote a letter this night to Sir J. Mennes in
the Downs for his opinion in the business of striking of flags.

6th (Twelfth day).  This morning I sent my lute to the Paynter's, and
there I staid with him all the morning to see him paint the neck of my
lute in my picture, which I was not pleased with after it was done. Thence
to dinner to Sir W. Pen's, it being a solemn feast day with him, his
wedding day, and we had, besides a good chine of beef and other good
cheer, eighteen mince pies in a dish, the number of the years that he hath
been married, where Sir W. Batten and his Lady, and daughter was, and
Colonel Treswell and Major Holmes, who I perceive would fain get to be
free and friends with my wife, but I shall prevent it, and she herself
hath also a defyance against him.  After dinner they set in to drinking,
so that I would stay no longer, but went away home, and Captain Cock, who
was quite drunk, comes after me, and there sat awhile and so away, and
anon I went again after the company was gone, and sat and played at cards
with Sir W. Pen and his children, and so after supper home, and there I
hear that my man Gull was gone to bed, and upon enquiry I hear that he did
vomit before he went to bed, and complained his head ached, and thereupon
though he was asleep I sent for him out of his bed, and he rose and came
up to me, and I appeared very angry and did tax him with being drunk, and
he told me that he had been with Mr. Southerne and Homewood at the
Dolphin, and drank a quart of sack, but that his head did ache before he
went out.  But I do believe he has drunk too much, and so I did threaten
him to bid his uncle dispose of him some other way, and sent him down to
bed and do resolve to continue to be angry with him.  So to bed to my
wife, and told her what had passed.

7th.  Long in bed, and then rose and went along with Sir W. Pen on foot to
Stepny to Mrs. Chappell's (who has the pretty boy to her son), and there
met my wife and Sir W. Pen's children all, and Mrs. Poole and her boy, and
there dined and' were very merry, and home again by coach and so to the
office.  In the afternoon and at night to Sir W. Pen's, there supped and
played at cards with them and were merry, the children being to go all
away to school again to-morrow.  Thence home and to bed.

8th.  I rose and went to Westminster Hall, and there walked up and down
upon several businesses, and among, others I met with Sir W. Pen, who told
me that he had this morning heard Sir G. Carteret extremely angry against
my man Will that he is every other day with the Commissioners of
Parliament at Westminster, and that his uncle was a rogue, and that he did
tell his uncle every thing that passes at the office, and Sir William,
though he loves the lad, did advise me to part with him, which did with
this surprise mightily trouble me, though I was already angry with him,
and so to the Wardrobe by water, and all the way did examine Will about
the business, but did not tell him upon what score, but I find that the
poor lad do suspect something.  To dinner with my Lady, and after dinner
talked long with her, and so home, and to Sir W. Batten's, and sat and
talked with him, and so home troubled in mind, and so up to my study and
read the two treaties before Mr. Selden's "Mare Clausum," and so to bed.
This night come about L100 from Brampton by carrier to me, in holsters
from my father, which made me laugh.

9th.  At the office all the morning private with Sir G. Carteret (who I
expected something from about yesterday's business, but he said nothing),
Sir W. Batten, and Sir W. Pen, about drawing; up an answer to several
demands of my Lord Treasurer, and late at it till 2 o'clock.  Then to
dinner, and my wife to Sir W. Pen's, and so to the office again and sat
till late; and so home, where I found Mr. Armiger below talking with my
wife, but being offended with him for his leaving of my brother Tom I
shewed him no countenance, but did take notice of it to him plainly, and I
perceive he was troubled at it, but I am glad I told him of it.  Then
(when he was gone) up to write several letters by the post, and so to set
my papers and things in order, and to bed.  This morning we agreed upon
some things to answer to the Duke about the practice of striking of the
flags, which will now put me upon finishing my resolution of writing
something upon the subject.

10th.  To White Hall, and there spoke with Sir Paul Neale' about a
mathematical request of my Lord's to him, which I did deliver to him, and
he promised to employ somebody to answer it, something about observation
of the moon and stars, but what I did not mind.  Here I met with Mr.
Moore, who tells me that an injuncon is granted in Chancery against T.
Trice, at which I was very glad, being before in some trouble for it. With
him to Westminster Hall, where I walked till noon talking with one or
other, and so to the Wardrobe to dinner, where tired with Mr. Pickering's
company I returned to Westminster, by appointment, to meet my wife at Mrs.
Hunt's to gossip with her, which we did alone, and were very merry, and
did give her a cup and spoon for my wife's god-child, and so home by
coach, and I late reading in my chamber and then to bed, my wife being
angry that I keep the house so late up.

11th.  My brother Tom came to me, and he and I to Mr. Turner the Draper's,
and paid L15 to him for cloth owing to him by my father for his mourning
for my uncle, and so to his house, and there invited all the Honiwood's to
dinner on Monday next.  So to the Exchange, and there all the news is of
the French and Dutch joyning against us; but I do not think it yet true.
So home to dinner, and in the afternoon to the office, and so to Sir W.
Batten's, where in discourse I heard the custom of the election of the
Dukes of Genoa, who for two years are every day attended in the greatest
state; and four or five hundred men always waiting upon him as a king; and
when the two years are out, and another is chose, a messenger is, sent to
him, who stands at the bottom of the stairs, and he at the top, and says,
"Va. Illustrissima Serenita sta finita, et puede andar en casa."--"Your
serenity is now ended; and now you may be going home," and so claps on his
hat.  And the old Duke (having by custom sent his goods home before),
walks away, it may be but with one man at his heels; and the new one
brought immediately in his room, in the greatest state in the world.
Another account was told us, how in the Dukedom of Ragusa, in the
Adriatique (a State that is little, but more ancient, they say, than
Venice, and is called the mother of Venice, and the Turks lie round about
it), that they change all the officers of their guard, for fear of
conspiracy, every twenty-four hours, so that nobody knows who shall be
captain of the guard to-night; but two men come to a man, and lay hold of
him as a prisoner, and carry him to the place; and there he hath the keys
of the garrison given him, and he presently issues his orders for that
night's watch: and so always from night to night.  Sir Win. Rider told the
first of his own knowledge; and both he and Sir W. Batten confirm the
last.  Hence home and to read, and so to bed, but very late again.

12th (Lord's day).  To church, where a stranger made a very good sermon.
At noon Sir W. Pen and my good friend Dean Fuller, by appointment, and my
wife's brother by chance, dined with me very merry and handsomely.  After
dinner the Dean, my wife and I by Sir W. Pen's coach left us, he to
Whitehall, and my wife and I to visit Mrs. Pierce and thence Mrs. Turner,
who continues very ill still, and The. is also fallen sick, which do
trouble me for the poor mother.  So home and to read, I being troubled to
hear my wife rate though not without cause at her mayd Nell, who is a lazy
slut.  So to prayers and to bed.

13th.  All the morning at home, and Mr. Berkenshaw (whom I have not seen a
great while, came to see me), who staid with me a great while talking of
musique, and I am resolved to begin to learn of him to compose, and to
begin to-morrow, he giving of me so great hopes that I shall soon do it.
Before twelve o'clock comes, by appointment, Mr. Peter and the Dean, and
Collonel Noniwood, brothers, to dine with me; but so soon that I was
troubled at it.  But, however, I entertained them with talk and oysters
till one o'clock, and then we sat down to dinner, not staying for my uncle
and aunt Wight, at which I was troubled, but they came by and by, and so
we dined very merry, at least I seemed so, but the dinner does not please
me, and less the Dean and Collonel, whom I found to be pitiful sorry
gentlemen, though good-natured, but Mr. Peter above them both, who after
dinner did show us the experiment (which I had heard talk of) of the
chymicall glasses, which break all to dust by breaking off a little small
end; which is a great mystery to me.  They being gone, my aunt Wight and
my wife and I to cards, she teaching of us how to play at gleeke, which is
a pretty game; but I have not my head so free as to be troubled with it.
By and by comes my uncle Wight back, and so to supper and talk, and then
again to cards, when my wife and I beat them two games and they us one,
and so good night and to bed.

14th.  All the morning at home, Mr. Berkenshaw by appointment yesterday
coming to me, and begun composition of musique, and he being gone I to
settle my papers and things in my chamber, and so after dinner in the
afternoon to the office, and thence to my chamber about several businesses
of the office and my own, and then to supper and to bed.  This day my
brave vellum covers to keep pictures in, come in, which pleases me very
much.

15th.  This morning Mr. Berkenshaw came again, and after he had examined
me and taught me something in my work, he and I went to breakfast in my
chamber upon a collar of brawn, and after we had eaten, asked me whether
we had not committed a fault in eating to-day; telling me that it is a
fast day ordered by the Parliament, to pray for more seasonable weather;
it having hitherto been summer weather, that it is, both as to warmth and
every other thing, just as if it were the middle of May or June, which do
threaten a plague (as all men think) to follow, for so it was almost the
last winter; and the whole year after hath been a very sickly time to this
day.  I did not stir out of my house all day, but conned my musique, and
at night after supper to bed.

16th.  Towards Cheapside; and in Paul's Churchyard saw the funeral of my
Lord Cornwallis, late Steward of the King's House, a bold profane talking
man, go by, and thence I to the Paynter's, and there paid him L6 for the
two pictures, and 36s. for the two frames.  From thence home, and Mr.
Holliard and my brother Tom dined with me, and he did give me good advice
about my health.  In the afternoon at the office, and at night to Sir W.
Batten, and there saw him and Captain Cock and Stokes play at cards, and
afterwards supped with them.  Stokes told us, that notwithstanding the
country of Gambo is so unhealthy, yet the people of the place live very
long, so as the present king there is 150 years old, which they count by
rains: because every year it rains continually four months together.  He
also told us, that the kings there have above 100 wives a-piece, and
offered him the choice of any of his wives to lie with, and so he did
Captain Holmes.  So home and to bed.

17th.  To Westminster with Mr. Moore, and there, after several walks up
and down to hear news, I met with Lany, the Frenchman, who told me that he
had a letter from France last night, that tells him that my Lord
Hinchingbroke is dead,--[proved false]--and that he did die yesterday was
se'nnight, which do surprise me exceedingly (though we know that he hath
been sick these two months), so I hardly ever was in my life; but being
fearfull that my Lady should come to hear it too suddenly, he and I went
up to my Lord Crew's, and there I dined with him, and after dinner we told
him, and the whole family is much disturbed by it: so we consulted what to
do to tell my Lady of it; and at last we thought of my going first to Mr.
George Montagu's to hear whether he had any news of it, which I did, and
there found all his house in great heaviness for the death of his son, Mr.
George Montagu, who did go with our young gentlemen into France, and that
they hear nothing at all of our young Lord; so believing that thence comes
the mistake, I returned to my Lord Crew (in my way in the Piazza seeing a
house on fire, and all the streets full of people to quench it), and told
them of it, which they are much glad of, and conclude, and so I hope, that
my Lord is well; and so I went to my Lady Sandwich, and told her all, and
after much talk I parted thence with my wife, who had been there all the
day, and so home to my musique, and then to bed.

18th.  This morning I went to Dr. Williams, and there he told me how T.
Trice had spoke to him about getting me to meet that our difference might
be made up between us by ourselves, which I am glad of, and have appointed
Monday next to be the day.  Thence to the Wardrobe, and there hearing it
would be late before they went to dinner, I went and spent some time in
Paul's Churchyard among some books, and then returned thither, and there
dined with my Lady and Sir H. Wright and his lady, all glad of yesterday's
mistake, and after dinner to the office, and then home and wrote letters
by the post to my father, and by and by comes Mr. Moore to give me an
account how Mr. Montagu was gone away of a sudden with the fleet, in such
haste that he hath left behind some servants, and many things of
consequence; and among others, my Lord's commission for Embassador.
Whereupon he and I took coach, and to White Hall to my Lord's lodgings, to
have spoke with Mr. Ralph Montagu, his brother (and here we staid talking
with Sarah and the old man); but by and by hearing that he was in Covent
Garden, we went thither: and at my Lady Harvy's, his sister, I spoke with
him, and he tells me that the commission is not left behind.  And so I
went thence by the same coach (setting down Mr. Moore) home, and after
having wrote a letter to my Lord at 12 o'clock at night by post I went to
bed.

19th (Lord's day).  To church in the morning, where Mr. Mills preached
upon Christ's being offered up for our sins, and there proving the equity
with what justice God would lay our sins upon his Son, he did make such a
sermon (among other things pleading, from God's universal sovereignty over
all his creatures, the power he has of commanding what he would of his Son
by the same rule as that he might have made us all, and the whole world
from the beginning to have been in hell, arguing from the power the potter
has over his clay), that I could have wished he had let it alone; and
speaking again, the Father is now so satisfied by our security for our
debt, that we might say at the last day as many of us as have interest in
Christ's death: Lord, we owe thee nothing, our debt is paid. We are not
beholden to, thee for anything, for thy debt is paid to thee to the full;
which methinks were very bold words.  Home to dinner, and then my wife and
I on foot to see Mrs. Turner, who continues still sick, and thence into
the Old Bayly by appointment to speak with Mrs. Norbury who lies at (it
falls out) next door to my uncle Fenner's; but as God would have it, we
having no desire to be seen by his people, he having lately married a
midwife that is old and ugly, and that hath already brought home to him a
daughter and three children, we were let in at a back door.  And here she
offered me the refusall of some lands of her's at Brampton, if I have a
mind to buy, which I answered her I was not at present provided to do.
She took occasion to talk of her sister Wight's making much of the Wights,
who for namesake only my uncle do shew great kindness to, so I fear may do
us that are nearer to him a great deal of wrong, if he should die without
children, which I am sorry for.  Thence to my uncle Wight's, and there we
supped and were merry, though my uncle hath lately lost 200 or 300 at sea,
and I am troubled to hear that the Turks do take more and more of our
ships in the Straights, and that our merchants here in London do daily
break, and are still likely to do so. So home, and I put in at Sir W.
Batten's, where Major Holmes was, and in our discourse and drinking I did
give Sir J. Mennes' health, which he swore he would not pledge, and called
him knave and coward (upon the business of Holmes with the Swedish ship
lately), which we all and I particularly did desire him to forbear, he
being of our fraternity, which he took in great dudgeon, and I was vexed
to hear him persist in calling him so, though I believe it to be true, but
however he is to blame and I am troubled at it.  So home and to prayers,
and to bed.

20th.  This morning Sir Win. Batten and Pen and I did begin the examining
the Treasurer's accounts, the first time ever he had passed in the office,
which is very long, and we were all at it till noon, and then to dinner,
he providing a fine dinner for us, and we eat it at Sir W. Batten's, where
we were very merry, there being at table the Treasurer and we three, Mr.
Wayth, Ferrer, Smith, Turner, and Mr. Morrice, the wine cooper, who this
day did divide the two butts, which we four did send for, of sherry from
Cales, and mine was put into a hogshead, and the vessel filled up with
four gallons of Malaga wine, but what it will stand us in I know not: but
it is the first great quantity of wine that I ever bought.  And after
dinner to the office all the afternoon till late at night, and then home,
where my aunt and uncle Wight and Mrs. Anne Wight came to play at cards
(at gleek which she taught me and my wife last week) and so to supper, and
then to cards and so good night.  Then I to my practice of musique and
then at 12 o'clock to bed.  This day the workmen began to make me a sellar
door out of the back yard, which will much please me.

21st.  To the finishing of the Treasurer's accounts this morning, and then
to dinner again, and were merry as yesterday, and so home, and then to the
office till night, and then home to write letters, and to practise my
composition of musique, and then to bed.  We have heard nothing yet how
far the fleet hath got toward Portugall, but the wind being changed again,
we fear they are stopped, and may be beat back again to the coast of
Ireland.

22d.  After musique-practice, to White Hall, and thence to Westminster, in
my way calling at Mr. George Montagu's, to condole him the loss of his
son, who was a fine gentleman, and it is no doubt a great discomfort to
our two young gentlemen, his companions in France.  After this discourse
he told me, among other news, the great jealousys that are now in the
Parliament House.  The Lord Chancellor, it seems, taking occasion from
this late plot to raise fears in the people, did project the raising of an
army forthwith, besides the constant militia, thinking to make the Duke of
York General thereof.  But the House did, in very open terms, say, they
were grown too wise to be fooled again into another army; and said they
had found how that man that hath the command of an army is not beholden to
any body to make him King.  There are factions (private ones at Court)
about Madam Palmer; but what it is about I know not.  But it is something
about the King's favour to her now that the Queen is coming. He told me,
too, what sport the King and Court do make at Mr. Edward Montagu's leaving
his things behind him.  But the Chancellor (taking it a little more
seriously) did openly say to my Lord Chamberlain, that had it been such a
gallant as my Lord Mandeville his son, it might have; been taken as a
frolique; but for him that would be thought a grave coxcomb, it was very
strange.  Thence to the Hall, where I heard the House had ordered all the
King's murderers, that remain, to be executed, but Fleetwood and Downes.
So to the Wardrobe and there dined, meeting my wife there, who went after
dinner with my Lady to see Mr. George Montagu's lady, and I to have a
meeting by appointment with Tho. Trice and Dr. Williams in order to a
treating about the difference between us, but I find there is no hopes of
ending it but by law, and so after a pint or two of wine we parted.  So to
the Wardrobe for my wife again, and so home, and after writing and doing
some things to bed.

23rd.  All the morning with Mr. Berkenshaw, and after him Mr. Moore in
discourse of business, and in the afternoon by coach by invitacon to my
uncle Fenner's, where I found his new wife, a pitiful, old, ugly, illbred
woman in a hatt, a midwife.  Here were many of his, and as many of her
relations, sorry, mean people; and after choosing our gloves, we all went
over to the Three Crane Tavern,' and though the best room in the house, in
such a narrow dogg-hole we were crammed, and I believe we were near forty,
that it made me loathe my company and victuals; and a sorry poor dinner it
was too.  After dinner, I took aside the two Joyce's, and took occasion to
thank them for their kind thoughts for a wife for Tom: but that
considering the possibility there is of my having no child, and what then
I shall be able to leave him, I do think he may expect in that respect a
wife with more money, and so desired them to think no more of it.  Now the
jest was Anthony mistakes and thinks that I did all this while encourage
him (from my thoughts of favour to Tom) to pursue the match till Will
Joyce tells him that he was mistaken.  But how he takes it I know not, but
I endeavoured to tell it him in the most respectful way that I could.
This done with my wife by coach to my aunt Wight's, where I left her, and
I to the office, and that being done to her again, and sat playing at
cards after supper till 12 at night, and so by moonshine home and to bed.

24th.  This morning came my cozen Thos. Pepys the Executor, to speak with
me, and I had much talk with him both about matters of money which my Lord
Sandwich has of his and I am bond for, as also of my uncle Thomas, who I
hear by him do stand upon very high terms.  Thence to my painter's, and
there I saw our pictures in the frames, which please me well.  Thence to
the Wardrobe, where very merry with my Lady, and after dinner I seat for
the pictures thither, and mine is well liked; but she is much offended
with my wife's, and I am of her opinion, that it do much wrong her; but I
will have it altered.  So home, in my way calling at Pope's Head alley,
and there bought me a pair of scissars and a brass square. So home and to
my study and to bed.

25th.  At home and the office all the morning.  Walking in the garden to
give the gardener directions what to do this year (for I intend to have
the garden handsome), Sir W. Pen came to me, and did break a business to
me about removing his son from Oxford to Cambridge to some private
college.  I proposed Magdalene, but cannot name a tutor at present; but I
shall think and write about it.  Thence with him to the Trinity-house to
dinner; where Sir Richard Brown (one of the clerks of the Council, and who
is much concerned against Sir N. Crisp's project of making a great sasse

     [A kind of weir with flood-gate, or a navigable sluice.  This
     project is mentioned by Evelyn, January 16th, 1661-62, and Lysons'
     "Environs" vol. iv., p.  392.--B.]

in the King's lands about Deptford, to be a wett-dock to hold 200 sail of
ships.  But the ground, it seems, was long since given by the King to Sir
Richard) was, and after the Trinity-house men had done their business, the
master, Sir William Rider, came to bid us welcome; and so to dinner, where
good cheer and discourse, but I eat a little too much beef, which made me
sick, and so after dinner we went to the office, and there in a garden I
went in the dark and vomited, whereby I did much ease my stomach.  Thence
to supper with my wife to Sir W. Pen's, his daughter being come home
to-day, not being very well, and so while we were at supper comes Mr.
Moore with letters from my Lord Sandwich, speaking of his lying still at
Tangier, looking for the fleet; which, we hope, is now in a good way
thither.  So home to write letters by the post to-night, and then again to
Sir W. Pen's to cards, where very merry, and so home and to bed.

26th (Lord's day).  To church in the morning, and then home to dinner
alone with my wife, and so both to church in the afternoon and home again,
and so to read and talk with my wife, and to supper and to bed. It having
been a very fine clear frosty day-God send us more of them!--for the warm
weather all this winter makes us fear a sick summer.  But thanks be to
God, since my leaving drinking of wine, I do find myself much better and
do mind my business better, and do spend less money, and less time lost in
idle company.

27th.  This morning, both Sir Williams and I by barge to Deptford-yard to
give orders in businesses there; and called on several ships, also to give
orders, and so to Woolwich, and there dined at Mr. Falconer's of victuals
we carried ourselves, and one Mr. Dekins, the father of my Morena, of whom
we have lately bought some hemp.  That being done we went home again.
This morning, going to take water upon Tower-hill, we met with three
sleddes standing there to carry my Lord Monson and Sir H. Mildmay and
another, to the gallows and back again, with ropes about their necks;
which is to be repeated every year, this being the day of their sentencing
the King.

28th.  This morning (after my musique practice with Mr. Berkenshaw) with
my wife to the Paynter's, where we staid very late to have her picture
mended, which at last is come to be very like her, and I think well done;
but the Paynter, though a very honest man, I found to be very silly as to
matter of skill in shadows, for we were long in discourse, till I was
almost angry to hear him talk so simply.  So home to dinner and then to
the office, and so home for all night.

29th.  To Westminster, and at the Parliament door spoke with Mr. Coventry
about business, and so to the Wardrobe to dinner, and thence to several
places, and so home, where I found Mrs. Pen and Mrs. Rooth and Smith, who
played at cards with my wife, and I did give them a barrel of oysters, and
had a pullet to supper for them, and when it was ready to come to table,
the foolish girl had not the manners to stay and sup with me, but went
away, which did vex me cruelly.  So I saw her home, and then to supper,
and so to musique practice, and to bed.

30th.  Fast-day for the murthering of the late King.  I went to church,
and Mr. Mills made a good sermon upon David's words, "Who can lay his
hands upon the Lord's Anoynted and be guiltless?"  So home and to dinner,
and employed all the afternoon in my chamber, setting things and papers to
rights, which pleased me very well, and I think I shall begin to take
pleasure in being at home and minding my business.  I pray God I may, for
I find a great need thereof.  At night to supper and to bed.

31st.  All the morning, after musique practice, in my cellar, ordering
some alteracons therein, being much pleased with my new door into the back
yard.  So to dinner, and all the afternoon thinking upon business. I did
by night set many things in order, which pleased me well, and puts me upon
a resolution of keeping within doors and minding my business and the
business of the office, which I pray God I may put in practice.  At night
to bed.

                          DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS.
                                FEBRUARY
                                1661-1962

February 1st.  This morning within till 11 o'clock, and then with
Commissioner Pett to the office; and he staid there writing, while I and
Sir W. Pen walked in the garden talking about his business of putting his
son to Cambridge; and to that end I intend to write to-night to Dr.
Fairebrother, to give me an account of Mr. Burton of Magdalene.  Thence
with Mr. Pett to the Paynter's; and he likes our pictures very well, and
so do I. Thence he and I to the Countess of Sandwich, to lead him to her
to kiss her hands: and dined with her, and told her the news (which Sir W.
Pen told me to-day) that express is come from my Lord with letters, that
by a great storm and tempest the mole of Argier is broken down, and many
of their ships sunk into the mole.  So that God Almighty hath now ended
that unlucky business for us;  which is very good news.  After dinner to
the office, where we staid late, and so I home, and late writing letters
to my father and Dr. Fairebrother, and an angry letter to my brother John
for not writing to me, and so to bed.

2nd (Lord's day).  To church in the morning, and then home and dined with
my wife, and so both of us to church again, where we had an Oxford man
give us a most impertinent sermon upon "Cast your bread upon the waters,
&c.  So home to read, supper, and to prayers, and then to bed.

3rd.  After musique practice I went to the office, and there with the two
Sir Williams all the morning about business, and at noon I dined with Sir
W. Batten with many friends more, it being his wedding-day, and among
other froliques, it being their third year, they had three pyes, whereof
the middlemost was made of an ovall form, in an ovall hole within the
other two, which made much mirth, and was called the middle piece; and
above all the rest, we had great striving to steal a spooneful out of it;
and I remember Mrs. Mills, the minister's wife, did steal one for me and
did give it me; and to end all, Mrs. Shippman did fill the pye full of
white wine, it holding at least a pint and a half, and did drink it off
for a health to Sir William and my Lady, it being the greatest draft that
ever I did see a woman drink in my life.  Before we had dined came Sir G.
Carteret, and we went all three to the office and did business there till
night, and then to Sir W. Batten again, and I went along with my lady and
the rest of the gentlewomen to Major Holmes's, and there we had a fine
supper, among others, excellent lobsters, which I never eat at this time
of the year before.  The Major bath good lodgings at the Trinity House.
Here we staid, and at last home, and, being in my chamber, we do hear
great noise of mirth at Sir William Batten's, tearing the ribbands from my
Lady and him.--[As if they were a newly-married couple.]--So I to bed.

4th.  To Westminster Hall, where it was full term.  Here all the morning,
and at noon to my Lord Crew's, where one Mr. Tempter (an ingenious man and
a person of honour he seems to be) dined; and, discoursing of the nature
of serpents, he told us some that in the waste places of Lancashire do
grow to a great bigness, and that do feed upon larks, which they take
thus: They observe when the lark is soared to the highest, and do crawl
till they come to be just underneath them; and there they place themselves
with their mouths uppermost, and there, as is conceived, they do eject
poyson up to the bird; for the bird do suddenly come down again in its
course of a circle, and falls directly into the mouth of the serpent;
which is very strange.  He is a great traveller; and, speaking of the
tarantula, he says that all the harvest long (about which times they are
most busy) there are fidlers go up and down the fields every where, in
expectation of being hired by those that are stung.  Thence to the office,
where late, and so to my chamber and then to bed, my mind a little
troubled how to put things in order to my advantage in the office in
readiness to the Duke's orders lately sent to us, and of which we are to
treat at the office to-morrow morning.  This afternoon, going into the
office, one met me and did serve a subpoena upon me for one Field, whom we
did commit to prison the other day for some ill words he did give the
office.  The like he had for others, but we shall scour him for it.

5th.  Early at the office.  Sir G. Carteret, the two Sir Williams and
myself all alone reading of the Duke's institutions for the settlement of
our office, whereof we read as much as concerns our own duties, and left
the other officers for another time.  I did move several things for my
purpose, and did ease my mind.  At noon Sir W. Pen dined with me, and
after dinner he and I and my wife to the Theatre, and went in, but being
very early we went out again to the next door, and drank some Rhenish wine
and sugar, and so to the House again, and there saw "Rule a Wife and have
a Wife" very well done.  And here also I did look long upon my Lady
Castlemaine, who, notwithstanding her late sickness, continues a great
beauty.  Home and supped with Sir W. Pen and played at cards with him, and
so home and to bed, putting some cataplasm to my .  .  .  .  which begins
to swell again.

6th.  At my musique practice, and so into my cellar to my workmen, and I
am very much pleased with my alteracon there.  About noon comes my uncle
Thomas to me to ask for his annuity, and I did tell him my mind freely. We
had some high words, but I was willing to end all in peace, and so I made
him' dine with me, and I have hopes to work my end upon him.  After dinner
the barber trimmed me, and so to the office, where I do begin to be exact
in my duty there and exacting my privileges, and shall continue to do so.
None but Sir W. Batten and me here to-night, and so we broke up early, and
I home and to my chamber to put things in order, and so to bed.  My
swelling I think do begin to go away again.

7th.  Among my workmen this morning.  By and by by water to Westminster
with Commissioner Pett (landing my wife at Black Friars) where I hear the
prisoners in the Tower that are to die are come to the Parliament-house
this morning.  To the Wardrobe to dinner with my Lady; where a civitt cat,
parrot, apes, and many other things are come from my Lord by Captain Hill,
who dined with my Lady with us to-day.  Thence to the Paynter's, and am
well pleased with our pictures.  So by coach home, where I found the
joyners putting up my chimney-piece in the dining-room, which pleases me
well, only the frame for a picture they have made so massy and heavy that
I cannot tell what to do with it.  This evening came my she cozen Porter
to see us (the first time that we had seen her since we came to this end
of the town) and after her Mr. Hart, who both staid with us a pretty while
and so went away.  By and by, hearing that Mr. Turner was much troubled at
what I do in the office, and do give ill words to Sir W. Pen and others of
me, I am much troubled in my mind, and so went to bed; not that I fear him
at all, but the natural aptness I have to be troubled at any thing that
crosses me.

8th.  All the morning in the cellar with the colliers, removing the coles
out of the old cole hole into the new one, which cost me 8s. the doing;
but now the cellar is done and made clean, it do please me exceedingly, as
much as any thing that was ever yet done to my house.  I pray God keep me
from setting my mind too much upon it.  About 3 o'clock the colliers
having done I went up to dinner (my wife having often urged me to come,
but my mind is so set upon these things that I cannot but be with the
workmen to see things done to my mind, which if I am not there is seldom
done), and so to the office, and thence to talk with Sir W. Pen, walking
in the dark in the garden some turns, he telling me of the ill management
of our office, and how Wood the timber merchant and others were very
knaves, which I am apt to believe.  Home and wrote letters to my father
and my brother John, and so to bed.  Being a little chillish, intending to
take physique to-morrow morning.

9th (Lord's day).  I took physique this day, and was all day in my
chamber, talking with my wife about her laying out of L20, which I had
long since promised her to lay out in clothes against Easter for herself,
and composing some ayres, God forgive me!  At night to prayers and to bed.

10th.  Musique practice a good while, then to Paul's Churchyard, and there
I met with Dr. Fuller's "England's Worthys," the first time that I ever
saw it; and so I sat down reading in it, till it was two o'clock before I,
thought of the time going, and so I rose and went home to dinner, being
much troubled that (though he had some discourse with me about my family
and arms) he says nothing at all, nor mentions us either in Cambridgeshire
or Norfolk.  But I believe, indeed, our family were never considerable.
At home all the afternoon, and at night to bed.

11th.  Musique, then my brother Tom came, and spoke to him about selling
of Sturtlow, he consents to, and I think will be the best for him,
considering that he needs money, and has no mind to marry.  Dined at home,
and at the office in the afternoon.  So home to musique, my mind being
full of our alteracons in the garden, and my getting of things in the
office settled to the advantage of my clerks, which I found Mr. Turner
much troubled at, and myself am not quiet in mind.  But I hope by degrees
to bring it to it.  At night begun to compose songs, and begin with "Gaze
not on Swans."  So to bed.

12th.  This morning, till four in the afternoon, I spent abroad, doing of
many and considerable businesses at Mr. Phillips the lawyer, with Prior,
Westminster, my Lord Crew's, Wardrobe, &c., and so home about the time of
day to dinner with my mind very highly contented with my day's work,
wishing I could do so every day.  Then to my chamber drawing up writings,
in expectation of my uncle Thomas corning.  So to my musique and then to
bed.  This night I had half a 100 poor Jack--[The "poor john" is a hake
salted and dried.  It is frequently referred to in old authors as poor
fare.]--sent me by Mr. Adis.

13th.  After musique comes my cozen Tom Pepys the executor, and he did
stay with me above two hours discoursing about the difference between my
uncle Thomas and me, and what way there may be to make it up, and I have
hopes we may do good of it for all this.  Then to dinner, and then came
Mr. Kennard, and he and I and Sir W. Pen went up and down his house to
view what may be the contrivance and alterations there to the best
advantage.  So home, where Mr. Blackburne (whom I have not seen a long
time) was come to speak with me, and among other discourse he do tell me
plain of the corruption of all our Treasurer's officers, and that they
hardly pay any money under ten per cent.; and that the other day, for a
mere assignation of L200 to some counties, they took L15 which is very
strange.  So to the office till night, and then home and to write by the
post about many businesses, and so to bed.  Last night died the Queen of
Bohemia.

14th (Valentine's day).  I did this day purposely shun to be seen at Sir
W. Batten's, because I would not have his daughter to be my Valentine, as
she was the last year, there being no great friendship between us now, as
formerly.  This morning in comes W. Bowyer, who was my wife's Valentine,
she having, at which I made good sport to myself, held her hands all the
morning, that she might not see the paynters that were at work in gilding
my chimney-piece and pictures in my diningroom.  By and by she and I by
coach with him to Westminster, by the way leaving at Tom's and my wife's
father's lodgings each of them some poor Jack, and some she carried to my
father Bowyer's, where she staid while I walked in the Hall, and there
among others met with Serj'. Pierce, and I took him aside to drink a cup
of ale, and he told me the basest thing of Mr. Montagu's and his man
Eschar's going away in debt, that I am troubled and ashamed, but glad to
be informed of.  He thinks he has left L1000 for my Lord to pay, and that
he has not laid out L3,000 Out of the L5,000 for my Lord's use, and is not
able to make an account of any of the money.  My wife and I to dinner to
the Wardrobe, and then to talk with my Lady, and so by coach, it raining
hard, home, and so to do business and to bed.

15th.  With the two Sir Williams to the Trinity-house; and there in their
society had the business debated of Sir Nicholas Crisp's sasse at
Deptford.  Then to dinner, and after dinner I was sworn a Younger Brother;
Sir W. Rider being Deputy Master for my Lord of Sandwich; and after I was
sworn, all the Elder Brothers shake me by the hand: it is their custom, it
seems.  Hence to the office, and so to Sir Wm. Batten's all three, and
there we staid till late talking together in complaint of the Treasurer's
instruments.  Above all Mr. Waith, at whose child's christening our wives
and we should have been to-day, but none of them went and I am glad of it,
for he is a very rogue, So home, and drew up our report for Sir N.
Crispe's sasse, and so to bed.  No news yet of our fleet gone to Tangier,
which we now begin to think long.

16th (Lord's day).  To church this morning, and so home and to dinner. In
the afternoon I walked to St. Bride's to church, to hear Dr. Jacomb preach
upon the recovery, and at the request of Mrs. Turner, who came abroad this
day, the first time since her long sickness.  He preached upon David's
words, "I shall not die, but live, and declare the works of the Lord," and
made a pretty good sermon, though not extraordinary. After sermon I led
her home, and sat with her, and there was the Dr. got before us; but
strange what a command he hath got over Mrs. Turner, who was so carefull
to get him what he would, after his preaching, to drink, and he, with a
cunning gravity, knows how to command, and had it, and among other things
told us that he heard more of the Common Prayer this afternoon (while he
stood in the vestry, before he went up into the pulpitt) than he had heard
this twenty years.  Thence to my uncle Wight to meet my wife, and with
other friends of hers and his met by chance we were very merry, and
supped, and so home, not being very well through my usual pain got by
cold.  So to prayers and to bed, and there had a good draft of mulled ale
brought me.

17th.  This morning, both Sir Williams, myself, and Captain Cocke and
Captain Tinker of the Convertine, which we are going to look upon (being
intended to go with these ships fitting for the East Indys), down to
Deptford; and thence, after being on shipboard, to Woolwich, and there eat
something.  The Sir Williams being unwilling to eat flesh,

     [In Lent, of which the observance, intermitted for nineteen years,
     was now reviving.  We have seen that Pepys, as yet, had not cast off
     all show of Puritanism.  "In this month the Fishmongers' Company
     petitioned the King that Lent might be kept, because they had
     provided abundance of fish for this season, and their prayer was
     granted."--Rugge.--B.]

Captain Cocke and I had a breast of veal roasted.  And here I drank wine
upon necessity, being ill for want of it, and I find reason to fear that
by my too sudden leaving off wine, I do contract many evils upon myself.
Going and coming we played at gleeke, and I won 9s. 6d.  clear, the most
that ever I won in my life.  I pray God it may not tempt me to play again.
Being come home again we went to the Dolphin, where Mr. Alcock and my Lady
and Mrs. Martha Batten came to us, and after them many others (as it
always is where Sir W. Batten goes), and there we had some pullets to
supper.  I eat though I was not very well, and after that left them, and
so home and to bed.

18th.  Lay long in bed, then up to the office (we having changed our days
to Tuesday and Saturday in the morning and Thursday at night), and by and
by with Sir W. Pen, Mr. Kennard, and others to survey his house again, and
to contrive for the alterations there, which will be handsome I think.
After we had done at the office, I walked to the Wardrobe, where with Mr.
Moore and Mr. Lewis Phillips after dinner we did agree upon the agreement
between us and Prior and I did seal and sign it.  Having agreed with Sir
Wm. Pen and my wife to meet them at the Opera, and finding by my walking
in the streets, which were every where full of brick-battes and tyles
flung down by the extraordinary wind the last night (such as hath not been
in memory before, unless at the death of the late Protector), that it was
dangerous to go out of doors; and hearing how several persons had been
killed to-day by the fall of things in the streets, and that the pageant
in Fleetstreet is most of it blown down, and hath broke down part of
several houses, among others Dick Brigden's; and that one Lady Sanderson,
a person of quality in Covent Garden, was killed by the fall of the house,
in her bed, last night; I sent my boy home to forbid them to go forth.
But he bringing me word that they are gone, I went thither and there saw
"The Law against Lovers," a good play and well performed, especially the
little girl's (whom I never saw act before) dancing and singing; and were
it not for her, the loss of Roxalana would spoil the house.  So home and
to musique, and so to bed.

19th.  Musique practice: thence to the Trinity House to conclude upon our
report of Sir N. Crisp's project, who came to us to answer objections, but
we did give him no ear, but are resolved to stand to our report; though I
could wish we had shewn him more justice and had heard him. Thence to the
Wardrobe and dined with my Lady, and talked after dinner as I used to do,
and so home and up to my chamber to put things in order to my good
content, and so to musique practice.

20th.  This morning came Mr. Child to see me, and set me something to my
Theorbo, and by and by come letters from Tangier from my Lord, telling me
how, upon a great defete given to the Portuguese there by the Moors, he
had put in 300 men into the town, and so he is in possession, of which we
are very glad, because now the Spaniard's designs of hindering our getting
the place are frustrated.  I went with the letter inclosed to my Lord
Chancellor to the House of Lords, and did give it him in the House. And
thence to the Wardrobe with my Lady's, and there could not stay dinner,
but went by promise to Mr. Savill's, and there sat the first time for my
picture in little, which pleaseth me well.  So to the office till night
and then home.

     ["Sunday, Jan.  12.  This morning, the Portuguese, 140 horse in
     Tangier, made a salley into the country for booty, whereof they had
     possessed about 400 cattle, 30 camels, and some horses, and 35 women
     and girls, and being six miles distant from Tangier, were
     intercepted by 100 Moors with harquebusses, who in the first charge
     killed the Aidill with a shot in the head, whereupon the rest of the
     Portuguese ran, and in the pursuit 51 were slain, whereof were 11 of
     the knights, besides the Aidill.  The horses of the 51 were also
     taken by the Moors, and all the booty relieved.

     "Tuesday, Jan. 14.  This morning, Mr. Mules came to me from the
     Governor, for the assistance of some of our men into the castle.

     "Thursday, Jan. 16.  About 80 men out of my own ship, and the
     Princess, went into Tangier, into the lower castle, about four of
     the clock in the afternoon.

     "Friday, Jan. 17.  In the morning, by eight o'clock, the 'Martyr'
     came in from Cales (Cadiz) with provisions, and about ten a clock I
     sent Sir Richard Stayner, with 120 men, besides officers, to the
     assistance of the Governor, into Tangier."--Lord Sandwich's Journal,
     in Kennet's Register.

     On the 23rd, Lord Sandwich put one hundred more men into Tangier; on
     the 29th and 30th, Lord Peterborough and his garrison arrived from
     England, and received possession from the Portuguese; and, on the
     31st, Sir Richard Stayner and the seamen re-embarked on board Lord
     Sandwich's fleet.--B.]

21st, All the morning putting things in my house in order, and packing up
glass to send into the country to my father, and books to my brother John,
and then to my Lord Crew's to dinner; and thence to Mr. Lewes Philip's
chamber, and there at noon with him for business, and received L80 upon
Jaspar Trice's account, and so home with it, and so to my chamber for all
this evening, and then to bed.

22nd.  At the office busy all the morning, and thence to dinner to my Lady
Sandwich's, and thence with Mr. Moore to our Attorney, Wellpoole's, and
there found that Godfry has basely taken out a judgment against us for the
L40, for which I am vexed.  And thence to buy a pair of stands and a
hanging shelf for my wife's chamber, and so home, and thither came Mr.
Savill with the pictures, and we hung them up in our dining-room. It comes
now to appear very handsome with all my pictures.  This evening I wrote
letters to my father; among other things acquainting him with the unhappy
accident which hath happened lately to my Lord of Dorset's two oldest
sons, who, with two Belasses and one Squire Wentworth, were lately
apprehended for killing and robbing of a tanner about Newington' on
Wednesday last, and are all now in Newgate.  I am much troubled for it,
and for the grief and disgrace it brings to their familys and friends.
After this, having got a very great cold, I got something warm to-night,
and so to bed.

23rd (Lord's day).  My cold being increased, I staid at home all day,
pleasing myself with my dining-room, now graced with pictures, and reading
of Dr. Fuller's "Worthys."  So I spent the day, and at night comes Sir W.
Pen and supped and talked with me.  This day by God's mercy I am 29 years
of age, and in very good health, and like to live and get an estate; and
if I have a heart to be contented, I think I may reckon myself as happy a
man as any is in the world, for which God be praised. So to prayers and to
bed.

24th.  Long with Mr. Berkenshaw in the morning at my musique practice;
finishing my song of "Gaze not on Swans," in two parts, which pleases me
well, and I did give him L5 for this month or five weeks that he hath
taught me, which is a great deal of money and troubled me to part with it.
Thence to the Paynter s, and set again for my picture in little, and
thence over the water to Southwark to Mr. Berkenshaw's house, and there
sat with him all the afternoon, he showing me his great card of the body
of musique, which he cries up for a rare thing, and I do believe it cost
much pains, but is not so useful as he would have it.  Then we sat down
and set "Nulla, nulla sit formido," and he has set it very finely.  So
home and to supper, and then called Will up, and chid him before my wife
for refusing to go to church with the maids yesterday, and telling his
mistress that he would not be made a slave of, which vexes me.  So to bed.

25th.  All the morning at the office.  At noon with Mr. Moore to the
Coffee-house, where among other things the great talk was of the effects
of this late great wind; and I heard one say that he had five great trees
standing together blown down; and, beginning to lop them, one of them, as
soon as the lops were cut off, did, by the weight of the root, rise again
and fasten.  We have letters from the forest of Deane, that above 1000
Oakes and as many beeches are blown down in one walk there.  And letters
from my father tell me of L20 hurt done to us at Brampton.  This day in
the news-book I find that my Lord Buckhurst and his fellows have printed
their case as they did give it in upon examination to a justice of Peace,
wherein they make themselves a very good tale that they were in pursuit of
thieves, and that they took this man for one of them, and so killed him;
and that he himself confessed it was the first time of his robbing; and
that he did pay dearly for it, for he was a dead man.  But I doubt things
will be proved otherwise, as they say.  Home to dinner, and by and by
comes Mr. Hunt and his wife to see us and staid a good, while with us.
Then parted, and I to my study in the office.  The first time since the
alteracon that I have begun to do business myself there, and I think I
shall be well pleased with it.  At night home to supper and to bed.

26th.  Mr. Berkenshaw with me all the morning composing of musique to
"This cursed jealousy, what is it," a song of Sir W. Davenant's.  After
dinner I went to my Bookseller's, W. Joyce's, and several other places to
pay my debts and do business, I being resolved to cast up my accounts
within a day or two, for I fear I have run out too far.  In coming home I
met with a face I knew and challenged him, thinking it had been one of the
Theatre musicians, and did enquire for a song of him, but finding it a
mistake, and that it was a gentleman that comes sometimes to the office, I
was much ashamed, but made a pretty good excuse that I took him for a
gentleman of Gray's Inn who sings well, and so parted.  Home for all night
and set things in order and so to bed.

27th.  This morning came Mr. Berkenshaw to me and in our discourse I,
finding that he cries up his rules for most perfect (though I do grant
them to be very good, and the best I believe that ever yet were made), and
that I could not persuade him to grant wherein they were somewhat lame, we
fell to angry words, so that in a pet he flung out of my chamber and I
never stopped him, having intended to put him off today, whether this had
happened or no, because I think I have all the rules that he hath to give.
And so there remains not the practice now to do me good, and it is not for
me to continue with him at; L5 per month.  So I settled to put all his
rules in fair order in a book, which was my work all the morning till
dinner.  After dinner to the office till late at night, and so home to
write by the post, and so to bed.

28th.  The boy failing to call us up as I commanded, I was angry, and
resolved to whip him for that and many other faults, to-day.  Early with
Sir W. Pen by coach to Whitehall, to the Duke of York's chamber, and there
I presented him from my Lord a fine map of Tangier, done by one Captain
Beckman, a Swede, that is with my Lord.  We staid looking it over a great
while with the Duke after he was ready.  Thence I by water to the
Painter's, and there sat again for my face in little, and thence home to
dinner, and so at home all the afternoon.  Then came Mr. Moore and staid
and talked with me, and then I to the office, there being all the
Admiralty papers brought hither this afternoon from Mr. Blackburne's,
where they have lain all this while ever since my coming into this office.
This afternoon Mr. Hater received half a year's salary for me, so that now
there is not owing me but this quarter, which will be out the next month.
Home, and to be as good as my word, I bade Will get me a rod, and he and I
called the boy up to one of the upper rooms of the Comptroller's house
towards the garden, and there I reckoned all his faults, and whipped him
soundly, but the rods were so small that I fear they did not much hurt to
him, but only to my arm, which I am already, within a quarter of an hour,
not able to stir almost.  After supper to bed.

     ETEXT EDITOR'S BOOKMARKS:

     Aptness I have to be troubled at any thing that crosses me
     Cannot but be with the workmen to see things done to my mind
     Command of an army is not beholden to any body to make him King



                THE DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS M.A.  F.R.S.

            CLERK OF THE ACTS AND SECRETARY TO THE ADMIRALTY

    TRANSCRIBED FROM THE SHORTHAND MANUSCRIPT IN THE PEPYSIAN LIBRARY
 MAGDALENE COLLEGE CAMBRIDGE BY THE REV. MYNORS BRIGHT M.A. LATE FELLOW
                  AND PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE

                              (Unabridged)

                      WITH LORD BRAYBROOKE'S NOTES

                        EDITED WITH ADDITIONS BY

                        HENRY B. WHEATLEY F.S.A.

                           DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS.

                              MARCH & APRIL
                                1661-1662

March 1st.  This morning I paid Sir W. Batten L40, which I have owed him
this half year, having borrowed it of him.  Then to the office all the
morning, so dined at home, and after dinner comes my uncle Thomas, with
whom I had some high words of difference, but ended quietly, though I fear
I shall do no good by fair means upon him.  Thence my wife and I by coach,
first to see my little picture that is a drawing, and thence to the Opera,
and there saw "Romeo and Juliet," the first time it was ever acted; but it
is a play of itself the worst that ever I heard in my life, and the worst
acted that ever I saw these people do, and I am resolved to go no more to
see the first time of acting, for they were all of them out more or less.
Thence home, and after supper and wrote by the post, I settled to what I
had long intended, to cast up my accounts with myself, and after much
pains to do it and great fear, I do find that I am 1500 in money
beforehand in the world, which I was afraid I was not, but I find that I
had spent above L250 this last half year, which troubles me much, but by
God's blessing I am resolved to take up, having furnished myself with all
things for a great while, and to-morrow to think upon some rules and
obligations upon myself to walk by.  So with my mind eased of a great deal
of trouble, though with no great content to find myself above L100 worse
now than I was half a year ago, I went to bed.

2nd (Lord's day).  With my mind much eased talking long in bed with my
wife about our frugall life for the time to come, proposing to her what I
could and would do if I were worth L2,000, that is, be a knight, and keep
my coach, which pleased her,

     [Lord Braybrooke wrote, "This reminds me of a story of my father's,
     when he was of Merton College, and heard Bowen the porter wish that
     he had L100 a-year, to enable him to keep a couple of hunters and a
     pack of foxhounds."]

and so I do hope we shall hereafter live to save something, for I am
resolved to keep myself by rules from expenses.  To church in the morning:
none in the pew but myself.  So home to dinner, and after dinner came Sir
William and talked with me till church time, and then to church, where at
our going out I was at a loss by Sir W. Pen's putting me upon it whether
to take my wife or Mrs. Martha (who alone was there), and I began to take
my wife, but he jogged me, and so I took Martha, and led her down before
him and my wife.  So set her at home, and Sir William and my wife and I to
walk in the garden, and anon hearing that Sir G. Carteret had sent to see
whether we were at home or no, Sir William and I went to his house, where
we waited a good while, they being at prayers, and by and by we went up to
him; there the business was about hastening the East India ships, about
which we are to meet to-morrow in the afternoon.  So home to my house, and
Sir William supped with me, and so to bed.

3rd.  All the morning at home about business with my brother Tom, and then
with Mr. Moore, and then I set to make some strict rules for my future
practice in my expenses, which I did bind myself in the presence of God by
oath to observe upon penalty therein set down, and I do not doubt but
hereafter to give a good account of my time and to grow rich, for I do
find a great deal more of content in these few days, that I do spend well
about my business, than in all the pleasure of a whole week, besides the
trouble which I remember I always have after that for the expense of my
money.  Dined at home, and then up to my chamber again about business, and
so to the office about despatching of the East India ships, where we staid
till 8 at night, and then after I had been at Sir W. Pen's awhile
discoursing with him and Mr. Kenard the joiner about the new building in
his house, I went home, where I found a vessel of oysters sent me from
Chatham, so I fell to eat some and then to supper, and so after the barber
had done to bed.  I am told that this day the Parliament hath voted 2s.
per annum for every chimney in England, as a constant revenue for ever to
the Crown.

     [Although fumage or smoke money was as old as the Conquest, the
     first parliamentary levy of hearth or chimney money was by statute
     13 and 14 Car. II., c. 10, which gave the king an hereditary revenue
     of two shillings annually upon every hearth in all houses paying
     church or poor rate.  This act was repealed by statute I William and
     Mary, c. 10, it being declared in the preamble as "not only a great
     oppression to the poorer sort, but a badge of slavery upon the whole
     people, exposing every man's house to be entered into and searched
     at pleasure by persons unknown to him."]

4th.  At the office all the morning, dined at home at noon, and then to
the office again in the afternoon to put things in order there, my mind
being very busy in settling the office to ourselves, I having now got
distinct offices for the other two.  By and by Sir W. Pen and I and my
wife in his coach to Moore Fields, where we walked a great while, though
it was no fair weather and cold; and after our walk we went to the Pope's
Head, and eat cakes and other fine things, and so home, and I up to my
chamber to read and write, and so to bed.

5th.  In the morning to the Painter's about my little picture.  Thence to
Tom's about business, and so to the pewterer's, to buy a poore's-box to
put my forfeits in, upon breach of my late vows.  So to the Wardrobe and
dined, and thence home and to my office, and there sat looking over my
papers of my voyage, when we fetched over the King, and tore so many of
these that were worth nothing, as filled my closet as high as my knees. I
staid doing this till 10 at night, and so home and to bed.

6th.  Up early, my mind full of business, then to the office, where the
two Sir Williams and I spent the morning passing the victualler's
accounts, the first I have had to do withal.  Then home, where my Uncle
Thomas (by promise and his son Tom) were come to give me his answer
whether he would have me go to law or arbitracon with him, but he is
unprovided to answer me, and desires two days more.  I left them to dine
with my wife, and myself to Mr. Gauden and the two knights at dinner at
the Dolphin, and thence after dinner to the office back again till night,
we having been these four or five days very full of business, and I thank
God I am well pleased with it, and hope I shall continue of that temper,
which God grant.  So after a little being at Sir W. Batten's with Sir G.
Carteret talking, I went home, and so to my chamber, and then to bed, my
mind somewhat troubled about Brampton affairs.  This night my new camelott
riding coat to my coloured cloth suit came home.  More news to-day of our
losses at Brampton by the late storm.

7th.  Early to White Hall to the chappell, where by Mr. Blagrave's means I
got into his pew, and heard Dr. Creeton, the great Scotchman, preach
before the King, and Duke and Duchess, upon the words of Micah:--"Roule
yourselves in dust."  He made a most learned sermon upon the words; but,
in his application, the most comical man that ever I heard in my life.
Just such a man as Hugh Peters; saying that it had been better for the
poor Cavalier never to have come with the King into England again; for he
that hath the impudence to deny obedience to the lawful magistrate, and to
swear to the oath of allegiance, &c., was better treated now-a-days in
Newgate, than a poor Royalist, that hath suffered all his life for the
King, is at White Hall among his friends.  He discoursed much against a
man's lying with his wife in Lent, saying that he might be as incontinent
during that time with his own wife as at another time in another man's
bed.  Thence with Mr. Moore to Whitehall and walked a little, and so to
the Wardrobe to dinner, and so home to the office about business till late
at night by myself, and so home and to bed.

8th.  By coach with both Sir Williams to Westminster; this being a great
day there in the House to pass the business for chimney-money, which was
done.  In the Hall I met with Serjeant Pierce; and he and I to drink a cup
of ale at the Swan, and there he told me how my Lady Monk hath disposed of
all the places which Mr. Edwd. Montagu hoped to have had, as he was Master
of the Horse to the Queen; which I am afraid will undo him, because he
depended much upon the profit of what he should make by these places.  He
told me, also, many more scurvy stories of him and his brother Ralph,
which troubles me to hear of persons of honour as they are.  About one
o'clock with both Sir Williams and another, one Sir Rich. Branes, to the
Trinity House, but came after they had dined, so we had something got
ready for us.  Here Sir W. Batten was taken with a fit of coughing that
lasted a great while and made him very ill, and so he went home sick upon
it.  Sir W. Pen. and I to the office, whither afterward came Sir G.
Carteret; and we sent for Sir Thos. Allen, one of the Aldermen of the
City, about the business of one Colonel Appesley, whom we had taken
counterfeiting of bills with all our hands and the officers of the yards,
so well counterfeited that I should never have mistrusted them.  We staid
about this business at the office till ten at night, and at last did send
him with a constable to the Counter; and did give warrants for the seizing
of a complice of his, one Blinkinsopp.  So home and wrote to my father,
and so to bed.

9th (Lord's day).  Church in the morning: dined at home, then to Church
again and heard Mr. Naylor, whom I knew formerly of Keye's College, make a
most eloquent sermon.  Thence to Sir W. Batten's to see how he did, then
to walk an hour with Sir W. Pen in the garden: then he in to supper with
me at my house, and so to prayers and to bed.

10th.  At the office doing business all the morning, and my wife being
gone to buy some things in the city I dined with Sir W. Batten, and in the
afternoon met Sir W. Pen at the Treasury Office, and there paid off the
Guift, where late at night, and so called in and eat a bit at Sir W.
Batten's again, and so home and to bed, to-morrow being washing day.

11th.  At the office all the morning, and all the afternoon rummaging of
papers in my chamber, and tearing some and sorting others till late at
night, and so to bed, my wife being not well all this day.  This afternoon
Mrs. Turner and The. came to see me, her mother not having been abroad
many a day before, but now is pretty well again and has made me one of the
first visits.

12th.  At the office from morning till night putting of papers in order,
that so I may have my office in an orderly condition.  I took much pains
in sorting and folding of papers.  Dined at home, and there came Mrs.
Goldsborough about her old business, but I did give her a short answer and
sent away.  This morning we had news from Mr. Coventry, that Sir G.
Downing (like a perfidious rogue, though the action is good and of service
to the King,

     [("And hail the treason though we hate the traitor.") On the 21st
     Charles returned his formal thanks to the States for their
     assistance in the matter.--B.]

yet he cannot with any good conscience do it) hath taken Okey, Corbet, and
Barkestead at Delfe, in Holland, and sent them home in the Blackmore. Sir
W. Pen, talking to me this afternoon of what a strange thing it is for
Downing to do this, he told me of a speech he made to the Lords States of
Holland, telling them to their faces that he observed that he was not
received with the respect and observance now, that he was when he came
from the traitor and rebell Cromwell: by whom, I am sure, he hath got all
he hath in the world,--and they know it too.

     [Charles, when residing at Brussels, went to the Hague at night to
     pay a secret visit to his sister, the Princess of Orange.  After his
     arrival, "an old reverend-like man, with a long grey beard and
     ordinary grey clothes," entered the inn and begged for a private
     interview.  He then fell on his knees, and pulling off his disguise,
     discovered himself to be Mr. Downing, then ambassador from Cromwell
     to the States-General.  He informed Charles that the Dutch had
     guaranteed to the English Commonwealth to deliver him into their
     hands should he ever set foot in their territory.  This warning
     probably saved Charles's liberty.--M. B.]

13th.  All day, either at the office or at home, busy about business till
late at night, I having lately followed my business much, I find great
pleasure in it, and a growing content.

14th.  At the office all the morning.  At noon Sir W. Pen and I making a
bargain with the workmen about his house, at which I did see things not so
well contracted for as I would have, and I was vexed and made him so too
to see me so critical in the agreement.  Home to dinner.  In the afternoon
came the German Dr. Kuffler,

     [This is the secret of Cornelius van Drebbel (1572-1634), which is
     referred to again by Pepys on November 11th, 1663.  Johannes
     Siberius Kuffler was originally a dyer at Leyden, who married
     Drebbel's daughter. In the "Calendar of State Papers, Domestic,"
     1661-62 (p. 327), is the following entry: "Request of Johannes
     Siberius Kuffler and Jacob Drebble for a trial of their father
     Cornelius Drebble's secret of sinking or destroying ships in a
     moment; and if it succeed, for a reward of L10,000. The secret was
     left them by will, to preserve for the English crown before any
     other state."  Cornelius van Drebbel settled in London, where he
     died. James I.  took some interest in him, and is said to have
     interfered when he was in prison in Austria and in danger of
     execution.]

to discourse with us about his engine to blow up ships.  We doubted not
the matter of fact, it being tried in Cromwell's time, but the safety of
carrying them in ships; but he do tell us, that when he comes to tell the
King his secret (for none but the Kings, successively, and their heirs
must know it), it will appear to be of no danger at all.  We concluded
nothing; but shall discourse with the Duke of York to-morrow about it. In
the afternoon, after we had done with him, I went to speak with my uncle
Wight and found my aunt to have been ill a good while of a miscarriage, I
staid and talked with her a good while.  Thence home, where I found that
Sarah the maid had been very ill all day, and my wife fears that she will
have an ague, which I am much troubled for.  Thence to my lute, upon which
I have not played a week or two, and trying over the two songs of "Nulla,
nulla," &c., and "Gaze not on Swans," which Mr. Berkenshaw set for me a
little while ago, I find them most incomparable songs as he has set them,
of which I am not a little proud, because I am sure none in the world has
them but myself, not so much as he himself that set them.  So to bed.

15th.  With Sir G. Carteret and both the Sir Williams at Whitehall to wait
on the Duke in his chamber, which we did about getting money for the Navy
and other things.  So back again to the office all the morning. Thence to
the Exchange to hire a ship for the Maderas, but could get none.  Then
home to dinner, and Sir G. Carteret and I all the afternoon by ourselves
upon business in the office till late at night.  So to write letters and
home to bed. Troubled at my maid's being ill.

16th (Lord's day).  This morning, till churches were done, I spent going
from one church to another and hearing a bit here and a bit there.  So to
the Wardrobe to dinner with the young Ladies, and then into my Lady's
chamber and talked with her a good while, and so walked to White Hall, an
hour or two in the Park, which is now very pleasant.  Here the King and
Duke came to see their fowl play.  The Duke took very civil notice of me.
So walked home, calling at Tom's, giving him my resolution about my boy's
livery.  Here I spent an hour walking in the garden with Sir W. Pen, and
then my wife and I thither to supper, where his son William is at home not
well.  But all things, I fear, do not go well with them; they look
discontentedly, but I know not what ails them. Drinking of cold small beer
here I fell ill, and was forced to go out and vomit, and so was well again
and went home by and by to bed.  Fearing that Sarah would continue ill,
wife and I removed this night to our matted chamber and lay there.

17th.  All the morning at the office by myself about setting things in
order there, and so at noon to the Exchange to see and be seen, and so
home to dinner and then to the office again till night, and then home and
after supper and reading a while to bed.  Last night the Blackmore pink

     [A "pink" was a form of vessel now obsolete, and had a very narrow
     stern. The "Blackmoor" was a sixth-rate of twelve guns, built at
     Chatham by Captain Tayler in 1656.]

brought the three prisoners, Barkestead, Okey, and Corbet, to the Tower,
being taken at Delfe in Holland; where, the Captain tells me, the Dutch
were a good while before they could be persuaded to let them go, they
being taken prisoners in their land.  But Sir G. Downing would not be
answered so: though all the world takes notice of him for a most
ungrateful villain for his pains.

18th.  All the morning at the office with Sir W. Pen.  Dined at home, and
Luellin and Blurton with me.  After dinner to the office again, where Sir
G. Carteret and we staid awhile, and then Sir W. Pen and I on board some
of the ships now fitting for East Indys and Portugall, to see in what
forwardness they are, and so back home again, and I write to my father by
the post about Brampton Court, which is now coming on.  But that which
troubles me is that my Father has now got an ague that I fear may endanger
his life.  So to bed.

19th.  All the morning and afternoon at my office putting things in order,
and in the evening I do begin to digest my uncle the Captain's papers into
one book, which I call my Brampton book, for the clearer understanding
things how they are with us.  So home and supper and to bed.  This noon
came a letter from T. Pepys, the turner, in answer to one of mine the
other day to him, wherein I did cheque him for not coming to me, as he had
promised, with his and his father's resolucion about the difference
between us.  But he writes to me in the very same slighting terms that I
did to him, without the least respect at all, but word for word as I did
him, which argues a high and noble spirit in him, though it troubles me a
little that he should make no more of my anger, yet I cannot blame him for
doing so, he being the elder brother's son, and not depending upon me at
all.

20th.  At my office all the morning, at noon to the Exchange, and so home
to dinner, and then all the afternoon at the office till late at night,
and so home and to bed, my mind in good ease when I mind business, which
methinks should be a good argument to me never to do otherwise.

21st.  With Sir W. Batten by water to Whitehall, and he to Westminster. I
went to see Sarah and my Lord's lodgings, which are now all in dirt, to be
repaired against my Lord's coming from sea with the Queen.  Thence to
Westminster Hall; and there walked up and down and heard the great
difference that hath been between my Lord Chancellor and my Lord of
Bristol, about a proviso that my Lord Chancellor would have brought into
the Bill for Conformity, that it shall be in the power of the King, when
he sees fit, to dispense with the Act of Conformity; and though it be
carried in the House of Lords, yet it is believed it will hardly pass in
the Commons.  Here I met with Chetwind, Parry, and several others, and
went to a little house behind the Lords' house to drink some wormwood ale,
which doubtless was a bawdy house, the mistress of the house having the
look and dress: Here we staid till noon and then parted, I by water to the
Wardrobe to meet my wife, but my Lady and they had dined, and so I dined
with the servants, and then up to my Lady, and there staid and talked a
good while, and then parted and walked into Cheapside, and there saw my
little picture, for which I am to sit again the next week.  So home, and
staid late writing at my office, and so home and to bed, troubled that now
my boy is also fallen sick of an ague we fear.

22nd.  At the office all the morning.  At noon Sir Williams both and I by
water down to the Lewes, Captain Dekins, his ship, a merchantman, where we
met the owners, Sir John Lewes and Alderman Lewes, and several other great
merchants; among others one Jefferys, a merry man that is a fumbler, and
he and I called brothers, and he made all the mirth in the company.  We
had a very fine dinner, and all our wives' healths, with seven or nine
guns apiece; and exceeding merry we were, and so home by barge again, and
I vexed to find Griffin leave the office door open, and had a design to
have carried away the screw or the carpet in revenge to him, but at last I
would not, but sent for him and chid him, and so to supper and to bed,
having drank a great deal of wine.

23rd (Lord's day).  This morning was brought me my boy's fine livery,
which is very handsome, and I do think to keep to black and gold lace upon
gray, being the colour of my arms, for ever.  To church in the morning,
and so home with Sir W. Batten, and there eat some boiled great oysters,
and so home, and while I was at dinner with my wife I was sick, and was
forced to vomit up my oysters again, and then I was well.  By and by a
coach came to call me by my appointment, and so my wife and I carried to
Westminster to Mrs. Hunt's, and I to Whitehall, Worcester House, and to my
Lord Treasurer's to have found Sir G. Carteret, but missed in all these
places.  So back to White Hall, and there met with Captn. Isham, this day
come from Lisbon, with letters from the Queen to the King.  And he did
give me letters which speak that our fleet is all at Lisbon;

     [One of these letters was probably from John Creed.  Mr. S. J.
     Davey, of 47, Great Russell Street, Bloomsbury, in 1889 had in his
     possession nine long letters from Creed to Pepys.  In the first of
     these, dated from Lisbon, March, 1662, Creed wrote: "My Lord
     Embassador doth all he can to hasten the Queen's Majestie's
     embarquement, there being reasons enough against suffering any
     unnecessary delay."  There appear to have been considerable delays
     in the arrangements for the following declaration of Charles II.
     was dated June 22nd, 1661: "Charles R.  Whereas his Maj. is resolved
     to declare, under his Royall hand and seale, the most illustrious
     Lady Infanta of Portugall to be his lawfull wife, before the Treaty
     shall be signed by the King of Portugall; which is to be done only
     for the better expediting the marriage, without sending to Rome for
     a dispensation, which the laws of Portugall would require if the
     said most Illustrious Infanta were to be betrothed in that
     Kingdome," &c.]

and that the Queen do not intend to embarque sooner than tomorrow come
fortnight.  So having sent for my wife, she and I to my Lady Sandwich, and
after a short visit away home.  She home, and I to Sir G. Carteret's about
business, and so home too, and Sarah having her fit we went to bed.

24th.  Early Sir G. Carteret, both Sir Williams and I on board the
Experiment, to dispatch her away, she being to carry things to the
Madeiras with the East Indy fleet.  Here (Sir W. Pen going to Deptford to
send more hands) we staid till noon talking, and eating and drinking a
good ham of English bacon, and having put things in very good order home,
where I found Jane, my old maid, come out of the country, and I have a
mind to have her again.  By and by comes La Belle Pierce to see my wife,
and to bring her a pair of peruques of hair, as the fashion now is for
ladies to wear; which are pretty, and are of my wife's own hair, or else I
should not endure them.  After a good whiles stay, I went to see if any
play was acted, and I found none upon the post, it being Passion week. So
home again, and took water with them towards Westminster; but as we put
off with the boat Griffin came after me to tell me that Sir G. Carteret
and the rest were at the office, so I intended to see them through the
bridge and come back again, but the tide being against us, when we were
almost through we were carried back again with much danger, and Mrs.
Pierce was much afeard and frightened.  So I carried them to the other
side and walked to the Beare, and sent them away, and so back again myself
to the office, but finding nobody there I went again to the Old Swan, and
thence by water to the New Exchange, and there found them, and thence by
coach carried my wife to Bowes to buy something, and while they were there
went to Westminster Hall, and there bought Mr. Grant's book of
observations upon the weekly bills of mortality, which appear to me upon
first sight to be very pretty.  So back again and took my wife, calling at
my brother Tom's, whom I found full of work, which I am glad of, and
thence at the New Exchange and so home, and I to Sir W. Batten's, and
supped there out of pure hunger and to save getting anything ready at
home, which is a thing I do not nor shall not use to do.  So home and to
bed.

26th.  Up early.  This being, by God's great blessing, the fourth solemn
day of my cutting for the stone this day four years, and am by God's mercy
in very good health, and like to do well, the Lord's name be praised for
it.  To the office and Sir G. Carteret's all the morning about business.
At noon come my good guests, Madame Turner, The., and Cozen Norton, and a
gentleman, one Mr. Lewin of the King's Life-Guard; by the same token he
told us of one of his fellows killed this morning in a duel.  I had a
pretty dinner for them, viz., a brace of stewed carps, six roasted
chickens, and a jowl of salmon, hot, for the first course; a tanzy

     [Tansy (tanacetum), a herb from which puddings were made.  Hence any
     pudding of the kind.  Selden ("Table Talk") says: "Our tansies at
     Easter have reference to the bitter herbs."  See in Wordsworth's
     "University Life in the Eighteenth Century" recipes for "an apple
     tansey," "a bean tansey," and "a gooseberry tansey."--M. B.]

and two neats' tongues, and cheese the second; and were very merry all the
afternoon, talking and singing and piping upon the flageolette.  In the
evening they went with great pleasure away, and I with great content and
my wife walked half an hour in the garden, and so home to supper and to
bed.  We had a man-cook to dress dinner to-day, and sent for Jane to help
us, and my wife and she agreed at L3 a year (she would not serve under)
till both could be better provided, and so she stays with us, and I hope
we shall do well if poor Sarah were but rid of her ague.

27th.  Early Sir G. Carteret, both Sir Williams and I by coach to
Deptford, it being very windy and rainy weather, taking a codd and some
prawnes in Fish Street with us.  We settled to pay the Guernsey, a small
ship, but come to a great deal of money, it having been unpaid ever since
before the King came in, by which means not only the King pays wages while
the ship has lain still, but the poor men have most of them been forced to
borrow all the money due for their wages before they receive it, and that
at a dear rate, God knows, so that many of them had very little to receive
at the table, which grieved me to see it.  To dinner, very merry.  Then
Sir George to London, and we again to the pay, and that done by coach home
again and to the office, doing some business, and so home and to bed.

28th (Good Friday).  At home all the morning, and dined with my wife, a
good dinner.  At my office all the afternoon.  At night to my chamber to
read and sing, and so to supper and to bed.

29th.  At the office all the morning.  Then to the Wardrobe, and there
coming late dined with the people below.  Then up to my Lady, and staid
two hours talking with her about her family business with great content
and confidence in me.  So calling at several places I went home, where my
people are getting the house clean against to-morrow.  I to the office and
wrote several letters by post, and so home and to bed.

30th (Easter day).  Having my old black suit new furbished, I was pretty
neat in clothes to-day, and my boy, his old suit new trimmed, very
handsome.  To church in the morning, and so home, leaving the two Sir
Williams to take the Sacrament, which I blame myself that I have hitherto
neglected all my life, but once or twice at Cambridge.

     [This does not accord with the certificate which Dr. Mines wrote in
     1681, where he says that Pepys was a constant communicant.  See Life
     of Pepys in vol. i.]

Dined with my wife, a good shoulder of veal well dressed by Jane, and
handsomely served to table, which pleased us much, and made us hope that
she will serve our turn well enough.  My wife and I to church in the
afternoon, and seated ourselves, she below me, and by that means the
precedence of the pew, which my Lady Batten and her daughter takes, is
confounded; and after sermon she and I did stay behind them in the pew,
and went out by ourselves a good while after them, which we judge a very
fine project hereafter to avoyd contention.  So my wife and I to walk an
hour or two on the leads, which begins to be very pleasant, the garden
being in good condition.  So to supper, which is also well served in. We
had a lobster to supper, with a crabb Pegg Pen sent my wife this
afternoon, the reason of which we cannot think; but something there is of
plot or design in it, for we have a little while carried ourselves pretty
strange to them. After supper to bed.

31st.  This morning Mr. Coventry and all our company met at the office
about some business of the victualling, which being dispatched we parted.
I to my Lord Crew's to dinner (in my way calling upon my brother Tom, with
whom I staid a good while and talked, and find him a man like to do well,
which contents me much), where used with much respect, and talking with
him about my Lord's debts, and whether we should make use of an offer of
Sir G. Carteret's to lend my Lady 4 or L500, he told me by no means, we
must not oblige my Lord to him, and by the by he made a question whether
it was not my Lord's interest a little to appear to the King in debt, and
for people to clamor against him as well as others for their money, that
by that means the King and the world may see that he do lay out for the
King's honour upon his own main stock, which many he tells me do, that in
fine if there be occasion he and I will be bound for it. Thence to Sir
Thomas Crew's lodgings.  He hath been ill, and continues so, under fits of
apoplexy.  Among other things, he and I did discourse much of Mr.
Montagu's base doings, and the dishonour that he will do my Lord, as well
as cheating him of 2 or L3,000, which is too true.  Thence to the play,
where coming late, and meeting with Sir W. Pen, who had got room for my
wife and his daughter in the pit, he and I into one of the boxes, and
there we sat and heard "The Little Thiefe," a pretty play and well done.
Thence home, and walked in the garden with them, and then to the house to
supper and sat late talking, and so to bed.

                          DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS.

                                APRIL 1662

April 1st.  Within all the morning and at the office.  At noon my wife and
I (having paid our maid Nell her whole wages, who has been with me half a
year, and now goes away for altogether) to the Wardrobe, where my Lady and
company had almost dined.  We sat down and dined.  Here was Mr. Herbert,
son to Sir Charles Herbert, that lately came with letters from my Lord
Sandwich to the King.  After some discourse we remembered one another to
have been together at the tavern when Mr. Fanshaw took his leave of me at
his going to Portugall with Sir Richard.  After dinner he and I and the
two young ladies and my wife to the playhouse, the Opera, and saw "The
Mayde in the Mill," a pretty good play.  In the middle of the play my Lady
Paulina, who had taken physique this morning, had need to go forth, and so
I took the poor lady out and carried her to the Grange, and there sent the
maid of the house into a room to her, and she did what she had a mind to,
and so back again to the play; and that being done, in their coach I took
them to Islington, and then, after a walk in the fields, I took them to
the great cheese-cake house and entertained them, and so home, and after
an hour's stay with my Lady, their coach carried us home, and so weary to
bed.

2nd.  Mr. Moore came to me, and he and I walked to the Spittle an hour or
two before my Lord Mayor and the blewcoat boys come, which at last they
did, and a fine sight of charity it is indeed.  We got places and staid to
hear a sermon; but, it being a Presbyterian one, it was so long, that
after above an hour of it we went away, and I home and dined; and then my
wife and I by water to the Opera, and there saw "The Bondman" most
excellently acted; and though we had seen it so often, yet I never liked
it better than to-day, Ianthe acting Cleora's part very well now Roxalana
is gone.  We are resolved to see no more plays till Whitsuntide, we having
been three days together.  Met Mr. Sanchy, Smithes; Gale, and Edlin at the
play, but having no great mind to spend money, I left them there.  And so
home and to supper, and then dispatch business, and so to bed.

3rd.  At home and at the office all day.  At night to bed.

4th.  By barge Sir George, Sir Williams both and I to Deptford, and there
fell to pay off the Drake and Hampshire, then to dinner, Sir George to his
lady at his house, and Sir Wm. Pen to Woolwich, and Sir W. Batten and I to
the tavern, where much company came to us and our dinner, and somewhat
short by reason of their taking part away with them.  Then to pay the rest
of the Hampshire and the Paradox, and were at it till 9 at night, and so
by night home by barge safe, and took Tom Hater with some that the clerks
had to carry home along with us in the barge, the rest staying behind to
pay tickets, but came home after us that night.  So being come home, to
bed.  I was much troubled to-day to see a dead man lie floating upon the
waters, and had done (they say) these four days, and nobody takes him up
to bury him, which is very barbarous.

5th.  At the office till almost noon, and then broke up.  Then came Sir G.
Carteret, and he and I walked together alone in the garden, taking notice
of some faults in the office, particularly of Sir W. Batten's, and he
seemed to be much pleased with me, and I hope will be the ground of a
future interest of mine in him, which I shall be glad of.  Then with my
wife abroad, she to the Wardrobe and there dined, and I to the Exchange
and so to the Wardrobe, but they had dined.  After dinner my wife and the
two ladies to see my aunt Wight, and thence met me at home.  From thence
(after Sir W. Batten and I had viewed our houses with a workman in order
to the raising of our roofs higher to enlarge our houses) I went with them
by coach first to Moorfields and there walked, and thence to Islington and
had a fine walk in the fields there, and so, after eating and drinking,
home with them, and so by water with my wife home, and after supper to
bed.

6th (Lord's day).  By water to White Hall, to Sir G. Carteret, to give him
an account of the backwardness of the ships we have hired to Portugall: at
which he is much troubled.  Thence to the Chappell, and there, though
crowded, heard a very honest sermon before the King by a Canon of Christ
Church, upon these words, "Having a form of godliness, but denying," &c.
Among other things, did much insist upon the sin of adultery: which
methought might touch the King, and the more because he forced it into his
sermon, methinks, besides his text.  So up and saw the King at dinner; and
thence with Sir G. Carteret to his lodgings to dinner, with him and his
lady, where I saluted her, and was well received as a stranger by her; she
seems a good lady, and all their discourse, which was very much, was upon
their sufferings and services for the King. Yet not without some trouble,
to see that some that had been much bound to them, do now neglect them;
and others again most civil that have received least from them: and I do
believe that he hath been a good servant to the King.  Thence to walk in
the Park, where the King and Duke did walk round the Park.  After I was
tired I went and took boat to Milford stairs, and so to Graye's Inn walks,
the first time I have been there this year, and it is very pleasant and
full of good company.  When tired I walked to the Wardrobe, and there
staid a little with my Lady, and so by water from Paul's Wharf (where my
boat staid for me), home and supped with my wife with Sir W. Pen, and so
home and to bed.

7th.  By water to Whitehall and thence to Westminster, and staid at the
Parliament-door long to speak with Mr. Coventry, which vexed me.  Thence
to the Lords' House, and stood within the House, while the Bishops and
Lords did stay till the Chancellor's coming, and then we were put out, and
they to prayers. There comes a Bishop; and while he was rigging himself,
he bid his man listen at the door, whereabout in the prayers they were but
the man told him something, but could not tell whereabouts it was in the
prayers, nor the Bishop neither, but laughed at the conceit; so went in:
but, God forgive me!  I did tell it by and by to people, and did say that
the man said that they were about something of saving their souls, but
could not tell whereabouts in the prayers that was.  I sent in a note to
my Lord Privy Seal, and he came out to me; and I desired he would make
another deputy for me, because of my great business of the Navy this
month; but he told me he could not do it without the King's consent, which
vexed me.  So to Dr. Castle's, and there did get a promise from his clerk
that his master should officiate for me to-morrow.  Thence by water to
Tom's, and there with my wife took coach and to the old Exchange, where
having bought six large Holland bands, I sent her home, and myself found
out my uncle Wight and Mr. Rawlinson, and with them went to the tatter's
house to dinner, and there had a good dinner of cold meat and good wine,
but was troubled in my head after the little wine I drank, and so home to
my office, and there did promise to drink no more wine but one glass a
meal till Whitsuntide next upon any score.  Mrs. Bowyer and her daughters
being at my house I forbore to go to them, having business and my head
disturbed, but staid at my office till night, and then to walk upon the
leads with my wife, and so to my chamber and thence to bed.  The great
talk is, that the Spaniards and the Hollanders do intend to set upon the
Portuguese by sea, at Lisbon, as soon as our fleet is come away; and by
that means our fleet is not likely to come yet these two months or three;
which I hope is not true.

8th.  Up very early and to my office, and there continued till noon.  So
to dinner, and in comes uncle Fenner and the two Joyces.  I sent for a
barrel of oysters and a breast of veal roasted, and were very merry; but I
cannot down with their dull company and impertinent.  After dinner to the
office again.  So at night by coach to Whitehall, and Mr. Coventry not
being there I brought my business of the office to him, it being almost
dark, and so came away and took up my wife.  By the way home and on
Ludgate Hill there being a stop I bought two cakes, and they were our
supper at home.

9th.  Sir George Carteret, Sir Williams both and myself all the morning at
the office passing the Victualler's accounts, and at noon to dinner at the
Dolphin, where a good chine of beef and other good cheer.  At dinner Sir
George showed me an account in French of the great famine, which is to the
greatest extremity in some part of France at this day, which is very
strange.

     [On the 5th of June following, Louis, notwithstanding the scarcity,
     gave that splendid carousal in the court before the Tuileries, from
     which the place has ever since taken its name.--B.]

So to the Exchange, Mrs. Turner (who I found sick in bed), and several
other places about business, and so home.  Supper and to bed.

10th.  To Westminster with the two Sir Williams by water, and did several
businesses, and so to the Wardrobe with Mr. Moore to dinner.  Yesterday
came Col. Talbot with letters from Portugall, that the Queen is resolved
to embarque for England this week.  Thence to the office all the
afternoon.  My Lord Windsor came to us to discourse of his affairs, and to
take his leave of us; he being to go Governor of Jamaica with this fleet
that is now going.  Late at the office.  Home with my mind full of
business.  So to bed.

11th.  Up early to my lute and a song, then about six o'clock with Sir W.
Pen by water to Deptford; and among the ships now going to Portugall with
men and horse, to see them dispatched.  So to Greenwich; and had a fine
pleasant walk to Woolwich, having in our company Captn. Minnes, with whom
I was much pleased to hear him talk in fine language, but pretty well for
all that. Among other things, he and the other Captains that were with us
tell me that negros drowned look white and lose their blackness, which I
never heard before. At Woolwich, up and down to do the same business; and
so back to Greenwich by water, and there while something is dressing for
our dinner, Sir William and I walked into the Park, where the King hath
planted trees and made steps in the hill up to the Castle, which is very
magnificent.  So up and down the house, which is now repayring in the
Queen's lodgings.  So to dinner at the Globe, and Captain Lambert of the
Duke's pleasure boat came to us and dined with us, and were merry, and so
home, and I in the evening to the Exchange, and spoke with uncle Wight,
and so home and walked with my wife on the leads late, and so the barber
came to me, and so to bed very weary, which I seldom am.

12th.  At the office all the morning, where, among other things, being
provoked by some impertinence of Sir W. Batten's, I called him
unreasonable man, at which he was very angry and so was I, but I think we
shall not much fall out about it.  After dinner to several places about
business, and so home and wrote letters at my office, and one to Mr.
Coventry about business, and at the close did excuse my not waiting on him
myself so often as others do for want of leisure.  So home and to bed.

13th (Lord's day).  In the morning to Paul's, where I heard a pretty good
sermon, and thence to dinner with my Lady at the Wardrobe; and after much
talk with her after dinner, I went to the Temple to Church, and there
heard another: by the same token a boy, being asleep, fell down a high
seat to the ground, ready to break his neck, but got no hurt.  Thence to
Graye's Inn walkes; and there met Mr. Pickering and walked with him two
hours till 8 o'clock till I was quite weary.  His discourse most about the
pride of the Duchess of York; and how all the ladies envy my Lady
Castlemaine.  He intends to go to Portsmouth to meet the Queen this week;
which is now the discourse and expectation of the town.  So home, and no
sooner come but Sir W. Warren comes to me to bring me a paper of Field's
(with whom we have lately had a great deal of trouble at the office),
being a bitter petition to the King against our office for not doing
justice upon his complaint to us of embezzlement of the King's stores by
one Turpin.  I took Sir William to Sir W. Pen's (who was newly come from
Walthamstow), and there we read it and discoursed, but we do not much fear
it, the King referring it to the Duke of York.  So we drank a glass or two
of wine, and so home and I to bed, my wife being in bed already.

14th.  Being weary last night I lay very long in bed to-day, talking with
my wife, and persuaded her to go to Brampton, and take Sarah with her,
next week, to cure her ague by change of ayre, and we agreed all things
therein.  We rose, and at noon dined, and then we to the Paynter's, and
there sat the last time for my little picture, which I hope will please
me.  Then to Paternoster Row to buy things for my wife against her going.
So home and walked upon the leads with my wife, and whether she suspected
anything or no I know not, but she is quite off of her going to Brampton,
which something troubles me, and yet all my design was that I might the
freer go to Portsmouth when the rest go to pay off the yards there, which
will be very shortly.  But I will get off if I can.  So to supper and to
bed.

15th.  At the office all the morning.  Dined at home.  Again at the office
in the afternoon to despatch letters and so home, and with my wife, by
coach, to the New Exchange, to buy her some things; where we saw some
new-fashion pettycoats of sarcenett, with a black broad lace printed round
the bottom and before, very handsome, and my wife had a mind to one of
them, but we did not then buy one.  But thence to Mr. Bowyer's, thinking
to have spoke to them for our Sarah to go to Huntsmore for a while to get
away her ague, but we had not opportunity to do it, and so home and to
bed.

16th.  Up early and took my physique; it wrought all the morning well. At
noon dined, and all the afternoon, Mr. Hater to that end coming to me, he
and I did go about my abstracting all the contracts made in the office
since we came into it.  So at night to bed.

17th.  To Mr. Holliard's in the morning, thinking to be let blood, but he
was gone out.  So to White Hall, thinking to have had a Seal at Privy
Seal, but my Lord did not come, and so I walked back home and staid within
all the afternoon, there being no office kept to-day, but in the evening
Sir W. Batten sent for me to tell me that he had this day spoke to the
Duke about raising our houses, and he hath given us leave to do it, at
which, being glad, I went home merry, and after supper to bed.

18th.  This morning sending the boy down into the cellar for some beer I
followed him with a cane, and did there beat him for his staying of awards
and other faults, and his sister came to me down and begged for him.  So I
forebore, and afterwards, in my wife's chamber, did there talk to Jane how
much I did love the boy for her sake, and how much it do concern to
correct the boy for his faults, or else he would be undone.  So at last
she was well pleased.  This morning Sir G. Carteret, Sir W. Batten and I
met at the office, and did conclude of our going to Portsmouth next week,
in which my mind is at a great loss what to do with my wife, for I cannot
persuade her to go to Brampton, and I am loth to leave her at, home.  All
the afternoon in several places to put things in order for my going.  At
night home and to bed.

19th.  This morning, before we sat, I went to Aldgate; and at the corner
shop, a draper's, I stood, and did see Barkestead, Okey, and Corbet, drawn
towards the gallows at Tiburne; and there they were hanged and quartered.
They all looked very cheerful; but I hear they all die defending what they
did to the King to be just; which is very strange. So to the office and
then home to dinner, and Captain David Lambert came to take his leave of
me, he being to go back to Tangier there to lie. Then abroad about
business, and in the evening did get a bever, an old one, but a very good
one, of Sir W. Batten, for which I must give him something; but I am very
well pleased with it.  So after writing by the post to bed.

20th (Lord's day).  My intention being to go this morning to White Hall to
hear South, my Lord Chancellor's chaplain, the famous preacher and oratour
of Oxford, (who the last Lord's day did sink down in the pulpit before the
King, and could not proceed,) it did rain, and the wind against me, that I
could by no means get a boat or coach to carry me; and so I staid at
Paul's, where the judges did all meet, and heard a sermon, it being the
first Sunday of the term; but they had a very poor sermon. So to my Lady's
and dined, and so to White Hall to Sir G. Carteret, and so to the
Chappell, where I challenged my pew as Clerk of the Privy Seal and had it,
and then walked home with Mr. Blagrave to his old house in the Fishyard,
and there he had a pretty kinswoman that sings, and we did sing some holy
things, and afterwards others came in and so I left them, and by water
through the bridge (which did trouble me) home, and so to bed.

21st: This morning I attempted to persuade my wife in bed to go to
Brampton this week, but she would not, which troubles me, and seeing that
I could keep it no longer from her, I told her that I was resolved to go
to Portsmouth to-morrow.  Sir W. Batten goes to Chatham to-day, and will
be back again to come for Portsmouth after us on Thursday next.  I went to
Westminster and several places about business.  Then at noon dined with my
Lord Crew; and after dinner went up to Sir Thos. Crew's chamber, who is
still ill.  He tells me how my Lady Duchess of Richmond and Castlemaine
had a falling out the other day; and she calls the latter Jane Shore, and
did hope to see her come to the same end that she did. Coming down again
to my Lord, he told me that news was come that the Queen is landed; at
which I took leave, and by coach hurried to White Hall, the bells ringing
in several places; but I found there no such matter, nor anything like it.
So I went by appointment to Anthony Joyce's, where I sat with his wife and
Matt.  Joyce an hour or two, and so her husband not being at home, away I
went and in Cheapside spied him and took him into the coach.  Home, and
there I found my Lady Jemimah, and Anne, and Madamoiselle come to see my
wife, whom I left, and to talk with Joyce about a project I have of his
and my joyning, to get some money for my brother Tom and his kinswoman to
help forward with her portion if they should marry.  I mean in buying of
tallow of him at a low rate for the King, and Tom should have the profit;
but he tells me the profit will be considerable, at which I was troubled,
but I have agreed with him to serve some in my absence.  He went away, and
then came Mr. Moore and sat late with me talking about business, and so
went away and I to bed.

22nd.  After taking leave of my wife, which we could hardly do kindly,
because of her mind to go along with me, Sir W. Pen and I took coach and
so over the bridge to Lambeth, W. Bodham and Tom Hewet going as clerks to
Sir W. Pen, and my Will for me.  Here we got a dish of buttered eggs, and
there staid till Sir G. Carteret came to us from White Hall, who brought
Dr. Clerke with him, at which I was very glad, and so we set out, and I
was very much pleased with his company, and were very merry all the way
. . . .  We came to Gilford and there passed our time in the garden,
cutting of sparagus for supper, the best that ever I eat in my life but in
the house last year.  Supped well, and the Doctor and I to bed together,
calling cozens from his name and my office.

23d.  Up early, and to Petersfield, and there  dined well; and thence got
a countryman to guide us by Havant, to avoid going through the Forest; but
he carried us much out of the way, and upon our coming we sent away an
express to Sir W. Batten to stop his coming, which I did project to make
good my oath, that my wife should come if any of our wives came, which my
Lady Batten did intend to do with her husband.  The Doctor and I lay
together at Wiard's, the chyrurgeon's, in Portsmouth, his wife a very
pretty woman.  We lay very well and merrily; in the morning, concluding
him to be of the eldest blood and house of the Clerkes, because that all
the fleas came to him and not to me.

24th.  Up and to Sir G. Carteret's lodgings at Mrs. Stephens's, where we
keep our table all the time we are here.  Thence all of us to the
Pay-house; but the books not being ready, we went to church to the
lecture, where there was my Lord Ormond and Manchester, and much London
company, though not so much as I expected.  Here we had a very good sermon
upon this text: "In love serving one another;" which pleased me very well.
No news of the Queen at all.  So to dinner; and then to the Pay all the
afternoon.  Then W. Pen and I walked to the King's Yard, and there lay at
Mr. Tippets's, where exceeding well treated.

25th.  All the morning at Portsmouth, at the Pay, and then to dinner, and
again to the Pay; and at night got the Doctor to go lie with me, and much
pleased with his company; but I was much troubled in my eyes, by reason of
the healths I have this day been forced to drink.

26th.  Sir George' and I, and his clerk Mr. Stephens, and Mr. Holt our
guide, over to Gosport; and so rode to Southampton.  In our way, besides
my Lord Southampton's' parks and lands, which in one view we could see
L6,000 per annum, we observed a little church-yard, where the graves are
accustomed to be all sowed with sage.

     [Gough says, "It is the custom at this day all over Wales to strew
     the graves, both within and without the church, with green herbs,
     branches of box, flowers, rushes, and flags, for one year, after
     which such as can afford it lay down a stone."--Brand's Popular
     Antiquities, edited W. C. Hazlitt, vol. ii., p. 218.]

At Southampton we went to the Mayor's and there dined, and had sturgeon of
their own catching the last week, which do not happen in twenty years, and
it was well ordered.  They brought us also some caveare, which I attempted
to order, but all to no purpose, for they had neither given it salt
enough, nor are the seedes of the roe broke, but are all in berryes. The
towne is one most gallant street, and is walled round with stone, &c., and
Bevis's picture upon one of the gates; many old walls of religious houses,
and the key, well worth seeing.  After dinner to horse again, being in
nothing troubled but the badness of my hat, which I borrowed to save my
beaver.  Home by night and wrote letters to London, and so with Sir W. Pen
to the Dock to bed.

27th (Sunday).  Sir W. Pen got trimmed before me, and so took the coach to
Portsmouth to wait on my Lord Steward to church, and sent the coach for me
back again.  So I rode to church, and met my Lord Chamberlain upon the
walls of the garrison, who owned and spoke to me.  I followed him in the
crowd of gallants through the Queen's lodgings to chappell; the rooms
being all rarely furnished, and escaped hardly being set on fire
yesterday.  At chappell we had a most excellent and eloquent sermon. And
here I spoke and saluted Mrs. Pierce, but being in haste could not learn
of her where her lodgings are, which vexes me.  Thence took Ned Pickering
to dinner with us, and the two Marshes, father and Son, dined with us, and
very merry.  After dinner Sir W. Batten and I, the Doctor, and Ned
Pickering by coach to the Yard, and there on board the Swallow in the dock
hear our navy chaplain preach a sad sermon, full of nonsense and false
Latin; but prayed for the Right Honourable the principal officers.

     [Principal officers of the navy, of which body Pepys was one as
     Clerk of the Acts.]

After sermon took him to Mr. Tippets's to drink a glass of wine, and so at
4 back again by coach to Portsmouth, and then visited the Mayor, Mr.
Timbrell, our anchor-smith, who showed us the present they have for the
Queen; which is a salt-sellar of silver, the walls christall, with four
eagles and four greyhounds standing up at the top to bear up a dish; which
indeed is one of the neatest pieces of plate that ever I saw, and the case
is very pretty also.

     [A salt-cellar answering this description is preserved at the
     Tower.]

This evening came a merchantman in the harbour, which we hired at London
to carry horses to Portugall; but, Lord!  what running there was to the
seaside to hear what news, thinking it had come from the Queen.  In the
evening Sir George, Sir W. Pen and I walked round the walls, and thence we
two with the Doctor to the yard, and so to supper and to bed.

28th.  The Doctor and I begun philosophy discourse exceeding pleasant. He
offers to bring me into the college of virtuosoes--[The Royal
Society.]--and my Lord Brouncker's acquaintance, and to show me some
anatomy, which makes me very glad; and I shall endeavour it when I come to
London.  Sir W. Pen much troubled upon letters came last night. Showed me
one of Dr. Owen's

     [John Owen, D.D., a learned Nonconformist divine, and a voluminous
     theological writer, born 1616, made Dean of Christ Church in 1653 by
     the Parliament, and ejected in 1659-60.  He died at Ealing in 1683.]

to his son,--[William Penn, the celebrated Quaker.]--whereby it appears
his son is much perverted in his opinion by him; which I now perceive is
one thing that hath put Sir William so long off the hooks.  By coach to
the Pay-house, and so to work again, and then to dinner, and to it again,
and so in the evening to the yard, and supper and bed.

29th.  At the pay all the morning, and so to dinner; and then to it again
in the afternoon, and after our work was done, Sir G. Carteret, Sir W. Pen
and I walked forth, and I spied Mrs. Pierce and another lady passing by.
So I left them and went to the ladies, and walked with them up and down,
and took them to Mrs. Stephens, and there gave them wine and sweetmeats,
and were very merry; and then comes the Doctor, and we carried them by
coach to their lodging, which was very poor, but the best they could get,
and such as made much mirth among us.  So I appointed one to watch when
the gates of the town were ready to be shut, and to give us notice; and so
the Doctor and I staid with them playing and laughing, and at last were
forced to bid good night for fear of being locked into the town all night.
So we walked to the yard, designing how to prevent our going to London
tomorrow, that we might be merry with these ladies, which I did.  So to
supper and merrily to bed.

30th.  This morning Sir G. Carteret came down to the yard, and there we
mustered over all the men and determined of some regulations in the yard,
and then to dinner, all the officers of the yard with us, and after dinner
walk to Portsmouth, there to pay off the Success, which we did pretty
early, and so I took leave of Sir W. Pen, he desiring to know whither I
went, but I would not tell him.  I went to the ladies, and there took them
and walked to the Mayor's to show them the present, and then to the Dock,
where Mr. Tippets made much of them, and thence back again, the Doctor
being come to us to their lodgings, whither came our supper by my
appointment, and we very merry, playing at cards and laughing very merry
till 12 o'clock at night, and so having staid so long (which we had
resolved to stay till they bade us be gone), which yet they did not do but
by consent, we bade them good night, and so past the guards, and went to
the Doctor's lodgings, and there lay with him, our discourse being much
about the quality of the lady with Mrs. Pierce, she being somewhat old and
handsome, and painted and fine, and had a very handsome maid with her,
which we take to be the marks of a bawd.  But Mrs. Pierce says she is a
stranger to her and met by chance in the coach, and pretends to be a
dresser.  Her name is Eastwood.  So to sleep in a bad bed about one
o'clock in the morning.  This afternoon after dinner comes Mr. Stephenson,
one of the burgesses of the town, to tell me that the Mayor and burgesses
did desire my acceptance of a burgess-ship, and were ready at the Mayor's
to make me one.  So I went, and there they were all ready, and did with
much civility give me my oath, and after the oath, did by custom shake me
all by the hand.  So I took them to a tavern and made them drink, and
paying the reckoning, went away.  They having first in the tavern made Mr.
Waith also a burgess, he coming in while we were drinking.  It cost me a
piece in gold to the Town Clerk, and 10s. to the Bayliffes, and spent 6s.

     ETEXT EDITOR'S BOOKMARKS:

     After taking leave of my wife, which we could hardly do kindly
     Agreed at L3 a year (she would not serve under)
     All the fleas came to him and not to me
     Badge of slavery upon the whole people (taxes)
     Did much insist upon the sin of adultery
     Discoursed much against a man's lying with his wife in Lent
     Fearing that Sarah would continue ill, wife and I removed
     Parliament hath voted 2s. per annum for every chimney in England
     Peruques of hair, as the fashion now is for ladies to wear
     Raising of our roofs higher to enlarge our houses
     See a dead man lie floating upon the waters
     Sermon; but, it being a Presbyterian one, it was so long
     To Mr. Holliard's in the morning, thinking to be let blood
     Up early and took my physique; it wrought all the morning well
     Whether he would have me go to law or arbitracon with him
     Whether she suspected anything or no I know not



                THE DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS M.A.  F.R.S.

            CLERK OF THE ACTS AND SECRETARY TO THE ADMIRALTY

    TRANSCRIBED FROM THE SHORTHAND MANUSCRIPT IN THE PEPYSIAN LIBRARY
 MAGDALENE COLLEGE CAMBRIDGE BY THE REV. MYNORS BRIGHT M.A. LATE FELLOW
                      AND PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE

                              (Unabridged)

                      WITH LORD BRAYBROOKE'S NOTES

                        EDITED WITH ADDITIONS BY

                        HENRY B. WHEATLEY F.S.A.

                          DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS.
                               MAY & JUNE
                                   1662

May 1st.  Sir G. Carteret, Sir W. Pen, and myself, with our clerks, set
out this morning from Portsmouth very early, and got by noon to
Petersfield; several officers of the Yard accompanying us so far.  Here we
dined and were merry.  At dinner comes my Lord Carlingford from London,
going to Portsmouth: tells us that the Duchess of York is brought to bed
of a girl,--[Mary, afterwards Queen of England.]--at which I find nobody
pleased; and that Prince Rupert and the Duke of Buckingham are sworn of
the Privy Councell.  He himself made a dish with eggs of the butter of the
Sparagus, which is very fine meat, which I will practise hereafter.  To
horse again after dinner, and got to Gilford, where after supper I to bed,
having this day been offended by Sir W. Pen's foolish talk, and I
offending him with my answers.  Among others he in discourse complaining
of want of confidence, did ask me to lend him a grain or two, which I told
him I thought he was better stored with than myself, before Sir George.
So that I see I must keep a greater distance than I have done, and I hope
I may do it because of the interest which I am making with Sir George.  To
bed all alone, and my Will in the truckle bed.

     [According to the original Statutes of Corpus Christi Coll. Oxon,
     a Scholar slept in a truckle bed below each Fellow.  Called also
     "a trindle bed."  Compare Hall's description of an obsequious tutor:

                              "He lieth in a truckle bed
                    While his young master lieth o'er his head."

                                                  Satires, ii.  6, 5.

     The bed was drawn in the daytime under the high bed of the tutor.
     See Wordsworth's "University Life in the Eighteenth Century."--M. B.]

2nd.  Early to coach again and to Kingston, where we baited a little, and
presently to coach again and got early to London, and I found all well at
home, and Mr. Hunt and his wife had dined with my wife to-day, and been
very kind to my wife in my absence.  After I had washed myself, it having
been the hottest day that has been this year, I took them all by coach to
Mrs. Hunt's, and I to Dr. Clerke's lady, and gave her her letter and
token.  She is a very fine woman, and what with her person and the number
of fine ladies that were with her, I was much out of countenance, and
could hardly carry myself like a man among them; but however, I staid till
my courage was up again, and talked to them, and viewed her house, which
is most pleasant, and so drank and good-night.  And so to my Lord's
lodgings, where by chance I spied my Lady's coach, and found her and my
Lady Wright there, and so I spoke to them, and they being gone went to Mr.
Hunt's for my wife, and so home and to bed.

3rd.  Sir W. Pen and I by coach to St. James's, and there to the Duke's
Chamber, who had been a-hunting this morning and is come back again.
Thence to Westminster, where I met Mr. Moore, and hear that Mr. Watkins'
is suddenly dead since my going.  To dinner to my Lady Sandwich, and Sir
Thomas Crew's children coming thither, I took them and all my Ladys to the
Tower and showed them the lions

     [The Tower Menagerie was not abolished until the reign of
     William IV.]

and all that was to be shown, and so took them to my house, and there made
much of them, and so saw them back to my Lady's.  Sir Thomas Crew's
children being as pretty and the best behaved that ever I saw of their
age.  Thence, at the goldsmith's, took my picture in little,--[Miniature
by Savill]--which is now done, home with me, and pleases me exceedingly
and my wife.  So to supper and to bed, it being exceeding hot.

4th (Lord's day).  Lay long talking with my wife, then Mr. Holliard came
to me and let me blood, about sixteen ounces, I being exceedingly full of
blood and very good.  I begun to be sick; but lying upon my back I was
presently well again, and did give him 5s. for his pains, and so we
parted, and I, to my chamber to write down my journall from the beginning
of my late journey to this house.  Dined well, and after dinner, my arm
tied up with a black ribbon, I walked with my wife to my brother Tom's;
our boy waiting on us with his sword, which this day he begins to wear, to
outdo Sir W. Pen's boy, who this day, and Six W. Batten's too, begin to
wear new livery; but I do take mine to be the neatest of them all.  I led
my wife to Mrs. Turner's pew, and the church being full, it being to hear
a Doctor who is to preach a probacon sermon, I went out to the Temple and
there walked, and so when church was done went to Mrs. Turner's, and after
a stay there, my wife and I walked to Grays Inn, to observe fashions of
the ladies, because of my wife's making some clothes. Thence homewards,
and called in at Antony Joyce's, where we found his wife brought home sick
from church, and was in a convulsion fit.  So home and to Sir W. Pen's and
there supped, and so to prayers at home and to bed.

5th.  My arme not being well, I staid within all the morning, and dined
alone at home, my wife being gone out to buy some things for herself, and
a gown for me to dress myself in.  And so all the afternoon looking over
my papers, and at night walked upon the leads, and so to bed.

6th.  This morning I got my seat set up on the leads, which pleases me
well.  So to the office, and thence to the Change, but could not meet with
my uncle Wight.  So home to dinner and then out again to several places to
pay money and to understand my debts, and so home and walked with my wife
on the leads, and so to supper and to bed.  I find it a hard matter to
settle to business after so much leisure and pleasure.

7th.  Walked to Westminster; where I understand the news that Mr. Montagu
is this last night come to the King with news, that he left the Queen and
fleet in the Bay of Biscay, coming this wayward; and that he believes she
is now at the Isle of Scilly.  So at noon to my Lord Crew's and there
dined, and after dinner Sir Thos. Crew and I talked together, and among
other instances of the simple light discourse that sometimes is in the
Parliament House, he told me how in the late business of Chymny money,
when all occupiers were to pay, it was questioned whether women were under
that name to pay, and somebody rose and said that they were not occupiers,
but occupied.  Thence to Paul's Church Yard; where seeing my Lady's
Sandwich and Carteret, and my wife (who this day made a visit the first
time to my Lady Carteret), come by coach, and going to Hide Park, I was
resolved to follow them; and so went to Mrs. Turner's: and thence found
her out at the Theatre, where I saw the last act of the "Knight of the
Burning Pestle," which pleased me not at all.  And so after the play done,
she and The. Turner and Mrs. Lucin and I, in her coach to the Park; and
there found them out, and spoke to them; and observed many fine ladies,
and staid till all were gone almost.  And so to Mrs. Turner's, and there
supped, and so walked home, and by and by comes my wife home, brought by
my Lady Carteret to the gate, and so to bed.

8th.  At the office all the morning doing business alone, and then to the
Wardrobe, where my, Lady going out with the children to dinner I staid
not, but returned home, and was overtaken in St. Paul's Churchyard by Sir
G. Carteret in his coach, and so he carried me to the Exchange, where I
staid awhile.  He told me that the Queen and the fleet were in Mount's Bay
on Monday last, and that the Queen endures her sickness pretty well. He
also told me how Sir John Lawson hath done some execution upon the Turks
in the Straight, of which I am glad, and told the news the first on the
Exchange, and was much followed by merchants to tell it.  So home and to
dinner, and by and by to the office, and after the rest gone (my Lady
Albemarle being this day at dinner at Sir W. Batten's) Sir G. Carteret
comes, and he and I walked in the garden, and, among other discourse,
tells me that it is Mr. Coventry that is to come to us as a Commissioner
of the Navy; at which he is much vexed, and cries out upon Sir W. Pen, and
threatens him highly.  And looking upon his lodgings, which are now
enlarging, he in passion cried, "Guarda mi spada; for, by God, I may
chance to keep him in Ireland, when he is there:" for Sir W. Pen is going
thither with my Lord Lieutenant.  But it is my design to keep much in with
Sir George; and I think I have begun very well towards it.  So to the
office, and was there late doing business, and so with my head full of
business I to bed.

9th.  Up and to my office, and so to dinner at home, and then to several
places to pay my debts, and then to Westminster to Dr. Castle, who
discoursed with me about Privy Seal business, which I do not much mind, it
being little worth, but by Watkins's--[clerk of the Privy Seal]--late
sudden death we are like to lose money.  Thence to Mr. de Cretz, and there
saw some good pieces that he hath copyed of the King's pieces, some of
Raphael and Michael Angelo; and I have borrowed an Elizabeth of his
copying to hang up in my house, and sent it home by Will.  Thence with Mr.
Salisbury, who I met there, into Covent Garden to an alehouse, to see a
picture that hangs there, which is offered for 20s., and I offered
fourteen--but it is worth much more money--but did not buy it, I having no
mind to break my oath.  Thence to see an Italian puppet play that is
within the rayles there, which is very pretty, the best that ever I saw,
and great resort of gallants.  So to the Temple and by water home, and so
walk upon the leads, and in the dark there played upon my flageolette, it
being a fine still evening, and so to supper and to bed.  This day I paid
Godfrey's debt of 40 and odd pounds.  The Duke of York went last night to
Portsmouth; so that I believe the Queen is near.

10th.  By myself at the office all the morning drawing up instructions for
Portsmouth yard in those things wherein we at our late being there did
think fit to reform, and got them signed this morning to send away
to-night, the Duke being now there.  At noon to the Wardrobe; there dined.
My Lady told me how my Lady Castlemaine do speak of going to lie in at
Hampton Court; which she and all our ladies are much troubled at, because
of the King's being forced to show her countenance in the sight of the
Queen when she comes.  Back to the office and there all afternoon, and in
the evening comes Sir G. Carteret, and he and I did hire a ship for
Tangier, and other things together; and I find that he do single me out to
join with me apart from the rest, which I am much glad of.  So home, and
after being trimmed, to bed.

11th (Lord's day).  To our church in the morning, where, our Minister
being out of town, a dull, flat Presbiter preached.  Dined at home, and my
wife's brother with us, we having a good dish of stewed beef of Jane's own
dressing, which was well done, and a piece of sturgeon of a barrel sent me
by Captain Cocke.  In the afternoon to White Hall; and there walked an
hour or two in the Park, where I saw the King now out of mourning, in a
suit laced with gold and silver, which it was said was out of fashion.
Thence to the Wardrobe; and there consulted with the ladies about our
going to Hampton Court to-morrow, and thence home, and after settled
business there my wife and I to the Wardrobe, and there we lay all night
in Captain Ferrers' chambers, but the bed so soft that I could not sleep
that hot night.

12th.  Mr. Townsend called us up by four o'clock; and by five the three
ladies, my wife and I, and Mr. Townsend, his son and daughter, were got to
the barge and set out.  We walked from Mortlake to Richmond, and so to
boat again.  And from Teddington to Hampton Court Mr. Townsend and I
walked again.  And then met the ladies, and were showed the whole house by
Mr. Marriott; which is indeed nobly furnished, particularly the Queen's
bed, given her by the States of Holland; a looking-glass sent by the
Queen-mother from France, hanging in the Queen's chamber, and many brave
pictures.  So to Mr. Marriott's, and there we rested ourselves and drank.
And so to barge again, and there we had good victuals and wine, and were
very merry; and got home about eight at night very well.  So my wife and I
took leave of my Ladies, and home by a hackney-coach, the easiest that
ever I met with, and so to bed.

14th.  All the morning at Westminster and elsewhere about business, and
dined at the Wardrobe; and after dinner, sat talking an hour or two alone
with my Lady.  She is afeard that my Lady Castlemaine will keep still with
the King, and I am afeard she will not, for I love her well.  Thence to my
brother's, and finding him in a lie about the lining of my new morning
gown, saying that it was the same with the outside, I was very angry with
him and parted so.  So home after an hour stay at Paul's Churchyard, and
there came Mr. Morelock of Chatham, and brought me a stately cake, and I
perceive he has done the same to the rest, of which I was glad; so to bed.

15th.  To Westminster; and at the Privy Seal I saw Mr. Coventry's seal for
his being Commissioner with us, at which I know not yet whether to be glad
or otherwise.  So doing several things by the way, I walked home, and
after dinner to the office all the afternoon.  At night, all the bells of
the town rung, and bonfires made for the joy of the Queen's arrival, who
came and landed at Portsmouth last night.  But I do not see much thorough
joy, but only an indifferent one, in the hearts of people, who are much
discontented at the pride and luxury of the Court, and running in debt.

16th.  Up early, Mr. Hater and I to the office, and there I made an end of
my book of contracts which I have been making an abstract of.  Dined at
home, and spent most of the day at the office.  At night to supper and
bed.

17th.  Upon a letter this morning from Mr. Moore, I went to my cozen
Turner's chamber, and there put him drawing a replication to Tom Trice's
answer speedily.  So to Whitehall and there met Mr. Moore, and I walked
long in Westminster Hall, and thence with him to the Wardrobe to dinner,
where dined Mrs. Sanderson, the mother of the maids, and after dinner my
Lady and she and I on foot to Pater Noster Row to buy a petticoat against
the Queen's coming for my Lady, of plain satin, and other things; and
being come back again, we there met Mr. Nathaniel Crew

     [Nathaniel Crew, born 1633, fifth son of John, first Lord Crew; he
     himself became third Lord Crew in 1697.  Sub-Rector of Lincoln
     College, Oxford, 1659.  Took orders in 1664, and was Rector of
     Lincoln College in 1668; Dean of Chichester, 1669; Bishop of Oxford,
     1671; Bishop of Durham, 1674; sworn of the Privy Council in 1676.
     He was very subservient to James II., and at the Revolution was
     excepted from the general pardon of May, 1690, but he was allowed to
     keep possession of the bishopric of Durham.]

at the Wardrobe with a young gentleman, a friend and fellow student of
his, and of a good family, Mr. Knightly, and known to the Crews, of whom
my Lady privately told me she hath some thoughts of a match for my Lady
Jemimah.  I like the person very well, and he hath L2000 per annum. Thence
to the office, and there we sat, and thence after writing letters to all
my friends with my Lord at Portsmouth, I walked to my brother Tom's to see
a velvet cloak, which I buy of Mr. Moore.  It will cost me L8 10s.; he
bought it for L6 10s., but it is worth my money.  So home and find all
things made clean against to-morrow, which pleases me well.  So to bed.

18th (Whitsunday).  By water to White Hall, and thereto chappell in my pew
belonging to me as Clerk of the Privy Seal; and there I heard a most
excellent sermon of Dr. Hacket, Bishop of Lichfield and Coventry, upon
these words: "He that drinketh this water shall never thirst."  We had an
excellent anthem, sung by Captain Cooke and another, and brave musique.
And then the King came down and offered, and took the sacrament upon his
knees; a sight very well worth seeing.  Hence with Sir G. Carteret to his
lodging to dinner with his Lady and one Mr. Brevin, a French Divine, we
were very merry, and good discourse, and I had much talk with my Lady.
After dinner, and so to chappell again; and there had another good anthem
of Captain Cooke's.  Thence to the Councell-chamber; where the King and
Councell sat till almost eleven o'clock at night, and I forced to walk up
and down the gallerys till that time of night.  They were reading all the
bills over that are to pass to-morrow at the House, before the King's
going out of town and proroguing the House.  At last the Councell risen,
and Sir G. Carteret telling me what the Councell hath ordered about the
ships designed to carry horse from Ireland to Portugall, which is now
altered.  I got a coach and so home, sending the boat away without me. At
home I found my wife discontented at my being abroad, but I pleased her.
She was in her new suit of black sarcenet and yellow petticoat very
pretty.  So to bed.

19th.  Long in bed, sometimes scolding with my wife, and then pleased
again, and at last up, and put on my riding cloth suit, and a camelott
coat new, which pleases me well enough.  To the Temple about my
replication, and so to my brother Tom's, and there hear that my father
will be in town this week.  So home, the shops being but some shut and
some open.  I hear that the House of Commons do think much that they
should be forced to huddle over business this morning against the
afternoon, for the King to pass their Acts, that he may go out of town.

     [To ears accustomed to the official words of speeches from the
     throne at the present day, the familiar tone of the following
     extracts from Charles's speech to the Commons, on the 1st of March;
     will be amusing: "I will conclude with putting you in mind of the
     season of the year, and the convenience of your being in the
     country, in many respects, for the good and welfare of it; for you
     will find much tares have been sowed there in your absence.  The
     arrival of my wife, who I expect some time this month, and the
     necessity of my own being out of town to meet her, and to stay some
     time before she comes hither, makes it very necessary that the
     Parliament be adjourned before Easter, to meet again in the winter.
     .  .  .  .  The mention of my wife's arrival puts me in mind to
     desire you to put that compliment upon her, that her entrance into
     the town may be with more decency than the ways will now suffer it
     to be; and, to that purpose, I pray you would quickly pass such laws
     as are before you, in order to the amending those ways, and that she
     may not find Whitehall surrounded with water."  Such a bill passed
     the Commons on the 24th June.  From Charles's Speech, March 1st,
     1662.--B.]

But he, I hear since, was forced to stay till almost nine o'clock at night
before he could have done, and then he prorogued them; and so to Gilford,
and lay there.  Home, and Mr. Hunt dined with me, and were merry.  After
dinner Sir W. Pen and his daughter, and I and my wife by coach to the
Theatre, and there in a box saw "The Little Thief" well done.  Thence to
Moorefields, and walked and eat some cheesecake and gammon of bacon, but
when I was come home I was sick, forced to vomit it up again.  So my wife
walking and singing upon the leads till very late, it being pleasant and
moonshine, and so to bed.

10th.  Sir W. Pen and I did a little business at the office, and so home
again.  Then comes Dean Fuller after we had dined, but I got something for
him, and very merry we were for an hour or two, and I am most pleased with
his company and goodness.  At last parted, and my wife and I by coach to
the Opera, and there saw the 2nd part of "The Siege of Rhodes," but it is
not so well done as when Roxalana was there, who, it is said, is now owned
by my Lord of Oxford.

     [For note on Mrs. Davenport, who was deceived by a pretended
     marriage with the Earl of Oxford, see ante.  Lord Oxford's first
     wife died in 1659.  He married, in 1672, his second wife, Diana
     Kirke, of whom nothing more need be said than that she bore an
     inappropriate Christian name.]

Thence to Tower-wharf, and there took boat, and we all walked to Halfeway
House, and there eat and drank, and were pleasant, and so finally home
again in the evening, end so good night, this being a very pleasant life
that we now lead, and have long done; the Lord be blessed, and make us
thankful.  But, though I am much against too much spending, yet I do think
it best to enjoy some degree of pleasure now that we have health, money,
and opportunity, rather than to leave pleasures to old age or poverty,
when we cannot have them so properly.

21st.  My wife and I by water to Westminster, and after she had seen her
father (of whom lately I have heard nothing at all what he does or her
mother), she comes to me to my Lord's lodgings, where she and I staid
walking in White Hall garden.  And in the Privy-garden saw the finest
smocks and linnen petticoats of my Lady Castlemaine's, laced with rich
lace at the bottom, that ever I saw; and did me good to look upon them. So
to Wilkinson's, she and I and Sarah to dinner, where I had a good quarter
of lamb and a salat.  Here Sarah told me how the King dined at my Lady
Castlemaine's, and supped, every day and night the last week; and that the
night that the bonfires were made for joy of the Queen's arrivall, the
King was there; but there was no fire at her door, though at all the rest
of the doors almost in the street; which was much observed: and that the
King and she did send for a pair of scales and weighed one another; and
she, being with child, was said to be heaviest. But she is now a most
disconsolate creature, and comes not out of doors, since the King's going.
But we went to the Theatre to "The French Dancing Master," and there with
much pleasure gazed upon her (Lady Castlemaine); but it troubles us to see
her look dejectedly and slighted by people already.  The play pleased us
very well; but Lacy's part, the Dancing Master, the best in the world.
Thence to my brother Tom's, in expectation to have met my father to-night
come out of the country, but he is not yet come, but here we found my
uncle Fenner and his old wife, whom I had not seen since the wedding
dinner, nor care to see her.  They being gone, my wife and I went and saw
Mrs. Turner, whom we found not well, and her two boys Charles and Will
come out of the country, grown very plain boys after three years being
under their father's care in Yorkshire.  Thence to Tom's again, and there
supped well, my she cozen Scott being there and my father being not come,
we walked home and to bed.

22d.  This morning comes an order from the Secretary of State, Nicholas,
for me to let one Mr. Lee, a Councellor, to view what papers I have
relating to passages of the late times, wherein Sir H. Vane's hand is
employed, in order to the drawing up his charge; which I did, and at noon
he, with Sir W. Pen and his daughter, dined with me, and he to his work
again, and we by coach to the Theatre and saw "Love in a Maze."  The play
hath little in it but Lacy's part of a country fellow, which he did to
admiration.  So home, and supped with Sir W. Pen, where Sir W. Batten and
Captn. Cocke came to us, to whom I have lately been a great stranger. This
night we had each of us a letter from Captain Teddiman from the Streights,
of a peace made upon good terms, by Sir J. Lawson, with the Argier men,
which is most excellent news?  He hath also sent each of us some
anchovies, olives, and muscatt; but I know not yet what that is, and am
ashamed to ask.  After supper home, and to bed, resolving to make up this
week in seeing plays and pleasure, and so fall to business next week again
for a great while.

23rd.  At the office good part of the morning, and then about noon with my
wife on foot to the Wardrobe.  My wife went up to the dining room to my
Lady Paulina, and I staid below talking with Mr. Moore in the parley,
reading of the King's and Chancellor's late speeches at the proroguing of
the Houses of Parliament.  And while I was reading, news was brought me
that my Lord Sandwich is come and gone up to my Lady, which put me into
great suspense of joy, so I went up waiting my Lord's coming out of my
Lady's chamber, which by and by he did, and looks very well, and my soul
is glad to see him.  He very merry, and hath left the King and Queen at
Portsmouth, and is come up to stay here till next Wednesday, and then to
meet the King and Queen at Hampton Court.  So to dinner, Mr. Browne, Clerk
of the House of Lords, and his wife and brother there also; and my Lord
mighty merry; among other things, saying that the Queen is a very
agreeable lady, and paints still.  After dinner I showed him my letter
from Teddiman about the news from Argier, which pleases him exceedingly;
and he writ one to the Duke of York about it, and sent it express.  There
coming much company after dinner to my Lord, my wife and I slunk away to
the Opera, where we saw "Witt in a Constable," the first time that it is
acted; but so silly a play I never saw I think in my life.  After it was
done, my wife and I to the puppet play in Covent Garden, which I saw the
other day, and indeed it is very pleasant.  Here among the fidlers I first
saw a dulcimere

     [The dulcimer (or psaltery) consisted of a flat box, acting as a
     resonating chamber, over which strings of wire were stretched: These
     were struck by little hammers.]

played on with sticks knocking of the strings, and is very pretty.  So by
water home, and supped with Sir William Pen very merry, and so to bed.

24th.  To the Wardrobe, and there again spoke with my Lord, and saw W.
Howe, who is grown a very pretty and is a sober fellow.  Thence abroad
with Mr. Creed, of whom I informed myself of all I had a mind to know.
Among other things, the great difficulty my Lord hath been in all this
summer for lack of good and full orders from the King; and I doubt our
Lords of the Councell do not mind things as the late powers did, but their
pleasures or profit more.  That the Juego de Toros is a simple sport, yet
the greatest in Spain.  That the Queen hath given no rewards to any of the
captains or officers, but only to my Lord Sandwich; and that was a bag of
gold, which was no honourable present, of about L1400 sterling.  How
recluse the Queen hath ever been, and all the voyage never come upon the
deck, nor put her head out of her cabin; but did love my Lord's musique,
and would send for it down to the state-room, and she sit in her cabin
within hearing of it.  That my Lord was forced to have some clashing with
the Council of Portugall about payment of the portion, before he could get
it; which was, besides Tangier and a free trade in the Indys, two millions
of crowns, half now, and the other half in twelve months.  But they have
brought but little money; but the rest in sugars and other commoditys, and
bills of exchange.  That the King of Portugall is a very fool almost, and
his mother do all, and he is a very poor Prince.  After a morning draft at
the Star in Cheapside, I took him to the Exchange, thence home, but my
wife having dined, I took him to Fish Street, and there we had a couple of
lobsters, and dined upon them, and much discourse.  And so I to the
office, and that being done, Sir W. Pen and I to Deptford by water to
Captain Rooth's to see him, he being very sick, and by land home, calling
at Halfway house, where we eat and drank. So home and to bed.

25th (Lord's day).  To trimming myself, which I have this week done every
morning, with a pumice stone,--[Shaving with pumice stone.]--which I
learnt of Mr. Marsh, when I was last at Portsmouth; and I find it very
easy, speedy, and cleanly, and shall continue the practice of it.  To
church, and heard a good sermon of Mr. Woodcocke's at our church; only in
his latter prayer for a woman in childbed, he prayed that God would
deliver her from the hereditary curse of child-bearing, which seemed a
pretty strange expression.  Dined at home, and Mr. Creed with me.  This
day I had the first dish of pease I have had this year.  After discourse
he and I abroad, and walked up and down, and looked into many churches,
among others Mr. Baxter's at Blackfryers.  Then to the Wardrobe, where I
found my Lord takes physic, so I did not see him, but with Captn. Ferrers
in Mr. George Montagu's coach to Charing Cross; and there at the Triumph
tavern he showed me some Portugall ladys, which are come to town before
the Queen.  They are not handsome, and their farthingales a strange dress.

     [Farthingales had gone out of fashion in England during the reign of
     Charles I., and therefore their use by the Portuguese ladies
     astonished the English.  Evelyn also remarks in his Diary on this
     ugly custom (May 30th, 1662).]

Many ladies and persons of quality come to see them.  I find nothing in
them that is pleasing; and I see they have learnt to kiss and look freely
up and down already, and I do believe will soon forget the recluse
practice of their own country.  They complain much for lack of good water
to drink.  So to the Wardrobe back on foot and supped with my Lady, and so
home, and after a walk upon the leads with my wife, to prayers and bed.
The King's guards and some City companies do walk up and down the town
these five or six days; which makes me think, and they do say, there are
some plots in laying.  God keep us.

26th.  Up by four o'clock in the morning, and fell to the preparing of
some accounts for my Lord of Sandwich.  By and by, by appointment comes
Mr. Moore, and, by what appears to us at present, we found that my Lord is
above L7,000 in debt, and that he hath money coming into him that will
clear all, and so we think him clear, but very little money in his purse.
So to my Lord's, and after he was ready, we spent an hour with him, giving
him an account thereof; and he having some L6,000 in his hands, remaining
of the King's, he is resolved to make use of that, and get off of it as
well as he can, which I like well of, for else I fear he will scarce get
beforehand again a great while.  Thence home, and to the Trinity House;
where the Brethren (who have been at Deptford choosing a new Maister;
which is Sir J. Minnes, notwithstanding Sir W. Batten did contend highly
for it: at which I am not a little pleased, because of his proud lady)
about three o'clock came hither, and so to dinner.  I seated myself close
by Mr. Prin, who, in discourse with me, fell upon what records he hath of
the lust and wicked lives of the nuns heretofore in England, and showed me
out of his pocket one wherein thirty nuns for their lust were ejected of
their house, being not fit to live there, and by the Pope's command to be
put, however, into other nunnerys.  I could not stay to end dinner with
them, but rose, and privately went out, and by water to my brother's, and
thence to take my wife to the Redd Bull, where we saw "Doctor Faustus,"
but so wretchedly and poorly done, that we were sick of it, and the worse
because by a former resolution it is to be the last play we are to see
till Michaelmas.  Thence homewards by coach, through Moorefields, where we
stood awhile, and saw the wrestling. At home, got my lute upon the leads,
and there played, and so to bed.

27th.  To my Lord this morning, and thence to my brother's, where I found
my father, poor man, come, which I was glad to see.  I staid with him till
noon, and then he went to my cozen Scott's to dinner, who had invited him.
He tells me his alterations of the house and garden at Brampton, which
please me well.  I could not go with him, and so we parted at Ludgate, and
I home to dinner, and to the office all the afternoon, and musique in my
chamber alone at night, and so to bed.

28th.  Up early to put things in order in my chamber, and then to my
Lord's, with whom I spoke about several things, and so up and down in
several places about business with Mr. Creed, among others to Mr. Wotton's
the shoemaker, and there drank our morning draft, and then home about
noon, and by and by comes my father by appointment to dine with me, which
we did very merrily, I desiring to make him as merry as I can, while the
poor man is in town.  After dinner comes my uncle Wight and sat awhile and
talked with us, and thence we three to the Mum House at Leadenhall, and
there sat awhile.  Then I left them, and to the Wardrobe, where I found my
Lord gone to Hampton Court.  Here I staid all the afternoon till late with
Creed and Captain Ferrers, thinking whether we should go to-morrow
together to Hampton Court, but Ferrers his wife coming in by and by to the
house with the young ladies (with whom she had been abroad), she was
unwilling to go, whereupon I was willing to put off our going, and so
home, but still my mind was hankering after our going to-morrow.  So to
bed.

29th.  At home all the morning.  At noon to the Wardrobe, and dined with
my Lady, and after dinner staid long talking with her; then homeward, and
in Lumbard Street was called out of a window by Alderman Backwell, where I
went, and saluted his lady, a very pretty woman.  Here was Mr. Creed, and
it seems they have been under some disorder in fear of a fire at the next
door, and had been removing their goods, but the fire was over before I
came.  Thence home, and with my wife and the two maids, and the boy, took
boat and to Foxhall,

     [Foxhall, Faukeshall, or Vauxhall, a manor in Surrey, properly
     Fulke's.  Hall, and so called from Fulke de Breaute, the notorious
     mercenary follower of King John.  The manor house was afterwards
     known as Copped or Copt Hall.  Sir Samuel Morland obtained a lease
     of the place, and King Charles made him Master of Mechanics, and
     here "he (Morland), anno 1667, built a fine room," says Aubrey, "the
     inside all of looking-glass and fountains, very pleasant to behold."
     The gardens were formed about 1661, and originally called the "New
     Spring Gardens," to distinguish them from the "Old Spring Gardens"
     at Charing Cross, but according to the present description by Pepys
     there was both an Old and a New Spring Garden at Vauxhall.
     Balthazar Monconys, who visited England early in the reign of
     Charles II., describes the 'Jardins Printemps' at Lambeth as having
     lawns and gravel walks, dividing squares of twenty or thirty yards
     enclosed with hedges of gooseberry trees, within which were planted
     roses.]

where I had not been a great while.  To the Old Spring Garden, and there
walked long, and the wenches gathered pinks.  Here we staid, and seeing
that we could not have anything to eat, but very dear, and with long stay,
we went forth again without any notice taken of us, and so we might have
done if we had had anything.  Thence to the New one, where I never was
before, which much exceeds the other; and here we also walked, and the boy
crept through the hedge and gathered abundance of roses, and, after a long
walk, passed out of doors as we did in the other place, and here we had
cakes and powdered beef--[salt beef]--and ale, and so home again by water
with much pleasure.  This day, being the King's birth-day, was very
solemnly observed; and the more, for that the Queen this day comes to
Hampton Court.  In the evening, bonfires were made, but nothing to the
great number that was heretofore at the burning of the Rump.  So to bed.

30th.  This morning I made up my accounts, and find myself 'de claro'
worth about L530, and no more, so little have I increased it since my last
reckoning; but I confess I have laid out much money in clothes. Upon a
suddaine motion I took my wife, and Sarah and Will by water, with some
victuals with us, as low as Gravesend, intending to have gone into the
Hope to the Royal James, to have seen the ship and Mr. Shepley, but
meeting Mr. Shepley in a hoy, bringing up my Lord's things, she and I went
on board, and sailed up with them as far as half-way tree, very glad to
see Mr. Shepley.  Here we saw a little Turk and a negroe, which are
intended for pages to the two young ladies.  Many birds and other pretty
noveltys there was, but I was afeard of being louzy, and so took boat
again, and got to London before them, all the way, coming and going,
reading in the "Wallflower" with great pleasure.  So home, and thence to
the Wardrobe, where Mr. Shepley was come with the things.  Here I staid
talking with my Lady, who is preparing to go to-morrow to Hampton Court.
So home, and at ten o'clock at night Mr. Shepley came to sup with me.  So
we had a dish of mackerell and pease, and so he bid us good night, going
to lie on board the hoy, and I to bed.

31st.  Lay long in bed, and so up to make up my Journall for these two or
three days past.  Then came Anthony Joyce, who duns me for money for the
tallow which he served in lately by my desire, which vexes me, but I must
get it him the next by my promise.  By and by to White Hall, hearing that
Sir G. Carteret was come to town, but I could not find him, and so back to
Tom's, and thence I took my father to my house, and there he dined with
me, discoursing of our businesses with uncle Thomas and T. Trice. After
dinner he departed and I to the office where we met, and that being done I
walked to my Brother's and the Wardrobe and other places about business,
and so home, and had Sarah to comb my head clean, which I found so foul
with powdering and other troubles, that I am resolved to try how I can
keep my head dry without powder; and I did also in a suddaine fit cut off
all my beard, which I had been a great while bringing up, only that I may
with my pumice-stone do my whole face, as I now do my chin, and to save
time, which I find a very easy way and gentile.  So she also washed my
feet in a bath of herbs, and so to bed.  This month ends with very fair
weather for a great while together.  My health pretty well, but only wind
do now and then torment me .  .  .  extremely.  The Queen is brought a few
days since to Hampton Court; and all people say of her to be a very fine
and handsome lady, and very discreet; and that the King is pleased enough
with her which, I fear, will put Madam Castlemaine's nose out of joynt.
The Court is wholly now at Hampton.  A peace with Argier is lately made;
which is also good news.  My father is lately come to town to see us, and
though it has cost and will cost more money, yet I am pleased with the
alteraeons on my house at Brampton.  My Lord Sandwich is lately come with
the Queen from sea, very well and in good repute.  Upon an audit of my
estate I find myself worth about L530 'de claro'.  The Act for Uniformity
is lately printed,

     ["An Act for the Uniformity of public prayers and administration of
     sacraments and other rites and ceremonies, and for establishing the
     form of making, ordaining, and consecrating bishops, priests, and
     deacons in the Church of England."]

which, it is thought, will make mad work among the Presbyterian ministers.
People of all sides are very much discontented; some thinking themselves
used, contrary to promise, too hardly; and the other, that they are not
rewarded so much as they expected by the King.  God keep us all.  I have
by a late oath obliged myself from wine and plays, of which I find good
effect.

                          DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS.
                                   JUNE
                                   1662

June 1st (Lord's day).  At church in the morning.  A stranger made a very
good sermon.  Dined at home, and Mr. Spong came to see me; so he and I sat
down a little to sing some French psalms, and then comes Mr. Shepley and
Mr. Moore, and so we to dinner, and after dinner to church again, where a
Presbyter made a sad and long sermon, which vexed me, and so home, and so
to walk on the leads, and supper and to prayers and bed.

2nd.  Up early about business and then to the Wardrobe with Mr. Moore, and
spoke to my Lord about the exchange of the crusados

     [Cruzado, a Portuguese coin of 480 reis.  It is named from a cross
     which it bears on one side, the arms of Portugal being on the other.
     It varied in value at different periods from 2s. 3d. to 4s.]

into sterling money, and other matters.  So to my father at Tom's, and
after some talk with him away home, and by and by comes my father to
dinner with me, and then by coach, setting him down in Cheapside, my wife
and I to Mrs. Clarke's at Westminster, the first visit that ever we both
made her yet.  We found her in a dishabille, intending to go to Hampton
Court to-morrow.  We had much pretty discourse, and a very fine lady she
is.  Thence by water to Salisbury Court, and Mrs. Turner not being at
home, home by coach, and so after walking on the leads and supper to bed.
This day my wife put on her slasht wastecoate, which is very pretty.

3rd.  Up by four o'clock and to my business in my chamber, to even
accounts with my Lord and myself, and very fain I would become master of
L1000, but I have not above L530 toward it yet.  At the office all the
morning, and Mr. Coventry brought his patent and took his place with us
this morning.  Upon our making a contract, I went, as I use to do, to draw
the heads thereof, but Sir W. Pen most basely told me that the Comptroller
is to do it, and so begun to employ Mr. Turner about it, at which I was
much vexed, and begun to dispute; and what with the letter of the Duke's
orders, and Mr. Barlow's letter, and the practice of our predecessors,
which Sir G. Carteret knew best when he was Comptroller, it was ruled for
me.  What Sir J. Minnes will do when he comes I know not, but Sir W. Pen
did it like a base raskall, and so I shall remember him while I live.
After office done, I went down to the Towre Wharf, where Mr. Creed and
Shepley was ready with three chests of the crusados, being about L6000,
ready to bring to shore to my house, which they did, and put it in my
further cellar, and Mr. Shepley took the key.  I to my father and Dr.
Williams and Tom Trice, by appointment, in the Old Bayly, to Short's, the
alehouse, but could come to no terms with T. Trice.  Thence to the
Wardrobe, where I found my Lady come from Hampton Court, where the Queen
hath used her very civilly; and my Lady tells me is a most pretty woman,
at which I am glad.  Yesterday (Sir R. Ford told me) the Aldermen of the
City did attend her in their habits, and did present her with a gold Cupp
and L1000 in gold therein.  But, he told me, that they are so poor in
their Chamber, that they were fain to call two or three Aldermen to raise
fines to make up this sum, among which was Sir W. Warren.  Home and to the
office, where about 8 at night comes Sir G. Carteret and Sir W. Batten,
and so we did some business, and then home and to bed, my mind troubled
about Sir W. Pen, his playing the rogue with me to-day, as also about the
charge of money that is in my house, which I had forgot; but I made the
maids to rise and light a candle, and set it in the dining-room, to scare
away thieves, and so to sleep.

4th.  Up early, and Mr. Moore comes to me and tells me that Mr. Barnwell
is dead, which troubles me something, and the more for that I believe we
shall lose Mr. Shepley's company.  By and by Sir W. Batten and I by water
to Woolwich; and there saw an experiment made of Sir R. Ford's Holland's
yarn (about which we have lately had so much stir; and I have much
concerned myself for our ropemaker, Mr. Hughes, who has represented it as
bad), and we found it to be very bad, and broke sooner than, upon a fair
triall, five threads of that against four of Riga yarn; and also that some
of it had old stuff that had been tarred, covered over with new hemp,
which is such a cheat as hath not been heard of.  I was glad of this
discovery, because I would not have the King's workmen discouraged (as Sir
W. Batten do most basely do) from representing the faults of merchants'
goods, where there is any.  After eating some fish that we had bought upon
the water at Falconer's, we went to Woolwich, and there viewed our frames
of our houses, and so home, and I to my Lord's, who I find resolved to buy
Brampton Manor of Sir Peter Ball,

     [Sir Peter Ball was the Queen's Attorney-General, and Evelyn
     mentions, in his Diary (January 11th, 1661-62), having received from
     him the draft of an act against the nuisance of the smoke of
     London.]

at which I am glad.  Thence to White Hall, and showed Sir G. Carteret the
cheat, and so to the Wardrobe, and there staid and supped with my Lady. My
Lord eating nothing, but writes letters to-night to several places, he
being to go out of town to-morrow.  So late home and to bed.

5th.  To the Wardrobe, and there my Lord did enquire my opinion of Mr.
Moore, which I did give to the best advantage I could, and by that means
shall get him joined with Mr. Townsend in the Wardrobe business.  He did
also give me all Mr. Shepley's and Mr. Moore's accounts to view, which I
am glad of, as being his great trust in me, and I would willingly keep up
a good interest with him.  So took leave of him (he being to go this day)
and to the office, where they were just sat down, and I showed them
yesterday's discovery, and have got Sir R. Ford to be my enemy by it; but
I care not, for it is my duty, and so did get his bill stopped for the
present.  To dinner, and found Dr. Thos. Pepys at my house; but I was
called from dinner by a note from Mr. Moore to Alderman Backwell's, to see
some thousands of my Lord's crusados weighed, and we find that 3,000 come
to about L530 or 40 generally.  Home again and found my father there; we
talked a good while and so parted.  We met at the office in the afternoon
to finish Mr. Gauden's accounts, but did not do them quite.  In the
evening with Mr. Moore to Backwell's with another 1,200 crusados and saw
them weighed, and so home and to bed.

6th.  At my office all alone all the morning, and the smith being with me
about other things, did open a chest that hath stood ever since I came to
the office, in my office, and there we found a modell of a fine ship,
which I long to know whether it be the King's or Mr. Turner's.  At noon to
the Wardrobe by appointment to meet my father, who did come and was well
treated by my Lady, who tells me she has some thoughts to send her two
little boys to our house at Brampton, but I have got leave for them to go
along with me and my wife to Hampton Court to-morrow or Sunday. Thence to
my brother Tom's, where we found a letter from Pall that my mother is
dangerously ill in fear of death, which troubles my father and me much,
but I hope it is otherwise, the letter being four days old since it was
writ.  Home and at my office, and with Mr. Hater set things in order till
evening, and so home and to bed by daylight.  This day at my father's
desire I lent my brother Tom L20, to be repaid out of the proceeds of
Sturtlow when we can sell it.  I sent the money all in new money by my boy
from Alderman Backwell's.

7th.  To the office, where all the morning, and I find Mr. Coventry is
resolved to do much good, and to enquire into all the miscarriages of the
office.  At noon with him and Sir W. Batten to dinner at Trinity House;
where, among others, Sir J. Robinson, Lieutenant of the Tower, was, who
says that yesterday Sir H. Vane had a full hearing at the King's Bench,
and is found guilty; and that he did never hear any man argue more simply
than he in all his life, and so others say.  My mind in great trouble
whether I should go as I intended to Hampton Court to-morrow or no.  At
last resolved the contrary, because of the charge thereof, and I am afraid
now to bring in any accounts for journeys, and so will others I suppose
be, because of Mr. Coventry's prying into them.  Thence sent for to Sir G.
Carteret's, and there talked with him a good while.  I perceive, as he
told me, were it not that Mr. Coventry had already feathered his nest in
selling of places, he do like him very well, and hopes great good from
him.  But he complains so of lack of money, that my heart is very sad,
under the apprehension of the fall of the office.  At my office all the
afternoon, and at night hear that my father is gone into the country, but
whether to Richmond as he intended, and thence to meet us at Hampton Court
on Monday, I know not, or to Brampton.  At which I am much troubled.  In
the evening home and to bed.

8th (Lord's day).  Lay till church-time in bed, and so up and to church,
and there I found Mr. Mills come home out of the country again, and
preached but a lazy sermon.  Home and dined with my wife, and so to church
again with her.  Thence walked to my Lady's, and there supped with her,
and merry, among other things, with the parrott which my Lord hath brought
from the sea, which speaks very well, and cries Pall so pleasantly, that
made my Lord give it my Lady Paulina; but my Lady, her mother, do not like
it.  Home, and observe my man Will to walk with his cloak flung over his
shoulder, like a Ruffian, which, whether it was that he might not be seen
to walk along with the footboy, I know not, but I was vexed at it; and
coming home, and after prayers, I did ask him where he learned that
immodest garb, and he answered me that it was not immodest, or some such
slight answer, at which I did give him two boxes on the ears, which I
never did before, and so was after a little troubled at it.

9th.  Early up and at the office with Mr. Hater, making my alphabet of
contracts, upon the dispatch of which I am now very intent, for that I am
resolved much to enquire into the price of commodities.  Dined at home,
and after dinner to Greatorex's, and with him and another stranger to the
Tavern, but I drank no wine.  He recommended Bond, of our end of the town,
to teach me to measure timber, and some other things that I would learn,
in order to my office.  Thence back again to the office, and there T.
Hater and I did make an end of my alphabet, which did much please me. So
home to supper and to bed.

10th.  At the office all the morning, much business; and great hopes of
bringing things, by Mr. Coventry's means, to a good condition in the
office.  Dined at home, Mr. Hunt with us; to the office again in the
afternoon, but not meeting, as was intended, I went to my brother's and
bookseller's, and other places about business, and paid off all for books
to this day, and do not intend to buy any more of any kind a good while,
though I had a great mind to have bought the King's works, as they are new
printed in folio, and present it to my Lord; but I think it will be best
to save the money.  So home and to bed.

     [There is a beautiful copy of "The Workes of King Charles the
     Martyr, and Collections of Declarations, Treaties, &c."  (2 vols.
     folio, 1662), in the Pepysian Library, with a very interesting note
     in the first volume by Pepys (dated October 7th, 1700), to the
     effect that he had collated it with a copy in Lambeth Library,
     presented by Dr. Zachary Cradock, Provost of Eton.  "This book being
     seized on board an English ship was delivered, by order of the
     Inquisition of Lisbon, to some of the English Priests to be perused
     and corrected according to the Rules of the 'Index Expurgatorius.'
     Thus corrected it was given to Barnaby Crafford, English merchant
     there, and by him it was given to me, the English preacher resident
     there A.D. 1670, and by me as I then received it to the Library at
     Lambeth to be there preserved.  Nov. 2, 1678.  'Ita testor', Zach.
     Cradock.--From which (through the favour of the most Reverend Father
     in God and my most honoured Friend his Grace the present Archbishop
     of Canterbury) I have this 7th of October, 1700, had an opportunity
     given me there (assisted by my clerk, Thomas Henderson), leisurely to
     overlook, and with my uttermost attention to note the said
     Expurgations through each part of this my own Book."  Whole
     sentences in the book are struck through, as well as such words as
     Martyr, Defender of the Faith, More than Conqueror, &c.]

11th.  At the office all the morning, Sir W. Batten, Sir W. Pen, and I
about the Victualler's accounts.  Then home to dinner and to the office
again all the afternoon, Mr. Hater and I writing over my Alphabet fair, in
which I took great pleasure to rule the lines and to have the capitall
words wrote with red ink.  So home and to supper.  This evening Savill the
Paynter came and did varnish over my wife's picture and mine, and I paid
him for my little picture L3, and so am clear with him.  So after supper
to bed.  This day I had a letter from my father that he is got down well,
and found my mother pretty well again.  So that I am vexed with all my
heart at Pall for writing to him so much concerning my mother's illness
(which I believe was not so great), so that he should be forced to hasten
down on the sudden back into the country without taking leave, or having
any pleasure here.

12th.  This morning I tried on my riding cloth suit with close knees, the
first that ever I had; and I think they will be very convenient, if not
too hot to wear any other open knees after them.  At the office all the
morning, where we had a full Board, viz., Sir G. Carteret, Sir John
Mennes, Sir W. Batten, Mr. Coventry, Sir W. Pen, Mr. Pett, and myself.
Among many other businesses, I did get a vote signed by all, concerning my
issuing of warrants, which they did not smell the use I intend to make of
it; but it is to plead for my clerks to have their right of giving out all
warrants, at which I am not a little pleased.  But a great difference
happened between Sir G. Carteret and Mr. Coventry, about passing the
Victualler's account, and whether Sir George is to pay the Victualler his
money, or the Exchequer; Sir George claiming it to be his place to save
his threepences.  It ended in anger, and I believe will come to be a
question before the King and Council.  I did what I could to keep myself
unconcerned in it, having some things of my own to do before I would
appear high in anything.  Thence to dinner, by Mr. Gauden's invitation, to
the Dolphin, where a good dinner; but what is to myself a great wonder;
that with ease I past the whole dinner without drinking a drop of wine.
After dinner to the office, my head full of business, and so home, and it
being the longest day in the year,--[That is, by the old style. The new
style was not introduced until 1752]--I made all my people go to bed by
daylight.  But after I was a-bed and asleep, a note came from my brother
Tom to tell me that my cozen Anne Pepys, of Worcestershire, her husband is
dead, and she married again, and her second husband in town, and intends
to come and see me to-morrow.

13th.  Up by 4 o'clock in the morning, and read Cicero's Second Oration
against Catiline, which pleased me exceedingly; and more I discern therein
than ever I thought was to be found in him; but I perceive it was my
ignorance, and that he is as good a writer as ever I read in my life. By
and by to Sir G. Carteret's, to talk with him about yesterday's difference
at the office; and offered my service to look into any old books or papers
that I have, that may make for him.  He was well pleased therewith, and
did much inveigh against Mr. Coventry; telling me how he had done him
service in the Parliament, when Prin had drawn up things against him for
taking of money for places; that he did at his desire, and upon his,
letters, keep him off from doing it.  And many other things he told me, as
how the King was beholden to him, and in what a miserable condition his
family would be, if he should die before he hath cleared his accounts.
Upon the whole, I do find that he do much esteem of me, and is my friend,
and I may make good use of him.  Thence to several places about business,
among others to my brother's, and there Tom Beneere the barber trimmed me.
Thence to my Lady's, and there dined with her, Mr. Laxton, Gibbons, and
Goldgroove with us, and after dinner some musique, and so home to my
business, and in the evening my wife and I, and Sarah and the boy, a most
pleasant walk to Halfway house, and so home and to bed.

14th.  Up by four o'clock in the morning and upon business at my office.
Then we sat down to business, and about 11 o'clock, having a room got
ready for us, we all went out to the Tower-hill; and there, over against
the scaffold, made on purpose this day, saw Sir Henry Vane brought.

     [Sir Harry Vane the younger was born 1612.  Charles signed on June
     12th a warrant for the execution of Vane by hanging at Tyburn on the
     14th, which sentence on the following day "upon humble suit made" to
     him, Charles was "graciously pleased to mitigate," as the warrant
     terms it, for the less ignominious punishment of beheading on Tower
     Hill, and with permission that the head and body should be given to
     the relations to be by them decently and privately interred.--
     Lister's Life of Clarendon, ii, 123.]

A very great press of people.  He made a long speech, many times
interrupted by the Sheriff and others there; and they would have taken his
paper out of his hand, but he would not let it go.  But they caused all
the books of those that writ after him to be given the Sheriff; and the
trumpets were brought under the scaffold that he might not be heard. Then
he prayed, and so fitted himself, and received the blow; but the scaffold
was so crowded that we could not see it done.  But Boreman, who had been
upon the scaffold, came to us and told us, that first he began to speak of
the irregular proceeding against him; that he was, against Magna Charta,
denied to have his exceptions against the indictment allowed; and that
there he was stopped by the Sheriff.  Then he drew out his, paper of
notes, and begun to tell them first his life; that he was born a
gentleman, that he was bred up and had the quality of a gentleman, and to
make him in the opinion of the world more a gentleman, he had been, till
he was seventeen years old, a good fellow, but then it pleased God to lay
a foundation of grace in his heart, by which he was persuaded, against his
worldly interest, to leave all preferment and go abroad, where he might
serve God with more freedom.  Then he was called home, and made a member
of the Long Parliament; where he never did, to this day, any thing against
his conscience, but all for the glory of God.  Here he would have given
them an account of the proceedings of the Long Parliament, but they so
often interrupted him, that at last he was forced to give over: and so
fell into prayer for England in generall, then for the churches in
England, and then for the City of London: and so fitted himself for the
block, and received the blow.  He had a blister, or issue, upon his neck,
which he desired them not hurt: he changed not his colour or speech to the
last, but died justifying himself and the cause he had stood for; and
spoke very confidently of his being presently at the right hand of Christ;
and in all, things appeared the most resolved man that ever died in that
manner, and showed more of heat than cowardize, but yet with all humility
and gravity.  One asked him why he did not pray for the King.  He
answered, "Nay," says he, "you shall see I can pray for the King: I pray
God bless him!"  The King had given his body to his friends; and,
therefore, he told them that he hoped they would be civil to his body when
dead; and desired they would let him die like a gentleman and a Christian,
and not crowded and pressed as he was. So to the office a little, and so
to the Trinity-house all of us to dinner; and then to the office again all
the afternoon till night.  So home and to bed.  This day, I hear, my Lord
Peterborough is come unexpected from Tangier, to give the King an account
of the place, which, we fear, is in none of the best condition.  We had
also certain news to-day that the Spaniard is before Lisbon with thirteen
sail; six Dutch, and the rest his own ships; which will, I fear, be ill
for Portugall.  I writ a letter of all this day's proceedings to my Lord,
at Hinchingbroke, who, I hear, is very well pleased with the work there.

15th (Lord's day).  To church in the morning and home to dinner, where
come my brother Tom and Mr. Fisher, my cozen, Nan Pepys's second husband,
who, I perceive, is a very good-humoured man, an old cavalier.  I made as
much of him as I could, and were merry, and am glad she hath light of so
good a man.  They gone, to church again; but my wife not being dressed as
I would have her, I was angry, and she, when she was out of doors in her
way to church, returned home again vexed.  But I to church, Mr. Mills, an
ordinary sermon.  So home, and found my wife and Sarah gone to a neighbour
church, at which I was not much displeased.  By and by she comes again,
and, after a word or two, good friends.  And then her brother came to see
her, and he being gone she told me that she believed he was married and
had a wife worth L500 to him, and did inquire how he might dispose the
money to the best advantage, but I forbore to advise her till she could
certainly tell me how things are with him, being loth to meddle too soon
with him.  So to walk upon the leads, and to supper, and to bed.

16th.  Up before four o'clock, and after some business took Will forth,
and he and I walked over the Tower Hill, but the gate not being open we
walked through St. Catharine's and Ratcliffe (I think it is) by the
waterside above a mile before we could get a boat, and so over the water
in a scull (which I have not done a great while), and walked finally to
Deptford, where I saw in what forwardness the work is for Sir W. Batten's
house and mine, and it is almost ready.  I also, with Mr. Davis, did view
my cozen Joyce's tallow, and compared it with the Irish tallow we bought
lately, and found ours much more white, but as soft as it; now what is the
fault, or whether it be or no a fault, I know not.  So walked home again
as far as over against the Towre, and so over and home, where I found Sir
W. Pen and Sir John Minnes discoursing about Sir John Minnes's house and
his coming to live with us, and I think he intends to have Mr. Turner's
house and he to come to his lodgings, which I shall be very glad of.  We
three did go to Mr. Turner's to view his house, which I think was to the
end that Sir John Minnes might see it.  Then by water with my wife to the
Wardrobe, and dined there; and in the afternoon with all the children by
water to Greenwich, where I showed them the King's yacht, the house, and
the park, all very pleasant; and so to the tavern, and had the musique of
the house, and so merrily home again.  Will and I walked home from the
Wardrobe, having left my wife at the Tower Wharf coming by, whom I found
gone to bed not very well . . . .  So to bed.

17th.  Up, and Mr. Mayland comes to me and borrowed 30s. of me to be paid
again out of the money coming to him in the James and Charles for his late
voyage.  So to the office, where all the morning.  So home to dinner, my
wife not being well, but however dined with me.  So to the office, and at
Sir W. Batten's, where we all met by chance and talked, and they drank
wine; but I forebore all their healths.  Sir John Minnes, I perceive, is
most excellent company.  So home and to bed betimes by daylight.

18th.  Up early; and after reading a little in Cicero, I made me ready and
to my office, where all the morning very busy.  At noon Mr. Creed came to
me about business, and he and I walked as far as Lincoln's Inn Fields
together.  After a turn or two in the walks we parted, and I to my Lord
Crew's and dined with him; where I hear the courage of Sir H. Vane at his
death is talked on every where as a miracle.  Thence to Somerset House to
Sir J. Winter's chamber by appointment, and met Mr. Pett, where he and I
read over his last contract with the King for the Forest of Dean, whereof
I took notes because of this new one that he is now in making.  That done
he and I walked to Lilly's, the painter's, where we saw among other rare
things, the Duchess of York, her whole body, sitting instate in a chair,
in white sattin, and another of the King, that is not finished; most rare
things.  I did give the fellow something that showed them us, and promised
to come some other time, and he would show me Lady Castlemaine's, which I
could not then see, it being locked up!  Thence to Wright's, the
painter's: but, Lord! the difference that is between their two works.
Thence to the Temple, and there spoke with my cozen Roger, who gives me
little hopes in the business between my Uncle Tom and us. So Mr. Pett (who
staid at his son's chamber) and I by coach to the old Exchange, and there
parted, and I home and at the office till night.  My windows at my office
are made clean to-day and a casement in my closet. So home, and after some
merry discourse in the kitchen with my wife and maids as I now-a-days
often do, I being well pleased with both my maids, to bed.

19th.  Up by five o'clock, and while my man Will was getting himself ready
to come up to me I took and played upon my lute a little.  So to dress
myself, and to my office to prepare things against we meet this morning.
We sat long to-day, and had a great private business before us about
contracting with Sir W. Rider, Mr. Cutler, and Captain Cocke, for 500 ton
of hemp, which we went through, and I am to draw up the conditions.  Home
to dinner, where I found Mr. Moore, and he and I cast up our accounts
together and evened them, and then with the last chest of crusados to
Alderman Backwell's, by the same token his lady going to take coach stood
in the shop, and having a gilded glassfull of perfumed comfits given her
by Don Duarte de Silva, the Portugall merchant, that is come over with the
Queen, I did offer at a taste, and so she poured some out into my hand,
and, though good, yet pleased me the better coming from a pretty lady.  So
home and at the office preparing papers and things, and indeed my head has
not been so full of business a great while, and with so much pleasure, for
I begin to see the pleasure it gives.  God give me health.  So to bed.

20th.  Up by four or five o'clock, and to the office, and there drew up
the agreement between the King and Sir John Winter about the Forrest of
Deane; and having done it, he came himself (I did not know him to be the
Queen's Secretary before, but observed him to be a man of fine parts); and
we read it, and both liked it well.  That done, I turned to the Forrest of
Deane, in Speede's Mapps, and there he showed me how it lies; and the
Lea-bayly, with the great charge of carrying it to Lydny, and many other
things worth my knowing; and I do perceive that I am very short in my
business by not knowing many times the geographical part of my business.
At my office till Mr. Moore took me out and at my house looked over our
papers again, and upon our evening accounts did give full discharges one
to the other, and in his and many other accounts I perceive I shall be
better able to give a true balance of my estate to myself within a day or
two than I have been this twelve months.  Then he and I to Alderman
Backwell's and did the like there, and I gave one receipt for all the
money I have received thence upon the receipt of my Lord's crusados.  Then
I went to the Exchange, and hear that the merchants have a great fear of a
breach with the Spaniard; for they think he will not brook our having
Tangier, Dunkirk, and Jamaica; and our merchants begin to draw home their
estates as fast as they can.  Then to Pope's Head Ally, and there bought
me a pair of tweezers, cost me 14s., the first thing like a bawble I have
bought a good while, but I do it with some trouble of mind, though my
conscience tells me that I do it with an apprehension of service in my
office to have a book to write memorandums in, and a pair of compasses in
it; but I confess myself the willinger to do it because I perceive by my
accounts that I shall be better by L30 than I expected to be.  But by
tomorrow night I intend to see to the bottom of all my accounts.  Then
home to dinner, where Mr. Moore met me.  Then he went away, and I to the
office and dispatch much business.  So in the evening, my wife and I and
Jane over the water to the Halfway-house, a pretty, pleasant walk, but the
wind high.  So home again and to bed.

21st. Up about four o'clock, and settled some private business of my own,
then made me ready and to the office to prepare things for our meeting
to-day.  By and by we met, and at noon Sir W. Pen and I to the Trinity
House; where was a feast made by the Wardens, when great good cheer, and
much, but ordinary company.  The Lieutenant of the Tower, upon my
demanding how Sir H. Vane died, told me that he died in a passion; but all
confess with so much courage as never man died.  Thence to the office,
where Sir W. Rider, Capt. Cocke, and Mr. Cutler came by appointment to
meet me to confer about the contract between us and them for 500 tons of
hemp.  That being done, I did other business and so went home, and there
found Mr. Creed, who staid talking with my wife and me an hour or two, and
I put on my riding cloth suit, only for him to see how it is, and I think
it will do very well.  He being gone, and I hearing from my wife and the
maids' complaints made of the boy, I called him up, and with my whip did
whip him till I was not able to stir, and yet I could not make him confess
any of the lies that they tax him with.  At last, not willing to let him
go away a conqueror, I took him in task again, and pulled off his frock to
his shirt, and whipped him till he did confess that he did drink the whey,
which he had denied, and pulled a pink, and above all did lay the
candlestick upon the ground in his chamber, which he had denied this
quarter of a year.  I confess it is one of the greatest wonders that ever
I met with that such a little boy as he could possibly be able to suffer
half so much as he did to maintain a lie.  I think I must be forced to put
him away.  So to bed, with my arm very weary.

22nd (Lord's day).  This day I first put on my slasht doublet, which I
like very well.  Mr. Shepley came to me in the morning, telling me that he
and my Lord came to town from Hinchinbroke last night.  He and I spend an
hour in looking over his account, and then walked to the Wardrobe, all the
way discoursing of my Lord's business.  He tells me to my great wonder
that Mr. Barnwell is dead L500 in debt to my Lord.  By and by my Lord came
from church, and I dined, with some others, with him, he very merry, and
after dinner took me aside and talked of state and other matters.  By and
by to my brother Tom's and took him out with me homewards (calling at the
Wardrobe to talk a little with Mr. Moore), and so to my house, where I
paid him all I owed him, and did make the L20 I lately lent him up to L40,
for which he shall give bond to Mr. Shepley, for it is his money.  So my
wife and I to walk in the garden, where all our talk was against Sir W.
Pen, against whom I have lately had cause to be much prejudiced.  By and
by he and his daughter came out to walk, so we took no notice of them a
great while, at last in going home spoke a word or two, and so good night,
and to bed.  This day I am told of a Portugall lady, at Hampton Court,
that hath dropped a child already since the Queen's coming, but the king
would not have them searched whose it is; and so it is not commonly known
yet.  Coming home to-night, I met with Will. Swan, who do talk as high for
the Fanatiques as ever he did in his life; and do pity my Lord Sandwich
and me that we should be given up to the wickedness of the world; and that
a fall is coming upon us all; for he finds that he and his company are the
true spirit of the nation, and the greater part of the nation too, who
will have liberty of conscience in spite of this "Act of Uniformity," or
they will die; and if they may not preach abroad, they will preach in
their own houses.  He told me that certainly Sir H. Vane must be gone to
Heaven, for he died as much a martyr and saint as ever man did; and that
the King hath lost more by that man's death, than he will get again a good
while.  At all which I know not what to think; but, I confess, I do think
that the Bishops will never be able to carry it so high as they do.

23rd.  Up early, this morning, and my people are taking down the hangings
and things in my house because of the great dust that is already made by
the pulling down of Sir W. Batten's house, and will be by my own when I
come to it.  To my office, and there hard at work all the morning.  At
noon to the Exchange to meet Dr. Williams, who sent me this morning notice
of his going into the country tomorrow, but could not find him, but
meeting with Frank Moore, my Lord Lambeth's man formerly, we, and two or
three friends of his did go to a tavern, and there they drank, but I
nothing but small beer.  In the next room one was playing very finely of
the dulcimer, which well played I like well, but one of our own company, a
talking fellow, did in discourse say much of this Act against Seamen,

     [In 1662 was passed "An Act for providing of carriage by land and by
     water for the use of His Majesty's Navy and Ordinance" (13-14 Gar.
     II., cap. 20), which gave power for impressing seamen, &c.]

for their being brought to account; and that it was made on purpose for my
Lord Sandwich, who was in debt L100,000, and hath been forced to have
pardon oftentimes from Oliver for the same: at which I was vexed at him,
but thought it not worth my trouble to oppose what he said, but took leave
and went home, and after a little dinner to my office again, and in the
evening Sir W. Warren came to me about business, and that being done,
discoursing of deals, I did offer to go along with him among his deal
ships, which we did to half a score, where he showed me the difference
between Dram, Swinsound, Christiania, and others, and told me many
pleasant notions concerning their manner of cutting and sawing them by
watermills, and the reason how deals become dearer and cheaper, among
others, when the snow is not so great as to fill up the values that they
may pass from hill to hill over the snow, then it is dear carriage.  From
on board he took me to his yard, where vast and many places of deals,
sparrs, and bulks, &c., the difference between which I never knew before,
and indeed am very proud of this evening's work.  He had me into his
house, which is most pretty and neat and well furnished.  After a glass,
not of wine, for I would not be tempted to drink any, but a glass of mum,
I well home by water, but it being late was forced to land at the Custom
House, and so home and to bed, and after I was a-bed, letters came from
the Duke for the fitting out of four ships forthwith from Portsmouth (I
know not yet for what) so I was forced to make Will get them wrote, and
signed them in bed and sent them away by express.  And so to sleep.

24th (Midsummer day).  Up early and to my office, putting things in order
against we sit.  There came to me my cozen Harry Alcocke, whom I much
respect, to desire (by a letter from my father to me, where he had been
some days) my help for him to some place.  I proposed the sea to him, and
I think he will take it, and I hope do well.  Sat all the morning, and I
bless God I find that by my diligence of late and still, I do get ground
in the office every day.  At noon to the Change, where I begin to be known
also, and so home to dinner, and then to the office all the afternoon
dispatching business.  At night news is brought me that Field the rogue
hath this day cast me at Guildhall in L30 for his imprisonment, to which I
signed his commitment with the rest of the officers; but they having been
parliament-men, that he hath begun the law with me; and threatens more,
but I hope the Duke of York will bear me out.  At night home, and Mr.
Spong came to me, and so he and I sat singing upon the leads till almost
ten at night and so he went away (a pretty, harmless, and ingenious man),
and I to bed, in a very great content of mind, which I hope by my care
still in my business will continue to me.

25th.  Up by four o'clock, and put my accounts with my Lord into a very
good order, and so to my office, where having put many things in order I
went to the Wardrobe, but found my Lord gone to Hampton Court.  After
discourse with Mr. Shepley we parted, and I into Thames Street, beyond the
Bridge, and there enquired among the shops the price of tarre and oyle,
and do find great content in it, and hope to save the King money by this
practice.  So home to dinner, and then to the Change, and so home again,
and at the office preparing business against to-morrow all the afternoon.
At night walked with my wife upon the leads, and so to supper and to bed.
My wife having lately a great pain in her ear, for which this night she
begins to take physique, and I have got cold and so have a great deal of
my old pain.

26th.  Up and took physique, but such as to go abroad with, only to loosen
me, for I am bound.  So to the office, and there all the morning sitting
till noon, and then took Commissioner Pett home to dinner with me, where
my stomach was turned when my sturgeon came to table, upon which I saw
very many little worms creeping, which I suppose was through the staleness
of the pickle.  He being gone, comes Mr. Nicholson, my old fellow-student
at Magdalene, and we played three or four things upon the violin and
basse, and so parted, and I to my office till night, and there came Mr.
Shepley and Creed in order to settling some accounts of my Lord to-night,
and so to bed.

27th.  Up early, not quite rid of my pain.  I took more physique, and so
made myself ready to go forth.  So to my Lord, who rose as soon as he
heard I was there; and in his nightgown and shirt stood talking with me
alone two hours,.  I believe, concerning his greatest matters of state and
interest.  Among other things, that his greatest design is, first, to get
clear of all debts to the King for the Embassy money, and then a pardon.
Then, to get his land settled; and then to, discourse and advise what is
best for him, whether to keep his sea employment longer or no. For he do
discern that the Duke would be willing to have him out, and that by
Coventry's means.  And here he told me, how the terms at Argier were
wholly his; and that he did plainly tell Lawson and agree with him, that
he would have the honour of them, if they should ever be agreed to; and
that accordingly they did come over hither entitled, "Articles concluded
on by Sir J. Lawson, according to instructions received from His Royal
Highness James Duke of York, &c., and from His Excellency the Earle of
Sandwich."  (Which however was more than needed; but Lawson tells my Lord
in his letter, that it was not he, but the Council of Warr that would have
"His Royal Highness" put into the title, though he did not contribute one
word to it.)  But the Duke of York did yesterday propose them to the
Council, to be printed with this title: "Concluded on, by Sir J. Lawson,
Knt."  and my Lord quite left out.  Here I find my Lord very politique;
for he tells me, that he discerns they design to set up Lawson as much as
they can and that he do counterplot them by setting him up higher still;
by which they will find themselves spoiled of their design, and at last
grow jealous of Lawson.  This he told me with much pleasure; and that
several of the Duke's servants, by name my Lord Barkeley [of Stratton],
Mr. Talbot, and others, had complained to my Lord, of Coventry, and would
have him out.  My Lord do acknowledge that his greatest obstacle is
Coventry.  He did seem to hint such a question as this: "Hitherto I have
been supported by the King and Chancellor against the Duke; but what if it
should come about, that it should be the Duke and Chancellor against the
King?" which, though he said it in these plain words, yet I could not
fully understand it; but may more here after.  My Lord did also tell me,
that the Duke himself at Portsmouth did thank my Lord for all his pains
and care; and that he perceived it must be the old Captains that must do
the business; and that the new ones would spoil all.  And that my Lord did
very discreetly tell the Duke (though quite against his judgement and
inclination), that, however, the King's new captains ought to be borne
with a little and encouraged. By which he will oblige that party, and
prevent, as much as may be, their envy; but he says that certainly things
will go to rack if ever the old captains should be wholly out, and the new
ones only command.  Then we fell to talk of Sir J. Minnes, of whom my Lord
hath a very slight opinion, and that at first he did come to my Lord very
displeased and sullen, and had studied and turned over all his books to
see whether it had ever been that two flags should ride together in the
main-top, but could not find it, nay, he did call his captains on board to
consult them.  So when he came by my Lord's side, he took down his flag,
and all the day did not hoist it again, but next day my Lord did tell him
that it was not so fit to ride without a flag, and therefore told him that
he should wear it in the fore-top, for it seems my Lord saw his
instructions, which were that he should not wear his flag in the maintop
in the presence of the Duke or my Lord. But that after that my Lord did
caress him, and he do believe him as much his friend as his interest will
let him.  I told my Lord of the late passage between Swan and me, and he
told me another lately between Dr. Dell and himself when he was in the
country.  At last we concluded upon dispatching all his accounts as soon
as possible, and so I parted, and to my office, where I met Sir W. Pen,
and he desired a turn with me in the garden, where he told me the day now
was fixed for his going into Ireland;--[Penn was Governor of
Kinsale.-B.]--and that whereas I had mentioned some service he could do a
friend of mine there, Saml. Pepys,

     [Mentioned elsewhere as "My cousin in Ireland."  He was son of Lord
     Chief Justice Richard Pepys.]

he told me he would most readily do what I would command him, and then
told me we must needs eat a dish of meat together before he went, and so
invited me and my wife on Sunday next.  To all which I did give a cold
consent, for my heart cannot love or have a good opinion of him since his
last playing the knave with me, but he took no notice of our difference at
all, nor I to him, and so parted, and I by water to Deptford, where I
found Sir W. Batten alone paying off the yard three quarters pay.  Thence
to dinner, where too great a one was prepared, at which I was very much
troubled, and wished I had not been there.  After dinner comes Sir J.
Minnes and some captains with him, who had been at a Councill of Warr
to-day, who tell us they have acquitted Captain Hall, who was accused of
cowardice in letting of old Winter, the Argier pyrate, go away from him
with a prize or two; and also Captain Diamond of the murder laid to him of
a man that he had struck, but he lived many months after, till being
drunk, he fell into the hold, and there broke his jaw and died, but they
say there are such bawdy articles against him as never were heard of
.  .  .  .  To the pay again, where I left them, and walked to Redriffe,
and so home, and there came Mr. Creed and Shepley to me, and staid till
night about my Lord's accounts, our proceeding to set them in order, and
so parted and I to bed.  Mr. Holliard had been with my wife to-day, and
cured her of her pain in her ear by taking out a most prodigious quantity
of hard wax that had hardened itself in the bottom of the ear, of which I
am very glad.

28th.  Up to my Lord's and my own accounts, and so to the office, where
all the forenoon sitting, and at noon by appointment to the Mitre, where
Mr. Shepley gave me and Mr. Creed, and I had my uncle Wight with us, a
dish of fish.  Thence to the office again, and there all the afternoon
till night, and so home, and after talking with my wife to bed.  This day
a genteel woman came to me, claiming kindred of me, as she had once done
before, and borrowed 10s. of me, promising to repay it at night, but I
hear nothing of her.  I shall trust her no more.  Great talk there is of a
fear of a war with the Dutch; and we have order to pitch upon twenty ships
to be forthwith set out; but I hope it is but a scarecrow to the world, to
let them see that we can be ready for them; though, God knows! the King is
not able to set out five ships at this present without great difficulty,
we neither having money, credit, nor stores.  My mind is now in a
wonderful condition of quiet and content, more than ever in all my life,
since my minding the business of my office, which I have done most
constantly; and I find it to be the very effect of my late oaths against
wine and plays, which, if God please, I will keep constant in, for now my
business is a delight to me, and brings me great credit, and my purse
encreases too.

29th (Lord's day).  Up by four o'clock, and to the settling of my own
accounts, and I do find upon my monthly ballance, which I have undertaken
to keep from month to month, that I am worth L650, the greatest sum that
ever I was yet master of.  I pray God give me a thankfull, spirit, and
care to improve and encrease it.  To church with my wife, who this day put
on her green petticoat of flowred satin, with fine white and gimp lace of
her own putting on, which is very pretty.  Home with Sir W. Pen to dinner
by appointment, and to church again in the afternoon, and then home, Mr.
Shepley coming to me about my Lord's accounts, and in the evening parted,
and we to supper again to Sir W. Pen.  Whatever the matter is, he do much
fawn upon me, and I perceive would not fall out with me, and his daughter
mighty officious to my wife, but I shall never be deceived again by him,
but do hate him and his traitorous tricks with all my heart.  It was an
invitation in order to his taking leave of us to-day, he being to go for
Ireland in a few days.  So home and prayers, and to bed.

30th.  Up betimes, and to my office, where I found Griffen's girl making
it clean, but, God forgive me! what a mind I had to her, but did not
meddle with her.  She being gone, I fell upon boring holes for me to see
from my closet into the great office, without going forth, wherein I
please myself much.  So settled to business, and at noon with my wife to
the Wardrobe, and there dined, and staid talking all the afternoon with my
Lord, and about four o'clock took coach with my wife and Lady, and went
toward my house, calling at my Lady Carteret's, who was within by chance
(she keeping altogether at Deptford for a month or two), and so we sat
with her a little.  Among other things told my Lady how my Lady Fanshaw is
fallen out with her only for speaking in behalf of the French, which my
Lady wonders at, they having been formerly like sisters, but we see there
is no true lasting friendship in the world.  Thence to my house, where I
took great pride to lead her through the Court by the hand, she being very
fine, and her page carrying up her train.  She staid a little at my house,
and then walked through the garden, and took water, and went first on
board the King's pleasure boat, which pleased her much. Then to Greenwich
Park; and with much ado she was able to walk up to the top of the hill,
and so down again, and took boat, and so through bridge to Blackfryers,
and home, she being much pleased with the ramble in every particular of
it.  So we supped with her, and then walked home, and to bed.

                              OBSERVATIONS.

This I take to be as bad a juncture as ever I observed.  The King and his
new Queen minding their pleasures at Hampton Court.  All people
discontented; some that the King do not gratify them enough; and the
others, Fanatiques of all sorts, that the King do take away their liberty
of conscience; and the height of the Bishops, who I fear will ruin all
again.  They do much cry up the manner of Sir H. Vane's death, and he
deserves it.  They clamour against the chimney-money, and say they will
not pay it without force.  And in the mean time, like to have war abroad;
and Portugall to assist, when we have not money to pay for any ordinary
layings-out at home.  Myself all in dirt about building of my house and
Sir W. Batten's a story higher.  Into a good way, fallen on minding my
business and saving money, which God encrease; and I do take great delight
in it, and see the benefit of it.  In a longing mind of going to see
Brampton, but cannot get three days time, do what I can.  In very good
health, my wife and myself.

     ETEXT EDITOR'S BOOKMARKS:

     Afeard of being louzy
     Afeard that my Lady Castlemaine will keep still with the King
     Afraid now to bring in any accounts for journeys
     As much his friend as his interest will let him
     Comb my head clean, which I found so foul with powdering
     Deliver her from the hereditary curse of child-bearing
     Discontented at the pride and luxury of the Court
     Enjoy some degree of pleasure now that we have health, money
     God forgive me! what a mind I had to her
     Hard matter to settle to business after so much leisure
     Holes for me to see from my closet into the great office
     I know not yet what that is, and am ashamed to ask
     King dined at my Lady Castlemaine's, and supped, every day
     Lady Castlemaine do speak of going to lie in at Hampton Court
     Let me blood, about sixteen ounces, I being exceedingly full
     Lust and wicked lives of the nuns heretofore in England
     Only wind do now and then torment me .  .  .  extremely
     See her look dejectedly and slighted by people already
     She also washed my feet in a bath of herbs, and so to bed
     Sir W. Pen did it like a base raskall, and so I shall remember
     Slight answer, at which I did give him two boxes on the ears
     They were not occupiers, but occupied (women)
     Trumpets were brought under the scaffold that he not be heard
     Up and took physique, but such as to go abroad with
     Will put Madam Castlemaine's nose out of joynt
     With my whip did whip him till I was not able to stir



                THE DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS M.A.  F.R.S.

            CLERK OF THE ACTS AND SECRETARY TO THE ADMIRALTY

    TRANSCRIBED FROM THE SHORTHAND MANUSCRIPT IN THE PEPYSIAN LIBRARY
 MAGDALENE COLLEGE CAMBRIDGE BY THE REV. MYNORS BRIGHT M.A. LATE FELLOW
                      AND PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE

                              (Unabridged)

                      WITH LORD BRAYBROOKE'S NOTES

                        EDITED WITH ADDITIONS BY

                        HENRY B. WHEATLEY F.S.A.

                          DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS.
                              JULY & AUGUST
                                  1662

July 1st.  To the office, and there we sat till past noon, and then
Captain Cuttance and I by water to Deptford, where the Royal James (in
which my Lord went out the last voyage, though [he] came back in the
Charles) was paying off by Sir W. Batten and Sir W. Pen.  So to dinner,
where I had Mr. Sheply to dine with us, and from thence I sent to my Lord
to know whether she should be a first rate, as the men would have her, or
a second.  He answered that we should forbear paying the officers and such
whose pay differed upon the rate of the ship, till he could speak with his
Royal Highness.  To the Pay again after dinner, and seeing of Cooper, the
mate of the ship, whom I knew in the Charles, I spoke to him about
teaching the mathematiques, and do please myself in my thoughts of
learning of him, and bade him come to me in a day or two.  Towards evening
I left them, and to Redriffe by land, Mr. Cowly, the Clerk of the Cheque,
with me, discoursing concerning the abuses of the yard, in which he did
give me much light.  So by water home, and after half an hour sitting
talking with my wife, who was afeard I did intend to go with my Lord to
fetch the Queen mother over, in which I did clear her doubts, I went to
bed by daylight, in order to my rising early to-morrow.

2nd.  Up while the chimes went four, and to put down my journal, and so to
my office, to read over such instructions as concern the officers of the
Yard; for I am much upon seeing into the miscarriages there.  By and by,
by appointment, comes Commissioner Pett; and then a messenger from Mr.
Coventry, who sits in his boat expecting us, and so we down to him at the
Tower, and there took water all, and to Deptford (he in our passage taking
notice how much difference there is between the old Captains for obedience
and order, and the King's new Captains, which I am very glad to hear him
confess); and there we went into the Store-house, and viewed first the
provisions there, and then his books, but Mr. Davis himself was not there,
he having a kinswoman in the house dead, for which, when by and by I saw
him, he do trouble himself most ridiculously, as if there was never
another woman in the world; in which so much laziness, as also in the
Clerkes of the Cheque and Survey (which after one another we did examine),
as that I do not perceive that there is one-third of their duties
performed; but I perceive, to my great content, Mr. Coventry will have
things reformed.  So Mr. Coventry to London, and Pett and I to the Pay,
where Sir Williams both were paying off the Royal James still, and so to
dinner, and to the Pay again, where I did relieve several of my Lord
Sandwich's people, but was sorry to see them so peremptory, and at every
word would, complain to my Lord, as if they shall have such a command over
my Lord.  In the evening I went forth and took a walk with Mr. Davis, and
told him what had passed at his office to-day, and did give him my advice,
and so with the rest by barge home and to bed

3rd.  Up by four o'clock and to my office till 8 o'clock, writing over two
copies of our contract with Sir W. Rider, &c., for 500 ton of hempe,
which, because it is a secret, I have the trouble of writing over as well
as drawing.  Then home to dress myself, and so to the office, where
another fray between Sir R. Ford and myself about his yarn, wherein I find
the board to yield on my side, and was glad thereof, though troubled that
the office should fall upon me of disobliging Sir Richard.  At noon we all
by invitation dined at the Dolphin with the Officers of the Ordnance;
where Sir W. Compton, Mr. O'Neale,'and other great persons, were, and a
very great dinner, but I drank as I still do but my allowance of wine.
After dinner, was brought to Sir W. Compton a gun to discharge seven
times, the best of all devices that ever I saw, and very serviceable, and
not a bawble; for it is much approved of, and many thereof made.  Thence
to my office all the afternoon as long as I could see, about setting many
businesses in order.  In the evening came Mr. Lewis to me, and very
ingeniously did enquire whether I ever did look into the business of the
Chest at Chatham;

     [Pepys gives some particulars about the Chest on November 13th,
     1662.  "The Chest at Chatham was originally planned by Sir Francis
     Drake and Sir John Hawkins in 1588, after the defeat of the Armada;
     the seamen voluntarily agreed to have 'defalked' out of their wages
     certain sums to form a fund for relief.  The property became
     considerable, as well as the abuses, and in 1802 the Chest was
     removed to Greenwich.  In 1817, the stock amounted to L300,000
     Consols."--Hist.  of Rochester, p. 346.--B.]

and after my readiness to be informed did appear to him, he did produce a
paper, wherein he stated the government of the Chest to me; and upon the
whole did tell me how it hath ever been abused, and to this day is; and
what a meritorious act it would be to look after it; which I am resolved
to do, if God bless me; and do thank him very much for it.  So home, and
after a turn or two upon the leads with my wife, who has lately had but
little of my company, since I begun to follow my business, but is
contented therewith since she sees how I spend my time, and so to bed.

4th.  Up by five o'clock, and after my journall put in order, to my office
about my business, which I am resolved to follow, for every day I see what
ground I get by it.  By and by comes Mr. Cooper, mate of the Royall
Charles, of whom I intend to learn mathematiques, and do begin with him
to-day, he being a very able man, and no great matter, I suppose, will
content him.  After an hour's being with him at arithmetique (my first
attempt being to learn the multiplication-table); then we parted till
to-morrow.  And so to my business at my office again till noon, about
which time Sir W. Warren did come to me about business, and did begin to
instruct me in the nature of fine timber and deals, telling me the nature
of every sort; and from that we fell to discourse of Sir W. Batten's
corruption and the people that he employs, and from one discourse to
another of the kind.  I was much pleased with his company, and so staid
talking with him all alone at my office till 4 in the afternoon, without
eating or drinking all day, and then parted, and I home to eat a bit, and
so back again to my office; and toward the evening came Mr. Sheply, who is
to go out of town to-morrow, and so he and I with much ado settled his
accounts with my Lord, which, though they be true and honest, yet so
obscure, that it vexes me to see in what manner they are kept.  He being
gone, and leave taken of him as of a man likely not to come to London
again a great while, I eat a bit of bread and butter, and so to bed.  This
day I sent my brother Tom, at his request, my father's old Bass Viall
which he and I have kept so long, but I fear Tom will do little good at
it.

5th.  To my office all the morning, to get things ready against our
sitting, and by and by we sat and did business all the morning, and at
noon had Sir W. Pen, who I hate with all my heart for his base treacherous
tricks, but yet I think it not policy to declare it yet, and his son
William, to my house to dinner, where was also Mr. Creed and my cozen
Harry Alcocke.  I having some venison given me a day or two ago, and so I
had a shoulder roasted, another baked, and the umbles

     [The umbles are the liver, kidneys, and other portions of the inside
     of the deer.  They were usually made into pies, and old cookery
     books contain directions for the making of 'umble pies.']

baked in a pie, and all very well done.  We were merry as I could be in
that company, and the more because I would not seem otherwise to Sir W.
Pen, he being within a day or two to go for Ireland.  After dinner he and
his son went away, and Mr. Creed would, with all his rhetoric, have
persuaded me to have gone to a play; and in good earnest I find my nature
desirous to have gone, notwithstanding my promise and my business, to
which I have lately kept myself so close, but I did refuse it, and I hope
shall ever do so, and above all things it is considerable that my mind was
never in my life in so good a condition of quiet as it has been since I
have followed my business and seen myself to get greater and greater
fitness in my employment, and honour every day more than other.  So at my
office all the afternoon, and then my mathematiques at night with Mr.
Cooper, and so to supper and to bed.

6th (Lord's day).  Lay long in bed to-day with my wife merry and pleasant,
and then rose and settled my accounts with my wife for housekeeping, and
do see that my kitchen, besides wine, fire, candle, sope, and many other
things, comes to about 30s. a week, or a little over.  To church, where
Mr. Mills made a lazy sermon.  So home to dinner, where my brother Tom
dined with me, and so my wife and I to church again in the afternoon, and
that done I walked to the Wardrobe and spent my time with Mr. Creed and
Mr. Moore talking about business; so up to supper with my Lady [Sandwich],
who tells me, with much trouble, that my Lady Castlemaine is still as
great with the King, and that the King comes as often to her as ever he
did, at which, God forgive me, I am well pleased. It began to rain, and so
I borrowed a hat and cloak of Mr. Moore and walked home, where I found
Captain Ferrer with my wife, and after speaking a matter of an hour with
him he went home and we all to bed. Jack Cole, my old friend, found me out
at the Wardrobe; and, among other things, he told me that certainly most
of the chief ministers of London would fling up their livings; and that,
soon or late, the issue thereof would be sad to the King and Court.

7th.  Up and to my office early, and there all the morning alone till
dinner, and after dinner to my office again, and about 3 o'clock with my
wife by water to Westminster, where I staid in the Hall while my wife went
to see her father and mother, and she returning we by water home again,
and by and by comes Mr. Cooper, so he and I to our mathematiques, and so
supper and to bed.  My morning's work at the office was to put the new
books of my office into order, and writing on the backsides what books
they be, and transcribing out of some old books some things into them.

8th.  At the office all the morning and dined at home, and after dinner in
all haste to make up my accounts with my Lord, which I did with some
trouble, because I had some hopes to have made a profit to myself in this
account and above what was due to me (which God forgive me in), but I
could not, but carried them to my Lord, with whom they passed well.  So to
the Wardrobe, where alone with my Lord above an hour; and he do seem still
to have his old confidence in me; and tells me to boot, that Mr. Coventry
hath spoke of me to him to great advantage; wherein I am much pleased.  By
and by comes in Mr. Coventry to visit my Lord; and so my Lord and he and I
walked together in the great chamber a good while; and I found him a most
ingenuous man and good company.  He being gone I also went home by water,
Mr. Moore with me for discourse sake, and then parted from me, Cooper
being there ready to attend me, so he and I to work till it was dark, and
then eat a bit and by daylight to bed.

9th.  Up by four o'clock, and at my multiplicacion-table hard, which is
all the trouble I meet withal in my arithmetique.  So made me ready and to
the office, where all the morning busy, and Sir W. Pen came to my office
to take his leave of me, and desiring a turn in the garden, did commit the
care of his building to me, and offered all his services to me in all
matters of mine.  I did, God forgive me! promise him all my service and
love, though the rogue knows he deserves none from me, nor do I intend to
show him any; but as he dissembles with me, so must I with him.  Dined at
home, and so to the office again, my wife with me, and while I was for an
hour making a hole behind my seat in my closet to look into the office,
she was talking to me about her going to Brampton, which I would willingly
have her to do but for the cost of it, and to stay here will be very
inconvenient because of the dirt that I must have when my house is pulled
down.  Then to my business till night, then Mr. Cooper and I to our
business, and then came Mr. Mills, the minister, to see me, which he hath
but rarely done to me, though every day almost to others of us; but he is
a cunning fellow, and knows where the good victuals is, and the good
drink, at Sir W. Batten's.  However, I used him civilly, though I love him
as I do the rest of his coat.  So to supper and to bed.

10th.  Up by four o'clock, and before I went to the office I practised my
arithmetique, and then, when my wife was up, did call her and Sarah, and
did make up a difference between them, for she is so good a servant as I
am loth to part with her.  So to the office all the morning, where very
much business, but it vexes me to see so much disorder at our table, that,
every man minding a several business, we dispatch nothing.  Dined at home
with my wife, then to the office again, and being called by Sir W. Batten,
walked to the Victualler's office, there to view all the several offices
and houses to see that they were employed in order to give the Council an
account thereof.  So after having taken an oath or two of Mr. Lewes and
Captain Brown and others I returned to the office, and there sat
despatching several businesses alone till night, and so home and by
daylight to bed.

11th.  Up by four o'clock, and hard at my multiplicacion-table, which I am
now almost master of, and so made me ready and to my office, where by and
by comes Mr. Pett, and then a messenger from Mr. Coventry, who stays in
his boat at the Tower for us.  So we to him, and down to Deptford first,
and there viewed some deals lately served in at a low price, which our
officers, like knaves, would untruly value in their worth, but we found
them good.  Then to Woolwich, and viewed well all the houses and stores
there, which lie in very great confusion for want of storehouses, and then
to Mr. Ackworth's and Sheldon's to view their books, which we found not to
answer the King's service and security at all as to the stores.  Then to
the Ropeyard, and there viewed the hemp, wherein we found great
corruption, and then saw a trial between Sir R. Ford's yarn and our own,
and found great odds.  So by water back again.  About five in the
afternoon to Whitehall, and so to St. James's; and at Mr. Coventry's
chamber, which is very neat and fine, we had a pretty neat dinner, and
after dinner fell to discourse of business and regulation, and do think of
many things that will put matters into better order, and upon the whole my
heart rejoices to see Mr. Coventry so ingenious, and able, and studious to
do good, and with much frankness and respect to Mr. Pett and myself
particularly.  About 9 o'clock we broke up after much discourse and many
things agreed on in order to our business of regulation, and so by water
(landing Mr. Pett at the Temple) I went home and to bed.

12th.  Up by five o'clock, and put things in my house in order to be laid
up, against my workmen come on Monday to take down the top of my house,
which trouble I must go through now, but it troubles me much to think of
it.  So to my office, where till noon we sat, and then I to dinner and to
the office all the afternoon with much business.  At night with Cooper at
arithmetique, and then came Mr. Creed about my Lord's accounts to even
them, and he gone I to supper and to bed.

13th (Lord's day) .  .  .  .  I had my old pain all yesterday and this
morning, and so kept my bed all this morning.  So up and after dinner and
some of my people to church, I set about taking down my books and papers
and making my chamber fit against to-morrow to have the people come to
work in pulling down the top of my house.  In the evening I walked to the
garden and sent for Mr. Turner (who yesterday did give me occasion of
speaking to him about the difference between him and me), and I told him
my whole mind, and how it was in my power to do him a discourtesy about
his place of petty purveyance, and at last did make him see (I think) that
it was his concernment to be friendly to me and what belongs to me. After
speaking my mind to him and he to me, we walked down and took boat at the
Tower and to Deptford, on purpose to sign and seal a couple of warrants,
as justice of peace in Kent, against one Annis, who is to be tried next
Tuesday, at Maidstone assizes, for stealing some lead out of Woolwich
Yard.  Going and coming I did discourse with Mr. Turner about the faults
of our management of the business of our office, of which he is sensible,
but I believe is a very knave.  Come home I found a rabbit at the fire,
and so supped well, and so to my journall and to bed.

14th.  Up by 4 o'clock and to my arithmetique, and so to my office till 8,
then to Thames Street along with old Mr. Green, among the tarr-men, and
did instruct myself in the nature and prices of tarr, but could not get
Stockholm for the use of the office under L10 15s. per last, which is a
great price.  So home, and at noon Dr. T. Pepys came to me, and he and I
to the Exchequer, and so back to dinner, where by chance comes Mr. Pierce,
the chyrurgeon, and then Mr. Battersby, the minister, and then Mr. Dun,
and it happened that I had a haunch of venison boiled, and so they were
very wellcome and merry; but my simple Dr. do talk so like a fool that I
am weary of him.  They being gone, to my office again, and there all the
afternoon, and at night home and took a few turns with my wife in the
garden and so to bed.  My house being this day almost quite untiled in
order to its rising higher.  This night I began to put on my waistcoat
also.  I found the pageant in Cornhill taken down, which was pretty
strange.

15th.  Up by 4 o'clock, and after doing some business as to settling my
papers at home, I went to my office, and there busy till sitting time. So
at the office all the morning, where J. Southern, Mr. Coventry's clerk,
did offer me a warrant for an officer to sign which I desired, claiming it
for my clerk's duty, which however did trouble me a little to be put upon
it, but I did it.  We broke up late, and I to dinner at home, where my
brother Tom and Mr. Cooke came and dined with me, but I could not be merry
for my business, but to my office again after dinner, and they two and my
wife abroad.  In the evening comes Mr. Cooper, and I took him by water on
purpose to tell me things belonging to ships, which was time well spent,
and so home again, and my wife came home and tells me she has been very
merry and well pleased with her walk with them.  About bedtime it fell
a-raining, and the house being all open at top, it vexed me; but there was
no help for it.

16th.  In the morning I found all my ceilings, spoiled with rain last
night, so that I fear they must be all new whited when the work is done.
Made me ready and to my office, and by and by came Mr. Moore to me, and so
I went home and consulted about drawing up a fair state of all my Lord's
accounts, which being settled, he went away, and I fell to writing of it
very neatly, and it was very handsome and concisely done.  At noon to my
Lord's with it, but found him at dinner, and some great company with him,
Mr. Edward Montagu and his brother, and Mr. Coventry, and after dinner he
went out with them, and so I lost my labour; but dined with Mr. Moore and
the people below, who after dinner fell to talk of Portugall rings, and
Captain Ferrers offered five or six to sell, and I seeming to like a ring
made of a coco-nutt with a stone done in it, he did offer and would give
it me.  By and by we went to Mr. Creed's lodging, and there got a dish or
two of sweetmeats, and I seeing a very neat leaden standish to carry
papers, pen, and ink in when one travels I also got that of him, and that
done I went home by water and to finish some of my Lord's business, and so
early to bed.  This day I was told that my Lady Castlemaine (being quite
fallen out with her husband) did yesterday go away from him, with all her
plate, jewels, and other best things; and is gone to Richmond to a brother
of her's; which, I am apt to think, was a design to get out of town, that
the King might come at her the better. But strange it is how for her
beauty I am willing to construe all this to the best and to pity her
wherein it is to her hurt, though I know well enough she is a whore.

17th.  To my office, and by and by to our sitting; where much business.
Mr. Coventry took his leave, being to go with the Duke over for the
Queen-Mother.  I dined at home, and so to my Lord's, where I presented him
with a true state of all his accounts to last Monday, being the 14th of
July, which did please him, and to my great joy I continue in his great
esteem and opinion.  I this day took a general acquittance from my Lord to
the same day.  So that now I have but very few persons to deal withall for
money in the world.  Home and found much business to be upon my hands, and
was late at the office writing letters by candle light, which is rare at
this time of the year, but I do it with much content and joy, and then I
do please me to see that I begin to have people direct themselves to me in
all businesses.  Very late I was forced to send for Mr. Turner, Smith,
Young, about things to be sent down early to-morrow on board the King's
pleasure boat, and so to bed with my head full of business, but well
contented in mind as ever in my life.

18th.  Up very early, and got a-top of my house, seeing the design of my
work, and like it very well, and it comes into my head to have my
dining-room wainscoated, which will be very pretty.  By-and-by by water to
Deptford, to put several things in order, being myself now only left in
town, and so back again to the office, and there doing business all the
morning and the afternoon also till night, and then comes Cooper for my
mathematiques, but, in good earnest, my head is so full of business that I
cannot understand it as otherwise I should do.  At night to bed, being
much troubled at the rain coming into my house, the top being open.

19th.  Up early and to some business, and my wife coming to me I staid
long with her discoursing about her going into the country, and as she is
not very forward so am I at a great loss whether to have her go or no
because of the charge, and yet in some considerations I would be glad she
was there, because of the dirtiness of my house and the trouble of having
of a family there.  So to my office, and there all the morning, and then
to dinner and my brother Tom dined with me only to see me.  In the
afternoon I went upon the river to look after some tarr I am sending down
and some coles, and so home again; it raining hard upon the water, I put
ashore and sheltered myself, while the King came by in his barge, going
down towards the Downs to meet the Queen: the Duke being gone yesterday.
But methought it lessened my esteem of a king, that he should not be able
to command the rain.  Home, and Cooper coming (after I had dispatched
several letters) to my mathematiques, and so at night to bed to a chamber
at Sir W. Pen's, my own house being so foul that I cannot lie there any
longer, and there the chamber lies so as that I come into it over my leads
without going about, but yet I am not fully content with it, for there
will be much trouble to have servants running over the leads to and fro.

20th (Lord's day).  My wife and I lay talking long in bed, and at last she
is come to be willing to stay two months in the country, for it is her
unwillingness to stay till the house is quite done that makes me at a loss
how to have her go or stay.  But that which troubles me most is that it
has rained all this morning so furiously that I fear my house is all over
water, and with that expectation I rose and went into my house and find
that it is as wet as the open street, and that there is not one
dry-footing above nor below in my house.  So I fitted myself for dirt, and
removed all my books to the office and all day putting up and restoring
things, it raining all day long as hard within doors as without.  At last
to dinner, we had a calf's head and bacon at my chamber at Sir W. Pen's,
and there I and my wife concluded to have her go and her two maids and the
boy, and so there shall be none but Will and I left at home, and so the
house will be freer, for it is impossible to have anybody come into my
house while it is in this condition, and with this resolution all the
afternoon we were putting up things in the further cellar against next
week for them to be gone, and my wife and I into the office and there
measured a soiled flag that I had found there, and hope to get it to
myself, for it has not been demanded since I came to the office.  But my
wife is not hasty to have it, but rather to stay a while longer and see
the event whether it will be missed or no.  At night to my office, and
there put down this day's passages in my journall, and read my oaths, as I
am obliged every Lord's day.  And so to Sir W. Pen's to my chamber again,
being all in dirt and foul, and in fear of having catched cold today with
dabbling in the water.  But what has vexed me to-day was that by carrying
the key to Sir W. Pen's last night, it could not in the midst of all my
hurry to carry away my books and things, be found, and at last they found
it in the fire that we made last night.  So to bed.

21st. Up early, and though I found myself out of order and cold, and the
weather cold and likely to rain, yet upon my promise and desire to do what
I intended, I did take boat and down to Greenwich, to Captain Cocke's, who
hath a most pleasant seat, and neat.  Here I drank wine, and eat some
fruit off the trees; and he showed a great rarity, which was two or three
of a great number of silver dishes and plates, which he bought of an
embassador that did lack money, in the edge or rim of which was placed
silver and gold medalls, very ancient, and I believe wrought, by which, if
they be, they are the greatest rarity that ever I saw in my life, and I
will show Mr. Crumlum them.  Thence to Woolwich to the Rope-yard; and
there looked over several sorts of hemp, and did fall upon my great survey
of seeing the working and experiments of the strength and the charge in
the dressing of every sort; and I do think have brought it to so great a
certainty, as I have done the King great service in it: and do purpose to
get it ready against the Duke's coming to town to present to him.  I
breakfasted at Mr. Falconer's well, and much pleased with my inquiries.
Thence to the dock, where we walked in Mr. Shelden's garden, eating more
fruit, and drinking, and eating figs, which were very good, and talking
while the Royal James was bringing towards the dock, and then we went out
and saw the manner and trouble of docking such a ship, which yet they
could not do, but only brought her head into the Dock, and so shored her
up till next tide.  But, good God!  what a deal of company was there from
both yards to help to do it, when half the company would have done it as
well.  But I see it is impossible for the King to have things done as
cheap as other men.  Thence by water, and by and by landing at the
riverside somewhere among the reeds, we walked to Greenwich, where to
Cocke's house again and walked in the garden, and then in to his lady, who
I find is still pretty, but was now vexed and did speak very discontented
and angry to the Captain for disappointing a gentleman that he had invited
to dinner, which he took like a wise man and said little, but she was very
angry, which put me clear out of countenance that I was sorry I went in.
So after I had eat still some more fruit I took leave of her in the garden
plucking apricots for preserving, and went away and so by water home, and
there Mr. Moore coming and telling me that my Lady goes into the country
to-morrow, I carried my wife by coach to take her leave of her father, I
staying in Westminster Hall, she going away also this week, and thence to
my Lady's, where we staid and supped with her, but found that my Lady was
truly angry and discontented with us for our neglecting to see her as we
used to do, but after a little she was pleased as she was used to be, at
which we were glad.  So after supper home to bed.

22d.  Among my workmen early: then to the office, and there I had letters
from the Downs from Mr. Coventry; who tells me of the foul weather they
had last Sunday, that drove them back from near Boulogne, whither they
were going for the Queen, back again to the Downs, with the loss of their
cables, sayles, and masts; but are all safe, only my Lord Sandwich, who
went before with the yachts; they know not what is become of him, which do
trouble me much; but I hope he got ashore before the storm begun; which
God grant!  All day at the office, only at home at dinner, where I was
highly angry with my wife for her keys being out of the way, but they were
found at last, and so friends again.  All the afternoon answering letters
and writing letters, and at night to Mr. Coventry an ample letter in
answer to all his and the Duke's business.  Late at night at the office,
where my business is great, being now all alone in town, but I shall go
through it with pleasure.  So home and to bed.

23rd.  This morning angry a little in the morning, and my house being so
much out of order makes me a little pettish.  I went to the office, and
there dispatched business by myself, and so again in the afternoon; being
a little vexed that my brother Tom, by his neglect, do fail to get a coach
for my wife and maid this week, by which she will not be at Brampton
Feast, to meet my Lady at my father's.  At night home, and late packing up
things in order to their going to Brampton to-morrow, and so to bed, quite
out of sorts in my mind by reason that the weather is so bad, and my house
all full of wet, and the trouble of going from one house to another to Sir
W. Pen's upon every occasion.  Besides much disturbed by reason of the
talk up and down the town, that my Lord Sandwich is lost; but I trust in
God the contrary.

24th.  Up early this morning sending the things to the carrier's, and my
boy, who goes to-day, though his mistress do not till next Monday.  All
the morning at the office, Sir W. Batten being come to town last night. I
hear, to my great content, that my Lord Sandwich is safe landed in France.
Dined at our chamber, where W. Bowyer with us, and after much simple talk
with him, I left him, and to my office, where all the afternoon busy till
9 at night, among other things improving my late experiment at Woolwich
about hemp.  So home and to bed.

25th.  At the office all the morning, reading Mr. Holland's' discourse of
the Navy, lent me by Mr. Turner, and am much pleased with them, they
hitting the very diseases of the Navy, which we are troubled with
now-a-days.  I shall bestow writing of them over and much reading thereof.
This morning Sir W. Batten came in to the office and desired to speak with
me; he began by telling me that he observed a strangeness between him and
me of late, and would know the reason of it, telling me he heard that I
was offended with merchants coming to his house and making contracts
there.  I did tell him that as a friend I had spoke of it to Sir W. Pen
and desired him to take a time to tell him of it, and not as a backbiter,
with which he was satisfied, but I find that Sir W. Pen has played the
knave with me, and not told it from me as a friend, but in a bad sense.
He also told me that he heard that exceptions were taken at his carrying
his wife down to Portsmouth, saying that the King should not pay for it,
but I denied that I had spoke of it, nor did I.  At last he desired the
difference between our wives might not make a difference between us, which
I was exceedingly glad to hear, and do see every day the fruit of looking
after my business, which I pray God continue me in, for I do begin to be
very happy.  Dined at home, and so to the office all the afternoon again,
and at night home and to bed.

26th.  Sir W. Batten, Mr. Pett, and I at the office sitting all the
morning.  So dined at home, and then to my office again, causing the model
hanging in my chamber to be taken down and hung up in my office, for fear
of being spoilt by the workmen, and for my own convenience of studying it.
This afternoon I had a letter from Mr. Creed, who hath escaped narrowly in
the King's yacht, and got safe to the Downs after the late storm; and that
there the King do tell him, that he is sure that my Lord is landed at
Callis safe, of which being glad, I sent news thereof to my Lord Crew, and
by the post to my Lady into the country.  This afternoon I went to
Westminster; and there hear that the King and Queen intend to come to
White Hall from Hampton Court next week, for all winter.  Thence to Mrs.
Sarah, and there looked over my Lord's lodgings, which are very pretty;
and White Hall garden and the Bowling-ally (where lords and ladies are now
at bowles), in brave condition.  Mrs. Sarah told me how the falling out
between my Lady Castlemaine and her Lord was about christening of the
child lately,

     [The boy was born in June at Lady Castlemaine's house in King
     Street.  By the direction of Lord Castlemaine, who had become a
     Roman Catholic, the child was baptized by a priest, and this led to
     a final separation between husband and wife.  Some days afterwards
     the child was again baptized by the rector of St. Margaret's,
     Westminster, in presence of the godparents, the King, Aubrey De
     Vere, Earl of Oxford, and Barbara, Countess of Suffolk, first Lady
     of the Bedchamber to the Queen and Lady Castlemaine's aunt.  The
     entry in the register of St. Margaret's is as follows: "1662 June
     18 Charles Palmer Ld Limbricke, s. to ye right honorble Roger Earl
     of Castlemaine by Barbara" (Steinman's "Memoir of Barbara, Duchess
     of Cleveland," 1871, p.  33).  The child was afterwards called
     Charles Fitzroy, and was created Duke of Southampton in 1674.  He
     succeeded his mother in the dukedom of Cleveland in 1709, and died
     1730.]

which he would have, and had done by a priest: and, some days after, she
had it again christened by a minister; the King, and Lord of Oxford, and
Duchesse of Suffolk, being witnesses: and christened with a proviso, that
it had not already been christened.  Since that she left her Lord,
carrying away every thing in the house; so much as every dish, and cloth,
and servant but the porter.  He is gone discontented into France, they
say, to enter a monastery; and now she is coming back again to her house
in Kingstreet.  But I hear that the Queen did prick her out of the list
presented her by the King;

     ["By the King's command Lord Clarendon, much against his
     inclination, had twice visited his royal mistress with a view of
     inducing her, by persuasions which he could not justify, to give way
     to the King's determination to have Lady Castlemaine of her
     household .  .  .  .  Lord Clarendon has given a full account of all
     that transpired between himself, the King and the Queen, on this
     very unpleasant business ('Continuation of Life of Clarendon,' 1759,
     ff. 168-178)."--Steinman's Memoir of Duchess of Cleveland, p. 35.
     "The day at length arrived when Lady Castlemaine was to be formally
     admitted a Lady of the Bedchamber.  The royal warrant, addressed to
     the Lord Chamberlain, bears date June 1, 1663, and includes with
     that of her ladyship, the names of the Duchess of Buckingham, the
     Countesses of Chesterfield and Bath, and the Countess Mareshall.  A
     separate warrant of the same day directs his lordship to admit the
     Countess of Suffolk as Groom of the Stole and first Lady of the
     Bedchamber, to which undividable offices she had, with the
     additional ones of Mistress of the Robes and Keeper of the Privy
     Purse, been nominated by a warrant dated April 2, 1662, wherein the
     reception of her oath is expressly deferred until the Queen's
     household shall be established.  We here are furnished with the
     evidence that Charles would not sign the warrants for the five until
     Catherine had withdrawn her objection to his favourite one."--
     Addenda to Steinman's Memoir of Duchess of Cleveland (privately
     printed), 1874, p. i.]

desiring that she might have that favour done her, or that he would send
her from whence she come: and that the King was angry and the Queen
discontented a whole day and night upon it; but that the King hath
promised to have nothing to do with her hereafter.  But I cannot believe
that the King can fling her off so, he loving her too well: and so I writ
this night to my Lady to be my opinion; she calling her my lady, and the
lady I admire.  Here I find that my Lord hath lost the garden to his
lodgings, and that it is turning into a tennis-court.  Hence by water to
the Wardrobe to see how all do there, and so home to supper and to bed.

27th (Lord's day).  At church alone in the pew in the morning.  In the
afternoon by water I carried my wife to Westminster, where she went to
take leave of her father,

     [Mrs. Pepys's father was Alexander Marchant, Sieur de St. Michel, a
     scion of a good family in Anjou.  Having turned Huguenot at the age
     of twenty-one, his father disinherited him, and he was left
     penniless.  He came over in the retinue of Henrietta Maria, on her
     marriage with Charles I., as one of her Majesty's gentlemen carvers,
     but the Queen dismissed him on finding out he was a Protestant and
     did not go to mass.  He described himself as being captain and major
     of English troops in Italy and Flanders.--Wheatley's Pepys and the
     World he lived in, pp. 6, 250.  He was full of schemes; see
     September 22nd, 1663, for account of his patent for curing smoky
     chimneys.]

and I to walk in the Park, which is now every day more and more pleasant,
by the new works upon it.  Here meeting with Laud Crispe, I took him to
the farther end, and sat under a tree in a corner, and there sung some
songs, he singing well, but no skill, and so would sing false sometimes.
Then took leave of him, and found my wife at my Lord's lodging, and so
took her home by water, and to supper in Sir W. Pen's balcony, and Mrs.
Keene with us, and then came my wife's brother, and then broke up, and to
bed.

28th.  Up early, and by six o'clock, after my wife was ready, I walked
with her to the George, at Holborn Conduit, where the coach stood ready to
carry her and her maid to Bugden, but that not being ready, my brother Tom
staid with them to see them gone, and so I took a troubled though willing
goodbye, because of the bad condition of my house to have a family in it.
So I took leave of her and walked to the waterside, and there took boat
for the Tower; hearing that the Queen-Mother is come this morning already
as high as Woolwich: and that my Lord Sandwich was with her; at which my
heart was glad, and I sent the waterman, though yet not very certain of
it, to my wife to carry news thereof to my Lady.  So to my office all the
morning abstracting the Duke's instructions in the margin thereof.  So
home all alone to dinner, and then to the office again, and in the evening
Cooper comes, and he being gone, to my chamber a little troubled and
melancholy, to my lute late, and so to bed, Will lying there at my feet,
and the wench in my house in Will's bed.

29th.  Early up, and brought all my money, which is near L300, out of my
house into this chamber; and so to the office, and there we sat all the
morning, Sir George Carteret and Mr. Coventry being come from sea.  This
morning among other things I broached the business of our being abused
about flags, which I know doth trouble Sir W. Batten, but I care not. At
noon being invited I went with Sir George and Mr. Coventry to Sir W.
Batten's to dinner, and there merry, and very friendly to Sir Wm. and he
to me, and complies much with me, but I know he envies me, and I do not
value him.  To the office again, and in the evening walked to Deptford
(Cooper with me talking of mathematiques), to send a fellow to prison for
cutting of buoy ropes, and to see the difference between the flags sent in
now-a-days, and I find the old ones, which were much cheaper, to be wholly
as good.  So I took one of a sort with me, and Mr. Wayth accompanying of
me a good way, talking of the faults of the Navy, I walked to Redriffe
back, and so home by water, and after having done, late, at the office, I
went to my chamber and to bed.

30th.  Up early, and to my office, where Cooper came to me and begun his
lecture upon the body of a ship, which my having of a modell in the office
is of great use to me, and very pleasant and useful it is.  Then by water
to White Hall, and there waited upon my Lord Sandwich; and joyed him, at
his lodgings, of his safe coming home after all his danger, which he
confesses to be very great.  And his people do tell me how bravely my Lord
did carry himself, while my Lord Crofts did cry; and I perceive it is all
the town talk how poorly he carried himself.  But the best was of one Mr.
Rawlins, a courtier, that was with my Lord; and in the greatest danger
cried, "God damn me, my Lord, I won't give you three-pence for your place
now."  But all ends in the honour of the pleasure-boats; which, had they
not been very good boats, they could never have endured the sea as they
did.  Thence with Captain Fletcher, of the Gage, in his ship's boat with 8
oars (but every ordinary oars outrowed us) to Woolwich, expecting to find
Sir W. Batten there upon his survey, but he is not come, and so we got a
dish of steaks at the White Hart, while his clarkes and others were
feasting of it in the best room of the house, and after dinner playing at
shuffleboard,

     [The game of shovelboard was played by two players (each provided
     with five coins) on a smooth heavy table.  On the table were marked
     with chalk a series of lines, and the play was to strike the coin on
     the edge of the table with the hand so that it rested between these
     lines.  Shakespeare uses the expression "shove-groat shilling," as
     does Ben Jonson.  These shillings were usually smooth and worn for
     the convenience of playing.  Strutt says ("Sports and Pastimes"), "I
     have seen a shovel-board table at a low public house in Benjamin
     Street, near Clerkenwell Green, which is about three feet in breadth
     and thirty-nine feet two inches in length, and said to be the
     longest at this time in London."]

and when at last they heard I was there, they went about their survey. But
God help the King!  what surveys, shall be taken after this manner! I
after dinner about my business to the Rope-yard, and there staid till
night, repeating several trialls of the strength, wayte, waste, and other
things of hemp, by which I have furnished myself enough to finish my
intended business of stating the goodness of all sorts of hemp.  At night
home by boat with Sir W. Warren, who I landed by the way, and so being
come home to bed.

31st.  Up early and among my workmen, I ordering my rooms above, which
will please me very well.  So to my office, and there we sat all the
morning, where I begin more and more to grow considerable there.  At noon
Mr. Coventry and I by his coach to the Exchange together; and in
Lumbard-street met Captain Browne of the Rosebush: at which he was cruel
angry: and did threaten to go to-day to the Duke at Hampton Court, and get
him turned out because he was not sailed.  But at the Exchange we resolved
of eating a bit together, which we did at the Ship behind the Exchange,
and so took boat to Billingsgate, and went down on board the Rosebush at
Woolwich, and found all things out of order, but after frightening the
officers there, we left them to make more haste, and so on shore to the
yard, and did the same to the officers of the yard, that the ship was not
dispatched.  Here we found Sir W. Batten going about his survey, but so
poorly and unlike a survey of the Navy, that I am ashamed of it, and so is
Mr. Coventry.  We found fault with many things, and among others the
measure of some timber now serving in which Mr. Day the assistant told us
of, and so by water home again, all the way talking of the office business
and other very pleasant discourse, and much proud I am of getting thus far
into his books, which I think I am very much in.  So home late, and it
being the last day of the month, I did make up my accounts before I went
to bed, and found myself worth about L650, for which the Lord God be
praised, and so to bed.  I drank but two glasses of wine this day, and yet
it makes my head ake all night, and indisposed me all the next day, of
which I am glad.  I am now in town only with my man Will and Jane, and
because my house is in building, I do lie at Sir W. Pen's house, he being
gone to Ireland.  My wife, her maid and boy gone to Brampton.  I am very
well entered into the business and esteem of the office, and do ply it
close, and find benefit by it.

                          DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS.
                                 AUGUST
                                  1662

August 1st.  Up, my head aching, and to my office, where Cooper read me
another lecture upon my modell very pleasant.  So to my business all the
morning, which increases by people coming now to me to the office.  At
noon to the Exchange, where meeting Mr. Creed and Moore we three to a
house hard by (which I was not pleased with) to dinner, and after dinner
and some discourse ordinary by coach home, it raining hard, and so at the
office all the afternoon till evening to my chamber, where, God forgive
me, I was sorry to hear that Sir W. Pen's maid Betty was gone away
yesterday, for I was in hopes to have had a bout with her before she had
gone, she being very pretty.  I had also a mind to my own wench, but I
dare not for fear she should prove honest and refuse and then tell my
wife.  I staid up late, putting things in order for my going to Chatham
to-morrow, and so to bed, being in pain .  .  .  with the little riding in
a coach to-day from the Exchange, which do trouble me.

2nd.  Up early, and got me ready in my riding clothes, and so to the
office, and there wrote letters to my father and wife against night, and
then to the business of my office, which being done, I took boat with
Will, and down to Greenwich, where Captain Cocke not being at home I was
vexed, and went to walk in the Park till he come thither to me: and Will's
forgetting to bring my boots in the boat did also vex me, for I was forced
to send the boat back again for them.  I to Captain Cocke's along with him
to dinner, where I find his lady still pretty, but not so good a humour as
I thought she was.  We had a plain, good dinner, and I see they do live
very frugally.  I eat among other fruit much mulberrys, a thing I have not
eat of these many years, since I used to be at Ashted, at my cozen
Pepys's.  After dinner we to boat, and had a pleasant passage down to
Gravesend, but it was nine o'clock before we got thither, so that we were
in great doubt what to do, whether to stay there or no; and the rather
because I was afeard to ride, because of my pain .  .  . ; but at the
Swan, finding Mr. Hemson and Lieutenant Carteret of the Foresight come to
meet me, I borrowed Mr. Hemson's horse, and he took another, and so we
rode to Rochester in the dark, and there at the Crown Mr. Gregory, Barrow,
and others staid to meet me.  So after a glass of wine, we to our barge,
that was ready for me, to the Hill-house, where we soon went to bed,
before we slept I telling upon discourse Captain Cocke the manner of my
being cut of the stone, which pleased him much.  So to sleep.

3rd (Lord's day).  Up early, and with Captain Cocke to the dock-yard, a
fine walk, and fine weather.  Where we walked till Commissioner Pett come
to us, and took us to his house, and showed us his garden and fine things,
and did give us a fine breakfast of bread and butter, and sweetmeats and
other things with great choice, and strong drinks, with which I could not
avoyde making my head ake, though I drank but little. Thither came Captain
Allen of the Foresight, and the officers of the yard to see me.  Thence by
and by to church, by coach, with the Commissioner, and had a dull sermon.
A full church, and some pretty women in it; among others, Beck Allen, who
was a bride-maid to a new married couple that came to church to-day, and,
which was pretty strange, sat in a pew hung with mourning for a mother of
the bride's, which methinks should have been taken down.  After dinner
going out of the church saluted Mrs. Pett, who came after us in the coach
to church, and other officers' wives.  The Commissioner staid at dinner
with me, and we had a good dinner, better than I would have had, but I saw
there was no helping of it.  After dinner the Commissioner and I left the
company and walked in the garden at the Hill-house, which is very
pleasant, and there talked of our businesses and matters of the navy.  So
to church again, where quite weary, and so after sermon walked with him to
the yard up and down and the fields, and saw the place designed for the
wet dock.  And so to his house, and had a syllabub, and saw his closet,
which come short of what I expected, but there was fine modells of ships
in it indeed, whose worth I could not judge of.  At night walked home to
the Hill-house, Mr. Barrow with me, talking of the faults of the yard,
walking in the fields an hour or two, and so home to supper, and so
Captain Cocke and I to bed.  This day among other stories he told me how
despicable a thing it is to be a hangman in Poland, although it be a place
of credit.  And that, in his time, there was some repairs to be made of
the gallows there, which was very fine of stone; but nobody could be got
to mend it till the Burgomaster, or Mayor of the town, with all the
companies of those trades which were necessary to be used about those
repairs, did go in their habits with flags, in solemn procession to the
place, and there the Burgomaster did give the first blow with the hammer
upon the wooden work; and the rest of the Masters of the Companys upon the
works belonging to their trades; that so workmen might not be ashamed to
be employed upon doing of the gallows' works.

4th.  Up by four o'clock in the morning and walked to the Dock, where
Commissioner Pett and I took barge and went to the guardships and mustered
them, finding them but badly manned; thence to the Sovereign, which we
found kept in good order and very clean, which pleased us well, but few of
the officers on board.  Thence to the Charles, and were troubled to see
her kept so neglectedly by the boatswain Clements, who I always took for a
very good officer; it is a very brave ship.  Thence to Upnor Castle, and
there went up to the top, where there is a fine prospect, but of very
small force; so to the yard, and there mustered the whole ordinary, where
great disorder by multitude of servants and old decrepid men, which must
be remedied.  So to all the storehouses and viewed the stores of all sorts
and the hemp, where we found Captain Cocke's (which he came down to see
along with me) very bad, and some others, and with much content (God
forgive me) I did hear by the Clerk of the Ropeyard how it was by Sir W.
Batten's private letter that one parcel of Alderman Barker's' was
received.  At two o'clock to dinner to the Hill-house, and after dinner
dispatched many people's business, and then to the yard again, and looked
over Mr. Gregory's and Barrow's houses to see the matter of difference
between them concerning an alteration that Barrow would make, which I
shall report to the board, but both their houses very pretty, and deserve
to be so, being well kept.  Then to a trial of several sorts of hemp, but
could not perform it here so well as at Woolwich, but we did do it pretty
well.  So took barge at the dock and to Rochester, and there Captain Cocke
and I and our two men took coach about 8 at night and to Gravesend, where
it was very dark before we got thither to the Swan; and there, meeting
with Doncaster, an old waterman of mine above bridge, we eat a short
supper, being very merry with the drolling, drunken coachman that brought
us, and so took water.  It being very dark, and the wind rising, and our
waterman unacquainted with this part of the river, so that we presently
cast upon the Essex shore, but got off again, and so, as well as we could,
went on, but I in such fear that I could not sleep till we came to Erith,
and there it begun to be calm, and the stars to shine, and so I began to
take heart again, and the rest too, and so made shift to slumber a little.
Above Woolwich we lost our way, and went back to Blackwall, and up and
down, being guided by nothing but the barking of a dog, which we had
observed in passing by Blackwall, and so,

5th.  Got right again with much ado, after two or three circles and so on,
and at Greenwich set in Captain Cocke, and I set forward, hailing to all
the King's ships at Deptford, but could not wake any man: so that we could
have done what we would with their ships.  At last waked one man; but it
was a merchant ship, the Royall Catharine: so to the Towerdock and home,
where the girl sat up for me.  It was about three o'clock, and putting Mr.
Boddam out of my bed, went to bed, and lay till nine o'clock, and so to
the office, where we sat all the morning, and I did give some accounts of
my service.  Dined alone at home, and was glad my house is begun tiling.
And to the office again all the afternoon, till it was so dark that I
could not see hardly what it is that I now set down when I write this
word, and so went to my chamber and to bed, being sleepy.

6th.  Up early, and, going to my office, met Sir G. Carteret in coming
through the yard, and so walked a good while talking with him about Sir W.
Batten, and find that he is going down the wind in every body's esteem,
and in that of his honesty by this letter that he wrote to Captn. Allen
concerning Alderman Barker's hemp.  Thence by water to White Hall; and so
to St. James's; but there found Mr. Coventry gone to Hampton Court.  So to
my Lord's; and he is also gone: this being a great day at the Council
about some business at the Council before the King.  Here I met with Mr.
Pierce, the chyrurgeon, who told me how Mr. Edward Montagu hath lately had
a duell with Mr. Cholmely, that is first gentleman-usher to the Queen, and
was a messenger from the King to her in Portugall, and is a fine
gentleman; but had received many affronts from Mr. Montagu, and some
unkindness from my Lord, upon his score (for which I am sorry).  He proved
too hard for Montagu, and drove him so far backward that he fell into a
ditch, and dropt his sword, but with honour would take no advantage over
him; but did give him his life: and the world says Mr. Montagu did carry
himself very poorly in the business, and hath lost his honour for ever
with all people in it, of which I am very glad, in hopes that it will
humble him.  I hear also that he hath sent to my Lord to borrow L400,
giving his brother Harvey's' security for it, and that my Lord will lend
it him, for which I am sorry.  Thence home, and at my office all the
morning, and dined at home, and can hardly keep myself from having a mind
to my wench, but I hope I shall not fall to such a shame to myself.  All
the afternoon also at my office, and did business. In the evening came Mr.
Bland the merchant to me, who has lived long in Spain, and is concerned in
the business of Tangier, who did discourse with me largely of it, and
after he was gone did send me three or four printed things that he hath
wrote of trade in general and of Tangier particularly, but I do not find
much in them.  This afternoon Mr. Waith was with me, and did tell me much
concerning the Chest, which I am resolved to look into; and I perceive he
is sensible of Sir W. Batten's carriage; and is pleased to see any thing
work against him.  Who, poor man, is, I perceive, much troubled, and did
yesterday morning walk in the garden with me, did tell me he did see there
was a design of bringing another man in his room, and took notice of my
sorting myself with others, and that we did business by ourselves without
him.  Part of which is true, but I denied, and truly, any design of doing
him any such wrong as that.  He told me he did not say it particularly of
me, but he was confident there was somebody intended to be brought in,
nay, that the trayne was laid before Sir W. Pen went, which I was glad to
hear him say. Upon the whole I see he perceives himself tottering, and
that he is suspected, and would be kind to me, but I do my business in the
office and neglect him.  At night writing in my study a mouse ran over my
table, which I shut up fast under my shelf's upon my table till to-morrow,
and so home and to bed.

7th.  Up by four o'clock and to my office, and by and by Mr. Cooper comes
and to our modell, which pleases me more and more.  At this till 8
o'clock, and so we sat in the office and staid all the morning, my
interest still growing, for which God be praised.  This morning I got
unexpectedly the Reserve for Mr. Cooper to be maister of, which was only
by taking an opportune time to motion [it], which is one good effect of my
being constant at the office, that nothing passes without me; and I have
the choice of my own time to propose anything I would have.  Dined at
home, and to the office again at my business all the afternoon till night,
and so to supper and to bed.  It being become a pleasure to me now-a-days
to follow my business, and the greatest part may be imputed to my drinking
no wine, and going to no plays.

8th.  Up by four o'clock in the morning, and at five by water to Woolwich,
there to see the manner of tarring, and all the morning looking to see the
several proceedings in making of cordage, and other things relating to
that sort of works, much to my satisfaction.  At noon came Mr. Coventry on
purpose from Hampton Court to see the same, and dined with Mr. Falconer,
and after dinner to several experiments of Hemp, and particularly some
Milan hemp that is brought over ready dressed.  Thence we walked talking,
very good discourse all the way to Greenwich, and I do find most excellent
discourse from him.  Among other things, his rule of suspecting every man
that proposes any thing to him to be a knave; or, at least, to have some
ends of his own in it.  Being led thereto by the story of Sir John
Millicent, that would have had a patent from King James for every man to
have had leave to have given him a shilling; and that he might take it of
every man that had a mind to give it, and being answered that that was a
fair thing, but what needed he a patent for it, and what he would do to
them that would not give him.  He answered, he would not force them; but
that they should come to the Council of State, to give a reason why they
would not.  Another rule is a proverb that he hath been taught, which is
that a man that cannot sit still in his chamber (the reason of which I did
not understand him), and he that cannot say no (that is, that is of so
good a nature that he cannot deny any thing, or cross another in doing any
thing), is not fit for business.  The last of which is a very great fault
of mine, which I must amend in.  Thence by boat; I being hot, he put the
skirt of his cloak about me; and it being rough, he told me the passage of
a Frenchman through London Bridge, where, when he saw the great fall, he
begun to cross himself and say his prayers in the greatest fear in the
world, and soon as he was over, he swore "Morbleu!  c'est le plus grand
plaisir du monde," being the most like a French humour in the world.

     [When the first editions of this Diary were printed no note was
     required here.  Before the erection of the present London Bridge the
     fall of water at the ebb tide was great, and to pass at that time
     was called "Shooting the bridge".  It was very hazardous for small
     boats.  The ancient mode, even in Henry VIII.'s time, of going to
     the Tower and Greenwich, was to land at the Three Cranes, in Upper
     Thames Street, suffer the barges to shoot the bridge, and to enter
     them again at Billingsgate.  See Cavendish's "Wolsey," p. 40, ed.
     1852]

To Deptford, and there surprised the Yard, and called them to a muster,
and discovered many abuses, which we shall be able to understand hereafter
and amend.  Thence walked to Redriffe, and so to London Bridge, where I
parted with him, and walked home and did a little business, and to supper
and to bed.

9th.  Up by four o'clock or a little after, and to my office, whither by
and by comes Cooper, to whom I told my getting for him the Reserve, for
which he was very thankful, and fell to work upon our modell, and did a
good morning's work upon the rigging, and am very sorry that I must lose
him so soon.  By and by comes Mr. Coventry, and he and I alone sat at the
office all the morning upon business.  And so to dinner to Trinity House,
and thence by his coach towards White Hall; but there being a stop at the
Savoy, we 'light and took water, and my Lord Sandwich being out of town,
we parted there, all the way having good discourse, and in short I find
him the most ingenuous person I ever found in my life, and am happy in his
acquaintance and my interest in him.  Home by water, and did business at
my office.  Writing a letter to my brother John to dissuade him from being
Moderator of his year, which I hear is proffered him, of which I am very
glad.  By and by comes Cooper, and he and I by candlelight at my modell,
being willing to learn as much of him as is possible before he goes.  So
home and to bed.

10th (Lord's day).  Being to dine at my brother's, I walked to St.
Dunstan's, the church being now finished; and here I heard Dr. Bates,' who
made a most eloquent sermon; and I am sorry I have hitherto had so low an
opinion of the man, for I have not heard a neater sermon a great while,
and more to my content.  So to Tom's, where Dr. Fairebrother, newly come
from Cambridge, met me, and Dr. Thomas Pepys.  I framed myself as pleasant
as I could, but my mind was another way.  Hither came my uncle Fenner,
hearing that I was here, and spoke to me about Pegg Kite's business of her
portion, which her husband demands, but I will have nothing to do with it.
I believe he has no mind to part with the money out of his hands, but let
him do what he will with it.  He told me the new service-book--[The Common
Prayer Book of 1662, now in use.]--(which is now lately come forth) was
laid upon their deske at St. Sepulchre's for Mr. Gouge to read; but he
laid it aside, and would not meddle with it: and I perceive the Presbyters
do all prepare to give over all against Bartholomew-tide.

     [Thomas Gouge (1609-1681), an eminent Presbyterian minister, son of
     William Gouge, D.D. (lecturer at and afterwards Rector of St.
     Anne's, Blackfriars).  He was vicar of the parish of St. Sepulchre
     from 1638 until the Act of Uniformity, in 1662, forced him to resign
     his living.]

Mr. Herring, being lately turned out at St. Bride's, did read the psalm to
the people while they sung at Dr. Bates's, which methought is a strange
turn.  After dinner to St. Bride's, and there heard one Carpenter, an old
man, who, they say, hath been a Jesuit priest, and is come over to us; but
he preaches very well.  So home with Mrs. Turner, and there hear that Mr.
Calamy hath taken his farewell this day of his people, and that others
will do so the next Sunday.  Mr. Turner, the draper, I hear, is knighted,
made Alderman, and pricked for Sheriffe, with Sir Thomas Bluddel, for the
next year, by the King, and so are called with great honour the King's
Sheriffes.  Thence walked home, meeting Mr. Moore by the way, and he home
with me and walked till it was dark in the garden, and so good night, and
I to my closet in my office to perfect my Journall and to read my solemn
vows, and so to bed.

11th.  All the morning at the office.  Dined at home all alone, and so to
my office again, whither Dean Fuller came to see me, and having business
about a ship to carry his goods to Dublin, whither he is shortly to
return, I went with him to the Hermitage, and the ship happening to be
Captn. Holland's I did give orders for them to be well looked after, and
thence with him to the Custom House about getting a pass for them, and so
to the Dolphin tavern, where I spent 6d. on him, but drank but one glass
of wine, and so parted.  He tells me that his niece, that sings so well,
whom I have long longed to see, is married to one Mr. Boys, a wholesale
man at the Three Crowns in Cheapside.  I to the office again, whither
Cooper came and read his last lecture to me upon my modell, and so bid me
good bye, he being to go to-morrow to Chatham to take charge of the ship I
have got him.  So to my business till 9 at night, and so to supper and to
bed, my mind a little at ease because my house is now quite tiled.

12th.  Up early at my office, and I find all people beginning to come to
me.  Among others Mr. Deane, the Assistant of Woolwich, who I find will
discover to me the whole abuse that his Majesty suffers in the measuring
of timber, of which I shall be glad.  He promises me also a modell of a
ship, which will please me exceedingly, for I do want one of my own.  By
and by we sat, and among other things Sir W. Batten and I had a difference
about his clerk's making a warrant for a Maister, which I would not
suffer, but got another signed, which he desires may be referred to a full
board, and I am willing to it.  But though I did get another signed of my
own clerk's, yet I will give it to his clerk, because I would not be
judged unkind, and though I will stand upon my privilege.  At noon home
and to dinner alone, and so to the office again, where busy all the
afternoon till to o'clock at night, and so to supper and to bed, my mind
being a little disquieted about Sir W. Batten's dispute to-day, though
this afternoon I did speak with his man Norman at last, and told him the
reason of my claim.

13th.  Up early, and to my office, where people come to me about business,
and by and by we met on purpose to enquire into the business of the
flag-makers, where I am the person that do chiefly manage the business
against them on the King's part; and I do find it the greatest cheat that
I have yet found; they having eightpence per yard allowed them by pretence
of a contract, where no such thing appears; and it is threepence more than
was formerly paid, and than I now offer the Board to have them done.  We
did not fully end it, but refer it to another time. At noon Commr. Pett
and I by water to Greenwich, and on board the pleasure-boats to see what
they wanted, they being ordered to sea, and very pretty things I still
find them, and so on shore and at the Shipp had a bit of meat and dined,
there waiting upon us a barber of Mr. Pett's acquaintance that plays very
well upon the viollin.  Thence to Lambeth; and there saw the little
pleasure-boat in building by the King, my Lord Brunkard, and the
virtuosoes of the town, according to new lines, which Mr. Pett cries up
mightily, but how it will prove we shall soon see.  So by water home, and
busy at my study late, drawing a letter to the yards of reprehension and
direction for the board to sign, in which I took great pains.  So home and
to bed.

14th.  Up early and to look on my works, and find my house to go on apace.
So to my office to prepare business, and then we met and sat till noon,
and then Commissioner Pett and I being invited, went by Sir John Winter's
coach sent for us, to the Mitre, in Fenchurch street, to a venison-pasty;
where I found him a very worthy man; and good discourse. Most of which was
concerning the Forest of Dean, and the timber there, and iron-workes with
their great antiquity, and the vast heaps of cinders which they find, and
are now of great value, being necessary for the making of iron at this
day; and without which they cannot work: with the age of many trees there
left at a great fall in Edward the Third's time, by the name of
forbid-trees, which at this day are called vorbid trees. Thence to my
office about business till late, and so home and to bed.

15th.  Up very early, and up about seeing how my work proceeds, and am
pretty well pleased therewith; especially my wife's closet will be very
pretty.  So to the office and there very busy, and many people coming to
me.  At noon to the Change, and there hear of some Quakers that are seized
on, that would have blown up the prison in Southwark where they are put.
So to the Swan, in Old Fish Street, where Mr. Brigden and his
father-in-law, Blackbury, of whom we had bought timber in the office, but
have not dealt well with us, did make me a fine dinner only to myself; and
after dinner comes in a jugler, which shewed us very pretty tricks. I
seemed very pleasant, but am no friend to the man's dealings with us in
the office.  After an hour or two sitting after dinner talking about
office business, where I had not spent any time a great while, I went to
Paul's Church Yard to my bookseller's; and there I hear that next Sunday
will be the last of a great many Presbyterian ministers in town, who, I
hear, will give up all.  I pray God the issue may be good, for the
discontent is great.  Home and to my office till 9 at night doing
business, and so to bed.  My mind well pleased with a letter I found at
home from Mr. Coventry, expressing his satisfaction in a letter I writ
last night, and sent him this morning, to be corrected by him in order to
its sending down to all the Yards as a charge to them.

17th (Lord's day).  Up very early, this being the last Sunday that the
Presbyterians are to preach, unless they read the new Common Prayer and
renounce the Covenant,

     [On St. Bartholomew's day, August 24th, 1662, the Act of Uniformity
     took effect, and about two hundred Presbyterian and Independent
     ministers lost their preferments.]

and so I had a mind to hear Dr. Bates's farewell sermon, and walked
thither, calling first at my brother's, where I found that he is come home
after being a week abroad with Dr. Pepys, nobody knows where, nor I but by
chance, that he was gone, which troubles me.  So I called only at the
door, but did not ask for him, but went to Madam Turner's to know whether
she went to church, and to tell her that I would dine with her; and so
walked to St. Dunstan's, where, it not being seven o'clock yet, the doors
were not open; and so I went and walked an hour in the Temple-garden,
reading my vows, which it is a great content to me to see how I am a
changed man in all respects for the better, since I took them, which the
God of Heaven continue to me, and make me thankful for.  At eight o'clock
I went, and crowded in at a back door among others, the church being
half-full almost before any doors were open publicly; which is the first
time that I have done so these many years since I used to go with my
father and mother, and so got into the gallery, beside the pulpit, and
heard very well.  His text was, "Now the God of Peace--;" the last
Hebrews, and the 20th verse: he making a very good sermon, and very little
reflections in it to any thing of the times.  Besides the sermon, I was
very well pleased with the sight of a fine lady that I have often seen
walk in Graye's Inn Walks, and it was my chance to meet her again at the
door going out, and very pretty and sprightly she is, and I believe the
same that my wife and I some years since did meet at Temple Bar gate and
have sometimes spoke of.  So to Madam Turner's, and dined with her. She
had heard Parson Herring take his leave; tho' he, by reading so much of
the Common Prayer as he did, hath cast himself out of the good opinion of
both sides.  After dinner to St. Dunstan's again; and the church quite
crowded before I came, which was just at one o'clock; but I got into the
gallery again, but stood in a crowd and did exceedingly sweat all the
time.  He pursued his text again very well; and only at the conclusion
told us, after this manner: "I do believe that many of you do expect that
I should say something to you in reference to the time, this being the
last time that possibly I may appear here.  You know it is not my manner
to speak any thing in the pulpit that is extraneous to my text and
business; yet this I shall say, that it is not my opinion, fashion, or
humour that keeps me from complying with what is required of us; but
something which, after much prayer, discourse, and study yet remains
unsatisfied, and commands me herein.  Wherefore, if it is my unhappiness
not to receive such an illumination as should direct me to do otherwise, I
know no reason why men should not pardon me in this world, and am
confident that God will pardon me for it in the next."  And so he
concluded.  Parson Herring read a psalm and chapters before sermon; and
one was the chapter in the Acts, where the story of Ananias and Sapphira
is.  And after he had done, says he, "This is just the case of England at
present.  God he bids us to preach, and men bid us not to preach; and if
we do, we are to be imprisoned and further punished.  All that I can say
to it is, that I beg your prayers, and the prayers of all good Christians,
for us."  This was all the exposition he made of the chapter in these very
words, and no more.  I was much pleased with Dr. Bates's manner of
bringing in the Lord's Prayer after his own; thus, "In whose comprehensive
words we sum up all our imperfect desires; saying, 'Our Father,'" &c.
Church being done and it raining I took a hackney coach and so home, being
all in a sweat and fearful of getting cold.  To my study at my office, and
thither came Mr. Moore to me and walked till it was quite dark.  Then I
wrote a letter to my Lord Privy Seale as from my Lord for Mr.-------to be
sworn directly by deputy to my Lord, he denying to swear him as deputy
together with me.  So that I am now clear of it, and the profit is now
come to be so little that I am not displeased at my getting off so well.
He being gone I to my study and read, and so to eat a bit of bread and
cheese and so to bed.  I hear most of the Presbyters took their leaves
to-day, and that the City is much dissatisfied with it. I pray God keep
peace among us, and make the Bishops careful of bringing in good men in
their rooms, or else all will fly a-pieces; for bad ones will not [go]
down with the City.

18th.  Up very early, and up upon my house to see how work goes on, which
do please me very well.  So about seven o'clock took horse and rode to
Bowe, and there staid at the King's Head, and eat a breakfast of eggs till
Mr. Deane of Woolwich came to me, and he and I rid into Waltham Forest,
and there we saw many trees of the King's a-hewing; and he showed me the
whole mystery of off square,

     [Off-square is evidently a mistake, in the shorthand MS., for half
     square.]

wherein the King is abused in the timber that he buys, which I shall with
much pleasure be able to correct.  After we had been a good while in the
wood, we rode to Illford, and there, while dinner was getting ready, he
and I practised measuring of the tables and other things till I did
understand measuring of timber and board very well.  So to dinner and by
and by, being sent for, comes Mr. Cooper, our officer in the Forest, and
did give me an account of things there, and how the country is backward to
come in with their carts.  By and by comes one Mr. Marshall, of whom the
King has many carriages for his timber, and they staid and drank with me,
and while I am here, Sir W. Batten passed by in his coach, homewards from
Colchester, where he had been seeing his son-in-law, Lemon, that lies
a-dying, but I would take no notice of him, but let him go.  By and by I
got a horseback again and rode to Barking, and there saw the place where
they ship this timber for Woolwich; and so Deane and I home again, and
parted at Bowe, and I home just before a great showre of rayne, as God
would have it.  I find Deane a pretty able man, and able to do the King
service; but, I think, more out of envy to the rest of the officers of the
yard, of whom he complains much, than true love, more than others, to the
service.  He would fain seem a modest man, and yet will commend his own
work and skill, and vie with other persons, especially the Petts, but I
let him alone to hear all he will say.  Whiled away the evening at my
office trying to repeat the rules of measuring learnt this day, and so to
bed with my mind very well pleased with this day's work.

19th.  Up betimes and to see how my work goes on.  Then Mr. Creed came to
me, and he and I walked an hour or two till 8 o'clock in the garden,
speaking of our accounts one with another and then things public.  Among
other things he tells me that my Lord has put me into Commission with
himself and many noblemen and others for Tangier, which, if it be, is not
only great honour, but may be of profit too, and I am very glad of it. By
and by to sit at the office; and Mr. Coventry did tell us of the duell
between Mr. Jermyn, nephew to my Lord St. Albans, and Colonel Giles
Rawlins, the latter of whom is killed, and the first mortally wounded, as
it is thought.  They fought against Captain Thomas Howard, my Lord
Carlisle's brother, and another unknown; who, they say, had armour on that
they could not be hurt, so that one of their swords went up to the hilt
against it.  They had horses ready, and are fled.  But what is most
strange, Howard sent one challenge, but they could not meet, and then
another, and did meet yesterday at the old Pall Mall at St. James's, and
would not to the last tell Jermyn what the quarrel was; nor do any body
know.  The Court is much concerned in this fray, and I am glad of it;
hoping that it will cause some good laws against it.  After sitting, Sir
G. Carteret and I walked a good while in the garden, who told me that Sir
W. Batten had made his complaint to him that some of us had a mind to do
him a bad turn, but I do not see that Sir George is concerned for him at
all, but rather against him.  He professes all love to me, and did tell me
how he had spoke of me to my Lord Chancellor, and that if my Lord Sandwich
would ask my Lord Chancellor, he should know what he had said of me to him
to my advantage, of which I am very glad, and do not doubt that all things
will grow better and better every day for me.  Dined at home alone, then
to my office, and there till late at night doing business, and so home,
eat a bit, and to bed.

20th.  Up early, and to my office, and thence to my Lord Sandwich, whom I
found in bed, and he sent for me in.  Among other talk, he do tell me that
he hath put me into commission with a great many great persons in the
business of Tangier, which is a very great honour to me, and may be of
good concernment to me.  By and by comes in Mr. Coventry to us, whom my
Lord tells that he is also put into the commission, and that I am there,
of which he said he was glad; and did tell my Lord that I was indeed the
life of this office, and much more to my commendation beyond measure.  And
that, whereas before he did bear me respect for his sake, he do do it now
much more for my own; which is a great blessing to me. Sir G. Carteret
having told me what he did yesterday concerning his speaking to my Lord
Chancellor about me.  So that on all hands, by God's blessing, I find
myself a very rising man.  By and by comes my Lord Peterborough in, with
whom we talked a good while, and he is going tomorrow towards Tangier
again.  I perceive there is yet good hopes of peace with Guyland,--[A
Moorish usurper, who had put himself at the head of an army for the
purpose of attacking Tangier.--B.]--which is of great concernment to
Tangier.  And many other things I heard which yet I understand not, and so
cannot remember.  My Lord and Lord Peterborough going out to the Solicitor
General about the drawing up of this Commission, I went to Westminster
Hall with Mr. Moore, and there meeting Mr. Townsend, he would needs take
me to Fleet Street, to one Mr. Barwell, squire sadler to the King, and
there we and several other Wardrobe-men dined.  We had a venison pasty,
and other good plain and handsome dishes; the mistress of the house a
pretty, well-carriaged woman, and a fine hand she hath; and her maid a
pretty brown lass.  But I do find my nature ready to run back to my old
course of drinking wine and staying from my business, and yet, thank God,
I was not fully contented with it, but did stay at little ease, and after
dinner hastened home by water, and so to my office till late at night.  In
the evening Mr. Hayward came to me to advise with me about the business of
the Chest, which I have now a mind to put in practice, though I know it
will vex Sir W. Batten, which is one of the ends (God forgive me) that I
have in it.  So home, and eat a bit, and to bed.

21st.  Up early, and to my office, and by and by we sat all the morning.
At noon, though I was invited to my uncle Fenner's to dinner to a haunch
of venison I sent him yesterday, yet I did not go, but chose to go to Mr.
Rawlinson's, where my uncle Wight and my aunt, and some neighbour couples
were at a very good venison pasty.  Hither came, after we were set down, a
most pretty young lady (only her hands were not white nor handsome), which
pleased me well, and I found her to be sister to Mrs. Anne Wight that
comes to my uncle Wight's.  We were good company, and had a very pretty
dinner.  And after dinner some talk, I with my aunt and this young lady
about their being [at] Epsom, from whence they came to-day, and so home
and to my office, and there doing business till past 9 at night, and so
home and to bed.  But though I drank no wine to-day, yet how easily was I
of my own accord stirred up to desire my aunt and this pretty lady (for it
was for her that I did it) to carry them to Greenwich and see the pleasure
boats.  But my aunt would not go, of which since I am much glad.

22nd.  About three o'clock this morning I waked with the noise of the
rayne, having never in my life heard a more violent shower; and then the
catt was lockt in the chamber, and kept a great mewing, and leapt upon the
bed, which made me I could not sleep a great while.  Then to sleep, and
about five o'clock rose, and up to my office, and about 8 o'clock went
down to Deptford, and there with Mr. Davis did look over most of his
stores; by the same token in the great storehouse, while Captain Badily
was talking to us, one from a trap-door above let fall unawares a coyle of
cable, that it was 10,000 to one it had not broke Captain Badily's neck,
it came so near him, but did him no hurt.  I went on with looking and
informing myself of the stores with great delight, and having done there,
I took boat home again and dined, and after dinner sent for some of my
workmen and did scold at them so as I hope my work will be hastened.  Then
by water to Westminster Hall, and there I hear that old Mr. Hales did
lately die suddenly in an hour's time.  Here I met with Will Bowyer, and
had a promise from him of a place to stand to-morrow at his house to see
the show.  Thence to my Lord's, and thither sent for Mr. Creed, who came,
and walked together talking about business, and then to his lodgings at
Clerke's, the confectioner's, where he did give me a little banquet, and I
had liked to have begged a parrot for my wife, but he hath put me in a way
to get a better from Steventon; at Portsmouth. But I did get of him a
draught of Tangier to take a copy by, which pleases me very well.  So home
by water and to my office, where late, and so home to bed.

23d.  Up early, and about my works in my house, to see what is done and
design more.  Then to my office, and by and by we sat till noon at the
office.  After sitting, Mr. Coventry and I did walk together a great while
in the Garden, where he did tell me his mind about Sir G. Carteret's
having so much the command of the money, which must be removed.  And
indeed it is the bane of all our business.  He observed to me also how Sir
W. Batten begins to struggle and to look after his business, which he do
indeed a little, but it will come to nothing. I also put him upon getting
an order from the Duke for our inquiries into the Chest, which he will see
done.  So we parted, and Mr. Creed by appointment being come, he and I
went out together, and at an ordinary in Lumbard Streete dined together,
and so walked down to the Styllyard, and so all along Thames-street, but
could not get a boat: I offered eight shillings for a boat to attend me
this afternoon, and they would not, it being the day of the Queen's coming
to town from Hampton Court.  So we fairly walked it to White Hall, and
through my Lord's lodgings we got into White Hall garden, and so to the
Bowling-green, and up to the top of the new Banqueting House there, over
the Thames, which was a most pleasant place as any I could have got; and
all the show consisted chiefly in the number of boats and barges; and two
pageants, one of a King, and another of a Queen, with her Maydes of Honour
sitting at her feet very prettily; and they tell me the Queen is Sir.
Richard Ford's daughter.  Anon come the King and Queen in a barge under a
canopy with 10,000 barges and boats, I think, for we could see no water
for them, nor discern the King nor Queen.  And so they landed at White
Hall Bridge, and the great guns on the other side went off: But that which
pleased me best was, that my Lady Castlemaine stood over against us upon a
piece of White Hall, where I glutted myself with looking on her.  But
methought it was strange to see her Lord and her upon the same place
walking up and down without taking notice one of another, only at first
entry he put off his hat, and she made him a very civil salute, but
afterwards took no notice one of another; but both of them now and then
would take their child, which the nurse held in her armes, and dandle it.
One thing more; there happened a scaffold below to fall, and we feared
some hurt, but there was none, but she of all the great ladies only run
down among the common rabble to see what hurt was done, and did take care
of a child that received some little hurt, which methought was so noble.
Anon there came one there booted and spurred that she talked long with.
And by and by, she being in her hair, she put on his hat, which was but an
ordinary one, to keep the wind off.  But methinks it became her mightily,
as every thing else do.  The show being over, I went away, not weary with
looking on her, and to my Lord's lodgings, where my brother Tom and Dr.
Thomas Pepys were to speak with me.  So I walked with them in the garden,
and was very angry with them both for their going out of town without my
knowledge; but they told me the business, which was to see a gentlewoman
for a wife for Tom, of Mr. Cooke's providing, worth L500, of good
education, her name Hobell, and lives near Banbury, demands L40 per annum
joynter.  Tom likes her, and, they say, had a very good reception, and
that Cooke hath been very serviceable therein, and that she is committed
to old Mr. Young, of the Wardrobe's, tuition.  After I had told them my
mind about their folly in going so unadvisedly, I then begun to inquire
after the business, and so did give no answer as to my opinion till I have
looked farther into it by Mr. Young.  By and by, as we were walking in my
Lord's walk, comes my Lord, and so we broke our discourse and went in with
him, and after I had put them away I went in to my Lord, and he and I had
half an hour's private discourse about the discontents of the times, which
we concluded would not come to anything of difference, though the
Presbyters would be glad enough of it; but we do not think religion will
so soon cause another war.  Then to his own business.  He asked my advice
there, whether he should go on to purchase more land and to borrow money
to pay for it, which he is willing to do, because such a bargain as that
of Mr. Buggins's, of Stukely, will not be every day to be had, and
Brampton is now perfectly granted him by the King--I mean the reversion of
it--after the Queen's death; and, in the meantime, he buys it of Sir Peter
Ball his present right.  Then we fell to talk of Navy business, and he
concludes, as I do, that he needs not put himself upon any more voyages
abroad to spend money, unless a war comes; and that by keeping his family
awhile in the country, he shall be able to gather money.  He is glad of a
friendship with Mr. Coventry, and I put him upon increasing it, which he
will do, but he (as Mr. Coventry do) do much cry against the course of our
payments and the Treasurer to have the whole power in his own hands of
doing what he will, but I think will not meddle in himself.  He told me
also that in the Commission for Tangier Mr. Coventry had advised him that
Mr. Povy, who intended to be Treasurer,

     [Thomas Povy, who had held, under Cromwell, a high situation in the
     Office of Plantations, was appointed in July, 1660, Treasurer and
     Receiver-General of the Rents and Revenues of James, Duke of York;
     but his royal master's affairs falling into confusion, he
     surrendered his patent on the 27th July, 1668, for a consideration
     of L2,000.  He was also First Treasurer for Tangier, which office he
     resigned to Pepys.  Povy, had apartments at Whitehall, besides his
     lodgings in Lincoln's Inn, and a villa near Hounslow, called the
     Priory, which he had inherited from Justinian Povy, who purchased it
     in 1625.  He was one of the sons of Justinian Povy, Auditor-General
     to Queen Anne of Denmark in 1614, whose father was John Povy,
     citizen and embroiderer of London.]

and it is intended him, may not be of the Commission itself, and my Lord I
think will endeavour to get him to be contented to be left out of the
Commission, and it is a very good rule indeed that the Treasurer in no
office ought to be of the Commission.  Here we broke off, and I bid him
good night, and so with much ado, the streets being at nine o'clock at
night crammed with people going home to the city, for all the borders of
the river had been full of people, as the King had come, to a miracle got
to the Palace Yard, and there took boat, and so to the Old Swan, and so
walked home, and to bed very weary.

24th (Lord's day).  Slept till 7 o'clock, which I have not done a very
great while, but it was my weariness last night that caused it.  So rose
and to my office till church time, writing down my yesterday's
observations, and so to church, where I all alone, and found Will Griffin
and Thomas Hewett got into the pew next to our backs, where our maids sit,
but when I come, they went out; so forward some people are to outrun
themselves.  Here we had a lazy, dull sermon.  So home to dinner, where my
brother Tom came to me, and both before and after dinner he and I walked
all alone in the garden, talking about his late journey and his mistress,
and for what he tells me it is like to do well.  He being gone, I to
church again, where Mr. Mills, making a sermon upon confession, he did
endeavour to pull down auricular confession, but did set it up by his bad
arguments against it, and advising people to come to him to confess their
sins when they had any weight upon their consciences, as much as is
possible, which did vex me to hear.  So home, and after an hour's being in
my office alone, looking over the plates and globes, I walked to my uncle
Wight's, the truth is, in hopes to have seen and been acquainted with the
pretty lady that came along with them to dinner the other day to Mr.
Rawlinson, but she is gone away.  But here I staid supper, and much
company there was; among others, Dr. Burnett, Mr. Cole the lawyer, Mr.
Rawlinson, and Mr. Sutton, a brother of my aunt's, that I never saw
before.  Among other things they tell me that there hath been a
disturbance in a church in Friday Street; a great many young people
knotting together and crying out "Porridge"

     [A nickname given by the Dissenters to the Prayer-Book.  In Mrs.
     Behn's "City Heiress" (1682), Sir Anthony says to Sir Timothy, "You
     come from Church, too."  Sir Timothy replies, "Ay, needs must when
     the Devil drives--I go to save my bacon, as they say, once a month,
     and that too after the Porridge is served up."  Scott quotes, in his
     notes to "Woodstock," a pamphlet entitled, "Vindication of the Book
     of Common Prayer, against the contumelious Slanders of the Fanatic
     party terming it Porridge."]

often and seditiously in the church, and took the Common Prayer Book, they
say, away; and, some say, did tear it; but it is a thing which appears to
me very ominous.  I pray God avert it.  After supper home and to bed.

25th.  Up early, and among my workmen when they came, and set them in good
order at work on all hands, which, though it at first began angrily, yet I
pleased myself afterwards in seeing it put into a good posture, and so I
left them, and away by water to Woolwich (calling in my way in Hamcreek,
where I have never been before, and there found two of the King's ships
lie there without any living creature aboard, which troubled me, every
thing being stole away that can be), where I staid seeing a cable of 14
inches laid, in which there was good variety.  Then to Mr. Falconer's, and
there eat a bit of roast meat off of the spit, and so away to the yard,
and there among other things mustered the yard, and did things that I
perceive people do begin to value me, and that I shall be able to be of
command in all matters, which God be praised for.  Then to Mr. Pett's, and
there eat some fruit and drank, and so to boat again, and to Deptford,
calling there about the business of my house only, and so home, where by
appointment I found Mr. Coventry, Sir W. Batten, and Mr. Waith met at Sir
W. Batten's, and thither I met, and so agreed upon a way of answering my
Lord Treasurer's letter.  Here I found Mr. Coventry had got a letter from
the Duke, sent us for looking into the business of the Chest, of which I
am glad.  After we had done here I went home, and up among my workmen, and
found they had done a good day's work, and so to my office till late
ordering of several businesses, and so home and to bed, my mind, God be
praised, full of business, but great quiet.

26th.  Up betimes and among my works and workmen, and with great pleasure
seeing them go on merrily, and a good many hands, which I perceive makes
good riddance, and so to the office, where we sat all the morning, and at
noon dined alone with Sir W. Batten, which I have not done a great while,
but his lady being out of the way I was the willinger to do it, and after
dinner he and I by water to Deptford, and there found Sir G. Carteret and
my Lady at dinner, and so we sat down and eat another dinner of venison
with them, and so we went to the payhouse, and there staid till to o'clock
at night paying off the Martin and Kinsale, being small but troublesome
ships to pay, and so in the dark by water home to the Custom House, and so
got a lanthorn to light us home, there being Mr. Morrice the wine cooper
with us, he having been at Deptford to view some of the King's casks we
have to sell.  So to bed.

27th.  Up and among my workmen, my work going on still very well.  So to
my office all the morning, and dined again with Sir W. Batten, his Lady
being in the country.  Among other stories, he told us of the Mayor of
Bristoll's reading a pass with the bottom upwards; and a barber that could
not read, that flung a letter in the kennel when one came to desire him to
read the superscription, saying, "Do you think I stand here to read
letters?"  Among my workmen again, pleasing myself all the afternoon
there, and so to the office doing business till past 9 at night, and so
home and to bed.  This afternoon Mrs. Hunt came to see me, and I did give
her a Muske Millon.  To-day my hogshead of sherry I have sold to Sir W.
Batten, and am glad of my money instead of wine.  After I had wrote this
at my office (as I have of late altogether done since my wife has been in
the country) I went into my house, and Will having been making up books at
Deptford with other clerks all day, I did not think he was come home, but
was in fear for him, it being very late, what was become of him.  But when
I came home I found him there at his ease in his study, which vexed me
cruelly, that he should no more mind me, but to let me be all alone at the
office waiting for him.  Whereupon I struck him, and did stay up till 12
o'clock at night chiding him for it, and did in plain terms tell him that
I would not be served so, and that I am resolved to look out some boy that
I may have the bringing up of after my own mind, and which I do intend to
do, for I do find that he has got a taste of liberty since he came to me
that he will not leave.  Having discharged my mind, I went to bed.

28th.  I observe that Will, whom I used to call two or three times in a
morning, would now wake of himself and rise without calling.  Which though
angry I was glad to see.  So I rose and among my workmen, in my gown,
without a doublet, an hour or two or more, till I was afraid of getting an
ague, and so to the office, and there we sat all the morning, and at noon
Mr. Coventry and I dined at Sir W. Batten's, where I have now dined three
days together, and so in the afternoon again we sat, which we intend to do
two afternoons in a week besides our other sitting.  In the evening we
rose, and I to see how my work goes on, and so to my office, writing by
the post and doing other matters, and so home and to bed late.

29th.  Up betimes and among my workmen, where I did stay with them the
greatest part of the morning, only a little at the office, and so to
dinner alone at home, and so to my workmen again, finding my presence to
carry on the work both to my mind and with more haste, and I thank God I
am pleased with it.  At night, the workmen being gone, I went to my
office, and among other businesses did begin to-night with Mr. Lewes to
look into the nature of a purser's account, and the business of
victualling, in which there is great variety; but I find I shall
understand it, and be able to do service there also.  So being weary and
chill, being in some fear of an ague, I went home and to bed.

30th.  Up betimes among my workmen, and so to the office, where we sat all
the morning, and at noon rose and had news that Sir W. Pen would be in
town from Ireland, which I much wonder at, he giving so little notice of
it, and it troubled me exceedingly what to do for a lodging, and more what
to do with my goods, that are all in his house; but at last I resolved to
let them lie there till Monday, and so got Griffin to get a lodging as
near as he could, which is without a door of our back door upon Tower
Hill, a chamber where John Pavis, one of our clerks, do lie in, but he do
provide himself elsewhere, and I am to have his chamber. So at the office
all the afternoon and the evening till past to at night expecting Sir W.
Pen's coming, but he not coming to-night I went thither and there lay very
well, and like my lodging well enough.  My man Will after he had got me to
bed did go home and lay there, and my maid Jane lay among my goods at Sir
W. Pen's.

31st (Lord's day).  Waked early, but being in a strange house, did not
rise till 7 o'clock almost, and so rose and read over my oaths, and whiled
away an hour thinking upon businesses till Will came to get me ready, and
so got ready and to my office, and thence to church.  After sermon home
and dined alone.  News is brought me that Sir W. Pen is come. But I would
take no notice thereof till after dinner, and then sent him word that I
would wait on him, but he is gone to bed.  So to my office, and there made
my monthly accounts, and find myself worth in money about L686 19s. 2
1/2d., for which God be praised; and indeed greatly I hope to thank
Almighty God, who do most manifestly bless me in my endeavours to do the
duties of my office, I now saving money, and my expenses being little.  My
wife is still in the country; my house all in dirt; but my work in a good
forwardness, and will be much to my mind at last.  In the afternoon to
church, and there heard a simple sermon of a stranger upon David's words,
"Blessed is the man that walketh not in the way of the ungodly," &c., and
the best of his sermon was the degrees of walking, standing, and sitting,
showing how by steps and degrees sinners do grow in wickedness.  After
sermon to my brother Tom's, who I found has taken physic to-day, and I
talked with him about his country mistress, and read Cook's letter,
wherein I am well satisfied, and will appear in promoting it; so back and
to Mr. Rawlinson's, and there supped with him, and in came my uncle Wight
and my aunt.  Our discourse of the discontents that are abroad, among, and
by reason of the Presbyters.  Some were clapped up to-day, and strict
watch is kept in the City by the train-bands, and letters of a plot are
taken.  God preserve us! for all these things bode very ill.  So home, and
after going to welcome home Sir W. Pen, who was unready, going to bed, I
staid with him a little while, and so to my lodging and to bed.

     ETEXT EDITOR'S BOOKMARKS:

     Bowling-ally (where lords and ladies are now at bowles)
     Fear she should prove honest and refuse and then tell my wife
     Hopes to have had a bout with her before she had gone
     Lady Castlemaine is still as great with the King
     Last of a great many Presbyterian ministers
     Muske Millon
     My first attempt being to learn the multiplication-table
     So good a nature that he cannot deny any thing
     Sorry to hear that Sir W. Pen's maid Betty was gone away



                THE DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS M.A.  F.R.S.

            CLERK OF THE ACTS AND SECRETARY TO THE ADMIRALTY

    TRANSCRIBED FROM THE SHORTHAND MANUSCRIPT IN THE PEPYSIAN LIBRARY
 MAGDALENE COLLEGE CAMBRIDGE BY THE REV. MYNORS BRIGHT M.A. LATE FELLOW
                      AND PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE

                              (Unabridged)

                      WITH LORD BRAYBROOKE'S NOTES

                        EDITED WITH ADDITIONS BY

                        HENRY B. WHEATLEY F.S.A.

                          DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS.
                           SEPTEMBER & OCTOBER
                                  1662

September 1st.  Up betimes at my lodging and to my office and among my
workmen, and then with Sir W. Batten and Sir W. Pen by coach to St.
James's, this being the first day of our meeting there by the Duke's
order; but when we come, we found him going out by coach with his Duchess,
and he told us he was to go abroad with the Queen to-day (to Durdans, it
seems, to dine with my Lord Barkeley, where I have been very merry when I
was a little boy); so we went and staid a little at Mr. Coventry's
chamber, and I to my Lord Sandwich's, who is gone to wait upon the King
and Queen today.  And so Mr. Paget being there, Will Howe and I and he
played over some things of Locke's that we used to play at sea, that
pleased us three well, it being the first music I have heard a great
while, so much has my business of late taken me off from all my former
delights.  By and by by water home, and there dined alone, and after
dinner with my brother Tom's two men I removed all my goods out of Sir W.
Pen's house into one room that I have with much ado got ready at my house,
and so I am to be quit of any further obligation to him.  So to my office,
but missing my key, which I had in my hand just now, makes me very angry
and out of order, it being a thing that I hate in others, and more in
myself, to be careless of keys, I thinking another not fit to be trusted
that leaves a key behind their hole.  One thing more vexes me: my wife
writes me from the country that her boy plays the rogue there, and she is
weary of him, and complains also of her maid Sarah, of which I am also
very sorry.  Being thus out of temper, I could do little at my office, but
went home and eat a bit, and so to my lodging to bed.

2nd.  Up betimes and got myself ready alone, and so to my office, my mind
much troubled for my key that I lost yesterday, and so to my workmen and
put them in order, and so to my office, and we met all the morning, and
then dined at Sir W. Batten's with Sir W. Pen, and so to my office again
all the afternoon, and in the evening wrote a letter to Mr. Cooke, in the
country, in behalf of my brother Tom, to his mistress, it being the first
of my appearing in it, and if she be as Tom sets her out, it may be very
well for him.  So home and eat a bit, and so to my lodging to bed.

3rd.  Up betimes, but now the days begin to shorten, and so whereas I used
to rise by four o'clock, it is not broad daylight now till after five
o'clock, so that it is after five before I do rise.  To my office, and
about 8 o'clock I went over to Redriffe, and walked to Deptford, where I
found Mr. Coventry and Sir W. Pen beginning the pay, it being my desire to
be there to-day because it is the first pay that Mr. Coventry has been at,
and I would be thought to be as much with Mr. Coventry as I can.  Here we
staid till noon, and by that time paid off the Breda, and then to dinner
at the tavern, where I have obtained that our commons is not so large as
they used to be, which I am glad to see.  After dinner by water to the
office, and there we met and sold the Weymouth, Successe, and Fellowship
hulkes, where pleasant to see how backward men are at first to bid; and
yet when the candle is going out, how they bawl and dispute afterwards who
bid the most first.  And here I observed one man cunninger than the rest
that was sure to bid the last man, and to carry it; and inquiring the
reason, he told me that just as the flame goes out the smoke descends,
which is a thing I never observed before, and by that he do know the
instant when to bid last, which is very pretty.  In our discourse in the
boat Mr. Coventry told us how the Fanatiques and the Presbyters, that did
intend to rise about this time, did choose this day as the most auspicious
to them in their endeavours against monarchy: it being fatal twice to the
King, and the day of Oliver's death.

     [Cromwell had considered the 3rd of September as the most fortunate
     day of his life, on account of his victories at Dunbar and
     Worcester.  It was also remarkable for the great storm that occurred
     at the time of his death; and as being the day on which the Fire of
     London, in 1666, burnt with the greatest fury.--B.]

But, blessed be God! all is likely to be quiet, I hope.  After the sale I
walked to my brother's, in my way meeting with Dr. Fairbrother, of whom I
enquired what news in Church matters.  He tells me, what I heard confirmed
since, that it was fully resolved by the King's new Council that an
indulgence should be granted the Presbyters; but upon the Bishop of
London's speech

     [Gilbert Sheldon, born July 19th, 1598; Fellow of All Souls, Oxford,
     1622; Warden, 1635; Bishop of London, 1660-63; Archbishop of
     Canterbury, 1663.  Died November 9th, 1677.]

(who is now one of the most powerful men in England with the King), their
minds were wholly turned.  And it is said that my Lord Albemarle did
oppose him most; but that I do believe is only in appearance.  He told me
also that most of the Presbyters now begin to wish they had complied, now
they see that no Indulgence will be granted them, which they hoped for;
and that the Bishop of London hath taken good care that places are
supplied with very good and able men, which is the only thing that will
keep all quiet.  I took him in the tavern at Puddle dock, but neither he
nor I drank any of the wine we called for, but left it, and so after
discourse parted, and Mr. Townsend not being at home I went to my
brother's, and there heard how his love matter proceeded, which do not
displease me, and so by water to White Hall to my Lord's lodgings, where
he being to go to Hinchingbroke to-morrow morning, I staid and fiddled
with Will.  Howe some new tunes very pleasant, and then my Lord came in
and had much kind talk with him, and then to bed with Mr. Moore there
alone.  So having taken my leave of my Lord before I went to bed, I
resolved to rise early and be gone without more speaking to him--

4th.  Which I did, and by water betimes to the Tower and so home, where I
shifted myself, being to dine abroad, and so being also trimmed, which is
a thing I have very seldom done of late, I gat to my office and then met
and sit all the morning, and at noon we all to the Trinity House, where we
treated, very dearly, I believe, the officers of the Ordnance; where was
Sir W. Compton and the rest and the Lieutenant of the Tower.  We had much
and good music, which was my best entertainment.  Sir Wm. Compton I heard
talk with great pleasure of the difference between the fleet now and in
Queen Elisabeth's days; where, in 88, she had but 36 sail great and small,
in the world; and ten rounds of powder was their allowance at that time
against the Spaniard.  After Sir W. Compton and Mr. Coventry, and some of
the best of the rest were gone, I grew weary of staying with Sir Williams
both, and the more for that my Lady Batten and her crew, at least half a
score, come into the room, and I believe we shall pay size for it; but
'tis very pleasant to see her in her hair under her hood, and how by
little and little she would fain be a gallant; but, Lord! the company she
keeps about her are like herself, that she may be known by them what she
is.  Being quite weary I stole from them and to my office, where I did
business till 9 at night, and so to my lodgings to bed.

5th.  Up by break of day at 5 o'clock, and down by water to Woolwich: in
my way saw the yacht lately built by our virtuosoes (my Lord Brunkard and
others, with the help of Commissioner Pett also) set out from Greenwich
with the little Dutch bezan, to try for mastery; and before they got to
Woolwich the Dutch beat them half-a-mile (and I hear this afternoon, that,
in coming home, it got above three miles); which all our people are glad
of.  Here I staid and mustered the yard and looked into the storehouses;
and so walked all alone to Greenwich, and thence by water to Deptford, and
there examined some stores, and did some of my own business in hastening
my work there, and so walked to Redriffe, being by this time pretty weary
and all in a sweat; took boat there for the Tower, which made me a little
fearful, it being a cold, windy morning.  So to my lodgings and there
rubbed myself clean, and so to Mr. Bland's, the merchant, by invitation, I
alone of all our company of this office; where I found all the officers of
the Customs, very grave fine gentlemen, and I am very glad to know them;
viz.--Sir Job Harvy, Sir John Wolstenholme, Sir John Jacob, Sir Nicholas
Crisp, Sir John Harrison, and Sir John Shaw: very good company.  And among
other pretty discourse, some was of Sir Jerom Bowes, Embassador from
Queene Elizabeth to the Emperor of Russia;

     [In 1583; the object of his mission being to persuade the Muscovite
     (Ivan IV. the Terrible) to a peace with John, King of Sweden.  He
     was also employed to confirm the trade of the English with Russia,
     and having incurred some personal danger, was received with favour
     on his return by the Queen.  He died in 1616.]

who, because some of the noblemen there would go up the stairs to the
Emperor before him, he would not go up till the Emperor had ordered those
two men to be dragged down stairs, with their heads knocking upon every
stair till they were killed.  And when he was come up, they demanded his
sword of him before he entered the room.  He told them, if they would have
his sword, they should have his boots too.  And so caused his boots to be
pulled off, and his night-gown and night-cap and slippers to be sent for;
and made the Emperor stay till he could go in his night-dress, since he
might not go as a soldier.  And lastly, when the Emperor in contempt, to
show his command of his subjects, did command one to leap from the window
down and broke his neck in the sight of our Embassador, he replied that
his mistress did set more by, and did make better use of the necks of her
subjects but said that, to show what her subjects would do for her, he
would, and did, fling down his gantlett before the Emperor; and challenged
all the nobility there to take it up, in defence of the Emperor against
his Queen: for which, at this very day, the name of Sir Jerom Bowes is
famous and honoured there.  After dinner I came home and found Sir John
Minnes come this day, and I went to him to Sir W. Batten's, where it
pleased me to see how jealous Sir Williams both are of my going down to
Woolwich, &c., and doing my duty as I nowadays do, and of my dining with
the Commission of the Customs.  So to my office, and there till 9 at
night, and so to my lodgings to bed.  I this day heard that Mr. Martin
Noell is knighted by the King, which I much wonder at; but yet he is
certainly a very useful man.

6th.  Lay long, that is, till 6 and past before I rose, in order to sweat
a little away the cold which I was afraid I might have got yesterday, but
I bless God I am well.  So up and to my office, and then we met and sat
till noon, very full of business.  Then Sir John Minnes, both Sir Williams
and I to the Trinity House, where we had at dinner a couple of venison
pasties, of which I eat but little, being almost cloyed, having been at
five pasties in three days, namely, two at our own feast, and one
yesterday, and two to-day.  So home and at the office all the afternoon,
busy till nine at night, and so to my lodging and to bed.  This afternoon
I had my new key and the lock of my office door altered, having lost my
key the other day, which vexed me.

7th (Lord's day).  Up betimes and round about by the streets to my office,
and walked in the garden and in my office till my man Will rose, and then
sent to tell Sir J. Minnes that I would go with him to Whitehall, which
anon we did, in his coach, and to the Chapell, where I heard a good sermon
of the Dean of Ely's, upon returning to the old ways, and a most excellent
anthem, with symphonys between, sung by Captain Cooke.  Then home with Mr.
Fox and his lady; and there dined with them, where much company come to
them.  Most of our discourse was what ministers are flung out that will
not conform: and the care of the Bishop of London that we are here
supplied with very good men.  Thence to my Lord's, where nobody at home
but a woman that let me in, and Sarah above, whither I went up to her and
played and talked with her .  .  .  After I had talked an hour or two with
her I went and gave Mr. Hunt a short visit, he being at home alone, and
thence walked homewards, and meeting Mr. Pierce, the chyrurgeon, he took
me into Somersett House; and there carried me into the Queen-Mother's
presence-chamber, where she was with our own Queen sitting on her left
hand (whom I did never see before); and though she be not very charming,
yet she hath a good, modest, and innocent look, which is pleasing.  Here I
also saw Madam Castlemaine, and, which pleased me most, Mr. Crofts, the
King's bastard, a most pretty spark of about 15 years old, who, I
perceive, do hang much upon my Lady Castlemaine, and is always with her;
and, I hear, the Queens both of them are mighty kind to him.

     [James, the son of Charles II. by Lucy Walter, daughter of William
     Walter, of Roch Castle, co.  Pembroke.  He was born April 9th, 1649,
     and landed in England with the Queen-Mother, July 28th, 1662, when
     he bore the name of Crofts, after Lord Crofts, his governor.  He was
     created Duke of Monmouth, February 14th, 1663, and married Lady Anne
     Scott, daughter and heiress of Francis, second Earl of Buccleuch, on
     April 20th following.  In 1673 he took the name of Scott, and was
     created Duke of Buccleuch.]

By and by in comes the King, and anon the Duke and his Duchess; so that,
they being all together, was such a sight as I never could almost have
happened to see with so much ease and leisure.  They staid till it was
dark, and then went away; the King and his Queen, and my Lady Castlemaine
and young Crofts, in one coach and the rest in other, coaches.  Here were
great store of great ladies, but very few handsome.  The King and Queen
were very merry; and he would have made the Queen-Mother believe that his
Queen was with child, and said that she said so.  And the young Queen
answered, "You lye;" which was the first English word that I ever heard
her say which made the King good sport; and he would have taught her to
say in English, "Confess and be hanged."  The company being gone I walked
home with great content as I can be in for seeing the greatest rarity, and
yet a little troubled that I should see them before my wife's coming home,
I having made a promise that I would not, nor did I do it industriously
and by design, but by chance only.  To my office, to fit myself for
waiting on the Duke to-morrow morning with the rest of our company, and so
to my lodgings and to bed.

8th.  Up betimes and to my office preparing an account to give the Duke
this morning of what we have of late done at the office.  About 7 o'clock
I went forth thinking to go along with Sir John Minnes and the rest, and I
found them gone, which did vex me, so I went directly to the old Swan and
took boat before them to Sir G. Carteret's lodgings at Whitehall, and
there staying till he was dressed talking with him, he and I to St.
James's, where Sir Williams both and Sir John were come, and so up with
Mr. Coventry to the Duke; who, after he was out of his bed, did send for
us in; and, when he was quite ready, took us into his closet, and there
told us that he do intend to renew the old custom for the Admirals to have
their principal officers to meet them once a-week, to give them an account
what they have done that week; which I am glad of: and so the rest did
tell his Royal Highness that I could do it best for the time past.  And so
I produced my short notes, and did give him an account of all that we have
of late done; and proposed to him several things for his commands, which
he did give us, and so dismissed us.  The rest to Deptford, I to the
Exchequer to meet Mr. Townsend, where I hear he is gone to the Sun tavern,
and there found him with some friends at breakfast, which I eat with him,
and so we crossed the water together, and in walking I told him my brother
Tom's intentions for a wife, which he would do me all favour in to Mr.
Young, whose kinswoman he do look after.  We took boat again at the
Falcon, and there parted, and I to the old Swan, and so to the Change, and
there meeting Sir W. Warren did step to a tavern, and there sat and talked
about price of masts and other things, and so broke up and to my office to
see what business, and so we took water again, and at the Tower I over to
Redriffe, and there left him in the boat and walked to Deptford, and there
up and down the yard speaking with people, and so Sir W. Pen coming out of
the payhouse did single me out to tell me Sir J. Minnes' dislike of my
blinding his lights over his stairs (which indeed is very bad) and
blocking up the house of office on the leads.  Which did trouble me.  So I
went into the payhouse and took an occasion of speaking with him alone,
and did give him good satisfaction therein, so as that I am well pleased
and do hope now to have my closet on the leads without any more trouble,
for he do not object against my having a door upon the leads, but that all
my family should not make it a thoroughfare, which I am contented with.
So to the pay, and in the evening home in the barge, and so to my office,
and after doing some business there to my lodgings, and so to bed.

9th.  At my office betimes, and by and by we sat, and at noon Mr.
Coventry, Sir J. Minnes, Mr. Pett, and myself by water to Deptford, where
we met Sir G. C., Sir W. B., and Sir W. P. At the pay of a ship, and we
dined together on a haunch of good venison boiled, and after dinner
returned again to the office, and there met several tradesmen by our
appointment to know of them their lowest rates that they will take for
their several provisions that they sell to us, for I do resolve to know
that, and to buy no dearer, that so when we know the lowest rate, it shall
be the Treasurer's fault, and not ours, that we pay dearer.  This
afternoon Sir John Minnes, Mr. Coventry, and I went into Sir John's
lodgings, where he showed us how I have blinded all his lights, and
stopped up his garden door, and other things he takes notice of that he
resolves to abridge me of, which do vex me so much that for all this
evening and all night in my bed, so great a fool I am, and little master
of my passion, that I could not sleep for the thoughts of my losing the
privilege of the leads, and other things which in themselves are small and
not worth half the trouble.  The more fool am I, and must labour against
it for shame, especially I that used to preach up Epictetus's rule:

     ["Some things are in our power, others are not" Pepys means,
     "I ought not to vex myself about what I cannot control."]

Late at my office, troubled in mind, and then to bed, but could hardly
sleep at night.

10th.  Up and to my house, and there contrived a way how Sir John Minnes
shall come into the leads, and yet I save part of the closet I hoped for,
which, if it will not please him, I am a madman to be troubled at it. To
my office, and then at my house among my lazy workmen all day.  In the
afternoon to the Wardrobe to speak with Mr. Townsend, who tells me that he
has spoke with Mr. Young about my brother Tom's business, and finds that
he has made enquiry of him, and do hear him so well spoken of that he
doubts not that the business will take with ordinary endeavours.  So to my
brother's, and there finding both door and hatch open, I went in and
knocked 3 or 4 times, and nobody came to me, which troubled me mightily;
at last came Margaret, who complained of Peter, who by and by came in, and
I did rattle him soundly for it.  I did afterwards take occasion to talk
seriously alone with Margaret, who I find a very discreet, good woman, and
tells me, upon my demand, that her master is a very good husband, and
minds his business well, but his fault is that he has not command over his
two men, but they do what they list, and care not for his commands, and
especially on Sundays they go whither they please, and not to church,
which vexes me mightily, and I am resolved to school [him] soundly for it,
it being so much unlike my father, that I cannot endure it in myself or
him.  So walked home and in my way at the Exchange found my uncle Wight,
and he and I to an alehouse to drink a cup of beer, and so away, and I
home and at the office till 9 o'clock and past, and so to my lodgings.  I
forgot that last night Mr. Cooke came to me to make his peace for inviting
my brother lately out of town without my leave, but he do give me such a
character of the lady that he has found out for him that I do much rejoice
at, and did this night write a letter to her, which he enclosed in one of
his, and by the report that I hear of her I confess I am much pleased with
the match.

11th.  Up, but not so soon as I have of late practised, my little trouble
of mind and the shortness of the days making me to lie a little longer
than I used to do, but I must make it up by sitting up longer of nights.
To my office, whither my brother Tom, whom I chide sufficiently for
yesterday's work.  So we sat at the office all the morning, some of us at
Deptford paying the ordinary there; at noon Sir W. Pen took me to his
lodgings to dinner, and after dinner I to my office again, and now and
then to see how my work goes on, and so to my office late, and so to my
lodgings, and after staying up till past 12 at night, at my musique upon
my lute, to bed.  This night Tom came to show me a civil letter sent him
from his mistress.  I am pleased well enough with the business.

12th.  Up betimes and to my office, and up to my workmen, which goes on
slowly and troubles me much.  Besides, my mind is troubled till I see how
Sir John Minnes will carry himself to me about my lodgings, for all my
fear is that he will get my best chamber from me, for as for the leads I
care not a farthing for them.  At my office all the morning, Mr. Lewes
teaching me to understand the method of making up Purser's accounts, which
is very needful for me and very hard.  Dined at home all in dirt, and my
mind weary of being thus out of order, but I hope in God it will away, but
for the present I am very melancholy, as I have been a great while.  All
the afternoon till 9 at night at my office, and then home and eat an egg
or two, and so to my lodgings and to bed.  This day, by letters from my
father, I hear that Captain Ferrers, who is with my Lord in the country,
was at Brampton (with Mr. Creed) to see him; and that a day or two ago,
being provoked to strike one of my Lord's footmen, the footman drew his
sword, and hath almost cut the fingers of one of his hands off; which I am
sorry for: but this is the vanity of being apt to command and strike.

13th.  Up betimes and to my office, and we sat all the morning, and then
at noon dined alone at home, and so among my work folks studying how to
get my way sure to me to go upon the leads, which I fear at last I must be
contented to go without, but, however, my mind is troubled still about it.
We met again in the afternoon to set accounts even between the King and
the masters of ships hired to carry provisions to Lisbon, and in the
evening Mr. Moore came to me and did lie with me at my lodgings.  It is
great pleasure to me his company and discourse, and did talk also about my
law business, which I must now fall upon minding again, the term coming on
apace.  So to bed.

14th (Lord's day).  Up very early, and Mr. Moore taking leave of me the
barber came and trimmed me (I having him now to come to me again after I
have used a pumice-stone a good while, not but what I like this where I
cannot conveniently have a barber, but here I cannot keep my hair dry
without one), and so by water to White Hall, by the way hearing that the
Bishop of London had given a very strict order against boats going on
Sundays, and as I come back again, we were examined by the masters of the
company in another boat; but I told them who I was.  But the door not
being open to Westminster stairs there, called in at the Legg and drank a
cup of ale and a toast, which I have not done many a month before, but it
served me for my two glasses of wine to-day.  Thence to St. James's to Mr.
Coventry, and there staid talking privately with him an hour in his
chamber of the business of our office, and found him to admiration good
and industrious, and I think my most true friend in all things that are
fair.  He tells me freely his mind of every man and in every thing. Thence
to White Hall chapel, where sermon almost done, and I heard Captain
Cooke's new musique.  This the first day of having vialls and other
instruments to play a symphony between every verse of the anthem; but the
musique more full than it was the last Sunday, and very fine it is.

     [Charles II. determined to form his own chapel on the model of that
     at Versailles.  Twenty-four instrumentalists were engaged, and this
     was the first day upon which they were brought into requisition.
     Evelyn alludes to the change in his Diary, but he puts the date down
     as the 21st instead of the 14th.  "Instead of the antient, grave and
     solemn wind musiq accompanying the organ, was introduc'd a concert
     of 24 violins between every pause after the French fantastical light
     way, better suiting a tavern or playhouse than a church.  This was
     the first time of change, and now we no more heard the cornet which
     gave life to the organ, that instrument quite left off in which the
     English were so skilful."  A list of the twenty-four fiddlers in
     1674, taken from an Exchequer document, "The names of the Gents of
     his Majesties Private Musick paid out of the Exchequer," is printed
     in North's "Memoires of Musick," ed.  Rimbault, 1846, p. 98 (note).]

But yet I could discern Captain Cooke to overdo his part at singing, which
I never did before.  Thence up into the Queen's presence, and there saw
the Queen again as I did last Sunday, and some fine ladies with her; but,
my troth, not many.  Thence to Sir G. Carteret's, and find him to have
sprained his foot and is lame, but yet hath been at chappell, and my Lady
much troubled for one of her daughters that is sick.  I dined with them,
and a very pretty lady, their kinswoman, with them.  My joy is, that I do
think I have good hold on Sir George and Mr. Coventry.  Sir George told me
of a chest of drawers that were given Sir W. B. by Hughes the rope-maker,
whom he has since put out of his employment, and now the fellow do cry out
upon Sir W. for his cabinet.  So home again by water and to church, and
from church Sir Williams both and Sir John Minnes into the garden, and
anon Sir W. Pen and I did discourse about my lodgings and Sir J. Minnes,
and I did open all my mind to him, and he told me what he had heard, and I
do see that I shall hardly keep my best lodging chamber, which troubles
me, but I did send for Goodenough the plasterer, who tells me that it did
ever belong to my lodgings, but lent by Mr. Payles to Mr. Smith, and so I
will strive hard for it before I lose it.  So to supper with them at Sir
W. Batten's, and do counterfeit myself well pleased, but my heart is
troubled and offended at the whole company.  So to my office to prepare
notes to read to the Duke to-morrow morning, and so to my lodgings and to
bed, my mind a little eased because I am resolved to know the worst
concerning my lodgings tomorrow.  Among other things Sir W. Pen did tell
me of one of my servants looking into Sir J. Minnes' window when my Lady
Batten lay there, which do much trouble them, and me also, and I fear will
wholly occasion my loosing the leads.  One thing more he told me of my
Jane's cutting off a carpenter's long mustacho, and how the fellow cried,
and his wife would not come near him a great while, believing that he had
been among some of his wenches.  At which I was merry, though I perceive
they discourse of it as a crime of hers, which I understand not.

15th.  Up betimes to meet with the plasterer and bricklayer that did first
divide our lodgings, and they do both tell me that my chamber now in
dispute did ever belong to my lodgings, which do put me into good quiet of
mind.  So by water with Sir Wm. Pen to White Hall; and, with much ado, was
fain to walk over the piles through the bridge, while Sir W. Batten and
Sir J. Minnes were aground against the bridge, and could not in a great
while get through.  At White Hall we hear that the Duke of York is gone
a-hunting to-day; and so we returned: they going to the Duke of
Albemarle's, where I left them (after I had observed a very good picture
or two there), and so home, and there did resolve to give up my endeavours
for access to the leads, and to shut up my doors lest the being open might
give them occasion of longing for my chamber, which I am in most fear
about.  So to Deptford, and took my Lady Batten and her daughter and Mrs.
Turner along with me, they being going through the garden thither, they to
Mr. Unthwayte's and I to the Pay, and then about 3 o'clock went to dinner
(Sir W. Pen and I), and after dinner to the Pay again, and at night by
barge home all together, and so to my lodgings and to bed, my mind full of
trouble about my house.

16th.  Up and to my workmen, and then to the office, and there we sat till
noon; then to the Exchange, and in my way met with the housekeeper of this
office, and he did give me so good an account of my chamber in my house
about which I am so much troubled that I am well at ease in my mind.  At
my office all the afternoon alone.  In the evening Sir J. M. and I walked
together a good while in the garden, very pleasant, and takes no notice
that he do design any further trouble to me about my house.  At night eat
a bit of bread and cheese, and so to my lodgings and to bed, my mind ill
at ease for these particulars: my house in dirt, and like to lose my best
chamber.  My wife writes me from the country that she is not pleased there
with my father nor mother, nor any of her servants, and that my boy is
turned a very rogue.  I have L30 to pay to the cavaliers: then a doubt
about my being forced to leave all my business here, when I am called to
the court at Brampton; and lastly, my law businesses, which vex me to my
heart what I shall be able to do next term, which is near at hand.

17th.  At my office all the morning, and at noon to the Exchange, where
meeting Mr. Moore and Mr. Stucky, of the Wardrobe, we to an ordinary to
dinner, and after dinner Mr. Moore and I about 3 o'clock to Paul's school,
to wait upon Mr. Crumlum (Mr. Moore having a hopeful lad, a kinsman of
his, there at school), who we take very luckily, and went up to his
chamber with him, where there was also an old fellow student of Mr.
Crumlum's, one Mr. Newell, come to see him, of whom he made so much, and
of me, that the truth is he with kindness did drink more than I believe he
used to do, and did begin to be a little impertinent, the more when after
all he would in the evening go forth with us and give us a bottle of wine
abroad, and at the tavern met with an acquaintance of his that did
occasion impertinent discourse, that though I honour the man, and he do
declare abundance of learning and worth, yet I confess my opinion is much
lessened of him, and therefore let it be a caution to myself not to love
drink, since it has such an effect upon others of greater worth in my own
esteem.  I could not avoid drinking of 5 glasses this afternoon with him,
and after I had parted with him Mr. Moore and I to my house, and after we
had eaten something to my lodgings, where the master of the house, a very
ordinary fellow, was ready to entertain me and took me into his
dining-room where his wife was, a pretty and notable lady, too fine surely
for him, and too much wit too.  Here I was forced to stay with them a good
while and did drink again, there being friends of theirs with them.  At
last being weary of his idle company, I bid good-night and so to my
chamber and Mr. [Moore] and I to bed, neither of us well pleased with our
afternoon's work, merely from our being witnesses of Mr. Crumlum's
weakness.  This day my boy is come from Brampton, and my wife I think the
next week.

18th.  At the office all the morning, and at noon Sir G. Carteret, Mr.
Coventry, and I by invitation to dinner to Sheriff Maynell's, the great
money-man; he, Alderman Backwell, and much noble and brave company, with
the privilege of their rare discourse, which is great content to me above
all other things in the world.  And after a great dinner and much
discourse, we arose and took leave, and home to the business of my office,
where I thank God I take delight, and in the evening to my lodging and to
bed.  Among other discourse, speaking concerning the great charity used in
Catholic countrys, Mr. Ashburnham did tell us, that this last year, there
being great want of corn in Paris, and so a collection made for the poor,
there was two pearls brought in, nobody knew from whom (till the Queen,
seeing them, knew whose they were, but did not discover it), which were
sold for 200,000 crownes.

19th.  Up betimes and to my office, and at 9 o'clock, none of the rest
going, I went alone to Deptford, and there went on where they left last
night to pay Woolwich yard, and so at noon dined well, being chief at the
table, and do not see but every body begins to give me as much respect and
honour as any of the rest.  After dinner to Pay again, and so till 9 at
night, my great trouble being that I was forced to begin an ill practice
of bringing down the wages of servants, for which people did curse me,
which I do not love.  At night, after I had eaten a cold pullet, I walked
by brave moonshine, with three or four armed men to guard me, to Redriffe,
it being a joy to my heart to think of the condition that I am now in,
that people should of themselves provide this for me, unspoke to.  I hear
this walk is dangerous to walk alone by night, and much robbery committed
here.  So from thence by water home, and so to my lodgings to bed.

20th.  Up betimes and to my office, where I found my brother Tom, who
tells me that his mistress's mother has wrote a letter to Mr. Lull of her
full satisfaction about Tom, of which I was glad, and do think the
business will take.  All this morning we sat at the office, Sir J. Minnes
and I.  And so dined at home, and among my workmen all the afternoon, and
in the evening Tom brought Mr. Lull to me, a friend of his mistress, a
serious man, with whom I spoke, and he gives me a good account of her and
of their satisfaction in Tom, all which pleases me well.  We walked a good
while in the garden together, and did give him a glass of wine at my
office, and so parted.  So to write letters by the post and news of this
to my father concerning Tom, and so home to supper and to my lodgings and
to bed.  To-night my barber sent me his man to trim me, who did live in
King Street in Westminster lately, and tells me that three or four that I
knew in that street, tradesmen, are lately fallen mad, and some of them
dead, and the others continue mad.  They live all within a door or two one
of another.

21st (Lord's day).  Got up betimes and walked to St. James's, and there to
Mr. Coventry, and sat an hour with him, talking of business of the office
with great pleasure, and I do perceive he do speak his whole mind to me.
Thence to the Park, where by appointment I met my brother Tom and Mr.
Cooke, and there spoke about Tom's business, and to good satisfaction.
The Queen coming by in her coach, going to her chappell at St. James's'
(the first time it hath been ready for her), I crowded after her, and I
got up to the room where her closet is; and there stood and saw the fine
altar, ornaments, and the fryers in their habits, and the priests come in
with their fine copes and many other very fine things. I heard their
musique too; which may be good, but it did not appear so to me, neither as
to their manner of singing, nor was it good concord to my ears, whatever
the matter was.  The Queene very devout: but what pleased me best was to
see my dear Lady Castlemaine, who, tho' a Protestant, did wait upon the
Queen to chappell.  By and by, after mass was done, a fryer with his cowl
did rise up and preach a sermon in Portuguese; which I not understanding,
did go away, and to the King's chappell, but that was done; and so up to
the Queen's presence-chamber, where she and the King was expected to dine:
but she staying at St. James's, they were forced to remove the things to
the King's presence [chamber]; and there he dined alone, and I with Mr.
Fox very finely; but I see I must not make too much of that liberty for my
honour sake only, not but that I am very well received.  After dinner to
Tom's, and so home, and after walking a good while in the garden I went to
my uncle Wight's, where I found my aunt in mourning and making sad stories
for the loss of her dear sister Nicholls, of which I should have been very
weary but that pretty Mrs. Margaret Wight came in and I was much pleased
with her company, and so all supper did vex my aunt talking in
commendation of the mass which I had been at to-day, but excused it
afterwards that it was only to make mirth.  And so after supper broke up
and home, and after putting my notes in order against to-morrow I went to
bed.

22nd.  Up betimes among my workmen, hastening to get things ready against
my wife's coming, and so with Sir J. M., Sir W. B., and Sir W. P., by
coach to St. James's, and there with the Duke.  I did give him an account
of all things past of late; but I stood in great pain, having a great fit
of the colic, having catched cold yesterday by putting off my stockings to
wipe my toes, but at last it lessened, and then I was pretty well again,
but in pain all day more or less.  Thence I parted from them and walked to
Greatorex's, and there with him did overlook many pretty things, new
inventions, and have bespoke a weather glass of him.  Thence to my Lord
Crew's, and dined with the servants, he having dined; and so, after
dinner, up to him, and sat an hour talking with him of publique, and my
Lord's private businesses, with much content.  So to my brother Tom's,
where Mr. Cooke expected me, and did go with me to see Mr. Young and Mr.
Lull in Blackfryers, kindred of Tom's mistress, where I was very well
used, and do find things to go in the business to my good content. Thence
to Mr. Townsend, and did there talk with Mr. Young himself also, and then
home and to my study, and so to my lodgings and to bed.

23rd.  Up betimes and with my workmen, taking some pleasure to see my work
come towards an end, though I am vexed every day enough with their delay.
We met and sat all the morning, dined at home alone, and with my workmen
all the afternoon, and in the evening by water and land to Deptford to
give order for things about my house, and came back again by coach with
Sir G. Carteret and Sir W. Batten (who has been at a Pay to-day), and to
my office and did some business, and so to supper and to my lodgings, and
so to bed.  In our coming home Sir G. Carteret told me how in most
cabaretts in France they have writ upon the walls in fair letters to be
read, "Dieu te regarde," as a good lesson to be in every man's mind, and
have also, as in Holland, their poor's box; in both which places at the
making all contracts and bargains they give so much, which they call God's
penny.

24th.  Up betimes and among my workmen, and among them all the morning
till noon, and then to my Lord Crew's, and there dined alone with him, and
among other things he do advise me by all means to keep my Lord Sandwich
from proceeding too far in the business of Tangier.  First, for that he is
confident the King will not be able to find money for the building the
Mole; and next, for that it is to be done as we propose it by the reducing
of the garrison; and then either my Lord must oppose the Duke of York, who
will have the Irish regiment under the command of Fitzgerald continued, or
else my Lord Peterborough, who is concerned to have the English continued,
and he, it seems, is gone back again merely upon my Lord Sandwich's
encouragement.  Thence to Mr. Wotton, the shoemaker's, and there bought a
pair of boots, cost me 30s., and he told me how Bird hath lately broke his
leg, while he was fencing in "Aglaura," upon the stage, and that the new
theatre of all will be ready against term.  So to my brother's, and there
discoursed with him and Mr. Cooke about their journey to Tom's mistress
again, and I did speak with Mr. Croxton about measuring of silk flags.  So
by water home and to my workmen, and so at night till late at my office,
inditing a letter from Tom to his mistress upon his sending her a watch
for a token, and so home and to supper, and to my lodgings and to bed.  It
is my content that by several hands to-day I hear that I have the name of
good-natured man among the poor people that come to the office.

25th.  Up betimes and to my workmen, and then to the office, where we sat
all the morning.  So home to dinner alone and then to my workmen till
night, and so to my office till bedtime, and so after supper to my
lodgings and to bed.  This evening I sat awhile at Sir W. Batten's with
Sir J. Minnes, &c., where he told us among many other things how in
Portugal they scorn to make a seat for a house of office, but they do
.  .  .  . all in pots and so empty them in the river.  I did also
hear how the woman, formerly nurse to Mrs. Lemon (Sir W. Batten's
daughter), her child was torn to pieces by two doggs at Walthamstow this
week, and is dead, which is very strange.

26th.  Up betimes and among my workmen.  By and by to Sir W. Batten, who
with Sir J. M. are going to Chatham this morning, and I was in great pain
till they were gone that I might see whether Sir John do speak any thing
of my chamber that I am afraid of losing or no.  But he did not, and so my
mind is a little at more ease.  So all day long till night among my
workmen, and in the afternoon did cause the partition between the entry
and the boy's room to be pulled down to lay it all into one, which I hope
will please me and make my coming in more pleasant.  Late at my office at
night writing a letter of excuse to Sir G. Carteret that I cannot wait
upon him to-morrow morning to Chatham as I promised, which I am loth to do
because of my workmen and my wife's coming to town to-morrow.  So to my
lodgings and to bed.

27th.  Up betimes and among my workmen, and with great pleasure see the
posts in the entry taken down beyond expectation, so that now the boy's
room being laid into the entry do make my coming in very handsome, which
was the only fault remaining almost in my house.  We sat all the morning,
and in the afternoon I got many jobbs done to my mind, and my wife's
chamber put into a good readiness against her coming, which she did at
night, for Will did, by my leave to go, meet her upon the road, and at
night did bring me word she was come to my brother's, by my order.  So I
made myself ready and put things at home in order, and so went thither to
her.  Being come, I found her and her maid and dogg very well, and herself
grown a little fatter than she was.  I was very well pleased to see her,
and after supper to bed, and had her company with great content and much
mutual love, only I do perceive that there has been falling out between my
mother and she, and a little between my father and she; but I hope all is
well again, and I perceive she likes Brampton House and seat better than
ever I did myself, and tells me how my Lord hath drawn a plot of some
alteracions to be made there, and hath brought it up, which I saw and like
well.  I perceive my Lord and Lady have been very kind to her, and Captn.
Ferrers so kind that I perceive I have some jealousy of him, but I know
what is the Captain's manner of carriage, and therefore it is nothing to
me.  She tells me of a Court like to be in a little time, which troubles
me, for I would not willingly go out of town.

28th (Lord's day).  Waked early, and fell talking one with another with
great pleasure of my house at Brampton and that here, and other matters.
She tells me what a rogue my boy is, and strange things he has been found
guilty of, not fit to name, which vexes [me], but most of all the unquiett
life that my mother makes my father and herself lead through her want of
reason.  At last I rose, and with Tom to the French Church at the Savoy,
where I never was before--a pretty place it is--and there they have the
Common Prayer Book read in French, and, which I never saw before, the
minister do preach with his hat off, I suppose in further conformity with
our Church.  So to Tom's to dinner with my wife, and there came Mr. Cooke,
and Joyce Norton do also dine there, and after dinner Cooke and I did talk
about his journey and Tom's within a day or two about his mistress.  And I
did tell him my mind and give him my opinion in it.  So I walked home and
found my house made a little clean, and pleases me better and better, and
so to church in the afternoon, and after sermon to my study, and there did
some things against to-morrow that I go to the Duke's, and so walked to
Tom's again, and there supped and to bed with good content of mind.

29th (Michaelmas day).  This day my oaths for drinking of wine and going
to plays are out, and so I do resolve to take a liberty to-day, and then
to fall to them again.  Up and by coach to White Hall, in my way taking up
Mr. Moore, and walked with him, talking a good while about business, in
St. James's Park, and there left him, and to Mr. Coventry's, and so with
him and Sir W. Pen up to the Duke, where the King came also and staid till
the Duke was ready.  It being Collarday, we had no time to talk with him
about any business.  They went out together.  So we parted, and in the
park Mr. Cooke by appointment met me, to whom I did give my thoughts
concerning Tom's match and their journey tomorrow, and did carry him by
water to Tom's, and there taking up my wife, maid, dog, and him, did carry
them home, where my wife is much pleased with my house, and so am I fully.
I sent for some dinner and there dined, Mrs. Margaret Pen being by, to
whom I had spoke to go along with us to a play this afternoon, and then to
the King's Theatre, where we saw "Midsummer's Night's Dream," which I had
never seen before, nor shall ever again, for it is the most insipid
ridiculous play that ever I saw in my life.  I saw, I confess, some good
dancing and some handsome women, which was all my pleasure.  Thence set my
wife down at Madam Turner's, and so by coach home, and having delivered
Pegg Pen to her father safe, went home, where I find Mr. Deane, of
Woolwich, hath sent me the modell he had promised me; but it so far
exceeds my expectations, that I am sorry almost he should make such a
present to no greater a person; but I am exceeding glad of it, and shall
study to do him a courtesy for it.  So to my office and wrote a letter to
Tom's mistress's mother to send by Cooke to-morrow. Then came Mr. Moore
thinking to have looked over the business of my Brampton papers against
the Court, but my mind was so full of other matters (as it is my nature
when I have been a good while from a business, that I have almost forgot
it, I am loth to come to it again) that I could not set upon it, and so he
and I past the evening away in discourse, and to my lodgings and to bed.

30th.  We rose, and he about his business, and I to my house to look over
my workmen; but good God! how I do find myself by yesterday's liberty hard
to be brought to follow business again, but however, I must do it,
considering the great sweet and pleasure and content of mind that I have
had since I did leave drink and plays, and other pleasures, and followed
my business.  So to my office, where we sat till noon, and then I to
dinner with Sir W. Pen, and while we were at it coming my wife to the
office, and so I sent for her up, and after dinner we took coach and to
the Duke's playhouse, where we saw "The Duchess of Malfy" well performed,
but Betterton and Ianthe to admiration.  That being done, home again, by
coach, and my wife's chamber got ready for her to lie in to-night, but my
business did call me to my office, so that staying late I did not lie with
her at home, but at my lodgings.  Strange to see how easily my mind do
revert to its former practice of loving plays and wine, having given
myself a liberty to them but these two days; but this night I have again
bound myself to Christmas next, in which I desire God to bless me and
preserve me, for under God I find it to be the best course that ever I
could take to bring myself to mind my business.  I have also made up this
evening my monthly ballance, and find that, notwithstanding the loss of
L30 to be paid to the loyall and necessitous cavaliers by act of
Parliament,

     [Two acts were passed in 1662 for this purpose, viz., 13 and 14 Car.
     II. cap. 8: "An act for distribution of threescore thousand pounds
     amongst the truly loyal and indigent commission officers, and for
     assessing of offices and distributing the monies thereby raised for
     their further supply;" and cap.  9, "An act for the relief of poor
     and maimed officers and soldiers who have faithfully served his
     Majesty and his royal father in the late wars."]

yet I am worth about L680, for which the Lord God be praised.  My
condition at present is this:--I have long been building, and my house to
my great content is now almost done.  But yet not so but that I shall have
dirt, which troubles me too, for my wife has been in the country at
Brampton these two months, and is now come home a week or two before the
house is ready for her.  My mind is somewhat troubled about my best
chamber, which I question whether I shall be able to keep or no.  I am
also troubled for the journey which I must needs take suddenly to the
Court at Brampton, but most of all for that I am not provided to
understand my business, having not minded it a great while, and at the
best shall be able but to make a bad matter of it, but God, I hope, will
guide all to the best, and I am resolved to-morrow to fall hard to it.  I
pray God help me therein, for my father and mother and all our well-doings
do depend upon my care therein.  My Lord Sandwich has lately been in the
country, and very civil to my wife, and hath himself spent some pains in
drawing a plot of some alterations in our house there, which I shall
follow as I get money.  As for the office, my late industry hath been
such, as I am become as high in reputation as any man there, and good hold
I have of Mr. Coventry and Sir G. Carteret, which I am resolved, and it is
necessary for me, to maintain by all fair means. Things are all quiett,
but the King poor, and no hopes almost of his being otherwise, by which
things will go to rack, especially in the Navy. The late outing of the
Presbyterian clergy by their not renouncing the Covenant as the Act of
Parliament commands, is the greatest piece of state now in discourse.  But
for ought I see they are gone out very peaceably, and the people not so
much concerned therein as was expected. My brother Tom is gone out of town
this day, to make a second journey to his mistress at Banbury, of which I
have good expectations, and pray God to bless him therein.  My mind, I
hope, is settled to follow my business again, for I find that two days'
neglect of business do give more discontent in mind than ten times the
pleasure thereof can repair again, be it what it will.

                          DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS.
                                 OCTOBER
                                   1662

October 1st.  Up with my mind pretty well at rest about my accounts and
other business, and so to my house and there put my work to business, and
then down to Deptford to do the same there, and so back and with my
workmen all the afternoon, and my wife putting a chamber in order for us
to lie in.  At night to look over some Brampton papers against the Court
which I expect every day to hear of, and that done home and with my wife
to bed, the first time I have lain there these two months and more, which
I am now glad to do again, and do so like the chamber as it is now ordered
that all my fear is my not keeping it.  But I hope the best, for it would
vex me to the heart to lose it.

2nd.  Up and to the office, where we sat till noon, and then to dinner,
and Mr. Moore came and dined with me, and after dinner to look over my
Brampton papers, which was a most necessary work, though it is not so much
to my content as I could wish.  I fear that it must be as it can, and not
as I would.  He being gone I to my workmen again, and at night by coach
towards Whitehall took up Mr. Moore and set him at my Lord's, and myself,
hearing that there was a play at the Cockpit (and my Lord Sandwich, who
came to town last night, at it), I do go thither, and by very great
fortune did follow four or five gentlemen who were carried to a little
private door in a wall, and so crept through a narrow place and come into
one of the boxes next the King's, but so as I could not see the King or
Queene, but many of the fine ladies, who yet are really not so handsome
generally as I used to take them to be, but that they are finely dressed.
Here we saw "The Cardinall," a tragedy I had never seen before, nor is
there any great matter in it.  The company that came in with me into the
box, were all Frenchmen that could speak no English, but Lord! what sport
they made to ask a pretty lady that they got among them that understood
both French and English to make her tell them what the actors said.
Thence to my Lord's, and saw him, and staid with him half an hour in his
chamber talking about some of mine and his own business, and so up to bed
with Mr. Moore in the chamber over my Lord's.

3rd.  Rose, and without taking leave or speaking to my Lord went out early
and walked home, calling at my brother's and Paul's Churchyard, but bought
nothing because of my oath, though I had a great mind to it.  At my
office, and with my workmen till noon, and then dined with my wife upon
herrings, the first I have eat this year, and so to my workmen again.  By
and by comes a gentleman to speak with my wife, and I found him to be a
gentleman that had used her very civilly in her coming up out of the
country, on which score I showed him great respect, and found him a very
ingenious gentleman, and sat and talked with him a great while. He gone,
to my workmen again, and in the evening comes Captain Ferrers, and sat and
talked a great while, and told me the story of his receiving his cut in
the hand by falling out with one of my Lord's footmen.  He told me also of
the impertinence and mischief that Ned Pickering has made in the country
between my Lord and all his servants almost by his finding of faults,
which I am vexed to hear, it being a great disgrace to my Lord to have the
fellow seen to be so great still with him.  He brought me a letter from my
father, that appoints the day for the Court at Brampton to be the 13th of
this month; but I perceive he has kept the letter in his pocket these
three days, so that if the day had been sooner, I might have been spilt.
So that it is a great folly to send letters of business by any friend that
require haste.  He being gone I to my office all the evening, doing
business there till bedtime, it being now my manner since my wife is come
to spend too much of my daytime with her and the workmen and do my office
business at night, which must not be after the work of the house is done.
This night late I had notice that Dekins, the merchant, is dead this
afternoon suddenly, for grief that his daughter, my Morena, who has long
been ill, is given over by the Doctors.  For both which I am very sorry.
So home and to bed.

4th.  To my office all the morning, after I was up (my wife beginning to
make me lie long a mornings), where we sat till noon, and then dined at
home, and after a little with my workmen to my office till 9 at night,
among other things examining the particulars of the miscarriage of the
Satisfaction, sunk the other day on the Dutch coast through the negligence
of the pilott.

5th (Lord's day).  Lay long in bed talking with my wife, and among other
things fell out about my maid Sarah, whom my wife would fain put away,
when I think her as good a servant as ever came into a house, but it seems
my wife would have one that would dress a head well, but we were friends
at last.  I to church; and this day the parson has got one to read with a
surplice on.  I suppose himself will take it up hereafter, for a cunning
fellow he is as any of his coat.  Dined with my wife, and then to talk
again above, chiefly about her learning to dance against her going next
year into the country, which I am willing she shall do.  Then to church to
a tedious sermon, and thence walked to Tom's to see how things are in his
absence in the country, and so home and in my wife's chamber till bedtime
talking, and then to my office to put things in order to wait on the Duke
to-morrow morning, and so home and to bed.

6th.  Sir W. Pen and I early to St. James's by water, where Mr. Coventry,
finding the Duke in bed, and not very well, we did not stay to speak with
him, but to White Hall, and there took boat and down to Woolwich we went.
In our way Mr. Coventry telling us how of late upon enquiry into the
miscarriages of the Duke's family, Mr. Biggs, his steward, is found very
faulty, and is turned out of his employment.  Then we fell to reading of a
book which I saw the other day at my Lord Sandwich's, intended for the
late King, finely bound up, a treatise concerning the benefit the
Hollanders make of our fishing, but whereas I expected great matters from
it, I find it a very impertinent [book], and though some things good, yet
so full of tautologies, that we were weary of it.  At Woolwich we mustered
the yard, and then to the Hart to dinner, and then to the Rope-yard, where
I did vex Sir W. Pen I know to appear so well acquainted, I thought better
than he, in the business of hemp; thence to Deptford, and there looked
over several businesses, and wakened the officers there; so walked to
Redriffe, and thence, landing Sir W. Pen at the Tower, I to White Hall
with Mr. Coventry, and so to my Lord Sandwich's lodgings, but my Lord was
not within, being at a ball this night with the King at my Lady
Castlemaine's at next door.  But here to my trouble I hear that Mr. Moore
is gone very sick to the Wardrobe this afternoon, which troubles me much
both for his own sake and for mine, because of my law business that he
does for me and also for my Lord's matters.  So hence by water, late as it
was, to the Wardrobe, and there found him in a high fever, in bed, and
much cast down by his being ill.  So thought it not convenient to stay,
but left him and walked home, and there weary went to supper, and then the
barber came to me, and after he had done, to my office to set down my
journall of this day, and so home and to bed.

7th.  At the office all the morning, dined at home with my wife.  After
dinner with her by coach to see Mr. Moore, who continues ill.  I took his
books of accounts, and did discourse with him about my Lord's and my own
businesses, and there being Mr. Battersby by, did take notice of my having
paid him the L100 borrowed of him, which they both did confess and promise
to return me my bond.  Thence by water with Will.  Howe to Westminster,
and there staying a little while in the Hall (my wife's father and mother
being abroad, and so she returning presently) thence by coach to my
Lord's, and there I left money for Captain Ferrers to buy me two bands.
So towards the New Exchange, and there while my wife was buying things I
walked up and down with Dr. Williams, talking about my law businesses, and
thence took him to my brother's, and there gave him a glass of wine, and
so parted, and then by coach with my wife home, and Sir J. M. and Sir W.
B. being come from Chatham Pay I did go see them for complaisance, and so
home and to bed.

8th.  Up and by water to my Lord Sandwich's, and was with him a good while
in his chamber, and among other things to my extraordinary joy, he did
tell me how much I was beholding to the Duke of York, who did yesterday of
his own accord tell him that he did thank him for one person brought into
the Navy, naming myself, and much more to my commendation, which is the
greatest comfort and encouragement that ever I had in my life, and do owe
it all to Mr. Coventry's goodness and ingenuity.  I was glad above measure
of this.  Thence to Mr. Moore, who, I hope, is better than he was, and so
home and dined at home, and all the afternoon busy at my office, and at
night by coach to my Lord's again, thinking to speak with him, but he is
at White Hall with the King, before whom the puppet plays I saw this
summer in Covent-garden are acted this night.  Hither this night my
scallop,

     [A lace band, the edges of which were indented with segments of
     circles, so as to resemble a scallop shell.  The word "scallop" was
     used till recently for a part of a lady's dress embroidered and cut
     to resemble a scallop shell.]

bought and got made by Captain Ferrers' lady, is sent, and I brought it
home, a very neat one.  It cost me about L3, and L3 more I have given him
to buy me another.  I do find myself much bound to go handsome, which I
shall do in linen, and so the other things may be all the plainer.  Here I
staid playing some new tunes to parts with Wm. Howe, and, my Lord not
coming home, I came home late on foot, my boy carrying a link, and so eat
a bit and to bed, my head full of ordering of businesses against my
journey to-morrow, that there may be nothing done to my wrong in my
absence.  This day Sir W. Pen did speak to me from Sir J. Minnes to desire
my best chamber of me, and my great joy is that I perceive he do not stand
upon his right, which I was much afraid of, and so I hope I shall do well
enough with him for it, for I will not part with it by fair means, though
I contrive to let him have another room for it.

9th.  Up early about my business to get me ready for my journey.  But
first to the office; where we sat all the morning till noon, and then
broke up; and I bid them adieu for a week, having the Duke's leave got me
by Mr. Coventry.  To whom I did give thanks for my newes yesterday of the
Duke's words to my Lord Sandwich concerning me, which he took well; and do
tell me so freely his love and value of me, that my mind is now in as
great a state of quiett as to my interest in the office, as I could ever
wish to be.  I should this day have dined at Sir W. Pen's at a venison
pasty with the rest of our fellows, but I could not get time, but sent for
a bit home, and so between one and two o'clock got on horseback at our
back gate, with my man Will with me, both well-mounted on two grey horses.
We rode and got to Ware before night; and so resolved to ride on to
Puckeridge, which we did, though the way was bad, and the evening dark
before we got thither, by help of company riding before us; and among
others, a gentleman that took up at the same inn, the Falcon, with me, his
name Mr. Brian, with whom I supped, and was very good company, and a
scholar.  He tells me, that it is believed the Queen is with child, for
that the coaches are ordered to ride very easily through the streets.
After supper we paid the reckoning together, and so he to his chamber and
I to bed, very well, but my feet being much cramped by my new hard boots
that I bought the other day of Wotton were in much pain.  Will lay in
another bed in the chamber with me.

10th.  Up, and between eight and nine mounted again; but my feet so
swelled with yesterday's pain, that I could not get on my boots, which
vexed me to the blood, but was forced to pay 4s. for a pair of old shoes
of my landlord's, and so rid in shoes to Cambridge; but the way so good
that but for a little rain I had got very well thither, and set up at the
Beare: and there being spied in the street passing through the town my
cozen Angier came to me, and I must needs to his house, which I did; and
there found Dr. Fairbrother, with a good dinner, a barrel of good oysters,
a couple of lobsters, and wine.  But, above all, telling me that this day
there is a Congregation for the choice of some officers in the University,
he after dinner gets me a gown, cap, and hood, and carries me to the
Schooles, where Mr. Pepper, my brother's tutor, and this day chosen
Proctor, did appoint a M.A. to lead me into the Regent House, where I sat
with them, and did [vote] by subscribing papers thus: "Ego Samuel Pepys
eligo Magistrum Bernardum Skelton, (and which was more strange, my old
schoolfellow and acquaintance, and who afterwards did take notice of me,
and we spoke together), alterum e taxatoribus hujus Academiae in annum
sequentem."  The like I did for one Biggs, for the other Taxor, and for
other officers, as the Vice-Proctor (Mr. Covell), for Mr. Pepper, and
which was the gentleman that did carry me into the Regent House.  This
being done, and the Congregation dissolved by the Vice-Chancellor, I did
with much content return to my Cozen Angier's, being much pleased of doing
this jobb of work, which I had long wished for and could never have had
such a time as now to do it with so much ease.  Thence to Trinity Hall,
and there staid a good while with Dr. John Pepys, who tells me that [his]
brother Roger has gone out of town to keep a Court; and so I was forced to
go to Impington, to take such advice as my old uncle and his son Claxton
could give me.  Which I did, and there supped and talked with them, but
not of my business till by and by after supper comes in, unlooked for, my
cozen Roger, with whom by and by I discoursed largely, and in short he
gives me good counsel, but tells me plainly that it is my best way to
study a composition with my uncle Thomas, for that law will not help us,
and that it is but a folly to flatter ourselves, with which, though much
to my trouble, yet I was well satisfied, because it told me what I am to
trust to, and so to bed.

11th.  Up betimes, and after a little breakfast, and a very poor one, like
our supper, and such as I cannot feed on, because of my she-cozen
Claxton's gouty hands; and after Roger had carried me up and down his
house and orchards, to show me them, I mounted, and rode to Huntingdon,
and so to Brampton; where I found my father and two brothers, and Mr.
Cooke, my mother and sister.  So we are now all together, God knows when
we shall be so again.  I walked up and down the house and garden, and find
my father's alteracions very handsome.  But not so but that there will be
cause enough of doing more if ever I should come to live there, but it is,
however, very well for a country being as any little thing in the country.
So to dinner, where there being nothing but a poor breast of mutton, and
that ill-dressed, I was much displeased, there being Mr. Cooke there, who
I invited to come over with my brother thither, and for whom I was
concerned to make much of.  I told my father and mother of it, and so had
it very well mended for the time after, as long as I staid, though I am
very glad to see them live so frugally.  But now to my business.  I found
my uncle Thomas come into the country, and do give out great words, and
forwarns all our people of paying us rent, and gives out that he will
invalidate the Will, it being but conditional, we paying debts and
legacies, which we have not done, but I hope we shall yet go through well
enough.  I settled to look over papers, and discourse of business against
the Court till the evening; and then rode to Hinchingbroke (Will with me),
and there to my Lady's chamber and saw her, but, it being night, and my
head full of business, staid not long, but drank a cup of ale below, and
so home again, and to supper, and to bed, being not quiet in mind till I
speak with Piggott, to see how his business goes, whose land lies
mortgaged to my late uncle, but never taken up by him, and so I fear the
heire at law will do it and that we cannot, but my design is to supplant
him by pretending bonds as well as a mortgage for the same money, and so
as executor have the benefit of the bonds.

12th (Lord's day).  Made myself fine with Captain Ferrers's lace band,
being lothe to wear my own new scallop, it is so fine; and, after the
barber had done with us, to church, where I saw most of the gentry of the
parish; among others, Mrs. Hanbury, a proper lady, and Mr. Bernard and his
Lady, with her father, my late Lord St. John, who looks now like a very
plain grave man.  Mr. Wells preached a pretty good sermon, and they say he
is pretty well in his witts again.  So home to dinner, and so to walk in
the garden, and then to Church again, and so home, there coming several
people about business, and among others Mr. Piggott, who gives me good
assurance of his truth to me and our business, in which I am very much
pleased, and tells me what my uncle Thomas said to him and what he
designs, which (in fine) is to be admitted to the estate as well as we,
which I must endeavour to oppose as well as I can.  So to supper, but my
mind is so full of our business that I am no company at all, and then
their drink do not please me, till I did send to Goody Stanks for some of
her's which is very small and fresh, with a little taste of wormewood,
which ever after did please me very well.  So after supper to bed,
thinking of business, but every night getting my brother John to go up
with me for discourse sake, while I was making unready.

     [That is, "undressing."  So of the French lords leaping over the
     walls in their shirts

         "Alenc.  How now, my lords!  what all unready so?
          Bast.  Unready!  ay, and glad we 'scaped so well."
                         Henry VI., act ii., sc. i.--M. B.]

13th.  Up to Hinchingbroke, and there with Mr. Sheply did look all over
the house, and I do, I confess, like well of the alteracions, and do like
the staircase, but there being nothing to make the outside more regular
and modern, I am not satisfied with it, but do think it to be too much to
be laid out upon it.  Thence with Sheply to Huntingdon to the Crown, and
there did sit and talk, and eat a breakfast of cold roast beef, and so he
to St. Ives Market, and I to Sir Robert Bernard's for council, having a
letter from my Lord Sandwich to that end.  He do give it me with much
kindness in appearance, and upon my desire do promise to put off my
uncle's admittance, if he can fairly, and upon the whole do make my case
appear better to me than my cozen Roger did, but not so but that we are
liable to much trouble, and that it will be best to come to an agreement
if possible.  With my mind here also pretty well to see things proceed so
well I returned to Brampton, and spent the morning in looking over papers
and getting my copies ready against to-morrow.  So to dinner, and then to
walk with my father and other business, when by and by comes in my uncle
Thomas and his son Thomas to see us, and very calm they were and we to
them.  And after a short How do you, and drinking a cup of beer, they went
away again, and so by and by my father and I to Mr. Phillips, and there
discoursed with him in order to to-morrow's business of the Court and
getting several papers ready, when presently comes in my uncle Thomas and
his son thither also, but finding us there I believe they were
disappointed and so went forth again, and went to the house that Prior has
lately bought of us (which was Barton's) and there did make entry and
forbade paying rent to us, as now I hear they have done everywhere else,
and that that was their intent in coming to see us this day.  I perceive
most of the people that do deal with us begin to be afraid that their
title to what they buy will not be good.  Which troubled me also I confess
a little, but I endeavoured to remove all as well as I could. Among other
things they make me afraid that Barton was never admitted to that that my
uncle bought of him, but I hope the contrary.  Thence home, and with my
father took a melancholy walk to Portholme, seeing the country-maids
milking their cows there, they being there now at grass, and to see with
what mirth they come all home together in pomp with their milk, and
sometimes they have musique go before them.  So back home again, and to
supper, and in comes Piggott with a counterfeit bond which by agreement
between us (though it be very just in itself) he has made, by which I
shall lay claim to the interest of the mortgage money, and so waiting with
much impatience and doubt the issue of to-morrow's Court, I to bed, but
hardly slept half an hour the whole night, my mind did so run with fears
of to-morrow.

14th.  Up, and did digest into a method all I could say in our defence, in
case there should be occasion, for I hear he will have counsel to plead
for him in the Court, and so about nine o'clock to the court at the
Lordshipp where the jury was called; and there being vacancies, they would
have had my father, in respect to him, [to] have been one of the Homage,
but he thought fit to refuse it, he not knowing enough the customs of the
town.  They being sworn and the charge given them, they fell to our
business, finding the heir-at-law to be my uncle Thomas; but Sir Robert
[Bernard] did tell them that he had seen how the estate was devised to my
father by my uncle's will, according to the custom of the manour, which
they would have denied, first, that it was not according to the custom of
the manour, proposing some difficulty about the half-acre of land which is
given the heir-at-law according to custom, which did put me into great
fear lest it might not be in my uncle's possession at his death, but
mortgaged with other to T. Trice (who was there, and was with my good will
admitted to Taylor's house mortgaged to him if not being worth the money
for which it was mortgaged, which I perceive he now, although he lately
bragged the contrary, yet is now sensible of, and would have us to redeem
it with money, and he would now resurrender it to us rather than the
heir-at-law) or else that it was part of Goody Gorum's in which she has a
life, and so might not be capable of being according to the custom given
to the heir-at-law, but Will Stanks tells me we are sure enough against
all that.  Then they fell to talk of Piggott's land mortgaged to my uncle,
but he never admitted to it, which they now as heir would have admitted
to.  But the steward, as he promised me, did find pretensions very kindly
and readily to put off their admittance, by which I find they are much
defeated, and if ever, I hope, will now listen to a treaty and agreement
with us, at our meeting at London.  So they took their leaves of the
steward and Court, and went away, and by and by, after other business many
brought in, they broke up to dinner.  So my father and I home with great
content to dinner; my mind now as full against the afternoon business,
which we sat upon after dinner at the Court, and did sue out a recovery,
and cut off the intayle; and my brothers there, to join therein.  And my
father and I admitted to all the lands; he for life, and I for myself and
my heirs in reversion, and then did surrender according to bargain to
Prior, Greene, and Shepheard the three cottages with their appurtenances
that they have bought of us, and that being done and taken leave of the
steward, I did with most compleat joy of mind go from the Court with my
father home, and in a quarter of an hour did get on horseback, with my
brother Tom, Cooke, and Will, all mounted, and without eating or drinking,
take leave of father, mother, Pall, to whom I did give 10s., but have
shown no kindness since I come, for I find her so very ill-natured that I
cannot love her, and she so cruel a hypocrite that she can cry when she
pleases, and John and I away, calling in at Hinchingbroke, and taking
leave in three words of my Lady, and the young ladies; and so by moonlight
most bravely all the way to Cambridge, with great pleasure, whither we
come at about nine o'clock, and took up at the Bear, but the house being
full of guests we had very ill lodging, which troubled me, but had a
supper, and my mind at good ease, and so to bed.  Will in another bed in
my chamber.

15th.  My mind, though out of trouble, yet intent upon my journey home,
being desirous to know how all my matters go there, I could hardly sleep,
but waked very early; and, when it was time, did call up Will, and we
rose, and musique (with a bandore

     [A musical instrument with wire strings, and sounded with a
     plectrum; used as a bass to the cittern.  The banjo is a
     modification of the bandore, as the name is a negro corruption of
     that word.]

for the base) did give me a levett;

     [A blast of trumpets, intended as a 'reveillee', from French lever.

                   "First he that led the Cavalcade
                    Wore a Sow-gelder's Flagellet,
                    On which he blew as strong a Levet
                    As well-feed Lawyer on his breviate."

                                   Hudibras, II. ii. v. 609.]

and so we got ready; and while breakfast was providing, I went forth (by
the way finding Mr. George Mountagu and his Lady, whom I saluted, going to
take their coach thus early to proceed on their journey, they having
lodged in the chamber just under me all this night) and showed Mr. Cooke
King's College Chapel, Trinity College, and St. John's College Library;
and that being done, to our inn again: where I met Dr. Fairbrother brought
thither by my brother Tom, and he did breakfast with us, a very
good-natured man he is, and told us how the room we were in was the room
where Cromwell and his associated officers did begin to plot and act their
mischiefs in these counties.  Having eat well, only our oysters proving
bad, we mounted, having a pair of boots that I borrowed and carried with
me from Impington, my own to be sent from Cambridge to London, and took
leave of all, and begun our journey about nine o'clock. After we had rode
about 10 miles we got out of our way into Royston road, which did vex me
cruelly, and the worst for that my brother's horse, which was lame
yesterday, grows worse to-day, that he could not keep pace with us.  At
last with much ado we got into the road again, having misguided also a
gentleman's man who had lost his master and thought us to be going the
same way did follow us, but coming into the road again we met with his
master, by his coat a divine, but I perceiving Tom's horse not able to
keep with us, I desired Mr. Cooke and him to take their own time, and Will
and I we rode before them keeping a good pace, and came to Ware about
three o'clock in the afternoon, the ways being every where but bad.  Here
I fell into acquaintance and eat and drank with the divine, but know not
who he is, and after an hour's bait to myself and horses he, though
resolved to have lodged there, yet for company would out again, and so we
remounted at four o'clock, and he went with me as far almost as Tibbald's
and there parted with us, taking up there for all night, but finding our
horses in good case and the night being pretty light, though by reason of
clouds the moon did not shine out, we even made shift from one place to
another to reach London, though both of us very weary.  And having left
our horses at their masters, walked home, found all things well, and with
full joy, though very weary, came home and went to bed, there happening
nothing since our going to my discontent in the least degree; which do so
please me, that I cannot but bless God for my journey, observing a whole
course of success from the beginning to the end of it, and I do find it to
be the reward of my diligence, which all along in this has been
extraordinary, for I have not had the least kind of divertisement
imaginable since my going forth, but merely carrying on my business which
God has been pleased to bless.  So to bed very hot and feverish by being
weary, but early morning the fever was over.

16th.  And so I rose in good temper, finding a good chimneypiece made in
my upper dining-room chamber, and the diningroom wainscoat in a good
forwardness, at which I am glad, and then to the office, where by T. Hater
I found all things to my mind, and so we sat at the office till noon, and
then at home to dinner with my wife.  Then coming Mr. Creede in order to
some business with Sir J. Minnes about his accounts, this afternoon I took
him to the Treasury office, where Sir John and I did stay late paying some
money to the men that are saved out of the Satisfaction that was lost the
other day.  The King gives them half-pay, which is more than is used in
such cases, for they never used to have any thing, and yet the men were
most outrageously discontented, and did rail and curse us till I was
troubled to hear it, and wished myself unconcerned therein.  Mr. Creede
seeing us engaged took leave of us. Here late, and so home, and at the
office set down my journey-journall to this hour, and so shut up my book,
giving God thanks for my good success therein, and so home, and to supper,
and to bed.  I hear Mr. Moore is in a way of recovery.  Sir H. Bennet made
Secretary of State in Sir Edward Nicholas's stead; not known whether by
consent or not.  My brother Tom and Cooke are come to town I hear this
morning, and he sends me word that his mistress's mother is also come to
treat with us about her daughter's portion and her jointure, which I am
willing should be out of Sturtlow lands.

17th.  This morning Tom comes to me, and I advise him how to deal with his
mistress's mother about his giving her a joynture, but I intend to speak
with her shortly, and tell her my mind.  Then to my Lord Sandwich by
water, and told him how well things do go in the country with me, of which
he was very glad, and seems to concern himself much for me.  Thence with
Mr. Creed to Westminster Hall, and by and by thither comes Captn. Ferrers,
upon my sending for him, and we three to Creed's chamber, and there sat a
good while and drank chocolate.  Here I am told how things go at Court;
that the young men get uppermost, and the old serious lords are out of
favour; that Sir H. Bennet, being brought into Sir Edward Nicholas's
place, Sir Charles Barkeley is made Privy Purse; a most vicious person,
and one whom Mr. Pierce, the surgeon, to-day (at which I laugh to myself),
did tell me that he offered his wife L300 per annum to be his mistress.
He also told me that none in Court hath more the King's ear now than Sir
Charles Barkeley, and Sir H. Bennet, and my Lady Castlemaine, whose
interest is now as great as ever and that Mrs. Haslerigge, the great
beauty, is got with child, and now brought to bed, and lays it to the King
or the Duke of York.

     [The child was owned by neither of the royal brothers.--B.]

He tells me too that my Lord St. Albans' is like to be Lord Treasurer: all
which things do trouble me much.  Here I staid talking a good while, and
so by water to see Mr. Moore, who is out of bed and in a way to be well,
and thence home, and with Commr. Pett by water to view Wood's masts that
he proffers to sell, which we found bad, and so to Deptford to look over
some businesses, and so home and I to my office, all our talk being upon
Sir J. M. and Sir W. B.'s base carriage against him at their late being at
Chatham, which I am sorry to hear, but I doubt not but we shall fling Sir
W. B. upon his back ere long.  At my office, I hearing Sir W. Pen was not
well, I went to him to see, and sat with him, and so home and to bed.

18th.  This morning, having resolved of my brother's entertaining his
mistress's mother to-morrow, I sent my wife thither to-day to lie there
to-night and to direct him in the business, and I all the morning at the
office, and the afternoon intent upon my workmen, especially my joyners,
who will make my dining room very pretty.  At night to my office to
dispatch business, and then to see Sir W. Pen, who continues in great
pain, and so home and alone to bed, but my head being full of my own and
my brother Tom's business I could hardly sleep, though not in much
trouble, but only multitude of thoughts.

19th (Lord's day).  Got me ready in the morning and put on my first new
laceband; and so neat it is, that I am resolved my great expense shall be
lacebands, and it will set off any thing else the more.  So walked to my
brother's, where I met Mr. Cooke, and discoursing with him do find that he
and Tom have promised a joynture of L50 to his mistress, and say that I
did give my consent that she should be joyntured in L30 per ann. for
Sturtlow, and the rest to be made up out of her portion.  At which I was
stark mad, and very angry the business should be carried with so much
folly and against my mind and all reason.  But I was willing to forbear
discovering of it, and did receive Mrs. Butler, her mother, Mr. Lull and
his wife, very civil people, very kindly, and without the least
discontent, and Tom had a good and neat dinner for us.  We had little
discourse of any business, but leave it to one Mr. Smith on her part and
myself on ours.  So we staid till sermon was done, and I took leave, and
to see Mr. Moore, who recovers well; and his doctor coming to him, one Dr.
Merrit, we had some of his very good discourse of anatomy, and other
things, very pleasant.  By and by, I with Mr. Townsend walked in the
garden, talking and advising with him about Tom's business, and he tells
me he will speak with Smith, and says I offer fair to give her L30
joynture and no more.  Thence Tom waiting for me homewards towards my
house, talking and scolding him for his folly, and telling him my mind
plainly what he has to trust to if he goes this way to work, for he shall
never have her upon the terms they demand of L50.  He left me, and I to my
uncle Wight, and there supped, and there was pretty Mistress Margt. Wight,
whom I esteem very pretty, and love dearly to look upon her.  We were very
pleasant, I droning with my aunt and them, but I am sorry to hear that the
news of the selling of Dunkirk

     [A treaty was signed on the 27th October by which Dunkirk was sold
     to France for five million livres, two of which were to be paid
     immediately, and the remaining three by eight bills at dates varying
     from three months to two years; during which time the King of
     England was to contribute the aid of a naval force, if necessary,
     for defence against Spain.  Subsequently the remaining three
     millions were reduced to 2,500,000 to be paid at Paris, and 254,000
     in London.  It is not known that Clarendon suggested the sale of
     Dunkirk, but it is certain that he adopted the measure with zeal.
     There is also no doubt that he got as much as France could be
     induced to give.--Lister's Life of Clarendon, ii. 173-4.]

is taken so generally ill, as I find it is among the merchants; and other
things, as removal of officers at Court, good for worse; and all things
else made much worse in their report among people than they are.  And this
night, I know not upon what ground, the gates of the City ordered to be
kept shut, and double guards every where.  So home, and after preparing
things against to-morrow for the Duke, to bed.  Indeed I do find every
body's spirit very full of trouble; and the things of the Court and
Council very ill taken; so as to be apt to appear in bad colours, if there
should ever be a beginning of trouble, which God forbid!

20th.  Up and in Sir J. Minnes's coach with him and Sir W. Batten to White
Hall, where now the Duke is come again to lodge: and to Mr. Coventry's
little new chamber there.  And by and by up to the Duke, who was making
himself ready; and there among other discourse young Killigrew did so
commend "The Villaine," a new play made by Tom Porter; and acted only on
Saturday at the Duke's house, as if there never had been any such play
come upon the stage.  The same yesterday was told me by Captain Ferrers;
and this morning afterwards by Dr. Clerke, who saw it.  Insomuch that
after I had done with the Duke, and thence gone with Commissioner Pett to
Mr. Lilly's, the great painter, who came forth to us; but believing that I
come to bespeak a picture, he prevented us by telling us, that he should
not be at leisure these three weeks; which methinks is a rare thing.  And
then to see in what pomp his table was laid for himself to go to dinner;
and here, among other pictures, saw the so much desired by me picture of
my Lady Castlemaine, which is a most blessed picture; and that that I must
have a copy of.  And having thence gone to my brother's, where my wife
lodged last night, and eat something there, I took her by coach to the
Duke's house, and there was the house full of company: but whether it was
in over-expecting or what, I know not, but I was never less pleased with a
play in my life.  Though there was good singing and dancing, yet no fancy
in the play, but something that made it less contenting was my conscience
that I ought not to have gone by my vow, and, besides, my business
commanded me elsewhere.  But, however, as soon as I came home I did pay my
crown to the poor's box, according to my vow, and so no harm as to that is
done, but only business lost and money lost, and my old habit of pleasure
wakened, which I will keep down the more hereafter, for I thank God these
pleasures are not sweet to me now in the very enjoying of them.  So by
coach home, and after a little business at my office, and seeing Sir W.
Pen, who continues ill, I went to bed.  Dunkirk, I am confirmed, is
absolutely sold; for which I am very sorry.

21st.  Up, and while I was dressing myself, my brother Tom being there I
did chide him for his folly in abusing himself about the match, for I
perceive he do endeavour all he can to get her, and she and her friends to
have more than her portion deserves, which now from 6 or L700 is come to
L450.  I did by several steps shew Tom how he would not be L100 the better
for her according to the ways he took to joynture her.  After having done
with him to the office, and there all the morning, and in the middle of
our sitting my workmen setting about the putting up of my rails upon my
leads, Sir J. Minnes did spy them and fell a-swearing, which I took no
notice of, but was vexed, and am still to the very heart for it, for fear
it should put him upon taking the closett and my chamber from me, which I
protest I am now afraid of.  But it is my very great folly to be so much
troubled at these trifles, more than at the loss of L100, or things of
greater concernment; but I forget the lesson I use to preach to others.
After dinner to my office with my head and heart full of troublesome
business, and thence by water with Mr. Smith, to Mr. Lechmore, the
Counsellor at the Temple, about Field's business; and he tells me plainly
that, there being a verdict against me, there is no help for it, but it
must proceed to judgment.  It is L30 damage to me for my joining with
others in committing Field to prison, we being not justices of the Peace
in the City, though in Middlesex; this troubled me, but I hope the King
will make it good to us.  Thence to Mr. Smith, the scrivener, upon Ludgate
Hill, to whom Mrs. Butler do committ her business concerning her daughter
and my brother.  He tells me her daughter's portion is but L400, at which
I am more troubled than before; and they find fault that his house is too
little.  So after I had told him my full mind, I went away to meet again
to-morrow, but I believe the business will be broke off, which for Tom's
sake I am much grieved for, but it cannot be helped without his ruin.
Thence to see Mr. Moore, who is pretty well again, and we read over and
discoursed about Mrs. Goldsborough's business, and her son coming by my
appointment thither, I did tell him our resolution as to her having her
estate reconveyed to her.  Hither also came my brother, and before Mr.
Moore I did advise and counsel him about his match, and how we had all
been abused by Mr. Cooke's folly.  So home and to my office, and there
settled many businesses, and so home and to supper, and so to bed, Sir W.
Pen being still in great pain.

22nd.  Up, and carrying my wife and her brother to Covent Garden, near
their father's new lodging, by coach, I to my Lord Sandwich's, who
receives me now more and more kindly, now he sees that I am respected in
the world; and is my most noble patron.  Here I staid and talked about
many things, with my Lord and Mr. Povy, being there about Tangier
business, for which the Commission is a taking out.  Hence (after talking
with Mr. Cooke, whom I met here about Mrs. Butler's portion, he do persist
to say that it will be worth L600 certain, when he knows as well as I do
now that it is but L400, and so I told him, but he is a fool, and has made
fools of us).  So I by water to my brother's, and thence to Mr. Smith's,
where I was, last night, and there by appointment met Mrs. Butler, with
whom I plainly discoursed and she with me.  I find she will give but L400,
and no more, and is not willing to do that without a joynture, which she
expects and I will not grant for that portion, and upon the whole I find
that Cooke has made great brags on both sides, and so has abused us both,
but know not how to help it, for I perceive she had much greater
expectations of Tom's house and being than she finds. But however we did
break off the business wholly, but with great love and kindness between
her and me, and would have been glad we had known one another's minds
sooner, without being misguided by this fellow to both our shames and
trouble.  For I find her a very discreet, sober woman, and her daughter, I
understand and believe, is a good lady; and if portions did agree, though
she finds fault with Tom's house, and his bad imperfection in his speech,
I believe we should well agree in other matters.  After taking a kind
farewell, I to Tom's, and there did give him a full account of this sad
news, with which I find he is much troubled, but do appear to me to be
willing to be guided herein, and apprehends that it is not for his good to
do otherwise, and so I do persuade [him] to follow his business again, and
I hope he will, but for Cooke's part and Dr. Pepys, I shall know them for
two fools another time. Hence, it raining hard, by coach home, being first
trimmed here by Benier, who being acquainted with all the players, do tell
me that Betterton is not married to Ianthe, as they say; but also that he
is a very sober, serious man, and studious and humble, following of his
studies, and is rich already with what he gets and saves, and then to my
office till late, doing great deal of business, and settling my mind in
pretty good order as to my business, though at present they are very many.
So home and to bed.  This night was buried, as I hear by the bells at
Barking Church, my poor Morena,

     [The burial of Elizabeth, daughter of John Dekins or Dickens, is
     recorded in the parish register of All Hallows, Barking, as having
     taken place on October 22nd.  See ante, October 3rd]

whose sickness being desperate, did kill her poor father; and he being
dead for sorrow, she could not recover, nor desire to live, but from that
time do languish more and more, and so is now dead and buried.

23rd.  Up and among my workmen, and so to the office, and there sitting
all the morning we stept all out to visit Sir W. Batten, who it seems has
not been well all yesterday, but being let blood is now pretty well, and
Sir W. Pen after office I went to see, but he continues in great pain of
the gout and in bed, cannot stir hand nor foot but with great pain.  So to
my office all the evening putting things public and private in order, and
so at night home and to supper and to bed, finding great content since I
am come to follow my business again, which God preserve in me.

24th.  After with great pleasure lying a great while talking and sporting
in bed with my wife (for we have been for some years now, and at present
more and more, a very happy couple, blessed be God), I got up and to my
office, and having done there some business, I by water, and then walked
to Deptford to discourse with Mr. Lowly and Davis about my late
conceptions about keeping books of the distinct works done in the yards,
against which I find no objection but their ignorance and unwillingness to
do anything of pains and what is out of their ordinary dull road, but I
like it well, and will proceed in it.  So home and dined there with my
wife upon a most excellent dish of tripes of my own directing, covered
with, mustard, as I have heretofore seen them done at my Lord Crew's, of
which I made a very great meal, and sent for a glass of wine for myself,
and so to see Sir W. Pen, who continues bed-rid in great pain, and hence
to the Treasury to Sir J. Minnes paying off of tickets, and at night home,
and in my study (after seeing Sir W. Batten, who also continues ill) I
fell to draw out my conceptions about books for the clerk that cheques in
the yard to keep according to the distinct works there, which pleases me
very well, and I am confident it will be of great use.  At 9 at night
home, and to supper, and to bed.  This noon came to see me and sat with me
a little after dinner Mr. Pierce, the chyrurgeon, who tells me how ill
things go at Court: that the King do show no countenance to any that
belong to the Queen; nor, above all, to such English as she brought over
with her, or hath here since, for fear they should tell her how he carries
himself to Mrs. Palmer;--[Lady Castlemaine.]--insomuch that though he has
a promise, and is sure of being made her chyrurgeon, he is at a loss what
to do in it, whether to take it or no, since the King's mind is so altered
in favour to all her dependants, whom she is fain to let go back into
Portugall (though she brought them from their friends against their wills
with promise of preferment), without doing any thing for them.  But he
tells me that her own physician did tell him within these three days that
the Queen do know how the King orders things, and how he carries himself
to my Lady Castlemaine and others, as well as any body; but though she
hath spirit enough, yet seeing that she do no good by taking notice of it,
for the present she forbears it in policy; of which I am very glad.  But I
pray God keep us in peace; for this, with other things, do give great
discontent to all people.

25th.  Up and to the office, and there with Mr. Coventry sat all the
morning, only we two, the rest being absent or sick.  Dined at home with
my wife upon a good dish of neats' feet and mustard, of which I made a
good meal.  All the afternoon alone at my office and among my workmen, who
(I mean the joyners) have even ended my dining room, and will be very
handsome and to my full content.  In the evening at my office about one
business or another, and so home and to bed, with my mind every day more
and more quiet since I come to follow my business, and shall be very happy
indeed when the trouble of my house is over.

26th (Lord's day).Up and put on my new Scallop, and is very fine.  To
church, and there saw the first time Mr. Mills in a surplice; but it
seemed absurd for him to pull it over his ears in the reading-pew, after
he had done, before all the church, to go up to the pulpitt, to preach
without it.  Home and dined, and Mr. Sympson, my joyner that do my
diningroom, and my brother Tom with me to a delicate fat pig.  Tom takes
his disappointment of his mistress to heart; but all will be well again in
a little time.  Then to church again, and heard a simple Scot preach most
tediously.  So home, and to see Sir W. Batten, who is pretty well again,
and then to my uncle Wight's to show my fine band and to see Mrs. Margaret
Wight, but she was not there.  All this day soldiers going up and down the
town, there being an alarm and many Quakers and others clapped up; but I
believe without any reason: only they say in Dorsetshire there hath been
some rising discovered.  So after supper home, and then to my study, and
making up my monthly account to myself. I find myself, by my expense in
bands and clothes this month, abated a little of my last, and that I am
worth L679 still; for which God be praised.  So home and to bed with
quiett mind, blessed be God, but afeard of my candle's going out, which
makes me write thus slubberingly.

27th.  Up, and after giving order to the plasterer now to set upon the
finishing of my house, then by water to wait upon the Duke, and walking in
the matted Gallery, by and by comes Mr. Coventry and Sir John Minnes, and
then to the Duke, and after he was ready, to his closet, where I did give
him my usual account of matters, and afterwards, upon Sir J. Minnes'
desire to have one to assist him in his employment, Sir W. Pen is
appointed to be his, and Mr. Pett to be the Surveyor's assistant.  Mr.
Coventry did desire to be excused, and so I hope (at least it is my
present opinion) to have none joined with me, but only Mr. Coventry do
desire that I would find work for one of his clerks, which I did not deny,
but however I will think of it, whether without prejudice to mine I can do
it.  Thence to my Lord Sandwich, who now-a-days calls me into his chamber,
and alone did discourse with me about the jealousy that the Court have of
people's rising; wherein he do much dislike my Lord Monk's being so eager
against a company of poor wretches, dragging them up and down the street;
but would have him rather to take some of the greatest ringleaders of
them, and punish them; whereas this do but tell the world the King's fears
and doubts.  For Dunkirk; he wonders any wise people should be so troubled
thereat, and scorns all their talk against it, for that he says it was not
Dunkirk, but the other places, that did and would annoy us, though we had
that, as much as if we had it not.  He also took notice of the new
Ministers of State, Sir H. Bennet and Sir Charles Barkeley, their bringing
in, and the high game that my Lady Castlemaine plays at Court (which I
took occasion to mention as that that the people do take great notice of),
all which he confessed.  Afterwards he told me of poor Mr. Spong, that
being with other people examined before the King and Council (they being
laid up as suspected persons; and it seems Spong is so far thought guilty
as that they intend to pitch upon him to put to the wracke or some other
torture), he do take knowledge of my Lord Sandwich, and said that he was
well known to Mr. Pepys.  But my Lord knows, and I told him, that it was
only in matter of musique and pipes, but that I thought him to be a very
innocent fellow; and indeed I am very sorry for him.  After my Lord and I
had done in private, we went out, and with Captain Cuttance and Bunn did
look over their draught of a bridge for Tangier, which will be brought by
my desire to our office by them to-morrow.  Thence to Westminster Hall,
and there walked long with Mr. Creed, and then to the great half-a-crown
ordinary, at the King's Head, near Charing Cross, where we had a most
excellent neat dinner and very high company, and in a noble manner.  After
dinner he and I into another room over a pot of ale and talked.  He showed
me our commission, wherein the Duke of York, Prince Rupert, Duke of
Albemarle, Lord Peterborough, Lord Sandwich, Sir G. Carteret, Sir William
Compton, Mr. Coventry, Sir R. Ford, Sir William Rider, Mr. Cholmley, Mr.
Povy, myself, and Captain Cuttance, in this order are joyned for the
carrying on the service of Tangier, which I take for a great honour to me.
He told me what great faction there is at Court; and above all, what is
whispered, that young Crofts is lawful son to the King, the King being
married to his mother.

     [There has been much confusion as to the name and parentage of
     Charles's mistress.  Lucy Walter was the daughter of William Walter
     of Roch Castle, co. Pembroke, and Mr. S. Steinman, in his "Althorp
     Memoirs" (privately printed, 1869), sets out her pedigree, which is
     a good one.  Roch Castle was taken and burnt by the Parliamentary
     forces in 1644, and Lucy was in London in 1648, where she made the
     acquaintance of Colonel Algernon Sidney.  She then fell into the
     possession of his brother, Colonel Robert Sidney.  In September of
     this same year she was taken up by Charles, Prince of Wales.
     Charles terminated his connection with her on October 30th, 1651,
     and she died in 1658, as appears by a document (administration entry
     in the Register of the Prerogative Court) met with by the late
     Colonel Chester.  William Erskine, who had served Charles as
     cupbearer in his wanderings, and was appointed Master of the
     Charterhouse in December, 1677, had the care of Lucy Walter, and
     buried her in Paris.  He declared that the king never had any
     intention of marrying her, and she did not deserve it.  Thomas Ross,
     the tutor of her son, put the idea of this claim into his head, and
     asked Dr. Cosin to certify to a marriage.  In consequence of this he
     was removed from his office, and Lord Crofts took his place
     (Steinman's "Althorp Memoirs").  Lucy Walter took the name of Barlow
     during her wanderings.]

How true this is, God knows; but I believe the Duke of York will not be
fooled in this of three crowns.  Thence to White Hall, and walked long in
the galleries till (as they are commanded to all strange persons), one
come to tell us, we not being known, and being observed to walk there four
or five hours (which was not true, unless they count my walking there in
the morning), he was commanded to ask who we were; which being told, he
excused his question, and was satisfied.  These things speak great fear
and jealousys.  Here we staid some time, thinking to stay out the play
before the King to-night, but it being "The Villaine," and my wife not
being there, I had no mind.  So walk to the Exchange, and there took many
turns with him; among other things, observing one very pretty Exchange
lass, with her face full of black patches, which was a strange sight.  So
bid him good-night and away by coach to Mr. Moore, with whom I staid an
hour, and found him pretty well and intends to go abroad tomorrow, and so
it raining hard by coach home, and having visited both Sir Williams, who
are both sick, but like to be well again, I to my office, and there did
some business, and so home and to bed.  At Sir W. Batten's I met with Mr.
Mills, who tells me that he could get nothing out of the maid hard by
(that did poyson herself) before she died, but that she did it because she
did not like herself, nor had not liked herself, nor anything she did a
great while.  It seems she was well-favoured enough, but crooked, and this
was all she could be got to say, which is very strange.

28th.  At the office sitting all the morning, and then home to dinner with
my wife, and after dinner she and I passing an hour or two in ridiculous
talk, and then to my office, doing business there till 9 at night, and so
home and to supper and to bed.  My house is now in its last dirt, I hope,
the plasterer and painter now being upon winding up all my trouble, which
I expect will now in a fortnight's time, or a little more, be quite over.

29th (Lord Mayor's day).  Intended to have made me fine, and by invitation
to have dined with the Lord Mayor to-day, but going to see Sir W. Batten
this morning, I found Sir G. Carteret and Sir J. Minnes going with Sir W.
Batten and myself to examine Sir G. Carteret's accounts for the last year,
whereupon I settled to it with them all the day long, only dinner time
(which Sir G. Carteret gave us), and by night did as good as finish them,
and so parted, and thence to my office, and there set papers in order and
business against to-morrow.  I received a letter this day from my father,
speaking more trouble about my uncle Thomas his business, and of
proceeding to lay claim to Brampton and all my uncle left, because it is
given conditional that we should pay legacys, which to him we have not yet
done, but I hope that will do us no hurt; God help us if it should, but it
disquiets my mind.  I have also a letter from my Lord Sandwich desiring me
upon matters of concernment to be with him early tomorrow morning, which I
wonder what it should be.  So my mind full of thoughts, and some trouble
at night, home and to bed.  Sir G. Carteret, who had been at the examining
most of the late people that are clapped up, do say that he do not think
that there hath been any great plotting among them, though they have a
good will to it; but their condition is so poor, and silly, and low, that
they do not fear them at all.

30th.  Could sleep but little to-night for thoughts of my business.  So up
by candlelight and by water to Whitehall, and so to my Lord Sandwich, who
was up in his chamber and all alone, did acquaint me with his business;
which was, that our old acquaintance Mr. Wade (in Axe Yard) hath
discovered to him L7,000 hid in the Tower, of which he was to have two for
discovery; my Lord himself two, and the King the other three, when it was
found; and that the King's warrant runs for me on my Lord's part, and one
Mr. Lee for Sir Harry Bennet, to demand leave of the Lieutenant of the
Tower for to make search.  After he had told me the whole business, I took
leave and hastened to my office, expecting to be called by a letter from
my Lord to set upon the business, and so there I sat with the officers all
the morning.  At noon when we were up comes Mr. Wade with my Lord's
letter, and tells me the whole business.  So we consulted for me to go
first to Sir H. Bennet, who is now with many of the Privy Counsellors at
the Tower, examining of their late prisoners, to advise with him when to
begin.  So I went; and the guard at the Tower Gate, making me leave my
sword at the gate, I was forced to stay so long in the ale-house hard by,
till my boy run home for my cloak, that my Lord Mayor that now is, Sir
John Robinson, Lieutenant of the Tower, with all his company, was gone
with their coaches to his house in Minchen Lane. So my cloak being come, I
walked thither; and there, by Sir G. Carteret's means, did presently speak
with Sir H. Bennet, who did show and give me the King's warrant to me and
Mr. Leigh, and another to himself, for the paying of L2,000 to my Lord,
and other two to the discoverers.  After a little discourse, dinner come
in; and I dined with them.  There was my Lord Mayor, my Lord Lauderdale,
Mr. Secretary Morris, to whom Sir H. Bennet would give the upper hand; Sir
Wm. Compton, Sir G. Carteret, and myself, and some other company, and a
brave dinner.  After dinner, Sir H. Bennet did call aside the Lord Mayor
and me, and did break the business to him, who did not, nor durst appear
the least averse to it, but did promise all assistance forthwith to set
upon it.  So Mr. Lee and I to our office, and there walked till Mr. Wade
and one Evett his guide did come, and W. Griffin, and a porter with his
picke-axes, &c.; and so they walked along with us to the Tower, and Sir H.
Bennet and my Lord Mayor did give us full power to fall to work.  So our
guide demands, a candle, and down into the cellars he goes, inquiring
whether they were the same that Baxter

     [Intended for John Barkstead, Lieutenant of the Tower under
     Cromwell.  Committed to the Tower (see March 17th, 1661-62).]

always had.  We went into several little cellars, and then went out
a-doors to view, and to the Cole Harbour; but none did answer so well to
the marks which was given him to find it by, as one arched vault.  Where,
after a great deal of council whether to set upon it now, or delay for
better and more full advice, we set to it, to digging we went to almost
eight o'clock at night, but could find nothing.  But, however, our guides
did not at all seem discouraged; for that they being confident that the
money is there they look for, but having never been in the cellars, they
could not be positive to the place, and therefore will inform themselves
more fully now they have been there, of the party that do advise them. So
locking the door after us, we left work to-night, and up to the Deputy
Governor (my Lord Mayor, and Sir H. Bennet, with the rest of the company
being gone an hour before); and he do undertake to keep the key of the
cellars, that none shall go down without his privity.  But, Lord! to see
what a young simple fantastique coxcombe is made Deputy Governor, would
make one mad; and how he called out for his night-gown of silk, only to
make a show to us; and yet for half an hour I did not think he was the
Deputy Governor, and so spoke not to him about the business, but waited
for another man; at last I broke our business to him; and he promising his
care, we parted.  And Mr. Leigh and I by coach to White Hall, where I did
give my Lord Sandwich an account of our proceedings, and some
encouragement to hope for something hereafter, and so bade him good-night,
and so by coach home again, where to my trouble I found that the painter
had not been here to-day to do any thing, which vexes me mightily.  So to
my office to put down my journal, and so home and to bed.  This morning,
walking with Mr. Coventry in the garden, he did tell me how Sir G.
Carteret had carried the business of the Victuallers' money to be paid by
himself, contrary to old practice; at which he is angry I perceive, but I
believe means no hurt, but that things maybe done as they ought.  He
expects Sir George should not bespatter him privately, in revenge, but
openly.  Against which he prepares to bedaub him, and swears he will do it
from the beginning, from Jersey to this day.  And as to his own taking of
too large fees or rewards for places that he had sold, he will prove that
he was directed to it by Sir George himself among others. And yet he did
not deny Sir G. Carteret his due, in saying that he is a man that do take
the most pains, and gives himself the most to do business of any man about
the Court, without any desire of pleasure or divertisements; which is very
true.  But which pleased me mightily, he said in these words, that he was
resolved, whatever it cost him, to make an experiment, and see whether it
was possible for a man to keep himself up in Court by dealing plainly and
walking uprightly, with any private game a playing: in the doing whereof,
if his ground do slip from under him, he will be contented; but he is
resolved to try, and never to baulke taking notice of any thing that is to
the King's prejudice, let it fall where it will; which is a most brave
resolucion.  He was very free with me; and by my troth, I do see more
reall worth in him than in most men that I do know.  I would not forget
two passages of Sir J. Minnes's at yesterday's dinner.  The one, that to
the question how it comes to pass that there are no boars seen in London,
but many sows and pigs; it was answered, that the constable gets them
a-nights.  The other, Thos. Killigrew's way of getting to see plays when
he was a boy.  He would go to the Red Bull, and when the man cried to the
boys, "Who will go and be a devil, and he shall see the play for nothing?"
then would he go in, and be a devil upon the stage, and so get to see
plays.

31st.  Lay pretty long in bed, and then up and among my workmen, the
carpenters being this day laying of my floor of my dining room, with whom
I staid a good while, and so to my office, and did a little business, and
so home to dinner, and after dinner all the afternoon with my carpenters,
making them lay all my boards but one in my dining room this day, which I
am confident they would have made two good days work of if I had not been
there, and it will be very pleasant.  At night to my office, and there
late doing of my office business, and so home to supper and bed.  Thus
ends this month, I and my family in good health, but weary heartily of
dirt, but now in hopes within two or three weeks to be out of it.  My head
troubled with much business, but especially my fear of Sir J. Minnes
claiming my bed-chamber of me, but I hope now that it is almost over, for
I perceive he is fitting his house to go into it the next week.  Then my
law businesses for Brampton makes me mad almost, for that I want time to
follow them, but I must by no means neglect them.  I thank God I do save
money, though it be but a little, but I hope to find out some job or other
that I may get a sum by to set me up.  I am now also busy in a discovery
for my Lord Sandwich and Sir H. Bennett by Mr. Wade's means of some of
Baxter's [Barkstead] money hid in one of his cellars in the Tower.  If we
get it it may be I may be 10 or L20 the better for it.  I thank God I have
no crosses, but only much business to trouble my mind with.  In all other
things as happy a man as any in the world, for the whole world seems to
smile upon me, and if my house were done that I could diligently follow my
business, I would not doubt to do God, and the King, and myself good
service.  And all I do impute almost wholly to my late temperance, since
my making of my vowes against wine and plays, which keeps me most happily
and contentfully to my business; which God continue!  Public matters are
full of discontent, what with the sale of Dunkirk, and my Lady
Castlemaine, and her faction at Court; though I know not what they would
have more than to debauch the king, whom God preserve from it!  And then
great plots are talked to be discovered, and all the prisons in town full
of ordinary people, taken from their meeting-places last Sunday.  But for
certain some plots there hath been, though not brought to a head.

     ETEXT EDITOR'S BOOKMARKS:

     All made much worse in their report among people than they are
     Care not for his commands, and especially on Sundays
     Catched cold yesterday by putting off my stockings
     Hate in others, and more in myself, to be careless of keys
     I fear that it must be as it can, and not as I would
     Lying a great while talking and sporting in bed with my wife
     My Jane's cutting off a carpenter's long mustacho
     No good by taking notice of it, for the present she forbears
     Parson is a cunning fellow he is as any of his coat
     Pleasures are not sweet to me now in the very enjoying of them
     She so cruel a hypocrite that she can cry when she pleases
     Strange things he has been found guilty of, not fit to name
     Then to church to a tedious sermon
     When the candle is going out, how they bawl and dispute



                THE DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS M.A.  F.R.S.

            CLERK OF THE ACTS AND SECRETARY TO THE ADMIRALTY

    TRANSCRIBED FROM THE SHORTHAND MANUSCRIPT IN THE PEPYSIAN LIBRARY
 MAGDALENE COLLEGE CAMBRIDGE BY THE REV. MYNORS BRIGHT M.A. LATE FELLOW
                      AND PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE

                              (Unabridged)

                      WITH LORD BRAYBROOKE'S NOTES

                        EDITED WITH ADDITIONS BY

                        HENRY B. WHEATLEY F.S.A.

                          DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS.
                           NOVEMBER & DECEMBER
                                  1662

November 1st.  Up and after a little while with my workmen I went to my
office, and then to our sitting all the morning.  At noon with Mr. Creede,
whom I found at my house, to the Trinity House, to a great dinner there,
by invitacion, and much company.  It seems one Captain Evans makes his
Elder Brother's dinner to-day.  Among other discourses one Mr. Oudant,
secretary to the late Princesse of Orange, did discourse of the
convenience as to keeping the highways from being deep, by their horses,
in Holland (and Flanders where the ground is as miry as ours is), going in
their carts and, waggons as ours in coaches, wishing the same here as an
expedient to make the ways better, and I think there is something in it,
where there is breadth enough.  Thence to my office, sent for to meet Mr.
Leigh again; from Sir H. Bennet.  And he and I, with Wade and his
intelligencer and labourers, to the Tower cellars, to make one tryall
more; where we staid two or three hours digging, and dug a great deal all
under the arches, as it was now most confidently directed, and so
seriously, and upon pretended good grounds, that I myself did truly expect
to speed; but we missed of all: and so we went away the second time like
fools.  And to our office, whither, a coach being come, Mr. Leigh goes
home to Whitehall; and I by appointment to the Dolphin Tavern, to meet
Wade and the other, Captn. Evett, who now do tell me plainly, that he that
do put him upon this is one that had it from Barkestead's own mouth, and
was advised with by him, just before the King's coming in, how to get it
out, and had all the signs told him how and where it lay, and had always
been the great confident of Barkestead even to the trusting him with his
life and all he had.  So that he did much convince me that there is good
ground for what we go about.  But I fear it may be that he did find some
conveyance of it away, without the help of this man, before he died.  But
he is resolved to go to the party once more, and then to determine what we
shall do further.  So we parted, and I to my office, where after sending
away my letters to the post I do hear that Sir J. Minnes is resolved to
turn part of our entry into a room and to divide the back yard between Sir
W. Pen and him, which though I do not see how it will annoy me much
particularly, yet it do trouble me a little for fear it should, but I do
not see how it can well unless in his desiring my coming to my back
stairs, but for that I shall do as well as himself or Sir W. Pen, who is
most concerned to look after it.

2nd (Lord's day).  Lay long with pleasure talking with my wife, in whom I
never had greater content, blessed be God! than now, she continuing with
the same care and thrift and innocence, so long as I keep her from
occasions of being otherwise, as ever she was in her life, and keeps the
house as well.  To church, where Mr. Mills, after he had read the service,
and shifted himself as he did the last day, preached a very ordinary
sermon.  So home to dinner with my wife.  Then up into my new rooms which
are, almost finished, and there walked with great content talking with my
wife till church time, and then to church, and there being a lazy preacher
I slept out the sermon, and so home, and after visiting the two Sir
Williams, who are both of them mending apace, I to my office preparing
things against to-morrow for the Duke, and so home and to bed, with some
pain, .  .  .  having taken cold this morning in sitting too long
bare-legged to pare my corns.  My wife and I spent a good deal of this
evening in reading "Du Bartas' Imposture" and other parts which my wife of
late has taken up to read, and is very fine as anything I meet with.

3d.  Up and with Sir J. Minnes in his coach to White Hall, to the Duke's;
but found him gone out a-hunting.  Thence to my Lord Sandwich, from whom I
receive every day more and more signs of his confidence and esteem of me.
Here I met with Pierce the chyrurgeon, who tells me that my Lady
Castlemaine is with child; but though it be the King's, yet her Lord being
still in town, and sometimes seeing of her, though never to eat or lie
together, it will be laid to him.  He tells me also how the Duke of York
is smitten in love with my Lady Chesterfield

     [Lady Elizabeth Butler, daughter of James Butler, first Duke of
     Ormond, second wife of Philip Stanhope, second Earl of Chesterfield.
     She died July, 1665 (see "Memoires de Grammont," chap. viii.).
     Peter Cunningham thinks that this banishment was only temporary,
     for, according to the Grammont Memoirs, she was in town when the
     Russian ambassador was in London, December, 1662, and January,
     1662-63.  "It appears from the books of the Lord Steward's office
     .  .  .  that Lord Chesterfield set out for the country on the
     12th May, 1663, and, from his 'Short Notes' referred to in the
     Memoirs before his Correspondence, that he remained at Bretby, in
     Derbyshire, with his wife, throughout the summer of that year"
     ("Story of Nell Gwyn," 1852, p. 189).]

(a virtuous lady, daughter to my Lord of Ormond); and so much, that the
duchess of York hath complained to the King and her father about it, and
my Lady Chesterfield is gone into the country for it.  At all which I am
sorry; but it is the effect of idleness, and having nothing else to employ
their great spirits upon.  Thence with Mr. Creede and Mr. Moore (who is
got upon his legs and come to see my Lord) to Wilkinson's, and there I did
give them and Mr. Howe their dinner of roast beef, cost me 5s., and after
dinner carried Mr. Moore as far as Paul's in a coach, giving him direction
about my law business, and there set him down, and I home and among my
workmen, who happened of all sorts to meet to their making an end of a
great many jobbs, so that after to-morrow I shall have but a little
plastering and all the painting almost to do, which was good content to
me.  At night to my office, and did business; and there came to me Mr.
Wade and Evett, who have been again with their prime intelligencer, a
woman, I perceive: and though we have missed twice, yet they bring such an
account of the probability of the truth of the thing, though we are not
certain of the place, that we shall set upon it once more; and I am
willing and hopefull in it.  So we resolved to set upon it again on
Wednesday morning; and the woman herself will be there in a disguise, and
confirm us in the place.  So they took leave for the night, and I to my
business, and then home to my wife and to supper and bed, my pain being
going away.  So by God's great blessing my mind is in good condition of
quiet.

4th.  Lay long talking pleasantly with my wife in bed, it having rained,
and do still, very much all night long.  Up and to the office, where we
sat till noon.  This morning we had news by letters that Sir Richard
Stayner is dead at sea in the Mary, which is now come into Portsmouth from
Lisbon; which we are sorry for, he being a very stout seaman.  But there
will be no great miss of him for all that.  Dined at home with my wife,
and all the afternoon among my workmen, and at night to my office to do
business there, and then to see Sir W. Pen, who is still sick, but his
pain less than it was.  He took occasion to talk with me about Sir J.
Minnes's intention to divide the entry and the yard, and so to keep him
out of the yard, and forcing him to go through the garden to his house.
Which he is vexed at, and I am glad to see that Sir J. Minnes do use him
just as he do me, and so I perceive it is not anything extraordinary his
carriage to me in the matter of our houses, for this is worse than
anything he has done to me, that he should give order for the stopping up
of his way to his house without so much as advising with him or letting of
him know it, and I confess that it is very highly and basely done of him.
So to my office again, and after doing business there, then home to supper
and to bed.

5th.  Up and with my painters painting my dining room all day long till
night, not stirring out at all.  Only in the morning my.  Lady Batten did
send to speak with me, and told me very civilly that she did not desire,
nor hoped I did, that anything should pass between us but what was civill,
though there was not the neighbourliness between her and my wife that was
fit to be, and so complained of my maid's mocking of her; when she called
"Nan" to her maid within her own house, my maid Jane in the garden
overheard her, and mocked her, and some other such like things she told
me, and of my wife's speaking unhandsomely of her; to all which I did give
her a very respectfull answer, such as did please her, and am sorry indeed
that this should be, though I do not desire there should be any
acquaintance between my wife and her.  But I promised to avoid such words
and passages for the future.  So home, and by and by Sir W. Pen did send
for me to his bedside; and tell me how really Sir J. Minnes did resolve to
have one of my rooms, and that he was very angry and hot, and said he
would speak to the Duke.  To which, knowing that all this was but to scare
me, and to get him to put off his resolution of making up the entry, I did
tell him plainly how I did not value his anger more, than he did mine, and
that I should be willing to do what the Duke commanded, and I was sure to
have justice of him, and that was all I did say to him about it, though I
was much vexed, and after a little stay went home; and there telling my
wife she did put me into heart, and resolve to offer him to change
lodgings, and believe that that will one way or other bring us to some end
in this dispute.  At night I called up my maids, and schooled Jane, who
did answer me so humbly and drolly about it, that though I seemed angry, I
was much pleased with her and [my] wife also.  So at night to bed.

6th.  At the office forenoon and afternoon till late at night, very busy
answering my Lord Treasurer's letter, and my mind troubled till we come to
some end with Sir J. Minnes about our lodgings, and so home.  And after
some pleasant discourse and supper to bed, and in my dream much troubled
by being with Will. Swan, a great fanatic, my old acquaintance, and,
methought, taken and led up with him for a plotter, all our discourse
being at present about the late plots.

7th.  Up and being by appointment called upon by Mr. Lee, he and I to the
Tower, to make our third attempt upon the cellar.  And now privately the
woman, Barkestead's great confident, is brought, who do positively say
that this is the place which he did say the money was hid in, and where he
and she did put up the L50,000

     [Thus in the MS., although the amount was first stated as L7,000
     (see October 30th, 1662)]

in butter firkins; and the very day that he went out of England did say
that neither he nor his would be the better for that money, and therefore
wishing that she and hers might.  And so left us, and we full of hope did
resolve to dig all over the cellar, which by seven o'clock at night we
performed.  At noon we sent for a dinner, and upon the head of a barrel
dined very merrily, and to work again.  Between times, Mr. Lee, who had
been much in Spain, did tell me pretty stories of the customs and other
things, as I asked him, of the country, to my great content.  But at last
we saw we were mistaken; and after digging the cellar quite through, and
removing the barrels from one side to the other, we were forced to pay our
porters, and give over our expectations, though I do believe there must be
money hid somewhere by him, or else he did delude this woman in hopes to
oblige her to further serving him, which I am apt to believe. Thence by
coach to White Hall, and at my Lord's lodgings did write a letter, he not
being within, to tell him how things went, and so away again, only hearing
that Mrs. Sarah is married, I did go up stairs again and joy her and kiss
her, she owning of it; and it seems it is to a cook. I am glad she is
disposed of, for she grows old, and is very painfull,--[painstaking]--and
one I have reason to wish well for her old service to me.  Then to my
brother's, where my wife, by my order, is tonight to stay a night or two
while my house is made clean, and thence home, where I am angry to see,
instead of the house made in part clean, all the pewter goods and other
things are brought up to scouring, which makes the house ten times worse,
at which I was very much displeased, but cannot help it. So to my office
to set down my journal, and so home and to bed.

8th.  All the morning sitting at the office, and after that dined alone at
home, and so to the office again till 9 o'clock, being loth to go home,
the house is so dirty, and my wife at my brother's.  So home and to bed.

9th (Lord's day).  Lay alone a good while, my mind busy about pleading
to-morrow to the Duke if there shall be occasion for this chamber that I
lie in against Sir J., Minnes.  Then up, and after being ready walked to
my brother's, where my wife is, calling at many churches, and then to the
Temple, hearing a bit there too, and observing that in the streets and
churches the Sunday is kept in appearance as well as I have known it at
any time.  Then to dinner to my brother's, only he and my wife, and after
dinner to see Mr. Moore, who is pretty well, and he and I to St.
Gregory's, where I escaped a great fall down the staires of the gallery:
so into a pew there and heard Dr. Ball make a very good sermon, though
short of what I expected, as for the most part it do fall out.  So home
with Mr. Moore to his chamber, and after a little talk I walked home to my
house and staid at Sir W. Batten's.  Till late at night with him and Sir
J. Minnes, with whom we did abundance of most excellent discourse of
former passages of sea commanders and officers of the navy, and so home
and to bed, with my mind well at ease but only as to my chamber, which I
fear to lose.

10th.  Up betimes and to set my workmen to work, and then a little to the
office, and so with Sir J. Minnes, Sir W. Batten, and myself by coach to
White Hall, to the Duke, who, after he was ready, did take us into his
closett.  Thither come my Lord General Monk, and did privately talk with
the Duke about having the life-guards pass through the City today only for
show and to fright people, for I perceive there are great fears abroad;
for all which I am troubled and full of doubt that things will not go
well.  He being gone, we fell to business of the Navy.  Among other
things, how to pay off this fleet that is now come from Portugall; the
King of Portugall sending them home, he having no more use for them, which
we wonder at, that his condition should be so soon altered.  And our
landmen also are coming back, being almost starved in that poor country.
Having done here I went by my Lord Sandwich's, who was not at home, and so
to Westminster Hall, where full of term, and here met with many about
business, among others my cozen Roger Pepys, who is all for a composition
with my uncle Thomas, which upon any fair terms I am for also and desire
it.  Thence by water, and so by land to my Lord Crew's, and dined with him
and his brother, I know not his name; where very good discourse; among
others, of France's intention to make a patriarch of his own, independent
from the Pope, by which he will be able to cope with the Spaniard in all
councils, which hitherto he has never done.  My Lord Crew told us how he
heard my Lord of Holland say that, being Embassador about the match with
the Queene-Mother that now is, the King of France--[Louis XIII., in
1624.]--insisted upon a dispensation from the Pope, which my Lord Holland
making a question of, and that he was commanded to yield to nothing to the
prejudice of our religion, says the King of France, "You need not fear
that, for if the Pope will not dispense with the match, my Bishopp of
Paris shall."  By and by come in great Mr. Swinfen, the Parliament-man,
who, among other discourse of the rise and fall of familys, told us of
Bishopp Bridgeman (brother of Sir Orlando) who lately hath bought a seat
anciently of the Levers, and then the Ashtons; and so he hath in his great
hall window (having repaired and beautified the house) caused four great
places to be left for coates of armes.  In one, he hath put the Levers,
with this motto, "Olim."  In another the Ashtons, with this, "Heri."  In
the next his own, with this, "Hodie."  In the fourth nothing but this
motto, "Cras nescio cujus."  Thence towards my brother's; met with Jack
Cole in Fleet Street, and he and I went into his cozen Mary Cole's (whom I
never saw since she was married), and drank a pint of wine and much good
discourse.  I found him a little conceited, but he had good things in him,
and a man may know the temper of the City by him, he being of a general
conversation, and can tell how matters go; and upon that score I will
encourage his acquaintance.  Thence to my brother's, and taking my wife
up, carried her to Charing Cross, and there showed her the Italian motion,
much after the nature of what I showed her a while since in Covent Garden.
Their puppets here are somewhat better, but their motions not at all.
Thence by coach to my Lady's, and, hiding my wife with Sarah below, I went
up and heard some musique with my Lord, and afterwards discoursed with him
alone, and so good night to him and below, having sent for Mr. Creed, had
thought to have shown my wife a play before the King, but it is so late
that we could not, and so we took coach, and taking up Sarah at my
brother's with their night geare we went home, and I to my office to
settle matters, and so home and to bed.  This morning in the Duke's
chamber Sir J. Minnes did break to me his desire about my chamber, which I
did put off to another time to discourse of, he speaking to me very kindly
to make me the less trouble myself, hoping to save myself and to contrive
something or other to pleasure him as well, though I know not well what.
The town, I hear, is full of discontents, and all know of the King's new
bastard by Mrs. Haslerigge, and as far as I can hear will never be
contented with Episcopacy, they are so cruelly set for Presbytery, and the
Bishopps carry themselves so high, that they are never likely to gain
anything upon them.

11th.  All the morning sitting at the office, and then to dinner with my
wife, and so to the office again (where a good while Mr. Bland was with
me, telling me very fine things in merchandize, which, but that the
trouble of my office do so cruelly hinder me, I would take some pains in)
till late at night.  Towards the evening I, as I have done for three or
four nights, studying something of Arithmetique, which do please me well
to see myself come forward.  So home, to supper, and to bed.

12th.  At my office most of the morning, after I had done among my
painters, and sent away Mr. Shaw and Hawly, who came to give me a visit
this morning.  Shaw it seems is newly re-married to a rich widow.  At noon
dined at home with my wife, and by and by, by my wife's appointment came
two young ladies, sisters, acquaintances of my wife's brother's, who are
desirous to wait upon some ladies, and proffer their service to my wife.
The youngest, indeed, hath a good voice, and sings very well, besides
other good qualitys; but I fear hath been bred up with too great liberty
for my family, and I fear greater inconveniences of expenses, and my
wife's liberty will follow, which I must study to avoid till I have a
better purse; though, I confess, the gentlewoman, being pretty handsome,
and singing, makes me have a good mind to her.  Anon I took them by coach
and carried them to a friend's of theirs, in Lincoln's Inn Fields, and
there I left them and I to the Temple by appointment to my cousin Roger's
chamber, where my uncle Thomas and his son Thomas met us, I having hoped
that they would have agreed with me to have had [it] ended by my cozen
Roger, but they will have two strangers to be for them against two others
of mine, and so we parted without doing any thing till the two send me the
names of their arbiters.  Thence I walked home, calling a little in Paul's
Churchyard, and, I thank God, can read and never buy a book, though I have
a great mind to it.  So to the Dolphin Tavern near home, by appointment,
and there met with Wade and Evett, and have resolved to make a new attempt
upon another discovery, in which God give us better fortune than in the
other, but I have great confidence that there is no cheat in these people,
but that they go upon good grounds, though they have been mistaken in the
place of the first.  From thence, without drinking a drop of wine, home to
my office and there made an end, though late, of my collection of the
prices of masts for these twelve years to this day, in order to the buying
of some of Wood, and I bound it up in painted paper to lie by as a book
for future use.  So home and to supper and to bed, and a little before and
after we were in bed we had much talk and difference between us about my
wife's having a woman, which I seemed much angry at, that she should go so
far in it without consideration and my being consulted with.  So to bed.

13th.  Up and began our discontent again and sorely angered my wife, who
indeed do live very lonely, but I do perceive that it is want of work that
do make her and all other people think of ways of spending their time
worse, and this I owe to my building, that do not admit of her undertaking
any thing of work, because the house has been and is still so dirty.  I to
my office, and there sat all the morning and dined with discontent with my
wife at noon, and so to my office, and there this afternoon we had our
first meeting upon our commission of inspecting the Chest, and there met
Sir J. Minnes, Sir Francis Clerke, Mr. Heath, Atturney of the Dutchy, Mr.
Prinn, Sir W. Rider, Captn. Cocke, and myself.  Our first work to read
over the Institution, which is a decree in Chancery in the year 1617, upon
an inquisition made at Rochester about that time into the revenues of the
Chest, which had then, from the year 1588 or 1590, by the advice of the
Lord High Admiral and principal officers then being, by consent of the
seamen, been settled, paying sixpence per month, according to their wages
then, which was then but 10s.  which is now 24s.  We adjourned to a
fortnight hence.  So broke up, and I to see Sir W. Pen, who is now pretty
well, but lies in bed still; he cannot rise to stand.  Then to my office
late, and this afternoon my wife in her discontent sent me a letter, which
I am in a quandary what to do, whether to read it or not, but I purpose
not, but to burn it before her face, that I may put a stop to more of this
nature.  But I must think of some way, either to find her some body to
keep her company, or to set her to work, and by employment to take up her
thoughts and time.  After doing what I had to do I went home to supper,
and there was very sullen to my wife, and so went to bed and to sleep
(though with much ado, my mind being troubled) without speaking one word
to her.

14th.  She begun to talk in the morning and to be friends, believing all
this while that.  I had read her letter, which I perceive by her discourse
was full of good counsel, and relating the reason of her desiring a woman,
and how little charge she did intend it to be to me, so I begun and argued
it as full and plain to her, and she to reason it highly to me, to put her
away, and take one of the Bowyers if I did dislike her, that I did resolve
when the house is ready she shall try her for a while; the truth is, I
having a mind to have her come for her musique and dancing.  So up and
about my papers all the morning, and her brother coming I did tell him my
mind plain, who did assure me that they were both of the sisters very
humble and very poor, and that she that we are to have would carry herself
so.  So I was well contented and spent part of the morning at my office,
and so home and to dinner, and after dinner, finding Sarah to be
discontented at the news of this woman, I did begin in my wife's chamber
to talk to her and tell her that it was not out of unkindness to her, but
my wife came up, and I perceive she is not too reconciled to her whatever
the matter is, that I perceive I shall not be able to keep her, though she
is as good a servant (only a little pettish) that ever I desire to have,
and a creditable servant.  So she desired leave to go out to look [for] a
service, and did, for which I am troubled, and fell out highly afterwards
with my wife about it.  So to my office, where we met this afternoon about
answering a great letter of my Lord Treasurer's, and that done to my
office drawing up a letter to him, and so home to supper.

15th.  All the morning at the office sitting, dined with my wife
pleasantly at home, then among my painters, and by and by went to my Civil
Lawyers about my uncle's suit, and so home again and saw my painters make
an end of my house this night, which is my great joy, and so to my office
and did business till ten at night, and so home and to supper, and after
reading part of Bussy d'Ambois, a good play I bought to-day, to bed.

16th (Lord's day).  About 3 o'clock in the morning waked with a rude noise
among Sir J. Minnes his servants (he not being yet come to his lodgings),
who are the rudest people but they that lived before, one Mrs. Davis, that
ever I knew in my life.  To sleep again, and after long talking pleasantly
with my wife, up and to church, where Mrs. Goodyer, now Mrs. Buckworth,
was churched.  I love the woman for her gravity above any in the parish.
So home and to dinner with my wife with great content, and after dinner
walked up and down my house, which is now almost finished, there being
nothing to do but the glazier and furniture to put up.  By and by comes
Tom, and after a little talk I with him towards his end, but seeing many
strangers and coaches coming to our church, and finding that it was a
sermon to be preached by a probationer for the Turkey Company,--[The
Turkey or Levant Company was established in 1581.]--to be sent to Smyrna,
I returned thither.  And several Turkey merchants filled all the best pews
(and some in ours) in the Church, but a most pitiful sermon it was upon a
text in Zachariah, and a great time he spent to show whose son Zachary
was, and to prove Malachi to be the last prophet before John the Baptist.
Home and to see Sir W. Pen, who gets strength, but still keeps his bed.
Then home and to my office to do some business there, and so home to
supper and to bed.

17th.  To the Duke's to-day, but he is gone a-hunting, and therefore I to
my Lord Sandwich's, and having spoke a little with him about his
businesses, I to Westminster Hall and there staid long doing many
businesses, and so home by the Temple and other places doing the like, and
at home I found my wife dressing by appointment by her woman--[Mrs.
Gosnell.]--that I think is to be, and her other sister being here to-day
with her and my wife's brother, I took Mr. Creed, that came to dine, to an
ordinary behind the Change, and there dined together, and after dinner
home and there spent an hour or two till almost dark, talking with my
wife, and making Mrs. Gosnell sing; and then, there being no coach to be
got, by water to White Hall; but Gosnell not being willing to go through
bridge, we were forced to land and take water, again, and put her and her
sister ashore at the Temple.  I am mightily pleased with her humour and
singing.  At White Hall by appointment, Mr. Creed carried my wife and I to
the Cockpitt, and we had excellent places, and saw the King, Queen, Duke
of Monmouth, his son, and my Lady Castlemaine, and all the fine ladies;
and "The Scornfull Lady," well performed.  They had done by eleven
o'clock, and it being fine moonshine, we took coach and home, but could
wake nobody at my house, and so were fain to have my boy get through one
of the windows, and so opened the door and called up the maids, and went
to supper and to bed, my mind being troubled at what my wife tells me,
that her woman will not come till she hears from her mother, for I am so
fond of her that I am loth now not to have her, though I know it will be a
great charge to me which I ought to avoid, and so will make it up in other
things.  So to bed.

18th.  Up and to the office, where Mr. Phillip the lawyer came to me, but
I put him off to the afternoon.  At noon I dined at Sir W. Batten's, Sir
John Minnes being here, and he and I very kind, but I every day expect to
pull a crow with him about our lodgings.  My mind troubled about Gosnell
and my law businesses.  So after dinner to Mr. Phillips his chamber, where
he demands an abatement for Piggott's money, which vexes me also, but I
will not give it him without my father's consent, which I will write to
him to-night about, and have done it.  Here meeting my uncle Thomas, he
and I to my cozen Roger's chamber, and there I did give my uncle him and
Mr. Philips to be my two arbiters against Mr. Cole and Punt, but I expect
no great good of the matter.  Thence walked home, and my wife came home,
having been abroad to-day, laying out above L12 in linen, and a copper,
and a pot, and bedstead, and other household stuff, which troubles me
also, so that my mind to-night is very heavy and divided.  Late at my
office, drawing up a letter to my Lord Treasurer, which we have been long
about, and so home, and, my mind troubled, to bed.

20th.  All the morning sitting at the office, at noon with Mr. Coventry to
the Temple to advise about Field's, but our lawyers not being in the way
we went to St. James's, and there at his chamber dined, and I am still in
love more and more with him for his real worth.  I broke to him my desire
for my wife's brother to send him to sea as a midshipman, which he is
willing to agree to, and will do it when I desire it.  After dinner to the
Temple, to Mr. Thurland; and thence to my Lord Chief Baron, Sir Edward
Hale's, and back with Mr. Thurland to his chamber, where he told us that
Field will have the better of us; and that we must study to make up the
business as well as we can, which do much vex and trouble us: but I am
glad the Duke is concerned in it.  Thence by coach homewards, calling at a
tavern in the way (being guided by the messenger in whose custody Field
lies), and spoke with Mr. Smith our messenger about the business, and so
home, where I found that my wife had finished very neatly my study with
the former hangings of the diningroom, which will upon occasion serve for
a fine withdrawing room.  So a little to my office and so home, and spent
the evening upon my house, and so to supper and to bed.

21St. Within all day long, helping to put up my hangings in my house in my
wife's chamber, to my great content.  In the afternoon I went to speak to
Sir J. Minnes at his lodgings, where I found many great ladies, and his
lodgings made very fine indeed.  At night to supper and to bed: this night
having first put up a spitting sheet, which I find very convenient.  This
day come the King's pleasure-boats from Calais, with the Dunkirk money,
being 400,000 pistolles.

22nd.  This morning, from some difference between my wife and Sarah, her
maid, my wife and I fell out cruelly, to my great discontent.  But I do
see her set so against the wench, whom I take to be a most extraordinary
good servant, that I was forced for the wench's sake to bid her get her
another place, which shall cost some trouble to my wife, however, before I
suffer to be.  Thence to the office, where I sat all the morning, then
dined; Mr. Moore with me, at home, my wife busy putting her furniture in
order.  Then he and I out, and he home and I to my cozen Roger Pepys to
advise about treating with my uncle Thomas, and thence called at the
Wardrobe on Mr. Moore again, and so home, and after doing much business at
my office I went home and caused a new fashion knocker to be put on my
door, and did other things to the putting my house in order, and getting
my outward door painted, and the arch.  This day I bought the book of
country dances against my wife's woman Gosnell comes, who dances finely;
and there meeting Mr. Playford he did give me his Latin songs of Mr.
Deering's, which he lately printed.  This day Mr. Moore told me that for
certain the Queen-Mother is married to my Lord St. Albans, and he is like
to be made Lord Treasurer.  Newes that Sir J. Lawson hath made up a peace
now with Tunis and Tripoli, as well as Argiers, by which he will come home
very highly honoured.

23rd (Lord's day).  Up, after some talk with my wife, soberly, upon
yesterday's difference, and made good friends, and to church to hear Mr.
Mills, and so home, and Mr. Moore and my brother Tom dined with me.  My
wife not being well to-day did not rise.  In the afternoon to church
again, and heard drowsy Mr. Graves, and so to see Sir W. Pen, who
continues ill in bed, but grows better and better every day.  Thence to
Sir W. Batten's, and there staid awhile and heard how Sir R. Ford's
daughter is married to a fellow without friends' consent, and the match
carried on and made up at Will Griffin's, our doorkeeper's.  So to my
office and did a little business, and so home and to bed.  I talked to my
brother to-day, who desires me to give him leave to look after his
mistress still; and he will not have me put to any trouble or obligation
in it, which I did give him leave to do.  I hear to-day how old rich
Audley is lately dead, and left a very great estate, and made a great many
poor familys rich, not all to one.  Among others, one Davis, my old
schoolfellow at Paul's, and since a bookseller in Paul's Church Yard: and
it seems do forgive one man L60,000 which he had wronged him of, but names
not his name; but it is well known to be the scrivener in Fleet Street, at
whose house he lodged.  There is also this week dead a poulterer, in
Gracious Street, which was thought rich, but not so rich, that hath left
L800 per annum, taken in other men's names, and 40,000 Jacobs in gold.

     [A jacobus was a gold coin of the value of twenty-five shillings,
     called after James I, in whose reign it was first coined.]

24th.  Sir J. Minnes, Sir W. Batten, and I, going forth toward White Hall,
we hear that the King and Duke are come this morning to the Tower to see
the Dunkirk money!  So we by coach to them, and there went up and down all
the magazines with them; but methought it was but poor discourse and
frothy that the King's companions (young Killigrew among the rest) about
the codpieces of some of the men in armour there to be seen, had with him.
We saw none of the money, but Mr. Slingsby did show the King, and I did
see, the stamps of the new money that is now to be made by Blondeau's
fashion,

     [Peter Blondeau was employed by the Commonwealth to coin their
     money.  After the Restoration, November 3rd, 1662, he received
     letters of denization, and a grant for being engineer of the Mint in
     the Tower of London, and for using his new invention for coining
     gold and silver with the mill and press, with the fee of L100 per
     annum (Walpole's "Anecdotes of Painting").]

which are very neat, and like the King.  Thence the King to Woolwich,
though a very cold day; and the Duke to White Hall, commanding us to come
after him, which we did by coach; and in his closett, my Lord Sandwich
being there, did discourse with us about getting some of this money to pay
off the Fleets, and other matters; and then away hence, and, it being
almost dinner time, I to my Lord Crew's, and dined with him, and had very
good discourse, and he seemed to be much pleased with my visits.  Thence
to Mr. Phillips, and so to the Temple, where met my cozen Roger Pepys and
his brother, Dr. John, as my arbitrators against Mr. Cole and Mr. John
Bernard for my uncle Thomas, and we two with them by appointment.  They
began very high in their demands, and my friends, partly being not so well
acquainted with the will, and partly, I doubt, not being so good wits as
they, for which I blame my choosing of relations (who besides that are
equally engaged to stand for them as me), I was much troubled thereat, and
taking occasion to deny without my father's consent to bind myself in a
bond of L2000 to stand to their award, I broke off the business for the
present till I hear and consider further, and so thence by coach (my
cozen, Thomas Pepys, being in another chamber busy all the while, going
along with me) homeward, and I set him down by the way; but, Lord! how he
did endeavour to find out a ninepence to clubb with me for the coach, and
for want was forced to give me a shilling, and how he still cries "Gad!"
and talks of Popery coming in, as all the Fanatiques do, of which I was
ashamed.  So home, finding my poor wife very busy putting things in order,
and so to bed, my mind being very much troubled, and could hardly sleep
all night, thinking how things are like to go with us about Brampton, and
blaming myself for living so high as I do when for ought I know my father
and mother may come to live upon my hands when all is done.

25th.  Up and to the office all the morning, and at noon with the rest, by
Mr. Holy, the ironmonger's invitation, to the Dolphin, to a venison pasty,
very good, and rare at this time of the year, and thence by coach with Mr.
Coventry as far as the Temple, and thence to Greatorex's, where I staid
and talked with him, and got him to mend my pocket ruler for me, and so by
coach to my Lord's lodging, where I sat with Mr. Moore by appointment,
making up accounts for my Lord Sandwich, which done he and I and Capt.
Ferrers and W. Howe very merry a good while in the great dining room, and
so it being late and my Lord not coming in, I by coach to the Temple, and
thence walked home, and so to my study to do some business, and then home
and to bed.  Great talk among people how some of the Fanatiques do say
that the end of the world is at hand, and that next Tuesday is to be the
day.  Against which, whenever it shall be, good God fit us all.

26th.  In the morning to the Temple to my cozen Roger, who now desires
that I would excuse him from arbitrating, he not being able to stand for
me as he would do, without appearing too high against my uncle Thomas,
which will raise his clamour.  With this I am very well pleased, for I did
desire it, and so I shall choose other counsel.  Thence home, he being
busy that I could not speak more with him.  All day long till twelve
o'clock at night getting my house in order, my wife putting up the red
hangings and bed in her woman's chamber, and I my books and all other
matters in my chamber and study, which is now very pretty.  So to bed.

27th.  At my waking, I found the tops of the houses covered with snow,
which is a rare sight, that I have not seen these three years.  Up, and
put my people to perfect the cleaning of my house, and so to the office,
where we sat till noon; and then we all went to the next house upon Tower
Hill, to see the coming by of the Russia Embassador; for whose reception
all the City trained-bands do attend in the streets, and the King's
life-guards, and most of the wealthy citizens in their black velvet coats,
and gold chains (which remain of their gallantry at the King's coming in),
but they staid so long that we went down again home to dinner.  And after
I had dined, I heard they were coming, and so I walked to the Conduit in
the Quarrefowr,

     [In two ordinances of the reign of Edward III., printed in Riley's
     "Memorials of London" (pp. 300, 389), this is called the "Carfukes,"
     which nearly approaches the name of the "Carfax," at Oxford, where
     four ways also met.  Pepys's form of the word is nearer quatre
     voies, the French equivalent of quadrivium.]

at the end of Gracious-street and Cornhill; and there (the spouts thereof
running very near me upon all the people that were under it) I saw them
pretty well go by.  I could not see the Embassador in his coach; but his
attendants in their habits and fur caps very handsome, comely men, and
most of them with hawkes upon their fists to present to the King.  But
Lord! to see the absurd nature of Englishmen, that cannot forbear laughing
and jeering at every thing that looks strange.  So back and to the office,
and there we met and sat till seven o'clock, making a bargain with Mr.
Wood for his masts of New England; and then in Mr. Coventry's coach to the
Temple, but my cozen Roger Pepys not being at leisure to speak to me about
my business, I presently walked home, and to my office till very late
doing business, and so home, where I found my house more and more clear
and in order, and hope in a day or two now to be in very good condition
there and to my full content.  Which God grant!  So to supper and to bed.

28th.  A very hard frost; which is news to us after having none almost
these three years.  Up and to Ironmongers' Hall by ten o'clock to the
funeral of Sir Richard Stayner.  Here we were, all the officers of the
Navy, and my Lord Sandwich, who did discourse with us about the fishery,
telling us of his Majesty's resolution to give L200 to every man that will
set out a Busse;

     [A small sea-vessel used in the Dutch herring-fishery.]

and advising about the effects of this encouragement, which will be a very
great matter certainly.  Here we had good rings, and by and by were to
take coach; and I being got in with Mr. Creed into a four-horse coach,
which they come and told us were only for the mourners, I went out, and so
took this occasion to go home.  Where I staid all day expecting Gosnell's
coming, but there came an excuse from her that she had not heard yet from
her mother, but that she will come next week, which I wish she may, since
I must keep one that I may have some pleasure therein. So to my office
till late writing out a copy of my uncle's will, and so home and to bed.

29th.  Before I went to the office my wife's brother did come to us, and
we did instruct him to go to Gosnell's and to see what the true matter is
of her not coming, and whether she do intend to come or no, and so I to
the office; and this morning come Sir G. Carteret to us (being the first
time we have seen him since his coming from France): he tells us, that the
silver which he received for Dunkirk did weigh 120,000 weight.  Here all
the morning upon business, and at noon (not going home to dinner, though
word was brought me that Will. Joyce was there, whom I had not seen at my
house nor any where else these three or four months) with Mr. Coventry by
his coach as far as Fleet Street, and there stepped into Madam Turner's,
where was told I should find my cozen Roger Pepys, and with him to the
Temple, but not having time to do anything I went towards my Lord
Sandwich's.  (In my way went into Captn. Cuttance's coach, and with him to
my Lord's.)  But the company not being ready I did slip down to
Wilkinson's, and having not eat any thing to-day did eat a mutton pie and
drank, and so to my Lord's, where my Lord and Mr. Coventry, Sir Wm. Darcy,
one Mr. Parham (a very knowing and well-spoken man in this business), with
several others, did meet about stating the business of the fishery, and
the manner of the King's giving of this L200 to every man that shall set
out a new-made English Busse by the middle of June next.  In which
business we had many fine pretty discourses; and I did here see the great
pleasure to be had in discoursing of publique matters with men that are
particularly acquainted with this or that business. Having come to some
issue, wherein a motion of mine was well received, about sending these
invitations from the King to all the fishing-ports in general, with
limiting so many Busses to this, and that port, before we know the
readiness of subscribers, we parted, and I walked home all the way, and
having wrote a letter full of business to my father, in my way calling
upon my cozen Turner and Mr. Calthrop at the Temple, for their consent to
be my arbitrators, which they are willing to.  My wife and I to bed pretty
pleasant, for that her brother brings word that Gosnell, which my wife and
I in discourse do pleasantly call our Marmotte, will certainly come next
week without fail, which God grant may be for the best.

30th (Lord's day).  To church in the morning, and Mr. Mills made a pretty
good sermon.  It is a bitter cold frost to-day.  Dined alone with my wife
to-day with great content, my house being quite clean from top to bottom.
In the afternoon I to the French church here

     [The French Protestant Church was founded by Edward VI. in the
     church of St. Anthony's Hospital in Threadneedle Street.  This was
     destroyed in the Great Fire, and rebuilt, but demolished for the
     approaches of the new Royal Exchange.  The church was then removed
     to St. Martin's-le-Grand, but this was also removed in 1888 to make
     room for the new Post Office buildings.]

in the city, and stood in the aisle all the sermon, with great delight
hearing a very admirable sermon, from a very young man, upon the article
in our creed, in order of catechism, upon the Resurrection.  Thence home,
and to visit Sir W. Pen, who continues still bed-rid.  Here was Sir W.
Batten and his Lady, and Mrs. Turner, and I very merry, talking of the
confidence of Sir R. Ford's new-married daughter, though she married so
strangely lately, yet appears at church as brisk as can be, and takes
place of her elder sister, a maid.  Thence home and to supper, and then,
cold as it is, to my office, to make up my monthly accounts, and I do find
that, through the fitting of my house this month, I have spent in that and
kitchen L50 this month; so that now I am worth but L660, or thereabouts.
This being done and fitted myself for the Duke to-morrow, I went home, and
to prayers and to bed.  This day I first did wear a muffe, being my wife's
last year's muffe,

     [The fashion of men wearing muffs appears to have been introduced
     from France in this reign.]

and now I have bought her a new one, this serves me very well.  Thus ends
this month; in great frost; myself and family all well, but my mind much
disordered about my uncle's law business, being now in an order of being
arbitrated between us, which I wish to God it were done.  I am also
somewhat uncertain what to think of my going about to take a woman-servant
into my house, in the quality of a woman for my wife.  My wife promises it
shall cost me nothing but her meat and wages, and that it shall not be
attended with any other expenses, upon which termes I admit of it; for
that it will, I hope, save me money in having my wife go abroad on visits
and other delights; so that I hope the best, but am resolved to alter it,
if matters prove otherwise than I would have them. Publique matters in an
ill condition of discontent against the height and vanity of the Court,
and their bad payments: but that which troubles most, is the Clergy, which
will never content the City, which is not to be reconciled to Bishopps:
the more the pity that differences must still be.  Dunkirk newly sold, and
the money brought over; of which we hope to get some to pay the Navy:
which by Sir J. Lawson's having dispatched the business in the Straights,
by making peace with Argier,--[The ancient name for Algiers.]--Tunis, and
Tripoli (and so his fleet will also shortly come home), will now every day
grow less, and so the King's charge be abated; which God send!

                          DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS.
                                 DECEMBER
                                   1662

December 1st.  Up and by coach with Sir John Minnes and Sir W. Batten to
White Hall to the Duke's chamber, where, as is usual, my Lord Sandwich and
all of us, after his being ready, to his closett, and there discoursed of
matters of the Navy, and here Mr. Coventry did do me the great kindness to
take notice to the Duke of my pains in making a collection of all
contracts about masts, which have been of great use to us.  Thence I to my
Lord Sandwich's, to Mr. Moore, to talk a little about business; and then
over the Parke (where I first in my life, it being a great frost, did see
people sliding with their skeates,

     [Iron skates appear to have been introduced by the Dutch, as the
     name certainly was; but we learn from Fitzstephen that bone skates
     (although not so called) were used in London in the twelfth
     century.]

which is a very pretty art), to Mr. Coventry's chamber to St. James's,
where we all met to a venison pasty, and were very merry, Major Norwood
being with us, whom they did play upon for his surrendering of Dunkirk.
Here we staid till three or four o'clock; and so to the Council Chamber,
where there met the Duke of York, Prince Rupert, Duke of Albemarle, my
Lord Sandwich, Sir Win. Compton, Mr. Coventry, Sir J. Minnes, Sir R. Ford,
Sir W. Rider, myself, and Captain Cuttance, as Commissioners for Tangier.
And after our Commission was read by Mr. Creed, who I perceive is to be
our Secretary, we did fall to discourse of matters: as, first, the
supplying them forthwith with victualls; then the reducing it to make way
for the money, which upon their reduction is to go to the building of the
Mole; and so to other matters, ordered as against next meeting.  This done
we broke up, and I to the Cockpitt, with much crowding and waiting, where
I saw "The Valiant Cidd"--[Translated from the "Cid" of Corneille]--acted,
a play I have read with great delight, but is a most dull thing acted,
which I never understood before, there being no pleasure in it, though
done by Betterton and by Ianthe, And another fine wench that is come in
the room of Roxalana nor did the King or queen once smile all the whole
play, nor any of the company seem to take any pleasure but what was in the
greatness and gallantry of the company.  Thence to my Lord's, and Mr.
Moore being in bed I staid not, but with a link walked home and got
thither by 12 o'clock, knocked up my boy, and put myself to bed.

2nd.  Before I went to the office my wife and I had another falling out
about Sarah, against whom she has a deadly hate, I know not for what, nor
can I see but she is a very good servant.  Then to my office, and there
sat all the morning, and then to dinner with my wife at home, and after
dinner did give Jane a very serious lesson, against we take her to be our
chamber-maid, which I spoke so to her that the poor girl cried and did
promise to be very dutifull and carefull.  So to the office, where we sat
as Commissioners for the Chest, and so examined most of the old
accountants to the Chest about it, and so we broke up, and I to my office
till late preparing business, and so home, being cold, and this night
first put on a wastecoate.  So to bed.

3rd.  Called up by Commissioner Pett, and with him by water, much against
my will, to Deptford, and after drinking a warm morning draft, with Mr.
Wood and our officers measuring all the morning his New England masts,
with which sight I was much pleased for my information, though I perceive
great neglect and indifference in all the King's officers in what they do
for the King.  That done, to the Globe, and there dined with Mr. Wood, and
so by water with Mr. Pett home again, all the way reading his Chest
accounts, in which I did see things did not please me; as his allowing
himself 1300 for one year's looking to the business of the Chest, and L150
per annum for the rest of the years.  But I found no fault to him himself,
but shall when they come to be read at the Board.  We did also call at
Limehouse to view two Busses that are building, that being a thing we are
now very hot upon.  Our call was to see what dimensions they are of, being
50 feet by the keel and about 60 tons.  Home and did a little business,
and so taking Mr. Pett by the way, we walked to the Temple, in our way
seeing one of the Russia Embassador's coaches go along, with his footmen
not in liverys, but their country habits; one of one colour and another of
another, which was very strange.  At the Temple spoke with Mr. Turner and
Calthrop, and so walked home again, being in some pain through the cold
which I have got to-day by water, which troubles me.  At the office doing
business a good while, and so home and had a posset, and so to bed.

4th.  At the office all the morning setting about business, and after
dinner to it again, and so till night, and then home looking over my
Brampton papers against to-morrow that we are to meet with our counsel on
both sides toward an arbitration, upon which I was very late, and so to
bed.

5th.  Up, it being a snow and hard frost, and being up I did call up
Sarah, who do go away to-day or to-morrow.  I paid her her wages, and gave
her 10s. myself, and my wife 5s. to give her.  For my part I think never
servant and mistress parted upon such foolish terms in the world as they
do, only for an opinion in my wife that she is ill-natured, in all other
things being a good servant.  The wench cried, and I was ready to cry too,
but to keep peace I am content she should go, and the rather, though I say
nothing of that, that Jane may come into her place.  This being done, I
walked towards Guildhall, thither being summoned by the Commissioners for
the Lieutenancy; but they sat not this morning.  So meeting in my way W.
Swan, I took him to a house thereabouts, and gave him a morning draft of
buttered ale;

     [Buttered ale must have been a horrible concoction, as it is
     described as ale boiled with lump sugar and spice.]

he telling me still much of his Fanatique stories, as if he were a great
zealot, when I know him to be a very rogue.  But I do it for discourse,
and to see how things stand with him and his party; who I perceive have
great expectation that God will not bless the Court nor Church, as it is
now settled, but they must be purified.  The worst news he tells me, is
that Mr. Chetwind is dead, my old and most ingenious acquaintance.  He is
dead, worth L3,000, which I did not expect, he living so high as he did
always and neatly.  He hath given W. Symons his wife L300, and made Will
one of his executors.  Thence to the Temple to my counsel, and thence to
Gray's Inn to meet with Mr. Cole but could not, and so took a turn or two
in the garden, being very pleasant with the snow and frost.  Thence to my
brother's, and there I eat something at dinner and transcribed a copy or
two of the state of my uncle's estate, which I prepared last night, and so
to the Temple Church, and there walked alone till 4 or 5 o'clock, and then
to my cozen Turner's chamber and staid there, up and down from his to
Calthrop's and Bernard's chambers, till so late, that Mr. Cole not coming,
we broke up for meeting this night, and so taking my uncle Thomas
homewards with me by coach, talking of our desire to have a peace, and set
him down at Gracious-street end, and so home, and there I find Gosnell
come, who, my wife tells me, is like to prove a pretty companion, of which
I am glad.  So to my office for a little business and then home, my mind
having been all this day in most extraordinary trouble and care for my
father, there being so great an appearance of my uncle's going away with
the greatest part of the estate, but in the evening by Gosnell's coming I
do put off these thoughts to entertain myself with my wife and her, who
sings exceeding well, and I shall take great delight in her, and so
merrily to bed.

6th.  Up and to the office, and there sat all the morning, Mr. Coventry
and I alone, the rest being paying off of ships.  Dined at home with my
wife and Gosnell, my mind much pleased with her, and after dinner sat with
them a good while, till my wife seemed to take notice of my being at home
now more than at other times.  I went to the office, and there I sat till
late, doing of business, and at 9 o'clock walked to Mr. Rawlinson's,
thinking to meet my uncle Wight there, where he was, but a great deal of
his wife's kindred-women and I knew not whom (which Mr. Rawlinson did seem
to me to take much notice of his being led by the nose by his wife), I
went away to my office again, and doing my business there, I went home,
and after a song by Gosnell we to bed.

7th (Lord's day).  A great snow, and so to church this morning with my
wife, which is the first time she hath been at church since her going to
Brampton, and Gosnell attending her, which was very gracefull.  So home,
and we dined above in our dining room, the first time since it was new
done, and in the afternoon I thought to go to the French church; but
finding the Dutch congregation there, and then finding the French
congregation's sermon begun in the Dutch, I returned home, and up to our
gallery, where I found my wife and Gosnell, and after a drowsy sermon, we
all three to my aunt Wight's, where great store of her usuall company, and
here we staid a pretty while talking, I differing from my aunt, as I
commonly do, in our opinion of the handsomeness of the Queen, which I
oppose mightily, saying that if my nose be handsome, then is her's, and
such like.  After much discourse, seeing the room full, and being
unwilling to stay all three, I took leave, and so with my wife only to see
Sir W. Pen, who is now got out of his bed, and sits by the fireside. And
after some talk, home and to supper, and after prayers to bed.  This night
came in my wife's brother and talked to my wife and Gosnell about his
wife, which they told me afterwards of, and I do smell that he I doubt is
overreached in thinking that he has got a rich wife,' and I fear she will
prove otherwise.  So to bed.

8th.  Up, and carrying Gosnell by coach, set her down at Temple Barr, she
going about business of hers today.  By the way she was telling me how
Balty did tell her that my wife did go every day in the week to Court and
plays, and that she should have liberty of going abroad as often as she
pleased, and many other lies, which I am vexed at, and I doubt the wench
did come in some expectation of, which troubles me.  So to the Duke and
Mr. Coventry, and alone, the rest being at a Pay and elsewhere, and alone
with Mr. Coventry I did read over our letter to my Lord Treasurer, which I
think now is done as well as it can be.  Then to my Lord Sandwich's, and
there spent the rest of the morning in making up my Lord's accounts with
Mr. Moore, and then dined with Mr. Moore and Battersby his friend, very
well and merry, and good discourse.  Then into the Park, to see them slide
with their skeates, which is very pretty.  And so to the Duke's, where the
Committee for Tangier met: and here we sat down all with him at a table,
and had much good discourse about the business, and is to my great
content.  That done, I hearing what play it was that is to be acted before
the King to-night, I would not stay, but home by coach, where I find my
wife troubled about Gosnell, who brings word that her uncle, justice
Jiggins, requires her to come three times a week to him, to follow some
business that her mother intrusts her withall, and that, unless she may
have that leisure given her, he will not have her take any place; for
which we are both troubled, but there is no help for it, and believing it
to be a good providence of God to prevent my running behindhand in the
world, I am somewhat contented therewith, and shall make my wife so, who,
poor wretch, I know will consider of things, though in good earnest the
privacy of her life must needs be irksome to her.  So I made Gosnell and
we sit up looking over the book of Dances till 12 at night, not observing
how the time went, and so to prayers and to bed.

9th.  Lay long with my wife, contenting her about the business of
Gosnell's going, and I perceive she will be contented as well as myself,
and so to the office, and after sitting all the morning in hopes to have
Mr. Coventry dine with me, he was forced to go to White Hall, and so I
dined with my own company only, taking Mr. Hater home with me, but he,
poor man, was not very well, and so could not eat any thing.  After dinner
staid within all the afternoon, being vexed in my mind about the going
away of Sarah this afternoon, who cried mightily, and so was I ready to
do, and Jane did also, and then anon went Gosnell away, which did trouble
me too; though upon many considerations, it is better that I am rid of the
charge.  All together makes my house appear to me very lonely, which
troubles me much, and in a melancholy humour I went to the office, and
there about business sat till I was called to Sir G. Carteret at the
Treasury office about my Lord Treasurer's letter, wherein he puts me to a
new trouble to write it over again.  So home and late with Sir John Minnes
at the office looking over Mr. Creed's accounts, and then home and to
supper, and my wife and I melancholy to bed.

10th.  This morning rose, receiving a messenger from Sir G. Carteret and a
letter from Mr. Coventry, one contrary to another, about our letter to my
Lord Treasurer, at which I am troubled, but I went to Sir George, and
being desirous to please both, I think I have found out a way to do it. So
back to the office with Sir J. Minnes, in his coach, but so great a snow
that we could hardly pass the streets.  So we and Sir W. Batten to the
office, and there did discourse of Mr. Creed's accounts, and I fear it
will be a good while before we shall go through them, and many things we
meet with, all of difficulty.  Then to the Dolphin, where Sir J. Minnes,
Sir W. Batten, and I, did treat the Auditors of the Exchequer, Auditors
Wood and Beale, and hither come Sir G. Carteret to us.  We had a good
dinner, cost us L5 and 6s., whereof my share 26s., and after dinner did
discourse of our salarys and other matters, which I think now they will
allow.  Thence home, and there I found our new cook-mayde Susan come, who
is recommended to us by my wife's brother, for which I like her never the
better, but being a good well-looked lass, I am willing to try, and Jane
begins to take upon her as a chamber-mayde.  So to the office, where late
putting papers and my books and businesses in order, it being very cold,
and so home to supper.

11th.  Up, it being a great frost upon the snow, and we sat all the
morning upon Mr. Creed's accounts, wherein I did him some service and some
disservice.  At noon he dined with me, and we sat all the afternoon
together, discoursing of ways to get money, which I am now giving myself
wholly up to, and in the evening he went away and I to my office,
concluding all matters concerning our great letter so long in doing to my
Lord Treasurer, till almost one in the morning, and then home with my mind
much eased, and so to bed.

12th.  From a very hard frost, when I wake, I find a very great thaw, and
my house overflown with it, which vexed me.  At the office and home, doing
business all the morning.  Then dined with my wife and sat talking with
her all the afternoon, and then to the office, and there examining my copy
of Mr. Holland's book till 10 at night, and so home to supper and bed.

13th.  Slept long to-day till Sir J. Minnes and Sir W. Batten were set out
towards Portsmouth before I rose, and Sir G. Carteret came to the office
to speak with me before I was up.  So I started up and down to him.  By
and by we sat, Mr. Coventry and I (Sir G. Carteret being gone), and among
other things, Field and Stint did come, and received the L41 given him by
the judgement against me and Harry Kem;

     [Fine for the imprisonment of Field (see February 4th, 1661-62, and
     October 21st, 1662).]

and we did also sign bonds in L500 to stand to the award of Mr. Porter and
Smith for the rest: which, however, I did not sign to till I got Mr.
Coventry to go up with me to Sir W. Pen; and he did promise me before him
to bear his share in what should be awarded, and both concluded that Sir
W. Batten would do no less.  At noon broke up and dined with my wife, and
then to the office again, and there made an end of last night's
examination, and got my study there made very clean and put in order, and
then to write by the post, among other letters one to Sir W. Batten about
this day's work with Field, desiring his promise also.  The letter I have
caused to be entered in our public book of letters.  So home to supper and
to bed.

14th (Lord's day).  Lay with great content talking with my wife in bed,
and so up and to church and then home, and had a neat dinner by ourselves,
and after dinner walked to White Hall and my Lord's, and up and down till
chappell time, and then to the King's chappell, where I heard the service,
and so to my Lord's, and there Mr. Howe and Pagett, the counsellor, an old
lover of musique.  We sang some Psalms of Mr. Lawes, and played some
symphonys between till night, that I was sent for to Mr. Creed's lodging,
and there was Captain Ferrers and his lady and W. Howe and I; we supped
very well and good sport in discourse.  After supper I was sent for to my
Lord, with whom I staid talking about his, and my owne, and the publique
affairs, with great content, he advising me as to my owne choosing of Sir
R. Bernard for umpire in the businesses between my uncle and us, that I
would not trust to him upon his direction, for he did not think him a man
to be trusted at all; and so bid him good night, and to Mr. Creed's again;
Mr. Moore, with whom I intended to have lain, lying physically without
sheets; and there, after some discourse, to bed, and lay ill, though the
bed good, my stomach being sicke all night with my too heavy supper.

15th.  Up and to my Lord's and thence to the Duke, and followed him into
the Park, where, though the ice was broken and dangerous, yet he would go
slide upon his scates, which I did not like, but he slides very well. So
back and to his closett, whither my Lord Sandwich comes, and there Mr.
Coventry and we three had long discourse together about the matters of the
Navy; and, indeed, I find myself more and more obliged to Mr. Coventry,
who studies to do me all the right he can in every thing to the Duke.
Thence walked a good while up and down the gallerys; and among others, met
with Dr. Clerke, who in discourse tells me, that Sir Charles Barkeley's
greatness is only his being pimp to the King, and to my Lady Castlemaine.
And yet for all this, that the King is very kind to the Queen; who, he
says, is one of the best women in the world.  Strange how the King is
bewitched to this pretty Castlemaine.  Thence to my Lord's, and there with
Mr. Creed, Moore, and Howe to the Crown and dined, and thence to
Whitehall, where I walked up and down the gallerys, spending my time upon
the pictures, till the Duke and the Committee for Tangier met (the Duke
not staying with us), where the only matter was to discourse with my Lord
Rutherford, who is this day made Governor of Tangier, for I know not what
reasons; and my Lord of Peterborough to be called home; which, though it
is said it is done with kindness, yet all the world may see it is done
otherwise, and I am sorry to see a Catholick Governor sent to command
there, where all the rest of the officers almost are such already.  But
God knows what the reason is! and all may see how slippery places all
courtiers stand in.  Thence by coach home, in my way calling upon Sir John
Berkenheade, to speak about my assessment of L42 to the Loyal Sufferers;
which, I perceive, I cannot help; but he tells me I have been abused by
Sir R. Ford, which I shall hereafter make use of when it shall be fit.
Thence called at the Major-General's, Sir R. Browne, about my being
assessed armes to the militia; but he was abroad; and so driving through
the backside of the Shambles in Newgate Market, my coach plucked down two
pieces of beef into the dirt, upon which the butchers stopped the horses,
and a great rout of people in the street, crying that he had done him 40s
and L5 worth of hurt; but going down, I saw that he had done little or
none; and so I give them a shilling for it and they were well contented,
and so home, and there to my Lady Batten's to see her, who tells me she
hath just now a letter from Sir William, how that he and Sir J. Minnes did
very narrowly escape drowning on the road, the waters are so high; but is
well.  But, Lord! what a hypocrite-like face she made to tell it me.
Thence to Sir W. Pen and sat long with him in discourse, I making myself
appear one of greater action and resolution as to publique business than I
have hitherto done, at which he listens, but I know is a rogue in his
heart and likes not, but I perceive I may hold up my head, and the more
the better, I minding of my business as I have done, in which God do and
will bless me.  So home and with great content to bed, and talk and chat
with my wife while I was at supper, to our great pleasure.

16th.  Up and to the office, and thither came Mr. Coventry and Sir G.
Carteret, and among other business was Strutt's the purser, against Captn.
Browne, Sir W. Batten's brother-in-law, but, Lord!  though I believe the
Captain has played the knave, though I seem to have a good opinion of him
and to mean him well, what a most troublesome fellow that Strutt is, such
as I never did meet with his fellow in my life.  His talking and ours to
make him hold his peace set my head off akeing all the afternoon with
great pain.  So to dinner, thinking to have had Mr. Coventry, but he could
not go with me; and so I took Captn. Murford. Of whom I do hear what the
world says of me; that all do conclude Mr. Coventry, and Pett, and me, to
be of a knot; and that we do now carry all things before us; and much more
in particular of me, and my studiousnesse, &c., to my great content.
After dinner came Mrs. Browne, the Captain's wife, to see me and my wife,
and I showed her a good countenance, and indeed her husband has been civil
to us, but though I speak them fair, yet I doubt I shall not be able to do
her husband much favour in this business of Strutt's, whom without doubt
he has abused. So to the office, and hence, having done some business, by
coach to White Hall to Secretary Bennet's, and agreed with Mr. Lee to set
upon our new adventure at the Tower to-morrow.  Hence to Col. Lovelace in
Cannon Row about seeing how Sir R. Ford did report all the officers of the
navy to be rated for the Loyal Sufferers, but finding him at the Rhenish
wine-house I could not have any answer, but must take another time.
Thence to my Lord's, and having sat talking with Mr. Moore bewailing the
vanity and disorders of the age, I went by coach to my brother's, where I
met Sarah, my late mayde, who had a desire to speak with me, and I with
her to know what it was, who told me out of good will to me, for she loves
me dearly, that I would beware of my wife's brother, for he is begging or
borrowing of her and often, and told me of her Scallop whisk, and her
borrowing of 50s. for Will, which she believes was for him and her father.
I do observe so much goodness and seriousness in the mayde, that I am
again and again sorry that I have parted with her, though it was full
against my will then, and if she had anything in the world I would commend
her for a wife for my brother Tom.  After much discourse and her
professions of love to me and all my relations, I bade her good night and
did kiss her, and indeed she seemed very well-favoured to me to-night, as
she is always.  So by coach home and to my office, did some business, and
so home to supper and to bed.

17th.  This morning come Mr. Lee, Wade, and Evett, intending to have gone
upon our new design to the Tower today; but it raining, and the work being
to be done in the open garden, we put it off to Friday next.  And so I to
the office doing business, and then dined at home with my poor wife with
great content, and so to the office again and made an end of examining the
other of Mr. Holland's books about the Navy, with which I am much
contented, and so to other businesses till night at my office, and so home
to supper, and after much dear company and talk with my wife, to bed.

18th.  Up and to the office, Mr. Coventry and I alone sat till two
o'clock, and then he inviting himself to my house to dinner, of which I
was proud; but my dinner being a legg of mutton and two capons, they were
not done enough, which did vex me; but we made shift to please him, I
think; but I was, when he was gone, very angry with my wife and people.
This afternoon came my wife's brother and his wife, and Mrs. Lodum his
landlady (my old friend Mr. Ashwell's sister), Balty's wife is a most
little and yet, I believe, pretty old girl, not handsome, nor has anything
in the world pleasing, but, they say, she plays mighty well on the Base
Violl.  They dined at her father's today, but for ought I hear he is a
wise man, and will not give any thing to his daughter till he sees what
her husband do put himself to, so that I doubt he has made but a bad
matter of it, but I am resolved not to meddle with it.  They gone I to the
office, and to see Sir W. Pen, with my wife, and thence I to Mr. Cade the
stationer, to direct him what to do with my two copies of Mr. Holland's
books which he is to bind, and after supplying myself with several things
of him, I returned to my office, and so home to supper and to bed.

19th.  Up and by appointment with Mr. Lee, Wade, Evett, and workmen to the
Tower, and with the Lieutenant's leave set them to work in the garden, in
the corner against the mayne-guard, a most unlikely place. It being cold,
Mr. Lee and I did sit all the day till three o'clock by the fire in the
Governor's house; I reading a play of Fletcher's, being "A Wife for a
Month," wherein no great wit or language.  Having done we went to them at
work, and having wrought below the bottom of the foundation of the wall, I
bid them give over, and so all our hopes ended; and so went home, taking
Mr. Leigh with me, and after drunk a cup of wine he went away, and I to my
office, there reading in Sir W. Petty's book, and so home and to bed, a
little displeased with my wife, who, poor wretch, is troubled with her
lonely life, which I know not how without great charge to help as yet, but
I will study how to do it.

20th.  Up and had L100 brought me by Prior of Brampton in full of his
purchase money for Barton's house and some land.  So to the office, and
thence with Mr. Coventry in his coach to St. James's, with great content
and pride to see him treat me so friendly; and dined with him, and so to
White Hall together; where we met upon the Tangier Commission, and
discoursed many things thereon; but little will be done before my Lord
Rutherford comes there, as to the fortification or Mole.  That done, my
Lord Sandwich and I walked together a good while in the Matted Gallery, he
acquainting me with his late enquiries into the Wardrobe business to his
content; and tells me how things stand.  And that the first year was worth
about L3000 to him, and the next about as much; so that at this day, if he
were paid, it will be worth about L7000 to him.  But it contents me above
all things to see him trust me as his confidant: so I bid him good night,
he being to go into the country, to keep his Christmas, on Monday next.
So by coach home and to my office, being post night, and then home and to
bed.

21st (Lord's day).  Lay long in bed, so up to Church, and so home to
dinner alone with my wife very pleasant.  After dinner I walked to my
brother's, where he told me some hopes he had of bringing his business to
pass still of his mistress, but I do find they do stand upon terms that
will not be either fit or in his power to grant, and therefore I did
dislike his talk and advised him to give it quite over.  Thence walked to
White Hall, and there to chappell, and from thence up stairs, and up and
down the house and gallerys on the King's and Queen's side, and so through
the garden to my Lord's lodgings, where there was Mr. Gibbons, Madge, and
Mallard, and Pagett; and by and by comes in my Lord Sandwich, and so we
had great store of good musique.  By and by comes in my simple Lord
Chandois, who (my Lord Sandwich being gone out to Court) began to sing
psalms, but so dully that I was weary of it.  At last we broke up; and by
and by comes in my Lord Sandwich again, and he and I to talk together
about his businesses, and so he to bed and I and Mr. Creed and Captain
Ferrers fell to a cold goose pye of Mrs. Sarah's, heartily, and so spent
our time till past twelve o'clock, and then with Creed to his lodgings,
and so with him to bed, and slept till

22nd.  Six or seven o'clock and so up, and by the fireside read a good
part of "The Advice to a Daughter," which a simple coxcomb has wrote
against Osborne, but in all my life I never did nor can expect to see so
much nonsense in print Thence to my Lord's, who is getting himself ready
for his journey to Hinchingbroke.  And by and by, after eating something,
and talking with me about many things, and telling me his mind, upon my
asking about Sarah (who, it seems, only married of late, but is also said
to be turned a great drunkard, which I am ashamed of), that he likes her
service well, and do not love a strange face, but will not endure the
fault, but hath bade me speak to her and advise her if she hath a mind to
stay with him, which I will do.  My Lord and his people being gone, I
walked to Mr. Coventry's chamber, where I found him gone out into the Park
with the Duke, so the boy being there ready with my things, I shifted
myself into a riding-habitt, and followed him through White Hall, and in
the Park Mr. Coventry's people having a horse ready for me (so fine a one
that I was almost afeard to get upon him, but I did, and found myself more
feared than hurt) and I got up and followed the Duke, who, with some of
his people (among others Mr. Coventry) was riding out.  And with them to
Hide Park.  Where Mr. Coventry asking leave of the Duke, he bid us go to
Woolwich.  So he and I to the waterside, and our horses coming by the
ferry, we by oars over to Lambeth, and from thence, with brave discourse
by the way, rode to Woolwich, where we eat and drank at Mr. Peat's, and
discoursed of many businesses, and put in practice my new way of the
Call-book, which will be of great use.  Here, having staid a good while,
we got up again and brought night home with us and foul weather.  So over
to Whitehall to his chamber, whither my boy came, who had staid in St.
James's Park by my mistake all day, looking for me. Thence took my things
that I put off to-day, and by coach, being very wet and cold, on my feet
home, and presently shifted myself, and so had the barber come; and my
wife and I to read "Ovid's Metamorphoses," which I brought her home from
Paul's Churchyard to-night, having called for it by the way, and so to
bed,

23rd.  And slept hard till 8 o'clock this morning, and so up and to the
office, where I found Sir J. Minnes and Sir W. Batten come unexpectedly
home last night from Portsmouth, having done the Pay there before we could
have, thought it.  Sat all the morning, and at noon home to dinner with my
wife alone, and after dinner sat by the fire, and then up to make up my
accounts with her, and find that my ordinary housekeeping comes to L7 a
month, which is a great deal.  By and by comes Dr. Pierce, who among other
things tells me that my Lady Castlemaine's interest at Court increases,
and is more and greater than the Queen's; that she hath brought in Sir H.
Bennet, and Sir Charles Barkeley; but that the queen is a most good lady,
and takes all with the greatest meekness that may be. He tells me too that
Mr. Edward Montagu is quite broke at Court with his repute and purse; and
that he lately was engaged in a quarrell against my Lord Chesterfield: but
that the King did cause it to be taken up.  He tells me, too, that the
King is much concerned in the Chancellor's sickness, and that the
Chancellor is as great, he thinks, as ever he was with the King.  He also
tells me what the world says of me, "that Mr. Coventry and I do all the
business of the office almost:" at which I am highly proud.  He being gone
I fell to business, which was very great, but got it well over by nine at
night, and so home, and after supper to bed.

24th.  Lay pleasantly, talking to my wife, till 8 o'clock, then up and to
Sir W. Batten's to see him and Sir G. Carteret and Sir J. Minnes take
coach towards the Pay at Chatham, which they did and I home, and took
money in my pocket to pay many reckonings to-day in the town, as my
bookseller's, and paid at another shop L4 10s. for "Stephens's Thesaurus
Graecae Linguae," given to Paul's School: So to my brother's and
shoemaker, and so to my Lord Crew's, and dined alone with him, and after
dinner much discourse about matters.  Upon the whole, I understand there
are great factions at Court, and something he said that did imply a
difference like to be between the King and the Duke, in case the Queen
should not be with child.  I understand, about this bastard.

     [James Crofts, son of Charles II. by Lucy Walter, created Duke of
     Monmouth in 1663, Duke of Buccleuch in 1673, when he took the name
     of Scott.]

He says, also, that some great man will be aimed at when Parliament comes
to sit again; I understand, the Chancellor: and that there is a bill will
be brought in, that none that have been in arms for the Parliament shall
be capable of office.  And that the Court are weary of my Lord Albemarle
and Chamberlin.  He wishes that my Lord Sandwich had some good occasion to
be abroad this summer which is coming on, and that my Lord Hinchingbroke
were well married, and Sydney had some place at Court. He pities the poor
ministers that are put out, to whom, he says, the King is beholden for his
coming in, and that if any such thing had been foreseen he had never come
in.  After this, and much other discourse of the sea, and breeding young
gentlemen to the sea, I went away, and homeward, met Mr. Creed at my
bookseller's in Paul's Church-yard, who takes it ill my letter last night
to Mr. Povy, wherein I accuse him of the neglect of the Tangier boats, in
which I must confess I did not do altogether like a friend; but however it
was truth, and I must own it to be so, though I fall wholly out with him
for it.  Thence home and to my office alone to do business, and read over
half of Mr. Bland's discourse concerning Trade, which (he being no
scholler and so knows not the rules of writing orderly) is very good.  So
home to supper and to bed, my wife not being well .  .  .  .  This evening
Mr. Gauden sent me, against Christmas, a great chine of beef and three
dozen of tongues.  I did give 5s. to the man that brought it, and
half-a-crown to the porters.  This day also the parish-clerk brought the
general bill of mortality, which cost me half-a-crown more.

     [The Bills of Mortality for London were first compiled by order of
     Thomas Cromwell about 1538, and the keeping of them was commenced by
     the Company of Parish Clerks in the great plague year of 1593.  The
     bills were issued weekly from 1603.  The charter of the Parish
     Clerks' Company (1611) directs that "each parish clerk shall bring
     to the Clerks' Hall weekly a note of all christenings and burials."
     Charles I. in 1636 granted permission to the Parish Clerks to have a
     printing press and employ a printer in their hall for the purpose of
     printing their weekly bills.]

25th (Christmas Day).  Up pretty early, leaving my wife not well in bed,
and with my boy walked, it being a most brave cold and dry frosty morning,
and had a pleasant walk to White Hall, where I intended to have received
the Communion with the family, but I came a little too late. So I walked
up into the house and spent my time looking over pictures, particularly
the ships in King Henry the VIIIth's Voyage to Bullen;

     [Boulogne.  These pictures were given by George III. to the Society
     of Antiquaries, who in return presented to the king a set of Thomas
     Hearne's works, on large paper.  The pictures were reclaimed by
     George IV., and are now at Hampton Court.  They were exhibited in
     the Tudor Exhibition, 1890.]

marking the great difference between their build then and now.  By and by
down to the chappell again where Bishopp Morley preached upon the song of
the Angels, "Glory to God on high, on earth peace, and good will towards
men."  Methought he made but a poor sermon, but long, and reprehending the
mistaken jollity of the Court for the true joy that shall and ought to be
on these days, he particularized concerning their excess in plays and
gaming, saying that he whose office it is to keep the gamesters in order
and within bounds, serves but for a second rather in a duell, meaning the
groom-porter.  Upon which it was worth observing how far they are come
from taking the reprehensions of a bishopp seriously, that they all laugh
in the chappell when he reflected on their ill actions and courses.  He
did much press us to joy in these publique days of joy, and to
hospitality.  But one that stood by whispered in my ear that the Bishopp
himself do not spend one groat to the poor himself.  The sermon done, a
good anthem followed, with vialls, and then the King came down to receive
the Sacrament.  But I staid not, but calling my boy from my Lord's
lodgings, and giving Sarah some good advice, by my Lord's order, to be
sober and look after the house, I walked home again with great pleasure,
and there dined by my wife's bed-side with great content, having a mess of
brave plum-porridge

     [The national Christmas dish of plum pudding is a modern evolution
     from plum porridge, which was probably similar to the dish still
     produced at Windsor Castle.]

and a roasted pullet for dinner, and I sent for a mince-pie abroad, my
wife not being well to make any herself yet.  After dinner sat talking a
good while with her, her [pain] being become less, and then to see Sir W.
Pen a little, and so to my office, practising arithmetique alone and
making an end of last night's book with great content till eleven at
night, and so home to supper and to bed.

26th.  Up, my wife to the making of Christmas pies all day, being now
pretty well again, and I abroad to several places about some businesses,
among others bought a bake-pan in Newgate Market, and sent it home, it
cost me 16s.  So to Dr. Williams, but he is out of town, then to the
Wardrobe.  Hither come Mr. Battersby; and we falling into a discourse of a
new book of drollery in verse called Hudebras,

     [The first edition of Butler's "Hudibras" is dated 1663, and it
     probably had only been published a few days when Pepys bought it and
     sold it at a loss.  He subsequently endeavoured to appreciate the
     work, but was not successful.  The edition in the Pepysian Library
     is dated 1689.]

I would needs go find it out, and met with it at the Temple: cost me 2s.
6d.  But when I came to read it, it is so silly an abuse of the Presbyter
Knight going to the warrs, that I am ashamed of it; and by and by meeting
at Mr. Townsend's at dinner, I sold it to him for 18d.  Here we dined with
many tradesmen that belong to the Wardrobe, but I was weary soon of their
company, and broke up dinner as soon as I could, and away, with the
greatest reluctancy and dispute (two or three times my reason stopping my
sense and I would go back again) within myself, to the Duke's house and
saw "The Villaine," which I ought not to do without my wife, but that my
time is now out that I did undertake it for.  But, Lord! to consider how
my natural desire is to pleasure, which God be praised that he has given
me the power by my late oaths to curb so well as I have done, and will do
again after two or three plays more.  Here I was better pleased with the
play than I was at first, understanding the design better than I did. Here
I saw Gosnell and her sister at a distance, and could have found it in my
heart to have accosted them, but thought not prudent.  But I watched their
going out and found that they came, she, her sister and another woman,
alone, without any man, and did go over the fields a foot. I find that I
have an inclination to have her come again, though it is most against my
interest either of profit or content of mind, other than for their
singing.  Home on foot, in my way calling at Mr. Rawlinson's and drinking
only a cup of ale there.  He tells me my uncle has ended his purchase,
which cost him L4,500, and how my uncle do express his trouble that he has
with his wife's relations, but I understand his great intentions are for
the Wights that hang upon him and by whose advice this estate is bought.
Thence home, and found my wife busy among her pies, but angry for some
saucy words that her mayde Jane has given her, which I will not allow of,
and therefore will give her warning to be gone.  As also we are both
displeased for some slight words that Sarah, now at Sir W. Pen's, hath
spoke of us, but it is no matter.  We shall endeavour to joyne the lion's
skin to the fox's tail.  So to my office alone a while, and then home to
my study and supper and bed.  Being also vexed at my boy for his staying
playing abroad when he is sent of errands, so that I have sent him
to-night to see whether their country carrier be in town or no, for I am
resolved to keep him no more.

27th.  Up, and while I am dressing I sent for my boy's brother, William,
that lives in town here as a groom, to whom and their sister Jane I told
my resolution to keep the boy no longer.  So upon the whole they desire to
have him stay a week longer, and then he shall go.  So to the office, and
there Mr. Coventry and I sat till noon, and then I stept to the Exchange,
and so home to dinner, and after dinner with my wife to the Duke's
Theatre, and saw the second part of "Rhodes,"  done with the new Roxalana;
which do it rather better in all respects for person, voice, and judgment,
then the first Roxalana.  Home with great content with my wife, not so
well pleased with the company at the house to-day, which was full of
citizens, there hardly being a gentleman or woman in the house; a couple
of pretty ladies by us that made sport in it, being jostled and crowded by
prentices.  So home, and I to my study making up my monthly accounts,
which is now fallen again to L630 or thereabouts, which not long since was
L680, at which I am sorry, but I trust in God I shall get it up again, and
in the meantime will live sparingly.  So home to supper and to bed.

28th (Lord's day).  Up and, with my wife to church, and coming out, went
out both before my Lady Batten, he not being there, which I believe will
vex her.  After dinner my wife to church again, and I to the French
church, where I heard an old man make a tedious, long sermon, till they
were fain to light candles to baptize the children by.  So homewards,
meeting my brother Tom, but spoke but little with him, and calling also at
my uncle Wight's, but met him and her going forth, and so I went directly
home, and there fell to the renewing my last year's oaths, whereby it has
pleased God so much to better myself and practise, and so down to supper,
and then prayers and bed.

29th.  Up and walked to Whitehall, where the Duke and Mr. Coventry being
gone forth I went to Westminster Hall, where I staid reading at Mrs.
Mitchell's shop, and sent for half a pint of sack for her.  Here she told
me what I heard not of before, the strange burning of Mr. De Laun, a
merchant's house in Loathbury, and his lady (Sir Thomas Allen's daughter)
and her whole family; not one thing, dog nor cat, escaping; nor any of the
neighbours almost hearing of it till the house was quite down and burnt.
How this should come to pass, God knows, but a most strange thing it is!
Hither came Jack Spicer to me, and I took him to the Swan, where Mr.
Herbert did give me my breakfast of cold chine of pork; and here Spicer
and I talked of Exchequer matters, and how the Lord Treasurer' hath now
ordered all monies to be brought into the Exchequer, and hath settled the
King's revenue, and given to every general expence proper assignments; to
the Navy L200,000 and odd.  He also told me of the great vast trade of the
goldsmiths in supplying the King with money at dear rates.  Thence to
White Hall, and got up to the top gallerys in the Banquetting House, to
see the audience of the Russia Embassadors; which [took place] after long
waiting and fear of the falling of the gallery (it being so full, and part
of it being parted from the rest, for nobody to come up merely from the
weakness thereof): and very handsome it was. After they were come in, I
went down and got through the croude almost as high as the King and the
Embassadors, where I saw all the presents, being rich furs, hawks,
carpets, cloths of tissue, and sea-horse teeth.  The King took two or
three hawks upon his fist, having a glove on, wrought with gold, given him
for the purpose.  The son of one of the Embassadors was in the richest
suit for pearl and tissue, that ever I did see, or shall, I believe.
After they and all the company had kissed the King's hand, then the three
Embassadors and the son, and no more, did kiss the Queen's.  One thing
more I did observe, that the chief Embassador did carry up his master's
letters in state before him on high; and as soon as he had delivered them,
he did fall down to the ground and lay there a great while.  After all was
done, the company broke up; and I spent a little while walking up and down
the gallery seeing the ladies, the two Queens, and the Duke of Monmouth
with his little mistress, which is very little, and like my
brother-in-law's wife.  So with Mr. Creed to the Harp and Ball, and there
meeting with Mr. How, Goodgroom, and young Coleman, did drink and talk
with them, and I have almost found out a young gentlewoman for my turn, to
wait on my wife, of good family and that can sing.  Thence I went away,
and getting a coach went home and sat late talking with my wife about our
entertaining Dr. Clerke's lady and Mrs. Pierce shortly, being in great
pain that my wife hath never a winter gown, being almost ashamed of it,
that she should be seen in a taffeta one; when all the world wears
moyre;--[By moyre is meant mohair.-B.]--so to prayers and to bed, but we
could not come to any resolution what to do therein, other than to appear
as she is.

30th.  Up and to the office, whither Sir W. Pen came, the first time that
he has come downstairs since his late great sickness of the gout.  We with
Mr. Coventry sat till noon, then I to the Change ward, to see what play
was there, but I liked none of them, and so homeward, and calling in at
Mr, Rawlinson's, where he stopped me to dine with him and two East India
officers of ships and Howell our turner.  With the officers I had good
discourse, particularly of the people at the Cape of Good Hope, of whom
they of their own knowledge do tell me these one or two things: viz
.  .  .  .  that they never sleep lying, but always sitting upon the
ground, that their speech is not so articulate as ours, but yet [they]
understand one another well, that they paint themselves all over with the
grease the Dutch sell them (who have a fort there) and soot. After dinner
drinking five or six glasses of wine, which liberty I now take till I
begin my oath again, I went home and took my wife into coach, and carried
her to Westminster; there visited Mrs. Ferrer, and staid talking with her
a good while, there being a little, proud, ugly, talking lady there, that
was much crying up the Queen-Mother's Court at Somerset House above our
own Queen's; there being before no allowance of laughing and the mirth
that is at the other's; and indeed it is observed that the greatest Court
now-a-days is there. Thence to White Hall, where I carried my wife to see
the Queen in her presence-chamber; and the maydes of honour and the young
Duke of Monmouth playing at cards. Some of them, and but a few, were very
pretty; though all well dressed in velvet gowns.  Thence to my Lord's
lodgings, where Mrs. Sarah did make us my Lord's bed, and Mr. Creed I
being sent for, sat playing at cards till it was late, and so good night,
and with great pleasure to bed.

31st.  Lay pretty long in bed, and then I up and to Westminster Hall, and
so to the Swan, sending for Mr. W. Bowyer, and there drank my morning
draft, and had some of his simple discourse.  Among other things he tells
me how the difference comes between his fair cozen Butler and Collonell
Dillon, upon his opening letters of her brother's from Ireland,
complaining of his knavery, and forging others to the contrary; and so
they are long ago quite broke off.  Thence to a barber's and so to my
wife, and at noon took her to Mrs. Pierces by invitacion to dinner, where
there came Dr. Clerke and his wife and sister and Mr. Knight, chief
chyrurgeon to the King and his wife.  We were pretty merry, the two men
being excellent company, but I confess I am wedded from the opinion either
of Mrs. Pierces beauty upon discovery of her naked neck to-day, being
undrest when we came in, or of Mrs. Clerke's genius, which I so much
admired, I finding her to be so conceited and fantastique in her dress
this day and carriage, though the truth is, witty enough.  After dinner
with much ado the doctor and I got away to follow our business for a
while, he to his patients and I to the Tangier Committee, where the Duke
of York was, and we staid at it a good while, and thence in order to the
despatch of the boats and provisions for Tangier away, Mr. Povy, in his
coach, carried Mr. Gauden and I into London to Mr. Bland's, the merchant,
where we staid discoursing upon the reason of the delay of the going away
of these things a great while.  Then to eat a dish of anchovies, and drink
wine and syder, and very merry, but above all things pleased to hear Mrs.
Bland talk like a merchant in her husband's business very well, and it
seems she do understand it and perform a great deal. Thence merry back,
Mr. Povy and, I to White Hall; he carrying me thither on purpose to carry
me into the ball this night before the King.  All the way he talking very
ingenuously, and I find him a fine gentleman, and one that loves to live
nobly and neatly, as I perceive by his discourse of his house, pictures,
and horses.  He brought me first to the Duke's chamber, where I saw him
and the Duchess at supper; and thence into the room where the ball was to
be, crammed with fine ladies, the greatest of the Court.  By and by comes
the King and Queen, the Duke and Duchess, and all the great ones: and
after seating themselves, the King takes out the Duchess of York; and the
Duke, the Duchess of Buckingham; the Duke of Monmouth, my Lady
Castlemaine; and so other lords other ladies: and they danced the Bransle.

     "Branle.  Espece de danse de plusieurs personnes, qui se tiennent
     par la main, et qui se menent tour-a-tour. "Dictionnaire de
     l'Academie.  A country dance mentioned by Shakespeare and other
     dramatists under the form of brawl, which word continued to be used
     in the eighteenth century.

                    "My grave Lord Keeper led the brawls;
                    The seals and maces danced before him."
                                             Gray, 'A Long Story.'

After that, the King led a lady a single Coranto--[swift and lively]--and
then the rest of the lords, one after another, other ladies very noble it
was, and great pleasure to see.  Then to country dances; the King leading
the first, which he called for; which was, says he, "Cuckolds all awry,"
the old dance of England.  Of the ladies that danced, the Duke of
Monmouth's mistress, and my Lady Castlemaine, and a daughter of Sir Harry
de Vicke's, were the best.  The manner was, when the King dances, all the
ladies in the room, and the Queen herself, stand up: and indeed he dances
rarely, and much better that the Duke of York. Having staid here as long
as I thought fit, to my infinite content, it being the greatest pleasure I
could wish now to see at Court, I went out, leaving them dancing, and to
Mrs. Pierces, where I found the company had staid very long for my coming,
but all gone but my wife, and so I took her home by coach and so to my
Lord's again, where after some supper to bed, very weary and in a little
pain from my riding a little uneasily to-night in the coach.

Thus ends this year with great mirth to me and my wife: Our condition
being thus:--we are at present spending a night or two at my Lord's
lodgings at White Hall.  Our home at the Navy-office, which is and hath a
pretty while been in good condition, finished and made very convenient. My
purse is worth about L650, besides my goods of all sorts, which yet might
have been more but for my late layings out upon my house and public
assessment, and yet would not have been so much if I had not lived a very
orderly life all this year by virtue of the oaths that God put into my
heart to take against wine, plays, and other expenses, and to observe for
these last twelve months, and which I am now going to renew, I under God
owing my present content thereunto.  My family is myself and wife,
William, my clerk; Jane, my wife's upper mayde, but, I think, growing
proud and negligent upon it: we must part, which troubles me; Susan, our
cook-mayde, a pretty willing wench, but no good cook; and Wayneman, my
boy, who I am now turning away for his naughty tricks.  We have had from
the beginning our healths to this day very well, blessed be God!  Our late
mayde Sarah going from us (though put away by us) to live with Sir W. Pen
do trouble me, though I love the wench, so that we do make ourselves a
little strange to him and his family for it, and resolve to do so.  The
same we are for other reasons to my Lady Batten and hers. We have lately
had it in our thoughts, and I can hardly bring myself off of it, since
Mrs. Gosnell cannot be with us, to find out another to be in the quality
of a woman to my wife that can sing or dance, and yet finding it hard to
save anything at the year's end as I now live, I think I shall not be such
a fool till I am more warm in my purse, besides my oath of entering into
no such expenses till I am worth L1000.  By my last year's diligence in my
office, blessed be God!  I am come to a good degree of knowledge therein;
and am acknowledged so by all--the world, even the Duke himself, to whom I
have a good access and by that, and my being Commissioner with him for
Tangier, he takes much notice of me; and I doubt not but, by the
continuance of the same endeavours, I shall in a little time come to be a
man much taken notice of in the world, specially being come to so great an
esteem with Mr. Coventry.  The only weight that lies heavy upon my mind is
the ending the business with my uncle Thomas about my-dead uncle's estate,
which is very ill on our side, and I fear when all is done I must be
forced to maintain my father myself, or spare a good deal towards it out
of my own purse, which will be a very great pull back to me in my fortune.
But I must be contented and bring it to an issue one way or other.
Publique matters stand thus: The King is bringing, as is said, his family,
and Navy, and all other his charges, to a less expence.  In the mean time,
himself following his pleasures more than with good advice he would do; at
least, to be seen to all the world to do so.  His dalliance with my Lady
Castlemaine being publique, every day, to his great reproach; and his
favouring of none at Court so much as those that are the confidants of his
pleasure, as Sir H. Bennet and Sir Charles Barkeley; which, good God! put
it into his heart to mend, before he makes himself too much contemned by
his people for it!  The Duke of Monmouth is in so great splendour at
Court, and so dandled by the King, that some doubt, if the King should
have no child by the Queen (which there is yet no appearance of), whether
he would not be acknowledged for a lawful son; and that there will be a
difference follow upon it between the Duke of York and him; which God
prevent!  My Lord Chancellor is threatened by people to be questioned, the
next sitting of the Parliament, by some spirits that do not love to see
him so great: but certainly he is a good servant to the King.  The
Queen-Mother is said to keep too great a Court now; and her being married
to my Lord St. Albans is commonly talked of; and that they had a daughter
between them in France, how true, God knows.  The Bishopps are high, and
go on without any diffidence in pressing uniformity; and the Presbyters
seem silent in it, and either conform or lay down, though without doubt
they expect a turn, and would be glad these endeavours of the other
Fanatiques would take effect; there having been a plot lately found, for
which four have been publickly tried at the Old Bayley and hanged.  My
Lord Sandwich is still in good esteem, and now keeping his Christmas in
the country; and I in good esteem, I think, as any man can be, with him.
Mr. Moore is very sickly, and I doubt will hardly get over his late fit of
sickness, that still hangs on him.  In fine, for the good condition of
myself, wife, family, and estate, in the great degree that it is, and for
the public state of the nation, so quiett as it is, the Lord God be
praised!

     ETEXT EDITOR'S BOOKMARKS:

     All may see how slippery places all courtiers stand in
     Bewailing the vanity and disorders of the age
     Charles Barkeley's greatness is only his being pimp to the King
     Fanatiques do say that the end of the world is at hand
     Goldsmiths in supplying the King with money at dear rates
     He made but a poor sermon, but long
     Joyne the lion's skin to the fox's tail
     Lady Castlemaine's interest at Court increases
     Laughing and jeering at every thing that looks strange
     Lord! to see the absurd nature of Englishmen
     Short of what I expected, as for the most part it do fall out
     Will upon occasion serve for a fine withdrawing room

     ETEXT EDITOR'S BOOKMARKS FOR DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS, 1962 N.S.:

     Afeard of being louzy
     Afeard that my Lady Castlemaine will keep still with the King
     Afraid now to bring in any accounts for journeys
     After taking leave of my wife, which we could hardly do kindly
     Agreed at L3 a year (she would not serve under)
     All may see how slippery places all courtiers stand in
     All made much worse in their report among people than they are
     All the fleas came to him and not to me
     Aptness I have to be troubled at any thing that crosses me
     As much his friend as his interest will let him
     Badge of slavery upon the whole people (taxes)
     Bewailing the vanity and disorders of the age
     Bowling-ally (where lords and ladies are now at bowles)
     Cannot but be with the workmen to see things done to my mind
     Care not for his commands, and especially on Sundays
     Catched cold yesterday by putting off my stockings
     Charles Barkeley's greatness is only his being pimp to the King
     Comb my head clean, which I found so foul with powdering
     Command of an army is not beholden to any body to make him King
     Deliver her from the hereditary curse of child-bearing
     Did much insist upon the sin of adultery
     Discontented at the pride and luxury of the Court
     Discoursed much against a man's lying with his wife in Lent
     Enjoy some degree of pleasure now that we have health, money
     Fanatiques do say that the end of the world is at hand
     Fear she should prove honest and refuse and then tell my wife
     Fearing that Sarah would continue ill, wife and I removed
     God forgive me! what a mind I had to her
     Goldsmiths in supplying the King with money at dear rates
     Hard matter to settle to business after so much leisure
     Hate in others, and more in myself, to be careless of keys
     He made but a poor sermon, but long
     Holes for me to see from my closet into the great office
     Hopes to have had a bout with her before she had gone
     I fear that it must be as it can, and not as I would
     I know not yet what that is, and am ashamed to ask
     Joyne the lion's skin to the fox's tail
     King dined at my Lady Castlemaine's, and supped, every day
     Lady Castlemaine do speak of going to lie in at Hampton Court
     Lady Castlemaine is still as great with the King
     Lady Castlemaine's interest at Court increases
     Last of a great many Presbyterian ministers
     Laughing and jeering at every thing that looks strange
     Let me blood, about sixteen ounces, I being exceedingly full
     Lord! to see the absurd nature of Englishmen
     Lust and wicked lives of the nuns heretofore in England
     Lying a great while talking and sporting in bed with my wife
     Muske Millon
     My Jane's cutting off a carpenter's long mustacho
     My first attempt being to learn the multiplication-table
     No good by taking notice of it, for the present she forbears
     Only wind do now and then torment me .  .  .  extremely
     Parliament hath voted 2s. per annum for every chimney in England
     Parson is a cunning fellow he is as any of his coat
     Peruques of hair, as the fashion now is for ladies to wear
     Pleasures are not sweet to me now in the very enjoying of them
     Raising of our roofs higher to enlarge our houses
     See her look dejectedly and slighted by people already
     See a dead man lie floating upon the waters
     Sermon; but, it being a Presbyterian one, it was so long
     She so cruel a hypocrite that she can cry when she pleases
     She also washed my feet in a bath of herbs, and so to bed
     Short of what I expected, as for the most part it do fall out
     Sir W. Pen did it like a base raskall, and so I shall remember
     Slight answer, at which I did give him two boxes on the ears
     So good a nature that he cannot deny any thing
     Sorry to hear that Sir W. Pen's maid Betty was gone away
     Strange things he has been found guilty of, not fit to name
     Then to church to a tedious sermon
     They were not occupiers, but occupied (women)
     To Mr. Holliard's in the morning, thinking to be let blood
     Trumpets were brought under the scaffold that he not be heard
     Up and took physique, but such as to go abroad with
     Up early and took my physique; it wrought all the morning well
     When the candle is going out, how they bawl and dispute
     Whether she suspected anything or no I know not
     Whether he would have me go to law or arbitracon with him
     Will upon occasion serve for a fine withdrawing room
     Will put Madam Castlemaine's nose out of joynt
     With my whip did whip him till I was not able to stir





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