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Title: Diary of Samuel Pepys — Complete 1668 N.S.
Author: Pepys, Samuel, 1633-1703
Language: English
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*** Start of this Doctrine Publishing Corporation Digital Book "Diary of Samuel Pepys — Complete 1668 N.S." ***

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                THE DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS M.A. F.R.S.

            CLERK OF THE ACTS AND SECRETARY TO THE ADMIRALTY

    TRANSCRIBED FROM THE SHORTHAND MANUSCRIPT IN THE PEPYSIAN LIBRARY
 MAGDALENE COLLEGE CAMBRIDGE BY THE REV. MYNORS BRIGHT M.A. LATE FELLOW
                      AND PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE

                              (Unabridged)

                      WITH LORD BRAYBROOKE'S NOTES

                        EDITED WITH ADDITIONS BY

                        HENRY B. WHEATLEY F.S.A.

                          DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS.

                               1668 N.S.

                                JANUARY
                               1667-1668

January 1st.  Up, and all the morning in my chamber making up some
accounts against this beginning of the new year, and so about noon abroad
with my wife, who was to dine with W. Hewer and Willet at Mrs. Pierces,
but I had no mind to be with them, for I do clearly find that my wife is
troubled at my friendship with her and Knepp, and so dined with my Lord
Crew, with whom was Mr. Browne, Clerk of the House of Lords, and Mr. John
Crew.  Here was mighty good discourse, as there is always: and among other
things my Lord Crew did turn to a place in the Life of Sir Philip Sidney,
wrote by Sir Fulke Greville, which do foretell the present condition of
this nation, in relation to the Dutch, to the very degree of a prophecy;
and is so remarkable that I am resolved to buy one of them, it being,
quite throughout, a good discourse.  Here they did talk much of the
present cheapness of corne, even to a miracle; so as their farmers can pay
no rent, but do fling up their lands; and would pay in corne: but, which I
did observe to my Lord, and he liked well of it, our gentry are grown so
ignorant in every thing of good husbandry, that they know not how to
bestow this corne: which, did they understand but a little trade, they
would be able to joyne together, and know what markets there are abroad,
and send it thither, and thereby ease their tenants and be able to pay
themselves.  They did talk much of the disgrace the Archbishop is fallen
under with the King, and the rest of the Bishops also.  Thence I after
dinner to the Duke of York's playhouse, and there saw "Sir Martin
Mar-all;" which I have seen so often, and yet am mightily pleased with it,
and think it mighty witty, and the fullest of proper matter for mirth that
ever was writ; and I do clearly see that they do improve in their acting
of it.  Here a mighty company of citizens, 'prentices, and others; and it
makes me observe, that when I begun first to be able to bestow a play on
myself, I do not remember that I saw so many by half of the ordinary
'prentices and mean people in the pit at 2s. 6d. a-piece as now; I going
for several years no higher than the 12d. and then the 18d. places,
though, I strained hard to go in then when I did: so much the vanity and
prodigality of the age is to be observed in this particular.  Thence I to
White Hall, and there walked up and down the house a while, and do hear
nothing of anything done further in this business of the change of
Privy-counsellors: only I hear that Sir G. Savile, one of the Parliament
Committee of nine, for examining the Accounts, is by the King made a Lord,
the Lord Halifax; which, I believe, will displease the Parliament.  By and
by I met with Mr. Brisband; and having it in my mind this Christmas to (do
what I never can remember that I did) go to see the manner of the gaming
at the Groome-Porter's, I having in my coming from the playhouse stepped
into the two Temple-halls, and there saw the dirty 'prentices and idle
people playing; wherein I was mistaken, in thinking to have seen gentlemen
of quality playing there, as I think it was when I was a little child,
that one of my father's servants, John Bassum, I think, carried me in his
arms thither.  I did tell Brisband of it, and he did lead me thither,
where, after staying an hour, they begun to play at about eight at night,
where to see how differently one man took his losing from another, one
cursing and swearing, and another only muttering and grumbling to himself,
a third without any apparent discontent at all: to see how the dice will
run good luck in one hand, for half an hour together, and another have no
good luck at all: to see how easily here, where they play nothing but
guinnys, a L100 is won or lost: to see two or three gentlemen come in
there drunk, and putting their stock of gold together, one 22 pieces, the
second 4, and the third 5 pieces; and these to play one with another, and
forget how much each of them brought, but he that brought the 22 thinks
that he brought no more than the rest: to see the different humours of
gamesters to change their luck, when it is bad, how ceremonious they are
as to call for new dice, to shift their places, to alter their manner of
throwing, and that with great industry, as if there was anything in it: to
see how some old gamesters, that have no money now to spend as formerly,
do come and sit and look on, as among others, Sir Lewis Dives, who was
here, and hath been a great gamester in his time: to hear their cursing
and damning to no purpose, as one man being to throw a seven if he could,
and, failing to do it after a great many throws, cried he would be damned
if ever he flung seven more while he lived, his despair of throwing it
being so great, while others did it as their luck served almost every
throw: to see how persons of the best quality do here sit down, and play
with people of any, though meaner; and to see how people in ordinary
clothes shall come hither, and play away 100, or 2 or 300 guinnys, without
any kind of difficulty: and lastly, to see the formality of the
groome-porter, who is their judge of all disputes in play and all quarrels
that may arise therein, and how his under-officers are there to observe
true play at each table, and to give new dice, is a consideration I never
could have thought had been in the world, had I not now seen it.  And
mighty glad I am that I did see it, and it may be will find another
evening, before Christmas be over, to see it again, when I may stay later,
for their heat of play begins not till about eleven or twelve o'clock;
which did give me another pretty observation of a man, that did win mighty
fast when I was there.  I think he won L100 at single pieces in a little
time.  While all the rest envied him his good fortune, he cursed it,
saying, "A pox on it, that it should come so early upon me, for this
fortune two hours hence would be worth something to me, but then, God damn
me, I shall have no such luck."  This kind of prophane, mad entertainment
they give themselves.  And so I, having enough for once, refusing to
venture, though Brisband pressed me hard, and tempted me with saying that
no man was ever known to lose the first time, the devil being too cunning
to discourage a gamester; and he offered me also to lend me ten pieces to
venture; but I did refuse, and so went away, and took coach and home about
9 or to at night, where not finding my wife come home, I took the same
coach again, and leaving my watch behind me for fear of robbing, I did go
back and to Mrs. Pierces, thinking they might not have broken up yet, but
there I find my wife newly gone, and not going out of my coach spoke only
to Mr. Pierce in his nightgown in the street, and so away back again home,
and there to supper with my wife and to talk about their dancing and
doings at Mrs. Pierces to-day, and so to bed.

2nd.  Up, and with Sir J. Minnes by coach to White Hall, and there
attended the King and the Duke of York in the Duke of York's lodgings,
with the rest of the Officers and many of the Commanders of the fleete,
and some of our master shipwrights, to discourse the business of having
the topmasts of ships made to lower abaft of the mainmast; a business I
understand not, and so can give no good account; but I do see that by how
much greater the Council, and the number of Counsellors is, the more
confused the issue is of their councils; so that little was said to the
purpose regularly, and but little use was made of it, they coming to a
very broken conclusion upon it, to make trial in a ship or two.  From this
they fell to other talk about the fleete's fighting this late war, and how
the King's ships have been shattered; though the King said that the world
would not have it that about ten or twenty ships in any fight did do any
service, and that this hath been told so to him himself, by ignorant
people.  The Prince, who was there, was mightily surprised at it, and
seemed troubled: but the King told him that it was only discourse of the
world.  But Mr. Wren whispered me in the eare, and said that the Duke of
Albemarle had put it into his Narrative for the House, that not above
twenty-five ships fought in the engagement wherein he was, but that he was
advised to leave it out; but this he did write from sea, I am sure, or
words to that effect: and did displease many commanders, among others,
Captain Batts, who the Duke of York said was a very stout man, all the
world knew; and that another was brought into his ship that had been
turned out of his place when he was a boatswain, not long before, for
being a drunkard.  This the Prince took notice of, and would have been
angry, I think, but they let their discourse fall: but the Duke of York
was earnest in it.  And the Prince said to me, standing by me, "God damn
me, if they will turn out every man that will be drunk, they must turn out
all the commanders in the fleete.  What is the matter if he be drunk, so
when he comes to fight he do his work?  At least, let him be punished for
his drunkenness, and not put out of his command presently." This he spoke,
very much concerned for this idle fellow, one Greene. After this the King
began to tell stories of the cowardice of the Spaniards in Flanders, when
he was there, at the siege of Mardike and Dunkirke; which was very pretty,
though he tells them but meanly.  This being done I to Westminster Hall,
and there staid a little: and then home, and by the way did find with
difficulty the Life of Sir Philip Sidney (the book I mentioned yesterday).
And the bookseller told me that he had sold four, within this week or two,
which is more than ever he sold in all his life of them; and he could not
imagine what should be the reason of it: but I suppose it is from the same
reason of people's observing of this part therein, touching his
prophesying our present condition here in England in relation to the
Dutch, which is very remarkable.  So home to dinner, where Balty's wife is
come to town; she come last night and lay at my house, but being weary was
gone to bed before I come home, and so I saw her not before.  After dinner
I took my wife and her girl out to the New Exchange, and there my wife
bought herself a lace for a handkercher, which I do give her, of about L3,
for a new year's gift, and I did buy also a lace for a band for myself,
and so home, and there to the office busy late, and so home to my chamber,
where busy on some accounts, and then to supper and to bed.  This day my
wife shows me a locket of dyamonds worth about L40, which W. Hewer do
press her to accept, and hath done for a good while, out of his gratitude
for my kindness and hers to him.  But I do not like that she should
receive it, it not being honourable for me to do it; and so do desire her
to force him to take it back again, he leaving it against her will
yesterday with her.  And she did this evening force him to take it back,
at which she says he is troubled; but, however, it becomes me more to
refuse it, than to let her accept of it.  And so I am well pleased with
her returning it him.  It is generally believed that France is
endeavouring a firmer league with us than the former, in order to his
going on with his business against Spayne the next year; which I am, and
so everybody else is, I think, very glad of, for all our fear is, of his
invading us.  This day, at White Hall, I overheard Sir W. Coventry propose
to the King his ordering of some particular thing in the Wardrobe, which
was of no great value; but yet, as much as it was, it was of profit to the
King and saving to his purse.  The King answered to it with great
indifferency, as a thing that it was no great matter whether it was done
or no. Sir W. Coventry answered: "I see your Majesty do not remember the
old English proverb, 'He that will not stoop for a pin, will never be
worth a pound.'"  And so they parted, the King bidding him do as he would;
which, methought, was an answer not like a King that did intend ever to do
well.

3rd.  At the office all the morning with Mr. Willson and my clerks,
consulting again about a new contract with the Victualler of the Navy, and
at noon home to dinner, and then to the office again, where busy all the
afternoon preparing something for the Council about Tangier this evening.
So about five o'clock away with it to the Council, and there do find that
the Council hath altered its times of sitting to the mornings, and so I
lost my labour, and back again by coach presently round by the city wall,
it being dark, and so home, and there to the office, where till midnight
with Mr. Willson and my people to go through with the Victualler's
contract and the considerations about the new one, and so home to supper
and to bed, thinking my time very well spent.

4th.  Up, and there to the office, where we sat all the morning; at noon
home to dinner, where my clerks and Mr. Clerke the sollicitor with me, and
dinner being done I to the office again, where all the afternoon till late
busy, and then home with my mind pleased at the pleasure of despatching my
business, and so to supper and to bed, my thoughts full, how to order our
design of having some dancing at our house on Monday next, being
Twelfth-day.  It seems worth remembering that this day I did hear my Lord
Anglesey at the table, speaking touching this new Act for Accounts, say
that the House of Lords did pass it because it was a senseless,
impracticable, ineffectual, and foolish Act; and that my Lord Ashly having
shown this that it was so to the House of Lords, the Duke of Buckingham
did stand up and told the Lords that they were beholden to my Lord Ashly,
that having first commended them for a most grave and honourable assembly,
he thought it fit for the House to pass this Act for Accounts because it
was a foolish and simple Act: and it seems it was passed with but a few in
the House, when it was intended to have met in a grand Committee upon it.
And it seems that in itself it is not to be practiced till after this
session of Parliament, by the very words of the Act, which nobody
regarded, and therefore cannot come in force yet, unless the next meeting
they do make a new Act for the bringing it into force sooner; which is a
strange omission.  But I perceive my Lord Anglesey do make a mere
laughing-stock of this Act, as a thing that can do nothing considerable,
for all its great noise.

5th (Lord's day).  Up, and being ready, and disappointed of a coach, it
breaking a wheel just as it was coming for me, I walked as far as the
Temple, it being dirty, and as I went out of my doors my cozen Anthony
Joyce met me, and so walked part of the way with me, and it was to see
what I would do upon what his wife a little while since did desire, which
was to supply him L350 to enable him to go to build his house again.  I
(who in my nature am mighty unready to answer no to anything, and thereby
wonder that I have suffered no more in my life by my easiness in that kind
than I have) answered him that I would do it, and so I will, he offering
me good security, and so it being left for me to consider the manner of
doing it we parted.  Taking coach as I said before at the Temple, I to
Charing Cross, and there went into Unthanke's to have my shoes wiped,
dirty with walking, and so to White Hall, where I visited the
Vice-Chamberlain, who tells me, and so I find by others, that the business
of putting out of some of the Privy-council is over, the King being at
last advised to forbear it; for whereas he did design it to make room for
some of the House of Commons that are against him, thereby to gratify
them, it is believed that it will but so much the more fret the rest that
are not provided for, and raise a new stock of enemies by them that are
displeased, and so all they think is over: and it goes for a pretty saying
of my Lord Anglesey's up and down the Court, that he should lately say to
one of them that are the great promoters of this putting him and others
out of the Council, "Well," says he, "and what are we to look for when we
are outed?  Will all things be set right in the nation?" The other said
that he did believe that many things would be mended: "But," says my Lord,
"will you and the rest of you be contented to be hanged, if you do not
redeem all our misfortunes and set all right, if the power be put into
your hands?"  The other answered, "No, I would not undertake that:"--"Why,
then," says my Lord, "I and the rest of us that you are labouring to put
out, will be contented to be hanged, if we do not recover all that is
past, if the King will put the power into our hands, and adhere wholly to
our advice;" which saying as it was severe, so generally people have so
little opinion of those that are likely to be uppermost that they do
mightily commend my Lord Anglesey for this saying. From the
Vice-Chamberlain up and down the house till Chapel done, and then did
speak with several that I had a mind to, and so intending to go home, my
Lady Carteret saw and called me out of her window, and so would have me
home with her to Lincoln's Inn Fields to dinner, and there we met with my
Lord Brereton, and several other strangers, to dine there; and I find him
a very sober and serious, able man, and was in discourse too hard for the
Bishop of Chester, who dined there; and who, above all books lately wrote,
commending the matter and style of a late book, called "The Causes of the
Decay of Piety," I do resolve at his great commendation to buy it.  Here
dined also Sir Philip Howard, a Barkeshire Howard, whom I did once hear
swear publickly and loud in the matted gallery that he had not been at a
wench in so long a time.  He did take occasion to tell me at the table
that I have got great ground in the Parliament, by my ready answers to all
that was asked me there about the business of Chatham, and they would
never let me be out of employment, of which I made little; but was glad to
hear him, as well as others, say it.  And he did say also, relating to
Commissioner Pett, that he did not think that he was guilty of anything
like a fault, that he was either able or concerned to amend, but only the
not carrying up of the ships higher, he meant; but he said, three or four
miles lower down, to Rochester Bridge, which is a strange piece of
ignorance in a Member of Parliament at such a time as this, and after so
many examinations in the house of this business; and did boldly declare
that he did think the fault to lie in my Lord Middleton, who had the power
of the place, to secure the boats that were made ready by Pett, and to do
anything that he thought fit, and was much, though not altogether in the
right, for Spragg, that commanded the river, ought rather to be charged
with the want of the boats and the placing of them. After dinner, my Lord
Brereton very gentilely went to the organ, and played a verse very
handsomely.  Thence after dinner away with Sir G. Carteret to White Hall,
setting down my Lord Brereton at my Lord Brouncker's, and there up and
down the house, and on the Queen's side, to see the ladies, and there saw
the Duchesse of York, whom few pay the respect they used, I think, to her;
but she bears all out, with a very great deal of greatness; that is the
truth of it.  And so, it growing night, I away home by coach, and there
set my wife to read, and then comes Pelling, and he and I to sing a
little, and then sup and so to bed.

6th.  Up, leaving my wife to get her ready, and the maids to get a supper
ready against night for our company; and I by coach to White Hall, and
there up and down the house, and among others met with Mr. Pierce, by whom
I find, as I was afeard from the folly of my wife, that he understood that
he and his wife was to dine at my house to-day, whereas it was to sup; and
therefore I, having done my business at court, did go home to dinner, and
there find Mr. Harris, by the like mistake, come to dine with me.
However, we did get a pretty dinner ready for him; and there he and I to
discourse of many things, and I do find him a very excellent person, such
as in my whole [acquaintances] I do not know another better qualified for
converse, whether in things of his own trade, or of other kinds, a man of
great understanding and observation, and very agreeable in the manner of
his discourse, and civil as far as is possible.  I was mightily pleased
with his company; and after dinner did take coach with him, and my wife
and girl, to go to a play, and to carry him thither to his own house.  But
I 'light by the way to return home, thinking to have spoke with Mrs.
Bagwell, who I did see to-day in our entry, come from Harwich, whom I have
not seen these twelve months, I think, and more, and voudrai avoir hazer
alcun with her, sed she was gone, and so I took coach and away to my wife
at the Duke of York's house, in the pit, and so left her; and to Mrs.
Pierce, and took her and her cozen Corbet, Knepp and little James, and
brought them to the Duke's house; and, the house being full, was forced to
carry them to a box, which did cost me 20s., besides oranges, which
troubled me, though their company did please me.  Thence, after the play,
stayed till Harris was undressed, there being acted "The Tempest," and so
he withall, all by coach, home, where we find my house with good fires and
candles ready, and our Office the like, and the two Mercers, and Betty
Turner, Pendleton, and W. Batelier.  And so with much pleasure we into the
house, and there fell to dancing, having extraordinary Musick, two
viollins, and a base viollin, and theorbo, four hands, the Duke of
Buckingham's musique, the best in towne, sent me by Greeting, and there we
set in to dancing.  By and by to my house, to a very good supper, and
mighty merry, and good musick playing; and after supper to dancing and
singing till about twelve at night; and then we had a good sack posset for
them, and an excellent cake, cost me near 20s., of our Jane's making,
which was cut into twenty pieces, there being by this time so many of our
company, by the coming in of young Goodyer and some others of our
neighbours, young men that could dance, hearing of our dancing; and anon
comes in Mrs. Turner, the mother, and brings with her Mrs. Hollworthy,
which pleased me mightily.  And so to dancing again, and singing, with
extraordinary great pleasure, till about two in the morning, and then
broke up; and Mrs. Pierce and her family, and Harris and Knepp by coach
home, as late as it was.  And they gone, I took Mrs. Turner and Hollworthy
home to my house, and there gave wine and sweetmeats; but I find Mrs.
Hollworthy but a mean woman, I think, for understanding, only a little
conceited, and proud, and talking, but nothing extraordinary in person, or
discourse, or understanding.  However, I was mightily pleased with her
being there, I having long longed for to know her, and they being gone, I
paid the fiddlers L3 among the four, and so away to bed, weary and
mightily pleased, and have the happiness to reflect upon it as I do
sometimes on other things, as going to a play or the like, to be the
greatest real comfort that I am to expect in the world, and that it is
that that we do really labour in the hopes of; and so I do really enjoy
myself, and understand that if I do not do it now I shall not hereafter,
it may be, be able to pay for it, or have health to take pleasure in it,
and so fill myself with vain expectation of pleasure and go without it.

7th.  Up, weary, about 9 o'clock, and then out by coach to White Hall to
attend the Lords of the Treasury about Tangier with Sir Stephen Fox, and
having done with them I away back again home by coach time enough to
dispatch some business, and after dinner with Sir W. Pen's coach (he being
gone before with Sir D. Gawden) to White Hall to wait on the Duke of York,
but I finding him not there, nor the Duke of York within, I away by coach
to the Nursery, where I never was yet, and there to meet my wife and
Mercer and Willet as they promised; but the house did not act to-day; and
so I was at a loss for them, and therefore to the other two playhouses
into the pit, to gaze up and down, to look for them, and there did by this
means, for nothing, see an act in "The Schoole of Compliments" at the Duke
of York's house, and "Henry the Fourth" at the King's house; but, not
finding them, nor liking either of the plays, I took my coach again, and
home, and there to my office to do business, and by and by they come home,
and had been at the King's House, and saw me, but I could [not] see them,
and there I walked with them in the garden awhile, and to sing with Mercer
there a little, and so home with her, and taught her a little of my "It is
decreed," which I have a mind to have her learn to sing, and she will do
it well, and so after supper she went away, and we to bed, and there made
amends by sleep for what I wanted last night.

8th.  Up, and it being dirty, I by coach (which I was forced to go to the
charge for) to White Hall, and there did deliver the Duke of York a
memorial for the Council about the case of Tangiers want of money; and I
was called in there and my paper was read.  I did not think fit to say
much, but left them to make what use they pleased of my paper; and so went
out and waited without all the morning, and at noon hear that there is
something ordered towards our help, and so I away by coach home, taking up
Mr. Prin at the Court-gate, it raining, and setting him down at the
Temple: and by the way did ask him about the manner of holding of
Parliaments, and whether the number of Knights and Burgesses were always
the same?  And he says that the latter were not; but that, for aught he
can find, they were sent up at the discretion, at first, of the Sheriffes,
to whom the writs are sent, to send up generally the Burgesses and
citizens of their county: and he do find that heretofore the
Parliament-men being paid by the country, several burroughs have
complained of the Sheriffes putting them to the charge of sending up
Burgesses; which is a very extraordinary thing to me, that knew not this,
but thought that the number had been known, and always the same.  Thence
home to the office, and so with my Lord Brouncker and his mistress,
Williams, to Captain Cocke's to dinner, where was Temple and Mr. Porter,
and a very good dinner, and merry.  Thence with Lord Brouncker to White
Hall to the Commissioners of the Treasury at their sending for us to
discourse about the paying of tickets, and so away, and I by coach to the
'Change, and there took up my wife and Mercer and the girl by agreement,
and so home, and there with Mercer to teach her more of "It is decreed,"
and to sing other songs and talk all the evening, and so after supper I to
even my journall since Saturday last, and so to bed.  Yesterday Mr.
Gibson, upon his discovering by my discourse to him that I had a
willingness, or rather desire, to have him stay with me, than go, as he
designed, on Sir W. Warren's account, to sea, he resolved to let go the
design and wait his fortune with me, though I laboured hard to make him
understand the uncertainty of my condition or service, but however he will
hazard it, which I take mighty kindly of him, though troubled lest he may
come to be a loser by it, but it will not be for want of my telling him
what he was to think on and expect.  However, I am well pleased with it,
with regard to myself, who find him mighty understanding and acquainted
with all things in the Navy, that I should, if I continue in the Navy,
make great use of him.

9th.  Up, and to the office, having first been visited by my cozen Anthony
Joyce about the L350 which he desires me to lend him, and which I have a
mind enough to do, but would have it in my power to call it out again in a
little time, and so do take a little further time to consider it.  So to
the office, where all the morning busy, and so home at noon to dinner with
my people, where Mr. Hollier come and dined with me, and it is still
mighty pleasant to hear him talk of Rome and the Pope, with what hearty
zeal and hatred he talks against him.  After dinner to the office again,
where busy till night, very busy, and among other things wrote to my
father about lending Anthony Joyce the money he desires; and I declare
that I would do it as part of Pall's portion, and that Pall should have
the use of the money till she be married, but I do propose to him to think
of Mr. Cumberland rather than this Jackson that he is upon; and I confess
I have a mighty mind to have a relation so able a man, and honest, and so
old an acquaintance as Mr. Cumberland.  I shall hear his answer by the
next [post].  At night home and to cards with my wife and girle, and to
supper late, and so to bed.

10th.  Up, and with Sir Denis Gawden, who called me, to White Hall, and
there to wait on the Duke of York with the rest of my brethren, which we
did a little in the King's Greenroom, while the King was in Council: and
in this room we found my Lord Bristoll walking alone; which, wondering at,
while the Council was sitting, I was answered that, as being a Catholique,
he could not be of the Council, which I did not consider before.  After
broke up and walked a turn or two with Lord Brouncker talking about the
times, and he tells me that he thinks, and so do every body else, that the
great business of putting out some of the Council to make room for some of
the Parliament men to gratify and wheedle them is over, thinking that it
might do more hurt than good, and not obtain much upon the Parliament
either.  This morning there was a Persian in that country dress, with a
turban, waiting to kiss the King's hand in the Vane-room, against he come
out: it was a comely man as to features, and his dress, methinks, very
comely.  Thence in Sir W. Pen's coach alone (he going with Sir D. Gawden)
to my new bookseller's, Martin's; and there did meet with Fournier,

     [George Fournier, a Jesuit, born at Caen in 1569, was the author of
     several nautical works.  His chief one, "L'Hydrographie," was
     published at Paris in folio in 1663.  A second edition appeared in
     1667.]

the Frenchman, that hath wrote of the Sea and Navigation, and I could not
but buy him, and also bespoke an excellent book, which I met with there,
of China.  The truth is, I have bought a great many books lately to a
great value; but I think to buy no more till Christmas next, and those
that I have will so fill my two presses that I must be forced to give away
some to make room for them, it being my design to have no more at any time
for my proper library than to fill them.  Thence home and to the Exchange,
there to do a little business, where I find everybody concerned whether we
shall have out a fleete this next year or no, they talking of a peace
concluded between France and Spayne, so that the King of France will have
nothing to do with his army unless he comes to us; but I do not see in the
world how we shall be able to set out a fleete for want of money to buy
stores and pay men, for neither of which we shall be any more trusted.  So
home to dinner, and then with my wife and Deb. to the King's house, to see
"Aglaura," which hath been always mightily cried up; and so I went with
mighty expectation, but do find nothing extraordinary in it at all, and
but hardly good in any degree.  So home, and thither comes to us W.
Batelier and sat with us all the evening, and to cards and supper, passing
the evening pretty pleasantly, and so late at night parted, and so to bed.
I find him mightily troubled at the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury
opposing him in the business he hath a patent for about the business of
Impost on wine, but I do see that the Lords have reason for it, it being a
matter wherein money might be saved to his Majesty, and I am satisfied
that they do let nothing pass that may save money, and so God bless them!
So he being gone we to bed.  This day I received a letter from my father,
and another from my cozen Roger Pepys, who have had a view of Jackson's
evidences of his estate, and do mightily like of the man, and his
condition and estate, and do advise me to accept of the match for my
sister, and to finish it as soon as I can; and he do it so as, I confess,
I am contented to have it done, and so give her her portion; and so I
shall be eased of one care how to provide for her, and do in many respects
think that it may be a match proper enough to have her married there, and
to one that may look after my concernments if my father should die and I
continue where I am, and there[fore] I am well pleased with it, and so to
bed.

11th.  Lay some time, talking with my wife in bed about Pall's business,
and she do conclude to have her married here, and to be merry at it; and
to have W. Hewer, and Batelier, and Mercer, and Willet bridemen and
bridemaids, and to be very merry; and so I am glad of it, and do resolve
to let it be done as soon as I can.  So up, and to the office, where all
the morning busy, and thence home to dinner, and from dinner with Mercer,
who dined with us, and wife and Deb. to the King's house, there to see
"The Wild-goose Chase," which I never saw, but have long longed to see it,
being a famous play, but as it was yesterday I do find that where I expect
most I find least satisfaction, for in this play I met with nothing
extraordinary at all, but very dull inventions and designs. Knepp come and
sat by us, and her talk pleased me a little, she telling me how Mis Davis
is for certain going away from the Duke's house, the King being in love
with her; and a house is taken for her, and furnishing; and she hath a
ring given her already worth L600: that the King did send several times
for Nelly, and she was with him, but what he did she knows not; this was a
good while ago, and she says that the King first spoiled Mrs. Weaver,
which is very mean, methinks, in a prince, and I am sorry for it, and can
hope for no good to the State from having a Prince so devoted to his
pleasure.  She told me also of a play shortly coming upon the stage, of
Sir Charles Sidly's, which, she thinks, will be called "The Wandering
Ladys," a comedy that, she thinks, will be most pleasant; and also another
play, called "The Duke of Lerma;" besides "Catelin," which she thinks, for
want of the clothes which the King promised them, will not be acted for a
good while.  Thence home, and there to the office and did some business,
and so with my wife for half an hour walking in the moonlight, and it
being cold, frosty weather, walking in the garden, and then home to
supper, and so by the fireside to have my head combed, as I do now often
do, by Deb., whom I love should be fiddling about me, and so to bed.

12th (Lord's day).  Up, and to dress myself, and then called into my
wife's chamber, and there she without any occasion fell to discourse of my
father's coming to live with us when my sister marries.  This, she being
afeard of declaring an absolute hatred to him since his falling out with
her about Coleman's being with her, she declares against his coming
hither, which I not presently agreeing to, she declared, if he come, she
would not live with me, but would shame me all over the city and court,
which I made slight of, and so we fell very foul; and I do find she do
keep very bad remembrances of my former unkindness to her, and do mightily
complain of her want of money and liberty, which I will rather hear and
bear the complaint of than grant the contrary, and so we had very hot work
a great while: but at last I did declare as I intend, that my father shall
not come, and that he do not desire and intend it; and so we parted with
pretty good quiet, and so away, and being ready went to church, where
first I saw Alderman Backewell and his lady come to our church, they
living in Mark Lane; and I could find in my heart to invite her to sit
with us, she being a fine lady.  I come in while they were singing the
19th Psalm, while the sexton was gathering to his box, to which I did give
5s., and so after sermon home, my wife, Deb., and I all alone and very
kind, full of good discourses, and after dinner I to my chamber, ordering
my Tangier accounts to give to the Auditor in a day or two, which should
have been long ago with him.  At them to my great content all the
afternoon till supper, and after supper with my wife, W. Hewer and Deb.
pretty merry till 12 at night, and then to bed.

13th.  Up, and Mr. Gibbs comes to me, and I give him instructions about
the writing fair my Tangier accounts against to-morrow.  So I abroad with
Sir W. Pen to White Hall, and there did with the rest attend the Duke of
York, where nothing extraordinary; only I perceive there is nothing yet
declared for the next, year, what fleete shall be abroad.  Thence homeward
by coach and stopped at Martin's, my bookseller, where I saw the French
book which I did think to have had for my wife to translate, called
"L'escholle des filles,"

     ["L'Escole des Filles," by Helot, was burnt at the foot of the
     gallows in 1672, and the author himself was burnt in effigy.]

but when I come to look in it, it is the most bawdy, lewd book that ever I
saw, rather worse than "Putana errante,"  so that I was ashamed of reading
in it, and so away home, and there to the 'Change to discourse with Sir H.
Cholmly, and so home to dinner, and in the evening, having done some
business, I with my wife and girl out, and left them at Unthanke's, while
I to White Hall to the Treasury Chamber for an order for Tangier, and so
back, took up my wife, and home, and there busy about my Tangier accounts
against tomorrow, which I do get ready in good condition, and so with
great content to bed.

14th.  At the office all the morning, and at noon home to dinner, and
after dinner with Mr. Clerke and Gibson to the Temple (my wife and girle
going further by coach), and there at the Auditor's did begin the
examining my Tangier accounts, and did make a great entry into it and with
great satisfaction, and I am glad I am so far eased.  So appointing
another day for further part of my accounts, I with Gibson to my
bookseller, Martin, and there did receive my book I expected of China, a
most excellent book with rare cuts; and there fell into discourse with him
about the burning of Paul's when the City was burned; his house being in
the church-yard.  And he tells me that it took fire first upon the end of
a board that, among others, was laid upon the roof instead of lead, the
lead being broke off, and thence down lower and lower: but that the
burning of the goods under St. Fayth's arose from the goods taking fire in
the church-yard, and so got into St. Fayth's Church; and that they first
took fire from the Draper's side, by some timber of the houses that were
burned falling into the church.  He says that one warehouse of books was
saved under Paul's; and he says that there were several dogs found burned
among the goods in the church-yard, and but one man, which was an old man,
that said he would go and save a blanket which he had in the church, and,
being a weak old man, the fire overcome him, and was burned. He says that
most of the booksellers do design to fall a-building again the next year;
but he says that the Bishop of London do use them most basely, worse than
any other landlords, and says he will be paid to this day the rent, or
else he will not come to treat with them for the time to come; and will
not, on that condition either, promise them any thing how he will use
them; and, the Parliament sitting, he claims his privilege, and will not
be cited before the Lord Chief justice, as others are there, to be forced
to a fair dealing.  Thence by coach to Mrs. Pierce's, where my wife and
Deb. is; and there they fell to discourse of the last night's work at
Court, where the ladies and Duke of Monmouth and others acted "The Indian
Emperour;" wherein they told me these things most remark able: that not
any woman but the Duchesse of Monmouth and Mrs. Cornwallis did any thing
but like fools and stocks, but that these two did do most extraordinary
well: that not any man did any thing well but Captain O'Bryan, who spoke
and did well, but, above all things, did dance most incomparably. That she
did sit near the players of the Duke's house; among the rest, Mis Davis,
who is the most impertinent slut, she says, in the world; and the more,
now the King do show her countenance; and is reckoned his mistress, even
to the scorne of the whole world; the King gazing on her, and my Lady
Castlemayne being melancholy and out of humour, all the play, not smiling
once.  The King, it seems, hath given her a ring of L700, which she shews
to every body, and owns that the King did give it her; and he hath
furnished a house for her in Suffolke Street most richly, which is a most
infinite shame.  It seems she is a bastard of Colonell Howard, my Lord
Berkshire, and that he do pimp to her for the King, and hath got her for
him; but Pierce says that she is a most homely jade as ever she saw,
though she dances beyond any thing in the world. She tells me that the
Duchesse of Richmond do not yet come to the Court, nor hath seen the King,
nor will not, nor do he own his desire of seeing her; but hath used means
to get her to Court, but they do not take. Thence home, and there I to my
chamber, having a great many books brought me home from my bookbinder's,
and so I to the new setting of my books against the next year, which costs
me more trouble than I expected, and at it till two o'clock in the
morning, and then to bed, the business not being yet done to my mind.
This evening come Mr. Mills and his wife to see and sit and talk with us,
which they did till 9 o'clock at night, and then parted, and I to my
books.

15th.  Up, and to the Office, where all the morning.  At noon home to
dinner, and then to the Office again, where we met about some business of
D. Gawden's till candle-light; and then, as late as it was, I down to
Redriffe, and so walked by moonlight to Deptford, where I have not been a
great while, and my business I did there was only to walk up and down
above la casa of Bagwell, but could not see her, it being my intent to
have spent a little time con her, she being newly come from her husband;
but I did lose my labour, and so walked back again, but with pleasure by
the walk, and I had the sport to see two boys swear, and stamp, and fret,
for not being able to get their horse over a stile and ditch, one of them
swearing and cursing most bitterly; and I would fain, in revenge, have
persuaded him to have drove his horse through the ditch, by which I
believe he would have stuck there.  But the horse would not be drove, and
so they were forced to go back again, and so I walked away homeward, and
there reading all the evening, and so to bed.  This afternoon my Lord
Anglesey tells us that it is voted in Council to have a fleete of 50 ships
out; but it is only a disguise for the Parliament to get some money by;
but it will not take, I believe, and if it did, I do not think it will be
such as he will get any of, nor such as will enable us to set out such a
fleete.

16th.  Up, after talking with my wife with pleasure, about her learning on
the flageolet a month or two again this winter, and all the rest of the
year her painting, which I do love, and so to the office, where sat all
the morning, and here Lord Anglesey tells us again that a fleete is to be
set out; and that it is generally, he hears, said, that it is but a
Spanish rhodomontado; and that he saying so just now to the Duke of
Albemarle, who come to town last night, after the thing was ordered, he
told him a story of two seamen: one wished all the guns of the ship were
his, and that they were silver; and says the other, "You are a fool, for,
if you can have it for wishing, why do you not wish them gold?"--"So,"
says he, "if a rhodomontado will do any good, why do you not say 100
ships?" And it is true; for the Dutch and French are said to make such
preparations as 50 sail will do no good.  At noon home to dinner with my
gang of clerks, in whose society I am mightily pleased, and mightily with
Mr. Gibson's talking;

     [Richard Gibson, so frequently noticed by Pepys, was a clerk in the
     Navy Office.  His collection of papers relating to the navy of
     England A.D. 1650-1702, compiled, as he states, from the Admiralty
     books in the Navy Office, are in the British Museum.--B.]

he telling me so many good stories relating to the warr and practices of
commanders, which I will find a time to recollect; and he will be an
admirable help to my writing a history of the Navy, if ever I do.  So to
the office, where busy all the afternoon and evening, and then home.  My
work this night with my clerks till midnight at the office was to examine
my list of ships I am making for myself and their dimensions, and to see
how it agrees or differs from other lists, and I do find so great a
difference between them all that I am at a loss which to take, and
therefore think mine to be as much depended upon as any I can make out of
them all.  So little care there has been to this day to know or keep any
history of the Navy.

17th.  Up, and by coach to White Hall to attend the Council there, and
here I met first by Mr. Castle the shipwright, whom I met there, and then
from the whole house the discourse of the duell yesterday between the Duke
of Buckingham, Holmes, and one Jenkins, on one side, and my Lord of
Shrewsbury, Sir John Talbot, and one Bernard Howard, on the other side:
and all about my Lady Shrewsbury,

     [Anna Maria, daughter of Robert Brudenel, second Earl of Cardigan.
     Walpole says she held the Duke of Buckingham's horse, in the habit
     of a page, while he was fighting the duel with her husband.  She
     married, secondly, George Rodney Bridges, son of Sir Thomas Bridges
     of Keynsham, Somerset, Groom of the Bedchamber to Charles IL, and
     died April 20th, 1702.  A portrait of the Countess of Shrewsbury, as
     Minerva, by Lely.]

who is a whore, and is at this time, and hath for a great while been, a
whore to the Duke of Buckingham.  And so her husband challenged him, and
they met yesterday in a close near Barne-Elmes, and there fought: and my
Lord Shrewsbury is run through the body, from the right breast through the
shoulder: and Sir John Talbot all along up one of his armes; and Jenkins
killed upon the place, and the rest all, in a little measure, wounded.
This will make the world think that the King hath good councillors about
him, when the Duke of Buckingham, the greatest man about him, is a fellow
of no more sobriety than to fight about a whore. And this may prove a very
bad accident to the Duke of Buckingham, but that my Lady Castlemayne do
rule all at this time as much as ever she did, and she will, it is
believed, keep all matters well with the Duke of Buckingham: though this
is a time that the King will be very backward, I suppose, to appear in
such a business.  And it is pretty to hear how the King had some notice of
this challenge a week or two ago, and did give it to my Lord Generall to
confine the Duke, or take security that he should not do any such thing as
fight: and the Generall trusted to the King that he, sending for him,
would do it, and the King trusted to the Generall; and so, between both,
as everything else of the greatest moment do, do fall between two stools.
The whole House full of nothing but the talk of this business; and it is
said that my Lord Shrewsbury's case is to be feared, that he may die too;
and that may make it much the worse for the Duke of Buckingham: and I
shall not be much sorry for it, that we may have some sober man come in
his room to assist in the Government.  Here I waited till the Council
rose, and talked the while, with Creed, who tells me of Mr. Harry
Howard's' giving the Royal Society a piece of ground next to his house, to
build a College on, which is a most generous act.  And he tells me he is a
very fine person, and understands and speaks well; and no rigid Papist
neither, but one that would not have a Protestant servant leave his
religion, which he was going to do, thinking to recommend himself to his
master by it; saying that he had rather have an honest Protestant than a
knavish Catholique.  I was not called into the Council; and, therefore,
home, first informing myself that my Lord Hinchingbroke hath been married
this week to my Lord Burlington's daughter; so that that great business is
over; and I mighty glad of it, though I am not satisfied that I have not a
Favour sent me, as I see Attorney Montagu and the Vice-Chamberlain have.
But I am mighty glad that the thing is done.  So home, and there alone
with my wife and Deb. to dinner, and after dinner comes Betty Turner, and
I carried them to the New Exchange, and thence I to White Hall and did a
little business at the Treasury, and so called them there, and so home and
to cards and supper, and her mother come and sat at cards with us till
past 12 at night, and then broke up and to bed, after entering my
journall, which made it one before I went to bed.

18th.  At the office all the morning busy sitting.  At noon home to
dinner, where Betty Turner dined with us, and after dinner carried my
wife, her and Deb.  to the 'Change, where they bought some things, while I
bought "The Mayden Queene," a play newly printed, which I like at the
King's house so well, of Mr. Dryden's, which he himself, in his preface,
seems to brag of, and indeed is a good play.  So home again, and I late at
the office and did much business, and then home to supper and to bed.

19th (Lord's day).  My wife the last night very ill of those, and waked me
early, and hereupon I up and to church, where a dull sermon by our
lecturer, and so home to dinner in my wife's chamber, which she is a
little better.  Then after dinner with Captain Perryman down to Redriffe,
and so walked to Deptford, where I sent for Mr. Shish out of the Church to
advise about my vessel, "The Maybolt," and I do resolve to sell,
presently, for any thing rather than keep her longer, having already lost
L100 in her value, which I was once offered and refused, and the ship left
without any body to look to her, which vexes me.  Thence Perryman and I
back again, talking of the great miscarriages in the Navy, and among the
principal that of having gentlemen commanders.  I shall hereafter make use
of his and others' help to reckon up and put down in writing what is fit
to be mended in the Navy after all our sad experience therein.  So home,
and there sat with my wife all the evening, and Mr. Pelting awhile talking
with us, who tells me that my Lord Shrewsbury is likely to do well, after
his great wound in the late dwell.  He gone, comes W. Hewer and supped
with me, and so to talk of things, and he tells me that Mr. Jessop is made
Secretary to the Commissions of Parliament for Accounts, and I am glad,
and it is pretty to see that all the Cavalier party were not able to find
the Parliament nine Commissioners, or one Secretary, fit for the business.
So he gone, I to read a little in my chamber, and so to bed.

20th.  Up, and all the morning at the office very busy, and at noon by
coach to Westminster, to the 'Chequer, about a warrant for Tangier money.
In my way both coming and going I did stop at Drumbleby's, the pipe-maker,
there to advise about the making of a flageolet to go low and soft; and he
do shew me a way which do do, and also a fashion of having two pipes of
the same note fastened together, so as I can play on one, and then echo it
upon the other, which is mighty pretty.  So to my Lord Crew's to dinner,
where we hear all the good news of our making a league now with Holland
against the French power coming over them, or us which is the first good
act that hath been done a great while, and done secretly, and with great
seeming wisdom; and is certainly good for us at this time, while we are in
no condition to resist the French, if they should come over hither; and
then a little time of peace will give us time to lay up something, which
these Commissioners of the Treasury are doing; and the world do begin to
see that they will do the King's work for him, if he will let them.  Here
dined Mr. Case, the minister, who, Lord! do talk just as I remember he
used to preach, and did tell a pretty story of a religious lady, Queen of
Navarre;

     [Marguerite de Valois, Queen of Navarre, sister of Francis I. of
     France.  The "pretty story" was doubtless from her "Heptameron," a
     work imitating in title and matter the "Decameron" of Boccaccio.
     She is said to be the heroine of some of the adventures.  It is fair
     to add that she wrote also the "Miroir dune Ame Pecheresse,"
     translated into English by Queen Elizabeth, the title of whose book
     was "A Godly Medytacyon of the Christian Soules," published by John
     Bale in 1548.--B.]

and my Lord also told a good story of Mr. Newman, the Minister in New
England, who wrote the Concordance, of his foretelling his death and
preaching a funeral sermon, and did at last bid the angels do their
office, and died.  It seems there is great presumption that there will be
a Toleration granted: so that the Presbyterians do hold up their heads;
but they will hardly trust the King or the Parliament what to yield them,
though most of the sober party be for some kind of allowance to be given
them.  Thence and home, and then to the 'Change in the evening, and there
Mr. Cade told me how my Lord Gerard is likely to meet with trouble, the
next sitting of Parliament, about [Carr] being set in the pillory; and I
am glad of it; and it is mighty acceptable to the world to hear, that,
among other reductions, the King do reduce his Guards, which do please
mightily.  So to my bookbinder's with my boy, and there did stay late to
see two or three things done that I had a mind to see done, and among
others my Tangier papers of accounts, and so home to supper and to bed.

21st.  Up, and while at the office comes news from Kate Joyce that if I
would see her husband alive, I must come presently.  So, after the office
was up, I to him, and W. Hewer with me, and find him in his sick bed (I
never was at their house, this Inne, before) very sensible in discourse
and thankful for my kindness to him, and his breath rattled in his
throate, and they did lay pigeons to his feet while I was in the house,
and all despair of him, and with good reason.  But the story is that it
seems on Thursday last he went sober and quiet out of doors in the morning
to Islington, and behind one of the inns, the White Lion, did fling
himself into a pond, was spied by a poor woman and got out by some people
binding up hay in a barn there, and set on his head and got to life, and
known by a woman coming that way; and so his wife and friends sent for.
He confessed his doing the thing, being led by the Devil; and do declare
his reason to be, his trouble that he found in having forgot to serve God
as he ought, since he come to this new employment: and I believe that, and
the sense of his great loss by the fire, did bring him to it, and so
everybody concludes.  He stayed there all that night, and come home by
coach next morning, and there grew sick, and worse and worse to this day.
I stayed awhile among the friends that were there, and they being now in
fear that the goods and estate would be seized on, though he lived all
this while, because of his endeavouring to drown himself, my cozen did
endeavour to remove what she could of plate out of the house, and desired
me to take my flagons; which I was glad of, and did take them away with me
in great fear all the way of being seized; though there was no reason for
it, he not being dead, but yet so fearful I was.  So home, and there eat
my dinner, and busy all the afternoon, and troubled at this business.  In
the evening with Sir D. Gawden, to Guild Hall, to advise with the
Towne-Clerke about the practice of the City and nation in this case: and
he thinks that it cannot be found self-murder; but if it be, it will fall,
all the estate, to the King.  So we parted, and I to my cozens again;
where I no sooner come but news was brought down from his chamber that he
was departed.  So, at their entreaty, I presently took coach to White
Hall, and there find Sir W. Coventry; and he carried me to the King, the
Duke of York being with him, and there told my story which I had told him:

     [This was not the only time that Pepys took trouble to save the
     estate of a friend who had committed suicide.  In the "Caveat Book"
     in the Record Office, p. 42 of the volume for 1677, is the following
     entry: "That no grant pass of the Estate of Francis Gurney of Maldon
     in Essex, who drowned himself in his own well on Tuesday night ye
     12th of this instant August, at the desire of Samuel Pepys, Esquire,
     August 20, 1677."]

and the King, without more ado, granted that, if it was found, the estate
should be to the widow and children.  I presently to each Secretary's
office, and there left caveats, and so away back again to my cozens,
leaving a chimney on fire at White Hall, in the King's closet; but no
danger.  And so, when I come thither, I find her all in sorrow, but she
and the rest mightily pleased with my doing this for them; and, indeed, it
was a very great courtesy, for people are looking out for the estate, and
the coroner will be sent to, and a jury called to examine his death. This
being well done to my and their great joy, I home, and there to my office,
and so to supper and to bed.

22nd.  Up, mightily busy all the morning at the office.  At noon with Lord
Brouncker to Sir D. Gawden's, at the Victualling-Office, to dinner, where
I have not dined since he was Sheriff: He expected us; and a good dinner,
and much good company; and a fine house, and especially two rooms, very
fine, he hath built there.  His lady a good lady; but my Lord led himself
and me to a great absurdity in kissing all the ladies, but the finest of
all the company, leaving her out, I know not how; and I was loath to do
it, since he omitted it.  Here little Chaplin dined, who is like to be
Sheriff the next year; and a pretty humoured little man he is. I met here
with Mr. Talents, the younger, of Magdalene College, Chaplain here to the
Sheriff; which I was glad to see, though not much acquainted with him.
This day come the first demand from the Commissioners of Accounts to us,
and it contains more than we shall ever be able to answer while we live,
and I do foresee we shall be put to much trouble and some shame, at least
some of us.  Thence stole away after dinner to my cozen Kate's, and there
find the Crowner's jury sitting, but they could not end it, but put off
the business to Shrove Tuesday next, and so do give way to the burying of
him, and that is all; but they all incline to find it a natural death,
though there are mighty busy people to have it go otherwise, thinking to
get his estate, but are mistaken.  Thence, after sitting with her and
company a while, comforting her: though I can find she can, as all other
women, cry, and yet talk of other things all in a breath.  So home, and
thereto cards with my wife, Deb., and Betty Turner, and Batelier, and
after supper late to sing.  But, Lord! how did I please myself to make
Betty Turner sing, to see what a beast she is as to singing, not knowing
how to sing one note in tune; but, only for the experiment, I would not
for 40s. hear her sing a tune: worse than my wife a thousand times, so
that it do a little reconcile me to her.  So late to bed.

23rd.  At the Office all the morning; and at noon find the Bishop of
Lincolne come to dine with us; and after him comes Mr. Brisband; and there
mighty good company.  But the Bishop a very extraordinary good-natured
man, and one that is mightily pleased, as well as I am, that I live so
near Bugden, the seat of his bishopricke, where he is like to reside: and,
indeed, I am glad of it.  In discourse, we think ourselves safe for this
year, by this league with Holland, which pleases every body, and, they
say, vexes France; insomuch that D'Estrades; the French Embassador in
Holland, when he heard it, told the States that he would have them not
forget that his master is at the head of 100,000 men, and is but 28 years
old; which was a great speech.  The Bishop tells me he thinks that the
great business of Toleration will not, notwithstanding this talk, be
carried this Parliament; nor for the King's taking away the Deans' and
Chapters' lands to supply his wants, they signifying little to him, if he
had them, for his present service.  He gone, I mightily pleased with his
kindness, I to the office, where busy till night, and then to Mrs.
Turner's, where my wife, and Deb., and I, and Batelier spent the night,
and supped, and played at cards, and very merry, and so I home to bed.
She is either a very prodigal woman, or richer than she would be thought,
by her buying of the best things, and laying out much money in
new-fashioned pewter; and, among other things, a new-fashioned case for a
pair of snuffers, which is very pretty; but I could never have guessed
what it was for, had I not seen the snuffers in it.

24th.  Up before day to my Tangier accounts, and then out and to a
Committee of Tangier, where little done but discourse about reduction of
the charge of the garrison, and thence to Westminster about orders at the
Exchequer, and at the Swan I drank, and there met with a pretty ingenious
young Doctor of physic, by chance, and talked with him, and so home to
dinner, and after dinner carried my wife to the Temple, and thence she to
a play, and I to St. Andrew's church, in Holburne, at the 'Quest House,
where the company meets to the burial of my cozen Joyce; and here I staid
with a very great rabble of four or five hundred people of mean condition,
and I staid in the room with the kindred till ready to go to church, where
there is to be a sermon of Dr. Stillingfleete, and thence they carried him
to St. Sepulchre's.  But it being late, and, indeed, not having a black
cloak to lead her [Kate Joyce] with, or follow the corps, I away, and saw,
indeed, a very great press of people follow the corps. I to the King's
playhouse, to fetch my wife, and there saw the best part of "The Mayden
Queene," which, the more I see, the more I love, and think one of the best
plays I ever saw, and is certainly the best acted of any thing ever the
House did, and particularly Becke Marshall, to admiration. Found my wife
and Deb., and saw many fine ladies, and sat by Colonell Reames, who
understands and loves a play as well as I, and I love him for it.  And so
thence home; and, after being at the Office, I home to supper, and to bed,
my eyes being very bad again with overworking with them.

25th.  Up, and to the office, where busy all the morning, and then at noon
to the 'Change with Mr. Hater, and there he and I to a tavern to meet
Captain Minors, which we did, and dined; and there happened to be Mr.
Prichard, a ropemaker of his acquaintance, and whom I know also, and did
once mistake for a fiddler, which sung well, and I asked him for such a
song that I had heard him sing, and after dinner did fall to discourse
about the business of the old contract between the King and the East India
Company for the ships of the King that went thither, and about this did
beat my brains all the afternoon, and then home and made an end of the
accounts to my great content, and so late home tired and my eyes sore, to
supper and to bed.

26th (Lord's day).  Up, and with my wife to Church, and at noon home to
dinner.  No strangers there; and all the afternoon and evening very late
doing serious business of my Tangier accounts, and examining my East India
accounts, with Mr. Poynter, whom I employed all this day, to transcribe it
fair; and so to supper, W. Hewer with us, and so the girl to comb my head
till I slept, and then to bed.

27th.  It being weather like the beginning of a frost and the ground dry,
I walked as far as the Temple, and there took coach and to White Hall, but
the Committee not being met I to Westminster, and there I do hear of the
letter that is in the pamphlet this day of the King of France, declaring
his design to go on against Flanders, and the grounds of it, which do set
us mightily at rest.  So to White Hall, and there a committee of Tangier,
but little done there, only I did get two or three little jobs done to the
perfecting two or three papers about my Tangier accounts.  Here Mr. Povy
do tell me how he is like to lose his L400 a-year pension of the Duke of
York, which he took in consideration of his place which was taken from
him.  He tells me the Duchesse is a devil against him, and do now come
like Queen Elizabeth, and sits with the Duke of York's Council, and sees
what they do; and she crosses out this man's wages and prices, as she sees
fit, for saving money; but yet, he tells me, she reserves L5000 a-year for
her own spending; and my Lady Peterborough, by and by, tells me that the
Duchesse do lay up, mightily, jewells.  Thence to my Lady Peterborough's,
she desiring to speak with me.  She loves to be taken dressing herself, as
I always find her; and there, after a little talk, to please her, about
her husband's pension, which I do not think he will ever get again, I away
thence home, and all the afternoon mighty busy at the office, and late,
preparing a letter to the Commissioners of Accounts, our first letter to
them, and so home to supper, where Betty Turner was (whose brother Frank
did set out toward the East Indies this day, his father and mother gone
down with him to Gravesend), and there was her little brother Moses, whom
I examined, and he is a pretty good scholar for a child, and so after
supper to talk and laugh, and to bed.

28th.  Up, and to the office, and there with W. Griffin talking about
getting the place to build a coach-house, or to hire one, which I now do
resolve to have, and do now declare it; for it is plainly for my benefit
for saving money.  By and by the office sat, and there we concluded on our
letter to the Commissioners of Accounts and to the several officers of
ours about the work they are to do to answer their late great demands. At
noon home to dinner, and after dinner set my wife and girl down at the
Exchange, and I to White Hall; and, by and by, the Duke of York comes, and
we had a little meeting, Anglesey, W. Pen, and I there, and none else:
and, among other things, did discourse of the want of discipline in the
fleete, which the Duke' of York confessed, and yet said that he, while he
was there, did keep it in a good measure, but that it was now lost when he
was absent; but he will endeavour to have it again.  That he did tell the
Prince and Duke of Albemarle they would lose all order by making such and
such men commanders, which they would, because they were stout men: he
told them that it was a reproach to the nation, as if there were no sober
men among us, that were stout, to be had.  That they did put out some men
for cowards that the Duke of York had put in, but little before, for stout
men; and would now, were he to go to sea again, entertain them in his own
division, to choose: and did put in an idle fellow, Greene, who was hardly
thought fit for a boatswain by him: they did put him from being a
lieutenant to a captain's place of a second-rate ship; as idle a drunken
fellow, he said, as any was in the fleete.  That he will now desire the
King to let him be what he is, that is, Admirall; and he will put in none
but those that he hath great reason to think well of; and particularly
says, that; though he likes Colonell Legg well, yet his son that was, he
knows not how, made a captain after he had been but one voyage at sea, he
should go to sea another apprenticeship, before ever he gives him a
command.  We did tell him of the many defects and disorders among the
captains, and I prayed we might do it in writing to him, which he liked;
and I am glad of an opportunity of doing it.  Thence away, and took up
wife and girl, and home, and to the office, busy late, and so to supper
and to bed.  My wife this day hears from her father and mother: they are
in France, at Paris; he, poor good man!  I think he is, gives her good
counsel still, which I always observed of him, and thankful for my small
charities to him.  I could be willing to do something for them, were I
sure not to bring them over again hither. Coming home, my wife and I went
and saw Kate Joyce, who is still in mighty sorrow, and the more from
something that Dr. Stillingfleete should simply say in his sermon, of her
husband's manner of dying, as killing himself.

29th.  Up betimes, and by coach to Sir W. Coventry, whom I found in his
chamber, and there stayed an hour and talked with him about several things
of the Navy, and our want of money, which they indeed do supply us with a
little, but in no degree likely to enable us to go on with the King's
service.  He is at a stand where to have more, and is in mighty pain for
it, declaring that he believes there never was a kingdom so governed as
this was in the time of the late Chancellor and the Treasurer, nobody
minding or understanding any thing how things went or what the King had in
his Treasury, or was to have, nothing in the world of it minded.  He tells
me that there are still people desirous to overthrow him; he resolving to
stick at nothing nor no person that stands in his way against bringing the
King out of debt, be it to retrench any man's place or profit, and that he
cares not, for rather than be employed under the King, and have the King
continue in this condition of indigence, he desires to be put out from
among them, thinking it no honour to be a minister in such a government.
He tells me he hath no friends in the whole Court but my Lord Keeper and
Sir John Duncomb.  He tells me they have reduced the charges of Ireland
above L70,000 a-year, and thereby cut off good profits from my Lord
Lieutenant; which will make a new enemy, but he cares not. He tells me
that Townsend, of the Wardrobe, is the eeriest knave and bufflehead that
ever he saw in his life, and wonders how my Lord Sandwich come to trust
such a fellow, and that now Reames and--------are put in to be overseers
there, and do great things, and have already saved a great deal of money
in the King's liverys, and buy linnen so cheap, that he will have them buy
the next cloth he hath, for shirts.  But then this is with ready money,
which answers all.  He do not approve of my letter I drew and the office
signed yesterday to the Commissioners of Accounts, saying that it is a
little too submissive, and grants a little too much and too soon our bad
managements, though we lay on want of money, yet that it will be time
enough to plead it when they object it.  Which was the opinion of my Lord
Anglesey also; so I was ready to alter it, and did so presently, going
from him home, and there transcribed it fresh as he would have it, and got
it signed, and to White Hall presently and shewed it him, and so home, and
there to dinner, and after dinner all the afternoon and till 12 o'clock at
night with Mr. Gibson at home upon my Tangier accounts, and did end them
fit to be given the last of them to the Auditor to-morrow, to my great
content. This evening come Betty Turner and the two Mercers, and W.
Batelier, and they had fiddlers, and danced, and kept a quarter,--[A term
for making a noise or disturbance.]--which pleased me, though it disturbed
me; but I could not be with them at all.  Mr. Gibson lay at my house all
night, it was so late.

30th.  Up, it being fast day for the King's death, and so I and Mr. Gibson
by water to the Temple, and there all the morning with Auditor Wood, and I
did deliver in the whole of my accounts and run them over in three hours
with full satisfaction, and so with great content thence, he and I, and
our clerks, and Mr. Clerke, the solicitor, to a little ordinary in
Hercules-pillars Ally--the Crowne, a poor, sorry place, where a fellow, in
twelve years, hath gained an estate of, as he says, L600 a-year, which is
very strange, and there dined, and had a good dinner, and very good
discourse between them, old men belonging to the law, and here I first
heard that my cozen Pepys, of Salisbury Court, was Marshal to my Lord
Cooke when he was Lord Chief justice; which beginning of his I did not
know to be so low: but so it was, it seems.  After dinner I home, calling
at my bookbinder's, but he not within.  When come home, I find Kate Joyce
hath been there, with sad news that her house stands not in the King's
liberty, but the Dean of Paul's; and so, if her estate be forfeited, it
will not be in the King's power to do her any good.  So I took coach and
to her, and there found her in trouble, as I cannot blame her.  But I do
believe this arises from somebody that hath a mind to fright her into a
composition for her estate, which I advise her against; and, indeed, I do
desire heartily to be able to do her service, she being, methinks, a piece
of care I ought to take upon me, for our fathers' and friends' sake, she
being left alone, and no friend so near as me, or so able to help her.
After having given her my advice, I home, and there to my office and did
business, and hear how the Committee for Accounts are mighty active and
likely to examine every thing, but let them do their worst I am to be
before them with our contract books to-morrow.  So home from the office,
to supper, and to bed.

31st.  Up; and by coach, with W. Griffin with me, and our Contract-books,
to Durham Yard, to the Commissioners for Accounts; the first time I ever
was there; and staid awhile before I was admitted to them.  I did observe
a great many people attending about complaints of seamen concerning
tickets, and, among others, Mr. Carcasse, and Mr. Martin, my purser. And I
observe a fellow, one Collins, is there, who is employed by these
Commissioners particularly to hold an office in Bishopsgate Street, or
somewhere thereabouts, to receive complaints of all people about tickets:
and I believe he will have work enough.  Presently I was called in, where
I found the whole number of Commissioners, and was there received with
great respect and kindness; and did give them great satisfaction, making
it my endeavour to inform them what it was they were to expect from me,
and what was the duty of other people; this being my only way to preserve
myself, after all my pains and trouble.  They did ask many questions, and
demanded other books of me, which I did give them very ready and
acceptable answers to; and, upon the whole, I observe they do go about
their business like men resolved to go through with it, and in a very good
method; like men of understanding.  They have Mr. Jessop, their secretary:
and it is pretty to see that they are fain to find out an old-fashioned
man of Cromwell's to do their business for them, as well as the Parliament
to pitch upon such, for the most part, in the list of people that were
brought into the House, for Commissioners.  I went away, with giving and
receiving great satisfaction; and so away to White Hall to the
Commissioners of the Treasury; where, waiting some time, I there met with
Colonel Birch; and he and I fell into discourse; and I did give him thanks
for his kindness to me in the Parliament-house, both before my face and
behind my back.  He told me that he knew me to be a man of the old way for
taking pains, and did always endeavour to do me right, and prevent any
thing that was moved that might tend to my injury; which I was obliged to
him for, and thanked him.  Thence to talk of other things, and the want of
money and he told me of the general want of money in the country; that
land sold for nothing, and the many pennyworths he knows of lands and
houses upon them, with good titles in his country, at 16 years' purchase:
"and," says he, "though I am in debt, yet I have a mind to one thing, and
that is a Bishop's lease;" but said, "I will yet choose such a lease
before any other, yes," says he, plainly, "because I know they cannot
stand, and then it will fall into the King's hands, and I in possession
shall have an advantage by it."  "And," says he, "I know they must fall,
and they are now near it, taking all the ways they can to undo themselves,
and showing us the way;" and thereupon told the a story of the present
quarrel between the Bishop and Deane of Coventry and Lichfield; the former
of which did excommunicate the latter, and caused his excommunication to
be read in the Church while he was there; and, after it was read, the
Deane made the service be gone through with, though himself, an
excommunicate, was present, which is contrary to the Canon, and said he
would justify the quire therein against the Bishop; and so they are at law
in the Arches about it; which is a very pretty story.  He tells me that
the King is for Toleration, though the Bishops be against it: and that he
do not doubt but it will be carried in Parliament; but that he fears some
will stand for the tolerating of Papists with the rest; and that he knows
not what to say, but rather thinks that the sober party will be without
it, rather than have it upon those terms; and I do believe so.  Here we
broke off, and I home to dinner, and after dinner set down my wife and
Deb. at the 'Change, and I to make a visit to Mr. Godolphin

     [William Godolphin, descended from a younger branch of that family,
     which was afterwards ennobled in the person of Sidney, Earl
     Godolphin, Lord Treasurer.  William Godolphin was of Christ Church,
     Oxford, and graduated M.A., January 14th, 1660-61.  He was
     afterwards secretary to Sir H. Bennet (Lord Arlington), and M.P. for
     Camelford.  He was a great favourite at Court, and was knighted on
     August 28th, 1668.  In the spring of 1669 he returned to Spain as
     Envoy Extraordinary, and in 1671 he became Ambassador.  On July
     11th, 1696, he died at Madrid, having been for some years a Roman
     Catholic.]

at his lodgings, who is lately come from Spain from my Lord Sandwich, and
did, the other day, meeting me in White Hall, compliment me mightily, and
so I did offer him this visit, but missed him, and so back and took up my
wife and set her at Mrs. Turner's, and I to my bookbinder's, and there,
till late at night, binding up my second part of my Tangier accounts, and
I all the while observing his working, and his manner of gilding of books
with great pleasure, and so home, and there busy late, and then to bed.
This day Griffin did, in discourse in the coach, put me in the head of the
little house by our garden, where old goodman Taylor puts his brooms and
dirt, to make me a stable of, which I shall improve, so as, I think, to be
able to get me a stable without much charge, which do please me mightily.
He did also in discourse tell me that it is observed, and is true, in the
late fire of London, that the fire burned just as many Parish-Churches as
there were hours from the beginning to the end of the fire; and, next,
that there were just as many Churches left standing as there were taverns
left standing in the rest of the City that was not burned, being, I think
he told me, thirteen in all of each: which is pretty to observe.

     ETEXT EDITOR'S BOOKMARKS:

     And they did lay pigeons to his feet
     As all other women, cry, and yet talk of other things
     Carry them to a box, which did cost me 20s., besides oranges
     Declared, if he come, she would not live with me
     Fear that the goods and estate would be seized (after suicide)
     Fears some will stand for the tolerating of Papists
     Greater number of Counsellors is, the more confused the issue
     He that will not stoop for a pin, will never be worth a pound
     In my nature am mighty unready to answer no to anything
     It may be, be able to pay for it, or have health
     Lady Castlemayne do rule all at this time as much as ever
     No man was ever known to lose the first time
     She loves to be taken dressing herself, as I always find her
     The devil being too cunning to discourage a gamester
     The manner of the gaming
     This kind of prophane, mad entertainment they give themselves
     Turn out every man that will be drunk, they must turn out all
     Where I expect most I find least satisfaction



                THE DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS M.A. F.R.S.

            CLERK OF THE ACTS AND SECRETARY TO THE ADMIRALTY

    TRANSCRIBED FROM THE SHORTHAND MANUSCRIPT IN THE PEPYSIAN LIBRARY
 MAGDALENE COLLEGE CAMBRIDGE BY THE REV. MYNORS BRIGHT M.A. LATE FELLOW
                      AND PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE

                              (Unabridged)

                      WITH LORD BRAYBROOKE'S NOTES

                        EDITED WITH ADDITIONS BY

                        HENRY B. WHEATLEY F.S.A.

                          DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS.
                                FEBRUARY
                                1667-1668

February 1st.  Up, and to the office pretty betimes, and the Board not
meeting as soon as I wished, I was forced to go to White Hall in
expectation of a Committee for Tangier, but when I come it was put off,
and so home again to the office, and sat till past two o'clock; where at
the Board some high words passed between Sir W. Pen and I, begun by me,
and yielded to by him, I being in the right in finding fault with him for
his neglect of duty.  At noon home to dinner, and after dinner out with my
wife, thinking to have gone to the Duke of York's playhouse, but was, to
my great content in the saving my vow, hindered by coming a little too
late; and so, it being a fine day, we out to Islington, and there to the
old house and eat cheese-cakes and drank and talked, and so home in the
evening, the ways being mighty bad, so as we had no pleasure in being
abroad at all almost, but only the variety of it, and so to the office,
where busy late, and then home to supper and to bed, my head mighty full
of business now on my hands: viz., of finishing my Tangier Accounts; of
auditing my last year's Accounts; of preparing answers to the
Commissioners of Accounts; of drawing up several important letters to the
Duke of York and the Commissioners of the Treasury; the marrying of my
sister; the building of a coach and stables against summer, and the
setting many things in the Office right; and the drawing up a new form of
Contract with the Victualler of the Navy, and several other things, which
pains, however, will go through with, among others the taking care of Kate
Joyce in that now she is in at present for saving her estate.

2nd (Lord's day).  Wife took physick this day, I all day at home, and all
the morning setting my books in order in my presses, for the following
year, their number being much increased since the last, so as I am fain to
lay by several books to make room for better, being resolved to keep no
more than just my presses will contain.  At noon to dinner, my wife coming
down to me, and a very good dinner we had, of a powdered leg of pork and a
loin of lamb roasted, and with much content she and I and Deb. After
dinner, my head combed an hour, and then to work again, and at it, doing
many things towards the setting my accounts and papers in order, and so in
the evening Mr. Pelling supping with us, and to supper, and so to bed.

3rd.  Up, and to the office, where with my clerks all the morning very
busy about several things there wherein I was behindhand.  At noon home to
dinner, and thence after dinner to the Duke of York's house, to the play,
"The Tempest," which we have often seen, but yet I was pleased again, and
shall be again to see it, it is so full of variety, and particularly this
day I took pleasure to learn the tune of the seaman's dance, which I have
much desired to be perfect in, and have made myself so.  So home with my
wife and Deb., and there at the office met to my trouble with a warrant
from the Commissioners of Accounts for my attending them and Cocke two
days hence, which I apprehend by Captain Cocke's being to go also, to be
about the prizes.  But, however, there is nothing of crime can be laid to
my charge, and the worst that can be is to refund my L500 profit, and who
can help it.  So I resolve not to be troubled at it, though I fear I
cannot bear it so, my spirit being very poor and mean as to the bearing
with trouble that I do find of myself. So home, and there to my chamber
and did some business,--and thence to supper and to bed.

4th.  Up, and to the office, where a full Board sat all the morning, busy
among other things concerning a solemn letter we intend to write to the
Duke of York about the state of the things of the Navy, for want of money,
though I doubt it will be to little purpose.  After dinner I abroad by
coach to Kate Joyce's, where the jury did sit where they did before, about
her husband's death, and their verdict put off for fourteen days longer,
at the suit of somebody, under pretence of the King; but it is only to get
money out of her to compound the matter.  But the truth is, something they
will make out of Stillingfleete's sermon, which may trouble us, he
declaring, like a fool, in his pulpit, that he did confess that his losses
in the world did make him do what he did.  This do vex me to see how
foolish our Protestant Divines are, while the Papists do make it the duty
of Confessor to be secret, or else nobody would confess their sins to
them.  All being put off for to-day, I took my leave of Kate, who is
mightily troubled at it for her estate sake, not for her husband; for her
sorrow for that, I perceive, is all over.  I home, and, there to my office
busy till the evening, and then home, and there my wife and Deb. and I and
Betty Turner, I employed in the putting new titles to my books, which we
proceeded on till midnight, and then being weary and late to bed.

5th.  Up, and I to Captain Cocke's, where he and I did discourse of our
business that we are to go about to the Commissioners of Accounts about
our prizes, and having resolved to conceal nothing but to confess the
truth, the truth being likely to do us most good, we parted, and I to
White Hall, where missing of the Commissioners of the Treasury, I to the
Commissioners of Accounts, where I was forced to stay two hours before I
was called in, and when come in did take an oath to declare the truth to
what they should ask me, which is a great power; I doubt more than the Act
do, or as some say can, give them, to force a man to swear against
himself; and so they fell to enquire about the business of prize-goods,
wherein I did answer them as well as I could, answer them in everything
the just truth, keeping myself to that.  I do perceive at last, that, that
they did lay most like a fault to me was, that I did buy goods upon my
Lord Sandwich's declaring that it was with the King's allowance, and my
believing it, without seeing the King's allowance, which is a thing I will
own, and doubt not to justify myself in.  That that vexed me most was,
their having some watermen by, to witness my saying that they were rogues
that they had betrayed my goods, which was upon some discontent with one
of the watermen that I employed at Greenwich, who I did think did discover
the goods sent from Rochester to the Custom-House officer; but this can do
me no great harm.  They were inquisitive into the minutest particulars,
and the evening great information; but I think that they can do me no
hurt, at the worst, more than to make me refund, if it must be known, what
profit I did make of my agreement with Captain Cocke; and yet, though this
be all, I do find so poor a spirit within me, that it makes me almost out
of my wits, and puts me to so much pain, that I cannot think of anything,
nor do anything but vex and fret, and imagine myself undone, so that I am
ashamed of myself to myself, and do fear what would become of me if any
real affliction should come upon me.  After they had done with me, they
called in Captain Cocke, with whom they were shorter; and I do fear he may
answer foolishly, for he did speak to me foolishly before he went in; but
I hope to preserve myself, and let him shift for himself as well as he
can.  So I away, walked to my flageolet maker in the Strand, and there
staid for Captain Cocke, who took me up and carried me home, and there
coming home and finding dinner done, and Mr. Cooke, who come for my Lady
Sandwich's plate, which I must part with, and so endanger the losing of my
money, which I lent upon my thoughts of securing myself by that plate.
But it is no great sum--but L60: and if it must be lost, better that, than
a greater sum.  I away back again, to find a dinner anywhere else, and so
I, first, to the Ship Tavern, thereby to get a sight of the pretty
mistress of the house, with whom I am not yet acquainted at all, and I do
always find her scolding, and do believe she is an ill-natured devil, that
I have no great desire to speak to her. Here I drank, and away by coach to
the Strand, there to find out Mr. Moore, and did find him at the Bell Inn,
and there acquainted him with what passed between me and the Commissioners
to-day about the prize goods, in order to the considering what to do about
my Lord Sandwich, and did conclude to own the thing to them as done by the
King's allowance, and since confirmed.  Thence to other discourse, among
others, he mightily commends my Lord Hinchingbroke's match and Lady,
though he buys her L10,000 dear, by the jointure and settlement his father
makes her; and says that the Duke of York and Duchess of York did come to
see them in bed together, on their wedding-night, and how my Lord had
fifty pieces of gold taken out of his pocket that night, after he was in
bed.  He tells me that an Act of Comprehension is likely to pass this
Parliament, for admitting of all persuasions in religion to the public
observation of their particular worship, but in certain places, and the
persons therein concerned to be listed of this, or that Church; which, it
is thought, will do them more hurt than good, and make them not own, their
persuasion.  He tells me that there is a pardon passed to the Duke of
Buckingham, my Lord of Shrewsbury, and the rest, for the late duell and
murder;

     [The royal pardon was thus announced in the "Gazette" of February
     24th, 1668: "This day his Majesty was pleased to declare at the
     Board, that whereas, in contemplation of the eminent services
     heretofore done to his Majesty by most of the persons who were
     engaged in the late duel, or rencounter, wherein William Jenkins was
     killed, he Both graciously pardon the said offence: nevertheless, He
     is resolved from henceforth that on no pretence whatsoever any
     pardon shall be hereafter granted to any person whatsoever for
     killing of any man, in any duel or rencounter, but that the course
     of law shall wholly take place in all such cases."  The warrant for
     a pardon to George, Duke of Buckingham, is dated January 27th, 1668;
     and on the following day was issued, "Warrant for a grant to
     Francis, Earl of Shrewsbury, of pardon for killing William Jenkins,
     and for all duels, assaults, or batteries on George, Duke of
     Buckingham, Sir John Talbot, Sir Robert Holmes, or any other,
     whether indicted or not for the same, with restitution of lands,
     goods, &c."  ("Calendar of State Papers," 1667-68, pp. 192,193).]

which he thinks a worse fault than any ill use my late Lord Chancellor
ever put the Great Seal to, and will be so thought by the Parliament, for
them to be pardoned without bringing them to any trial: and that my Lord
Privy-Seal therefore would not have it pass his hand, but made it go by
immediate warrant; or at least they knew that he would not pass it, and so
did direct it to go by immediate warrant, that it might not come to him.
He tells me what a character my Lord Sandwich hath sent over of Mr.
Godolphin, as the worthiest man, and such a friend to him as he may be
trusted in any thing relating to him in the world; as one whom, he says,
he hath infallible assurances that he will remaine his friend which is
very high, but indeed they say the gentleman is a fine man.  Thence, after
eating a lobster for my dinner, having eat nothing to-day, we broke up,
here coming to us Mr. Townsend of the Wardrobe, who complains of the
Commissioners of the Treasury as very severe against my Lord Sandwich, but
not so much as they complain of him for a fool and a knave, and so I let
him alone, and home, carrying Mr. Moore as far as Fenchurch Street, and I
home, and there being vexed in my mind about my prize businesses I to my
chamber, where my wife and I had much talk of W. Hewer, she telling me
that he is mightily concerned for my not being pleased with him, and is
herself mightily concerned, but I have much reason to blame him for his
little assistance he gives me in my business, not being able to copy out a
letter with sense or true spelling that makes me mad, and indeed he is in
that regard of as little use to me as the boy, which troubles me, and I
would have him know it,--and she will let him know it.  By and by to
supper, and so to bed, and slept but ill all night, my mind running like a
fool on my prize business, which according to my reason ought not to
trouble me at all.

6th.  Up, and to the office, where all the morning, and among other
things Sir H. Cholmly comes to me about a little business, and there tells
me how the Parliament, which is to meet again to-day, are likely to fall
heavy on the business of the Duke of Buckingham's pardon; and I shall be
glad of it: and that the King hath put out of the Court the two Hides, my
Lord Chancellor's two sons, and also the Bishops of Rochester and
Winchester, the latter of whom should have preached before him yesterday,
being Ash Wednesday, and had his sermon ready, but was put by; which is
great news: He gone, we sat at the office all the morning, and at noon
home to dinner, and my wife being gone before, I to the Duke of York's
playhouse; where a new play of Etherige's, called "She Would if she
Could;" and though I was there by two o'clock, there was 1000 people put
back that could not have room in the pit: and I at last, because my wife
was there, made shift to get into the 18d. box, and there saw; but, Lord!
how full was the house, and how silly the play, there being nothing in the
world good in it, and few people pleased in it.  The King was there; but I
sat mightily behind, and could see but little, and hear not all.  The play
being done, I into the pit to look (for) my wife, and it being dark and
raining, I to look my wife out, but could not find her; and so staid going
between the two doors and through the pit an hour and half, I think, after
the play was done; the people staying there till the rain was over, and to
talk with one another.  And, among the rest, here was the Duke of
Buckingham to-day openly sat in the pit; and there I found him with my
Lord Buckhurst, and Sidly, and Etherige, the poet; the last of whom I did
hear mightily find fault with the actors, that they were out of humour,
and had not their parts perfect, and that Harris did do nothing, nor could
so much as sing a ketch in it; and so was mightily concerned while all the
rest did, through the whole pit, blame the play as a silly, dull thing,
though there was something very roguish and witty; but the design of the
play, and end, mighty insipid.  At last I did find my wife staying for me
in the entry; and with her was Betty Turner, Mercer, and Deb.  So I got a
coach, and a humour took us, and I carried them to Hercules Pillars, and
there did give them a kind of a supper of about 7s., and very merry, and
home round the town, not through the ruines; and it was pretty how the
coachman by mistake drives us into the ruines from London-wall into
Coleman Street: and would persuade me that I lived there.  And the truth
is, I did think that he and the linkman had contrived some roguery; but it
proved only a mistake of the coachman; but it was a cunning place to have
done us a mischief in, as any I know, to drive us out of the road into the
ruines, and there stop, while nobody could be called to help us.  But we
come safe home, and there, the girls being gone home, I to the office,
where a while busy, my head not being wholly free of my trouble about my
prize business, I home to bed.  This evening coming home I did put my hand
under the coats of Mercer and did touch her thigh, but then she did put by
my hand and no hurt done, but talked and sang and was merry.

7th.  Up, and to the office, to the getting of my books in order, to carry
to the Commissioners of Accounts this morning.  This being done, I away
first to Westminster Hall, and there met my cozen, Roger Pepys, by his
desire, the first time I have seen him since his coming to town, the
Parliament meeting yesterday and adjourned to Monday next; and here he
tells me that Mr. Jackson, my sister's servant, is come to town, and hath
this day suffered a recovery on his estate, in order to the making her a
settlement.  The young man is gone out of the Hall, so I could not now see
him, but here I walked a good while with my cozen, and among other things
do hear that there is a great triall between my Lord Gerard and Carr
to-day, who is indicted for his life at the King's Bench, for running from
his colours; but all do say that my Lord Gerard, though he designs the
ruining of this man, will not get any thing by it.  Thence to the
Commissioners of Accounts, and there presented my books, and was made to
sit down, and used with much respect, otherwise than the other day, when I
come to them as a criminal about the business of the prizes.  I sat here
with them a great while, while my books were inventoried.  And here do
hear from them by discourse that they are like to undo the Treasurer's
instruments of the Navy by making it a rule that they shall repay all
money paid to wrong parties, which is a thing not to be supported by these
poor creatures the Treasurer's instruments, as it is also hard for seamen
to be ruined by their paying money to whom they please.  I know not what
will be the issue of it.  I find these gentlemen to sit all day, and only
eat a bit of bread at noon, and a glass of wine; and are resolved to go
through their business with great severity and method.  Thence I, about
two o'clock, to Westminster Hall, by appointment, and there met my cozen
Roger again, and Mr. Jackson, who is a plain young man, handsome enough
for Pall, one of no education nor discourse, but of few words, and one
altogether that, I think, will please me well enough.  My cozen had got me
to give the odd sixth L100 presently, which I intended to keep to the
birth of the first child: and let it go--I shall be eased of the care, and
so, after little talk, we parted, resolving to dine together at my house
tomorrow.  So there parted, my mind pretty well satisfied with this plain
fellow for my sister, though I shall, I see, have no pleasure nor content
in him, as if he had been a man of reading and parts, like Cumberland, and
to the Swan, and there sent for a bit of meat and eat and drank, and so to
White Hall to the Duke of York's chamber, where I find him and my fellows
at their usual meeting, discoursing about securing the Medway this year,
which is to shut the door after the horse is stole.  However, it is good.
Having done here, my Lord Brouncker, and W. Pen, and I, and with us Sir
Arnold Breames, to the King's playhouse, and there saw a piece of "Love in
a Maze," a dull, silly play, I think; and after the play, home with W. Pen
and his son Lowther, whom we met there, and then home and sat most of the
evening with my wife and Mr. Pelting, talking, my head being full of
business of one kind or other, and most such as do not please me, and so
to supper and to bed.

8th.  Up, and to the office, where sat all day, and at noon home, and
there find cozen Roger and Jackson by appointment come to dine with me,
and Creed, and very merry, only Jackson hath few words, and I like him
never the worse for it.  The great talk is of Carr's coming off in all his
trials, to the disgrace of my Lord Gerard, to that degree, and the ripping
up of so many notorious rogueries and cheats of my Lord's, that my Lord,
it is thought, will be ruined; and, above all things, do skew the madness
of the House of Commons, who rejected the petition of this poor man by a
combination of a few in the House; and, much more, the base proceedings
(just the epitome of all our publick managements in this age), of the
House of Lords, that ordered him to stand in the pillory for those very
things, without hearing and examining what he hath now, by the seeking of
my Lord Gerard himself, cleared himself of, in open Court, to the gaining
himself the pity of all the world, and shame for ever to my Lord Gerard.
We had a great deal of good discourse at table, and after dinner we four
men took coach, and they set me down at the Old Exchange, and they home,
having discoursed nothing today with cozen or Jackson about our business.
I to Captain Cocke's, and there discoursed over our business of prizes,
and I think I shall go near to state the matter so as to secure myself
without wrong to him, doing nor saying anything but the very truth.
Thence away to the Strand, to my bookseller's, and there staid an hour,
and bought the idle, rogueish book, "L'escholle des filles;" which I have
bought in plain binding, avoiding the buying of it better bound, because I
resolve, as soon as I have read it, to burn it, that it may not stand in
the list of books, nor among them, to disgrace them if it should be found.
Thence home, and busy late at the office, and then home to supper and to
bed.  My wife well pleased with my sister's match, and designing how to be
merry at their marriage.  And I am well at ease in my mind to think that
that care will be over.  This night calling at the Temple, at the
Auditor's, his man told me that he heard that my account must be brought
to the view of the Commissioners of Tangier before it can be passed, which
though I know no hurt in it, yet it troubled me lest there should be any
or any designed by them who put this into the head of the Auditor, I
suppose Auditor Beale, or Creed, because they saw me carrying my account
another way than by them.

9th (Lord's day).  Up, and at my chamber all the morning and the office
doing business, and also reading a little of "L'escholle des filles,"
which is a mighty lewd book, but yet not amiss for a sober man once to
read over to inform himself in the villainy of the world.  At noon home to
dinner, where by appointment Mr. Pelting come and with him three friends,
Wallington, that sings the good base, and one Rogers, and a gentleman, a
young man, his name Tempest, who sings very well indeed, and understands
anything in the world at first sight.  After dinner we into our
dining-room, and there to singing all the afternoon.  (By the way, I must
remember that Pegg Pen was brought to bed yesterday of a girl; and, among
other things, if I have not already set it down, that hardly ever was
remembered such a season for the smallpox as these last two months have
been, people being seen all up and down the streets, newly come out after
the smallpox.) But though they sang fine things, yet I must confess that I
did take no pleasure in it, or very little, because I understood not the
words, and with the rests that the words are set, there is no sense nor
understanding in them though they be English, which makes me weary of
singing in that manner, it being but a worse sort of instrumental musick.
We sang until almost night, and drank mighty good store of wine, and then
they parted, and I to my chamber, where I did read through "L'escholle des
filles," a lewd book, but what do no wrong once to read for information
sake .  .  .  .  And after I had done it I burned it, that it might not be
among my books to my shame, and so at night to supper and to bed.

10th.  Up, and by coach to Westminster, and there made a visit to Mr.
Godolphin, at his chamber; and I do find him a very pretty and able
person, a man of very fine parts, and of infinite zeal to my Lord
Sandwich; and one that says he is, he believes, as wise and able a person
as any prince in the world hath.  He tells me that he meets with
unmannerly usage by Sir Robert Southwell, in Portugall, who would sign
with him in his negociations there, being a forward young man: but that my
Lord mastered him in that point, it being ruled for my Lord here, at a
hearing of a Committee of the Council.  He says that if my Lord can
compass a peace between Spain and Portugall, and hath the doing of it and
the honour himself, it will be a thing of more honour than ever any man
had, and of as much advantage.  Thence to Westminster Hall, where the Hall
mighty full: and, among other things, the House begins to sit to-day, and
the King come.  But, before the King's coming, the House of Commons met;
and upon information given them of a Bill intended to be brought in, as
common report said, for Comprehension, they did mightily and generally
inveigh against it, and did vote that the King should be desired by the
House (and the message delivered by the Privy-counsellers of the House)
that the laws against breakers of the Act of Uniformity should be put in
execution: and it was moved in the House that, if any people had a mind to
bring any new laws into the House, about religion, they might come, as a
proposer of new laws did in Athens, with ropes about their necks.  By and
by the King comes to the Lords' House, and there tells them of his league
with Holland, and the necessity of a fleete, and his debts; and,
therefore, want of money; and his desire that they would think of some way
to bring in all his Protestant subjects to a right understanding and peace
one with another; meaning the Bill of Comprehension.  The Commons coming
to their House, it was moved that the vote passed this morning might be
suspended, because of the King's speech, till the House was full and
called over, two days hence: but it was denied, so furious they are
against this Bill: and thereby a great blow either given to the King or
Presbyters, or, which is the rather of the two, to the House itself, by
denying a thing desired by the King, and so much desired by much the
greater part of the nation.  Whatever the consequence be, if the King be a
man of any stomach and heat, all do believe that he will resent this vote.
Thence with Creed home to my house to dinner, where I met with Mr.
Jackson, and find my wife angry with Deb., which vexes me.  After dinner
by coach away to Westminster; taking up a friend of Mr. Jackson's, a young
lawyer, and parting with Creed at White Hall.  They and I to Westminster
Hall, and there met Roger Pepys, and with him to his chamber, and there
read over and agreed upon the Deed of Settlement to our minds: my sister
to have L600 presently, and she to be joyntured in L60 per annum; wherein
I am very well satisfied.  Thence I to the Temple to Charles Porter's
lodgings, where Captain Cocke met me, and after long waiting, on
Pemberton,

     [Francis Pemberton, afterwards knighted, and made Lord Chief Justice
     of the King's Bench in 1679.  His career was a most singular one, he
     having been twice removed from the Bench, and twice imprisoned by
     the House of Commons.  He twice returned to the bar, and after his
     second return he practised with great success as a serjeant for the
     next fourteen years till his death, June 10th, 1697.  Evelyn says,
     "He was held to be the most learned of the judges and an honest man"
     ("Diary," October 4th, 1683).]

an able lawyer, about the business of our prizes, and left the matter with
him to think of against to-morrow, this being a matter that do much
trouble my mind, though there be no fault in it that I need fear the
owning that I know of.  Thence with Cocke home to his house and there left
him, and I home, and there got my wife to read a book I bought to-day, and
come out to-day licensed by Joseph Williamson for Lord Arlington, shewing
the state of England's affairs relating to France at this time, and the
whole body of the book very good and solid, after a very foolish
introduction as ever I read, and do give a very good account of the
advantage of our league with Holland at this time.  So, vexed in my mind
with the variety of cares I have upon me, and so to bed.

11th.  At the office all the morning, where comes a damned summons to
attend the Committee of Miscarriages to-day, which makes me mad, that I
should by my place become the hackney of this Office, in perpetual trouble
and vexation, that need it least.  At noon home to dinner, where little
pleasure, my head being split almost with the variety of troubles upon me
at this time, and cares, and after dinner by coach to Westminster Hall,
and sent my wife and Deb. to see "Mustapha" acted.  Here I brought a book
to the Committee, and do find them; and particularly Sir Thomas Clarges,
mighty hot in the business of tickets, which makes me mad to see them bite
at the stone, and not at the hand that flings it, and here my Lord
Brouncker unnecessarily orders it that he is called in to give opportunity
to present his report of the state of the business of paying by ticket,
which I do not think will do him any right, though he was made believe
that it did operate mightily, and that Sir Fresh. Hollis did make a mighty
harangue and to much purpose in his defence, but I believe no such effects
of it, for going in afterward I did hear them speak with prejudice of it,
and that his pleading of the Admiral's warrant for it now was only an
evasion, if not an aspersion upon the Admirall, and therefore they would
not admit of this his report, but go on with their report as they had
resolved before.  The orders they sent for this day was the first order
that I have yet met with about this business, and was of my own single
hand warranting, but I do think it will do me no harm, and therefore do
not much trouble myself with it, more than to see how much trouble I am
brought to who have best deported myself in all the King's business.
Thence with Lord Brouncker, and set him down at Bow Streete, and so to the
Duke of York's playhouse, and there saw the last act for nothing, where I
never saw such good acting of any creature as Smith's part of Zanger; and
I do also, though it was excellently acted by---------, do yet want
Betterton mightily.  Thence to the Temple, to Porter's chamber, where
Cocke met me, and after a stay there some time, they two and I to
Pemberton's chamber, and there did read over the Act of calling people to
account, and did discourse all our business of the prizes; and, upon the
whole, he do make it plainly appear, that there is no avoiding to give
these Commissioners satisfaction in everything they will ask; and that
there is fear lest they may find reason to make us refund for all the
extraordinary profit made by those bargains; and do make me resolve rather
to declare plainly, and, once for all, the truth of the whole, and what my
profit hath been, than be forced at last to do it, and in the meantime
live in gain, as I must always do: and with this resolution on my part I
departed, with some more satisfaction of mind, though with less hopes of
profit than I expected.  It was pretty here to see the heaps of money upon
this lawyer's table; and more to see how he had not since last night spent
any time upon our business, but begun with telling us that we were not at
all concerned in that Act; which was a total mistake, by his not having
read over the Act at all.  Thence to Porter's chamber, where Captain Cocke
had fetched my wife out of the coach, and there we staid and talked and
drank, he being a very generous, good-humoured man, and so away by coach,
setting Cocke at his house, and we with his coach home, and there I to the
office, and there till past one in the morning, and so home to supper and
to bed, my mind at pretty good ease, though full of care and fear of loss.
This morning my wife in bed told me the story of our Tom and Jane:--how
the rogue did first demand her consent to love and marry him, and then,
with pretence of displeasing me, did slight her; but both he and she have
confessed the matter to her, and she hath charged him to go on with his
love to her, and be true to her, and so I think the business will go on,
which, for my love to her, because she is in love with him, I am pleased
with; but otherwise I think she will have no good bargain of it, at least
if I should not do well in my place.  But if I do stand, I do intend to
give her L50 in money, and do them all the good I can in my way.

12th.  Up, and to the office, where all the morning drawing up my
narrative of my proceedings and concernments in the buying of prize-goods,
which I am to present to the Committee for Accounts; and being come to a
resolution to conceal nothing from them, I was at great ease how to draw
it up without any inventions or practise to put me to future pain or
thoughts how to carry on, and now I only discover what my profit was, and
at worst I suppose I can be made but to refund my profit and so let it go.
At noon home to dinner, where Mr. Jackson dined with me, and after dinner
I (calling at the Excise Office, and setting my wife and Deb. at her
tailor's) did with Mr. Jackson go to find my cozen Roger Pepys, which I
did in the Parliament House, where I met him and Sir Thomas Crew and Mr.
George Montagu, who are mighty busy how to save my Lord's name from being
in the Report for anything which the Committee is commanded to report to
the House of the miscarriages of the late war.  I find they drive
furiously still in the business of tickets, which is nonsense in itself
and cannot come to any thing.  Thence with cozen Roger to his lodgings,
and there sealed the writings with Jackson, about my sister's marriage:
and here my cozen Roger told me the pleasant passage of a fellow's
bringing a bag of letters to-day, into the lobby of the House, and left
them, and withdrew himself without observation.  The bag being opened, the
letters were found all of one size, and directed with one hand: a letter
to most of the Members of the House.  The House was acquainted with it,
and voted they should be brought in, and one opened by the Speaker;
wherein if he found any thing unfit to communicate, to propose a Committee
to be chosen for it.  The Speaker opening one, found it only a case with a
libell in it, printed: a satire most sober and bitter as ever I read; and
every letter was the same.  So the House fell a-scrambling for them like
boys: and my cozen Roger had one directed to him, which he lent me to
read.  So away, and took up my wife, and setting Jackson down at Fetter
Lane end, I to the old Exchange to look Mr. Houblon, but, not finding him,
did go home, and there late writing a letter to my Lord Sandwich, and to
give passage to a letter of great moment from Mr. Godolphin to him, which
I did get speedy passage for by the help of Mr. Houblon, who come late to
me, and there directed the letter to Lisbon under cover of his, and here
we talked of the times, which look very sad and distracted, and made good
mirth at this day's passage in the House, and so parted; and going to the
gate with him, I found his lady and another fine lady sitting an hour
together, late at night, in their coach, while he was with me, which is so
like my wife, that I was mighty taken with it, though troubled for it.  So
home to supper and to bed.  This day Captain Cocke was with the
Commissioners of Accounts to ask more time for his bringing in his answer
about the prize goods, and they would not give him 14 days as he asks, but
would give only two days, which was very hard, I think, and did trouble me
for fear of their severity, though I have prepared my matter so as to defy
it.

13th.  Up, and to the office, where all the morning.  At noon home to
dinner, and thence with my wife and Deb. to White Hall, setting, them at
her tailor's, and I to the Commissioners of the Treasury, where myself
alone did argue the business of the East India Company against their whole
Company on behalf of the King before the Lords Commissioners, and to very
good effect, I think, and with reputation.  That business being over, the
Lords and I had other things to talk about, and among the rest, about our
making more assignments on the Exchequer since they bid us hold, whereat
they were extraordinary angry with us, which troubled me a little, though
I am not concerned in it at all.  Waiting here some time without, I did
meet with several people, among others Mr. Brisband, who tells me in
discourse that Tom Killigrew hath a fee out of the Wardrobe for cap and
bells,

     [The Lord Chamberlain's Records contain a copy of a warrant dated
     July 12th, 1661, "to deliver to Mr. Killegrew thirty yards of
     velvett, three dozen of fringe, and sixteene yards of Damaske for
     the year 1661."  The heading of this entry is "Livery for ye jester"
     (Lowe's "Betterton," p. 70).]

under the title of the King's Foole or jester; and may with privilege
revile or jeere any body, the greatest person, without offence, by the
privilege of his place.  Thence took up my wife, and home, and there busy
late at the office writing letters, and so home to supper and to bed. The
House was called over to-day.  This morning Sir G. Carteret come to the
Office to see and talk with me: and he assures me that to this day the
King is the most kind man to my Lord Sandwich in the whole world; that he
himself do not now mind any publick business, but suffers things to go on
at Court as they will, he seeing all likely to come to ruin: that this
morning the Duke of York sent to him to come to make up one of a Committee
of the Council for Navy Affairs; where, when he come, he told the Duke of
York that he was none of them: which shews how things are now-a-days
ordered, that there should be a Committee for the Navy; and the Lord
Admiral not know the persons of it!  And that Sir G. Carteret and my Lord
Anglesey should be left out of it, and men wholly improper put into it.  I
do hear of all hands that there is a great difference at this day between
my Lord Arlington and Sir W. Coventry, which I am sorry for.

14th (Valentine's day).  Up, being called up by Mercer, who come to be my
Valentine, and so I rose and my wife, and were merry a little, I staying
to talk, and did give her a guinny in gold for her Valentine's gift. There
comes also my cozen Roger Pepys betimes, and comes to my wife, for her to
be his Valentine, whose Valentine I was also, by agreement to be so to her
every year; and this year I find it is likely to cost L4 or L5 in a ring
for her, which she desires.  Cozen Roger did come also to speak with Sir
W. Pen, who was quoted, it seems, yesterday by Sir Fr. Hollis to have said
that if my Lord Sandwich had done so and so, we might have taken all the
Dutch prizes at the time when he staid and let them go. But Sir W. Pen did
tell us he should say nothing in it but what would do my Lord honour, and
he is a knave I am able to prove if he do otherwise. He gone, I to my
Office, to perfect my Narrative about prize-goods; and did carry it to the
Commissioners of Accounts, who did receive it with great kindness, and
express great value of, and respect to me: and my heart is at rest that it
is lodged there, in so full truth and plainness, though it may hereafter
prove some loss to me.  But here I do see they are entered into many
enquiries about prizes, by the great attendance of commanders and others
before them, which is a work I am not sorry for. Thence I away, with my
head busy, but my heart at pretty good ease, to the Old Exchange, and
there met Mr. Houblon.  I prayed him to discourse with some of the
merchants that are of the Committee for Accounts, to see how they do
resent my paper, and in general my particular in the relation to the
business of the Navy, which he hath promised to do carefully for me and
tell me.  Here it was a mighty pretty sight to see old Mr. Houblon, whom I
never saw before, and all his sons about him, all good merchants.  Thence
home to dinner, and had much discourse with W. Hewer about my going to
visit Colonel Thomson, one of the Committee of Accounts, who, among the
rest, is mighty kind to me, and is likely to mind our business more than
any; and I would be glad to have a good understanding with him.  Thence
after dinner to White Hall, to attend the Duke of York, where I did let
him know, too, the troublesome life we lead, and particularly myself, by
being obliged to such attendances every day as I am, on one Committee or
another.  And I do find the Duke of York himself troubled, and willing not
to be troubled with occasions of having his name used among the
Parliament, though he himself do declare that he did give directions to
Lord Brouncker to discharge the men at Chatham by ticket, and will own it,
if the House call for it, but not else.  Thence I attended the King and
Council, and some of the rest of us, in a business to be heard about the
value of a ship of one Dorrington's:--and it was pretty to observe how Sir
W. Pen making use of this argument against the validity of an oath,
against the King, being made by the master's mate of the ship, who was but
a fellow of about 23 years of age--the master of the ship, against whom we
pleaded, did say that he did think himself at that age capable of being
master's mate of any ship; and do know that he, himself, Sir W: Pen, was
so himself, and in no better degree at that age himself: which word did
strike Sir W. Pen dumb, and made him open his mouth no more; and I saw the
King and Duke of York wink at one another at it.  This done, we into the
gallery; and there I walked with several people, and among others my Lord
Brouncker, who I do find under much trouble still about the business of
the tickets, his very case being brought in; as is said, this day in the
Report of the Miscarriages. And he seems to lay much of it on me, which I
did clear and satisfy him in; and would be glad with all my heart to serve
him in, and have done it more than he hath done for himself, he not
deserving the least blame, but commendations, for this.  I met with my
cozen Roger Pepys and Creed; and from them understand that the Report was
read to-day of the Miscarriages, wherein my Lord Sandwich is [named] about
the business I mentioned this morning; but I will be at rest, for it can
do him no hurt.  Our business of tickets is soundly up, and many others:
so they went over them again, and spent all the morning on the first,
which is the dividing of the fleete; wherein hot work was, and that among
great men, Privy-Councillors, and, they say, Sir W. Coventry; but I do not
much fear it, but do hope that it will shew a little, of the Duke of
Albemarle and the Prince to have been advisers in it: but whereas they
ordered that the King's Speech should be considered today, they took no
notice of it at all, but are really come to despise the King in all
possible ways of chewing it.  And it was the other day a strange saying,
as I am told by my cozen Roger Pepys, in the House, when it was moved that
the King's speech should be considered, that though the first part of the
Speech, meaning the league that is there talked of, be the only good
publick thing that hath been done since the King come into England, yet it
might bear with being put off to consider, till Friday next, which was
this day.  Secretary Morrice did this day in the House, when they talked
of intelligence, say that he was allowed but L70 a-year for
intelligence,--[Secret service money]--whereas, in Cromwell's time, he
[Cromwell] did allow L70,000 a-year for it; and was confirmed therein by
Colonel Birch, who said that thereby Cromwell carried the secrets of all
the princes of Europe at his girdle.  The House is in a most broken
condition; nobody adhering to any thing, but reviling and finding fault:
and now quite mad at the Undertakers, as they are commonly called,
Littleton, Lord Vaughan, Sir R. Howard, and others that are brought over
to the Court, and did undertake to get the King money; but they despise,
and would not hear them in the House; and the Court do do as much, seeing
that they cannot be useful to them, as was expected.  In short, it is
plain that the King will never be able to do any thing with this
Parliament; and that the only likely way to do better, for it cannot do
worse, is to break this and call another Parliament; and some do think
that it is intended.  I was told to-night that my Lady Castlemayne is so
great a gamester as to have won L5000 in one night, and lost L25,000 in
another night, at play, and hath played L1000 and L1500 at a cast.  Thence
to the Temple, where at Porter's chamber I met Captain Cocke, but lost our
labour, our Counsellor not being within, Pemberton, and therefore home and
late at my office, and so home to supper and to bed.

15th.  Up betimes, and with Captain Cocke my coach to the Temple to his
Counsel again about the prize goods in order to the drawing up of his
answer to them, where little done but a confirmation that our best
interest is for him to tell the whole truth, and so parted, and I home to
the office, where all the morning, and at noon home to dinner, and after
dinner all the afternoon and evening till midnight almost, and till I had
tired my own backe, and my wife's, and Deb.'s, in titleing of my books for
the present year, and in setting them in order, which is now done to my
very good satisfaction, though not altogether so completely as I think
they were the last year, when my mind was more at leisure to mind it. So
about midnight to bed, where my wife taking some physic overnight it
wrought with her, and those coming upon her with great gripes, she was in
mighty pain all night long, yet, God forgive me!  I did find that I was
most desirous to take my rest than to ease her, but there was nothing I
could do to do her any good with.

16th (Lord's day).  Up, and to my chamber, where all the morning making a
catalogue of my books, which did find me work, but with great pleasure, my
chamber and books being now set in very good order, and my chamber washed
and cleaned, which it had not been in some months before, my business and
trouble having been so much.  At noon Mr. Holliard put in, and dined with
my wife and me, who was a little better to-day.  His company very good.
His story of his love and fortune, which hath been very good and very bad
in the world, well worth hearing.  Much discourse also about the bad state
of the Church, and how the Clergy are come to be men of no worth in the
world; and, as the world do now generally discourse, they must be
reformed; and I believe the Hierarchy will in a little time be shaken,
whether they will or no; the King being offended with them, and set upon
it, as I hear.  He gone, after dinner to have my head combed, and then to
my chamber and read most of the evening till pretty late, when, my wife
not being well, I did lie below stairs in our great chamber, where I slept
well.

17th.  Up, and to the office, where all the morning till noon getting some
things more ready against the afternoon for the Committee of Accounts,
which did give me great trouble, to see how I am forced to dance after
them in one place, and to answer Committees of Parliament in another.  At
noon thence toward the Committee, but meeting with Sir W. Warren in Fleet
Street he and I to the Ordinary by Temple Bar and there dined together,
and to talk, where he do seem to be very high now in defiance of the
Board, now he says that the worst is come upon him to have his accounts
brought to the Committee of Accounts, and he do reflect upon my late
coldness to him, but upon the whole I do find that he is still a cunning
fellow, and will find it necessary to be fair to me, and what hath passed
between us of coldness to hold his tongue, which do please me very well.
Thence to the Committee, where I did deliver the several things they
expected from me, with great respect and show of satisfaction, and my mind
thereby eased of some care.  But thence I to Westminster Hall, and there
spent till late at night walking to and again with many people, and there
in general I hear of the great high words that were in the House on
Saturday last, upon the first part of the Committee's Report about the
dividing of the fleete; wherein some would have the counsels of the King
to be declared, and the reasons of them, and who did give them; where Sir
W. Coventry laid open to them the consequences of doing that, that the
King would never have any honest and wise men ever to be of his Council.
They did here in the House talk boldly of the King's bad counsellors, and
how they must be all turned out, and many of them, and better; brought in:
and the proceedings of the Long-Parliament in the beginning of the war
were called to memory: and the King's bad intelligence was mentioned,
wherein they were bitter against my Lord Arlington, saying, among other
things, that whatever Morrice's was, who declared he had but L750 a-year
allowed him for intelligence, the King paid too dear for my Lord
Arlington's, in giving him L10,000 and a barony for it.  Sir W. Coventry
did here come to his defence, in the business of the letter that was sent
to call back Prince Rupert, after he was divided from the fleete, wherein
great delay was objected; but he did show that he sent it at one in the
morning, when the Duke of York did give him the instructions after supper
that night, and did clear himself well of it: only it was laid as a fault,
which I know not how he removes, of not sending it by an express, but by
the ordinary post; but I think I have heard he did send it to my Lord
Arlington's; and that there it lay for some hours; it coming not to Sir
Philip Honiwood's hand at Portsmouth till four in the afternoon that day,
being about fifteen or sixteen hours in going; and about this, I think, I
have heard of a falling out between my Lord Arlington, heretofore, and W.
Coventry. Some mutterings I did hear of a design of dissolving the
Parliament; but I think there is no ground for it yet, though Oliver would
have dissolved them for half the trouble and contempt these have put upon
the King and his councils.  The dividing of the fleete, however, is, I
hear, voted a miscarriage, and the not building a fortification at
Sheernesse: and I have reason every hour to expect that they will vote the
like of our paying men off by ticket; and what the consequence of that
will be I know not, but I am put thereby into great trouble of mind.  I
did spend a little time at the Swan, and there did kiss the maid, Sarah.
At noon home, and there up to my wife, who is still ill, and supped with
her, my mind being mighty full of trouble for the office and my
concernments therein, and so to supper and talking with W. Hewer in her
chamber about business of the office, wherein he do well understand
himself and our case, and it do me advantage to talk with him and the rest
of my people. I to bed below as I did last night.

18th.  Up by break of day, and walked down to the old Swan, where I find
little Michell building, his booth being taken down, and a foundation laid
for a new house, so that that street is like to be a very fine place.  I
drank, but did not see Betty, and so to Charing Cross stairs, and thence
walked to Sir W. Coventry's,

     [Sir William Coventry's love of money is said by Sir John Denham to
     have influenced him in promoting naval officers, who paid him for
     their commissions.

               "Then Painter! draw cerulian Coventry
               Keeper, or rather Chancellor o' th' sea
               And more exactly to express his hue,
               Use nothing but ultra-mariuish blue.
               To pay his fees, the silver trumpet spends,
               And boatswain's whistle for his place depends.
               Pilots in vain repeat their compass o'er,
               Until of him they learn that one point more
               The constant magnet to the pole doth hold,
               Steel to the magnet, Coventry to gold.
               Muscovy sells us pitch, and hemp, and tar;
               Iron and copper, Sweden; Munster, war;
               Ashley, prize; Warwick, custom;
               Cart'ret, pay;
               But Coventry doth sell the fleet away."--B.]

and talked with him, who tells me how he hath been persecuted, and how he
is yet well come off in the business of the dividing of the fleete, and
the sending of the letter.  He expects next to be troubled about the
business of bad officers in the fleete, wherein he will bid them name whom
they call bad, and he will justify himself, having never disposed of any
but by the Admiral's liking.  And he is able to give an account of all
them, how they come recommended, and more will be found to have been
placed by the Prince and Duke of Albemarle than by the Duke of York during
the war, and as no bad instance of the badness of officers he and I did
look over the list of commanders, and found that we could presently
recollect thirty-seven commanders that have been killed in actuall service
this war.  He tells me that Sir Fr. Hollis is the main man that hath
persecuted him hitherto, in the business of dividing the fleete, saying
vainly that the want of that letter to the Prince hath given him that,
that he shall remember it by to his grave, meaning the loss of his arme;
when, God knows! he is as idle and insignificant a fellow as ever come
into the fleete.  He tells me that in discourse on Saturday he did repeat
Sir Rob. Howard's words about rowling out of counsellors, that for his
part he neither cared who they rowled in, nor who they rowled out, by
which the word is become a word of use in the House, the rowling out of
officers.  I will remember what, in mirth, he said to me this morning,
when upon this discourse he said, if ever there was another Dutch war,
they should not find a Secretary; "Nor," said I, "a Clerk of the Acts, for
I see the reward of it; and, thanked God! I have enough of my own to buy
me a good book and a good fiddle, and I have a good wife;"--"Why," says
he, "I have enough to buy me a good book, and shall not need a fiddle,
because I have never a one of your good wives."  I understand by him that
we are likely to have our business of tickets voted a miscarriage, but
[he] cannot tell me what that will signify more than that he thinks they
will report them to the King and there leave them, but I doubt they will
do more.  Thence walked over St. James's Park to White Hall, and thence to
Westminster Hall, and there walked all the morning, and did speak with
several Parliament-men-among others, Birch, who is very kind to me, and
calls me, with great respect and kindness, a man of business, and he
thinks honest, and so long will stand by me, and every such man, to the
death.  My business was to instruct them to keep the House from falling
into any mistaken vote about the business of tickets, before they were
better informed.  I walked in the Hall all the morning with my Lord
Brouncker, who was in great pain there, and, the truth is, his business
is, without reason, so ill resented by the generality of the House, that I
was almost troubled to be seen to walk with him, and yet am able to
justify him in all, that he is under so much scandal for.  Here I did get
a copy of the report itself, about our paying off men by tickets; and am
mightily glad to see it, now knowing the state of our case, and what we
have to answer to, and the more for that the House is like to be kept by
other business to-day and to-morrow, so that, against Thursday, I shall be
able to draw up some defence to put into some Member's hands, to inform
them, and I think we may [make] a very good one, and therefore my mind is
mightily at ease about it.  This morning they are upon a Bill, brought in
to-day by Sir Richard Temple, for obliging the King to call Parliaments
every three years; or, if he fail, for others to be obliged to do it, and
to keep him from a power of dissolving any Parliament in less than forty
days after their first day of sitting, which is such a Bill as do speak
very high proceedings, to the lessening of the King; and this they will
carry, and whatever else they desire, before they will give any money; and
the King must have money, whatever it cost him.  I stepped to the Dog
Tavern, and thither come to me Doll Lane, and there we did drink together,
and she tells me she is my valentine .  .  .  .  Thence, she being gone,
and having spoke with Mr. Spicer here, whom I sent for hither to discourse
about the security of the late Act of 11 months' tax on which I have
secured part of my money lent to Tangier.  I to the Hall, and there met
Sir W. Pen, and he and I to the Beare, in Drury Lane, an excellent
ordinary, after the French manner, but of Englishmen; and there had a good
fricassee, our dinner coming to 8s., which was mighty pretty, to my great
content; and thence, he and I to the King's house, and there, in one of
the upper boxes, saw "Flora's Vagarys," which is a very silly play; and
the more, I being out of humour, being at a play without my wife, and she
ill at home, and having no desire also to be seen, and, therefore, could
not look about me.  Thence to the Temple, and there we parted, and I to
see Kate Joyce, where I find her and her friends in great ease of mind,
the jury having this day given in their verdict that her husband died of a
feaver.  Some opposition there was, the foreman pressing them to declare
the cause of the feaver, thinking thereby to obstruct it: but they did
adhere to their verdict, and would give no reason; so all trouble is now
over, and she safe in her estate, which I am mighty glad of, and so took
leave, and home, and up to my wife, not owning my being at a play, and
there she shews me her ring of a Turky-stone set with little sparks of
dyamonds,

     [The turquoise.  This stone was sometimes referred to simply as the
     turkey, and Broderip ("Zoological Recreations") conjectured that the
     bird (turkey) took its name from the blue or turquoise colour of the
     skin about its head.]

which I am to give her, as my Valentine, and I am not much troubled at it.
It will cost me near L5--she costing me but little compared with other
wives, and I have not many occasions to spend on her.  So to my office,
where late, and to think upon my observations to-morrow, upon the report
of the Committee to the Parliament about the business of tickets, whereof
my head is full, and so home to supper and to bed.

19th.  Up, and to the office, where all the morning drawing up an answer
to the Report of the Committee for miscarriages to the Parliament touching
our paying men by tickets, which I did do in a very good manner I think.
Dined with my clerks at home, where much good discourse of our business of
the Navy, and the trouble now upon us, more than we expected. After dinner
my wife out with Deb., to buy some things against my sister's wedding, and
I to the office to write fair my business I did in the morning, and in the
evening to White Hall, where I find Sir W. Coventry all alone, a great
while with the Duke of York, in the King's drawing-room, they two talking
together all alone, which did mightily please me.  Then I did get Sir W.
Coventry (the Duke of York being gone) aside, and there read over my
paper, which he liked and corrected, and tells me it will be hard to
escape, though the thing be never so fair, to have it voted a miscarriage;
but did advise me and my Lord Brouncker, who coming by did join with us,
to prepare some members in it, which we shall do.  Here I do hear how La
Roche, a French captain, who was once prisoner here, being with his ship
at Plymouth, hath played some freakes there, for which his men being beat
out of the town, he hath put up his flag of defiance, and also, somewhere
thereabout, did land with his men, and go a mile into the country, and did
some pranks, which sounds pretty odd, to our disgrace, but we are in
condition now to bear any thing. But, blessed be God! all the Court is
full of the good news of my Lord Sandwich's having made a peace between
Spain and Portugall, which is mighty great news, and, above all, to my
Lord's honour, more than any thing he ever did; and yet I do fear it will
not prevail to secure him in Parliament against incivilities there.
Thence, took up my wife at Unthanke's, and so home, and there my mind
being full of preparing my paper against to-morrow for the House, with an
address from the office to the House, I to the office, very late, and then
home to supper and to bed.

20th.  Up, and to the office a while, and thence to White Hall by coach
with Mr. Batelier with me, whom I took up in the street.  I thence by
water to Westminster Hall, and there with Lord Brouncker, Sir T. Harvy,
Sir J. Minnes, did wait all the morning to speak to members about our
business, thinking our business of tickets would come before the House
to-day, but we did alter our minds about the petition to the House,
sending in the paper to them.  But the truth is we were in a great hurry,
but it fell out that they were most of the morning upon the business of
not prosecuting the first victory; which they have voted one of the
greatest miscarriages of the whole war, though they cannot lay the fault
anywhere yet, because Harman is not come home.  This kept them all the
morning, which I was glad of.  So down to the Hall, where my wife by
agreement stayed for me at Mrs. Michell's, and there was Mercer and the
girl, and I took them to Wilkinson's the cook's in King Street (where I
find the master of the house hath been dead for some time), and there
dined, and thence by one o'clock to the King's house: a new play, "The
Duke of Lerma," of Sir Robert Howard's: where the King and Court was; and
Knepp and Nell spoke the prologue most excellently, especially Knepp, who
spoke beyond any creature I ever, heard.  The play designed to reproach
our King with his mistresses, that I was troubled for it, and expected it
should be interrupted; but it ended all well, which salved all.  The play
a well-writ and good play, only its design I did not like of reproaching
the King, but altogether a very good and most serious play.  Thence home,
and there a little to the office, and so home to supper, where Mercer with
us, and sang, and then to bed.

21st.  At the office all the morning to get a little business done, I
having, and so the whole office, been put out of doing any business there
for this week by our trouble in attending the Parliament.  Hither comes to
me young Captain Beckford, the slopseller, and there presents me a little
purse with gold in it, it being, as he told me, for his present to me, at
the end of the last year.  I told him I had not done him any service I
knew of.  He persisted, and I refused, but did at several denials; and
telling him that it was not an age to take presents in, he told me he had
reason to present me with something, and desired me to accept of it,
which, at his so urging me, I did, and so fell to talk of his business,
and so parted.  I do not know of any manner of kindness I have done him
this last year, nor did expect any thing.  It was therefore very welcome
to me, but yet I was not fully satisfied in my taking it, because of my
submitting myself to the having it objected against me hereafter, and the
rather because this morning Jacke Fen come and shewed me an order from the
Commissioners of Accounts, wherein they demand of him an account upon oath
of all the sums of money that have been by him defalked or taken from any
man since their time, of enquiry upon any payments, and if this should, as
it is to be feared, come to be done to us, I know not what I shall then
do, but I shall take counsel upon it. At noon by coach towards
Westminster, and met my Lord Brouncker, and W. Pen, and Sir T. Harvey, in
King's Street, coming away from the Parliament House; and so I to them,
and to the French ordinary, at the Blue Bells, in Lincolne's Inn Fields,
and there dined and talked.  And, among other things, they tell me how the
House this day is still as backward for giving any money as ever, and do
declare they will first have an account of the disposals of the last
Poll-bill, and eleven months' tax: and it is pretty odde that the very
first sum mentioned in the account brought in by Sir Robert Long, of the
disposal of the Poll-bill money, is L5000 to my Lord Arlington for
intelligence; which was mighty unseasonable, so soon after they had so
much cried out against his want of intelligence. The King do also own but
L250,000, or thereabouts, yet paid on the Poll-bill, and that he hath
charged L350,000 upon it.  This makes them mad; for that the former
Poll-bill, that was so much less in its extent than the last, which took
in all sexes and qualities, did come to L350,000. Upon the whole, I
perceive they are like to do nothing in this matter to please the King, or
relieve the State, be the case never so pressing; and, therefore, it is
thought by a great many that the King cannot be worse if he should
dissolve them: but there is nobody dares advise it, nor do he consider any
thing himself.  Thence, having dined for 20s., we to the Duke of York at
White Hall, and there had our usual audience, and did little but talk of
the proceedings of the Parliament, wherein he is as much troubled as we;
for he is not without fears that they do ayme at doing him hurt; but yet
he declares that he will never deny to owne what orders he hath given to
any man to justify him, notwithstanding their having sent to him to desire
his being tender to take upon him the doing any thing of that kind.
Thence with Brouncker and T. Harvey to Westminster Hall, and there met
with Colonel Birch and Sir John Lowther, and did there in the lobby read
over what I have drawn up for our defence, wherein they own themselves
mightily satisfied; and Birch, like a particular friend, do take it upon
him to defend us, and do mightily do me right in all his discourse.  Here
walked in the Hall with him a great while, and discoursed with several
members, to prepare them in our business against to-morrow, and meeting my
cozen Roger Pepys, he showed me Granger's written confession,

     [Pepys here refers to the extraordinary proceedings which occurred
     between Charles, Lord Gerard, and Alexander Fitton, of which a
     narrative was published at the Hague in 1665.  Granger was a witness
     in the cause, and was afterwards said to be conscience-stricken from
     his perjury.  Some notice of this case will be found in North's
     "Examen," p. 558; but the copious and interesting note in Ormerod's
     "History of Cheshire," Vol.  iii., p.  291, will best satisfy the
     reader, who will not fail to be struck by the paragraph with which
     it is closed-viz., "It is not improbable that Alexander Fitton, who,
     in the first instance, gained rightful possession of Gawsworth under
     an acknowledged settlement, was driven headlong into unpremeditated
     guilt by the production of a revocation by will which Lord Gerard
     had so long concealed.  Having lost his own fortune in the
     prosecution of his claims, he remained in gaol till taken out by
     James II. to be made Chancellor of Ireland (under which character
     Hume first notices him), was knighted, and subsequently created Lord
     Gawsworth after the abdication of James, sat in his parliament in
     Dublin in 1689, and then is supposed to have accompanied his fallen
     master to France.  Whether the conduct of Fitton was met, as he
     alleges, by similar guilt on the part of Lord Gerard, God only can
     judge; but his hand fell heavily on the representatives of that
     noble house.  In less than half a century the husbands of its two
     co-heiresses, James, Duke of Hamilton, and Charles, Lord Mohun, were
     slain by each other's hands in a murderous duel arising out of a
     dispute relative to the partition of the Fitton estates, and
     Gawsworth itself passed to an unlineal hand, by a series of
     alienations complicated beyond example in the annals of this
     country."--B.]

of his being forced by imprisonment, &c., by my Lord Gerard, most
barbarously to confess his forging of a deed in behalf of Fitton, in the
great case between him [Fitton] and my Lord Gerard; which business is
under examination, and is the foulest against my Lord Gerard that ever any
thing in the world was, and will, all do believe, ruine him; and I shall
be glad of it.  Thence with Lord Brouncker and T. Harvey as far as the New
Exchange, and there at a draper's shop drawing up a short note of what
they are to desire of the House for our having a hearing before they
determine any thing against us, which paper is for them to show to what
friends they meet against to-morrow, I away home to the office, and there
busy pretty late, and here comes my wife to me, who hath been at Pegg
Pen's christening, which, she says, hath made a flutter and noise; but was
as mean as could be, and but little company, just like all the rest that
that family do.  So home to supper and to bed, with my head full of a
defence before the Parliament tomorrow, and therein content myself very
well, and with what I have done in preparing some of the members thereof
in order thereto.

22nd.  Up, and by coach through Ducke Lane, and there did buy Kircher's
Musurgia, cost me 35s., a book I am mighty glad of, expecting to find
great satisfaction in it.  Thence to Westminster Hall and the lobby, and
up and down there all the morning, and to the Lords' House, and heard the
Solicitor-General plead very finely, as he always do; and this was in
defence of the East India Company against a man that complains of wrong
from them, and thus up and down till noon in expectation of our business
coming on in the House of Commons about tickets, but they being busy about
my Lord Gerard's business I did give over the thoughts of ours coming on,
and so with my wife, and Mercer, and Deb., who come to the Hall to me, I
away to the Beare, in Drury Lane, and there bespoke a dish of meat; and,
in the mean time, sat and sung with Mercer; and, by and by, dined with
mighty pleasure, and excellent meat, one little dish enough for us all,
and good wine, and all for 8s., and thence to the Duke's playhouse, and
there saw "Albumazar," an old play, this the second time of acting.  It is
said to have been the ground of B. Jonson's "Alchymist;" but, saving the
ridicuiousnesse of Angell's part, which is called Trinkilo, I do not see
any thing extraordinary in it, but was indeed weary of it before it was
done.  The King here, and, indeed, all of us, pretty merry at the mimique
tricks of Trinkilo.  So home, calling in Ducke Lane for the book I bought
this morning, and so home, and wrote my letters at the office, and then
home to supper and to bed.

23rd (Lord's day).  Up, and, being desired by a messenger from Sir G.
Carteret, I by water over to Southwarke, and so walked to the Falkon, on
the Bank-side, and there got another boat, and so to Westminster, where I
would have gone into the Swan; but the door was locked; and the girl could
not let me in, and so to Wilkinson's in King Street, and there wiped my
shoes, and so to Court, where sermon not yet done I met with Brisband; and
he tells me, first, that our business of tickets did come to debate
yesterday, it seems, after I was gone away, and was voted a miscarriage in
general.  He tells me in general that there is great looking after places,
upon a presumption of a great many vacancies; and he did shew me a fellow
at Court, a brother of my Lord Fanshaw's, a witty but rascally fellow,
without a penny in his purse, that was asking him what places there were
in the Navy fit for him, and Brisband tells me, in mirth, he told him the
Clerke of the Acts, and I wish he had it, so I were well and quietly rid
of it; for I am weary of this kind of trouble, having, I think, enough
whereon to support myself.  By and by, chapel done, I met with Sir W.
Coventry, and he and I walked awhile together in the Matted Gallery; and
there he told me all the proceedings yesterday: that the matter is found,
in general, a miscarriage, but no persons named; and so there is no great
matter to our prejudice yet, till, if ever, they come to particular
persons.  He told me Birch was very industrious to do what he could, and
did, like a friend; but they were resolved to find the thing, in general,
a miscarriage; and says, that when we shall think fit to desire its being
heard, as to our own defence, it will be granted.  He tells me how he
hath, with advantage, cleared himself in what concerns himself therein, by
his servant Robson, which I am glad of.  He tells me that there is a
letter sent by conspiracy to some of the House, which he hath seen, about
the matter of selling of places, which he do believe he shall be called
upon to-morrow for: and thinks himself well prepared to defend himself in
it; and then neither he, nor his friends for him, are afeard of anything
to his prejudice. Thence by coach, with Brisband, to Sir G. Carteret's, in
Lincoln's Inn Fields, and there dined: a good dinner and good company; and
after dinner he and I alone, discoursing of my Lord Sandwich's matters;
who hath, in the first business before the House, been very kindly used
beyond expectation, the matter being laid by, till his coming home and old
Mr. Vaughan did speak for my Lord, which I am mighty glad of.  The
business of the prizes is the worst that can be said, and therein I do
fear something may lie hard upon him; but, against this, we must prepare
the best we can for his defence.  Thence with G. Carteret to White Hall,
where I, finding a meeting of the Committee of the Council for the Navy,
his Royal Highness there, and Sir W. Pen, and, some of the Brethren of the
Trinity House to attend, I did go in with them; and it was to be informed
of the practice heretofore, for all foreign nations, at enmity one with
another, to forbear any acts of hostility to one another, in the presence
of any of the King of England's ships, of which several instances were
given: and it is referred to their further enquiry, in order to the giving
instructions accordingly to our ships now, during the war between Spain
and France.  Would to God we were in the same condition as heretofore, to
challenge and maintain this our dominion!  Thence with W. Pen homeward,
and quite through to Mile End, for a little ayre; the days being now
pretty long, but the ways mighty dirty, and here we drank at the Rose, the
old house, and so back again, talking of the Parliament and our trouble
with them and what passed yesterday.  Going back again, Sir R. Brookes
overtook us coming to town; who hath played the jacke with us all, and is
a fellow that I must trust no more, he quoting me for all he hath said in
this business of tickets; though I have told him nothing that either is
not true, or I afeard to own.  But here talking, he did discourse in this
stile: "We,"--and "We" all along,--"will not give any money, be the
pretence never so great, nay, though the enemy was in the River of Thames
again, till we know what is become of the last money given;" and I do
believe he do speak the mind of his fellows, and so let them, if the King
will suffer it.  He gone, we home, and there I to read, and my belly being
full of my dinner to-day, I anon to bed, and there, as I have for many
days, slept not an hour quietly, but full of dreams of our defence to the
Parliament and giving an account of our doings.  This evening, my wife did
with great pleasure shew me her stock of jewells, encreased by the ring
she hath made lately as my Valentine's gift this year, a Turky stone' set
with diamonds: and, with this and what she had, she reckons that she hath
above L150 worth of jewells, of one kind or other; and I am glad of it,
for it is fit the wretch should have something to content herself with.

24th.  Up, and to my office, where most of the morning, entering my
journal for the three days past.  Thence about noon with my wife to the
New Exchange, by the way stopping at my bookseller's, and there leaving my
Kircher's Musurgia to be bound, and did buy "L'illustre Bassa," in four
volumes, for my wife.  Thence to the Exchange and left her; while meeting
Dr. Gibbons there, he and I to see an organ at the Dean of Westminster's
lodgings at the Abby, the Bishop of Rochester's; where he lives like a
great prelate, his lodgings being very good; though at present under great
disgrace at Court, being put by his Clerk of the Closet's place.  I saw
his lady, of whom the 'Terrae Filius' of Oxford was once so merry;

     [A scholar appointed to make a satirical and jesting speech at an
     Act in the University of Oxford.  Mr. Christopher Wordsworth gives,
     in his "Social Life at the English Universities in the Eighteenth
     Century," 1874, a list of terra-filii from 1591 to 1713 (pp. 296-
     298, 680).  The 'terrae filius' was sometimes expelled the
     university on account of the licence of his speech.  The practice
     was discontinued early in the eighteenth century.]

and two children, whereof one a very pretty little boy, like him, so fat
and black.  Here I saw the organ; but it is too big for my house, and the
fashion do not please me enough; and therefore will not have it.  Thence
to the 'Change back again, leaving him, and took my wife and Deb.  home,
and there to dinner alone, and after dinner I took them to the
Nursery,--[Theatre company of young actors in training.]--where none of us
ever were before; where the house is better and the musique better than we
looked for, and the acting not much worse, because I expected as bad as
could be: and I was not much mistaken, for it was so.  However, I was
pleased well to see it once, it being worth a man's seeing to discover the
different ability and understanding of people, and the different growth of
people's abilities by practise.  Their play was a bad one, called
"Jeronimo is Mad Again," a tragedy.  Here was some good company by us, who
did make mighty sport at the folly of their acting, which I could not
neither refrain from sometimes, though I was sorry for it.  So away hence
home, where to the office to do business a while, and then home to supper
and to read, and then to bed.  I was prettily served this day at the
playhouse-door, where, giving six shillings into the fellow's hand for us
three, the fellow by legerdemain did convey one away, and with so much
grace faced me down that I did give him but five, that, though I knew the
contrary, yet I was overpowered by his so grave and serious demanding the
other shilling, that I could not deny him, but was forced by myself to
give it him.  After I come home this evening comes a letter to me from
Captain Allen, formerly Clerk of the Ropeyard at Chatham, and whom I was
kind to in those days, who in recompense of my favour to him then do give
me notice that he hears of an accusation likely to be exhibited against me
of my receiving L50 of Mason, the timber merchant, and that his wife hath
spoke it.  I am mightily beholden to Captain Allen for this, though the
thing is to the best of my memory utterly false, and I do believe it to be
wholly so, but yet it troubles me to have my name mentioned in this
business, and more to consider how I may be liable to be accused where I
have indeed taken presents, and therefore puts me on an enquiry, into my
actings in this kind and prepare against a day of accusation.

25th.  Up, having lain the last night the first night that I have lain
with my wife since she was last ill, which is about eight days.  To the
office, where busy all the morning.  At noon comes W. Howe to me, to
advise what answer to give to the business of the prizes, wherein I did
give him the best advice I could; but am sorry to see so many things,
wherein I doubt it will not be prevented but Sir Roger Cuttance and Mr.
Pierce will be found very much concerned in goods beyond the distribution,
and I doubt my Lord Sandwich too, which troubles me mightily.  He gone I
to dinner, and thence set my wife at the New Exchange, and I to Mr.
Clerke, my solicitor, to the Treasury chamber, but the Lords did not sit,
so I by water with him to the New Exchange, and there we parted, and I
took my wife and Deb. up, and to the Nursery, where I was yesterday, and
there saw them act a comedy, a pastorall, "The Faythful Shepherd," having
the curiosity to see whether they did a comedy better than a tragedy; but
they do it both alike, in the meanest manner, that I was sick of it, but
only for to satisfy myself once in seeing the manner of it, but I shall
see them no more, I believe.  Thence to the New Exchange, to take some
things home that my wife hath bought, a dressing-box, and other things for
her chamber and table, that cost me above L4, and so home, and there to
the office, and tell W. Hewer of the letter from Captain Allen last night,
to give him caution if any thing should be discovered of his dealings with
anybody, which I should for his sake as well, or more than for my own, be
sorry for; and with great joy I do find, looking over my memorandum books,
which are now of great use to me, and do fully reward me for all my care
in keeping them, that I am not likely to be troubled for any thing of the
kind but what I shall either be able beforehand to prevent, or if
discovered, be able to justify myself in, and I do perceive, by Sir W.
Warren's discourse, that they [the House] do all they can possibly to get
out of him and others, what presents they have made to the Officers of the
Navy; but he tells me that he hath denied all, though he knows that he is
forsworn as to what relates to me.  So home to supper and to bed.

26th.  Up, and by water to Charing Cross stairs, and thence to W. Coventry
to discourse concerning the state of matters in the Navy, where he
particularly acquainted me with the trouble he is like to meet with about
the selling of places, all carried on by Sir Fr. Hollis, but he seems not
to value it, being able to justify it to be lawful and constant practice,
and never by him used in the least degree since he upon his own motion did
obtain a salary of L500 in lieu thereof.  Thence to the Treasury Chamber
about a little business, and so home by coach, and in my way did meet W.
Howe going to the Commissioners of Accounts.  I stopped and spoke to him,
and he seems well resolved what to answer them, but he will find them very
strict, and not easily put off: So home and there to dinner, and after
dinner comes W. Howe to tell me how he sped, who says he was used civilly,
and not so many questions asked as he expected; but yet I do perceive
enough to shew that they do intend to know the bottom of things, and where
to lay the great weight of the disposal of these East India goods, and
that they intend plainly to do upon my Lord Sandwich.  Thence with him by
coach and set him down at the Temple, and I to Westminster Hall, where, it
being now about six o'clock, I find the House just risen; and met with Sir
W. Coventry and the Lieutenant of the Tower, they having sat all day; and
with great difficulty have got a vote for giving the King L300,000, not to
be raised by any land-tax.  The sum is much smaller than I expected, and
than the King needs; but is grounded upon Mr. Wren's reading our estimates
the other day of L270,000, to keep the fleete abroad, wherein we demanded
nothing for setting and fitting of them out, which will cost almost
L200,000, I do verily believe: and do believe that the King hath no cause
to thank Wren for this motion.  I home to Sir W. Coventry's lodgings, with
him and the Lieutenant of the Tower, where also was Sir John Coventry, and
Sir John Duncomb, and Sir Job Charleton.  And here a great deal of good
discourse: and they seem mighty glad to have this vote pass, which I did
wonder at, to see them so well satisfied with so small a sum, Sir John
Duncomb swearing, as I perceive he will freely do, that it was as much as
the nation could beare.  Among other merry discourse about spending of
money, and how much more chargeable a man's living is now more than it was
heretofore, Duncomb did swear that in France he did live of L100 a year
with more plenty, and wine and wenches, than he believes can be done now
for L200, which was pretty odd for him, being a Committee-man's son, to
say.  Having done here, and supped, where I eat very little, we home in
Sir John Robinson's coach, and there to bed.

27th.  All the morning at the office, and at noon home to dinner, and
thence with my wife and Deb. to the King's House, to see "The Virgin
Martyr," the first time it hath been acted a great while: and it is mighty
pleasant; not that the play is worth much, but it is finely acted by Becke
Marshall.  But that which did please me beyond any thing in, the whole
world was the wind-musique when the angel comes down, which is so sweet
that it ravished me, and indeed, in a word, did wrap up my soul so that it
made me really sick, just as I have formerly been when in love with my
wife; that neither then, nor all the evening going home, and at home, I
was able to think of any thing, but remained all night transported, so as
I could not believe that ever any musick hath that real command over the
soul of a man as this did upon me: and makes me resolve to practice
wind-musique, and to make my wife do the like.

28th.  Up, and to the office, where all the morning doing business, and
after dinner with Sir W. Pen to White Hall, where we and the rest of us
presented a great letter of the state of our want of money to his Royal
Highness.  I did also present a demand of mine for consideration for my
travelling-charges of coach and boat-hire during the war, which, though
his Royal Highness and the company did all like of, yet, contrary to my
expectation, I find him so jealous now of doing any thing extraordinary,
that he desired the gentlemen that they would consider it, and report
their minds in it to him.  This did unsettle my mind a great while, not
expecting this stop: but, however, I shall do as well, I know, though it
causes me a little stop.  But that, that troubles me most is, that while
we were thus together with the Duke of York, comes in Mr. Wren from the
House, where, he tells us, another storm hath been all this day almost
against the Officers of the Navy upon this complaint,--that though they
have made good rules for payment of tickets, yet that they have not
observed them themselves, which was driven so high as to have it urged
that we should presently be put out of our places: and so they have at
last ordered that we shall be heard at the bar of the House upon this
business on Thursday next.  This did mightily trouble me and us all; but
me particularly, who am least able to bear these troubles, though I have
the least cause to be concerned in it.  Thence, therefore, to visit Sir H.
Cholmly, who hath for some time been ill of a cold; and thence walked
towards Westminster, and met Colonel Birch, who took me back to walk with
him, and did give me an account of this day's heat against the Navy
Officers, and an account of his speech on our behalf, which was very good;
and indeed we are much beholden to him, as I, after I parted with him, did
find by my cozen Roger, whom I went to: and he and I to his lodgings.  And
there he did tell me the same over again; and how much Birch did stand up
in our defence; and that he do see that there are many desirous to have us
out of the Office; and the House is so furious and passionate, that he
thinks nobody can be secure, let him deserve never so well.  But now, he
tells me, we shall have a fair hearing of the House, and he hopes justice
of them: but, upon the whole, he do agree with me that I should hold my
hand as to making any purchase of land, which I had formerly discoursed
with him about, till we see a little further how matters go.  He tells me
that that made them so mad to-day first was, several letters in the House
about the Fanatickes, in several places, coming in great bodies, and
turning people out of the churches, and there preaching themselves, and
pulling the surplice over the Parsons' heads: this was confirmed from
several places; which makes them stark mad, especially the hectors and
bravadoes of the House, who shew all the zeal on this occasion.  Having
done with him, I home vexed in my mind, and so fit for no business, but
sat talking with my wife and supped with her; and Nan Mercer come and sat
all the evening with us, and much pretty discourse, which did a little
ease me, and so to bed.

29th.  Up, and walked to Captain Cocke's, where Sir G. Carteret promised
to meet me and did come to discourse about the prize-business of my Lord
Sandwich's, which I perceive is likely to be of great ill consequence to
my Lord, the House being mighty vehement in it.  We could say little but
advise that his friends should labour to get it put off, till he comes. We
did here talk many things over, in lamentation of the present posture of
affairs, and the ill condition of all people that have had anything to do
under the King, wishing ourselves a great way off: Here they tell me how
Sir Thomas Allen hath taken the Englishmen out of "La Roche," and taken
from him an Ostend prize which La Roche had fetched out of our harbours;
and at this day La Roche keeps upon our coasts; and had the boldness to
land some men and go a mile up into the country, and there took some goods
belonging to this prize out of a house there; which our King resents, and,
they say, hath wrote to the King of France about; and everybody do think a
war will follow; and then in what a case we shall be for want of money,
nobody knows.  Thence to the office, where we sat all the morning, and at
noon home to dinner, and to the office again in the afternoon, where we
met to consider of an answer to the Parliament about the not paying of
tickets according to our own orders, to which I hope we shall be able to
give a satisfactory answer, but that the design of the House being
apparently to remove us, I do question whether the best answer will
prevail with them.  This done I by coach with my wife to Martin, my
bookseller's, expecting to have had my Kercher's Musurgia, but to my
trouble and loss of trouble it was not done.  So home again, my head full
of thoughts about our troubles in the office, and so to the office.  Wrote
to my father this post, and sent him now Colvill's--[The Goldsmith.]--note
for L600 for my sister's portion, being glad that I shall, I hope, have
that business over before I am out of place, and I trust I shall be able
to save a little of what I have got, and so shall not be troubled to be at
ease; for I am weary of this life.  So ends this month, with a great deal
of care and trouble in my head about the answerings of the Parliament, and
particularly in our payment of seamen by tickets.

     ETEXT EDITOR'S BOOKMARKS:

     Being very poor and mean as to the bearing with trouble
     Bite at the stone, and not at the hand that flings it
     Burned it, that it might not be among my books to my shame
     Come to see them in bed together, on their wedding-night
     Fear what would become of me if any real affliction should come
     Force a man to swear against himself
     L'escholle des filles, a lewd book
     Live of L100 a year with more plenty, and wine and wenches
     No pleasure--only the variety of it



                THE DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS M.A. F.R.S.

            CLERK OF THE ACTS AND SECRETARY TO THE ADMIRALTY

    TRANSCRIBED FROM THE SHORTHAND MANUSCRIPT IN THE PEPYSIAN LIBRARY
 MAGDALENE COLLEGE CAMBRIDGE BY THE REV. MYNORS BRIGHT M.A. LATE FELLOW
                      AND PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE

                              (Unabridged)

                      WITH LORD BRAYBROOKE'S NOTES

                        EDITED WITH ADDITIONS BY

                        HENRY B. WHEATLEY F.S.A.

                          DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS.
                                 MARCH
                               1667-1668

March 1st (Lord's day).  Up very betimes, and by coach to Sir W.
Coventry's; and there, largely carrying with me all my notes and papers,
did run over our whole defence in the business of tickets, in order to the
answering the House on Thursday next; and I do think, unless they be set
without reason to ruin us, we shall make a good defence.  I find him in
great anxiety, though he will not discover it, in the business of the
proceedings of Parliament; and would as little as is possible have his
name mentioned in our discourse to them; and particularly the business of
selling places is now upon his hand to defend himself in; wherein I did
help him in his defence about the flag-maker's place, which is named in
the House.  We did here do the like about the complaint of want of
victuals in the fleete in the year 1666, which will lie upon me to defend
also.  So that my head is full of care and weariness in my employment.
Thence home, and there my mind being a little lightened by my morning's
work in the arguments I have now laid together in better method for our
defence to the Parliament, I to talk with my wife; and in lieu of a coach
this year, I have got my wife to be contented with her closet being made
up this summer, and going into the country this summer for a month or two,
to my father's, and there Mercer and Deb.  and Jane shall go with her,
which I the rather do for the entertaining my wife, and preventing of
fallings out between her and my father or Deb., which uses to be the fate
of her going into the country.  After dinner by coach to Westminster, and
there to St. Margaret's church, thinking to have seen Betty Michell, but
she was not there, but met her father and mother and with them to her
father's house, where I never was before, but was mighty much made of,
with some good strong waters, which they have from their son Michell, and
mighty good people they are.  Thence to Mrs. Martin's, where I have not
been also a good while, and with great difficulty, company being there,
did get an opportunity to hazer what I would con her, and here I was
mightily taken with a starling which she hath, that was the King's, which
he kept in his bedchamber; and do whistle and talk the most and best that
ever I heard anything in my life.  Thence to visit Sir H. Cholmly, who
continues still sick of his cold, and thence calling, but in vain, to
speak with Sir G. Carteret at his house in Lincoln's Inn Fields, where I
spoke with nobody, but home, where spent the evening talking with W. Hewer
about business of the House, and declaring my expectation of all our being
turned out.  Hither comes Carcasse to me about business, and there did
confess to me of his own accord his having heretofore discovered as a
complaint against Sir W. Batten, Sir W. Pen and me that we did prefer the
paying of some men to man "The Flying Greyhound" to others, by order under
our hands.  The thing upon recollection I believe is true, and do hope no
great matter can be made of it, but yet I would be glad to have my name
out of it, which I shall labour to do; in the mean time it weighs as a new
trouble on my mind, and did trouble me all night.  So without supper to
bed, my eyes being also a little overwrought of late that I could not stay
up to read.

2nd.  Up and betimes to the office, where I did much business, and several
come to me, and among others I did prepare Mr. Warren, and by and by Sir
D. Gawden, about what presents I have had from them, that they may not
publish them, or if they do, that in truth I received none on the account
of the Navy but Tangier, and this is true to the former, and in both that
I never asked any thing of them.  I must do the like with the rest.  Mr.
Moore was with me, and he do tell me, and so W. Hewer tells me, he hears
this morning that all the town is full of the discourse that the Officers
of the Navy shall be all turned out, but honest Sir John Minnes, who, God
knows, is fitter to have been turned out himself than any of us, doing the
King more hurt by his dotage and folly than all the rest can do by their
knavery, if they had a mind to it.  At noon home to dinner, where was
Mercer, and very merry as I could be with my mind so full of business, and
so with my wife, her and the girl, to the King's house to see the "Virgin
Martyr" again, which do mightily please me, but above all the musique at
the coming down of the angel, which at this hearing the second time, do
still commend me as nothing ever did, and the other musique is nothing to
it.  Thence with my wife to the 'Change, and so, calling at the Cocke ale
house, we home, and there I settle to business, and with my people
preparing my great answer to the Parliament for the office about tickets
till past 1 a o'clock at night, and then home to supper and to bed,
keeping Mr. Gibson all night with me.  This day I have the news that my
sister was married on Thursday last to Mr. Jackson; so that work is, I
hope, well over.

3rd.  Up betimes to work again, and then met at the Office, where to our
great business of this answer to the Parliament; where to my great
vexation I find my Lord Brouncker prepared only to excuse himself, while
I, that have least reason to trouble myself, am preparing with great pains
to defend them all: and more, I perceive, he would lodge the beginning of
discharging ships by ticket upon me; but I care not, for I believe I shall
get more honour by it when the Parliament, against my will, shall see how
the whole business of the Office was done by me.  At noon rose and to
dinner.  My wife abroad with Mercer and Deb.  buying of things, but I with
my clerks home to dinner, and thence presently down with Lord Brouncker,
W. Pen, T. Harvy, T. Middleton, and Mr. Tippets, who first took his place
this day at the table, as a Commissioner, in the room of Commissioner
Pett.  Down by water to Deptford, where the King, Queene, and Court are to
see launched the new ship built by Mr. Shish, called "The Charles."  2 God
send her better luck than the former!  Here some of our brethren, who went
in a boat a little before my boat, did by appointment take opportunity of
asking the King's leave that we might make full use of the want of money,
in our excuse to the Parliament for the business of tickets, and other
things they will lay to our charge, all which arose from nothing else: and
this the King did readily agree to, and did give us leave to make our full
use of it.  The ship being well launched, I back again by boat, setting
[Sir] T. Middleton and Mr. Tippets on shore at Ratcliffe, I home and there
to my chamber with Mr. Gibson, and late up till midnight preparing more
things against our defence on Thursday next to my content, though vexed
that all this trouble should be on me.  So to supper and to bed.

4th.  Up betimes and with Sir W. Pen in his coach to White Hall, there to
wait upon the Duke of York and the Commissioners of the Treasury, [Sir] W.
Coventry and Sir John Duncombe, who do declare that they cannot find the
money we demand, and we that less than what we demand will not set out the
fleet intended, and so broke up, with no other conclusion than that they
would let us have what they could get and we would improve that as well as
we could.  So God bless us, and prepare us against the consequences of
these matters.  Thence, it being a cold wet day, I home with Sir J. Minnes
in his coach, and called by the way at my bookseller's and took home with
me Kercher's Musurgia--very well bound, but I had no comfort to look upon
them, but as soon as I come home fell to my work at the office, shutting
the doors, that we, I and my clerks, might not be interrupted, and so,
only with room for a little dinner, we very busy all the day till night
that the officers met for me to give them the heads of what I intended to
say, which I did with great discontent to see them all rely on me that
have no reason at all to trouble myself about it, nor have any thanks from
them for my labour, but contrarily Brouncker looked mighty dogged, as
thinking that I did not intend to do it so as to save him.  This troubled
me so much as, together with the shortness of the time and muchness of the
business, did let me be at it till but about ten at night, and then quite
weary, and dull, and vexed, I could go no further, but resolved to leave
the rest to to-morrow morning, and so in full discontent and weariness did
give over and went home, with[out] supper vexed and sickish to bed, and
there slept about three hours, but then waked, and never in so much
trouble in all my life of mind, thinking of the task I have upon me, and
upon what dissatisfactory grounds, and what the issue of it may be to me.

5th.  With these thoughts I lay troubling myself till six o'clock,
restless, and at last getting my wife to talk to me to comfort me, which
she at last did, and made me resolve to quit my hands of this Office, and
endure the trouble of it no longer than till I can clear myself of it. So
with great trouble, but yet with some ease, from this discourse with my
wife, I up, and to my Office, whither come my clerks, and so I did huddle
the best I could some more notes for my discourse to-day, and by nine
o'clock was ready, and did go down to the Old Swan, and there by boat,
with T. H[ater] and W. H[ewer] with me, to Westminster, where I found
myself come time enough, and my brethren all ready.  But I full of
thoughts and trouble touching the issue of this day; and, to comfort
myself, did go to the Dog and drink half-a-pint of mulled sack, and in the
Hall [Westminster] did drink a dram of brandy at Mrs. Hewlett's; and with
the warmth of this did find myself in better order as to courage, truly.
So we all up to the lobby; and between eleven and twelve o'clock, were
called in, with the mace before us, into the House, where a mighty full
House; and we stood at the bar, namely, Brouncker, Sir J. Minnes, Sir T.
Harvey, and myself, W. Pen being in the House, as a Member.  I perceive
the whole House was full, and full of expectation of our defence what it
would be, and with great prejudice.  After the Speaker had told us the
dissatisfaction of the House, and read the Report of the Committee, I
began our defence most acceptably and smoothly, and continued at it
without any hesitation or losse, but with full scope, and all my reason
free about me, as if it had been at my own table, from that time till past
three in the afternoon; and so ended, without any interruption from the
Speaker; but we withdrew.  And there all my Fellow-Officers, and all the
world that was within hearing, did congratulate me, and cry up my speech
as the best thing they ever heard; and my Fellow-Officers overjoyed in it;
we were called in again by and by to answer only one question, touching
our paying tickets to ticket-mongers; and so out; and we were in hopes to
have had a vote this day in our favour, and so the generality of the House
was; but my speech, being so long, many had gone out to dinner and come in
again half drunk; and then there are two or three that are professed
enemies to us and every body else; among others, Sir T. Littleton, Sir
Thomas Lee, Mr. Wiles, the coxcomb whom I saw heretofore at the
cock-fighting, and a few others; I say, these did rise up and speak
against the coming to a vote now, the House not being full, by reason of
several being at dinner, but most because that the House was to attend the
King this afternoon, about the business of religion, wherein they pray him
to put in force all the laws against Nonconformists and Papists; and this
prevented it, so that they put it off to to-morrow come se'nnight.
However, it is plain we have got great ground; and everybody says I have
got the most honour that any could have had opportunity of getting; and so
with our hearts mightily overjoyed at this success, we all to dinner to
Lord Brouncker's--that is to say, myself, T. Harvey, and W. Pen, and there
dined; and thence with Sir Anthony Morgan, who is an acquaintance of
Brouncker's, a very wise man, we after dinner to the King's house, and
there saw part of "The Discontented Colonel," but could take no great
pleasure in it, because of our coming in in the middle of it.  After the
play, home with W. Pen, and there to my wife, whom W. Hewer had told of my
success, and she overjoyed, and I also as to my particular; and, after
talking awhile, I betimes to bed, having had no quiet rest a good while.

6th.  Up betimes, and with Sir D. Gawden to Sir W, Coventry's chamber:
where the first word he said to me was, "Good-morrow, Mr. Pepys, that must
be Speaker of the Parliament-house:" and did protest I had got honour for
ever in Parliament.  He said that his brother, that sat by him, admires
me; and another gentleman said that I could not get less than L1000 a-year
if I would put on a gown and plead at the Chancery-bar; but, what pleases
me most, he tells me that the Sollicitor-Generall did protest that he
thought I spoke the best of any man in England.  After several talks with
him alone, touching his own businesses, he carried me to White Hall, and
there parted; and I to the Duke of York's lodgings, and find him going to
the Park, it being a very fine morning, and I after him; and, as soon as
he saw me, he told me, with great satisfaction, that I had converted a
great many yesterday, and did, with great praise of me, go on with the
discourse with me.  And, by and by, overtaking the King, the King and Duke
of York come to me both; and he--[The King]--said, "Mr. Pepys, I am very
glad of your success yesterday;" and fell to talk of my well speaking; and
many of the Lords there.  My Lord Barkeley did cry the up for what they
had heard of it; and others, Parliament-men there, about the King, did say
that they never heard such a speech in their lives delivered in that
manner.  Progers, of the Bedchamber, swore to me afterwards before
Brouncker, in the afternoon, that he did tell the King that he thought I
might teach the Sollicitor-Generall.  Every body that saw me almost come
to me, as Joseph Williamson and others, with such eulogys as cannot be
expressed.  From thence I went to Westminster Hall, where I met Mr. G.
Montagu, who come to me and kissed me, and told me that he had often
heretofore kissed my hands, but now he would kiss my lips: protesting that
I was another Cicero, and said, all the world said the same of me.  Mr.
Ashburnham, and every creature I met there of the Parliament, or that knew
anything of the Parliament's actings, did salute me with this honour:--Mr.
Godolphin;--Mr. Sands, who swore he would go twenty mile, at any time, to
hear the like again, and that he never saw so many sit four hours together
to hear any man in his life, as there did to hear me; Mr. Chichly,--Sir
John Duncomb,--and everybody do say that the kingdom will ring of my
abilities, and that I have done myself right for my whole life: and so
Captain Cocke, and others of my friends, say that no man had ever such an
opportunity of making his abilities known; and, that I may cite all at
once, Mr. Lieutenant of the Tower did tell me that Mr. Vaughan did protest
to him, and that, in his hearing it, said so to the Duke of Albemarle, and
afterwards to W. Coventry, that he had sat twenty-six years in Parliament
and never heard such a speech there before: for which the Lord God make me
thankful! and that I may make use of it not to pride and vain-glory, but
that, now I have this esteem, I may do nothing that may lessen it!  I
spent the morning thus walking in the Hall, being complimented by
everybody with admiration: and at noon stepped into the Legg with Sir
William Warren, who was in the Hall, and there talked about a little of
his business, and thence into the Hall a little more, and so with him by
coach as far as the Temple almost, and there 'light, to follow my Lord
Brouncker's coach, which I spied, and so to Madam Williams's, where I
overtook him, and agreed upon meeting this afternoon, and so home to
dinner, and after dinner with W. Pen, who come to my house to call me, to
White Hall, to wait on the Duke of York, where he again and all the
company magnified me, and several in the Gallery: among others, my Lord
Gerard, who never knew me before nor spoke to me, desires his being better
acquainted with me; and [said] that, at table where he was, he never heard
so much said of any man as of me, in his whole life.  We waited on the
Duke of York, and thence into the Gallery, where the House of Lords waited
the King's coming out of the Park, which he did by and by; and there, in
the Vane-room, my Lord Keeper delivered a message to the King, the Lords
being about him, wherein the Barons of England, from many good arguments,
very well expressed in the part he read out of, do demand precedence in
England of all noblemen of either of the King's other two kingdoms, be
their title what it will; and did shew that they were in England reputed
but as Commoners, and sat in the House of Commons, and at conferences with
the Lords did stand bare.  It was mighty worth my hearing: but the King
did only say that he would consider of it, and so dismissed them.  Thence
Brouncker and I to the Committee of Miscarriages sitting in the Court of
Wards, expecting with Sir D. Gawden to have been heard against Prince
Rupert's complaints for want of victuals.  But the business of Holmes's
charge against Sir Jer. Smith, which is a most shameful scandalous thing
for Flag officers to accuse one another of, and that this should be heard
here before men that understand it not at all, and after it hath been
examined and judged in before the King and Lord High Admirall and other
able seamen to judge, it is very hard.  But this business did keep them
all the afternoon, so we not heard but put off to another day.  Thence,
with the Lieutenant of the Tower, in his coach home; and there, with great
pleasure, with my wife, talking and playing at cards a little--she, and I,
and W. Hewer, and Deb., and so, after a little supper, I to bed.

7th.  Up, and to the office, where all the morning, at noon home to
dinner, where Mercer with us, and after dinner she, my wife, Deb., and I,
to the King's playhouse, and there saw "The Spanish Gipsys," the second
time of acting, and the first that I saw it.  A very silly play, only
great variety of dances, and those most excellently done, especially one
part by one Hanes, only lately come thither from the Nursery, an
understanding fellow, but yet, they say, hath spent L1000 a-year before he
come thither.  This day my wife and I full of thoughts about Mrs. Pierces
sending me word that she, and my old company, Harris and Knipp, would come
and dine with us next Wednesday, how we should do-to receive or put them
off, my head being, at this time, so full of business, and my wife in no
mind to have them neither, and yet I desire it.  Come to no resolution
tonight.  Home from the playhouse to the office, where I wrote what I had
to write, and among others to my father to congratulate my sister's
marriage, and so home to supper a little and then to bed.

8th (Lord's day).  At my sending to desire it, Sir J. Robinson, Lieutenant
of the Tower, did call me with his coach, and carried me to White Hall,
where met with very many people still that did congratulate my speech the
other day in the House of Commons, and I find all the world almost rings
of it.  Here spent the morning walking and talking with one or other, and
among the rest with Sir W. Coventry, who I find full of care in his own
business, how to defend himself against those that have a mind to choke
him; and though, I believe, not for honour and for the keeping his
employment, but for his safety and reputation's sake, is desirous to
preserve himself free from blame, and among other mean ways which himself
did take notice to me to be but a mean thing he desires me to get
information against Captain Tatnell, thereby to diminish his testimony,
who, it seems, hath a mind to do W. Coventry hurt: and I will do it with
all my heart; for Tatnell is a very rogue.  He would be glad, too, that I
could find anything proper for his taking notice against Sir F. Hollis.
At noon, after sermon, I to dinner with Sir G. Carteret to Lincoln's Inn
Fields, where I find mighty deal of company--a solemn day for some of his
and her friends, and dine in the great dining-room above stairs, where Sir
G. Carteret himself, and I, and his son, at a little table by, the great
table being full of strangers.  Here my Lady Jem. do promise to come, and
bring my Lord Hinchingbroke and his lady some day this week, to dinner to
me, which I am glad of.  After dinner, I up with her husband, Sir Philip
Carteret, to his closet, where, beyond expectation, I do find many pretty
things, wherein he appears to be ingenious, such as in painting, and
drawing, and making of watches, and such kind of things, above my
expectation; though, when all is done, he is a shirke, who owns his owing
me L10 for his lady two or three years ago, and yet cannot provide to pay
me.  The company by and by parted, and G. Carteret and I to White Hall,
where I set him down and took his coach as far as the Temple, it raining,
and there took a hackney and home, and so had my head combed, and then to
bed.

9th.  Up betimes, and anon with Sir W. Warren, who come to speak with me,
by coach to White Hall, and there met Lord Brouncker: and he and I to the
Commissioners of the Treasury, where I find them mighty kind to me, more,
I think, than was wont.  And here I also met Colvill, the goldsmith; who
tells me, with great joy, how the world upon the 'Change talks of me; and
how several Parliamentmen, viz., Boscawen and Major [Lionel] Walden, of
Huntingdon, who, it seems, do deal with him, do say how bravely I did
speak, and that the House was ready to have given me thanks for it; but
that, I think, is a vanity.  Thence I with Lord Brouncker, and did take up
his mistress, Williams, and so to the 'Change, only to shew myself, and
did a little business there, and so home to dinner, and then to the office
busy till the evening, and then to the Excize Office, where I find Mr.
Ball in a mighty trouble that he is to be put out of his place at
Midsummer, the whole Commission being to cease, and the truth is I think
they are very fair dealing men, all of them.  Here I did do a little
business, and then to rights home, and there dispatched many papers, and
so home late to supper and to bed, being eased of a great many thoughts,
and yet have a great many more to remove as fast as I can, my mind being
burdened with them, having been so much employed upon the public business
of the office in their defence before the Parliament of late, and the
further cases that do attend it.

10th.  Up, and to the office betimes, where all the morning.  At noon home
to dinner with my clerks, and after dinner comes Kate Joyce, who tells me
she is putting off her house, which I am glad of, but it was pleasant that
she come on purpose to me about getting a ticket paid, and in her way
hither lost her ticket, so that she is at a great loss what to do.--There
comes in then Mrs. Mercer, the mother, the first time she has been here
since her daughter lived with us, to see my wife, and after a little talk
I left them and to the office, and thence with Sir D. Gawden to
Westminster Hall, thinking to have attended the Committee about the
Victualling business, but they did not meet, but here we met Sir R.
Brookes, who do mightily cry up my speech the other day, saying my
fellow-officers are obliged to me, as indeed they are.  Thence with Sir D.
Gawden homewards, calling at Lincolne's Inn Fields: but my Lady Jemimah
was not within: and so to Newgate, where he stopped to give directions to
the jaylor about a Knight, one Sir Thomas Halford brought in yesterday for
killing one Colonel Temple, falling out at a taverne. So thence as far as
Leadenhall, and there I 'light, and back by coach to Lincoln's Inn Fields;
but my Lady was not come in, and so I am at a great loss whether she and
her brother Hinchingbroke and sister will dine with me to-morrow or no,
which vexes me.  So home; and there comes Mr. Moore to me, who tells me
that he fears my Lord Sandwich will meet with very great difficulties to
go through about the prizes, it being found that he did give orders for
more than the King's letter do justify; and then for the Act of
Resumption, which he fears will go on, and is designed only to do him
hurt, which troubles me much.  He tells me he believes the Parliament will
not be brought to do anything in matters of religion, but will adhere to
the Bishops.  So he gone, I up to supper, where I find W. Joyce and Harman
come to see us, and there was also Mrs. Mercer and her two daughters, and
here we were as merry as that fellow Joyce could make us with his mad
talking, after the old wont, which tired me.  But I was mightily pleased
with his singing; for the rogue hath a very good eare, and a good voice.
Here he stayed till he was almost drunk, and then away at about ten at
night, and then all broke up, and I to bed.

11th.  Up, and betimes to the office, where busy till 8 o'clock, and then
went forth, and meeting Mr. Colvill, I walked with, him to his building,
where he is building a fine house, where he formerly lived, in Lumbard
Street: and it will be a very fine street.  Thence walked down to the
Three Cranes and there took boat to White Hall, where by direction I
waited on the Duke of York about office business, and so by water to
Westminster, where walking in the Hall most of the morning, and up to my
Lady Jem. in Lincoln's Inn Fields to get her to appoint the day certain
when she will come and dine with me, and she hath appointed Saturday next.
So back to Westminster; and there still walked, till by and by comes Sir
W. Coventry, and with him Mr. Chichly and Mr. Andrew Newport, I to dinner
with them to Mr. Chichly's, in Queene Street, in Covent Garden.  A very
fine house, and a man that lives in mighty great fashion, with all things
in a most extraordinary manner noble and rich about him, and eats in the
French fashion all; and mighty nobly served with his servants, and very
civilly; that I was mighty pleased with it: and good discourse.  He is a
great defender of the Church of England, and against the Act for
Comprehension, which is the work of this day, about which the House is
like to sit till night.  After dinner, away with them back to Westminster,
where, about four o'clock, the House rises, and hath done nothing more in
the business than to put off the debate to this day month.  In the mean
time the King hath put out his proclamations this day, as the House
desired, for the putting in execution the Act against Nonconformists and
Papists, but yet it is conceived that for all this some liberty must be
given, and people will have it.  Here I met with my cozen Roger Pepys, who
is come to town, and hath been told of my performance before the House the
other day, and is mighty proud of it, and Captain Cocke met me here
to-day, and told me that the Speaker says he never heard such a defence
made; in all his life, in the House; and that the Sollicitor-Generall do
commend me even to envy.  I carried cozen Roger as far as the Strand,
where, spying out of the coach Colonel Charles George Cocke, formerly a
very great man, and my father's customer, whom I have carried clothes to,
but now walks like a poor sorry sneake, he stopped, and I 'light to him.
This man knew me, which I would have willingly avoided, so much pride I
had, he being a man of mighty height and authority in his time, but now
signifies nothing.  Thence home, where to the office a while and then
home, where W. Batelier was and played at cards and supped with us, my
eyes being out of order for working, and so to bed.

12th.  Up, and to the office, where all the morning, at noon home, and
after dinner with wife and Deb., carried them to Unthanke's, and I to
Westminster Hall expecting our being with the Committee this afternoon
about Victualling business, but once more waited in vain.  So after a turn
or two with Lord Brouncker, I took my wife up and left her at the 'Change
while I to Gresham College, there to shew myself; and was there greeted by
Dr. Wilkins, Whistler, and others, as the patron of the Navy Office, and
one that got great fame by my late speech to the Parliament. Here I saw a
great trial of the goodness of a burning glass, made of a new figure, not
spherical (by one Smithys, I think, they call him), that did burn a glove
of my Lord Brouncker's from the heat of a very little fire, which a
burning glass of the old form, or much bigger, could not do, which was
mighty pretty.  Here I heard Sir Robert Southwell give an account of some
things committed to him by the Society at his going to Portugall, which he
did deliver in a mighty handsome manner.

     [At the meeting of the Royal Society on March 12th, 1668, "Mr.
     Smethwick's glasses were tried again; and his telescope being
     compared with another longer telescope, and the object-glasses
     exchanged, was still found to exceed the other in goodness; and his
     burning concave being compared with a spherical burning-glass of
     almost twice the diameter, and held to the fire, it burnt gloves,
     whereas the other spherical ones would not burn at all."--"Sir
     Robert Southwell being lately returned from Portugal, where he had
     been ambassador from the king, and being desired to acquaint the
     society with what he had done with respect to the instructions,
     which he had received from them before his departure from England,
     related, that he had lodged the astronomical quadrant, which the
     society had sent to Portugal to make observations with there, with a
     body of men at Lisbon, who had applied themselves among other kinds
     of literature to mathematics" (Birch's "History of the Royal
     Society," vol.  ii., p.  256).]

Thence went away home, and there at my office as long as my eyes would
endure, and then home to supper, and to talk with Mr. Pelling, who tells
me what a fame I have in the City for my late performance; and upon the
whole I bless God for it.  I think I have, if I can keep it, done myself a
great deal of repute.  So by and by to bed.

13th.  Up betimes to my office, where to fit myself for attending the
Parliament again, not to make any more speech, which, while my fame is
good, I will avoid, for fear of losing it; but only to answer to what
objections will be made against us.  Thence walked to the Old Swan and
drank at Michell's, whose house is going up apace.  Here I saw Betty, but
could not baiser la, and so to Westminster, there to the Hall, where up to
my cozen Roger Pepys at the Parliament door, and there he took me aside,
and told me how he was taken up by one of the House yesterday, for moving
for going on with the King's supply of money, without regard to the
keeping pace therewith, with the looking into miscarriages, and was told
by this man privately that it did arise because that he had a kinsman
concerned therein; and therefore he would prefer the safety of his kinsman
to the good of the nation, and that there was great things against us and
against me, for all my fine discourse the other day.  But I did bid him be
at no pain for me; for I knew of nothing but what I was very well prepared
to answer; and so I think I am, and therefore was not at all disquieted by
this.  Thence he to the House, and I to the Hall, where my Lord Brouncker
and the rest waiting till noon and not called for by the House, they being
upon the business of money again, and at noon all of us to Chatelin's, the
French house in Covent Garden, to dinner--Brouncker, J. Minnes, W. Pen, T.
Harvey, and myself--and there had a dinner cost us 8s. 6d.  a-piece, a
damned base dinner, which did not please us at all, so that I am not fond
of this house at all, but do rather choose the Beare.  After dinner to
White Hall to the Duke of York, and there did our usual business,
complaining of our standing still in every-respect for want of money, but
no remedy propounded, but so I must still be.  Thence with our company to
the King's playhouse, where I left them, and I, my head being full of
to-morrow's dinner, I to my Lord Crew's, there to invite Sir Thomas Crew;
and there met with my Lord Hinchingbroke and his lady, the first time I
spoke to her.  I saluted her; and she mighty civil and; with my Lady
Jemimah, do all resolve to be very merry to-morrow at my house.  My Lady
Hinchingbroke I cannot say is a beauty, nor ugly; but is altogether a
comely lady enough, and seems very good-humoured, and I mighty glad of the
occasion of seeing her before to-morrow.  Thence home; and there find one
laying of my napkins against tomorrow in figures of all sorts, which is
mighty pretty; and, it seems, it is his trade, and he gets much money by
it; and do now and then furnish tables with plate and linnen for a feast
at so much, which is mighty pretty, and a trade I could not have thought
of.  I find my wife upon the bed not over well, her breast being broke out
with heat, which troubles her, but I hope it will be for her good.  Thence
I to Mrs. Turner, and did get her to go along with me to the French
pewterer's, and there did buy some new pewter against to-morrow; and
thence to White Hall, to have got a cook of her acquaintance, the best in
England, as she says.  But after we had with much ado found him, he could
not come, nor was Mr. Gentleman in town, whom next I would have had, nor
would Mrs. Stone let her man Lewis come, whom this man recommended to me;
so that I was at a mighty loss what in the world to do for a cooke,
Philips being out of town.  Therefore, after staying here at Westminster a
great while, we back to London, and there to Philips's, and his man
directed us to Mr. Levett's, who could not come, and he sent to two more,
and they could not; so that, at last, Levett as a great kindness did
resolve he would leave his business and come himself, which set me in
great ease in my mind, and so home, and there with my wife setting all
things in order against to-morrow, having seen Mrs. Turner at home, and so
late to bed.

14th.  Up very betimes, and with Jane to Levett's, there to conclude upon
our dinner; and thence to the pewterer's, to buy a pewter sesterne,

     [A pewter cistern was formerly part of the furniture of a well-
     appointed dining-room; the plates were rinsed in it, when necessary,
     during the meal.  A magnificent silver cistern is still preserved in
     the dining-room at Burghley House, the seat of the Marquis of
     Exeter.  It is said to be the largest piece of plate in England, and
     was once the subject of a curious wager.--B.]

which I have ever hitherto been without, and so up and down upon several
occasions to set matters in order, and that being done I out of doors to
Westminster Hall, and there met my Lord Brouncker, who tells me that our
business is put off till Monday, and so I was mighty glad that I was eased
of my attendance here, and of any occasion that might put me out of
humour, as it is likely if we had been called before the Parliament.
Therefore, after having spoke with Mr. Godolphin and cozen Roger, I away
home, and there do find everything in mighty good order, only my wife not
dressed, which troubles me.  Anon comes my company, viz., my Lord
Hinchingbroke and his lady, Sir Philip Carteret and his, lady, Godolphin
and my cozen Roger, and Creed: and mighty merry; and by and by to dinner,
which was very good and plentifull: (I should have said, and Mr. George
Montagu), who come at a very little warning, which was exceeding kind of
him.  And there, among other things, my Lord had Sir Samuel Morland's late
invention for casting up of sums of L. s. d.;

     [The same as Morland's so-called calculating machine.  Sir Samuel
     published in 1673 "The Description and Use of two Arithmetick
     Instruments, together with a short Treatise of Arithmetic, as
     likewise a Perpetual Almanack and severall useful tables."]

which is very pretty, but not very useful.  Most of our discourse was of
my Lord Sandwich and his family, as being all of us of the family; and
with extraordinary pleasure all the afternoon, thus together eating and
looking over my closet: and my Lady Hinchingbroke I find a very
sweet-natured and well-disposed lady, a lover of books and pictures, and
of good understanding.  About five o'clock they went; and then my wife and
I abroad by coach into Moorefields, only for a little ayre, and so home
again, staying no where, and then up to her chamber, there to talk with
pleasure of this day's passages, and so to bed.  This day I had the
welcome news of our prize being come safe from Holland, so as I shall have
hopes, I hope, of getting my money of my Lady Batten, or good part of it.

15th (Lord's day).  Up and walked, it being fine dry weather, to Sir W.
Coventry's, overtaking my boy Ely (that was), and he walked with me, being
grown a man, and I think a sober fellow.  He parted at Charing Cross, and
I to Sir W. Coventry's, and there talked with him about the Commissioners
of Accounts, who did give in their report yesterday to the House, and do
lay little upon us as aggravate any thing at present, but only do give an
account of the dissatisfactory account they receive from Sir G. Carteret,
which I am sorry for, they saying that he tells them not any time when he
paid any sum, which is fit for them to know for the computing of interest,
but I fear he is hardly able to tell it.  They promise to give them an
account of the embezzlement of prizes, wherein I shall be something
concerned, but nothing that I am afeard of, I thank God.  Thence walked
with W. Coventry into the Park, and there met the King and the Duke of
York, and walked a good while with them: and here met Sir Jer. Smith, who
tells me he is like to get the better of Holmes, and that when he is come
to an end of that, he will do Hollis's business for him, in the House, for
his blasphemies, which I shall be glad of. So to White Hall, and there
walked with this man and that man till chapel done, and, the King dined
and then Sir Thomas Clifford, the Comptroller, took me with him to dinner
to his lodgings, where my Lord Arlington and a great deal of good and
great company; where I very civilly used by them, and had a most excellent
dinner: and good discourse of Spain, Mr. Godolphin being there;
particularly of the removal of the bodies of all the dead Kings of Spain
that could be got together, and brought to the Pantheon at the Escuriall,
when it was finished, and there placed before the altar, there to lie for
ever; and there was a sermon made to them upon this text, "Arida ossa,
audite verbum Dei;" and a most eloquent sermon, as they say, who say they
have read it.  After dinner, away hence, and I to Mrs. Martin's, and there
spent the afternoon, and did hazer con elle, and here was her sister and
Mrs. Burrows, and so in the evening got a coach and home, and there find
Mr. Pelting and W. Hewer, and there talked and supped, Pelting being gone,
and mightily pleased with a picture that W. Hewer brought hither of
several things painted upon a deale board, which board is so well painted
that in my whole life I never was so well pleased or surprized with any
picture, and so troubled that so good pictures should be painted upon a
piece of bad deale.  Even after I knew that it was not board, but only the
picture of a board, I could not remove my fancy.  After supper to bed,
being very sleepy, and, I bless God, my mind being at very good present
rest.

16th.  Up, to set my papers and books in order, and put up my plate since
my late feast, and then to Westminster, by water, with Mr. Hater, and
there, in the Hall, did walk all the morning, talking with one or other,
expecting to have our business in the House; but did now a third time wait
to no purpose, they being all this morning upon the business of Barker's
petition about the making void the Act of Settlement in Ireland, which
makes a great deal of hot work: and, at last, finding that by all men's
opinion they could not come to our matter today, I with Sir W. Pen home,
and there to dinner, where I find, by Willet's crying, that her mistress
had been angry with her: but I would take no notice of it.  Busy all the
afternoon at the office, and then by coach to the Excize Office, but lost
my labour, there being nobody there, and so back again home, and after a
little at the office I home, and there spent the evening with my wife
talking and singing, and so to bed with my mind pretty well at ease. This
evening W. Pen and Sir R. Ford and I met at the first's house to talk of
our prize that is now at last come safe over from Holland, by which I hope
to receive some if not all the benefit of my bargain with W. Batten for my
share in it, which if she had miscarried I should have doubted of my Lady
Batten being left little able to have paid me.

17th.  Up betimes and to the office, where all the morning busy, and then
at noon home to dinner, and so again to the office awhile, and then abroad
to the Excize-Office, where I met Mr. Ball, and did receive the paper I
went for; and there fell in talk with him, who, being an old cavalier, do
swear and curse at the present state of things, that we should be brought
to this, that we must be undone and cannot be saved; that the Parliament
is sitting now, and will till midnight, to find how to raise this
L300,000, and he doubts they will not do it so as to be seasonable for the
King: but do cry out against our great men at Court; how it is a fine
thing for a Secretary of State to dance a jigg, and that it was not so
heretofore; and, above all, do curse my Lord of Bristoll, saying the worst
news that ever he heard in his life, or that the Devil could ever bring
us, was this Lord's coming to prayers the other day in the House of Lords,
by which he is coming about again from being a Papist, which will undo
this nation; and he says he ever did say, at the King's first coming in,
that this nation could not be safe while that man was alive.  Having done
there, I away towards Westminster, but seeing by the coaches the House to
be up, I stopped at the 'Change (where, I met Mrs. Turner, and did give
her a pair of gloves), and there bought several things for my wife, and so
to my bookseller's, and there looked for Montaigne's Essays,

     [This must have been Florio's translation, as Cotton's was not
     published until 1685.]

which I heard by my Lord Arlington and Lord Blaney so much commended, and
intend to buy it, but did not now, but home, where at the office did some
business, as much as my eyes would give leave, and so home to supper,
Mercer with us talking and singing, and so to bed.  The House, I hear,
have this day concluded upon raising L100,000 of the L300,000 by wine, and
the rest by a poll-[tax], and have resolved to excuse the Church, in
expectation that they will do the more of themselves at this juncture; and
I do hear that Sir W. Coventry did make a speech in behalf of the Clergy.

18th.  Up betimes to Westminster, where met with cozen Roger and Creed and
walked with them, and Roger do still continue of the mind that there is no
other way of saving this nation but by dissolving this Parliament and
calling another; but there are so many about the King that will not be
able to stand, if a new Parliament come, that they will not persuade the
King to it.  I spent most of the morning walking with one or other, and
anon met Doll Lane at the Dog tavern, and there je did hater what I did
desire with her .  .  .  and I did give her as being my valentine 20s. to
buy what elle would.  Thence away by coach to my bookseller's, and to
several places to pay my debts, and to Ducke Lane, and there bought
Montaigne's Essays, in English, and so away home to dinner, and after
dinner with W. Pen to White Hall, where we and my Lord Brouncker attended
the Council, to discourse about the fitness of entering of men presently
for the manning of the fleete, before one ship is in condition to receive
them.  W. Coventry did argue against it: I was wholly silent, because I
saw the King, upon the earnestness of the Prince, was willing to it,
crying very sillily, "If ever you intend to man the fleete, without being
cheated by the captains and pursers, you may go to bed, and resolve never
to have it manned;" and so it was, like other things, over-ruled that all
volunteers should be presently entered.  Then there was another great
business about our signing of certificates to the Exchequer for [prize]
goods, upon the L1,20,000 Act, which the Commissioners of the Treasury did
all oppose, and to the laying fault upon us.  But I did then speak to the
justifying what we had done, even to the angering of Duncomb and Clifford,
which I was vexed at: but, for all that, I did set the Office and myself
right, and went away with the victory, my Lord Keeper saying that he would
not advise the Council to order us to sign no more certificates.  But,
before I began to say anything in this matter, the King and the Duke of
York talking at the Council-table, before all the Lords, of the Committee
of Miscarriages, how this entering of men before the ships could be ready
would be reckoned a miscarriage; "Why," says the King, "it is then but Mr.
Pepys making of another speech to them;" which made all the Lords, and
there were by also the Atturny and Sollicitor-Generall, look upon me.
Thence Sir W. Coventry, W. Pen and I, by hackney-coach to take a little
ayre in Hyde Parke, the first time I have been there this year; and we did
meet many coaches going and coming, it being mighty pleasant weather; and
so, coming back again, I 'light in the Pell Mell; and there went to see
Sir H. Cholmly, who continues very ill of his cold.  And there come in Sir
H. Yelverton, whom Sir H. Cholmly commended me to his acquaintance, which
the other received, but without remembering to me, or I him, of our being
school-fellows together; and I said nothing of it.  But he took notice of
my speech the other day at the bar of the House; and indeed I perceive he
is a wise man by his manner of discourse, and here he do say that the town
is full of it, that now the Parliament hath resolved upon L300,000, the
King, instead of fifty, will set out but twenty-five ships, and the Dutch
as many; and that Smith is to command them, who is allowed to have the
better of Holmes in the late dispute, and is in good esteem in the
Parliament, above the other. Thence home, and there, in favour to my eyes,
stayed at home, reading the ridiculous History of my Lord Newcastle, wrote
by his wife, which shews her to be a mad, conceited, ridiculous woman, and
he an asse to suffer her to write what she writes to him, and of him.

     ["The Life of the thrice noble, high, and puissant Prince, William
     Cavendish, Duke .  .  .  of Newcastle," by his duchess, of which the
     first edition, in folio, was published in 1667.]

Betty Turner sent my wife the book to read, and it being a fair print, to
ease my eyes, which would be reading, I read that.  Anon comes Mrs. Turner
and sat and talked with us, and most about the business of Ackworth,

     [William Acworth, storekeeper at Woolwich, was accused of converting
     stores to his own use (see "Calendar of State Papers," 1667-68, p.
     279).]

which comes before us to-morrow, that I would favour it, but I do not
think, notwithstanding all the friendship I can shew him, that he can
escape, and therefore it had been better that he had followed the advice I
sent him the other day by Mrs. Turner, to make up the business.  So
parted, and I to bed, my eyes being very bad; and I know not how in the
world to abstain from reading.

19th.  Up, and betimes to the Old Swan, and by water to White Hall, and
thence to W. Coventry's, where stayed but a little to talk with him, and
thence by water back again, it being a mighty fine, clear spring morning.
Back to the Old Swan, and drank at Michell's, whose house goes up apace,
but I could not see Betty, and thence walked all along Thames Street,
which I have not done since it was burned, as far as Billingsgate; and
there do see a brave street likely to be, many brave houses being built,
and of them a great many by Mr. Jaggard; but the raising of the street
will make it mighty fine.  So to the office, where busy all the morning.
At noon home to dinner, and thence to the office, very busy till five
o'clock, and then to ease my eyes I took my wife out and Deb. to the
'Change, and there bought them some things, and so home again and to the
office, ended my letters, and so home to read a little more in last
night's book, with much sport, it being a foolish book, and so to supper
and to bed.  This afternoon I was surprized with a letter without a name
to it, very well writ, in a good stile, giving me notice of my cozen Kate
Joyce's being likely to ruin herself by marriage, and by ill reports
already abroad of her, and I do fear that this keeping of an inne may
spoil her, being a young and pretty comely woman, and thought to be left
well.  I did answer the letter with thanks and good liking, and am
resolved to take the advice he gives me, and go see her, and find out what
I can: but if she will ruin herself, I cannot help it, though I should be
troubled for it.

20th.  Up betimes, and to my Office, where we had a meeting extraordinary
to consider of several things, among others the sum of money fit to be
demanded ready money, to enable us to set out 27 ships, every body being
now in pain for a fleete, and everybody endeavouring to excuse themselves
for the not setting out of one, and our true excuse is lack of money. At
it all the morning, and so at noon home to dinner with my clerks, my wife
and Deb. being busy at work above in her chamber getting things ready and
fine for her going into the country a week or two hence.  I away by coach
to White Hall, where we met to wait on the Duke of York, and, soon as
prayers were done, it being Good Friday, he come to us, and we did a
little business and presented him with our demand of money, and so broke
up, and I thence by coach to Kate Joyce's, being desirous and in pain to
speak with her about the business that I received a letter yesterday, but
had no opportunity of speaking with her about it, company being with her,
so I only invited her to come and dine with me on Sunday next, and so away
home, and for saving my eyes at my chamber all the evening pricking down
some things, and trying some conclusions upon my viall, in order to the
inventing a better theory of musique than hath yet been abroad; and I
think verily I shall do it.  So to supper with my wife, who is in very
good humour with her working, and so am I, and so to bed.  This day at
Court I do hear that Sir W. Pen do command this summer's fleete; and Mr.
Progers of the Bedchamber, as a secret, told me that the Prince Rupert is
troubled at it, and several friends of his have been with him to know the
reason of it; so that he do pity Sir W. Pen, whom he hath great kindness
for, that he should not at any desire of his be put to this service, and
thereby make the Prince his enemy, and contract more envy from other
people.  But I am not a whit sorry if it should be so, first for the
King's sake, that his work will be better done by Sir W. Pen than the
Prince, and next that Pen, who is a false rogue, may be bit a little by
it.

21st.  Up betimes to the office, and there we sat all the morning, at noon
home with my clerks, a good dinner, and then to the Office, and wrote my
letters, and then abroad to do several things, and pay what little scores
I had, and among others to Mrs. Martin's, and there did give 20s. to Mrs.
Cragg, her landlady, who was my Valentine in the house, as well as Doll
Lane .  .  .  .  So home and to the office, there to end my letters, and
so home, where Betty Turner was to see my wife, and she being gone I to my
chamber to read a little again, and then after supper to bed.

22nd (Easter day).  I up, and walked to the Temple, and there got a coach,
and to White Hall, where spoke with several people, and find by all that
Pen is to go to sea this year with this fleete; and they excuse the
Prince's going, by saying it is not a command great enough for him. Here I
met with Brisband, and, after hearing the service at the King's chapel,
where I heard the Bishop of Norwich, Dr. Reynolds, the old presbyterian,
begin a very plain sermon, he and I to the Queen's chapel, and there did
hear the Italians sing; and indeed their musick did appear most admirable
to me, beyond anything of ours: I was never so well satisfied in my life
with it.  So back to White Hall, and there met Mr. Pierce, and adjusted
together how we should spend to-morrow together, and so by coach I home to
dinner, where Kate Joyce was, as I invited her, and had a good dinner,
only she and us; and after dinner she and I alone to talk about her
business, as I designed; and I find her very discreet, and she assures me
she neither do nor will incline to the doing anything towards marriage,
without my advice, and did tell me that she had many offers, and that
Harman and his friends would fain have her; but he is poor, and hath poor
friends, and so it will not be advisable: but that there is another, a
tobacconist, one Holinshed, whom she speaks well of, to be a plain, sober
man, and in good condition, that offers her very well, and submits to me
my examining and inquiring after it, if I see good, which I do like of it,
for it will be best for her to marry, I think, as soon as she can--at
least, to be rid of this house; for the trade will not agree with a young
widow, that is a little handsome, at least ordinary people think her so.
Being well satisfied with her answer, she anon went away, and I to my
closet to make a few more experiments of my notions in musique, and so
then my wife and I to walk in the garden, and then home to supper and to
bed.

23rd.  Up, and after discoursing with my wife about many things touching
this day's dinner, I abroad, and first to the taverne to pay what I owe
there, but missed of seeing the mistress of the house, and there bespoke
wine for dinner, and so away thence, and to Bishopsgate Streete, thinking
to have found a Harpsicon-maker that used to live there before the fire,
but he is gone, and I have a mind forthwith to have a little Harpsicon
made me to confirm and help me in my musique notions, which my head is
now-a-days full of, and I do believe will come to something that is very
good.  Thence to White Hall, expecting to have heard the Bishop of
Lincolne, my friend, preach, for so I understood he would do yesterday,
but was mistaken, and therefore away presently back again, and there find
everything in good order against dinner, and at noon come Mr. Pierce and
she, and Mrs. Manuel, the Jew's wife, and Mrs. Corbet, and Mrs. Pierces
boy and girl.  But we are defeated of Knepp, by her being forced to act
to-day, and also of Harris, which did trouble me, they being my chief
guests.  However, I had an extraordinary good dinner, and the better
because dressed by my own servants, and were mighty merry; and here was
Mr. Pelling by chance come and dined with me; and after sitting long at
dinner, I had a barge ready at Tower-wharfe, to take us in, and so we
went, all of us, up as high as Barne-Elms, a very fine day, and all the
way sang; and Mrs. Manuel sings very finely, and is a mighty discreet,
sober-carriaged woman, that both my wife and I are mightily taken with
her, and sings well, and without importunity or the contrary.  At
Barne-Elms we walked round, and then to the barge again, and had much
merry talk, and good singing; and come before it was dark to the New
Exchange stairs, and there landed, and walked up to Mrs. Pierces, where we
sat awhile, and then up to their dining-room.  And so, having a violin and
theorbo, did fall to dance, here being also Mrs. Floyd come hither, and by
and by Mr. Harris.  But there being so few of us that could dance, and my
wife not being very well, we had not much pleasure in the dancing: there
was Knepp also, by which with much pleasure we did sing a little, and so,
about ten o'clock, I took coach with my wife and Deb., and so home, and
there to bed.

24th.  Up pretty betimes, and so there comes to me Mr. Shish, to desire my
appearing for him to succeed Mr. Christopher Pett, lately dead, in his
place of Master-Shipwright of Deptford and Woolwich, which I do resolve to
promote what I can.  So by and by to White Hall, and there to the Duke of
York's chamber, where I understand it is already resolved by the King and
Duke of York that Shish shall have the place.  From the Duke's chamber Sir
W. Coventry and I to walk in the Matted Gallery; and there, among other
things, he tells me of the wicked design that now is at last contriving
against him, to get a petition presented from people that the money they
have paid to W. Coventry for their places may be repaid them back; and
that this is set on by Temple and Hollis of the Parliament, and, among
other mean people in it, by Captain Tatnell: and he prays me that I will
use some effectual way to sift Tatnell what he do, and who puts him on in
this business, which I do undertake, and will do with all my skill for his
service, being troubled that he is still under this difficulty.  Thence up
and down Westminster by Mrs. Burroughes her mother's shop, thinking to
have seen her, but could not, and therefore back to White Hall, where
great talk of the tumult at the other end of the town, about Moore-fields,
among the 'prentices, taking the liberty of these holydays to pull down
bawdy-houses.

     [It was customary for the apprentices of the metropolis to avail
     themselves of their holidays, especially on Shrove Tuesday, to
     search after women of ill fame, and to confine them during the
     season of Lent.  See a "Satyre against Separatists," 1642.

          "Stand forth, Shrove Tuesday, one a' the silenc'st bricklayers;
          'Tis in your charge to pull down bawdy-houses."

                    Middleton's Inner Temple Masque, 1619,
                         Works, ed.  Bullen, vii., 209.]

And, Lord! to see the apprehensions which this did give to all people at
Court, that presently order was given for all the soldiers, horse and
foot, to be in armes!  and forthwith alarmes were beat by drum and trumpet
through Westminster, and all to their colours, and to horse, as if the
French were coming into the town!  So Creed, whom I met here, and I to
Lincolne's Inn-fields, thinking to have gone into the fields to have seen
the 'prentices; but here we found these fields full of soldiers all in a
body, and my Lord Craven commanding of them, and riding up and down to
give orders, like a madman.  And some young men we saw brought by soldiers
to the Guard at White Hall, and overheard others that stood by say, that
it was only for pulling down the bawdy-houses; and none of the bystanders
finding fault with them, but rather of the soldiers for hindering them.
And we heard a justice of the Peace this morning say to the King, that he
had been endeavouring to suppress this tumult, but could not; and that,
imprisoning some [of them] in the new prison at Clerkenwell, the rest did
come and break open the prison and release them; and that they do give out
that they are for pulling down the bawdy-houses, which is one of the
greatest grievances of the nation.  To which the King made a very poor,
cold, insipid answer: "Why, why do they go to them, then?"  and that was
all, and had no mind to go on with the discourse.  Mr. Creed and I to
dinner to my Lord Crew, where little discourse, there being none but us at
the table, and my Lord and my Lady Jemimah, and so after dinner away,
Creed and I to White Hall, expecting a Committee of Tangier, but come too
late.  So I to attend the Council, and by and by were called in with Lord
Brouncker and Sir W. Pen to advise how to pay away a little money to most
advantage to the men of the yards, to make them dispatch the ships going
out, and there did make a little speech, which was well liked, and after
all it was found most satisfactory to the men, and best for the king's
dispatch, that what money we had should be paid weekly to the men for
their week's work until a greater sum could be got to pay them their
arrears and then discharge them.  But, Lord!  to see what shifts and what
cares and thoughts there was employed in this matter how to do the King's
work and please the men and stop clamours would make a man think the King
should not eat a bit of good meat till he has got money to pay the men,
but I do not see the least print of care or thoughts in him about it at
all.  Having done here, I out and there met Sir Fr. Hollis, who do still
tell me that, above all things in the world, he wishes he had my tongue in
his mouth, meaning since my speech in Parliament.  He took Lord Brouncker
and me down to the guards, he and his company being upon the guards
to-day; and there he did, in a handsome room to that purpose, make us
drink, and did call for his bagpipes, which, with pipes of ebony, tipt
with silver, he did play beyond anything of that kind that ever I heard in
my life; and with great pains he must have obtained it, but with pains
that the instrument do not deserve at all; for, at the best, it is mighty
barbarous musick.  So home and there to my chamber, to prick out my song,
"It is Decreed," intending to have it ready to give Mr. Harris on
Thursday, when we meet, for him to sing, believing that he will do it more
right than a woman that sings better, unless it were Knepp, which I cannot
have opportunity to teach it to.  This evening I come home from White Hall
with Sir W. Pen, who fell in talk about his going to sea this year, and
the difficulties that arise to him by it, by giving offence to the Prince,
and occasioning envy to him, and many other things that make it a bad
matter, at this time of want of money and necessaries, and bad and uneven
counsels at home,--for him to go abroad: and did tell me how much with the
King and Duke of York he had endeavoured to be excused, desiring the
Prince might be satisfied in it, who hath a mind to go; but he tells me
they will not excuse him, and I believe it, and truly do judge it a piece
of bad fortune to W. Pen.

25th.  Up, and walked to White Hall, there to wait on the Duke of York,
which I did: and in his chamber there, first by hearing the Duke of York
call me by my name, my Lord Burlington did come to me, and with great
respect take notice of me and my relation to my Lord Sandwich, and express
great kindness to me; and so to talk of my Lord Sandwich's concernments.
By and by the Duke of York is ready; and I did wait for an opportunity of
speaking my mind to him about Sir J. Minnes, his being unable to do the
King any service, which I think do become me to do in all respects, and
have Sir W. Coventry's concurrence therein, which I therefore will seek a
speedy opportunity to do, come what will come of it.  The Duke of York and
all with him this morning were full of the talk of the 'prentices, who are
not yet [put] down, though the guards and militia of the town have been in
armes all this night, and the night before; and the 'prentices have made
fools of them, sometimes by running from them and flinging stones at them.
Some blood hath been spilt, but a great many houses pulled down; and,
among others, the Duke of York was mighty merry at that of Damaris Page's,
the great bawd of the seamen; and the Duke of York complained merrily that
he hath lost two tenants, by their houses being pulled down, who paid him
for their wine licenses L15 a year.  But here it was said how these idle
fellows have had the confidence to say that they did ill in contenting
themselves in pulling down the little bawdyhouses, and did not go and pull
down the great bawdy-house at White Hall.  And some of them have the last
night had a word among them, and it was "Reformation and Reducement."
This do make the courtiers ill at ease to see this spirit among people,
though they think this matter will not come to much: but it speaks
people's minds; and then they do say that there are men of understanding
among them, that have been of Cromwell's army: but how true that is, I
know not.  Thence walked a little to Westminster, but met with nobody to
spend any time with, and so by coach homeward, and in Seething Lane met
young Mrs. Daniel, and I stopt, and she had been at my house, but found
nobody within, and tells me that she drew me for her Valentine this year,
so I took her into the coach, and was going to the other end of the town,
thinking to have taken her abroad, but remembering that I was to go out
with my wife this afternoon, .  .  .  and so to a milliner at the corner
shop going into Bishopsgate and Leadenhall Street, and there did give her
eight pair of gloves, and so dismissed her, and so I home and to dinner,
and then with my wife to the King's playhouse to see "The Storme," which
we did, but without much pleasure, it being but a mean play compared with
"The Tempest," at the Duke of York's house, though Knepp did act her part
of grief very well.  Thence with my wife and Deb. by coach to Islington,
to the old house, and there eat and drank till it was almost night, and
then home, being in fear of meeting the 'prentices, who are many of them
yet, they say, abroad in the fields, but we got well home, and so I to my
chamber a while, and then to supper and to bed.

26th.  Up betimes to the office, where by and by my Lord Brouncker and I
met and made an end of our business betimes.  So I away with him to Mrs.
Williams's, and there dined, and thence I alone to the Duke of York's
house, to see the new play, called "The Man is the Master," where the
house was, it being not above one o'clock, very full.  But my wife and
Deb. being there before, with Mrs. Pierce and Corbet and Betty Turner,
whom my wife carried with her, they made me room; and there I sat, it
costing me 8s. upon them in oranges, at 6d. a-piece.  By and by the King
come; and we sat just under him, so that I durst not turn my back all the
play.  The play is a translation out of French, and the plot Spanish, but
not anything extraordinary at all in it, though translated by Sir W.
Davenant, and so I found the King and his company did think meanly of it,
though there was here and there something pretty: but the most of the
mirth was sorry, poor stuffe, of eating of sack posset and slabbering
themselves, and mirth fit for clownes; the prologue but poor, and the
epilogue little in it but the extraordinariness of it, it being sung by
Harris and another in the form of a ballet.  Thence, by agreement, we all
of us to the Blue Balls, hard by, whither Mr. Pierce also goes with us,
who met us at the play, and anon comes Manuel, and his wife, and Knepp,
and Harris, who brings with him Mr. Banister, the great master of musique;
and after much difficulty in getting of musique, we to dancing, and then
to a supper of some French dishes, which yet did not please me, and then
to dance and sing; and mighty merry we were till about eleven or twelve at
night, with mighty great content in all my company, and I did, as I love
to do, enjoy myself in my pleasure as being the height of what we take
pains for and can hope for in this world, and therefore to be enjoyed
while we are young and capable of these joys.  My wife extraordinary fine
to-day, in her flower tabby suit, bought a year and more ago, before my
mother's death put her into mourning, and so not worn till this day: and
every body in love with it; and indeed she is very fine and handsome in
it.  I having paid the reckoning, which come to almost L4., we parted: my
company and William Batelier, who was also with us, home in a coach, round
by the Wall, where we met so many stops by the Watches, that it cost us
much time and some trouble, and more money, to every Watch, to them to
drink; this being encreased by the trouble the 'prentices did lately give
the City, so that the Militia and Watches are very strict at this time;
and we had like to have met with a stop for all night at the Constable's
watch, at Mooregate, by a pragmatical Constable; but we come well home at
about two in the morning, and so to bed.  This noon, from Mrs. Williams's,
my Lord Brouncker sent to Somersett House to hear how the Duchess of
Richmond do; and word was brought him that she is pretty well, but mighty
full of the smallpox, by which all do conclude she will be wholly spoiled,
which is the greatest instance of the uncertainty of beauty that could be
in this age; but then she hath had the benefit of it to be first married,
and to have kept it so long, under the greatest temptations in the world
from a King, and yet without the least imputation.  This afternoon, at the
play, Sir Fr. Hollis spoke to me as a secret, and matter of confidence in
me, and friendship to Sir W. Pen, who is now out of town, that it were
well he were made acquainted that he finds in the House of Commons, which
met this day, several motions made for the calling strictly again upon the
Miscarriages, and particularly in the business of the Prises, and the not
prosecuting of the first victory, only to give an affront to Sir W. Pen,
whose going to sea this year do give them matter of great dislike.  So
though I do not much trouble myself for him, yet I am sorry that he should
have this fall so unhappily without any fault, but rather merit of his own
that made him fitter for this command than any body else, and the more for
that this business of his may haply occasion their more eager pursuit
against the whole body of the office.

27th.  Up, and walked to the waterside, and thence to White Hall to the
Duke of York's chamber, where he being ready he went to a Committee of
Tangier, where I first understand that my Lord Sandwich is, in his coming
back from Spayne, to step over thither, to see in what condition the place
is, which I am glad of, hoping that he will be able to do some good there,
for the good of the place, which is so much out of order.  Thence to walk
a little in Westminster Hall, where the Parliament I find sitting, but
spoke with nobody to let me know what they are doing, nor did I enquire.
Thence to the Swan and drank, and did baiser Frank, and so down by water
back again, and to the Exchange a turn or two, only to show myself, and
then home to dinner, where my wife and I had a small squabble, but I first
this day tried the effect of my silence and not provoking her when she is
in an ill humour, and do find it very good, for it prevents its coming to
that height on both sides which used to exceed what was fit between us.
So she become calm by and by and fond, and so took coach, and she to the
mercer's to buy some lace, while I to White Hall, but did nothing, but
then to Westminster Hall and took a turn, and so to Mrs. Martin's, and
there did sit a little and talk and drink, and did hazer con her, and so
took coach and called my wife at Unthanke's, and so up and down to the
Nursery, where they did not act, then to the New Cockpit, and there
missed, and then to Hide Parke, where many coaches, but the dust so great,
that it was troublesome, and so by night home, where to my chamber and
finished my pricking out of my song for Mr. Harris ("It is decreed"), and
so a little supper, being very sleepy and weary since last night, and so
by to o'clock to bed and slept well all night.  This day, at noon, comes
Mr. Pelling to me, and shews me the stone cut lately out of Sir Thomas
Adams' (the old comely Alderman's) body, which is very large indeed,
bigger I think than my fist, and weighs above twenty-five ounces and,
which is very miraculous, he never in all his life had any fit of it, but
lived to a great age without pain, and died at last of something else,
without any sense of this in all his life.  This day Creed at White Hall
in discourse told me what information he hath had, from very good hands,
of the cowardice and ill-government of Sir Jer. Smith and Sir Thomas
Allen, and the repute they have both of them abroad in the Streights, from
their deportment when they did at several times command there; and that,
above all Englishmen that ever were there, there never was any man that
behaved himself like poor Charles Wager, whom the very Moores do mention,
with teares sometimes.

28th.  Up, and to the office, where all the morning busy, and at noon home
to dinner with my clerks; and though my head full of business, yet I had a
desire to end this holyday week with a play; and so, with my wife and
Deb., to the King's house, and there saw "The Indian Emperour," a very
good play indeed, and thence directly home, and to my writing of my
letters, and so home to supper and to bed for fearing my eyes.  Our
greatest business at the office to-day is our want of money for the
setting forth of these ships that are to go out, and my people at dinner
tell me that they do verily doubt that the want of men will be so great,
as we must press; and if we press, there will be mutinies in the town; for
the seamen are said already to have threatened the pulling down of the
Treasury Office; and if they do once come to that, it will not be long
before they come to ours.

29th (Lord's day).  Up, and I to Church, where I have not been these many
weeks before, and there did first find a strange Reader, who could not
find in the Service-book the place for churching women, but was fain to
change books with the clerke: and then a stranger preached, a seeming able
man; but said in his pulpit that God did a greater work in raising of an
oake-tree from an akehorne, than a man's body raising it, at the last day,
from his dust (shewing the possibility of the Resurrection): which was,
methought, a strange saying.  At home to dinner, whither comes and dines
with me W. Howe, and by invitation Mr. Harris and Mr. Banister, most
extraordinary company both, the latter for musique of all sorts, the
former for everything: here we sang, and Banister played on the theorbo,
and afterwards Banister played on his flageolet, and I had very good
discourse with him about musique, so confirming some of my new notions
about musique that it puts me upon a resolution to go on and make a scheme
and theory of musique not yet ever made in the world.  Harris do so
commend my wife's picture of Mr. Hales's, that I shall have him draw
Harris's head; and he hath also persuaded me to have Cooper draw my
wife's, which, though it cost L30, yet I will have done.  Thus spent the
afternoon most deliciously, and then broke up and walked with them as far
as the Temple, and there parted, and I took coach to Westminster, but
there did nothing, meeting nobody that I had a mind to speak with, and so
home, and there find Mr. Pelling, and then also comes Mrs. Turner, and
supped and talked with us, and so to bed.  I do hear by several that Sir
W. Pen's going to sea do dislike the Parliament mightily, and that they
have revived the Committee of Miscarriages to find something to prevent
it; and that he being the other day with the Duke of Albemarle to ask his
opinion touching his going to sea, the Duchess overheard and come in to
him, and asks W. Pen how he durst have the confidence to offer to go to
sea again, to the endangering the nation, when he knew himself such a
coward as he was, which, if true, is very severe.

30th.  Up betimes, and so to the office, there to do business till about
to o'clock, and then out with my wife and Deb. and W. Hewer by coach to
Common-garden Coffee-house, where by appointment I was to meet Harris;
which I did, and also Mr. Cooper, the great painter, and Mr. Hales: and
thence presently to Mr. Cooper's house, to see some of his work, which is
all in little, but so excellent as, though I must confess I do think the
colouring of the flesh to be a little forced, yet the painting is so
extraordinary, as I do never expect to see the like again.  Here I did see
Mrs. Stewart's picture as when a young maid, and now just done before her
having the smallpox: and it would make a man weep to see what she was
then, and what she is like to be, by people's discourse, now.  Here I saw
my Lord Generall's picture, and my Lord Arlington and Ashly's, and several
others; but among the rest one Swinfen, that was Secretary to my Lord
Manchester, Lord Chamberlain, with Cooling, done so admirably as I never
saw any thing: but the misery was, this fellow died in debt, and never
paid Cooper for his picture; but, it being seized on by his creditors,
among his other goods, after his death, Cooper himself says that he did
buy it, and give L25 out of his purse for it, for what he was to have had
but L30.  Being infinitely satisfied with this sight, and resolving that
my wife shall be drawn by him when she comes out of the country, I away
with Harris and Hales to the Coffee-house, sending my people away, and
there resolve for Hales to begin Harris's head for me, which I will be at
the cost of.  After a little talk, I away to White Hall and Westminster,
where I find the Parliament still bogling about the raising of this money:
and every body's mouth full now; and Mr. Wren himself tells me that the
Duke of York declares to go to sea himself this year; and I perceive it is
only on this occasion of distaste of the Parliament against W. Pen's
going, and to prevent the Prince's: but I think it is mighty hot counsel
for the Duke of York at this time to go out of the way; but, Lord! what a
pass are all our matters come to!  At noon by appointment to Cursitor's
Alley, in Chancery Lane, to meet Captain Cocke and some other creditors of
the Navy, and their Counsel, Pemberton, North, Offly, and Charles Porter;
and there dined, and talked of the business of the assignments on the
Exchequer of the L1,250,000 on behalf of our creditors; and there I do
perceive that the Counsel had heard of my performance in the
Parliamenthouse lately, and did value me and what I said accordingly.  At
dinner we had a great deal of good discourse about Parliament: their
number being uncertain, and always at the will of the King to encrease, as
he saw reason to erect a new borough.  But all concluded that the bane of
the Parliament hath been the leaving off the old custom of the places
allowing wages to those that served them in Parliament, by which they
chose men that understood their business and would attend it, and they
could expect an account from, which now they cannot; and so the Parliament
is become a company of men unable to give account for the interest of the
place they serve for. Thence, the meeting of the Counsel with the King's
Counsel this afternoon being put off by reason of the death of Serjeant
Maynard's lady, I to White Hall, where the Parliament was to wait on the
King; and they did: and it was to be told that he did think fit to tell
them that they might expect to be adjourned at Whitsuntide, and that they
might make haste to raise their money; but this, I fear, will displease
them, who did expect to sit as long as they pleased, and whether this be
done by the King upon some new counsel I know not, for the King must be
beholding to them till they do settle this business of money.  Great talk
to-day as if Beaufort was come into the Channel with about 20 ships, and
it makes people apprehensive, but yet the Parliament do not stir a bit
faster in the business of money.  Here I met with Creed, expecting a
Committee of Tangier, but the Committee met not, so he and I up and down,
having nothing to do, and particularly to the New Cockpit by the King's
Gate in Holborne, but seeing a great deal of rabble we did refuse to go
in, but took coach and to Hide Park, and there till all the tour was
empty, and so he and I to the Lodge in the Park, and there eat and drank
till it was night, and then carried him to White Hall, having had
abundance of excellent talk with him in reproach of the times and
managements we live under, and so I home, and there to talk and to supper
with my wife, and so to bed.

31st.  Up pretty betimes and to the office, where we sat all the morning,
and at noon I home to dinner, where uncle Thomas dined with me, as he do
every quarter, and I paid him his pension; and also comes Mr. Hollier a
little fuddled, and so did talk nothing but Latin, and laugh, that it was
very good sport to see a sober man in such a humour, though he was not
drunk to scandal.  At dinner comes a summons for this office and the
Victualler to attend a Committee of Parliament this afternoon, with Sir D.
Gawden, which I accordingly did, with my papers relating to the sending of
victuals to Sir John Harman's fleete; and there, Sir R. Brookes in the
chair, we did give them a full account, but, Lord! to see how full they
are and immoveable in their jealousy that some means are used to keep
Harman from coming home, for they have an implacable desire to know the
bottom of the not improving the first victory, and would lay it upon
Brouncker.  Having given them good satisfaction I away thence, up and
down, wanting a little to see whether I could get Mrs. Burroughes out, but
elle being in the shop ego did speak con her much, she could not then go
far, and so I took coach and away to Unthanke's, and there took up my wife
and Deb., and to the Park, where, being in a hackney, and they undressed,
was ashamed to go into the tour, but went round the park, and so with
pleasure home, where Mr. Pelting come and sat and talked late with us, and
he being gone, I called Deb. to take pen, ink, and paper and write down
what things come into my head for my wife to do in order to her going into
the country, and the girl, writing not so well as she would do, cried, and
her mistress construed it to be sullenness, and so away angry with her
too, but going to bed she undressed me, and there I did give her good
advice and baiser la, elle weeping still.

     ETEXT EDITOR'S BOOKMARKS:

     Act against Nonconformists and Papists
     Bookseller's, and there looked for Montaigne's Essays
     Bought Montaigne's Essays, in English
     But if she will ruin herself, I cannot help it
     Endangering the nation, when he knew himself such a coward
     I know not how in the world to abstain from reading
     Inventing a better theory of musique
     King, "it is then but Mr. Pepys making of another speech to them"
     Never saw so many sit four hours together to hear any man
     Not eat a bit of good meat till he has got money to pay the men
     Slabbering themselves, and mirth fit for clownes
     To be enjoyed while we are young and capable of these joys
     Tried the effect of my silence and not provoking her
     Trouble, and more money, to every Watch, to them to drink
     Uncertainty of beauty
     Without importunity or the contrary



                THE DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS M.A. F.R.S.

            CLERK OF THE ACTS AND SECRETARY TO THE ADMIRALTY

    TRANSCRIBED FROM THE SHORTHAND MANUSCRIPT IN THE PEPYSIAN LIBRARY
 MAGDALENE COLLEGE CAMBRIDGE BY THE REV. MYNORS BRIGHT M.A. LATE FELLOW
                      AND PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE

                              (Unabridged)

                      WITH LORD BRAYBROOKE'S NOTES

                        EDITED WITH ADDITIONS BY

                        HENRY B. WHEATLEY F.S.A.

                          DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS.
                                  APRIL
                                  1668

April 1st.  Up, and to dress myself, and call as I use Deb. to brush and
dress me .  .  .  , and I to my office, where busy till noon, and then out
to bespeak some things against my wife's going into the country to-morrow,
and so home to dinner, my wife and I alone, she being mighty busy getting
her things ready for her journey, I all the afternoon with her looking
after things on the same account, and then in the afternoon out and all
alone to the King's house, and there sat in an upper box, to hide myself,
and saw "The Black Prince," a very good play; but only the fancy, most of
it, the same as in the rest of my Lord Orrery's plays; but the dance very
stately; but it was pretty to see how coming after dinner and with no
company with me to talk to, and at a play that I had seen, and went to now
not for curiosity but only idleness, I did fall asleep the former part of
the play, but afterward did mind it and like it very well.  Thence called
at my bookseller's, and took Mr. Boyle's Book of Formes, newly reprinted,
and sent my brother my old one.  So home, and there to my chamber till
anon comes Mr. Turner and his wife and daughter, and Pelting, to sup with
us and talk of my wife's journey to-morrow, her daughter going with my
wife; and after supper to talk with her husband about the Office, and his
place, which, by Sir J. Minnes's age and inability, is very uncomfortable
to him, as well as without profit, or certainty what he shall do, when Sir
J. Minnes dies, which is a sad condition for a man that hath lived so long
in the Office as Mr. Turner hath done.  But he aymes, and I advise him to
it, to look for Mr. Ackworth's place, in case he should be removed.  His
wife afterwards did take me into my closet, and give me a cellar

     [A box to hold bottles.  "Run for the cellar of strong waters
     quickly"
                    --Ben Jonson, Magnetic Lady, act iii., sc.  r.]

of waters of her own distilling for my father, to be carried down with my
wife and her daughter to-morrow, which was very handsome.  So broke up and
to bed.

2nd.  Up, after much pleasant talk with my wife, and upon some alterations
I will make in my house in her absence, and I do intend to lay out some
money thereon.  So she and I up, and she got her ready to be gone, and by
and by comes Betty Turner and her mother, and W. Batelier, and they and
Deb., to whom I did give 10s. this morning, to oblige her to please her
mistress (and ego did baiser her mouche), and also Jane, and so in two
coaches set out about eight o'clock towards the carrier, there for to take
coach for my father's, that is to say, my wife and Betty Turner, Deb., and
Jane; but I meeting my Lord Anglesey going to the Office, was forced to
'light in Cheapside, and there took my leave of them (not baisado Deb.,
which je had a great mind to), left them to go to their coach, and I to
the office, where all the morning busy, and so at noon with my other
clerks (W. Hewer being a day's journey with my wife) to dinner, where Mr.
Pierce come and dined with me, and then with Lord Brouncker (carrying his
little kinswoman on my knee, his coach being full), to the Temple, where
my Lord and I 'light and to Mr. Porter's chamber, where Cocke and his
counsel, and so to the attorney's, whither the Sollicitor-Generall come,
and there, their cause about their assignments on the L1,250,000 Act was
argued, where all that was to be said for them was said, and so answered
by the Sollicitor-Generall beyond what I expected, that I said not one
word all my time, rather choosing to hold my tongue, and so mind my
reputation with the Sollicitor-Generall, who did mightily approve of my
speech in Parliament, than say anything against him to no purpose.  This I
believe did trouble Cocke and these gentlemen, but I do think this best
for me, and so I do think that the business will go against them, though
it is against my judgment, and I am sure against all justice to the men to
be invited to part with their goods and be deceived afterward of their
security for payment.  Thence with Lord Brouncker to the Royall Society,
where they were just done; but there I was forced to subscribe to the
building of a College, and did give L40; and several others did subscribe,
some greater and some less sums; but several I saw hang off: and I doubt
it will spoil the Society, for it breeds faction and ill-will, and becomes
burdensome to some that cannot, or would not, do it.  Here, to my great
content, I did try the use of the Otacousticon,--[Ear trumpet.]--which was
only a great glass bottle broke at the bottom, putting the neck to my
eare, and there I did plainly hear the dashing of the oares of the boats
in the Thames to Arundell gallery window, which, without it, I could not
in the least do, and may, I believe, be improved to a great height, which
I am mighty glad of.  Thence with Lord Brouncker and several of them to
the King's Head Taverne by Chancery Lane, and there did drink and eat and
talk, and, above the rest, I did hear of Mr. Hooke and my Lord an account
of the reason of concords and discords in musique, which they say is from
the equality of vibrations; but I am not satisfied in it, but will at my
leisure think of it more, and see how far that do go to explain it.  So
late at night home with Mr. Colwell, and parted, and I to the office, and
then to Sir W. Pen to confer with him, and Sir R. Ford and Young, about
our St. John Baptist prize, and so home, without more supper to bed, my
family being now little by the departure of my wife and two maids.

3rd.  Up, and Captain Perryman come to me to tell me how Tatnell told him
that this day one How is to charge me before the Commissioners of Prizes
to the value of L8000 in prizes, which I was troubled to hear, so fearful
I am, though I know that there is not a penny to be laid to my charge that
I dare not own, or that I have not owned under my hand, but upon
recollection it signifies nothing to me, and so I value it not, being sure
that I can have nothing in the world to my hurt known from the business.
So to the office, where all the morning to despatch business, and so home
to dinner with my clerks, whose company is of great pleasure to me for
their good discourse in any thing of the navy I have a mind to talk of.
After dinner by water from the Tower to White Hall, there to attend the
Duke of York as usual, and particularly in a fresh complaint the
Commissioners of the Treasury do make to him, and by and by to the Council
this day of our having prepared certificates on the Exchequer to the
further sum of near L50,000, and soon as we had done with the Duke of York
we did attend the Council; and were there called in, and did hear Mr.
Sollicitor [General] make his Report to the Council in the business; which
he did in a most excellent manner of words, but most cruelly severe
against us, and so were some of the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury,
as men guilty of a practice with the tradesmen, to the King's prejudice. I
was unwilling to enter into a contest with them; but took advantage of two
or three words last spoke, and brought it to a short issue in good words,
that if we had the King's order to hold our hands, we would, which did end
the matter: and they all resolved we should have it, and so it ended: and
so we away; I vexed that I did not speak more in a cause so fit to be
spoke in, and wherein we had so much advantage; but perhaps I might have
provoked the Sollicitor and the Commissioners of the Treasury, and
therefore, since, I am not sorry that I forbore.  Thence my Lord Brouncker
and I to the Duke of York's playhouse, and there saw the latter part of
"The Master and the Man," and thence by coach to Duck Lane, to look out
for Marsanne, in French, a man that has wrote well of musique, but it is
not to be had, but I have given order for its being sent for over, and I
did here buy Des Cartes his little treatise of musique, and so home, and
there to read a little, and eat a little, though I find that my having so
little taste do make me so far neglect eating that, unless company invite,
I do not love to spend time upon eating, and so bring emptiness and the
Cholique.  So to bed.  This day I hear that Prince Rupert and Holmes do go
to sea: and by this there is a seeming friendship and peace among our
great seamen; but the devil a bit is there any love among them, or can be.

4th.  Up betimes, and by coach towards White Hall, and took Aldgate Street
in my way, and there called upon one Hayward, that makes virginalls, and
did there like of a little espinette, and will have him finish it for me;
for I had a mind to a small harpsichon, but this takes up less room, and
will do my business as to finding out of chords, and I am very well
pleased that I have found it.  Thence to White Hall, and after long
waiting did get a small running Committee of Tangier, where I staid but
little, and little done but the correcting two or three egregious faults
in the Charter for Tangier after it had so long lain before the Council
and been passed there and drawn up by the Atturney Generall, so slightly
are all things in this age done.  Thence home to the office by water,
where we sat till noon, and then I moved we might go to the Duke of York
and the King presently to get out their order in writing that was ordered
us yesterday about the business of certificates, that we might be secure
against the tradesmen who (Sir John Banks by name) have told me this day
that they will complain in Parliament against us for denying to do them
right.  So we rose of a sudden, being mighty sensible of this
inconvenience we are liable to should we delay to give them longer, and
yet have no order for our indemnity.  I did dine with Sir W. Pen, where my
Lady Batten did come with desire of meeting me there, and speaking with me
about the business of the L500 we demand of her for the Chest.  She do
protest, before God, she never did see the account, but that it was as her
husband in his life-time made it, and he did often declare to her his
expecting L500, and that we could not deny it him for his pains in that
business, and that he hath left her worth nothing of his own in the world,
and that therefore she could pay nothing of it, come what will come, but
that he hath left her a beggar, which I am sorry truly for, though it is a
just judgment upon people that do live so much beyond themselves in
housekeeping and vanity, as they did.  I did give her little answer, but
generally words that might not trouble her, and so to dinner, and after
dinner Sir W. Pen and I away by water to White Hall, and there did attend
the Duke of York, and he did carry us to the King's lodgings: but he was
asleep in his closet; so we stayed in the Green-Roome, where the Duke of
York did tell us what rules he had, of knowing the weather, and did now
tell us we should have rain before to-morrow, it having been a dry season
for some time, and so it did rain all night almost; and pretty rules he
hath, and told Brouncker and me some of them, which were such as no reason
seems ready to be given.  By and by the King comes out, and he did easily
agree to what we moved, and would have the Commissioners of the Navy to
meet us with him to-morrow morning: and then to talk of other things;
about the Quakers not swearing, and how they do swear in the business of a
late election of a Knight of the Shire of Hartfordshire in behalf of one
they have a mind to have; and how my Lord of Pembroke says he hath heard
him (the Quaker) at the tennis-court swear to himself when he loses: and
told us what pretty notions my Lord Pembroke hath of the first chapter of
Genesis, how Adam's sin was not the sucking (which he did before) but the
swallowing of the apple, by which the contrary elements begun to work in
him, and to stir up these passions, and a great deal of such fooleries,
which the King made mighty mockery at.  Thence my Lord Brouncker and I
into the Park in his coach, and there took a great deal of ayre, saving
that it was mighty dusty, and so a little unpleasant.  Thence to Common
Garden with my Lord, and there I took a hackney and home, and after having
done a few letters at the office, I home to a little supper and so to bed,
my eyes being every day more and more weak and apt to be tired.

5th (Lord's day).  Up, and to my chamber, and there to the writing fair
some of my late musique notions, and so to church, where I have not been a
good while, and thence home, and dined at home, with W. Hewer with me; and
after dinner, he and I a great deal of good talk touching this Office, how
it is spoiled by having so many persons in it, and so much work that is
not made the work of any one man, but of all, and so is never done; and
that the best way to have it well done, were to have the whole trust in
one, as myself, to set whom I pleased to work in the several businesses of
the Office, and me to be accountable for the whole, and that would do it,
as I would find instruments: but this is not to be compassed; but
something I am resolved to do about Sir J. Minnes before it be long.  Then
to my chamber again, to my musique, and so to church; and then home, and
thither comes Captain Silas Taylor to me, the Storekeeper of Harwich,
where much talk, and most of it against Captain Deane, whom I do believe
to be a high, proud fellow; but he is an active man, and able in his way,
and so I love him.  He gone, I to my musique again, and to read a little,
and to sing with Mr. Pelling, who come to see me, and so spent the
evening, and then to supper and to bed.  I hear that eight of the
ringleaders in the late tumults of the 'prentices at Easter are condemned
to die.

     [Four were executed on May 9th, namely, Thomas Limmerick, Edward
     Cotton, Peter Massenger, and Richard Beasley.  They were drawn,
     hanged, and quartered at Tyburn, and two of their heads fixed upon
     London Bridge ("The London Gazette," No. 259).  See "The Tryals of
     such persons as under the notion of London Apprentices were
     tumultuously assembled in Moore Fields, under colour of pulling down
     bawdy-houses," 4to., London, 1668.  "It is to be observed," says
     "The London Gazette,"  "to the just vindication of the City, that
     none of the persons apprehended upon the said tumult were found to
     be apprentices, as was given out, but some idle persons, many of
     them nursed in the late Rebellion, too readily embracing any
     opportunity of making their own advantages to the disturbance of the
     peace, and injury of others."]

6th.  Betimes I to Alderman Backewell, and with him to my Lord Ashly's,
where did a little business about Tangier, and to talk about the business
of certificates, wherein, contrary to what could be believed, the King and
Duke of York themselves, in my absence, did call for some of the
Commissioners of the Treasury, and give them directions about the business
[of the certificates], which I, despairing to do any thing on a Sunday,
and not thinking that they would think of it themselves, did rest
satisfied, and stayed at home all yesterday, leaving it to do something in
this day; but I find that the King and Duke of York had been so pressing
in it, that my Lord Ashly was more forward with the doing of it this day,
than I could have been.  And so I to White Hall with Alderman Backewell in
his coach, with Mr. Blany; my Lord's Secretary: and there did draw up a
rough draught of what order I would have, and did carry it in, and had it
read twice and approved of, before my Lord Ashly and three more of the
Commissioners of the Treasury, and then went up to the Council-chamber,
where the Duke of York, and Prince Rupert, and the rest of the Committee
of the Navy were sitting: and I did get some of them to read it there: and
they would have had it passed presently, but Sir John Nicholas desired
they would first have it approved by a full Council: and, therefore, a
Council Extraordinary was readily summoned against the afternoon, and the
Duke of York run presently to the King, as if now they were really set to
mind their business, which God grant!  So I thence to Westminster, and
walked in the Hall and up and down, the House being called over to-day,
and little news, but some talk as if the agreement between France and
Spain were like to be, which would be bad for us, and at noon with Sir
Herbert Price to Mr. George Montagu's to dinner, being invited by him in
the hall, and there mightily made of, even to great trouble to me to be so
commended before my face, with that flattery and importunity, that I was
quite troubled with it.  Yet he is a fine gentleman, truly, and his lady a
fine woman; and, among many sons that I saw there, there was a little
daughter that is mighty pretty, of which he is infinite fond: and, after
dinner, did make her play on the gittar and sing, which she did mighty
prettily, and seems to have a mighty musical soul, keeping time with most
excellent spirit.  Here I met with Mr. Brownlow, my old schoolfellow, who
come thither, I suppose, as a suitor to one of the young ladies that were
there, and a sober man he seems to be.  But here Mr. Montagu did tell me
how Mr. Vaughan, in that very room, did say that I was a great man, and
had great understanding, and I know not what, which, I confess, I was a
little proud of, if I may believe him.  Here I do hear, as a great secret,
that the King, and Duke of York and Duchesse, and my Lady Castlemayne, are
now all agreed in a strict league, and all things like to go very current,
and that it is not impossible to have my Lord Clarendon, in time, here
again.  But I do hear that my Lady Castlemayne is horribly vexed at the
late libell,

     ["The Poor Whores' Petition to the most splendid, illustrious,
     serene and eminent Lady of Pleasure the Countess of Castlemayne,
     &c., signed by us, Madam Cresswell and Damaris Page, this present
     25th day of March, 1668."  This sham petition occasioned a pretended
     answer, entitled, "The Gracious Answer of the Most Illustrious Lady
     of Pleasure, the Countess of Castlem .  .  .  .  to the Poor Whores'
     Petition."  It is signed, "Given at our Closset, in King Street,
     Westminster, die Veneris, April 24, 1668.  Castlem .  .  .  ."
     Compare Evelyn, April 2nd, 1668.]

the petition of the poor whores about the town, whose houses were pulled
down the other day.  I have got one of them, but it is not very witty, but
devilish severe against her and the King and I wonder how it durst be
printed and spread abroad, which shews that the times are loose, and come
to a great disregard of the King, or Court, or Government.  Thence I to
White Hall to attend the Council, and when the Council rose we find my
order mightily enlarged by the Sollicitor Generall, who was called
thither, making it more safe for him and the Council, but their order is
the same in the command of it that I drew, and will I think defend us
well.  So thence, meeting Creed, he and I to the new Cocke-pitt by the
King's gate, and there saw the manner of it, and the mixed rabble of
people that come thither; and saw two battles of cocks, wherein is no
great sport, but only to consider how these creatures, without any
provocation, do fight and kill one another, and aim only at one another's
heads, and by their good will not leave till one of them be killed; and
thence to the Park in a hackney coach, so would not go into the tour, but
round about the Park, and to the House, and there at the door eat and
drank; whither come my Lady Kerneagy, of whom Creed tells me more
particulars; how her Lord, finding her and the Duke of York at the King's
first coming in too kind, did get it out of her that he did dishonour him,
and so bid her continue .  .  .  , which is the most pernicious and full
piece of revenge that ever I heard of; and he at this day owns it with
great glory, and looks upon the Duke of York and the world with great
content in the ampleness of his revenge.  Thence (where the place was now
by the last night's rain very pleasant, and no dust) to White Hall, and
set Creed down, and I home and to my chamber, and there about my musique
notions again, wherein I take delight and find great satisfaction in them,
and so, after a little supper, to bed.  This day, in the afternoon,
stepping with the Duke of York into St. James's Park, it rained: and I was
forced to lend the Duke of York my cloak, which he wore through the Park.

7th.  Up, and at the office all the morning, where great hurry to be made
in the fitting forth of this present little fleet, but so many rubs by
reason of want of money, and people's not believing us in cases where we
had money unless (which in several cases, as in hiring of vessels, cannot
be) they be paid beforehand, that every thing goes backward instead of
forward.  At noon comes Mr. Clerke, my solicitor, and the Auditor's men
with my account drawn up in the Exchequer way with their queries, which
are neither many nor great, or hard to answer upon it, and so dined with
me, and then I by coach to the King's playhouse, and there saw "The
English Monsieur;"' sitting for privacy sake in an upper box: the play
hath much mirth in it as to that particular humour.  After the play done,
I down to Knipp, and did stay her undressing herself; and there saw the
several players, men and women go by; and pretty to see how strange they
are all, one to another, after the play is done.  Here I saw a wonderful
pretty maid of her own, that come to undress her, and one so pretty that
she says she intends not to keep her, for fear of her being undone in her
service, by coming to the playhouse.  Here I hear Sir W. Davenant is just
now dead; and so who will succeed him in the mastership of the house is
not yet known.  The eldest Davenport is, it seems, gone from this house to
be kept by somebody; which I am glad of, she being a very bad actor. I
took her then up into a coach and away to the Park, which is now very fine
after some rain, but the company was going away most, and so I took her to
the Lodge, and there treated her and had a deal of good talk, and now and
then did baiser la, and that was all, and that as much or more than I had
much mind to because of her paint.  She tells me mighty news, that my Lady
Castlemayne is mightily in love with Hart of their house: and he is much
with her in private, and she goes to him, and do give him many presents;
and that the thing is most certain, and Becke Marshall only privy to it,
and the means of bringing them together, which is a very odd thing; and by
this means she is even with the King's love to Mrs. Davis.  This done, I
carried her and set her down at Mrs. Manuel's, but stayed not there
myself, nor went in; but straight home, and there to my letters, and so
home to bed.

8th.  Up, and at my office all the morning, doing business, and then at
noon home to dinner all alone.  Then to White Hall with Sir J. Minnes in
his coach to attend the Duke of York upon our usual business, which was
this day but little, and thence with Lord Brouncker to the Duke of York's
playhouse, where we saw "The Unfortunate Lovers," no extraordinary play,
methinks, and thence I to Drumbleby's, and there did talk a great deal
about pipes; and did buy a recorder, which I do intend to learn to play
on, the sound of it being, of all sounds in the world, most pleasing to
me.  Thence home, and to visit Mrs. Turner, where among other talk, Mr.
Foly and her husband being there, she did tell me of young Captain
Holmes's marrying of Pegg Lowther last Saturday by stealth, which I was
sorry for, he being an idle rascal, and proud, and worth little, I doubt;
and she a mighty pretty, well-disposed lady, and good fortune.  Her mother
and friends take on mightily; but the sport is, Sir Robert Holmes do seem
to be mad too with his brother, and will disinherit him, saying that he
hath ruined himself, marrying below himself, and to his disadvantage;
whereas, I said, in this company, that I had married a sister lately, with
little above half that portion, that he should have kissed her breech
before he should have had her, which, if R. Holmes should hear, would make
a great quarrel; but it is true I am heartily sorry for the poor girl that
is undone by it.  So home to my chamber, to be fingering of my Recorder,
and getting of the scale of musique without book, which I at last see is
necessary for a man that would understand musique, as it is now taught to
understand, though it be a ridiculous and troublesome way, and I know I
shall be able hereafter to show the world a simpler way; but, like the old
hypotheses in philosophy, it must be learned, though a man knows a better.
Then to supper, and to bed.  This morning Mr. Christopher Pett's widow and
daughter come to me, to desire my help to the King and Duke of York, and I
did promise, and do pity her.

9th.  Up, and to the office, where all the morning sitting, then at noon
home to dinner with my people, and so to the office again writing of my
letters, and then abroad to my bookseller's, and up and down to the Duke
of York's playhouse, there to see, which I did, Sir W. Davenant's corpse
carried out towards Westminster, there to be buried.  Here were many
coaches and six horses, and many hacknies, that made it look, methought,
as if it were the buriall of a poor poet.  He seemed to have many
children, by five or six in the first mourning-coach, all boys.  And there
I left them coming forth, and I to the New Exchange, there to meet Mrs.
Burroughs, and did take her in a carosse and carry elle towards the Park,
kissing her .  .  .  , but did not go into any house, but come back and
set her down at White Hall, and did give her wrapt in paper for my
Valentine's gift for the last year before this, which I never did yet give
her anything for, twelve half-crowns, and so back home and there to my
office, where come a packet from the Downes from my brother Balty, who,
with Harman, is arrived there, of which this day come the first news.  And
now the Parliament will be satisfied, I suppose, about the business they
have so long desired between Brouncker and Harman about not prosecuting
the first victory.  Balty is very well, and I hope hath performed his work
well, that I may get him into future employment.  I wrote to him this
night, and so home, and there to the perfecting my getting the scale of
musique without book, which I have done to perfection backward and
forward, and so to supper and to bed.

10th (Friday) All the morning at Office.  At noon with W. Pen to Duke of
York, and attended Council.  So to piper and Duck Lane, and there kissed
bookseller's wife, and bought Legend.  So home, coach.  Sailor.  Mrs.
Hannam dead.  News of Peace.  Conning my gamut.

     [The entries from April 10th to April 19th are transcribed from
     three leaves (six pages) of rough notes, which are inserted in the
     MS. The rough notes were made to serve for a sort of account book,
     but the amounts paid are often not registered in the fair copy when
     he came to transcribe his notes into the Diary.]

12th (Sunday).  Dined at Brouncker's, and saw the new book.  Peace.
Cutting away sails.

13th (Monday).  Spent at Michel's 6d.; in the Folly, 1s.;

     [The Folly was a floating house of entertainment on the Thames,
     which at this time was a fashionable resort.]

oysters, 1s.; coach to W. Coventry about Mrs. Pett, 1s.; thence to
Commissioners of Treasury, and so to Westminster Hall by water, 6d.  With
G. Montagu and Roger Pepys, and spoke with Birch and Vaughan, all in
trouble about the prize business.  So to Lord Crew's (calling for a low
pipe by the way), where Creed and G. M. and G. C. come, 1s.  So with Creed
to a play.  Little laugh, 4s.  Thence towards the Park by coach, 2s. 6d.
Come home, met with order of Commissioners of Accounts, which put together
with the rest vexed me, and so home to supper and to bed.

14th (Tuesday).  Up betimes by water to the Temple.  In the way read the
Narrative about prizes; and so to Lord Crew's bedside, and then to
Westminster, where I hear Pen is, and sent for by messenger last night.
Thence to Commissioners of Accounts and there examined, and so back to
Westminster Hall, where all the talk of committing all to the Tower, and
Creed and I to the Quaker's, dined together.  Thence to the House, where
rose about four o'clock; and, with much ado, Pen got to Thursday to bring
in his answer; so my Lord escapes to-day.  Thence with Godage and G.
Montagu to G. Carteret's, and there sat their dinner-time: and hear
myself, by many Parliament-men, mightily commended.  Thence to a play,
"Love's Cruelty," and so to my Lord Crew's, who glad of this day's time
got, and so home, and there office, and then home to supper and to bed, my
eyes being the better upon leaving drinking at night.  Water, 1s. Porter,
6d.  Water, 6d.  Dinner, 3s. 6d.  Play part, 2s.  Oranges, 1s. Home coach,
1s. 6d.

15th.  After playing a little upon my new little flageolet, that is so
soft that pleases me mightily, betimes to my office, where most of the
morning.  Then by coach, 1s., and meeting Lord Brouncker, 'light at the
Exchange, and thence by water to White Hall, 1s., and there to the Chapel,
expecting wind musick and to the Harp-and-Ball, and drank all alone, 2d.
Back, and to the fiddling concert, and heard a practice mighty good of
Grebus, and thence to Westminster Hall, where all cry out that the House
will be severe with Pen; but do hope well concerning the buyers, that we
shall have no difficulty, which God grant!  Here met Creed, and, about
noon, he and I, and Sir P. Neale to the Quaker's, and there dined with a
silly Executor of Bishop Juxon's, and cozen Roger Pepys.  Business of
money goes on slowly in the House.  Thence to White Hall by water, and
there with the Duke of York a little, but stayed not, but saw him and his
lady at his little pretty chapel, where I never was before: but silly
devotion, God knows!  Thence I left Creed, and to the King's playhouse,
into a corner of the 18d. box, and there saw "The Maid's Tragedy," a good
play.  Coach, 1s.: play and oranges, 2s. 6d. Creed come, dropping
presently here, but he did not see me, and come to the same place, nor
would I be seen by him.  Thence to my Lord Crew's, and there he come also
after, and there with Sir T. Crew bemoaning my Lord's folly in leaving his
old interest, by which he hath now lost all. An ill discourse in the
morning of my Lord's being killed, but this evening Godolphin tells us
here that my Lord is well.  Thence with Creed to the Cock ale-house, and
there spent 6d., and so by coach home, 2s. 6d., and so to bed.

16th.  Th[ursday].  Greeting's book, is.  Begun this day to learn the
Recorder.  To the office, where all the morning.  Dined with my clerks:
and merry at Sir W. Pen's crying yesterday, as they say, to the King, that
he was his martyr.  So to White Hall by coach to Commissioners of [the]
Treasury about certificates, but they met not, 2s.  To Westminster by
water.  To Westminster Hall, where I hear W. Pen is ordered to be
impeached, 6d.  There spoke with many, and particularly with G. Montagu:
and went with him and Creed to his house, where he told how W. Pen hath
been severe to Lord Sandwich; but the Coventrys both labouring to save
him, by laying it on Lord Sandwich, which our friends cry out upon, and I
am silent, but do believe they did it as the only way to save him.  It
could not be carried to commit him.  It is thought the House do coole: W.
Coventry's being for him, provoked Sir R. Howard and his party; Court, all
for W. Pen.  Thence to White Hall, but no meeting of the Commissioners,
and there met Mr. Hunt, and thence to Mrs. Martin's, and, there did what I
would, she troubled for want of employ for her husband, spent on her 1s.
Thence to the Hall to walk awhile and ribbon, spent is. So [to] Lord
Crew's, and there with G. Carteret and my Lord to talk, and they look upon
our matters much the better, and by this and that time is got, 1s.  So to
the Temple late, and by water, by moonshine, home, 1s. Cooks, 6d.  Wrote
my letters to my Lady Sandwich, and so home, where displeased to have my
maid bring her brother, a countryman, to lye there, and so to bed.

17th (Friday).  Called up by Balty's coming, who gives me a good account
of his voyage, and pleases me well, and I hope hath got something.  This
morning paid the Royall Society L1 6s., and so to the office all the
morning.  At noon home to dinner with my people, and there much pretty
discourse of Balty's.  So by coach to White Hall: the coachman on Ludgate
Hill 'lighted, and beat a fellow with a sword, 2s. 6d.  Did little
business with the Duke of York.  Hear that the House is upon the business
of Harman, who, they say, takes all on himself.  Thence, with Brouncker,
to the King's house, and saw "The Surprizall," where base singing, only
Knepp,' who come, after her song in the clouds, to me in the pit, and
there, oranges, 2s.  After the play, she, and I, and Rolt, by coach, 6s.
6d., to Kensington, and there to the Grotto, and had admirable pleasure
with their singing, and fine ladies listening to us: with infinite
pleasure, I enjoyed myself: so to the tavern there, and did spend 16s.
6d., and the gardener 2s.  Mighty merry, and sang all the way to the town,
a most pleasant evening, moonshine, and set them at her house in Covent
Garden, and I home and to bed.

18th (Saturday).  Up, and my bookseller brought home books, bound--the
binding comes to 17s.  Advanced to my maid Bridget L1.  Sir W. Pen at the
Office, seemingly merry.  Do hear this morning that Harman is committed by
the Parliament last night, the day he come up, which is hard; but he took
all upon himself first, and then when a witness come in to say otherwise,
he would have retracted; and the House took it so ill, they would commit
him.  Thence home to dinner with my clerks, and so to White Hall by water,
1s., and there a short Committee for Tangier, and so I to the King's
playhouse, 1s., and to the play of the "Duke of Lerma," 2s. 6d., and
oranges, 1s.  Thence by coach to Westminster, 1s., and the House just up,
having been about money business, 1s.  So home by coach, 3s., calling in
Duck Lane, and did get Des Cartes' Musique in English,' and so home and
wrote my letters, and then to my chamber to save my eyes, and to bed.

19th (Sunday).  Lay long.  Roger Pepys and his son come, and to Church
with me, where W. Pen was, and did endeavour to shew himself to the
Church.  Then home to dinner, and Roger Pepys did tell me the whole story
of Harman, how he prevaricated, and hath undoubtedly been imposed on, and
wheedled; and he is called the miller's man that, in Richard the Third's
time, was hanged for his master.

     [The story alluded to by Pepys, which belongs not to the reign of
     Richard III., but to that of Edward VI., occurred during a seditious
     outbreak at Bodmin, in Cornwall, and is thus related by Holinshed:
     "At the same time, and neare the same place [Bodmin], dwelled a
     miller, that had beene a greate dooer in that rebellion, for whom
     also Sir Anthonie Kingston sought: but the miller being thereof
     warned, called a good tall fellow that he had to his servant, and
     said unto him, 'I have business to go from home; if anie therefore
     come to ask for me, saie thou art the owner of the mill, and the man
     for whom they shall so aske, and that thou hast kept this mill for
     the space of three yeares; but in no wise name me.'  The servant
     promised his maister so to doo.  And shortlie after, came Sir
     Anthonie Kingston to the miller's house, and calling for the miller,
     the servant came forth, and answered that he was the miller.  'How
     long,' quoth Sir Anthonie, 'hast thou kept this mill?' He answered,
     'Three years.'--'Well, then,' said he, 'come on: thou must go with
     me;' and caused his men to laie hands on him, and to bring him to
     the next tree, saieing to him, 'Thou hast been a busie knave, and
     therefore here shalt thou hang.'  Then cried the fellow out, and
     saide that he was not the miller, but the miller's man.  'Well,
     then,' said Sir Anthonie, 'thou art a false knave to be in two
     tales: therefore,' said he, 'hang him up;' and so incontinentlie
     hanged he was indeed.  After he was dead, one that was present told
     Sir Anthonie, 'Surelie, sir, this was but the miller's man.'--'What
     then!' said he, 'could he ever have done his maister better service
     than to hang for him?'"--B.]

So after dinner I took them by water to White Hall, taking in a very
pretty woman at Paul's Wharf, and there landed we, and I left Roger Pepys
and to St. Margaret's Church, and there saw Betty, and so to walk in the
Abbey with Sir John Talbot, who would fain have pumped me about the
prizes, but I would not let him, and so to walk towards Michell's to see
her, but could not, and so to Martin's, and her husband was at home, and
so took coach and to the Park, and thence home and to bed betimes.  Water
1s., coach 5s.  Balty borrowed L2.

20th.  Up betimes and to the getting ready my answer to the Committee of
Accounts to several questions, which makes me trouble, though I know of no
blame due to me from any, let them enquire what they can out.

     [The first part of the entry for April 20th is among the rough
     notes, and stands as follows:  "Monday 20.  Up and busy about answer
     to Committee of Accounts this morning about several questions which
     vexed me though in none I have reason to be troubled.  But the
     business of The Flying Greyhound begins to find me some care, though
     in that I am wholly void of blame."  This may be compared with the
     text.]

I to White Hall, and there hear how Henry Brouncker is fled, which, I
think, will undo him: but what good it will do Harman I know not, he hath
so befooled himself; but it will be good sport to my Lord Chancellor to
hear how his great enemy is fain to take the same course that he is. There
met Robinson, who tells me that he fears his master, W. Coventry, will
this week have his business brought upon the stage again, about selling of
places, which I shall be sorry for, though the less, since I hear his
standing for Pen the other day, to the prejudice, though not to the wrong,
of my Lord Sandwich; and yet I do think what he did, he did out of a
principle of honesty.  Thence to Committee of Accounts, and delivered my
paper, and had little discourse, and was unwilling to stay long with them
to enter into much, but away and glad to be from them, though very civil
to me, but cunning and close I see they are.  So to Westminster Hall, and
there find the Parliament upon the Irish business, where going into the
Speaker's chamber I did hear how plainly one lawyer of counsel for the
complainants did inveigh by name against all the late Commissioners there.
Thence with Creed, thinking, but failed, of dining with Lord Crew, and so
he and I to Hercules Pillars, and there dined, and thence home by coach,
and so with Jack Fenn to the Chamberlain of London to look after the state
of some Navy assignments that are in his hands, and thence away, and
meeting Sir William Hooker, the Alderman, he did cry out mighty high
against Sir W. Pen for his getting such an estate, and giving L15,000 with
his daughter, which is more, by half, than ever he did give; but this the
world believes, and so let them.  Thence took coach and I all alone to
Hyde Park (passing through Duck Lane among the booksellers, only to get a
sight of the pretty little woman I did salute the other night, and did in
passing), and so all the evening in the Park, being a little unwilling to
be seen there, and at night home, and thereto W. Pen's and sat and talked
there with his wife and children a good while, he being busy in his
closet, I believe preparing his defence in Parliament, and so home to bed.

21st.  Up, and at the office all the morning, at noon dined at home, and
thence took Mrs. Turner out and carried her to the King's house, and saw
"The Indian Emperour;" and after that done, took Knepp out, and to
Kensington; and there walked in the garden, and then supped, and mighty
merry, there being also in the house Sir Philip Howard, and some company,
and had a dear reckoning, but merry, and away, it being quite night, home,
and dark, about 9 o'clock or more, and in my coming had the opportunity
the first time in my life to be bold with Knepp .  .  .  , and so left her
at home, and so Mrs. Turner and I home to my letters and to bed.  Here
hear how Sir W. Pen's impeachment was read, and agreed to, in the House
this day, and ordered to be engrossed; and he suspended the House--[From
sitting as a member pending the impeachment.-B.]--Harman set at liberty;
and Brouncker put out of the House, and a writ for a new election, and an
impeachment ordered to be brought in against him, he being fled!

     [Sir Charles Berkeley, jun. was chosen in his room.  In the sea-
     fight off Southwold Bay on June 3rd, 1665, the English triumphed
     over the Dutch, but the very considerable victory was not followed
     up.  During the night, while the Duke of York slept, Henry
     Brouncker, his groom of the bedchamber, ordered the lieutenant to
     shorten sail, by which means the progress of the whole fleet was
     retarded, the Duke of York's being the leading ship.  The duke
     affirmed that he first heard of Brouncker's unjustifiable action in
     July, and yet he kept the culprit in his service for nearly two
     years after the offence had come to his knowledge.  After Brouncker
     had been dismissed from the duke's service, the House of Commons
     ejected him.  The whole matter is one of the unsolved difficulties
     of history.  See Lister's "Life of Clarendon," ii., 334 335]

22nd.  Up, and all the morning at my office busy.  At noon, it being
washing day, I toward White Hall, and stopped and dined all alone at
Hercules Pillars, where I was mighty pleased to overhear a woman talk to
her counsel how she had troubled her neighbours with law, and did it very
roguishly and wittily.  Thence to White Hall, and there we attended the
Duke of York as usual; and I did present Mrs. Pett, the widow, and her
petition to the Duke of York, for some relief from the King.  Here was
to-day a proposition made to the Duke of York by Captain Von Hemskirke for
L20,000, to discover an art how to make a ship go two foot for one what
any ship do now, which the King inclines to try, it costing him nothing to
try; and it is referred to us to contract with the man. Thence to attend
the Council about the business of certificates to the Exchequer, where the
Commissioners of the Treasury of different minds, some would, and my Lord
Ashly would not have any more made out, and carried it there should not.
After done here, and the Council up, I by water from the Privy-stairs to
Westminster Hall; and, taking water, the King and the Duke of York were in
the new buildings; and the Duke of York called to me whither I was going?
and I answered aloud, "To wait on our maisters at Westminster;" at which
he and all the company laughed; but I was sorry and troubled for it
afterwards, for fear any Parliament-man should have been there; and will
be a caution to me for the time to come. Met with Roger Pepys, who tells
me they have been on the business of money, but not ended yet, but will
take up more time.  So to the fishmonger's, and bought a couple of
lobsters, and over to the 'sparagus garden, thinking to have met Mr.
Pierce, and his wife and Knepp; but met their servant coming to bring me
to Chatelin's, the French house, in Covent Garden, and there with musick
and good company, Manuel and his wife, and one Swaddle, a clerk of Lord
Arlington's, who dances, and speaks French well, but got drunk, and was
then troublesome, and here mighty merry till ten at night, and then I
away, and got a coach, and so home, where I find Balty and his wife come
to town, and did sup with them, and so they to bed.  This night the Duke
of Monmouth and a great many blades were at Chatelin's, and I left them
there, with a hackney-coach attending him.

23rd.  Up, and to the office, where all the morning, and at noon comes
Knepp and Mrs. Pierce, and her daughter, and one Mrs. Foster, and dined
with me, and mighty merry, and after dinner carried them to the Tower, and
shewed them all to be seen there, and, among other things, the Crown and
Scepters and rich plate, which I myself never saw before, and indeed is
noble, and I mightily pleased with it.  Thence by water to the Temple, and
thereto the Cocke alehouse, and drank, and eat a lobster, and sang, and
mighty merry.  So, almost night, I carried Mrs. Pierce home, and then
Knepp and I to the Temple again, and took boat, it being darkish, and to
Fox Hall, it being now night, and a bonfire burning at Lambeth for the
King's coronation-day.  And there she and I drank; .  .  .  .  and so
back, and led her home, it being now ten at night; and so got a link; and,
walking towards home, just at my entrance into the ruines at St.
Dunstan's, I was met by two rogues with clubs, who come towards us. So I
went back, and walked home quite round by the wall, and got well home, and
to bed weary, but pleased at my day's pleasure, but yet displeased at my
expence, and time I lose.

24th.  Up betimes, and by water to White Hall, to the Duke of York, and
there hear that this day Hopis and Temple purpose to bring in the petition
against Sir W. Coventry, which I am sorry for, but hope he will get out of
it.  Here I presented Mrs. Pett and her condition to Mr. Wren for his
favour, which he promised us.  Thence to Lord Brouncker and sat and talked
with him, who thinks the Parliament will, by their violence and delay in
money matters, force the King to run any hazard, and dissolve them.
Thence to Ducke Lane, and there did overlook a great many of Monsieur
Fouquet's library, that a bookseller hath bought, and I did buy one
Spanish [work], "Los Illustres Varones."

     [Nicholas Fouquet, "Surintendant des Finances" in France, had built
     at Vaux a house which surpassed in magnificence any palace belonging
     to Louis XIV., prior to the erection of Versailles, and caused much
     envy to all the Court, especially to Colbert.  Fouquet died at
     Pignerol in 1680, after nineteen years' incarceration; and whilst
     Pepys was buying his books in London, Colbert had become prime
     minister in France, and Colbert's brother ambassador in England.
     The 'viper' had caught the 'squirrel'!--B.]

Here did I endeavour to see my pretty woman that I did baiser in las
tenebras a little while depuis.  And did find her sofa in the book[shop],
but had not la confidence para alter a elle.  So lost my pains.  But will
another time, and so home and to my office, and then to dinner.  After
dinner down to the Old Swan, and by the way called at Michell's, and there
did see Betty, and that was all, for either she is shy or foolish, and su
mardi hath no mind para laiser me see su moher.  To White Hall by water,
and there did our business with the Duke of York, which was very little,
only here I do hear the Duke of York tell how Sir W. Pen's impeachment was
brought into the House of Lords to-day; and spoke with great kindness of
him: and that the Lords would not commit him till they could find
precedent for it, and did incline to favour him.  Thence to the King's
playhouse, and there saw a piece of "Beggar's Bush," which I have not seen
some years, and thence home, and there to Sir W. Pen's and supped and sat
talking there late, having no where else to go, and my eyes too bad to
read right, and so home to bed.

25th.  Up, and with Sir J. Minnes to my Lord Brouncker, and with him all
of us to my Lord Ashly to satisfy him about the reason of what we do or
have done in the business of the tradesmen's certificates, which he seems
satisfied with, but is not, but I believe we have done what we can
justify, and he hath done what he cannot in stopping us to grant them, and
I believe it will come into Parliament and make trouble.  So home and
there at the office all the morning.  At noon home to dinner, and thence
after dinner to the Duke of York's playhouse, and there saw "Sir Martin
Marr-all," which, the more I see, the more I like, and thence to
Westminster Hall, and there met with Roger Pepys; and he tells me that
nothing hath lately passed about my Lord Sandwich, but only Sir Robert
Carr did speak hardly of him.  But it is hoped that nothing will be done
more, this meeting of Parliament, which the King did, by a message
yesterday, declare again, should rise the 4th of May, and then only
adjourne for three months: and this message being only adjournment, did
please them mightily, for they are desirous of their power mightily.
Thence homeward by the Coffee House in Covent Garden, thinking to have met
Harris here but could not, and so home, and there, after my letters, I
home to have my hair cut by my sister Michell and her husband, and so to
bed.  This day I did first put off my waste-coate, the weather being very
hot, but yet lay in it at night, and shall, for a little time.

26th (Lord's day).  Lay long, and then up and to Church, and so home,
where there come and dined with me Harris, Rolt, and Bannister, and one
Bland, that sings well also, and very merry at dinner, and, after dinner,
to sing all the afternoon.  But when all was done, I did begin to think
that the pleasure of these people was not worth so often charge and cost
to me, as it hath occasioned me.  They being gone I and Balty walked as
far as Charing Cross, and there got a coach and to Hales's the painter,
thinking to have found Harris sitting there for his picture, which is
drawing for me.  But he, and all this day's company, and Hales, were got
to the Crown tavern, at next door, and thither I to them and stayed a
minute, leaving Captain Grant telling pretty stories of people that have
killed themselves, or been accessory to it, in revenge to other people,
and to mischief other people, and thence with Hales to his house, and
there did see his beginning of Harris's picture, which I think will be
pretty like, and he promises a very good picture.  Thence with Balty away
and got a coach and to Hide Park, and there up and down and did drink some
milk at the Lodge, and so home and to bed.

27th.  Up, and Captain Deane come to see me, and he and I toward
Westminster together, and I set him down at White Hall, while I to
Westminster Hall, and up to the Lords' House, and there saw Sir W. Pen go
into the House of Lords, where his impeachment was read to him, and he
used mighty civilly, the Duke of York being there; and two days hence, at
his desire, he is to bring in his answer, and a day then to be appointed
for his being heard with Counsel.  Thence down into the Hall, and with
Creed and Godolphin walked; and do hear that to-morrow is appointed, upon
a motion on Friday last, to discourse the business of my Lord Sandwich,
moved by Sir R. Howard, that he should be sent for, home; and I fear it
will be ordered.  Certain news come, I hear, this day, that the Spanish
Plenipotentiary in Flanders will not agree to the peace and terms we and
the Dutch have made for him and the King of France; and by this means the
face of things may be altered, and we forced to join with the French
against Spain, which will be an odd thing.  At noon with Creed to my Lord
Crew's, and there dined; and here was a very fine-skinned lady dined, the
daughter of my Lord Roberts, and also a fine lady, Mr. John Parkhurst his
wife, that was but a boy the other day.  And after dinner there comes in
my Lady Roberts herself, and with her Mr. Roberts's daughter, that was
Mrs. Boddevill, the great beauty, and a fine lady indeed, the first time I
saw her.  My Lord Crew, and Sir Thomas, and I, and Creed, all the
afternoon debating of my Lord Sandwich's business, against to-morrow, and
thence I to the King's playhouse, and there saw most of "The Cardinall," a
good play, and thence to several places to pay my debts, and then home,
and there took a coach and to Mile End to take a little ayre, and thence
home to Sir W. Pen's, where I supped, and sat all the evening; and being
lighted homeward by Mrs. Markham, I blew out the candle and kissed her,
and so home to bed.

28th.  Up betimes, and to Sir W. Coventry's by water, but lost my labour,
so through the Park to White Hall, and thence to my Lord Crew's to advise
again with him about my Lord Sandwich, and so to the office, where till
noon, and then I by coach to Westminster Hall, and there do understand
that the business of religion, and the Act against Conventicles, have so
taken them up all this morning, and do still, that my Lord Sandwich's
business is not like to come on to-day, which I am heartily glad of. This
law against Conventicles is very severe; but Creed, whom I met here, do
tell me that, it being moved that Papists' meetings might be included, the
House was divided upon it, and it was carried in the negative; which will
give great disgust to the people, I doubt.  Thence with Creed to Hercules
Pillars by the Temple again, and there dined he and I all alone, and
thence to the King's house, and there did see "Love in a Maze," wherein
very good mirth of Lacy, the clown, and Wintersell, the country-knight,
his master.  Thence to the New Exchange to pay a debt of my wife's there,
and so home, and there to the office and walk in the garden in the dark to
ease my eyes, and so home to supper and to bed.

29th.  Up, and to my office, where all the morning busy.  At noon dined at
home, and my clerks with me, and thence I to White Hall, and there do hear
how Sir W. Pen hath delivered in his answer; and the Lords have sent it
down to the Commons, but they have not yet read it, nor taken notice of
it, so as, I believe, they will by design defer it till they rise, that so
he, by lying under an impeachment, may be prevented in his going to sea,
which will vex him, and trouble the Duke of York.  Did little business
with the Duke of York, and then Lord Brouncker and I to the Duke of York's
playhouse, and there saw "Love in a Tubb;" and, after the play done, I
stepped up to Harris's dressing-room, where I never was, and there I
observe much company come to him, and the Witts, to talk, after the play
is done, and to assign meetings.  Mine was to talk about going down to see
"The Resolution," and so away, and thence to Westminster Hall, and there
met with Mr. G. Montagu, and walked and talked; who tells me that the best
fence against the Parliament's present fury is delay, and recommended it
to me, in my friends' business and my own, if I have any; and is that,
that Sir W. Coventry do take, and will secure himself; that the King will
deliver up all to the Parliament; and being petitioned the other day by
Mr. Brouncker to protect him, with teares in his eyes, the King did say he
could not, and bid him shift for himself, at least till the House is up.
Thence I away to White Hall, and there took coach home with a stranger I
let into the coach, to club with me for it, he going into London, I set
him down at the lower end of Cheapside, and I home, and to Sir W. Pen's,
and there sat, and by and by, it being now about nine o'clock at night, I
heard Mercer's voice, and my boy Tom's singing in the garden, which
pleased me mightily, I longing to see the girl, having not seen her since
my wife went; and so into the garden to her and sang, and then home to
supper, and mightily pleased with her company, in talking and singing, and
so parted, and to bed.

30th.  Up, and at the office all the morning.  At noon Sir J. Minnes and I
to the Dolphin Tavern, there to meet our neighbours, all of the Parish,
this being Procession-day, to dine.  And did; and much very good
discourse; they being, most of them, very able merchants as any in the
City: Sir Andrew Rickard, Mr. Vandeputt, Sir John Fredericke, Harrington,
and others.  They talked with Mr. Mills about the meaning of this day, and
the good uses of it; and how heretofore, and yet in several places, they
do whip a boy at each place they stop at in their procession. Thence I to
the Duke of York's playhouse, and there saw "The Tempest," which still
pleases me mightily, and thence to the New Exchange, and then home, and in
the way stopped to talk with Mr. Brisband, who gives me an account of the
rough usage Sir G. Carteret and his Counsel had the other day, before the
Commissioners of Accounts, and what I do believe we shall all of us have,
in a greater degree than any he hath had yet with them, before their three
years are out, which are not yet begun, nor God knows when they will, this
being like to be no session of Parliament, when they now rise.  So home,
and there took up Mrs. Turner and carried her to Mile End and drank, and
so back talking, and so home and to bed, I being mighty cold, this being a
mighty cold day, and I had left off my waistcoat three or four days.  This
evening, coming home in the dusk, I saw and spoke to our Nell, Pain's
daughter, and had I not been very cold I should have taken her to Tower
hill para together et toker her.  Thus ends this month; my wife in the
country, myself full of pleasure and expence; and some trouble for my
friends, my Lord Sandwich, by the Parliament, and more for my eyes, which
are daily worse and worse, that I dare not write or read almost any thing.
The Parliament going in a few days to rise; myself so long without
accounting now, for seven or eight months, I think, or more, that I know
not what condition almost I am in, as to getting or spending for all that
time, which troubles me, but I will soon do it.  The kingdom in an ill
state through poverty; a fleete going out, and no money to maintain it, or
set it out; seamen yet unpaid, and mutinous when pressed to go out again;
our Office able to do little, nobody trusting us, nor we desiring any to
trust us, and yet have not money for any thing, but only what particularly
belongs to this fleete going out, and that but lamely too.  The Parliament
several months upon an Act for L300,000, but cannot or will not agree upon
it, but do keep it back, in spite of the King's desires to hasten it, till
they can obtain what they have a mind, in revenge upon some men for the
late ill managements; and he is forced to submit to what they please,
knowing that, without it, he shall have no money, and they as well, that,
if they give the money, the King will suffer them to do little more; and
then the business of religion do disquiet every body, the Parliament being
vehement against the Nonconformists, while the King seems to be willing to
countenance them.  So we are all poor, and in pieces--God help us! while
the peace is like to go on between Spain and France; and then the French
may be apprehended able to attack us.  So God help us!

     ETEXT EDITOR'S BOOKMARKS:

     Best fence against the Parliament's present fury is delay
     But this the world believes, and so let them
     Coach to W. Coventry about Mrs. Pett, 1s.
     Ever have done his maister better service than to hang for him?
     Making their own advantages to the disturbance of the peace
     Parliament being vehement against the Nonconformists
     Rough notes were made to serve for a sort of account book
     Saw two battles of cocks, wherein is no great sport
     Whip a boy at each place they stop at in their procession
     Work that is not made the work of any one man



                THE DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS M.A. F.R.S.

            CLERK OF THE ACTS AND SECRETARY TO THE ADMIRALTY

    TRANSCRIBED FROM THE SHORTHAND MANUSCRIPT IN THE PEPYSIAN LIBRARY
 MAGDALENE COLLEGE CAMBRIDGE BY THE REV. MYNORS BRIGHT M.A. LATE FELLOW
                      AND PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE

                              (Unabridged)

                      WITH LORD BRAYBROOKE'S NOTES

                        EDITED WITH ADDITIONS BY

                        HENRY B. WHEATLEY F.S.A.

                          DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS.
                                  MAY
                                  1668

May 1st, 1668.  Up, and to the office, where all the morning busy.  Then
to Westminster Hall, and there met Sir W. Pen, who labours to have his
answer to his impeachment, and sent down from the Lords' House, read by
the House of Commons; but they are so busy on other matters, that he
cannot, and thereby will, as he believes, by design, be prevented from
going to sea this year.  Here met my cozen Thomas Pepys of Deptford, and
took some turns with him; who is mightily troubled for this Act now passed
against Conventicles, and in few words, and sober, do lament the condition
we are in, by a negligent Prince and a mad Parliament.  Thence I by coach
to the Temple, and there set him down, and then to Sir G. Carteret's to
dine, but he not being at home, I back again to the New Exchange a little,
and thence back again to Hercules Pillars, and there dined all alone, and
then to the King's playhouse, and there saw "The Surprizall;" and a
disorder in the pit by its raining in, from the cupola at top, it being a
very foul day, and cold, so as there are few I believe go to the Park
to-day, if any.  Thence to Westminster Hall, and there I understand how
the Houses of Commons and Lords are like to disagree very much, about the
business of the East India Company and one Skinner; to the latter of which
the Lords have awarded L5000 from the former, for some wrong done him
heretofore; and the former appealing to the Commons, the Lords vote their
petition a libell; and so there is like to follow very hot work.  Thence
by water, not being able to get a coach, nor boat but a sculler, and that
with company, is being so foul a day, to the Old Swan, and so home, and
there spent the evening, making Balty read to me, and so to supper and to
bed.

2nd.  Up, and at the office all the morning.  At noon with Lord Brouncker
in his coach as far as the Temple, and there 'light and to Hercules
Pillars, and there dined, and thence to the Duke of York's playhouse, at a
little past twelve, to get a good place in the pit, against the new play,
and there setting a poor man to keep my place, I out, and spent an hour at
Martin's, my bookseller's, and so back again, where I find the house quite
full.  But I had my place, and by and by the King comes and the Duke of
York; and then the play begins, called "The Sullen Lovers; or, The
Impertinents," having many good humours in it, but the play tedious, and
no design at all in it.  But a little boy, for a farce, do dance
Polichinelli, the best that ever anything was done in the world, by all
men's report: most pleased with that, beyond anything in the world, and
much beyond all the play.  Thence to the King's house to see Knepp, but
the play done; and so I took a hackney alone, and to the park, and there
spent the evening, and to the lodge, and drank new milk.  And so home to
the Office, ended my letters, and, to spare my eyes, home, and played on
my pipes, and so to bed.

3rd (Lord's day).  Up, and to church, where I saw Sir A. Rickard, though
he be under the Black Rod, by order of the Lords' House, upon the quarrel
between the East India Company and Skinner, which is like to come to a
very great heat between the two Houses.  At noon comes Mr. Mills and his
wife, and Mr. Turner and his wife, by invitation to dinner, and we were
mighty merry, and a very pretty dinner, of my Bridget and Nell's dressing,
very handsome.  After dinner to church again  .  .  .  . So home and with
Sir W. Pen took a hackney, and he and I to Old Street, to a brew-house
there, to see Sir Thomas Teddiman, who is very ill in bed of a fever, got,
I believe, by the fright the Parliament have put him into, of late.  But
he is a good man, a good seaman, and stout.  Thence Pen and I to
Islington, and there, at the old house, eat, and drank, and merry, and
there by chance giving two pretty fat boys each of them a cake, they
proved to be Captain Holland's children, whom therefore I pity.  So round
by Hackney home, having good discourse, he [Pen] being very open to me in
his talk, how the King ought to dissolve this Parliament, when the Bill of
Money is passed, they being never likely to give him more; how he [the
King] hath great opportunity of making himself popular by stopping this
Act against Conventicles; and how my Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, if the
Parliament continue, will undoubtedly fall, he having managed that place
with so much self-seeking, and disorder, and pleasure, and some great men
are designing to overthrow [him], as, among the rest, my Lord Orrery; and
that this will try the King mightily, he being a firm friend to my Lord
Lieutenant.  So home; and to supper a little, and then to bed, having
stepped, after I come home, to Alderman Backewell's about business, and
there talked a while with him and his wife, a fine woman of the country,
and how they had bought an estate at Buckeworth, within four mile of
Brampton.

4th.  Up betimes, and by water to Charing Cross, and so to W. Coventry,
and there talked a little with him, and thence over the Park to White
Hall, and there did a little business at the Treasury, and so to the Duke,
and there present Balty to the Duke of York and a letter from the Board to
him about him, and the Duke of York is mightily pleased with him, and I
doubt not his continuance in employment, which I am glad of. Thence with
Sir H. Cholmly to Westminster Hall talking, and he crying mightily out of
the power the House of Lords usurps in this business of the East India
Company.  Thence away home and there did business, and so to dinner, my
sister Michell and I, and thence to the Duke of York's house, and there
saw "The Impertinents" again, and with less pleasure than before, it being
but a very contemptible play, though there are many little witty
expressions in it; and the pit did generally say that of it. Thence, going
out, Mrs. Pierce called me from the gallery, and there I took her and Mrs.
Corbet by coach up and down, and took up Captain Rolt in the street; and
at last, it being too late to go to the Park, I carried them to the Beare
in Drury Lane, and there did treat them with a dish of mackrell, the first
I have seen this year, and another dish, and mighty merry; and so carried
her home, and thence home myself, well pleased with this evening's
pleasure, and so to bed.

5th.  Up, and all the morning at the office.  At noon home to dinner and
Creed with me, and after dinner he and I to the Duke of York's playhouse;
and there coming late, he and I up to the balcony-box, where we find my
Lady Castlemayne and several great ladies; and there we sat with them, and
I saw "The Impertinents" once more, now three times, and the three only
days it hath been acted.  And to see the folly how the house do this day
cry up the play more than yesterday! and I for that reason like it, I
find, the better, too; by Sir Positive At-all, I understand, is meant Sir
Robert Howard.  My Lady [Castlemaine] pretty well pleased with it; but
here I sat close to her fine woman, Willson, who indeed is very handsome,
but, they say, with child by the King.  I asked, and she told me this was
the first time her Lady had seen it, I having a mind to say something to
her.  One thing of familiarity I observed in my Lady Castlemayne: she
called to one of her women, another that sat by this, for a little patch
off her face, and put it into her mouth and wetted it, and so clapped it
upon her own by the side of her mouth, I suppose she feeling a pimple
rising there.  Thence with Creed to Westminster Hall, and there met with
cozen Roger, who tells me of the great conference this day between the
Lords and Commons, about the business of the East India Company, as being
one of the weightiest conferences that hath been, and managed as
weightily.  I am heartily sorry I was not there, it being upon a mighty
point of the privileges of the subjects of England, in regard to the
authority of the House of Lords, and their being condemned by them as the
Supreme Court, which, we say, ought not to be, but by appeal from other
Courts.  And he tells me that the Commons had much the better of them, in
reason and history there quoted, and believes the Lords will let it fall.
Thence to walk in the Hall, and there hear that Mrs. Martin's child, my
god-daughter, is dead, and so by water to the Old Swan, and thence home,
and there a little at Sir W. Pen's, and so to bed.

6th.  Up, and to the office, and thence to White Hall, but come too late
to see the Duke of York, with whom my business was, and so to Westminster
Hall, where met with several people and talked with them, and among other
things understand that my Lord St. John is meant by Mr. Woodcocke, in "The
Impertinents."

        ["Whilst Positive walks, like Woodcock in the park,
          Contriving projects with a brewer's clerk."

     Andrew Marvell's "Instructions to a Painter," part iii., to which is
     subjoined the following note: "Sir Robert Howard, and Sir William
     Bucknell, the brewer."--Works, ed.  by Capt.  E. Thompson, vol.
     iii., p. 405.--B.]

Here met with Mrs. Washington, my old acquaintance of the Hall, whose
husband has a place in the Excise at Windsor, and it seems lives well. I
have not seen her these 8 or 9 years, and she begins to grow old, I
perceive, visibly.  So time do alter, and do doubtless the like in myself.
This morning the House is upon the City Bill, and they say hath passed it,
though I am sorry that I did not think to put somebody in mind of moving
for the churches to be allotted according to the convenience of the
people, and not to gratify this Bishop, or that College.  Thence by water
to the New Exchange, where bought a pair of shoe-strings, and so to Mr.
Pierces, where invited, and there was Knepp and Mrs. Foster and here
dined, but a poor, sluttish dinner, as usual, and so I could not be
heartily merry at it: here saw her girl's picture, but it is mighty far
short of her boy's, and not like her neither;  but it makes Hales's
picture of her boy appear a good picture.  Thence to White Hall, walked
with Brisband, who dined there also, and thence I back to the King's
playhouse, and there saw "The Virgin Martyr," and heard the musick that I
like so well, and intended to have seen Knepp, but I let her alone; and
having there done, went to Mrs. Pierces back again, where she was, and
there I found her on a pallet in the dark .  .  .  ,  that is Knepp. And
so to talk; and by and by did eat some curds and cream, and thence away
home, and it being night, I did walk in the dusk up and down, round
through our garden, over Tower Hill, and so through Crutched Friars, three
or four times, and once did meet Mercer and another pretty lady, but being
surprized I could say little to them,, although I had an opportunity of
pleasing myself with them,  but left them, and then I did see our Nell,
Payne's daughter, and her je did desire venir after me, and so elle did
see me to, Tower Hill to our back entry there that comes upon the degres
entrant into nostra garden .  .  .  , and so parted, and je home to put up
things against to-morrow's carrier for my wife; and, among others, a very
fine salmon-pie, sent me by Mr. Steventon, W. Hewer's uncle, and so to
bed.

7th.  Up, and to the office, where all the morning.  At noon home to
dinner, and thither I sent for Mercer to dine with me, and after dinner
she and I called Mrs. Turner, and I carried them to the Duke of York's
house, and there saw "The Man's the Master," which proves, upon my seeing
it again, a very good play.  Thence called Knepp from the King's house,
where going in for her, the play being done, I did see Beck Marshall come
dressed, off of the stage, and looks mighty fine, and pretty, and noble:
and also Nell, in her boy's clothes, mighty pretty.  But, Lord!  their
confidence! and how many men do hover about them as soon as they come off
the stage, and how confident they are in their talk!  Here I did kiss the
pretty woman newly come, called Pegg, that was Sir Charles Sidly's
mistress, a mighty pretty woman, and seems, but is not, modest.  Here took
up Knepp into our coach, and all of us with her to her lodgings, and
thither comes Bannister with a song of hers, that he hath set in Sir
Charles Sidly's play for her, which is, I think, but very meanly set; but
this he did, before us, teach her, and it being but a slight, silly, short
ayre, she learnt it presently.  But I did get him to prick me down the
notes of the Echo in "The Tempest," which pleases me mightily.  Here was
also Haynes, the incomparable dancer of the King's house, and a seeming
civil man, and sings pretty well, and they gone, we abroad to Marrowbone,
and there walked in the garden, the first time I ever was there; and a
pretty place it is, and here we eat and drank and stayed till 9 at night,
and so home by moonshine .  .  .  .  And so set Mrs. Knepp at her lodging,
and so the rest, and I home talking with a great deal of pleasure, and so
home to bed.

8th.  Up, and to the office, where busy all the morning.  Towards noon I
to Westminster and there understand that the Lords' House did sit till
eleven o'clock last night, about the business in difference between them
and the Commons, in the matter of the East India Company.  Here took a
turn or two, and up to my Lord Crew's, and there dined; where Mr. Case,
the minister, a dull fellow in his talk, and all in the Presbyterian
manner; a great deal of noise and a kind of religious tone, but very dull.
After dinner my Lord and I together.  He tells me he hears that there are
great disputes like to be at Court, between the factions of the two women,
my Lady Castlemayne and Mrs. Stewart, who is now well again, and the King
hath made several public visits to her, and like to come to Court: the
other is to go to Barkeshire-house, which is taken for her, and they say a
Privy-Seal is passed for L5000 for it.  He believes all will come to ruin.
Thence I to White Hall, where the Duke of York gone to the Lords' House,
where there is to be a conference on the Lords' side to the Commons this
afternoon, giving in their Reasons, which I would have been at, but could
not; for, going by direction to the Prince's chamber, there Brouncker, W.
Pen, and Mr. Wren, and I, met, and did our business with the Duke of York.
But, Lord!  to see how this play of Sir Positive At-all,--["The
Impertinents."]--in abuse of Sir Robert Howard, do take, all the Duke's
and every body's talk being of that, and telling more stories of him, of
the like nature, that it is now the town and country talk, and, they say,
is most exactly true.  The Duke of York himself said that of his playing
at trap-ball is true, and told several other stories of him.  This being
done, Brouncker, Pen, and I to Brouncker's house, and there sat and
talked, I asking many questions in mathematics to my Lord, which he do me
the pleasure to satisfy me in, and here we drank and so spent an hour, and
so W. Pen and I home, and after being with W. Pen at his house an hour, I
home and to bed.

9th.  Up, and to the office, where all the morning we sat.  Here I first
hear that the Queene hath miscarryed of a perfect child, being gone about
ten weeks, which do shew that she can conceive, though it be unfortunate
that she cannot bring forth.  Here we are told also that last night the
Duchesse of Monmouth, dancing at her lodgings, hath sprained her thigh.
Here we are told also that the House of Commons sat till five o'clock this
morning, upon the business of the difference between the Lords and them,
resolving to do something therein before they rise, to assert their
privileges.  So I at noon by water to Westminster, and there find the King
hath waited in the Prince's chamber these two hours, and the Houses are
not ready for him.  The Commons having sent this morning, after their long
debate therein the last night, to the Lords, that they do think the only
expedient left to preserve unity between the two Houses is, that they do
put a stop to any proceedings upon their late judgement against the East
India Company, till their next meeting; to which the Lords returned answer
that they would return answer to them by a messenger of their own, which
they not presently doing, they were all inflamed, and thought it was only
a trick, to keep them in suspense till the King come to adjourne them;
and, so, rather than lose the opportunity of doing themselves right, they
presently with great fury come to this vote: "That whoever should assist
in the execution of the judgement of the Lords against the Company, should
be held betrayers of the liberties of the people of England, and of the
privileges of that House." This the Lords had notice of, and were mad at
it; and so continued debating without any design to yield to the Commons,
till the King come in, and sent for the Commons, where the Speaker made a
short but silly speech, about their giving Him L300,000; and then the
several Bills, their titles were read, and the King's assent signified in
the proper terms, according to the nature of the Bills, of which about
three or four were public Bills, and seven or eight private ones, the
additional Bills for the building of the City and the Bill against
Conventicles being none of them.  The King did make a short, silly speech,
which he read, giving them thanks for the money, which now, he said, he
did believe would be sufficient, because there was peace between his
neighbours, which was a kind of a slur, methought, to the Commons; and
that he was sorry for what he heard of difference between the two Houses,
but that he hoped their recesse would put them into a way of
accommodation; and so adjourned them to the 9th of August, and then
recollected himself, and told them the 11th; so imperfect a speaker he is.
So the Commons went to their House, and forthwith adjourned; and the Lords
resumed their House, the King being gone, and sat an hour or two after,
but what they did, I cannot tell; but every body expected they would
commit Sir Andrew Rickard, Sir Samuel Barnardiston, Mr. Boone, and Mr.
Wynne, who were all there, and called in, upon their knees, to the bar of
the House; and Sir John Robinson I left there, endeavouring to prevent
their being committed to the Tower, lest he should thereby be forced to
deny their order, because of this vote of the Commons, whereof he is one,
which is an odde case.

     [This "odd case" was that of Thomas Skinner and the East India
     Company.  According to Ralph, the Commons had ordered Skinner, the
     plaintiff, into the custody of the Serjeant-at-Arms, and the Lords
     did the same by Sir Samuel Barnadiston, deputy-governor of the
     company, as likewise Sir Andrew Rickard, Mr. Rowland Gwynn, and Mr.
     Christopher Boone.--B.]

Thence I to the Rose Taverne in Covent Garden, and there sent for a pullet
and dined all alone, being to meet Sir W. Pen, who by and by come, and he
and I into the King's house, and there "The Mayd's Tragedy," a good play,
but Knepp not there; and my head and eyes out of order, the first from my
drinking wine at dinner, and the other from my much work in the morning.
Thence parted, and I towards the New Exchange and there bought a pair of
black silk stockings at the hosier's that hath the very pretty woman to
his wife, about ten doors on this side of the 'Change, and she is indeed
very pretty, but I think a notable talking woman by what I heard to others
there.  Thence to Westminster Hall, where I hear the Lords are up, but
what they have done I know not, and so walked toward White Hall and thence
by water to the Tower, and so home and there to my letters, and so to Sir
W. Pen's; and there did talk with Mrs. Lowther, who is very kind to me,
more than usual, and I will make use of it.  She begins to draw very well,
and I think do as well, if not better, than my wife, if it be true that
she do it herself, what she shews me, and so to bed, and my head akeing
all night with the wine I drank to-day, and my eyes ill.  So lay long, my
head pretty well in the morning.

10th (Lord's day).  Up, and to the office, there to do, business till
church time, when Mr. Shepley, newly come to town, come to see me, and we
had some discourse of all matters, and particularly of my Lord Sandwich's
concernments, and here did by the by as he would seem tell me that my
Lady--[Lady Sandwich.]--had it in her thoughts, if she had occasion, to,
borrow L100 of me, which I did not declare any opposition to, though I
doubt it will be so much lost.  But, however, I will not deny my Lady, if
she ask it, whatever comes of it, though it be lost; but shall be glad
that it is no bigger sum.  And yet it vexes me though, and the more
because it brings into my head some apprehensions what trouble I may here
after be brought to when my Lord comes home, if he should ask me to come
into bonds with him, as I fear he will have occasions to make money, but I
hope I shall have the wit to deny it.  He being gone, I to church, and so
home, and there comes W. Hewer and Balty, and by and by I sent for Mercer
to come and dine with me, and pretty merry, and after dinner I fell to
teach her "Canite Jehovae," which she did a great part presently, and so
she away, and I to church, and from church home with my Lady Pen; and,
after being there an hour or so talking, I took her, and Mrs. Lowther, and
old Mrs. Whistler, her mother-in-law, by water with great pleasure as far
as Chelsy, and so back to Spring Garden, at Fox-hall, and there walked,
and eat, and drank, and so to water again, and set down the old woman at
home at Durham Yard:' and it raining all the way, it troubled us; but,
however, my cloak kept us all dry, and so home, and at the Tower wharf
there we did send for a pair of old shoes for Mrs. Lowther, and there I
did pull the others off and put them on, elle being peu shy, but do speak
con mighty kindness to me that she would desire me pour su mari if it were
to be done .  .  .  .  .  Here staid a little at Sir W. Pen's, who was
gone to bed, it being about eleven at night, and so I home to bed.

11th.  Up, and to my office, where alone all the morning.  About noon
comes to me my cousin Sarah, and my aunt Livett, newly come out of
Gloucestershire, good woman, and come to see me; I took them home, and
made them drink, but they would not stay dinner, I being alone.  But here
they tell me that they hear that this day Kate Joyce was to be married to
a man called Hollingshed, whom she indeed did once tell me of, and desired
me to enquire after him.  But, whatever she said of his being rich, I do
fear, by her doing this without my advice, it is not as it ought to be;
but, as she brews, let her bake.  They being gone, I to dinner with Balty
and his wife, who is come to town to-day from Deptford to see us, and
after dinner I out and took a coach, and called Mercer, and she and I to
the Duke of York's playhouse, and there saw "The Tempest," and between two
acts, I went out to Mr. Harris, and got him to repeat to me the words of
the Echo, while I writ them down, having tried in the play to have wrote
them; but, when I had done it, having done it without looking upon my
paper, I find I could not read the blacklead. But now I have got the words
clear, and, in going in thither, had the pleasure to see the actors in
their several dresses, especially the seamen and monster, which were very
droll: so into the play again.  But there happened one thing which vexed
me, which is, that the orange-woman did come in the pit, and challenge me
for twelve oranges, which she delivered by my order at a late play, at
night, to give to some ladies in a box, which was wholly untrue, but yet
she swore it to be true.  But, however, I did deny it, and did not pay
her; but, for quiet, did buy 4s. worth of oranges of her, at 6d. a-piece.
Here I saw first my Lord Ormond since his coming from Ireland, which is
now about eight days.  After the play done, I took Mercer by water to
Spring Garden; and there with great pleasure walked, and eat, and drank,
and sang, making people come about us, to hear us, and two little children
of one of our neighbours that happened to be there, did come into our
arbour, and we made them dance prettily.  So by water, with great
pleasure, down to the Bridge, and there landed, and took water again on
the other side; and so to the Tower, and I saw her home, I myself home to
my chamber, and by and by to bed.

12th.  Up, and to the office, where we sat, and sat all the morning. Here
Lord Anglesey was with us, and in talk about the late difference between
the two Houses, do tell us that he thinks the House of Lords may be in an
error, at least, it is possible they may, in this matter of Skinner; and
he doubts they may, and did declare his judgement in the House of Lords
against their proceedings therein, he having hindered 100 originall causes
being brought into their House, notwithstanding that he was put upon
defending their proceedings: but that he is confident that the House of
Commons are in the wrong, in the method they take to remedy an error of
the Lords, for no vote of theirs can do it; but, in all like cases, the
Commons have done it by petition to the King, sent up to the Lords, and by
them agreed to, and so redressed, as they did in the Petition of Right.
He says that he did tell them indeed, which is talked of, and which did
vex the Commons, that the Lords were "Judices nati et Conciliarii nati;"
but all other judges among us are under salary, and the Commons themselves
served for wages; and therefore the Lords, in reason, were the freer
judges.  At noon to dinner at home, and after dinner, where Creed dined
with me, he and I, by water to the Temple, where we parted, and I both to
the King's and Duke of York's playhouses, and there went through the
houses to see what faces I could spy that I knew, and meeting none, I away
by coach to my house, and then to Mrs. Mercer's, where I met with her two
daughters, and a pretty-lady I never knew yet, one Mrs. Susan Gayet, a
very pretty black lady, that speaks French well, and is a Catholick, and
merchant's daughter, by us, and here was also Mrs. Anne Jones, and after
sitting and talking a little, I took them out, and carried them through
Hackney to Kingsland, and there walked to Sir G. Whitmore's house, where I
have not been many a day; and so to the old house at Islington, and eat,
and drank, and sang, and mighty merry; and so by moonshine with infinite
pleasure home, and there sang again in Mercer's garden.  And so parted, I
having there seen a mummy in a merchant's warehouse there, all the middle
of the man or woman's body, black and hard.  I never saw any before, and,
therefore, it pleased me much, though an ill sight; and he did give me a
little bit, and a bone of an arme, I suppose, and so home, and there to
bed.

13th.  Up, and by water to White Hall, and so to Sir H. Cholmly's, who not
being up I made a short visit to Sir W. Coventry, and he and I through the
Park to White Hall, and thence I back into the Park, and there met Sir H.
Cholmly, and he and I to Sir Stephen Fox's, where we met and considered
the business of the Excise, how far it is charged in reference to the
payment of the Guards and Tangier.  Thence he and I walked to Westminster
Hall and there took a turn, it being holyday, and so back again, and I to
the mercer's, and my tailor's about a stuff suit that I am going to make.
Thence, at noon, to Hercules Pillars, and there dined all alone, and so to
White Hall, some of us attended the Duke of York as usual, and so to
attend the Council about the business of Hemskirke's project of building a
ship that sails two feet for one of any other ship, which the Council did
agree to be put in practice, the King to give him, if it proves good,
L5000 in hand, and L15,000 more in seven years, which, for my part, I
think a piece of folly for them to meddle with, because the secret cannot
be long kept.  So thence, after Council, having drunk some of the King's
wine and water with Mr. Chevins, my Lord Brouncker, and some others, I by
water to the Old Swan, and there to Michell's, and did see her and drink
there, but he being there je ne baiser la; and so back again by water to
Spring Garden all alone, and walked a little, and so back again home, and
there a little to my viall, and so to bed, Mrs. Turner having sat and
supped with me.  This morning I hear that last night Sir Thomas Teddiman,
poor man! did die by a thrush in his mouth: a good man, and stout and
able, and much lamented; though people do make a little mirth, and say, as
I believe it did in good part, that the business of the Parliament did
break his heart, or, at least, put him into this fever and disorder, that
caused his death.

14th.  Up, and to the office, where we sat all the morning, and at noon
home to dinner with my people, but did not stay to dine out with them, but
rose and straight by water to the Temple, and so to Penny's, my tailor's,
where by and by by agreement Mercer, and she, to my great content, brings
Mrs. Gayet, and I carried them to the King's house; but, coming too soon,
we out again to the Rose taverne, and there I did give them a tankard of
cool drink, the weather being very hot, and then into the playhouse again,
and there saw "The Country Captain," a very dull play, that did give us no
content, and besides, little company there, which made it very unpleasing.
Thence to the waterside, at Strand bridge, and so up by water and to
Fox-hall, where we walked a great while, and pleased mightily with the
pleasure thereof, and the company there, and then in, and eat and drank,
and then out again and walked, and it beginning to be dark, we to a corner
and sang, that everybody got about us to hear us; and so home, where I saw
them both at their doors, and, full of the content of this afternoon's
pleasure, I home and to walk in the garden a little, and so home to bed.

15th.  Up, and betimes to White Hall, and there met with Sir H. Cholmly at
Sir Stephen Fox's, and there was also the Cofferer, and we did there
consider about our money and the condition of the Excise, and after much
dispute agreed upon a state thereof and the manner of our future course of
payments.  Thence to the Duke of York, and there did a little navy
business as we used to do, and so to a Committee for Tangier, where God
knows how my Lord Bellasses's accounts passed; understood by nobody but my
Lord Ashly, who, I believe, was mad to let them go as he pleased.  But
here Sir H. Cholmly had his propositions read, about a greater price for
his work of the Mole, or to do it upon account, which, being read, he was
bid to withdraw.  But, Lord! to see how unlucky a man may be, by chance;
for, making an unfortunate minute when they were almost tired with the
other business, the Duke of York did find fault with it, and that made all
the rest, that I believe he had better have given a great deal, and had
nothing said to it to-day; whereas, I have seen other things more
extravagant passed at first hearing, without any difficulty.  Thence I to
my Lord Brouncker's, at Mrs. Williams's, and there dined, and she did shew
me her closet, which I was sorry to see, for fear of her expecting
something from me; and here she took notice of my wife's not once coming
to see her, which I am glad of; for she shall not--a prating, vain, idle
woman.  Thence with Lord Brouncker to Loriners'-hall,

     [The Loriners, or Lorimers (bit-makers), of London are by reputation
     an ancient mistery, but they were first incorporated by letters
     patent of 10 Queen Anne (December 3rd, 1711).  Their small hall was
     at the corner of Basinghall Street in London Wall.  The company has
     no hall now.]

by Mooregate, a hall I never heard of before, to Sir Thomas Teddiman's
burial, where most people belonging to the sea were.  And here we had
rings: and here I do hear that some of the last words that he said were,
that he had a very good King, God bless him!  but that the Parliament had
very ill rewarded him for all the service he had endeavoured to do them
and his country; so that, for certain, this did go far towards his death.
But, Lord!  to see among [the company] the young commanders, and Thomas
Killigrew and others that come, how unlike a burial this was, O'Brian
taking out some ballads out of his pocket, which I read, and the rest come
about me to hear! and there very merry we were all, they being new
ballets.  By and by the corpse went; and I, with my Lord Brouncker, and
Dr. Clerke, and Mr. Pierce, as far as the foot of London-bridge; and there
we struck off into Thames Street, the rest going to Redriffe, where he is
to be buried.  And we 'light at the Temple, and there parted; and I to the
King's house, and there saw the last act of "The Committee," thinking to
have seen Knepp there, but she did not act.  And so to my bookseller's,
and there carried home some books-among others, "Dr. Wilkins's Reall
Character," and thence to Mrs. Turner's, and there went and sat, and she
showed me her house from top to bottom, which I had not seen before, very
handsome, and here supped, and so home, and got Mercer, and she and I in
the garden singing till ten at night, and so home to a little supper, and
then parted, with great content, and to bed.  The Duchesse of Monmouth's
hip is, I hear, now set again, after much pain.  I am told also that the
Countess of Shrewsbury is brought home by the Duke of Buckingham to his
house, where his Duchess saying that it was not for her and the other to
live together in a house, he answered,  Why, Madam, I did think so, and,
therefore, have ordered your coach to be ready, to carry you to your
father's, which was a devilish speech, but, they say, true; and my Lady
Shrewsbury is there, it seems.

16th.  Up; and to the Office, where we sat all the morning; and at noon,
home with my people to dinner; and thence to the Office all the afternoon,
till, my eyes weary, I did go forth by coach to the King's playhouse, and
there saw the best part of "The Sea Voyage," where Knepp I see do her part
of sorrow very well.  I afterwards to her house; but she did not come
presently home; and there je did kiss her ancilla, which is so mighty
belle; and I to my tailor's, and to buy me a belt for my new suit against
to-morrow; and so home, and there to my Office, and afterwards late
walking in the garden; and so home to supper, and to bed, after Nell's
cutting of my hair close, the weather being very hot.

17th (Lord's day).  Up, and put on my new stuff-suit, with a
shoulder-belt, according to the new fashion, and the bands of my vest and
tunique laced with silk lace, of the colour of my suit: and so, very
handsome, to Church, where a dull sermon and of a stranger, and so home;
and there I find W. Howe, and a younger brother of his, come to dine with
me; and there comes Mercer, and brings with her Mrs. Gayet, which pleased
me mightily; and here was also W. Hewer, and mighty merry; and after
dinner to sing psalms.  But, Lord! to hear what an excellent base this
younger brother of W. Howe's sings, even to my astonishment, and mighty
pleasant. By and by Gayet goes away, being a Catholick, to her devotions,
and Mercer to church; but we continuing an hour or two singing, and so
parted; and I to Sir W. Pen's, and there sent for a hackney-coach; and he
and she [Lady Pen] and I out, to take the gyre.  We went to Stepney, and
there stopped at the Trinity House, he to talk with the servants there
against to-morrow, which is a great day for the choice of a new Master,
and thence to Mile End, and there eat and drank, and so home; and I supped
with them--that is, eat some butter and radishes, which is my excuse for
not eating any other of their victuals, which I hate, because of their
sluttery: and so home, and made my boy read to me part of Dr. Wilkins's
new book of the "Real Character;" and so to bed.

18th.  Up, and to my office, where most of the morning doing business and
seeing my window-frames new painted, and then I out by coach to my Lord
Bellasses, at his new house by my late Lord Treasurer's, and there met him
and Mr. Sherwin, Auditor Beale, and Creed, about my Lord's accounts, and
here my Lord shewed me his new house, which, indeed, is mighty noble, and
good pictures--indeed, not one bad one in it.  Thence to my tailor's, and
there did find Mercer come with Mrs. Horsfield and Gayet according to my
desire, and there I took them up, it being almost twelve o'clock, or a
little more, and carried them to the King's playhouse, where the doors
were not then open; but presently they did open; and we in, and find many
people already come in, by private ways, into the pit, it being the first
day of Sir Charles Sidly's new play, so long expected, "The Mullberry
Guarden," of whom, being so reputed a wit, all the world do expect great
matters.  I having sat here awhile, and eat nothing to-day, did slip out,
getting a boy to keep my place; and to the Rose Tavern, and there got half
a breast of mutton, off of the spit, and dined all alone.  And so to the
play again, where the King and Queen, by and by, come, and all the Court;
and the house infinitely full.  But the play, when it come, though there
was, here and there, a pretty saying, and that not very many neither, yet
the whole of the play had nothing extraordinary in it, at all, neither of
language nor design; insomuch that the King I did not see laugh, nor
pleased the whole play from the beginning to the end, nor the company;
insomuch that I have not been less pleased at a new play in my life, I
think.  And which made it the worse was, that there never was worse musick
played--that is, worse things composed, which made me and Captain Rolt,
who happened to sit near me, mad.  So away thence, very little satisfied
with the play, but pleased with my company.  I carried them to Kensington,
to the Grotto, and there we sang, to my great content, only vexed, in
going in, to see a son of Sir Heneage Finch's beating of a poor little dog
to death, letting it lie in so much pain that made me mad to see it, till,
by and by, the servants of the house chiding of their young master, one of
them come with a thong, and killed the dog outright presently.  Thence to
Westminster palace, and there took boat and to Fox Hall, where we walked,
and eat, and drank, and sang, and very merry.  But I find Mrs. Horsfield
one of the veriest citizen's wives in the world, so full of little silly
talk, and now and then a little sillily bawdy, that I believe if you had
her sola a man might hazer all with her.  So back by water to Westminster
Palace, and there got a coach which carried us as far as the Minorys, and
there some thing of the traces broke, and we forced to 'light, and walked
to Mrs. Horsfield's house, it being a long and bad way, and dark, and
having there put her in a doors, her husband being in bed, we left her and
so back to our coach, where the coachman had put it in order, but could
not find his whip in the dark a great while, which made us stay long.  At
last getting a neighbour to hold a candle out of their window Mercer found
it, and so away we home at almost 12 at night, and setting them both at
their homes, I home and to bed.

19th.  Up, and called on Mr. Pierce, who tells me that after all this ado
Ward is come to town, and hath appeared to the Commissioners of Accounts
and given such answers as he thinks will do every body right, and let the
world see that their great expectations and jealousies have been vain in
this matter of the prizes.  The Commissioners were mighty inquisitive
whether he was not instructed by letters or otherwise from hence from my
Lord Sandwich's friends what to say and do, and particularly from me,
which he did wholly deny, as it was true, I not knowing the man that I
know of.  He tells me also that, for certain, Mr. Vaughan is made Lord
Chief justice, which I am glad of.  He tells me, too; that since my Lord
of Ormond's coming over, the King begins to be mightily reclaimed, and
sups every night with great pleasure with the Queene: and yet, it seems,
he is mighty hot upon the Duchess of Richmond; insomuch that, upon Sunday
was se'nnight, at night, after he had ordered his Guards and coach to be
ready to carry him to the Park, he did, on a sudden, take a pair of oars
or sculler, and all alone, or but one with him, go to Somersett House, and
there, the garden-door not being open, himself clamber over the walls to
make a visit to her, which is a horrid shame.  He gone, I to the office,
where we sat all the morning, Sir W. Pen sick of the gout comes not out.
After dinner at home, to White Hall, it being a very rainy day, and there
a Committee for Tangier, where I was mightily pleased to see Sir W.
Coventry fall upon my Lord Bellasses' business of the 3d. in every piece
of it which he would get to himself, making the King pay 4s. 9d, while he
puts them off for 4s. 6d., so that Sir W. Coventry continues still the
same man for the King's good.  But here Creed did vex me with saying that
I ought first to have my account past by the Commissioners of Tangier
before in the Exchequer.  Thence W. Coventry and I in the Matted gallery,
and there he did talk very well to me about the way to save the credit of
the officers of the Navy, and their places too, by making use of this
interval of Parliament to be found to be mending of matters in the Navy,
and that nothing but this will do it, and gives an instance in themselves
of the Treasury, whereof himself and Sir John Duncombe all the world knows
have enemies, and my Lord Ashly a man obnoxious to most, and Sir Thomas
Clifford one that as a man suddenly rising and a creature of my Lord
Arlington's hath enemies enough (none of them being otherwise but the Duke
of Albemarle), yet with all this fault they hear nothing of the business
of the Treasury, but all well spoken of there.  He is for the removal of
Sir John Minnes, thinking that thereby the world will see a greater change
in the hands than now they do; and I will endeavour it, and endeavour to
do some good in the office also.  So home by coach, and to the office,
where ended my letters, and then home, and there got Balty to read to me
out of Sorbiere's Observations in his Voyage into England, and then to
bed.

20th.  Up, and with Colonell Middleton, in a new coach he hath made him,
very handsome, to White Hall, where the Duke of York having removed his
lodgings for this year to St. James's, we walked thither; and there find
the Duke of York coming to White Hall, and so back to the Council-chamber,
where the Committee of the Navy sat; and here we discoursed several
things; but, Lord! like fools; so as it was a shame to see things of this
importance managed by a Council that understand nothing of them: and,
among other things, one was about this building of a ship with Hemskirke's
secret, to sail a third faster than any other ship; but he hath got Prince
Rupert on his side, and by that means, I believe, will get his conditions
made better than he would otherwise, or ought indeed. Having done there, I
met with Sir Richard Browne, and he took me to dinner with him to a new
tavern, above Charing Cross, where some clients of his did give him a good
dinner, and good company; among others, one Bovy, a solicitor, and lawyer
and merchant all together, who hath travelled very much, did talk some
things well; but only he is a "Sir Positive:" but the talk of their
travels over the Alps very fine.  Thence walked to the King's playhouse,
and saw "The Mulberry Garden" again, and cannot be reconciled to it, but
only to find here and there an independent sentence of wit, and that is
all.  Here met with Creed; and took him to Hales's, and there saw the
beginnings of Harris's head which he draws for me, which I do not yet
like.  So he and I down to the New Exchange, and there cheapened ribbands
for my wife, and so down to the Whey house and drank some and eat some
curds, which did by and by make my belly ake mightily.  So he and I to
White Hall, and walked over the Park to the Mulberry-Garden,

     [On the site of the present Buckingham Palace and gardens.
     Originally a garden of mulberry trees, planted by James I. in 1609
     with the intention of cultivating the manufacture of English silks.]

where I never was before; and find it a very silly place, worse than
Spring-garden, and but little company, and those a rascally, whoring,
roguing sort of people, only a wilderness here, that is somewhat pretty,
but rude.  Did not stay to drink, but walked an hour and so away to
Charing Cross, and there took coach and away home, in my way going into
Bishopsgate Street, to bespeak places for myself and boy to go to
Cambridge in the coach this week, and so to Brampton, to see my wife.  So
home, and to supper and to bed.

21st.  Up, and busy to send some things into the country, and then to the
Office, where meets me Sir Richard Ford, who among other things
congratulates me, as one or two did yesterday, [on] my great purchase; and
he advises me rather to forbear, if it be not done, as a thing that the
world will envy me in: and what is it but my cozen Tom Pepys's buying of
Martin Abbey, in Surry! which is a mistake I am sorry for, and yet do fear
that it may spread in the world to my prejudice.  All the morning at the
office, and at noon my clerks dined with me, and there do hear from them
how all the town is full of the talk of a meteor, or some fire, that did
on Saturday last fly over the City at night, which do put me in mind that,
being then walking in the dark an hour or more myself in the garden, after
I had done writing, I did see a light before me come from behind me, which
made me turn back my head; and I did see a sudden fire or light running in
the sky, as it were towards Cheapside ward, and it vanished very quick,
which did make me bethink myself what holyday it was, and took it for some
rocket, though it was much brighter than any rocket, and so thought no
more of it, but it seems Mr. Hater and Gibson going home that night did
meet with many clusters of people talking of it, and many people of the
towns about the city did see it, and the world do make much discourse of
it, their apprehensions being mighty full of the rest of the City to be
burned, and the Papists to cut our throats. Which God prevent!  Thence
after dinner I by coach to the Temple, and there bought a new book of
songs set to musique by one Smith of Oxford, some songs of Mr. Cowley's,
and so to Westminster, and there to walk a little in the Hall, and so to
Mrs. Martin's, and there did hazer cet que je voudrai mit her, and drank
and sat most of the afternoon with her and her sister, and here she
promises me her fine starling, which was the King's, and speaks finely,
which I shall be glad of, and so walked to the Temple, meeting in the
street with my cozen Alcocke, the young man, that is a good sober youth, I
have not seen these four or five years, newly come to town to look for
employment: but I cannot serve him, though I think he deserves well, and
so I took coach and home to my business, and in the evening took Mrs.
Turner and Mercer out to Mile End and drank, and then home, and sang; and
eat a dish of greene pease, the first I have seen this year, given me by
Mr. Gibson, extraordinary young and pretty, and so saw them at home, and
so home to bed.  Sir W. Pen continues ill of the gout.

22nd.  Up, and all the morning at the office busy.  At noon home with my
people to dinner, where good discourse and merry.  After dinner comes Mr.
Martin, the purser, and brings me his wife's starling, which was formerly
the King's bird, that do speak and whistle finely, which I am mighty proud
of and shall take pleasure in it.  Thence to the Duke of York's house to a
play, and saw Sir Martin Marr-all, where the house is full; and though I
have seen it, I think, ten times, yet the pleasure I have is yet as great
as ever, and is undoubtedly the best comedy ever was wrote. Thence to my
tailor's and a mercer's for patterns to carry my wife of cloth and silk
for a bed, which I think will please her and me, and so home, and fitted
myself for my journey to-morrow, which I fear will not be pleasant,
because of the wet weather, it raining very hard all this day; but the
less it troubles me because the King and Duke of York and Court are at
this day at Newmarket, at a great horse-race, and proposed great pleasure
for two or three days, but are in the same wet.  So from the office home
to supper, and betimes to bed.

23rd.  Up by four o'clock; and, getting my things ready, and recommending
the care of my house to W. Hewer, I with my boy Tom, whom I take with me,
to the Bull, in Bishopsgate Street, and there, about six, took coach, he
and I, and a gentleman and his man, there being another coach also, with
as many more, I think, in it; and so away to Bishop's Stafford, and there
dined, and changed horses and coach, at Mrs. Aynsworth's; but I took no
knowledge of her.  Here the gentleman and I to dinner, and in comes
Captain Forster, an acquaintance of his, he that do belong to my Lord
Anglesey, who had been at the late horse-races at Newmarket, where the
King now is, and says that they had fair weather there yesterday, though
we here, and at London, had nothing but rain, insomuch that the ways are
mighty full of water, so as hardly to be passed.  Here I hear Mrs.
Aynsworth is going to live at London: but I believe will be mistaken in
it; for it will be found better for her to be chief where she is, than to
have little to do at London.  There being many finer than she there. After
dinner away again and come to Cambridge, after much bad way, about nine at
night; and there, at the Rose, I met my father's horses, with a man,
staying for me.  But it is so late, and the waters so deep, that I durst
not go to-night; but after supper to bed; and there lay very ill, by
reason of some drunken scholars making a noise all night, and vexed for
fear that the horses should not be taken up from grass, time enough for
the morning.  Well pleased all this journey with the conversation of him
that went with me, who I think is a lawyer, and lives about Lynne, but his
name I did not ask.

24th (Lord's day).  I up, at between two and three in the morning, and,
calling up my boy, and father's boy, we set out by three o'clock, it being
high day; end so through the water with very good success, though very
deep almost all the way, and got to Brampton, where most of them in bed,
and so I weary up to my wife's chamber, whom I find in bed, and pretended
a little not well, and indeed she hath those upon her, but fell to talk
and mightily pleased both of us, and upgot the rest, Betty Turner and
Willet and Jane, all whom I was glad to see, and very merry, and got me
ready in my new stuff clothes that I send down before me, and so my wife
and they got ready too, while I to my father, poor man, and walked with
him up and down the house--it raining a little, and the waters all over
Portholme and the meadows, so as no pleasure abroad.  Here I saw my
brothers and sister Jackson, she growing fat, and, since being married, I
think looks comelier than before: but a mighty pert woman she is, and I
think proud, he keeping her mighty handsome, and they say mighty fond, and
are going shortly to live at Ellington of themselves, and will keep
malting, and grazing of cattle.  At noon comes Mr. Phillips and dines with
us, and a pretty odd-humoured man he seems to be; but good withal, but of
mighty great methods in his eating and drinking, and will not kiss a woman
since his wife's death.  After dinner my Lady Sandwich sending to see
whether I was come, I presently took horse, and find her and her family at
chapel; and thither I went in to them, and sat out the sermon, where I
heard Jervas Fullwood, now their chaplain, preach a very good and seraphic
kind of sermon, too good for an ordinary congregation.  After sermon, I
with my Lady, and my Lady Hinchingbroke, and Paulina, and Lord
Hinchingbroke, to the dining-room, saluting none of them, and there sat
and talked an hour or two, with great pleasure and satisfaction, to my
Lady, about my Lord's matters; but I think not with that satisfaction to
her, or me, that otherwise would, she knowing that she did design
tomorrow, and I remaining all the while in fear, of being asked to lend
her some money, as I was afterward, when I had taken leave of her, by Mr.
Shepley, L100, which I will not deny my Lady, and am willing to be found
when my Lord comes home to have done something of that kind for them, and
so he riding to Brampton and supping there with me he did desire it of me
from my Lady, and I promised it, though much against my will, for I fear
it is as good as lost.  After supper, where very merry, we to bed, myself
very weary and to sleep all night.

25th.  Waked betimes, and lay long .  .  .  .  and there fell to talking,
and by and by rose, it being the first fair day, and yet not quite fair,
that we have had some time, and so up, and to walk with my father again in
the garden, consulting what to do with him and this house when Pall and
her husband go away; and I think it will be to let it, and he go live with
her, though I am against letting the house for any long time, because of
having it to retire to, ourselves.  So I do intend to think more of it
before I resolve.  By and by comes Mr. Cooke to see me and so spent the
morning, and he gone by and by at noon to dinner, where Mr. Shepley come
and we merry, all being in good humour between my wife and her people
about her, and after dinner took horse, I promising to fetch her away
about fourteen days hence, and so calling all of us, we men on horseback,
and the women and my father, at Goody Gorum's, and there in a frolic
drinking I took leave, there going with me and my boy, my two brothers,
and one Browne, whom they call in mirth Colonell, for our guide, and also
Mr. Shepley, to the end of Huntingdon, and another gentleman who
accidentally come thither, one Mr. Castle; and I made them drink at the
Chequers, where I observed the same tapster, Tom, that was there when I
was a little boy and so we, at the end of the town, took leave of Shepley
and the other gentleman, and so we away and got well to Cambridge, about
seven to the Rose, the waters not being now so high as before.  And here
'lighting, I took my boy and two brothers, and walked to Magdalene
College: and there into the butterys, as a stranger, and there drank my
bellyfull of their beer, which pleased me, as the best I ever drank: and
hear by the butler's man, who was son to Goody Mulliner over against the
College, that we used to buy stewed prunes of, concerning the College and
persons in it; and find very few, only Mr. Hollins and Pechell, I think,
that were of my time.  But I was mightily pleased to come in this
condition to see and ask, and thence, giving the fellow something, away
walked to Chesterton, to see our old walk, and there into the Church, the
bells ringing, and saw the place I used to sit in, and so to the ferry,
and ferried over to the other side, and walked with great pleasure, the
river being mighty high by Barnewell Abbey: and so by Jesus College to the
town, and so to our quarters, and to supper, and then to bed, being very
weary and sleepy and mightily pleased with this night's walk.

26th.  Up by four o'clock; and by the time we were ready, and had eat, we
were called to the coach, where about six o'clock we set out, there being
a man and two women of one company, ordinary people, and one lady alone,
that is tolerably handsome, but mighty well spoken, whom I took great
pleasure in talking to, and did get her to read aloud in a book she was
reading, in the coach, being the King's Meditations;--[The meditations on
death, and prayers used by Charles I. shortly before his execution]--and
then the boy and I to sing, and so about noon come to Bishop's Stafford,
to another house than what we were at the other day, and better used. And
here I paid for the reckoning 11s., we dining together, and pretty merry;
and then set out again, sleeping most part of the way; and got to
Bishopsgate Street before eight o'clock, the waters being now most of them
down, and we avoiding the bad way in the forest by a privy way, which
brought us to Hodsden; and so to Tibalds, that road, which was mighty
pleasant.  So home, where we find all well, and brother Balty and his wife
looking to the house, she mighty fine, in a new gold-laced 'just a cour'.
I shifted myself, and so to see Mrs. Turner, and Mercer appearing over the
way, called her in, and sat and talked, and then home to my house by and
by, and there supped and talked mighty merry, and then broke up and to
bed, being a little vexed at what W. Hewer tells me Sir John Shaw did this
day in my absence say at the Board, complaining of my doing of him injury
and the board permitting it, whereas they had more reason to except
against his attributing that to me alone which I could not do but with
their condent and direction, it being to very good service to the King,
and which I shall be proud to have imputed to me alone.  The King I hear
come to town last night.

27th.  Up, and to the office, where some time upon Sir D. Gawden's
accounts, and then I by water to Westminster for some Tangier orders, and
so meeting with Mr. Sawyers my old chamber-fellow, he and I by water
together to the Temple, he giving me an account of the base, rude usage,
which he and Sir G. Carteret had lately, before the Commissioners of
Accounts, where he was, as Counsel to Sir G. Carteret, which I was sorry
to hear, they behaving themselves like most insolent and ill-mannered men.
Thence by coach to the Exchange, and there met with Sir H. Cholmly at
Colvill's; and there did give him some orders, and so home, and there to
the office again, where busy till two o'clock, and then with Sir D. Gawden
to his house, with my Lord Brouncker and Sir J. Minnes, to dinner, where
we dined very well, and much good company, among others, a Dr., a fat man,
whom by face I know, as one that uses to sit in our church, that after
dinner did take me out, and walked together, who told me that he had now
newly entered himself into Orders, in the decay of the Church, and did
think it his duty so to do, thereby to do his part toward the support and
reformation thereof; and spoke very soberly, and said that just about the
same age Dr. Donne did enter into Orders.  I find him a sober gentleman,
and a man that hath seen much of the world, and I think may do good.
Thence after dinner to the office, and there did a little business, and so
to see Sir W. Pen, who I find still very ill of the goute, sitting in his
great chair, made on purpose for persons sick of that disease, for their
ease; and this very chair, he tells me, was made for my Lady Lambert!
Thence I by coach to my tailor's, there to direct about the making of me
another suit, and so to White Hall, and through St. James's Park to St.
James's, thinking to have met with Mr. Wren, but could not, and so
homeward toward the New Exchange, and meeting Mr. Creed he and I to drink
some whey at the whey-house, and so into the 'Change and took a walk or
two, and so home, and there vexed at my boy's being out of doors till ten
at night, but it was upon my brother Jackson's business, and so I was the
less displeased, and then made the boy to read to me out of Dr. Wilkins
his "Real Character," and particularly about Noah's arke, where he do give
a very good account thereof, shewing how few the number of the several
species of beasts and fowls were that were to be in the arke, and that
there was room enough for them and their food and dung, which do please me
mightily and is much beyond what ever I heard of the subject, and so to
bed.

28th.  Up, to set right some little matters of my Tangier accounts, and so
to the office, where busy all the morning, and then home with my people to
dinner, and after dinner comes about a petition for a poor woman
whose-ticket she would get paid, and so talked a little and did baiser
her, and so to the office, being pleased that this morning my bookseller
brings me home Marcennus's book of musick,' which costs me L3 2s.; but is
a very fine book.  So to the office and did some business, and then by
coach to the New Exchange, and there by agreement at my bookseller's shop
met Mercer and Gayet, and took them by water, first to one of the
Neat-houses, where walked in the garden, but nothing but a bottle of wine
to be had, though pleased with seeing the garden; and so to Fox Hall,
where with great pleasure we walked, and then to the upper end of the
further retired walk, and there sat and sang, and brought great many
gallants and fine people about us, and, upon the bench, we did by and by
eat and drink what we had, and very merry: and so with much pleasure to
the Old Swan, and walked with them home, and there left them, and so I
home to my business at the office a little, and so to bed.

29th.  Betimes up, and up to my Tangier accounts, and then by water to the
Council Chamber, and there received some directions from the Duke of York
and the Committee of the Navy there about casting up the charge of the
present summer's fleete, that so they may come within the bounds of the
sum given by the Parliament.  But it is pretty to see how Prince Rupert
and other mad, silly people, are for setting out but a little fleete,
there being no occasion for it; and say it will be best to save the money
for better uses.  But Sir W. Coventry did declare that, in wisdom, it was
better to do so; but that, in obedience to the Parliament, he was [for]
setting out the fifty sail talked on, though it spent all the money, and
to little purpose; and that this was better than to leave it to the
Parliament to make bad construction of their thrift, if any trouble should
happen.  Thus wary the world is grown!  Thence back again presently home,
and did business till noon: and then to Sir G. Carteret's to dinner, with
much good company, it being the King's birthday, and many healths drunk:
and here I did receive another letter from my Lord Sandwich, which
troubles me to see how I have neglected him, in not writing, or but once,
all this time of his being abroad; and I see he takes notice, but yet
gently, of it, that it puts me to great trouble, and I know not how to get
out of it, having no good excuse, and too late now to mend, he being
coming home.  Thence home, whither, by agreement, by and by comes Mercer
and Gayet, and two gentlemen with them, Mr. Monteith and Pelham, the
former a swaggering young handsome gentleman, the latter a sober citizen
merchant.  Both sing, but the latter with great skill-the other, no skill,
but a good voice, and a good basse, but used to sing only tavern tunes;
and so I spent all this evening till eleven at night singing with them,
till I was tired of them, because of the swaggering fellow with the base,
though the girl Mercer did mightily commend him before to me.  This night
je had agreed par' alter at Deptford, there par' avoir lain con the moher
de Bagwell, but this company did hinder me.

30th.  Up, and put on a new summer black bombazin suit, and so to the
office; and being come now to an agreement with my barber, to keep my
perriwig in good order at 20s. a-year, I am like to go very spruce, more
than I used to do.  All the morning at the office and at noon home to
dinner, and so to the King's playhouse, and there saw "Philaster;" where
it is pretty to see how I could remember almost all along, ever since I
was a boy, Arethusa, the part which I was to have acted at Sir Robert
Cooke's; and it was very pleasant to me, but more to think what a
ridiculous thing it would have been for me to have acted a beautiful
woman.  Thence to Mr. Pierces, and there saw Knepp also, and were merry;
and here saw my little Lady Katherine Montagu come to town, about her
eyes, which are sore, and they think the King's evil, poor, pretty lady.
Here I was freed from a fear that Knepp was angry or might take advantage
to declare the essay that je did the other day, quand je was con her
.  .  . Thence to the New Exchange, and there met Harris and Rolt, and one
Richards, a tailor and great company-keeper, and with these over to Fox
Hall, and there fell into the company of Harry Killigrew, a rogue newly
come back out of France, but still in disgrace at our Court, and young
Newport and others, as very rogues as any in the town, who were ready to
take hold of every woman that come by them.  And so to supper in an
arbour: but, Lord! their mad bawdy talk did make my heart ake!  And here I
first understood by their talk the meaning of the company that lately were
called Ballets; Harris telling how it was by a meeting of some young
blades, where he was among them, and my Lady Bennet

     [Evidently adopted as a cant expression.  The woman here alluded to
     was a procuress well known in her day, and described in the "Tatler"
     (No. 84) as "the celebrated Madam Bennet."  We further learn, from
     the "Spectator" (No. 266), that she was the Lady B. to whom
     Wycherley addressed his ironical dedication of "The Plain Dealer,"
     which is considered as a masterpiece of raillery.  It is worthy of
     remark that the fair sex may justly complain of almost every word in
     the English language designating a woman having, at some time or
     another, been used as a term of reproach; for we find Mother, Madam,
     Mistress, and Miss, all denoting women of bad character; and here
     Pepys adds the title of my Lady to the number, and completes the
     ungracious catalogue.--B.]

and her ladies; and their there dancing naked, and all the roguish things
in the world.  But, Lord! what loose cursed company was this, that I was
in to-night, though full of wit; and worth a man's being in for once, to
know the nature of it, and their manner of talk, and lives.  Thence set
Rolt and some of [them] at the New Exchange, and so I home, and my
business being done at the office, I to bed.

31st (Lord's day).  Up, and to church in the morning.  At noon I sent for
Mr. Mills and his wife and daughter to dine, and they dined with me, and
W. Hewer, and very good company, I being in good humour.  They gone to
church, comes Mr. Tempest, and he and I sang a psalm or two, and so
parted, and I by water to the New Exchange, and there to Mrs. Pierces,
where Knepp, and she, and W. Howe, and Mr. Pierce, and little Betty, over
to Fox Hall, and there walked and supped with great pleasure. Here was
Mrs. Manuel also, and mighty good company, and good mirth in making W.
Howe spend his six or seven shillings, and so they called him altogether
"Cully."  So back, and at Somerset-stairs do understand that a boy is
newly drowned, washing himself there, and they cannot find his body.  So
seeing them home, I home by water, W. Howe going with me, and after some
talk he lay at my house, and all to bed.  Here I hear that Mrs. Davis is
quite gone from the Duke of York's house, and Gosnell comes in her room,
which I am glad of.  At the play at Court the other night, Mrs. Davis was
there; and when she was to come to dance her jigg, the Queene would not
stay to see it, which people do think it was out of displeasure at her
being the King's whore, that she could not bear it. My Lady Castlemayne
is, it seems, now mightily out of request, the King coming little to her,
and thus she mighty melancholy and discontented.

     ETEXT EDITOR'S BOOKMARKS:

     And will not kiss a woman since his wife's death
     Beating of a poor little dog to death, letting it lie
     City to be burned, and the Papists to cut our throats
     Disorder in the pit by its raining in, from the cupola
     Down to the Whey house and drank some and eat some curds
     Eat some butter and radishes
     Little company there, which made it very unpleasing
     So time do alter, and do doubtless the like in myself
     There setting a poor man to keep my place
     Whom I find in bed, and pretended a little not well



                THE DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS M.A. F.R.S.

            CLERK OF THE ACTS AND SECRETARY TO THE ADMIRALTY

    TRANSCRIBED FROM THE SHORTHAND MANUSCRIPT IN THE PEPYSIAN LIBRARY
 MAGDALENE COLLEGE CAMBRIDGE BY THE REV. MYNORS BRIGHT M.A. LATE FELLOW
                      AND PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE

                              (Unabridged)

                      WITH LORD BRAYBROOKE'S NOTES

                        EDITED WITH ADDITIONS BY

                        HENRY B. WHEATLEY F.S.A.

                          DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS.
                               JUNE & JULY
                                   1668

June 1st.  Up and with Sir J. Minnes to Westminster, and in the Hall there
I met with Harris and Rolt, and carried them to the Rhenish wine-house,
where I have not been in a morning--nor any tavern, I think, these seven
years and more.  Here I did get the words of a song of Harris that I
wanted.  Here also Mr. Young and Whistler by chance met us, and drank with
us.  Thence home, and to prepare business against the afternoon, and did
walk an hour in the garden with Sir W. Warren, who do tell me of the great
difficulty he is under in the business of his accounts with the
Commissioners of Parliament, and I fear some inconveniences and troubles
may be occasioned thereby to me.  So to dinner, and then with Sir J.
Minnes to White Hall, and there attended the Lords of the Treasury and
also a committee of Council with the Duke of York about the charge of this
year's fleete, and thence I to Westminster and to Mrs. Martin's, and did
hazer what je would con her, and did once toker la thigh de su landlady,
and thence all alone to Fox Hall, and walked and saw young Newport, and
two more rogues of the town, seize on two ladies, who walked with them an
hour with their masks on; perhaps civil ladies; and there I left them, and
so home, and thence to Mr. Mills's, where I never was before, and here
find, whom I indeed saw go in, and that did make me go thither, Mrs.
Hallworthy and Mrs. Andrews, and here supped, and, extraordinary merry
till one in the morning, Mr. Andrews coming to us: and mightily pleased
with this night's company and mirth I home to bed. Mrs. Turner, too, was
with us.

2nd.  Up, and to the office, where all the morning.  At noon home to
dinner, and there dined with me, besides my own people, W. Batelier and
Mercer, and we very merry.  After dinner, they gone, only Mercer and I to
sing a while, and then parted, and I out and took a coach, and called
Mercer at their back-door, and she brought with her Mrs. Knightly,  a
little pretty sober girl, and I carried them to Old Ford, a town by Bow,
where I never was before, and there walked in the fields very pleasant,
and sang: and so back again, and stopped and drank at the Gun, at Mile
End, and so to the Old Exchange door, and did buy them a pound of
cherries, cost me 2s., and so set them down again; and I to my little
mercer's Finch, that lives now in the Minories, where I have left my
cloak, and did here baiser su moher, a belle femme, and there took my
cloak which I had left there, and so by water, it being now about nine
o'clock, down to Deptford, where I have not been many a day, and there it
being dark I did by agreement aller a la house de Bagwell, and there after
a little playing and baisando we did go up in the dark a su camera .  .  .
and to my boat again, and against the tide home.  Got there by twelve
o'clock, taking into my boat, for company, a man that desired a passage--a
certain western bargeman, with whom I had good sport, talking of the old
woman of Woolwich, and telling him the whole story.

3rd.  Up, and to the office, where busy till g o'clock, and then to White
Hall, to the Council-chamber, where I did present the Duke of York with an
account of the charge of the present fleete, to his satisfaction; and this
being done, did ask his leave for my going out of town five or six days,
which he did give me, saying, that my diligence in the King's business was
such, that I ought not to be denied when my own business called me any
whither.  Thence with Sir D. Gawden to Westminster, where I did take a
turn or two, and met Roger Pepys, who is mighty earnest for me to stay
from going into the country till he goes, and to bring my people thither
for some time: but I cannot, but will find another time this summer for
it.  Thence with him home, and there to the office till noon, and then
with Lord Brouncker, Sir J. Minnes, and Sir G. Carteret, upon whose
accounts they have been this day to the Three Tuns to dinner, and thence
back again home, and after doing a little business I by coach to the
King's house, and there saw good, part of "The Scornfull Lady," and that
done, would have takn out Knepp, but she was engaged, and so to my Lord
Crew's to visit him; from whom I learn nothing but that there hath been
some controversy at the Council-table, about my Lord Sandwich's signing,
where some would not have had him, in the treaty with Portugall; but all,
I think, is over in it.  Thence by coach to Westminster to the Hall, and
thence to the Park, where much good company, and many fine ladies; and in
so handsome a hackney I was, that I believe Sir W. Coventry and others,
who looked on me, did take me to be in one of my own, which I was a little
troubled for.  So to the lodge, and drank a cup of new milk, and so home,
and there to Mrs. Turner's, and sat and talked with her, and then home to
bed, having laid my business with W. Hewer to go out of town Friday next,
with hopes of a great deal of pleasure.

4th.  Up, and to the office, where all the morning, and at noon home to
dinner, where Mr. Clerke, the solicitor, dined with me and my clerks.
After dinner I carried and set him down at the Temple, he observing to me
how St. Sepulchre's church steeple is repaired already a good deal, and
the Fleet Bridge is contracted for by the City to begin to be built this
summer, which do please me mightily.  I to White Hall, and walked through
the Park for a little ayre; and so back to the Council-chamber, to the
Committee of the Navy, about the business of fitting the present fleete,
suitable to the money given, which, as the King orders it, and by what
appears, will be very little; and so as I perceive the Duke of York will
have nothing to command, nor can intend to go abroad.  But it is pretty to
see how careful these great men are to do every thing so as they may
answer it to the Parliament, thinking themselves safe in nothing but where
the judges, with whom they often advise, do say the matter is doubtful;
and so they take upon themselves then to be the chief persons to interpret
what is doubtful.  Thence home, and all the evening to set matters in
order against my going to Brampton to-morrow, being resolved upon my
journey, and having the Duke of York's leave again to-day; though I do
plainly see that I can very ill be spared now, there being much business,
especially about this, which I have attended the Council about, and I the
man that am alone consulted with; and, besides, my Lord Brouncker is at
this time ill, and Sir W. Pen.  So things being put in order at the
Office, I home to do the like there; and so to bed.

5th (Friday).

     [The rough notes for the journal from this time to the 17th of June
     are contained on five leaves, inserted in the book; and after them
     follow several pages left blank for the fair copy which was never
     made.]

At Barnet, for milk, 6d.  On the highway, to menders of the highway, 6d.
Dinner at Stevenage, 5s. 6d.

6th (Saturday).  Spent at Huntingdon with Bowles, and Appleyard, and
Shepley, 2s.

7th (Sunday).  My father, for money lent, and horse-hire L1 11s.

8th (Monday).  Father's servants (father having in the garden told me bad
stories of my wife's ill words), 14s.; one that helped at the horses, 2s.;
menders of the highway, 2s.  Pleasant country to Bedford, where, while
they stay, I rode through the town; and a good country-town; and there,
drinking, 1s.  We on to Newport; and there 'light, and I and W. Hewer to
the Church, and there give the boy 1s.  So to Buckingham, a good old town.
Here I to see the Church, which very good, and the leads, and a school in
it: did give the sexton's boy 1s.  A fair bridge here, with many arches:
vexed at my people's making me lose so much time; reckoning, 13s. 4d.
Mighty pleased with the pleasure of the ground all the day.  At night to
Newport Pagnell; and there a good pleasant country-town, but few people in
it.  A very fair--and like a Cathedral--Church; and I saw the leads, and a
vault that goes far under ground, and here lay with Betty Turner's
sparrow: the town, and so most of this country, well watered.  Lay here
well, and rose next day by four o'clock: few people in the town: and so
away.  Reckoning for supper, 19s. 6d.; poor, 6d. Mischance to the coach,
but no time lost.

9th (Tuesday).  When come to Oxford, a very sweet place: paid our guide,
L1 2s. 6d.; barber, 2s. 6d.; book, Stonage, 4s.

     [This must have been either Inigo Jones's "The most notable
     Antiquity of Great Britain vulgarly called Stonehenge," printed in
     1655, or "Chorea Gigantum, or the most famous Antiquity of Great
     Britain, vulgarly called Stones Heng, standing on Salisbury Plain,
     restor'd to the Danes," by Walter Charleton, M.D., and published in
     1663.]

To dinner; and then out with my wife and people, and landlord: and to him
that showed us the schools and library, 10s.; to him that showed us All
Souls' College, and Chichly's picture, 5s.  So to see Christ Church with
my wife, I seeing several others very fine alone, with W. Hewer, before
dinner, and did give the boy that went with me 1s.  Strawberries, 1s. 2d.
Dinner and servants, L1 0s. 6d.  After come home from the schools, I out
with the landlord to Brazen-nose College;--to the butteries, and in the
cellar find the hand of the Child of Hales, .  .  .  long.  Butler, 2s.
Thence with coach and people to Physic-garden, 1s.  So to Friar Bacon's
study: I up and saw it, and give the man 1s.  Bottle of sack for landlord,
2s.  Oxford mighty fine place; and well seated, and cheap entertainment.
At night come to Abingdon, where had been a fair of custard; and met many
people and scholars going home; and there did get some pretty good musick,
and sang and danced till supper: 5s.

10th (Wednesday).  Up, and walked to the Hospitall:--[Christ's
Hospital]--very large and fine; and pictures of founders, and the History'
of the Hospitall; and is said to be worth; L700 per annum; and that Mr.
Foly was here lately to see how their lands were settled; and here, in old
English, the story of the occasion of it, and a rebus at the bottom. So
did give the poor, which they would not take but in their box, 2s. 6d.  So
to the inn, and paid the reckoning and what not, 13s.  So forth towards
Hungerford, led this good way by our landlord, one Heart, an old but very
civil and well-spoken man, more than I ever heard, of his quality.  He
gone, we forward; and I vexed at my people's not minding the way.  So come
to Hungerford, where very good trouts, eels, and crayfish. Dinner: a mean
town.  At dinner there, 12s.  Thence set out with a guide, who saw us to
Newmarket-heath, and then left us, 3s. 6d.  So all over the Plain by the
sight of the steeple, the Plain high and low, to Salisbury, by night; but
before I come to the town, I saw a great fortification, and there 'light,
and to it and in it; and find it prodigious, so as to frighten me to be in
it all alone at that time of night, it being dark.  I understand, since,
it to be that, that is called Old Sarum.  Come to the George Inne, where
lay in a silk bed; and very good diet.  To supper; then to bed.

11th (Thursday).  Up, and W. Hewer and I up and down the town, and find it
a very brave place.  The river goes through every street; and a most
capacious market-place.  The city great, I think greater than Hereford.
But the Minster most admirable; as big, I think, and handsomer than
Westminster: and a most large Close about it, and houses for the Officers
thereof, and a fine palace for the Bishop.  So to my lodging back, and
took out my wife and people to shew them the town and Church; but they
being at prayers, we could not be shown the Quire.  A very good organ; and
I looked in, and saw the Bishop, my friend Dr. Ward.  Thence to the inne;
and there not being able to hire coach-horses, and not willing to use our
own, we got saddle-horses, very dear.  Boy that went to look for them, 6d.
So the three women behind W. Hewer, Murford, and our guide, and I single
to Stonage; over the Plain and some great hills, even to fright us.  Come
thither, and find them as prodigious as any tales I ever heard of them,
and worth going this journey to see.  God knows what their use was! they
are hard to tell, but yet maybe told.  Give the shepherd-woman, for
leading our horses, 4d.  So back by Wilton, my Lord Pembroke's house,
which we could not see, he being just coming to town; but the situation I
do not like, nor the house promise much, it being in a low but rich
valley.  So back home; and there being 'light, we to the Church, and there
find them at prayers again, so could not see the Quire; but I sent the
women home, and I did go in, and saw very many fine tombs, and among the
rest some very ancient, of the Montagus.

     [The Montacutes, from whom Lord Sandwich's family claimed descent:
     --B.]

So home to dinner; and, that being done, paid the reckoning, which was so
exorbitant; and particular in rate of my horses, and 7s. 6d. for bread and
beer, that I was mad, and resolve to trouble the master about it, and get
something for the poor; and come away in that humour: L2 5s. 6d. Servants,
1s. 6d.; poor, 1s.; guide to the Stones, 2s.; poor woman in the street,
1s.; ribbands, 9d.; washwoman, 1s.; sempstress for W. Hewer, 3s.; lent W.
Hewer, 3s.  Thence about six o'clock, and with a guide went over the
smooth Plain indeed till night; and then by a happy mistake, and that
looked like an adventure, we were carried out of our way to a town where
we would lye, since we could not go so far as we would.  And there with
great difficulty come about ten at night to a little inn, where we were
fain to go into a room where a pedlar was in bed, and made him rise; and
there wife and I lay, and in a truckle-bed Betty Turner and Willett.  But
good beds, and the master of the house a sober, understanding man, and I
had good discourse with him about this country's matters, as wool, and
corne, and other things.  And he also merry, and made us mighty merry at
supper, about manning the new ship, at Bristol, with none but men whose
wives do master them; and it seems it is become in reproach to some men of
estate that are such hereabouts, that this is become common talk.  By and
by to bed, glad of this mistake, because, it seems, had we gone on as we
intended, we could not have passed with our coach, and must have lain on
the Plain all night.  This day from Salisbury I wrote by the post my
excuse for not coming home, which I hope will do, for I am resolved to see
the Bath, and, it may be, Bristol.

12th (Friday).  Up, finding our beds good, but lousy; which made us merry.
We set out, the reckoning and servants coming to 9s. 6d.; my guide
thither, 2s.; coachman, advanced, 10s.  So rode a very good way, led to my
great content by our landlord to Philips-Norton, with great pleasure,
being now come into Somersetshire; where my wife and Deb. mightily joyed
thereat,--[They were natives of that county.-B.]--I commending the
country, as indeed it deserves.  And the first town we came to was
Brekington, where, we stopping for something for the horses, we called two
or three little boys to us, and pleased ourselves with their manner of
speech, and did make one of them kiss Deb., and another say the Lord's
Prayer (hallowed be thy kingdom come).  At Philips-Norton I walked to the
Church, and there saw a very ancient tomb of some Knight Templar, I think;
and here saw the tombstone whereon there were only two heads cut, which,
the story goes, and credibly, were two sisters, called the Fair Maids of
Foscott, that had two bodies upward and one belly, and there lie buried.
Here is also a very fine ring of six bells, and they mighty tuneable.
Having dined very well, 10s., we come before night to the Bath; where I
presently stepped out with my landlord, and saw the baths, with people in
them.  They are not so large as I expected, but yet pleasant; and the town
most of stone, and clean, though the streets generally narrow.  I home,
and being weary, went to bed without supper; the rest supping.

13th (Saturday).  Up at four o'clock, being by appointment called up to
the Cross Bath, where we were carried one after one another, myself, and
wife, and Betty Turner, Willet, and W. Hewer.  And by and by, though we
designed to have done before company come, much company come; very fine
ladies; and the manner pretty enough, only methinks it cannot be clean to
go so many bodies together in the same water.  Good conversation among
them that are acquainted here, and stay together.  Strange to see how hot
the water is; and in some places, though this is the most temperate bath,
the springs so hot as the feet not able to endure.  But strange to see,
when women and men herein, that live all the season in these waters, that
cannot but be parboiled, and look like the creatures of the bath! Carried
away, wrapped in a sheet, and in a chair, home; and there one after
another thus carried, I staying above two hours in the water, home to bed,
sweating for an hour; and by and by, comes musick to play to me,
extraordinary good as ever I heard at London almost, or anywhere: 5s. Up,
to go to Bristol, about eleven o'clock, and paying my landlord that was
our guide from Chiltern, 10s., and the serjeant of the bath, 10s., and the
man that carried us in chairs, 3s. 6d.  Set out towards Bristoll, and come
thither (in a coach hired to spare our own horses); the way bad, but
country good, about two o'clock, where set down at the Horse'shoe, and
there, being trimmed by a very handsome fellow, 2s., walked with my wife
and people through the city, which is in every respect another London,
that one can hardly know it, to stand in the country, no more than that.
No carts, it standing generally on vaults, only dog-carts.

     ["They draw all their heavy goods here on sleds, or sledges, which
     they call 'gee hoes,' without wheels, which kills a multitude of
     horses."  Another writer says, "They suffer no carts to be used in
     the city, lest, as some say, the shake occasioned by them on the
     pavement should affect the Bristol milk (the sherry) in the vaults,
     which is certainly had here in the greatest perfection."  An order
     of Common Council occurs in 1651 to prohibit the use of carts and
     waggons-only suffering drays.  "Camden in giving our city credit for
     its cleanliness in forming 'goutes,' says they use sledges here
     instead of carts, lest they destroy the arches beneath which are the
     goutes."--Chilcott's New Guide to Bristol, &c.,]

So to the Three ..Crowns Tavern I was directed; but, when I come in, the
master told me that he had newly given over the selling of wine; it seems,
grown rich; and so went to the Sun; and there Deb. going with W. Hewer and
Betty Turner to see her uncle [Butts], and leaving my wife with the
mistress of the house, I to see the quay, which is a most large and noble
Vlace; and to see the new ship building by Bally, neither he nor Furzer
being in town.  It will be a fine ship.  Spoke with the foreman, and did
give the boys that kept the cabin 2s.  Walked back to the Sun, where I
find Deb. come back, and with her, her uncle, a sober merchant, very good
company, and so like one of our sober, wealthy, London merchants, as
pleased me mightily.  Here we dined, and much good talk with him, 7s. 6d.:
a messenger to Sir John Knight, who was not at home, 6d.  Then walked with
him [Butts] and my wife and company round the quay, and to the ship; and
he shewed me the Custom-house, and made me understand many things of the
place, and led us through Marsh Street, where our girl was born.  But,
Lord!  the joy that was among the old poor people of the place, to see
Mrs. Willet's daughter, it seems her mother being a brave woman and
mightily beloved!  And so brought us a back way by surprize to his house,
where a substantial good house, and well furnished; and did give us good
entertainment of strawberries, a whole venison-pasty, cold, and plenty of
brave wine, and above all Bristoll milk,

     [A sort of rum punch (milk punch), which, and turtle, were products
     of the trade of Bristol with the West Indies.  So Byron says in the
     first edition of his "English Bards and Scotch Reviewers"

              "Too much in turtle Bristol's sons delight,
               Too much oer bowls of rack prolong the night."

     These lines will not be found in the modern editions; but the
     following are substituted:

              "Four turtle feeder's verse must needs he flat,
               Though Bristol bloat him with the verdant fat."

     Lord Macaulay says of the collations with which the sugar-refiners
     of   Bristol regaled their visitors: "The repast was dressed in the
     furnace, And was accompanied by a rich brewage made of the best
     Spanish wine, and celebrated over the whole kingdom as Bristol milk"
     ("Hist. of England," vol. i., p. 335)--B.]

where comes in another poor woman, who, hearing that Deb. was here, did
come running hither, and with her eyes so lull of tears, and heart so full
of joy, that she could not speak when she come in, that it made me weep
too: I protest that I was not able to speak to her, which I would have
done, to have diverted her tears.  His wife a good woman, and so sober and
substantiall as I was never more pleased anywhere.  Servant-maid, 2s.  So
thence took leave, and he with us through the city, where in walking I
find the city pay him great respect, and he the like to the meanest, which
pleased me mightily.  He shewed us the place where the merchants meet
here, and a fine Cross yet standing, like Cheapside.  And so to the
Horseshoe, where paid the reckoning, 2s. 6d.  We back, and by moonshine to
the Bath again, about ten-o'clock: bad way; and giving the coachman 1s.,
went all of us to bed.

14th (Sunday).  Up, and walked up and down the town, and saw a pretty good
market-place, and many good streets, and very fair stone-houses. And so to
the great Church, and there saw Bishop Montagu's tomb;

     [James Montagu, Bishop of Bath and Wells in 1608, and of Winchester
     in 1616--died 1618.  He was uncle to the Earl of Sandwich, whose
     mother was Pepys's aunt.  Hence Pepys's curiosity respecting the
     tomb.--B.]

and, when placed, did there see many brave people come, and, among others,
two men brought in, in litters, and set down in the chancel to hear: but I
did not know one face.  Here a good organ; but a vain, pragmatical fellow
preached a ridiculous, affected sermon, that made me angry, and some
gentlemen that sat next me, and sang well.  So home, walking round the
walls of the City, which are good, and the battlements all whole.  The
sexton of the church is.  So home to dinner, and after dinner comes Mr.
Butts again to see me, and he and I to church, where the same idle fellow
preached; and I slept most of the sermon.  Thence home, and took my wife
out and the girls, and come to this church again, to see it, and look over
the monuments, where, among others, Dr. Venner and Pelting, and a lady of
Sir W. Walter's; he lying with his face broken. So to the fields a little
and walked, and then home and had my head looked [at], and so to supper,
and then comes my landlord to me, a sober understanding man, and did give
me a good account of the antiquity of this town and Wells; and of two
Heads, on two pillars, in Wells church. But he a Catholick.  So he gone, I
to bed.

15th (Monday).  Up, and with Mr. Butts to look into the baths, and find
the King and Queen's full of a mixed sort, of good and bad, and the Cross
only almost for the gentry.  So home and did the like with my wife, and
did pay my guides, two women, 5s.; one man, 2s. 6d.; poor, 6d.; woman to
lay my foot-cloth, 1s.  So to our inne, and there eat and paid reckoning,
L1 8s. 6d.; servants, 3s.; poor, 1s.; lent the coach man, 10s.  Before I
took coach, I went to make a boy dive in the King's bath, 1s.  I paid also
for my coach and a horse to Bristol, L1 1s. 6d.  Took coach, and away,
without any of the company of the other stage-coaches, that go out of this
town to-day; and rode all day with some trouble, for fear of being out of
our way, over the Downes, where the life of the shepherds is, in fair
weather only, pretty.  In the afternoon come to Abebury, where, seeing
great stones like those of Stonage standing up, I stopped, and took a
countryman of that town, and he carried me and shewed me a place trenched
in, like Old Sarum almost, with great stones pitched in it, some bigger
than those at Stonage in figure, to my great admiration: and he told me
that most people of learning, coming by, do come and view them, and that
the King did so: and that the Mount cast hard by is called Selbury, from
one King Seall buried there, as tradition says.  I did give this man 1s.
So took coach again, seeing one place with great high stones pitched
round, which, I believe, was once some particular building, in some
measure like that of Stonage.  But, about a mile off, it was prodigious to
see how full the Downes are of great stones; and all along the vallies,
stones of considerable bigness, most of them growing certainly  out of the
ground so thick as to cover the ground, which makes me think the less of
the wonder of Stonage, for hence they might undoubtedly supply themselves
with stones, as well as those at Abebury. In my way did give to the poor
and menders of the highway 3s.  Before night, come to  Marlborough, and
lay at the Hart; a good house, and a pretty fair town for a street or two;
and what is most singular is, their houses on one side having their
pent-houses supported with pillars, which makes it a good walk.  My wife
pleased with all, this evening reading of "Mustapha" to me till supper,
and then to supper, and had musique whose innocence pleased me, and I did
give them 3s.  So to bed, and lay well all night, and long, so as all the
five coaches that come this day from Bath, as well as we, were gone out of
the town before six.

16th (Tuesday).  So paying the reckoning, 14s. 4d., and servants, 2s.,
poor 1s., set out; and overtook one coach and kept a while company with
it, till one of our horses losing a shoe, we stopped and drank and spent
1s.  So on, and passing through a good part of this county of Wiltshire,
saw a good house of Alexander Popham's, and another of my Lord Craven's, I
think in Barkeshire.  Come to Newbery, and there dined, which cost me, and
musick, which a song of the old courtier of Queen Elizabeth's, and how he
was changed upon the coming in of the King, did please me mightily, and I
did cause W. Hewer to write it out, 3s. 6d.  Then comes the reckoning,
forced to change gold, 8s. 7d.; servants and poor, 1s. 6d.  So out, and
lost our way, which made me vexed, but come into it again; and in the
evening betimes come to Reading, and there heard my wife read more of
"Mustapha," and then to supper, and then I to walk about the town, which
is a very great one, I think bigger than Salsbury: a river runs through
it, in seven branches, and unite in one, in one part of the town, and runs
into the Thames half-a-mile off one odd sign of the Broad Face.  W. Hewer
troubled with the headake we had none of his company last night, nor all
this day nor night to talk.  Then to my inn, and so to bed.

17th (Wednesday).  Rose, and paying the reckoning, 12s. 6d.; servants and
poor, 2s. 6d.; musick, the worst we have had, coming to our chamber-door,
but calling us by wrong names, we lay; so set out with one coach in
company, and through Maydenhead, which I never saw before, to Colebrooke
by noon; the way mighty good; and there dined, and fitted ourselves a
little to go through London, anon.  Somewhat out of humour all day,
reflecting on my wife's neglect of things, and impertinent humour got by
this liberty of being from me, which she is never to be trusted with; for
she is a fool.  Thence pleasant way to London, before night, and find all
very well, to great content; and there to talk with my wife, and saw Sir
W. Pen, who is well again.  I hear of the ill news by the great fire at
Barbados.  By and by home, and there with my people to supper, all in
pretty good humour, though I find my wife hath something in her gizzard,
that only waits an opportunity of being provoked to bring up; but I will
not, for my content-sake, give it.  So I to bed, glad to find all so well
here, and slept well.

          [The rough notes end here.]

18th.  Up betimes and to the office, there to set my papers in order and
books, my office having been new whited and windows made clean, and so to
sit, where all the morning, and did receive a hint or two from my Lord
Anglesey, as if he thought much of my taking the ayre as I have done; but
I care not a turd; but whatever the matter is, I think he hath some
ill-will to me, or at least an opinion that I am more the servant of the
Board than I am.  At noon home to dinner, where my wife still in a
melancholy, fusty humour, and crying, and do not tell me plainly what it
is; but I by little words find that she hath heard of my going to plays,
and carrying people abroad every day, in her absence; and that I cannot
help but the storm will break out, I think, in a little time.  After
dinner carried her by coach to St. James's, where she sat in the coach
till I to my Lady Peterborough's, who tells me, among other things, her
Lord's good words to the Duke of York lately, about my Lord Sandwich, and
that the Duke of York is kind to my Lord Sandwich, which I am glad to
hear: my business here was about her Lord's pension from Tangier.  Here
met with Povy, who tells me how hard Creed is upon him, though he did give
him, about six months since, I think he said, fifty pieces in gold; and
one thing there is in his accounts that I fear may touch me, but I shall
help it, I hope.  So my wife not speaking a word, going nor coming, nor
willing to go to a play, though a new one, I to the Office, and did much
business.  At night home, where supped Mr. Turner and his wife, and Betty
and Mercer and Pelling, as merry as the ill, melancholy humour that my
wife was in, would let us, which vexed me; but I took no notice of it,
thinking that will be the best way, and let it wear away itself.  After
supper, parted, and to bed; and my wife troubled all night, and about one
o'clock goes out of the bed to the girl's bed, which did trouble me, she
crying and sobbing, without telling the cause.  By and by she comes back
to me, and still crying; I then rose, and would have sat up all night, but
she would have me come to bed again; and being pretty well pacified, we to
sleep.

19th.  When between two and three in the morning we were waked with my
maids crying out, "Fire, fire, in Markelane!" So I rose and looked out,
and it was dreadful; and strange apprehensions in me, and us all, of being
presently burnt.  So we all rose; and my care presently was to secure my
gold, and plate, and papers, and could quickly have done it, but I went
forth to see where it was; and the whole town was presently in the
streets; and I found it in a new-built house that stood alone in
Minchin-lane, over against the Cloth-workers'-hall, which burned
furiously: the house not yet quite finished; and the benefit of brick was
well seen, for it burnt all inward, and fell down within itself; so no
fear of doing more hurt.  So homeward, and stopped at Mr. Mills's, where
he and she at the door, and Mrs. Turner, and Betty, and Mrs. Hollworthy,
and there I stayed and talked, and up to the church leads, and saw the
fire, which spent itself, till all fear over.  I home, and there we to bed
again, and slept pretty well, and about nine rose, and then my wife fell
into her blubbering again, and at length had a request to make to me,
which was, that she might go into France, and live there, out of trouble;
and then all come out, that I loved pleasure and denied her any, and a
deal of do; and I find that there have been great fallings out between my
father and her, whom, for ever hereafter, I must keep asunder, for they
cannot possibly agree.  And I said nothing, but, with very mild words and
few, suffered her humour to spend, till we begun to be very quiet, and I
think all will be over, and friends, and so I to the office, where all the
morning doing business.  Yesterday I heard how my Lord Ashly is like to
die, having some imposthume in his breast, that he hath been fain to be
cut into the body.

     ["Such an operation was performed in this year, after a consultation
     of medical men, and chiefly by Locke's advice, and the wound was
     afterwards always kept open, a silver pipe being inserted.  This
     saved Lord Ashley's life, and gave him health"--Christie's Life of
     the first Earl of Shaftesbury, vol. ii., p. 34.  'Tapski' was a name
     given to Shaftesbury in derision, and vile defamers described the
     abscess, which had originated in a carriage accident in Holland, as
     the result of extreme dissipation.  Lines by Duke, a friend and
     imitator of Dryden:

              "The working ferment of his active mind,
               In his weak body's cask with pain confined,
               Would burst the rotten vessel where 'tis pent,
               But that 'tis tapt to give the treason vent."]

At noon home to dinner, and thence by coach to White Hall, where we
attended the Duke of York in his closet, upon our usual business.  And
thence out, and did see many of the Knights of the Garter, with the King
and Duke of York, going into the Privychamber, to elect the Elector of
Saxony into that Order, who, I did hear the Duke of York say, was a good
drinker: I know not upon what score this compliment is done him.  Thence
with W. Pen, who is in great pain of the gowte, by coach round by Holborne
home, he being at every kennel full of pain. Thence home, and by and by
comes my wife and Deb. home, have been at the King's playhouse to-day,
thinking to spy me there; and saw the new play, "Evening Love," of
Dryden's, which, though the world commends, she likes not.  So to supper
and talk, and all in good humour, and then to bed, where I slept not well,
from my apprehensions of some trouble about some business of Mr. Povy's he
told me of the other day.

20th.  Up, and talked with my wife all in good humour, and so to the
office, where all the morning, and then home to dinner, and so she and I
alone to the King's house, and there I saw this new play my wife saw
yesterday, and do not like it, it being very smutty, and nothing so good
as "The Maiden Queen," or "The Indian Emperour," of his making, that I was
troubled at it; and my wife tells me wholly (which he confesses a little
in the epilogue) taken out of the "Illustre Bassa."  So she to Unthanke's
and I to Mr. Povy, and there settled some business; and here talked of
things, and he thinks there will be great revolutions, and that Creed will
be a great man, though a rogue, he being a man of the old strain, which
will now be up again.  So I took coach, and set Povy down at Charing
Cross, and took my wife up, and calling at the New Exchange at Smith's
shop, and kissed her pretty hand, and so we home, and there able to do
nothing by candlelight, my eyes being now constantly so bad that I must
take present advice or be blind.  So to supper, grieved for my eyes, and
to bed.

21st (Lord's day).  Up, and to church, and home and dined with my wife and
Deb. alone, but merry and in good humour, which is, when all is done, the
greatest felicity of all, and after dinner she to read in the "Illustre
Bassa" the plot of yesterday's play, which is most exactly the same, and
so to church I alone, and thence to see Sir W. Pen, who is ill again, and
then home, and there get my wife to read to me till supper, and then to
bed.

22nd.  Up, and with Balty to St. James's, and there presented him to Mr.
Wren about his being Muster-Master this year, which will be done.  So up
to wait on the Duke of York, and thence, with W. Coventry, walked to White
Hall good discourse about the Navy, where want of money undoes us. Thence
to the Harp and Ball I to drink, and so to the Coffee-house in Covent
Garden; but met with nobody but Sir Philip Howard, who shamed me before
the whole house there, in commendation of my speech in Parliament, and
thence I away home to dinner alone, my wife being at her tailor's, and
after dinner comes Creed, whom I hate, to speak with me, and before him
comes Mrs. Daniel about business .  .  .  .  She gone, Creed and I to the
King's playhouse, and saw an act or two of the new play ["Evening's Love"]
again, but like it not.  Calling this day at Herringman's, he tells me
Dryden do himself call it but a fifth-rate play.  Thence with him to my
Lord Brouncker's, where a Council of the Royall Society; and there heard
Mr. Harry Howard's' noble offers about ground for our College, and his
intentions of building his own house there most nobly. My business was to
meet Mr. Boyle, which I did, and discoursed about my eyes; and he did give
me the best advice he could, but refers me to one Turberville, of
Salsbury, lately come to town, which I will go to.

     [Daubigny Turberville, of Oriel College; created M.D. at
     Oxford,1660.  He was a physician of some eminence, and, dying at
     Salisbury on the 21st April, 1696, aged eighty-five, he was buried
     in the cathedral, where his monument remains.  Cassan, in his "Lives
     of the Bishops of Sarum," part iii., p. 103, has reprinted an
     interesting account of Turberville, from the "Memoir of Bishop Seth
     Ward," published in 1697, by Dr. Walter Pope.  Turberville was born
     at Wayford, co. Somerset, in 1612, and became an expert oculist; and
     probably Pepys received great benefit from his advice, as his vision
     does not appear to have failed during the many years that he lived
     after discontinuing the Diary.  The doctor died rich, and
     subsequently to his decease his sister Mary, inheriting all his
     prescriptions, and knowing how to use them, practised as an oculist
     in London with good reputation.--B.]

Thence home, where the streets full, at our end of the town, removing
their wine against the Act begins, which will be two days hence, to raise
the price.  I did get my store in of Batelier this night.  So home to
supper and to bed.

23rd.  Up, and all the morning at the office.  At noon home to dinner, and
so to the office again all the afternoon, and then to Westminster to Dr.
Turberville about my eyes, whom I met with: and he did discourse, I
thought, learnedly about them; and takes time before he did prescribe me
any thing, to think of it.  So I away with my wife and Deb., whom I left
at Unthanke's, and so to Hercules Pillars, and there we three supped on
cold powdered beef, and thence home and in the garden walked a good while
with Deane, talking well of the Navy miscarriages and faults.  So home to
bed.

24th.  Up, and Creed and Colonell Atkins come to me about sending coals to
Tangier: and upon that most of the morning.  Thence Creed and I to
Alderman Backewell's about Tangier business of money, and thence I by
water (calling and drinking, but not baisado, at Michell's) to
Westminster, but it being holyday did no business, only to Martin's .  .  .
and so home again by water, and busy till dinner, and then with wife,
Mercer, Deb., and W. Hewer to the Duke of York's playhouse, and there saw
"The Impertinents," a pretty good play; and so by water to Spring Garden,
and there supped, and so home, not very merry, only when we come home,
Mercer and I sat and sung in the garden a good while, and so to bed.

25th.  Up, and to the office all the morning, and after dinner at home to
the office again, and there all the afternoon very busy till night, and
then home to supper and to bed.

26th.  All the morning doing business at the office.  At noon, with my
Fellow-Officers, to the Dolphin, at Sir G. Carteret's charge, to dinner,
he having some accounts examined this morning.  All the afternoon we all
at Sir W. Pen's with him about the Victuallers' accounts, and then in the
evening to Charing Cross, and there took up my wife at her tailor's, and
so home and to walk in the garden, and then to sup and to bed.

27th.  At the office all the morning, at noon dined at home, and then my
wife, and Deb., and I to the King's playhouse, and saw "The Indian
Queene," but do not doat upon Nan Marshall's acting therein, as the world
talks of her excellence therein.  Thence with my wife to buy some linnen,
L13 worth, for sheets, &c., at the new shop over against the New Exchange;
[and the master, who is] come out of London--[To the Strand.]--since the
fire, says his and other tradesmen's retail trade is so great here, and
better than it was in London, that they believe they shall not return, nor
the city be ever so great for retail as heretofore.  So home and to my
business, and to bed.

28th (Lord's day).  Up, and to church, and then home to dinner, where
Betty Turner, Mercer, and Captain Deane, and after dinner to sing, Mr.
Pelting coming.  Then, they gone, Deane and I all the afternoon till night
to talk of navy matters and ships with great pleasure, and so at night, he
gone, I to supper, Pelling coming again and singing a while, then to bed.
Much talk of the French setting out their fleete afresh; but I hear
nothing that our King is alarmed at it, at all, but rather making his
fleete less.

29th.  Called up by my Lady Peterborough's servant about some business of
hers, and so to the office.  Thence by and by with Sir J. Minnes toward
St. James's, and I stop at Dr. Turberville's, and there did receive a
direction for some physic, and also a glass of something to drop into my
eyes: who gives me hopes that I may do well.  Thence to St. James's, and
thence to White Hall, where I find the Duke of York in the
Council-chamber; where the Officers of the Navy were called in about Navy
business, about calling in of more ships; the King of France having, as
the Duke of York says, ordered his fleete to come in, notwithstanding what
he had lately ordered for their staying abroad.  Thence to the Chapel, it
being St. Peter's day, and did hear an anthem of Silas Taylor's making; a
dull, old-fashioned thing, of six and seven parts, that nobody could
understand: and the Duke of York, when he come out, told me that he was a
better store-keeper than anthem-maker, and that was bad enough, too.  This
morning Mr. May' shewed me the King's new buildings at White Hall, very
fine; and among other things, his ceilings, and his houses of office.  So
home to dinner, and then with my wife to the King's playhouse--"The
Mulberry Garden," which she had not seen.  So by coach to Islington, and
round by Hackney home with much pleasure, and to supper and bed.

30th.  Up, and at the Office all the morning: then home to dinner, where a
stinking leg of mutton, the weather being very wet and hot to keep meat
in.  Then to the Office again, all the afternoon: we met about the
Victualler's new contract.  And so up, and to walk all the evening with my
wife and Mrs. Turner in the garden, till supper, about eleven at night;
and so, after supper, parted, and to bed, my eyes bad, but not worse, only
weary with working.  But, however, I very melancholy under the fear of my
eyes being spoiled, and not to be recovered; for I am come that I am not
able to readout a small letter, and yet my sight good for the little while
I can read, as ever they were, I think.



                THE DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS M.A. F.R.S.

            CLERK OF THE ACTS AND SECRETARY TO THE ADMIRALTY

   TRANSCRIBED FROM THE SHORTHAND MANUSCRIPT IN THE PEPYSIAN LIBRARY
MAGDALENE COLLEGE CAMBRIDGE BY THE REV. MYNORS BRIGHT M.A. LATE FELLOW
                      AND PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE

                              (Unabridged)

                      WITH LORD BRAYBROOKE'S NOTES

                        EDITED WITH ADDITIONS BY

                        HENRY B. WHEATLEY F.S.A.

                          DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS.
                                  JULY
                                  1668

July 1st.  Up; and all the morning we met at the office about the
Victualler's contract.  At noon home to dinner, my Cozen Roger, come newly
to town, dined with us, and mighty importunate for our coming down to
Impington, which I think to do, this Sturbridge fair.  Thence I set him
down at the Temple, and Commissioner Middleton dining the first time with
me, he and I to White Hall, and so to St. James's, where we met; and much
business with the Duke of York.  And I find the Duke of York very hot for
regulations in the Navy; and, I believe, is put on it by W. Coventry; and
I am glad of it; and particularly, he falls heavy on Chatham-yard,, and is
vexed that Lord Anglesey did, the other day, complain at the Council-table
of disorders in the Navy, and not to him. So I to White Hall to a
Committee of Tangier; and there vexed, with the importunity and clamours
of Alderman Backewell, for my acquittance for money supplied by him to the
garrison, before I have any order for paying it: so home, calling at
several places-among others, the 'Change, and on Cooper, to know when my
wife shall come to sit for her picture, which will be next week, and so
home and to walk with my wife, and then to supper and to bed.

2nd.  Called up by a letter from W. Coventry telling me that the
Commissioners of Accounts intend to summons me about Sir W. Warren's
Hamburg contract, and so I up and to W. Coventry's (he and G. Carteret
being the party concerned in it), and after conference with him about it
to satisfaction I home again to the office.  At noon home to dinner, and
then all the afternoon busy to prepare an answer to this demand of the
Commissioners of Accounts, and did discourse with Sir W. Warren about it,
and so in the evening with my wife and Deb. by coach to take ayre to
Mile-end, and so home and I to bed, vexed to be put to this frequent
trouble in things we deserve best in.

3rd.  Betimes to the office, my head full of this business.  Then by coach
to the Commissioners of Accounts at Brooke House, the first time I was
ever there, and there Sir W. Turner in the chair; and present, Lord
Halifax, Thoms[on], Gregory, Dunster, and Osborne.  I long with them, and
see them hot set on this matter; but I did give them proper and safe
answers.  Halifax, I perceive, was industrious on my side, in behalf of
his uncle Coventry, it being the business of fir W. Warren.  Vexed only at
their denial of a copy of what I set my hand to, and swore.  Here till
almost two o'clock, and then home to dinner, and set down presently what I
had done and said this day, and so abroad by water to Eagle Court in the
Strand, and there to an alehouse: met Mr. Pierce, the Surgeon, and Dr.
Clerke, Waldron, Turberville, my physician for the eyes, and Lowre, to
dissect several eyes of sheep and oxen, with great pleasure, and to my
great information.  But strange that this Turberville should be so great a
man, and yet, to this day, had seen no eyes dissected, or but once, but
desired this Dr. Lowre to give him the opportunity to see him dissect
some.  Thence to Unthanke's, to my wife, and carried her home, and there
walked in the garden, and so to supper and to bed.

4th.  Up, and to see Sir W. Coventry, and give him account of my doings
yesterday, which he well liked of, and was told thereof by my Lord Halifax
before; but I do perceive he is much concerned for this business. Gives me
advice to write a smart letter to the Duke of York about the want of money
in the Navy, and desire him to communicate it to the Commissioners of the
Treasury; for he tells me he hath hot work sometimes to contend with the
rest for the Navy, they being all concerned for some other part of the
King's expenses, which they would prefer to this, of the Navy.  He shewed
me his closet, with his round table, for him to sit in the middle, very
convenient; and I borrowed several books of him, to collect things out of
the Navy, which I have not, and so home, and there busy sitting all the
morning, and at noon dined, and then all the afternoon busy, till night,
and then to Mile-End with my wife and girl, and there drank and eat a joie
of salmon, at the Rose and Crown, our old house; and so home to bed.

5th (Lord's day).  About four in the morning took four pills of Dr.
Turberville's prescribing, for my eyes, and they wrought pretty well most
of the morning, and I did get my wife to spend the morning reading of
Wilkins's Reall Character.  At noon comes W. Hewer and Pelling, and young
Michell and his wife, and dined with us, and most of the afternoon
talking; and then at night my wife to read again, and to supper and to
bed.

6th.  Up, and to St. James's, and there attended the Duke of York, and was
there by himself told how angry he was, and did declare to my Lord
Anglesey, about his late complaining of things of the Navy to the King in
Council, and not to him; and I perceive he is mightily concerned at it,
and resolved to reform things therein.  Thence with W. Coventry walked in
the Park together a good while, he mighty kind to me.  And hear many
pretty stories of my Lord Chancellor's being heretofore made sport of by
Peter Talbot the priest, in his story of the death of Cardinall Bleau;

     [It is probable these stories, in ridicule of Clarendon, are nowhere
     recorded.  Cardinal Jean Balue was the minister of Louis XI. of
     France.  The reader will remember him in Sir W. Scott's "Quentin
     Durward."  He was confined for eleven years in an iron cage invented
     by himself in the Chateau de Loches, and died soon after he regained
     his liberty.--B.]

by Lord Cottington, in his 'Dolor de las Tyipas';

     [Gripes.  It was a joke against Lord Cottington that whenever he was
     seriously ill he declared himself a Roman Catholic, when he was well
     again he returned to the Protestant faith.]

and Tom Killigrew, in his being bred in Ram Ally, and now bound prentice
to Lord Cottington, going to Spain with L1000, and two suits of clothes.
Thence home to dinner, and thence to Mr. Cooper's, and there met my wife
and W. Hewer and Deb.; and there my wife first sat for her picture: but he
is a most admirable workman, and good company.  Here comes Harris, and
first told us how Betterton is come again upon the stage: whereupon my
wife and company to the [Duke's] house to see "Henry the Fifth;" while I
to attend the Duke of York at the Committee of the Navy, at the Council,
where some high dispute between him and W. Coventry about settling
pensions upon all Flag-Officers, while unemployed: W. Coventry against it,
and, I think, with reason.  Thence I to the playhouse, and saw a piece of
the play, and glad to see Betterton; and so with wife and Deb. to
Spring-garden, and eat a lobster, and so home in the evening and to bed.
Great doings at Paris, I hear, with their triumphs for their late
conquests!  The Duchesse of Richmond sworn last week of the queen's
Bedchamber, and the King minding little else but what he used to do--about
his women.

7th.  Up, and to the office, where Kate Joyce come to me about some
tickets of hers, but took no notice to me of her being married, but seemed
mighty pale, and doubtful what to say or do, expecting, I believe, that I
should begin; and not finding me beginning, said nothing, but, with
trouble in her face, went away.  At the office all the morning, and after
dinner also all the afternoon, and in the evening with my wife and Deb.
and Betty Turner to Unthanke's, where we are fain to go round by Newgate,
because of Fleet Bridge being under rebuilding.  They stayed there, and I
about some business, and then presently back and brought them home and
supped and Mrs. Turner, the mother, comes to us, and there late, and so to
bed.

8th.  Betimes by water to Sir W. Coventry, and there discoursed of several
things; and I find him much concerned in the present enquiries now on foot
of the Commissioners of Accounts, though he reckons himself and the rest
very safe, but vexed to see us liable to these troubles, in things wherein
we have laboured to do best.  Thence, he being to go out of town
to-morrow, to drink Banbury waters, I to the Duke of York, to attend him
about business of the Office; and find him mighty free to me, and how he
is concerned to mend things in the Navy himself, and not leave it to other
people.  So home to dinner; and then with my wife to Cooper's, and there
saw her sit; and he do do extraordinary things indeed.  So to White Hall;
and there by and by the Duke of York comes to the Robe-chamber, and spent
with us three hours till night, in hearing the business of the
Master-Attendants of Chatham, and the Store-keeper of Woolwich; and
resolves to displace them all; so hot he is of giving proofs of his
justice at this time, that it is their great fate now, to come to be
questioned at such a time as this.  Thence I to Unthanke's, and took my
wife and Deb. home, and to supper and to bed.

9th.  Up, and to the office, where sat all the morning, and after noon to
the office again till night, mighty busy getting Mr. Fist to come and help
me, my own clerks all busy, and so in the evening to ease my eyes, and
with my wife and Deb. and Betty Turner, by coach to Unthanke's and back
again, and then to supper and to bed.

10th.  Up, and to attend the Council, but all in vain, the Council
spending all the morning upon a business about the printing of the
Critickes, a dispute between the first Printer, one Bee that is dead, and
the Abstractor, who would now print his Abstract, one Poole.  So home to
dinner, and thence to Haward's to look upon an Espinette, and I did come
near the buying one, but broke off.  I have a mind to have one. So to
Cooper's; and there find my wife and W. Hewer and Deb., sitting, and
painting; and here he do work finely, though I fear it will not be so like
as I expected: but now I understand his great skill in musick, his playing
and setting to the French lute most excellently; and speaks French, and
indeed is an excellent man.  Thence, in the evening, with my people in a
glass hackney-coach to the park, but was ashamed to be seen. So to the
lodge, and drank milk, and so home to supper and to bed.

11th.  At the office all the morning.  After dinner to the King's
playhouse, to see an old play of Shirly's, called "Hide Parker" the first
day acted; where horses are brought upon the stage but it is but a very
moderate play, only an excellent epilogue spoke by Beck Marshall. Thence
home and to my office, and then to supper and to bed, and overnight took
some pills,

12th.  Which work with me pretty betimes, being Lord's day, and so I
within all day.  Busy all the morning upon some accounts with W. Hewer,
and at noon, an excellent dinner, comes Pelling and W. Howe, and the
latter staid and talked with me all the afternoon, and in the evening
comes Mr. Mills and his wife and supped and talked with me, and so to bed.
This last night Betty Michell about midnight cries out, and my wife goes
to her, and she brings forth a girl, and this afternoon the child is
christened, and my wife godmother again to a Betty.

13th.  Up, and to my office, and thence by water to White Hall to attend
the Council, but did not, and so home to dinner, and so out with my wife,
and Deb., and W. Hewer towards Cooper's, but I 'light and walked to Ducke
Lane, and there to the bookseller's; at the Bible, whose moher je have a
mind to, but elle no erat dentro, but I did there look upon and buy some
books, and made way for coming again to the man, which pleases me. Thence
to Reeves's, and there saw some, and bespoke a little perspective, and was
mightily pleased with seeing objects in a dark room.  And so to Cooper's,
and spent the afternoon with them; and it will be an excellent picture.
Thence my people all by water to Deptford, to see Balty, while I to buy my
espinette,

     [Espinette is the French term for a small harpsichord, at that time
     called in England a spinet.  It was named from a fancied resemblance
     of its quill plectra to spines or thorns.]

which I did now agree for, and did at Haward's meet with Mr. Thacker, and
heard him play on the harpsicon, so as I never heard man before, I think.
So home, it being almost night, and there find in the garden Pelling, who
hath brought Tempest, Wallington, and Pelham, to sings and there had most
excellent musick late, in the dark, with great pleasure.  Made them drink
and eat; and so with much pleasure to bed, but above all with little
Wallington.  This morning I was let blood, and did bleed about fourteen
ounces, towards curing my eyes.

14th.  Up, and to my office, where sat all the morning.  At noon home to
dinner, and thence all the afternoon hard at the office, we meeting about
the Victualler's new contract; and so into the garden, my Lady Pen, Mrs.
Turner and her daughter, my wife and I, and there supped in the dark and
were merry, and so to bed.  This day Bossc finished his copy of my
picture, which I confess I do not admire, though my wife prefers him to
Browne; nor do I think it like.  He do it for W. Hewer, who hath my wife's
also, which I like less.  This afternoon my Lady Pickering come to see us:
I busy, saw her not.  But how natural it is for us to slight people out of
power, and for people out of power to stoop to see those that while in
power they contemned!

15th.  Up, and all the morning busy at the office to my great content,
attending to the settling of papers there that I may have the more rest in
winter for my eyes by how much I do the more in the settling of all things
in the summer by daylight.  At noon home to dinner, where is brought home
the espinette I bought the other day of Haward; costs me L5. So to St.
James's, where did our ordinary business with the Duke of York. So to
Unthanke's to my wife, and with her and Deb. to visit Mrs. Pierce, whom I
do not now so much affect, since she paints.  But stayed here a while, and
understood from her how my Lady Duchesse of Monmouth is still lame, and
likely always to be so, which is a sad chance for a young [lady] to get,
only by trying of tricks in dancing.  So home, and there Captain Deane
come and spent the evening with me, to draw some finishing lines on his
fine draught of "The Resolution," the best ship, by all report, in the
world, and so to bed.  Wonderful hot all day and night, and this the first
night that I remember in my life that ever I could lie with only a sheet
and one rug.  So much I am now stronger than ever I remember myself, at
least since before I had the stone.

16th.  Up, and to the office, where Yeabsly and Lanyon come to town and to
speak with me about a matter wherein they are accused of cheating the King
before the Lords' Commissioners of Tangier, and I doubt it true, but I
have no hand in it, but will serve them what I can.  All the morning at
the office, and at noon dined at home, and then to the office again, where
we met to finish the draft of the Victualler's contract, and so I by water
with my Lord Brouncker to Arundell House, to the Royall Society, and there
saw an experiment of a dog's being tied through the back, about the spinal
artery, and thereby made void of all motion; and the artery being loosened
again, the dog recovers.  Thence to Cooper's, and saw his advance on my
wife's picture, which will be indeed very fine.  So with her to the
'Change, to buy some things, and here I first bought of the sempstress
next my bookseller's, where the pretty young girl is, that will be a great
beauty.  So home, and to supper with my wife in the garden, it being these
two days excessively hot, and so to bed.

17th.  Up, and fitted myself to discourse before the Council about
business of tickets.  So to White Hall, where waited on the Duke of York,
and then the Council about that business; and I did discourse to their
liking, only was too high to assert that nothing could be invented to
secure the King more in the business of tickets than there is; which the
Duke of Buckingham did except against, and I could have answered, but
forbore; but all liked very well.  Thence home, and with my wife and Deb.
to the King's House to see a play revived called The------, a sorry mean
play, that vexed us to sit in so much heat of the weather to hear it.
Thence to see Betty Michell newly lain in, and after a little stay we took
water and to Spring Garden, and there walked, and supped, and staid late,
and with much pleasure, and to bed.  The weather excessive hot, so as we
were forced to lie in two beds, and I only with a sheet and rug, which is
colder than ever I remember I could bear.

18th.  At the office all the morning.  At noon dined at home and Creed
with me, who I do really begin to hate, and do use him with some
reservedness.  Here was also my old acquaintance, Will Swan, to see me,
who continues a factious fanatick still, and I do use him civilly, in
expectation that those fellows may grow great again.  Thence to the
office, and then with my wife to the 'Change and Unthanke's, after having
been at Cooper's and sat there for her picture, which will be a noble
picture, but yet I think not so like as Hales's is.  So home and to my
office, and then to walk in the garden, and home to supper and to bed.
They say the King of France is making a war again, in Flanders, with the
King of Spain; the King of Spain refusing to give him all that he says was
promised him in the treaty.  Creed told me this day how when the King was
at my Lord Cornwallis's when he went last to Newmarket, that being there
on a Sunday, the Duke of Buckingham did in the afternoon to please the
King make a bawdy sermon to him out of Canticles, and that my Lord
Cornwallis did endeavour to get the King a whore, and that must be a
pretty girl the daughter of the parson of the place, but that she did get
away, and leaped off of some place and killed herself, which if true is
very sad.

19th (Lord's day).  Up, and to my chamber, and there I up and down in the
house spent the morning getting things ready against noon, when come Mr.
Cooper, Hales, Harris, Mr. Butler, that wrote Hudibras, and Mr. Cooper's
cozen Jacke; and by and by comes Mr. Reeves and his wife, whom I never saw
before: and there we dined: a good dinner, and company that pleased me
mightily, being all eminent men in their way.  Spent all the afternoon in
talk and mirth, and in the evening parted, and then my wife and I to walk
in the garden, and so home to supper, Mrs. Turner and husband and daughter
with us, and then to bed.

20th.  Up, and to the office, where Mrs. Daniel comes.  .  .  .  All the
morning at the office.  Dined at home, then with Mr. Colvill to the new
Excise Office in Aldersgate Street, and thence back to the Old Exchange,
to see a very noble fine lady I spied as I went through, in coming; and
there took occasion to buy some gloves, and admire her, and a mighty fine
fair lady indeed she was.  Thence idling all the afternoon to Duck Lane,
and there saw my bookseller's moher, but get no ground there yet; and here
saw Mrs. Michell's daughter married newly to a bookseller, and she proves
a comely little grave woman.  So to visit my Lord Crew, who is very sick,
to great danger, by an irisipulus;--[Erysipelas.]--the first day I heard
of it, and so home, and took occasion to buy a rest for my espinette at
the ironmonger's by Holborn Conduit, where the fair pretty woman is that I
have lately observed there, and she is pretty, and je credo vain enough.
Thence home and busy till night, and so to bed.

21st.  Up, and to St. James's, but lost labour, the Duke abroad.  So home
to the office, where all the morning, and so to dinner, and then all the
afternoon at the office, only went to my plate-maker's, and there spent an
hour about contriving my little plates,

     [This passage has been frequently quoted as referring to Pepys's.
     small bookplate, with his initials S. P. and two anchors and ropes
     entwined; but if looked at carefully with the further reference on
     the 27th, it will be seen that it merely describes the preparation
     of engravings of the four dockyards.]

for my books of the King's four Yards.  At night walked in the garden, and
supped and to bed, my eyes bad.

22nd.  All the morning at the office.  Dined at home, and then to White
Hall with Symson the joyner, and after attending at the Committee of the
Navy about the old business of tickets, where the only expedient they have
found is to bind the Commanders and Officers by oaths.  The Duke of York
told me how the Duke of Buckingham, after the Council the other day, did
make mirth at my position, about the sufficiency of present rules in the
business of tickets; and here I took occasion to desire a private
discourse with the Duke of York, and he granted it to me on Friday next.
So to shew Symson the King's new lodgings for his chimnies, which I desire
to have one built in that mode, and so I home, and with little supper, to
bed.  This day a falling out between my wife and Deb., about a hood lost,
which vexed me.

23rd.  Up, and all day long, but at dinner, at the Office, at work, till I
was almost blind, which makes my heart sad.

24th.  Up, and by water to St. James's, having, by the way, shewn Symson
Sir W. Coventry's chimney-pieces, in order to the making me one; and
there, after the Duke of York was ready, he called me to his closet; and
there I did long and largely show him the weakness of our Office, and did
give him advice to call us to account for our duties, which he did take
mighty well, and desired me to draw up what I would have him write to the
Office.  I did lay open the whole failings of the Office, and how it was
his duty to find them, and to find fault with them, as Admiral, especially
at this time, which he agreed to, and seemed much to rely on what I said.
Thence to White Hall, and there waited to attend the Council, but was not
called in, and so home, and after dinner back with Sir J. Minnes by coach,
and there attended, all of us, the Duke of York, and had the hearing of
Mr. Pett's business, the Master-Shipwright at Chatham, and I believe he
will be put out.  But here Commissioner. Middleton did, among others, shew
his good-nature and easiness to the Masters-Attendants, by mitigating
their faults, so as, I believe, they will come in again.  So home, and to
supper and to bed, the Duke of York staying with us till almost night.

25th.  Up, and at the Office all the morning; and at noon, after dinner,
to Cooper's, it being a very rainy day, and there saw my wife's picture go
on, which will be very fine indeed.  And so home again to my letters, and
then to supper and to bed.

26th (Lord's day).  Up, and all the morning and after dinner, the
afternoon also, with W. Hewer in my closet, setting right my Tangier
Accounts, which I have let alone these six months and more, but find them
very right, and is my great comfort.  So in the evening to walk with my
wife, and to supper and to bed.

27th.  Busy all the morning at my office.  At noon dined, and then I out
of doors to my bookseller in Duck Lane, but su moher not at home, and it
was pretty here to see a pretty woman pass by with a little wanton look,
and je did sequi her round about the street from Duck Lane to Newgate
Market, and then elle did turn back, and je did lose her.  And so to see
my Lord Crew, whom I find up; and did wait on him; but his face sore, but
in hopes to do now very well again.  Thence to Cooper's, where my wife's
picture almost done, and mighty fine indeed.  So over the water with my
wife, and Deb., and Mercer, to Spring-Garden, and there eat and walked;
and observe how rude some of the young gallants of the town are become, to
go into people's arbours where there are not men, and almost force the
women; which troubled me, to see the confidence of the vice of the age:
and so we away by water, with much pleasure home.  This day my plate-maker
comes with my four little plates of the four Yards, cost me L5, which
troubles me, but yet do please me also.

28th.  All the morning at the office, and after dinner with my wife and
Deb.  to the Duke of York's playhouse, and there saw "The Slighted Maid,"
but a mean play; and thence home, there being little pleasure now in a
play, the company being but little.  Here we saw Gosnell, who is become
very homely, and sings meanly, I think, to what I thought she did.

29th.  Busy all the morning at the office.  So home to dinner, where
Mercer, and there comes Mr. Swan, my old acquaintance, and dines with me,
and tells me, for a certainty, that Creed is to marry Betty Pickering, and
that the thing is concluded, which I wonder at, and am vexed for. So he
gone I with my wife and two girls to the King's house, and saw "The Mad
Couple," a mean play altogether, and thence to Hyde Parke, where but few
coaches, and so to the New Exchange, and thence by water home, with much
pleasure, and then to sing in the garden, and so home to bed, my eyes for
these four days being my trouble, and my heart thereby mighty sad.

30th.  Up, and by water to White Hall.  There met with Mr. May, who was
giving directions about making a close way for people to go dry from the
gate up into the House, to prevent their going through the galleries;
which will be very good.  I staid and talked with him about the state of
the King's Offices in general, and how ill he is served, and do still find
him an excellent person, and so back to the office.  So close at my office
all the afternoon till evening, and then out with my wife to the New
Exchange, and so back again.

31st.  Up, and at my office all the morning.  About noon with Mr.
Ashburnham to the new Excise Office, and there discoursed about our
business, and I made him admire my drawing a thing presently in shorthand:
but, God knows!  I have paid dear for it, in my eyes. Home and to dinner,
and then my wife and Deb. and I, with Sir J. Minnes, to White Hall, she
going hence to the New Exchange, and the Duke of York not being in the
way, Sir J. Minnes and I to her and took them two to the King's house, to
see the first day of Lacy's "Monsieur Ragou," now new acted.  The King and
Court all there, and mighty merry--a farce.  Thence Sir J. Minnes giving
us, like a gentleman, his coach, hearing we had some business, we to the
Park, and so home.  Little pleasure there, there being little company, but
mightily taken with a little chariot that we saw in the street, and which
we are resolved to have ours like it. So home to walk in the garden a
little, and then to bed.  The month ends mighty sadly with me, my eyes
being now past all use almost; and I am mighty hot upon trying the late
printed experiment of paper tubes.

     [An account of these tubulous spectacles ("An easy help for decayed
     sight") is given in "The Philosophical Transactions," No. 37, pp.
     727,731 (Hutton's Abridgment, vol. i., p. 266).  See Diary, August
     12th and 23rd, post.]

     ETEXT EDITOR'S BOOKMARKS:

     At work, till I was almost blind, which makes my heart sad
     Bristol milk (the sherry) in the vaults
     But get no ground there yet
     Cannot be clean to go so many bodies together in the same water
     City pay him great respect, and he the like to the meanest
     Cost me L5, which troubles me, but yet do please me also
     Espinette is the French term for a small harpsichord
     Forced to change gold, 8s. 7d.; servants and poor, 1s. 6d.
     Frequent trouble in things we deserve best in
     How natural it is for us to slight people out of power
     I could have answered, but forbore
     Little pleasure now in a play, the company being but little
     Made him admire my drawing a thing presently in shorthand
     My wife hath something in her gizzard, that only waits
     My wife's neglect of things, and impertinent humour
     So out, and lost our way, which made me vexed
     Suffered her humour to spend, till we begun to be very quiet
     Troubled me, to see the confidence of the vice of the age
     Up, finding our beds good, but lousy; which made us merry
     Weather being very wet and hot to keep meat in.
     When he was seriously ill he declared himself a Roman Catholic
     Where a pedlar was in bed, and made him rise



                THE DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS M.A. F.R.S.

            CLERK OF THE ACTS AND SECRETARY TO THE ADMIRALTY

    TRANSCRIBED FROM THE SHORTHAND MANUSCRIPT IN THE PEPYSIAN LIBRARY
 MAGDALENE COLLEGE CAMBRIDGE BY THE REV. MYNORS BRIGHT M.A. LATE FELLOW
                      AND PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE

                              (Unabridged)

                      WITH LORD BRAYBROOKE'S NOTES

                        EDITED WITH ADDITIONS BY

                        HENRY B. WHEATLEY F.S.A.

                          DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS.
                                 AUGUST
                                  1668

August 1st.  All the morning at the office.  After dinner my wife, and
Deb., and I, to the King's house again, coming too late yesterday to hear
the prologue, and do like the play better now than before; and, indeed,
there is a great deal of true wit in it, more than in the common sort of
plays, and so home to my business, and at night to bed, my eyes making me
sad.

2nd. (Lord's day).  Up and at home all the morning, hanging, and removing
of some pictures, in my study and house.  At noon Pelling dined with me.
After dinner, I and Tom, my boy, by water up to Putney, and there heard a
sermon, and many fine people in the church.  Thence walked to Barne Elmes,
and there, and going and coming, did make the boy read to me several
things, being now-a-days unable to read myself anything, for above two
lines together, but my eyes grow weary.  Home about night, and so to
supper and then to bed.

3rd.  Up, and by water to White Hall and St. James's, where I did much
business, and about noon meeting Dr. Gibbons, carried him to the Sun
taverne, in King Street, and there made him, and some friends of his,
drink; among others, Captain Silas Taylor, and here did get Gibbons to
promise me some things for my flageolets.  So to the Old Exchange, and
then home to dinner, and so, Mercer dining with us, I took my wife and her
and Deb. out to Unthanke's, while I to White Hall to the Commissioners of
the Treasury, and so back to them and took them out to Islington, where we
met with W. Joyce and his wife and boy, and there eat and drank, and a
great deal of his idle talk, and so we round by Hackney home, and so to
sing a little in the garden, and then to bed.

4th.  Up, and to my office a little, and then to White Hall about a
Committee for Tangier at my Lord Arlington's, where, by Creed's being out
of town, I have the trouble given me of drawing up answers to the
complaints of the Turks of Algiers, and so I have all the papers put into
my hand.  Here till noon, and then back to the Office, where sat a little,
and then to dinner, and presently to the office, where come to me my Lord
Bellassis, Lieutenant-Colonell Fitzgerald, newly come from Tangier, and
Sir Arthur Basset, and there I received their informations, and so, they
being gone, I with my clerks and another of Lord Brouncker's, Seddon, sat
up till two in the morning, drawing up my answers and writing them fair,
which did trouble me mightily to sit up so long, because of my eyes.

5th.  So to bed about two o'clock, and then up about seven and to White
Hall, where read over my report to Lord Arlington and Berkeley, and then
afterward at the Council Board with great good liking, but, Lord! how it
troubled my eyes, though I did not think I could have done it, but did do
it, and was not very bad afterward.  So home to dinner, and thence out to
the Duke of York's playhouse, and there saw "The Guardian;" formerly the
same, I find, that was called "Cutter of Coleman Street;" a silly play.
And thence to Westminster Hall, where I met Fitzgerald; and with him to a
tavern, to consider of the instructions for Sir Thomas Allen, against his
going to Algiers; he and I being designed to go down to Portsmouth by the
Council's order, and by and by he and I went to the Duke of York, who
orders me to go down to-morrow morning.  So I away home, and there bespeak
a coach; and so home and to bed, my wife being abroad with the Mercers
walking in the fields, and upon the water.

6th.  Waked betimes, and my wife, at an hour's warning, is resolved to go
with me, which pleases me, her readiness.  But, before ready, comes a
letter from Fitzgerald, that he is seized upon last night by an order of
the General's by a file of musqueteers, and kept prisoner in his chamber.
The Duke of York did tell me of it to-day: it is about a quarrel between.
him and Witham, and they fear a challenge: so I to him, and sent my wife
by the coach round to Lambeth.  I lost my labour going to his lodgings,
and he in bed: and, staying a great while for him, I at last grew
impatient, and would stay no longer; but to St. James's to Mr. Wren, to
bid him "God be with you!" and so over the water to Fox Hall; and there my
wife and Deb. come and took me up, and we away to Gilford, losing our way
for three or four mile, about Cobham.  At Gilford we dined; and, I shewed
them the hospitall there of Bishop Abbot's, and his tomb in the church,
which, and the rest of the tombs there, are kept mighty clean and neat,
with curtains before them.  So to coach again, and got to Lippock,2 late
over Hindhead, having an old man, a guide, in the coach with us; but got
thither with great fear of being out of our way, it being ten at night.
Here good, honest people; and after supper, to bed .  .  .  .

7th.  Up, and to coach, and with a guide to Petersfield, where I find Sir
Thomas Allen and Mr. Tippets come; the first about the business, the
latter only in respect to me; as also Fitzgerald, who come post all last
night, and newly arrived here.  We four sat down presently to our
business, and in an hour despatched all our talk; and did inform Sir
Thomas Allen well in it, who, I perceive, in serious matters, is a serious
man: and tells me he wishes all we are told be true, in our defence; for
he finds by all, that the Turks have, to this day, been very civil to our
merchant-men everywhere; and, if they would have broke with us, they never
had such an opportunity over our rich merchant-men, as lately, coming out
of the Streights.  Then to dinner, and pretty merry: and here was Mr.
Martin, the purser, and dined with us, and wrote some things for us.  And
so took coach again back; Fitzgerald with us, whom I was pleased with all
the day, with his discourse of his observations abroad, as being a great
soldier and of long standing abroad: and knows all things and persons
abroad very well--I mean, the great soldiers of France, and Spain, and
Germany; and talks very well. Come at night to Gilford, where the Red Lyon
so full of people, and a wedding, that the master of the house did get us
a lodging over the way, at a private house, his landlord's, mighty neat
and fine; and there supped and talked with the landlord and his wife: and
so to bed with great content, only Fitzgerald lay at the Inne.  So to bed.

8th.  Up, and I walked out, and met Uncle Wight, whom I sent to last
night, and Mr. Wight coming to see us, and I walked with them back to see
my aunt at Katherine Hill, and there walked up and down the hill and
places, about: but a dull place, but good ayre, and the house dull.  But
here I saw my aunt, after many days not seeing her--I think, a year or
two; and she walked with me to see my wife.  And here, at the Red Lyon, we
all dined together, and mighty merry, and then parted: and we home to Fox
Hall, where Fitzgerald and I 'light, and by water to White Hall, where the
Duke of York being abroad, I by coach and met my wife, who went round, and
after doing at the office a little, and finding all well at home, I to
bed.  I hear that Colbert, the French Ambassador, is come, and hath been
at Court incognito.  When he hath his audience, I know not.

9th (Lord's day).  Up, and walked to Holborne, where got John Powell's
coach at the Black Swan, and he attended me at St. James's, where waited
on the Duke of York: and both by him and several of the Privy-Council,
beyond expectation, I find that my going to Sir Thomas Allen was looked
upon as a thing necessary: and I have got some advantage by it, among
them.  Thence to White Hall, and thence to visit Lord Brouncker, and back
to White Hall, where saw the Queen and ladies; and so, with Mr. Slingsby,
to Mrs. Williams's, thinking to dine with Lord Brouncker there, but did
not, having promised my wife to come home, though here I met Knepp, to my
great content.  So home; and, after dinner, I took my wife and Deb. round
by Hackney, and up and down to take the ayre; and then home, and made
visits to Mrs. Turner, and Mrs. Mercer, and Sir W. Pen, who is come from
Epsom not well, and Sir J. Minnes, who is not well neither.  And so home
to supper, and to set my books a little right, and then to bed. This day
Betty Michell come and dined with us, the first day after her lying in,
whom I was glad to see.

10th.  Up, and by water to White Hall, and thence to Sir W. Coventry, but
he is gone out of town this morning, so thence to my Lord Arlington's
house, the first time I there since he come thither, at Goring House, a
very fine, noble place; and there he received me in sight of several Lords
with great respect.  I did give him an account of my journey; and here,
while I waited for him a little, my Lord Orrery took notice of me, and
begun discourse of hangings, and of the improvement of shipping: I not
thinking that he knew me, but did then discover it, with a mighty
compliment of my abilities and ingenuity, which I am mighty proud of; and
he do speak most excellently.  Thence to Westminster Hall, and so by coach
to the old Exchange, and there did several businesses, and so home to
dinner, and then abroad to Duck Lane, where I saw my belle femme of the
book vendor, but had no opportunity para hazer con her.  So away to
Cooper's, where I spent all the afternoon with my wife and girl, seeing
him-make an end of her picture, which he did Jo my great content, though
not so great as, I confess, I expected, being not satisfied in the
greatness of the resemblance, nor in the blue garment: but it is most
certainly a most rare piece of work, as to the painting.  He hath L30 for
his work--and the chrystal, and case, and gold case comes to L8 3s. 4d.;
and which I sent him this night, that I might be out of debt. Thence my
people home, and I to Westminster Hall about a little business, and so by
water home [to] supper, and my wife to read a ridiculous book I bought
today of the History of the Taylors' Company,

     [The title of this book was, "The Honour of the Merchant Taylors."
     Wherein is set forth the noble acts, valliant deeds, and heroick
     performances of Merchant Taylors in former ages; their honourable
     loves, and knightly adventures, their combating of foreign enemies
     and glorious successes in honour of the English nation: together
     with their pious....]

and all the while Deb. did comb my head, and I did toker her with my main
para very great pleasure, and so to bed.

11th.  Up, and by water to Sir W. Coventry to visit him, whom I find yet
troubled at the Commissioners of Accounts, about this business of Sir W.
Warren, which is a ridiculous thing, and can come to nothing but contempt,
and thence to Westminster Hall, where the Parliament met enough to
adjourne, which they did, to the 10th of November next, and so by water
home to the office, and so to dinner, and thence at the Office all the
afternoon till night, being mightily pleased with a little trial I have
made of the use of a tube-spectacall of paper, tried with my right eye.
This day I hear that, to the great joy of the Nonconformists, the time is
out of the Act against them, so that they may meet: and they have declared
that they will have a morning lecture

     [During the troubled reign of Charles I., the House of Commons gave
     parishioners the right of appointing lecturers at the various
     churches without the consent of rector or vicar, and this naturally
     gave rise to many quarrels.  In the early period of the war between
     the king and the parliament, a course of sermons or lectures was
     projected in aid of the parliamentary cause.  These lectures, which
     were preached by eminent Presbyterian divines at seven o'clock on
     the Sunday mornings, were commenced in the church of St. Mary
     Magdalen in Milk Street, but were soon afterwards removed to St.
     Giles's, Cripplegate.  After the Restoration the lectures were
     collected in four volumes, and published under the title of the
     "Cripplegate Morning Exercises," vol. i. in 1661; vol. ii. in 1674;
     vol. iii. in 1682; and vol. iv. in 1690.  In addition there were two
     volumes which form a supplement to the work, viz., "The Morning
     Exercises methodized," preached at St. Giles's-in-the-Fields, edited
     by the Rev. Thomas Case in 1660, and the "Exercises against Popery,"
     preached in Southwark, and published in 1675 (see Demon's "Records
     of St. Giles's, Crinnlegate," 1883, pp. 55-56).]

up again, which is pretty strange; and they are connived at by the King
every where, I hear, in City and country.  So to visit W. Pen, who is yet
ill, and then home, where W. Batelier and Mrs. Turner come and sat and
supped with us, and so they gone we to bed.  This afternoon my wife, and
Mercer, and Deb., went with Pelting to see the gypsies at Lambeth, and
have their fortunes told; but what they did, I did not enquire.

12th.  Up, and all the morning busy at my office.  Thence to the Excise
Office, and so to the Temple to take counsel about Major Nicholls's
business for the King.  So to several places about business, and among
others to Drumbleby's about the mouths for my paper tubes, and so to the
'Change and home.  Met Captain Cocke, who tells me that he hears for
certain the Duke of York will lose the authority of an Admiral, and be
governed by a Committee: and all our Office changed; only they are in
dispute whether I shall continue or no, which puts new thoughts in me, but
I know not whether to be glad or sorry.  Home to dinner, where Pelting
dines with us, and brings some partridges, which is very good meat; and,
after dinner, I, and wife, and Mercer, and Deb., to the Duke of York's
house, and saw "Mackbeth," to our great content, and then home, where the
women went to the making of my tubes, and I to the office, and then come
Mrs. Turner and her husband to advise about their son, the Chaplain, who
is turned out of his ship, a sorrow to them, which I am troubled for, and
do give them the best advice I can, and so they gone we to bed.

13th.  Up, and Greeting comes, and there he and I tried some things of Mr.
Locke's for two flageolets, to my great content, and this day my wife
begins again to learn of him; for I have a great mind for her to be able
to play a part with me.  Thence I to the Office, where all the afternoon
[morning??], and then to dinner, where W. Howe dined with me, who tells me
for certain that Creed is like to speed in his match with Mrs. Betty
Pickering.  Here dined with me also Mr. Hollier, who is mighty vain in his
pretence to talk Latin.  So to the Office again all the afternoon till
night, very busy, and so with much content home, and made my wife sing and
play on the flageolet to me till I slept with great pleasure in bed.

14th.  Up, and by water to White Hall and St. James's, and to see Sir W.
Coventry, and discourse about business of our Office, telling him my
trouble there, to see how things are ordered.  I told him also what Cocke
told me the other day, but he says there is not much in it, though he do
know that this hath been in the eye of some persons to compass for the
turning all things in the navy, and that it looks so like a popular thing
as that he thinks something may be done in it, but whether so general or
no, as I tell it him, he knows not.  Thence to White Hall, and there wait
at the Council-chamber door a good while, talking with one or other, and
so home by water, though but for a little while, because I am to return to
White Hall.  At home I find Symson, putting up my new chimney-piece, in
our great chamber, which is very fine, but will cost a great deal of
money, but it is not flung away.  So back to White Hall, and after the
council up, I with Mr. Wren, by invitation, to Sir Stephen Fox's to
dinner, where the Cofferer and Sir Edward Savage; where many good stories
of the antiquity and estates of many families at this day in Cheshire, and
that part of the kingdom, more than what is on this side, near London.  My
Lady [Fox] dining with us; a very good lady, and a family governed so
nobly and neatly as do me good to see it.  Thence the Cofferer, Sir
Stephen, and I to the Commissioners of the Treasury about business: and so
I up to the Duke of York, who enquired for what I had promised him, about
my observations of the miscarriages of our Office;

     [This refers to the letter on the affairs of the office which Pepys
     prepared, and respecting which, and the proceedings which grew out
     of it, so many references are made in future pages of the Diary.]

and I told him he should have it next week, being glad he called for it;
for I find he is concerned to do something, and to secure himself thereby,
I believe: for the world is labouring to eclipse him, I doubt; I mean, the
factious part of the Parliament.  The Office met this afternoon as usual,
and waited on him; where, among other things, he talked a great while of
his intentions of going to Dover soon, to be sworn as Lord Warden, which
is a matter of great ceremony and state, and so to the Temple with Mr.
Wren, to the Attorney's chamber, about business, but he abroad, and so I
home, and there spent the evening talking with my wife and piping, and
pleased with our chimney-piece, and so to bed.

15th.  Up, and to the office, where all the morning busy, and after dinner
with my wife, Mercer, and Deb., to the King's playhouse, and there saw
"Love's Mistresse" revived, the thing pretty good, but full of variety of
divertisement.  So home and to my business at the office, my eyes bad
again, and so to bed.

16th (Lord's day).  All the morning at my Office with W. Hewer, there
drawing up my Report to the Duke of York, as I have promised, about the
faults of this Office, hoping thereby to have opportunity of doing myself
[something].  At noon to dinner, and again with him to work all the
afternoon till night, till I was weary and had despatched a good deal of
business, and so to bed after hearing my wife read a little.

17th.  Up, and by water to White Hall, and so to St. James's, and thence
with Mr. Wren by appointment in his coach to Hampstead, to speak with the
Atturney-general, whom we met in the fields, by his old route and house;
and after a little talk about our business of Ackeworth, went and saw the
Lord Wotton's house and garden, which is wonderfull fine: too good for the
house the gardens are, being, indeed, the most noble that ever I saw, and
brave orange and lemon trees.  Thence to Mr. Chichley's by invitation, and
there dined with Sir John, his father not coming home. And while at dinner
comes by the French Embassador Colbert's mules, the first I eversaw, with
their sumpter-clothes mighty rich, and his coaches, he being to have his
entry to-day: but his things, though rich, are not new; supposed to be the
same his brother

     [A mistake of Pepys's.  Colbert de Croissy, then in England, had
     himself been the French Plenipotentiary at Aix-la-Chapelle.--B.]

had the other day, at the treaty at Aix-la-Chapelle, in Flanders.  Thence
to the Duke of York's house, and there saw "Cupid's Revenge," under the
new name of "Love Despised," that hath something very good in it, though I
like not the whole body of it.  This day the first time acted here. Thence
home, and there with Mr. Hater and W. Hewer late, reading over all the
principal officers' instructions in order to my great work upon my hand,
and so to bed, my eyes very ill.

18th.  Up, and to my office about my great business betimes, and so to the
office, where all the morning.  At noon dined, and then to the office all
the afternoon also, and in the evening to Sir W. Coventry's, but he not
within, I took coach alone to the Park, to try to meet him there, but did
not; but there were few coaches, but among the few there were in two
coaches our two great beauties, my Lady Castlemayne and Richmond; the
first time I saw the latter since she had the smallpox.  I had much
pleasure to see them, but I thought they were strange one to another.
Thence going out I met a coach going, which I thought had Knepp in it, so
I went back, but it was not she.  So back to White Hall and there took
water, and so home, and busy late about my great letter to the Duke of
York, and so to supper and to bed .  .  .  .

19th.  Up betimes, and all day and afternoon without going out, busy upon
my great letter to the Duke of York, which goes on to my content. W. Hewer
and Gibson I employ with me in it.  This week my people wash, over the
water, and so I little company at home.  In the evening, being busy above,
a great cry I hear, and go down; and what should it be but Jane, in a fit
of direct raving, which lasted half-an-hour.  Beyond four or five of our
strength to keep her down; and, when all come to all, a fit of jealousy
about Tom, with whom she is in love.  So at night, I, and my wife, and W.
Hewer called them to us, and there I did examine all the thing, and them,
in league.  She in love, and he hath got her to promise him to marry, and
he is now cold in it, so that I must rid my hands of them, which troubles
me, and the more because my head is now busy upon other greater things.  I
am vexed also to be told by W. Hewer that he is summoned to the
Commissioners of Accounts about receiving a present of L30 from Mr. Mason,
the timber merchant, though there be no harm in it, that will appear on
his part, he having done them several lawful kindnesses and never demanded
anything, as they themselves have this day declared to the Commissioners,
they being forced up by the discovery of somebody that they in confidence
had once told it to. So to supper vexed and my head full of care, and so
to bed.

20th.  Betimes at my business again, and so to the office, and dined with
Brouncker and J. Minnes, at Sir W. Pen's at a bad pasty of venison, and so
to work again, and at it till past twelve at night, that I might get my
great letter

     [In the Pepysian Library is a MS. (No. 2242), entitled, "Papers
     conteyning my addresse to his Royall Highnesse James Duke of Yorke,
     Lord High Admirall of England, &c., by letter dated the 20th of
     August, 1668, humbly tendering him my advice touching the present
     State of the Office of the Navy, with his Royall Highness's
     proceedings upon the same, and their result."]

to the Duke of York ready against to-morrow, which I shall do, to my great
content.  So to bed.

21st.  Up betimes, and with my people again to work, and finished all
before noon: and then I by water to White Hall, and there did tell the
Duke of York that I had done; and he hath to my great content desired me
to come to him at Sunday next in the afternoon, to read it over, by which
I have more time to consider and correct it.  So back home and to the
'Change, in my way calling at Morris', my vintner's, where I love to see
su moher, though no acquaintance accostais this day con her.  Did several
things at the 'Change, and so home to dinner.  After dinner I by coach to
my bookseller's in Duck Lane, and there did spend a little time and
regarder su moher, and so to St. James's, where did a little ordinary
business; and by and by comes Monsieur Colbert, the French Embassador, to
make his first visit to the Duke of York, and then to the Duchess: and I
saw it: a silly piece of ceremony, he saying only a few formal words.  A
comely man, and in a black suit and cloak of silk, which is a strange
fashion, now it hath been so long left off: This day I did first see the
Duke of York's room of pictures of some Maids of Honour, done by Lilly:
good, but not like.

     [The set of portraits known as "King Charles's Beauties," formerly
     in Windsor Castle, but now at Hampton Court.--B.]

Thence to Reeves's, and bought a reading-glass, and so to my bookseller's
again, there to buy a Book of Martyrs,

     [The popular name of John Fox's "Acts and Monuments," first
     published in 1562-63.]

which I did agree for; and so, after seeing and beginning acquaintance con
his femme, but very little, away home, and there busy very late at the
correcting my great letter to the Duke of York, and so to bed.

22nd.  Up betimes, at it again with great content, and so to the Office,
where all the morning, and did fall out with W. Pen about his slight
performance of his office, and so home to dinner, fully satisfied that
this Office must sink or the whole Service be undone.  To the office all
the afternoon again, and then home to supper and to bed, my mind being
pretty well at ease, my great letter being now finished to my full
content; and I thank God I have opportunity of doing it, though I know it
will set the Office and me by the ears for ever.  This morning Captain
Cocke comes, and tells me that he is now assured that it is true, what he
told me the other day, that our whole Office will be turned out, only me,
which, whether he says true or no, I know not, nor am much concerned,
though I should be better contented to have it thus than otherwise.  This
afternoon, after I was weary in my business of the office, I went forth to
the 'Change, thinking to have spoke with Captain Cocke, but he was not
within.  So I home, and took London-bridge in my way; walking down Fish
Street and Gracious Street, to see how very fine a descent they have now
made down the hill, that it is become very easy and pleasant, and going
through Leaden-Hall, it being market-day, I did see a woman catched, that
had stolen a shoulder of mutton off of a butcher's stall, and carrying it
wrapt up in a cloth, in a basket.  The jade was surprised, and did not
deny it, and the woman so silly, as to let her go that took it, only
taking the meat.

23rd (Lord's day).  Up betimes, my head busy in my great letter, and I did
first hang up my new map of Paris in my green room, and changed others in
other places.  Then to Captain Cocke's, thinking to have talked more of
what he told me yesterday, but he was not within.  So back to church, and
heard a good sermon of Mr. Gifford's at our church, upon "Seek ye first
the kingdom of Heaven and its righteousness, and all these things shall be
added to you."  A very excellent and persuasive, good and moral sermon.
Shewed, like a wise man, that righteousness is a surer moral way of being
rich, than sin and villainy.  Then home to dinner, where Mr. Pelting, who
brought us a hare, which we had at dinner, and W. Howe.  After dinner to
the Office, Mr. Gibson and I, to examine my letter to the Duke of York,
which, to my great joy, I did very well by my paper tube, without pain to
my eyes.  And I do mightily like what I have therein done; and did,
according to the Duke of York's order, make haste to St. James's, and
about four o'clock got thither: and there the Duke of York was ready, to
expect me, and did hear it all over with extraordinary content; and did
give me many and hearty thanks, and in words the most expressive tell me
his sense of my good endeavours, and that he would have a care of me on
all occasions; and did, with much inwardness,--[i.e., intimacy.]--tell me
what was doing, suitable almost to what Captain Cocke tells me, of designs
to make alterations in the Navy; and is most open to me in them, and with
utmost confidence desires my further advice on all occasions: and he
resolves to have my letter transcribed, and sent forthwith to the Office.
So, with as much satisfaction as I could possibly, or did hope for, and
obligation on the Duke of York's side professed to me, I away into the
Park, and there met Mr. Pierce and his wife, and sister and brother, and a
little boy, and with them to Mulberry Garden, and spent I 18s. on them,
and there left them, she being again with child, and by it, the least
pretty that ever I saw her. And so I away, and got a coach, and home, and
there with my wife and W. Hewer, talking all the evening, my mind running
on the business of the Office, to see what more I can do to the rendering
myself acceptable and useful to all and to the King.  We to supper, and to
bed.

24th.  Up, and to the office, where all the morning upon considerations on
the Victualler's contract, and then home to dinner, where my wife is upon
hanging the long chamber where the girl lies, with the sad stuff that was
in the best chamber, in order to the hanging that with tapestry. So to
dinner, and then to the office again, where all the afternoon till night,
we met to discourse upon the alterations which are propounded to be made
in the draft of the victualler's contract which we did lately make, and
then we being up comes Mr. Child, Papillion and Littleton, his partners,
to discourse upon the matter with me, which I did, and spent all the
evening with them at the office, and so, they being gone, I to supper and
talk with my wife, and so to bed.

25th.  Up, and by water to St. James's, and there, with Mr. Wren, did
discourse about my great letter, which the Duke of York hath given him:
and he hath set it to be transcribed by Billings, his man, whom, as he
tells me, he can most confide in for secresy, and is much pleased with it,
and earnest to have it be; and he and I are like to be much together in
the considering how to reform the Office, and that by the Duke of York's
command.  Thence I, mightily pleased with this success, away to the
Office, where all the morning, my head full of this business.  And it is
pretty how Lord Brouncker this day did tell me how he hears that a design
is on foot to remove us out of the Office: and proposes that we two do
agree to draw up a form of a new constitution of the Office, there to
provide remedies for the evils we are now under, so that we may be
beforehand with the world, which I agreed to, saying nothing of my design;
and, the truth is, he is the best man of them all, and I would be glad,
next myself, to save him; for, as he deserves best, so I doubt he needs
his place most.  So home to dinner at noon, and all the afternoon busy at
the office till night, and then with my mind full of business now in my
head, I to supper and to bed.

26th.  Up, and to the office, where all the morning almost, busy about
business against the afternoon, and we met a little to sign two or three
things at the Board of moment, and thence at noon home to dinner, and so
away to White Hall by water.  In my way to the Old Swan, finding a great
many people gathered together in Cannon Street about a man that was
working in the ruins, and the ground did sink under him, and he sunk in,
and was forced to be dug out again, but without hurt.  Thence to White
Hall, and it is strange to say with what speed the people employed do pull
down Paul's steeple, and with what ease: it is said that it, and the choir
are to be taken down this year, and another church begun in the room
thereof, the next.  At White Hall we met at the Treasury chamber, and
there before the Lords did debate our draft of the victualling contract
with the several bidders for it, which were Sir D. Gawden, Mr. Child and
his fellows, and Mr. Dorrington and his, a poor variety in a business of
this value.  There till after candle-lighting, and so home by coach with
Sir D. Gawden, who, by the way, tells me how the City do go on in several
things towards the building of the public places, which I am glad to hear;
and gives hope that in a few years it will be a glorious place; but we met
with several stops and new troubles in the way in the streets, so as makes
it bad to travel in the dark now through the City. So I to Mr. Batelier's
by appointment, where I find my wife, and Deb., and Mercer; Mrs. Pierce
and her husband, son, and daughter; and Knepp and Harris, and W. Batelier,
and his sister Mary, and cozen Gumbleton, a good-humoured, fat young
gentleman, son to the jeweller, that dances well; and here danced all
night long, with a noble supper; and about two in the morning the table
spread again for a noble breakfast beyond all moderation, that put me out
of countenance, so much and so good.  Mrs. Pierce and her people went home
betimes, she being big with child; but Knepp and the rest staid till
almost three in the morning, and then broke up.

27th.  Knepp home with us, and I to bed, and rose about six, mightily
pleased with last night's mirth, and away by water to St. James's, and
there, with Mr. Wren, did correct his copy of my letter, which the Duke of
York hath signed in my very words, without alteration of a syllable.

     [A copy of this letter is in the British Museum, Harl.  MS. 6003.
     See July 24th, ante, and August 29th, Post.  In the Pepysian
     Collection are the following: An Inquisition, by his Royal Highness
     the Duke of York, when Lord High Admiral of England, into the
     Management of the Navy, 1668, with his Regulations thereon, fol.
     Also Mr. Pepys's Defence of the same upon an Inquisition thereunto
     by Parliament, 1669, fol.--B.]

And so pleased therewith, I to my Lord Brouncker, who I find within, but
hath business, and so comes not to the Office to-day.  And so I by water
to the Office, where we sat all the morning; and, just as the Board rises,
comes the Duke of York's letter, which I knowing, and the Board not being
full, and desiring rather to have the Duke of York deliver it himself to
us, I suppressed it for this day, my heart beginning to falsify in this
business, as being doubtful of the trouble it may give me by provoking
them; but, however, I am resolved to go through it, and it is too late to
help it now.  At noon to dinner to Captain Cocke's, where I met with Mr.
Wren; my going being to tell him what I have done, which he likes, and to
confer with Cocke about our Office; who tells me that he is confident the
design of removing our Officers do hold, but that he is sure that I am
safe enough.  Which pleases me, though I do not much shew it to him, but
as a thing indifferent.  So away home, and there met at Sir Richard Ford's
with the Duke of York's Commissioners about our Prizes, with whom we shall
have some trouble before we make an end with them, and hence, staying a
little with them, I with my wife, and W. Batelier, and Deb.; carried them
to Bartholomew Fayre, where we saw the dancing of the ropes and nothing
else, it being late, and so back home to supper and to bed, after having
done at my office.

28th.  Busy at the office till toward 10 o'clock, and then by water to
White Hall, where attending the Council's call all the morning with Lord
Brouncker, W. Pen, and the rest, about the business of supernumeraries in
the fleete, but were not called in.  But here the Duke of York did call me
aside, and told me that he must speak with me in the afternoon, with Mr.
Wren, for that now he hath got the paper from my Lord Keeper about the
exceptions taken against the management of the Navy; and so we are to
debate upon answering them.  At noon I home with W. Coventry to his house;
and there dined with him, and talked freely with him; and did acquaint him
with what I have done, which he is well pleased with, and glad of: and do
tell me that there are endeavours on foot to bring the Navy into new, but,
he fears, worse hands.  After much talk with great content with him, I
walked to the Temple, and staid at Starky's, my bookseller's (looking over
Dr. Heylin's new book of the Life of Bishop Laud, a strange book of the
Church History of his time), till Mr. Wren comes, and by appointment we to
the Atturney General's chamber, and there read and heard the witnesses in
the business of Ackeworth, most troublesome and perplexed by the counter
swearing of the witnesses one against the other, and so with Mr. Wren away
thence to St. [James's] for his papers, and so to White Hall, and after
the Committee was done at the Council chamber about the business of
Supernumeraries, wherein W. Pen was to do all and did, but like an
ignorant illiterate coxcomb, the Duke of York fell to work with us, the
Committee being gone, in the Council-chamber; and there, with his own
hand, did give us his long letter, telling us that he had received several
from us, and now did give us one from him, taking notice of our several
duties and failures, and desired answer to it, as he therein desired; this
pleased me well; and so fell to other business, and then parted.  And the
Duke of York, and Wren, and I, it being now candle-light, into the Duke of
York's closet in White Hall; and there read over this paper of my Lord
Keeper's, wherein are laid down the faults of the Navy, so silly, and the
remedies so ridiculous, or else the same that are now already provided,
that we thought it not to need any answer, the Duke of York being able
himself to do it: that so it makes us admire the confidence of these men
to offer things so silly, in a business of such moment.  But it is a most
perfect instance of the complexion of the times! and so the Duke of York
said himself, who, I perceive, is mightily concerned in it, and do, again
and again, recommend it to Mr. Wren and me together, to consider upon
remedies fit to provide for him to propound to the King, before the rest
of the world, and particularly the Commissioners of Accounts, who are men
of understanding and order, to find our faults, and offer remedies of
their own, which I am glad of, and will endeavour to do something in it.
So parted, and with much difficulty, by candle-light, walked over the
Matted Gallery, as it is now with the mats and boards all taken up, so
that we walked over the rafters.  But strange to see what hard matter the
plaister of Paris is, that is there taken up, as hard as stone!  And pity
to see Holben's work in the ceiling blotted on, and only whited over!
Thence; with much ado, by several coaches home, to supper and to bed.  My
wife having been this day with Hales, to sit for her hand to be mended, in
her picture.

29th.  Up, and all the morning at the Office, where the Duke of York's
long letter was read, to their great trouble, and their suspecting me to
have been the writer of it.  And at noon comes, by appointment, Harris to
dine with me and after dinner he and I to Chyrurgeon's-hall, where they
are building it new, very fine; and there to see their theatre; which
stood all the fire, and, which was our business, their great picture of
Holben's, thinking to have bought it, by the help of Mr. Pierce, for a
little money: I did think to give L200 for it, it being said to be worth
L1000; but it is so spoiled that I have no mind to it, and is not a
pleasant, though a good picture.  Thence carried Harris to his playhouse,
where, though four o'clock, so few people there at "The Impertinents," as
I went out; and do believe they did not act, though there was my Lord
Arlington and his company there.  So I out, and met my wife in a coach,
and stopped her going thither to meet me; and took her, and Mercer, and
Deb., to Bartholomew Fair, and there did see a ridiculous, obscene little
stage-play, called "Marry Andrey;" a foolish thing, but seen by every
body; and so to Jacob Hall's dancing of the ropes; a thing worth seeing,
and mightily followed, and so home and to the office, and then to bed.
Writing to my father to-night not to unfurnish our house in the country
for my sister, who is going to her own house, because I think I may have
occasion myself to come thither; and so I do, by our being put out of the
Office, which do not at all trouble me to think of.

30th (Lord's day).  Walked to St. James's and Pell Mell, and read over,
with Sir W. Coventry, my long letter to the Duke of York, and which the
Duke of York hath, from mine, wrote to the Board, wherein he is mightily
pleased, and I perceive do put great value upon me, and did talk very
openly on all matters of State, and how some people have got the bit into
their mouths, meaning the Duke of Buckingham and his party, and would
likely run away with all.  But what pleased me mightily was to hear the
good character he did give of my Lord Falmouth for his generosity,
good-nature, desire of public good, and low thoughts of his own wisdom;
his employing his interest in the King to do good offices to all people,
without any other fault than the freedom he, do learn in France of
thinking himself obliged to serve his King in his pleasures: and was W.
Coventry's particular friend: and W. Coventry do tell me very odde
circumstances about the fatality of his death, which are very strange.
Thence to White Hall to chapel, and heard the anthem, and did dine with
the Duke of Albemarle in a dirty manner as ever.  All the afternoon, I
sauntered up and down the house and Park.  And there was a Committee for
Tangier met, wherein Lord Middleton would, I think, have found fault with
me for want of coles; but I slighted it, and he made nothing of it, but
was thought to be drunk; and I see that he hath a mind to find fault with
me and Creed, neither of us having yet applied ourselves to him about
anything: but do talk of his profits and perquisites taken from him, and
garrison reduced, and that it must be increased, and such things, as; I
fear, he will be just such another as my Lord Tiviott and the rest, to
ruin that place.  So I to the Park, and there walk an hour or two; and in
the King's garden, and saw the Queen and ladies walk; and I did steal some
apples off the trees; and here did see my Lady Richmond, who is of a noble
person as ever I saw, but her face worse than it was considerably by the
smallpox: her sister' is also very handsome.  Coming into the Park, and
the door kept strictly, I had opportunity of handing in the little,
pretty, squinting girl of the Duke of York's house, but did not make
acquaintance with her; but let her go, and a little girl that was with
her, to walk by themselves.  So to White Hall in the evening, to the
Queen's side, and there met the Duke of York; and he did tell me and W.
Coventry, who was with me, how that Lord Anglesey did take notice of our
reading his long and sharp letter to the Board; but that it was the
better, at least he said so.  The Duke of York, I perceive, is earnest in
it, and will have good effects of it; telling W. Coventry that it was a
letter that might have come from the Commissioners of Accounts, but it was
better it should come first from him.  I met Lord Brouncker, who, I
perceive, and the rest, do smell that it comes from me, but dare not find
fault with it; and I am glad of it, it being my glory and defence that I
did occasion and write it.  So by water home, and did spend the evening
with W. Hewer, telling him how we are all like to be turned out, Lord
Brouncker telling me this evening that the Duke of Buckingham did, within
few hours, say that he had enough to turn us all out which I am not sorry
for at all, for I know the world will judge me to go for company; and my
eyes are such as I am not able to do the business of my Office as I used,
and would desire to do, while I am in it.  So with full content, declaring
all our content in being released of my employment, my wife and I to bed,
and W. Hewer home, and so all to bed.

31st.  Up, and to my office, there to set my journal for all the last
week, and so by water to Westminster to the Exchequer, and thence to the
Swan, and there drank and did baiser la fille there, and so to the New
Exchange and paid for some things, and so to Hercules Pillars,' and there
dined all alone, while I sent my shoe to have the heel fastened at
Wotton's, and thence to White Hall to the Treasury chamber, where did a
little business, and thence to the Duke of York's playhouse and there met
my wife and Deb. and Mary Mercer and Batelier, where also W. Hewer was,
and saw "Hamlet," which we have not seen this year before, or more; and
mightily pleased with it; but, above all, with Betterton, the best part I
believe, that ever man acted.  Thence to the Fayre, and saw
"Polichinelle," and so home, and after a little supper to bed.  This night
lay the first night in Deb.'s chamber, which is now hung with that that
hung our great chamber, and is now a very handsome room.  This day Mrs.
Batelier did give my wife a mighty pretty Spaniel bitch [Flora], which she
values mightily, and is pretty; but as a new comer, I cannot be fond of
her.

     ETEXT EDITOR'S BOOKMARKS:

     And the woman so silly, as to let her go that took it
     But what they did, I did not enquire
     Family governed so nobly and neatly as do me good to see it
     I know not whether to be glad or sorry
     My heart beginning to falsify in this business
     Pictures of some Maids of Honor: good, but not like
     Resolved to go through it, and it is too late to help it now
     Saw "Mackbeth," to our great content
     The factious part of the Parliament
     Though I know it will set the Office and me by the ears for ever



                THE DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS M.A. F.R.S.

            CLERK OF THE ACTS AND SECRETARY TO THE ADMIRALTY

    TRANSCRIBED FROM THE SHORTHAND MANUSCRIPT IN THE PEPYSIAN LIBRARY
 MAGDALENE COLLEGE CAMBRIDGE BY THE REV. MYNORS BRIGHT M.A. LATE FELLOW
                      AND PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE

                              (Unabridged)

                      WITH LORD BRAYBROOKE'S NOTES

                        EDITED WITH ADDITIONS BY

                        HENRY B. WHEATLEY F.S.A.

                          DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS.
                           SEPTEMBER & OCTOBER
                                  1668

September 1st.  Up and all the morning at the office busy, and after
dinner to the office again busy till about four, and then I abroad (my
wife being gone to Hales's about drawing her hand new in her picture) and
I to see Betty Michell, which I did, but su mari was dentro, and no
pleasure.  So to the Fair, and there saw several sights; among others, the
mare that tells money,

     [This is not the first learned horse of which we read.  Shakespeare,
     "Love's Labour's Lost," act i., SC. 2, mentions "the dancing
     horse,"' and the commentators have added many particulars of Banks's
     bay horse.]

and many things to admiration; and, among others, come to me, when she was
bid to go to him of the company that most loved a pretty wench in a
corner.  And this did cost me 12d. to the horse, which I had flung him
before, and did give me occasion to baiser a mighty belle fille that was
in the house that was exceeding plain, but fort belle.  At night going
home I went to my bookseller's in Duck Lane, and find her weeping in the
shop, so as ego could not have any discourse con her nor ask the reason,
so departed and took coach home, and taking coach was set on by a wench
that was naught, and would have gone along with me to her lodging in Shoe
Lane, but ego did donner her a shilling   .  .  .  and left her, and home,
where after supper, W. Batelier with us, we to bed.  This day Mrs. Martin
come to see us, and dined with us.

2nd.  Fast-day for the burning of London, strictly observed.  I at home at
the office all day, forenoon and afternoon, about the Victualler's
contract and other things, and at night home to supper, having had but a
cold dinner, Mr. Gibson with me; and this evening comes Mr. Hill to
discourse with me about Yeabsly and Lanyon's business, wherein they are
troubled, and I fear they have played the knave too far for me to help or
think fit to appear for them.  So he gone, and after supper, to bed, being
troubled with a summons, though a kind one, from Mr. Jessop, to attend the
Commissioners of Accounts tomorrow.

3rd.  Up, and to the Office, where busy till it was time to go to the
Commissioners of Accounts, which I did about noon, and there was received
with all possible respect, their business being only to explain the
meaning of one of their late demands to us, which we had not answered in
our answer to them, and, this being done, I away with great content, my
mind being troubled before, and so to the Exchequer and several places,
calling on several businesses, and particularly my bookseller's, among
others, for "Hobbs's Leviathan,"

     ["Leviathan: or the matter, forme and power of a Commonwealth
     ecclesiasticall and civill," by Thomas Hobbes of Malmesbury, first
     published in 1651.  It was reprinted in 1680, with its old date.
     Hobbes's complete works, English and Latin, were published by Sir
     William Molesworth in sixteen volumes 8vo. between 1839 and 1845.]

which is now mightily called for; and what was heretofore sold for 8s.  I
now give 24s. for, at the second hand, and is sold for 30s., it being a
book the Bishops will not let be printed again, and so home to dinner, and
then to the office all the afternoon, and towards evening by water to the
Commissioners of the Treasury, and presently back again, and there met a
little with W. Pen and the rest about our Prize accounts, and so W. Pen
and Lord Brouncker and I at the lodging of the latter to read over our new
draft of the victualler's contract, and so broke up and home to supper and
to bed.

4th.  Up, and met at the Office all the morning; and at noon my wife, and
Deb., and Mercer, and W. Hewer and I to the Fair, and there, at the old
house, did eat a pig, and was pretty merry, but saw no sights, my wife
having a mind to see the play "Bartholomew-Fayre," with puppets.  Which we
did, and it is an excellent play; the more I see it, the more I love the
wit of it; only the business of abusing the Puritans begins to grow stale,
and of no use, they being the people that, at last, will be found the
wisest.  And here Knepp come to us, and sat with us, and thence took coach
in two coaches, and losing one another, my wife, and Knepp, and I to
Hercules Pillars, and there supped, and I did take from her mouth the
words and notes of her song of "the Larke," which pleases me mightily. And
so set her at home, and away we home, where our company come home before
us.  This night Knepp tells us that there is a Spanish woman lately come
over, that pretends to sing as well as Mrs. Knight; both of which I must
endeavour to hear.  So, after supper, to bed.

5th.  Up, and at the office all the morning.  At noon home to dinner, and
to the office to work all the afternoon again till the evening, and then
by coach to Mr. Hales's new house, where, I find, he hath finished my
wife's hand, which is better than the other; and here I find Harris's
picture, done in his habit of "Henry the Fifth;" mighty like a player, but
I do not think the picture near so good as any yet he hath made for me:
however, it is pretty well, and thence through the fair home, but saw
nothing, it being late, and so home to my business at the office, and
thence to supper and to bed.

6th (Lord's day).  Up betimes, and got myself ready to go by water, and
about nine o'clock took boat with Henry Russell to Gravesend, coming
thither about one, where, at the Ship, I dined; and thither come to me Mr.
Hosier, whom I went to speak with, about several businesses of work that
he is doing, and I would have him do, of writing work, for me. And I did
go with him to his lodging, and there did see his wife, a pretty tolerable
woman, and do find him upon an extraordinary good work of designing a
method of keeping our Storekeeper's Accounts, in the Navy. Here I should
have met with Mr. Wilson, but he is sick, and could not come from Chatham
to me.  So, having done with Hosier, I took boat again the beginning of
the flood, and come home by nine at night, with much pleasure, it being a
fine day.  Going down I spent reading of the "Five Sermons of Five Several
Styles," worth comparing one with another: but I do think, when all is
done, that, contrary to the design of the book, the Presbyterian style and
the Independent are the best of the five sermons to be preached in; this I
do, by the best of my present judgment think, and coming back I spent
reading of a book of warrants of our office in the first Dutch war, and do
find that my letters and warrants and method will be found another
gate's business than this that the world so much adores, and I am glad for
my own sake to find it so.  My boy was with me, and read to me all day,
and we sang a while together, and so home to supper a little, and so to
bed.

7th.  At the office all the morning, we met, and at noon dined at home,
and after dinner carried my wife and Deb. to Unthanke's, and I to White
Hall with Mr. Gibson, where the rest of our officers met us, and to the
Commissioners of the Treasury about the Victualling contract, but staid
not long, but thence, sending Gibson to my wife, I with Lord Brouncker
(who was this day in an unusual manner merry, I believe with drink), J.
Minnes, and W. Pen to Bartholomew-Fair; and there saw the dancing mare
again, which, to-day, I find to act much worse than the other day, she
forgetting many things, which her master beat her for, and was mightily
vexed; and then the dancing of the ropes, and also the little stage-play,
which is very ridiculous, and so home to the office with Lord Brouncker,
W. Pen, and myself (J. Minnes being gone home before not well), and so,
after a little talk together, I home to supper and to bed.

8th.  Up, and by water to White Hall, and to St. James's, there to talk a
little with Mr. Wren about the private business we are upon, in the
Office, where he tells me he finds that they all suspect me to be the
author of the great letter, which I value not, being satisfied that it is
the best thing I could ever do for myself; and so, after some discourse of
this kind more, I back to the Office, where all the morning; and after
dinner to it again, all the afternoon, and very late, and then home to
supper, where met W. Batelier and Betty Turner; and, after some talk with
them, and supper, we to bed.  This day, I received so earnest an
invitation again from Roger Pepys, to come to Sturbridge-Fair [at
Cambridge] that I resolve to let my wife go, which she shall do the next
week, and so to bed.  This day I received two letters from the Duke of
Richmond about his yacht, which is newly taken into the King's service,
and I am glad of it, hoping hereby to oblige him, and to have occasions of
seeing his noble Duchess, which I admire.

9th.  Up, and to the office, and thence to the Duke of Richmond's lodgings
by his desire, by letter, yesterday.  I find him at his lodgings in the
little building in the bowling-green, at White Hall, that was begun to be
built by Captain Rolt.  They are fine rooms.  I did hope to see his lady,
the beautiful Mrs. Stuart, but she, I hear, is in the country.  His
business was about his yacht, and he seems a mighty good-natured man, and
did presently write me a warrant for a doe from Cobham, when the season
comes, bucks season being past.  I shall make much of this acquaintance,
that I may live to see his lady near.  Thence to Westminster, to Sir R.
Longs Office: and, going, met Mr. George Montagu, who talked and
complimented me mightily; and long discourse I had with him, who, for
news, tells me for certain that Trevor do come to be Secretary at
Michaelmas, and that Morrice goes out, and he believes, without any
compensation.  He tells me that now Buckingham does rule all; and the
other day, in the King's journey he is now on, at Bagshot, and that way,
he caused Prince Rupert's horses to be turned out of an inne, and caused
his own to be kept there, which the Prince complained of to the King, and
the Duke of York seconded the complaint; but the King did over-rule it for
Buckingham, by which there are high displeasures among them; and
Buckingham and Arlington rule all.  Thence by water home and to dinner,
and after dinner by water again to White Hall, where Brouncker, W. Pen,
and I attended the Commissioners of the Treasury about the
victualling-contract, where high words between Sir Thomas Clifford and us,
and myself more particularly, who told him that something, that he said
was told him about this business, was a flat untruth.  However, we went on
to our business in, the examination of the draught, and so parted, and I
vexed at what happened, and Brouncker and W. Pen and I home in a hackney
coach.  And I all that night so vexed that I did not sleep almost all
night, which shows how unfit I am for trouble.  So, after a little supper,
vexed, and spending a little time melancholy in making a base to the
Lark's song, I to bed.

10th.  Up, and by water to White Hall, and there to Sir W. Coventry's
house, where I staid in his dining-room two hours thinking to speak with
him, but I find Garraway and he are private, which I am glad of, Captain
Cocke bringing them this day together.  Cocke come out and talked to me,
but it was too late for me to stay longer, and therefore to the Treasury
chamber, where the rest met, and W. Coventry come presently after.  And we
spent the morning in finishing the Victualler's contract, and so I by
water home, and there dined with me Batelier and his wife, and Mercer, and
my people, at a good venison-pasty; and after dinner I and W. Howe, who
come to see me, by water to the Temple, and met our four women, my wife,
M. Batelier, Mercer, and Deb., at the Duke's play-house, and there saw
"The Maid in the Mill," revived--a pretty, harmless old play.  Thence to
Unthanke's, and 'Change, where wife did a little business, while Mercer
and I staid in the coach; and, in a quarter of an hour, I taught her the
whole Larke's song perfectly, so excellent an eare she hath. Here we at
Unthanke's 'light, and walked them to White Hall, my wife mighty angry at
it, and did give me ill words before Batelier, which vexed me, but I made
no matter of it, but vexed to myself.  So landed them, it being fine
moonshine, at the Bear, and so took water to the other side, and home.  I
to the office, where a child is laid at Sir J. Minnes's door, as there was
one heretofore.  So being good friends again, my wife seeking, it, by my
being silent I overcoming her, we to bed.

11th.  Up, and at my Office all the morning, and after dinner all the
afternoon in my house with Batelier shut up, drawing up my defence to the
Duke of York upon his great letter, which I have industriously taken this
opportunity of doing for my future use.  At it late, and my mind and head
mighty full of it all night.

12th.  At it again in the morning, and then to the Office, where till
noon, and I do see great whispering among my brethren about their replies
to the Duke of York, which vexed me, though I know no reason for it; for I
have no manner of ground to fear them.  At noon home to dinner, and, after
dinner, to work all the afternoon again.  At home late, and so to bed.

13th (Lord's day).  The like all this morning and afternoon, and finished
it to my mind.  So about four o'clock walked to the Temple, and there by
coach to St. James's, and met, to my wish, the Duke of York and Mr. Wren;
and understand the Duke of York hath received answers from Brouncker, W.
Pen, and J. Minnes; and as soon as he saw me, he bid Mr. Wren read them
over with me.  So having no opportunity of talk with the Duke of York, and
Mr. Wren some business to do, he put them into my hands like an idle
companion, to, take home with me before himself had read them, which do
give me great opportunity of altering my answer, if there was cause. So
took a hackney and home, and after supper made my wife to read them all
over, wherein she is mighty useful to me; and I find them all evasions,
and in many things false, and in few, to the full purpose. Little said
reflective on me, though W. Pen and J. Minnes do mean me in one or two
places, and J. Minnes a little more plainly would lead the Duke of York to
question the exactness of my keeping my records; but all to no purpose.
My mind is mightily pleased by this, if I can but get time to have a copy
taken of them, for my future use; but I must return them tomorrow.  So to
bed.

14th.  Up betimes, and walked to the Temple, and stopped, viewing the
Exchange, and Paul's, and St. Fayth's, where strange how the very sight of
the stones falling from the top of the steeple do make me sea-sick! But no
hurt, I hear, hath yet happened in all this work of the steeple, which is
very much.  So from the Temple I by coach to St. James's, where I find Sir
W. Pen and Lord Anglesey, who delivered this morning his answer to the
Duke of York, but I could not see it.  But after being above with the Duke
of York, but said nothing, I down with Mr. Wren; and he and I read all
over that I had, and I expounded them to him, and did so order it that I
had them home with me, so that I shall, to my heart's wish, be able to
take a copy of them.  After dinner, I by water to, White Hall; and there,
with the Cofferer and Sir Stephen Fox, attended the Commissioners of the
Treasury, about bettering our fund; and are promised it speedily.  Thence
by water home, and so all the afternoon and evening late busy at the
office, and then home to supper, and Mrs. Turner comes to see my wife
before her journey to-morrow, but she is in bed, and so sat talking to
little purpose with me a great while, and, she gone, I to bed.

15th.  Up mighty betimes, my wife and people, Mercer lying here all night,
by three o'clock, and I about five; and they before, and I after them, to
the coach in Bishopsgate Street, which was not ready to set out. So took
wife and Mercer and Deb. and W. Hewer (who are all to set out this day for
Cambridge, to cozen Roger Pepys's, to see Sturbridge Fayre); and I shewed
them the Exchange, which is very finely carried on, with good dispatch.
So walked back and saw them gone, there being only one man in the coach
besides them; and so home to the Office, where Mrs. Daniel come and staid
talking to little purpose with me to borrow money, but I did not lend her
any, having not opportunity para hater allo thing mit her. At the office
all the morning, and at noon dined with my people at home, and so to the
office again a while, and so by water to the King's playhouse, to see a
new play, acted but yesterday, a translation out of French by Dryden,
called "The Ladys a la Mode:" so mean a thing as, when they come to say it
would be acted again to-morrow, both he that said it, Beeson, and the pit
fell a-laughing, there being this day not a quarter of the pit full.
Thence to St. James's and White Hall to wait on the Duke of York, but
could not come to speak to him till time to go home, and so by water home,
and there late at the office and my chamber busy, and so after a little
supper to bed.

16th.  Up; and dressing myself I did begin para toker the breasts of my
maid Jane, which elle did give way to more than usual heretofore, so I
have a design to try more when I can bring it to.  So to the office, and
thence to St. James's to the Duke of York, walking it to the Temple, and
in my way observe that the Stockes are now pulled quite down; and it will
make the coming into Cornhill and Lumber Street mighty noble. I stopped,
too, at Paul's, and there did go into St. Fayth's Church, and also in the
body of the west part of the Church; and do see a hideous sight of the
walls of the Church ready to fall, that I was in fear as long as I was in
it: and here I saw the great vaults underneath the body of the Church.  No
hurt, I hear, is done yet, since their going to pull down the Church and
steeple; but one man, on Monday this week, fell from the top to a piece of
the roof, of the east end, that stands next the steeple, and there broke
himself all to pieces.  It is pretty here to see how the late Church was
but a case wrought over the old Church; for you may see the very old
pillars standing whole within the wall of this. When I come to St.
James's, I find the Duke of York gone with the King to see the muster of
the Guards in Hyde Park; and their Colonel, the Duke of Monmouth, to take
his command this day of the King's Life-Guard, by surrender of my Lord
Gerard.  So I took a hackney-coach and saw it all: and indeed it was
mighty noble, and their firing mighty fine, and the Duke of Monmouth in
mighty rich clothes; but the well-ordering of the men I understand not.
Here, among a thousand coaches that were there, I saw and spoke to Mrs.
Pierce: and by and by Mr. Wren hunts me out, and gives me my Lord
Anglesey's answer to the Duke of York's letter, where, I perceive, he do
do what he can to hurt me, by bidding the Duke of York call for my books:
but this will do me all the right in the world, and yet I am troubled at
it.  So away out of the Park, and home; and there Mr. Gibson and I to
dinner: and all the afternoon with him, writing over anew, and a little
altering, my answer to the Duke of York, which I have not yet delivered,
and so have the opportunity of doing it after seeing all their answers,
though this do give me occasion to alter very little. This done, he to
write it over, and I to the Office, where late, and then home; and he had
finished it; and then he to read to me the life of Archbishop Laud, wrote
by Dr. Heylin; which is a shrewd book, but that which I believe will do
the Bishops in general no great good, but hurt, it pleads for so much
Popish.  So after supper to bed.  This day my father's letters tell me of
the death of poor Fancy, in the country, big with puppies, which troubles
me, as being one of my oldest acquaintances and servants.  Also good
Stankes is dead.

17th.  Up, and all the morning sitting at the office, where every body
grown mighty cautious in what they do, or omit to do, and at noon comes
Knepp, with design to dine with Lord Brouncker, but she being undressed,
and there being: much company, dined with me; and after dinner I out with
her, and carried her to the playhouse; and in the way did give her five
guineas as a fairing, I having given her nothing a great while, and her
coming hither sometimes having been matter of cost to her, and so I to St.
James's, but missed of the Duke of York, and so went back to the King's
playhouse, and saw "Rollo, Duke of Normandy," which, for old acquaintance,
pleased me pretty well, and so home and to my business,. and to read
again, and to bed.  This evening Batelier comes to tell me that he was
going down to Cambridge to my company, to see the Fair, which vexed me,
and the more because I fear he do know that Knepp did dine with me
to-day.--[And that he might tell Mrs. Pepys.--B.]

18th.  Up, and to St. James's, and there took a turn or two in the Park;
and then up to the Duke of York, and there had opportunity of delivering
my answer to his late letter, which he did not read, but give to Mr. Wren,
as looking on it as a thing I needed not have done, but only that I might
not give occasion to the rest to suspect my communication with the Duke of
York against them.  So now I am at rest in that matter, and shall be more,
when my copies are finished of their answers, which I am now taking with
all speed.  Thence to my several booksellers and elsewhere, about several
errands, and so at noon home, and after dinner by coach to White Hall, and
thither comes the Duke of York to us, and by and by met at the robe
chamber upon our usual business, where the Duke of York I find somewhat
sour, and particularly angry with Lord Anglesey for his not being there
now, nor at other times so often as he should be with us. So to the King's
house, and saw a piece of "Henry the Fourth;" at the end of the play,
thinking to have gone abroad with Knepp, but it was too late, and she to
get her part against to-morrow, in "The Silent Woman," and so I only set
her at home, and away home myself, and there to read again and sup with
Gibson, and so to bed.

19th.  Up, and to the office, where all the morning busy, and so dined
with my people at home, and then to the King's playhouse, and there saw
"The Silent Woman;" the best comedy, I think, that ever was wrote; and
sitting by Shadwell the poet, he was big with admiration of it.  Here was
my Lord Brouncker and W. Pen and their ladies in the box, being grown
mighty kind of a sudden; but, God knows, it will last but a little while,
I dare swear.  Knepp did her part mighty well.  And so home straight, and
to work, and particularly to my cozen Roger, who, W. Hewer and my wife
writes me, do use them with mighty plenty and noble entertainment: so home
to supper, and to bed.  All the news now is, that Mr. Trevor is for
certain now to be Secretary, in Morrice's place, which the Duke of York
did himself tell me yesterday; and also that Parliament is to be adjourned
to the 1st of March, which do please me well, hoping thereby to get my
things in a little better order than I should have done; and the less
attendances at that end of the town in winter.  So home to supper and to
bed.

20th (Lord's day).  Up, and to set some papers to rights in my chamber,
and the like in my office, and so to church, at our own church, and heard
but a dull sermon of one Dr. Hicks, who is a suitor to Mrs. Howell, the
widow of our turner of the Navy; thence home to dinner, staying till past
one o'clock for Harris, whom I invited, and to bring Shadwell the poet
with him; but they come not, and so a good dinner lost, through my own
folly.  And so to dinner alone, having since church heard the boy read
over Dryden's Reply to Sir R. Howard's Answer, about his Essay of Poesy,
and a letter in answer to that; the last whereof is mighty silly, in
behalf of Howard.

     [The title of the letter is as follows: "A Letter from a Gentleman
     to the Honourable Ed. Howard, Esq., occasioned by a Civiliz'd
     Epistle of Mr. Dryden's before his Second Edition of his Indian
     Emperour.  In the Savoy, printed by Thomas Newcomb, 1668."  The
     "Civiliz'd Epistle" was a caustic attack on Sir Robert Howard; and
     the Letter is signed, "Sir, your faithful and humble servant, R.
     F."--i.e., Richard Flecknoe.]

Thence walked forth and got a coach and to visit Mrs. Pierce, with whom,
and him, I staid a little while, and do hear how the Duchesse of Monmouth
is at this time in great trouble of the shortness of her lame leg, which
is likely to grow shorter and shorter, that she will never recover it.
Thence to St. Margaret's Church, thinking to have seen Betty Michell, but
she was not there.  So back, and walked to Gray's Inn walks a while, but
little company; and so over the fields to Clerkenwell, to see whether I
could find that the fair Botelers do live there still, I seeing Frances
the other day in a coach with Cary Dillon, her old servant, but know not
where she lives.  So walked home, and there walked in the garden an hour,
it being mighty pleasant weather, and so took my Lady Pen and Mrs. Markham
home with me and sent for Mrs. Turner, and by and by comes Sir W. Pen and
supped with me, a good supper, part of my dinner to-day.  They gone, Mrs.
Turner staid an hour talking with me .  . .  .  So parted, and I to bed.

21st. Up, and betimes Sir D. Gawden with me talking about the Victualling
business, which is now under dispute for a new contract, or whether it
shall be put into a Commission.  He gone, comes Mr. Hill to talk with me
about Lanyon's business, and so being in haste I took him to the water
with me, and so to White Hall, and there left him, and I to Sir W.
Coventry, and shewed him my answer to the Duke of York's great letter,
which he likes well.  We also discoursed about the Victualling business,
which he thinks there is a design to put into a way of Commission, but do
look upon all things to be managed with faction, and is grieved under it.
So to St. James's, and there the Duke of York did of his own accord come
to me, and tell me that he had read, and do like of, my answers to the
objections which he did give me the other day, about the Navy; and so did
W. Coventry too, who told me that the Duke of York had shown him them: So
to White Hall a little and the Chequer, and then by water home to dinner
with my people, where Tong was also this day with me, whom I shall employ
for a time, and so out again and by water to Somerset House, but when come
thither I turned back and to Southwarke-Fair, very dirty, and there saw
the puppet-show of Whittington, which was pretty to see; and how that idle
thing do work upon people that see it, and even myself too!  And thence to
Jacob Hall's dancing on the ropes, where I saw such action as I never saw
before, and mightily worth seeing; and here took acquaintance with a
fellow that carried me to a tavern, whither come the musick of this booth,
and by and by Jacob Hall himself, with whom I had a mind to speak, to hear
whether he had ever any mischief by falls in his time.  He told me, "Yes,
many; but never to the breaking of a limb:" he seems a mighty strong man.
So giving them a bottle or two of wine, I away with Payne, the waterman.
He, seeing me at the play, did get a link to light me, and so light me to
the Beare, where Bland, my waterman, waited for me with gold and other
things he kept for me, to the value of L40 and more, which I had about me,
for fear of my pockets being cut.  So by link-light through the bridge, it
being mighty dark, but still weather, and so home, where I find my draught
of "The Resolution" come, finished, from Chatham; but will cost me, one
way or other, about L12 or L13, in the board, frame, and garnishing, which
is a little too much, but I will not be beholden to the King's officers
that do it.  So to supper, and the boy to read to me, and so to bed.  This
day I met Mr. Moore in the New Exchange, and had much talk of my Lord's
concernments.  This day also come out first the new five-pieces in gold,
coined by the Guiny Company; and I did get two pieces of Mr. Holder.

     [Guineas took their name from the gold brought from Guinea by the
     African Company in 1663, who, as an encouragement to bring over gold
     to be coined, were permitted by their charter from Charles II. to
     have their stamp of an elephant upon the coin.  When first coined
     they were valued at 20s., but were worth 30s. in 1695.  There were
     likewise fivepound pieces, like the guinea, with the inscription
     upon the rim.]

22nd.  Up, and to the Office, where sitting all the morning at noon, home
to dinner, with my people, and so to the Office again, where busy all the
afternoon, and in the evening spent my time walking in the dark, in the
garden, to favour my eyes, which I find nothing but ease to help.  In the
garden there comes to me my Lady Pen and Mrs. Turner and Markham, and we
sat and talked together, and I carried them home, and there eat a bit of
something, and by and by comes Sir W. Pen, and eat with us, and mighty
merry-in appearance, at least, he being on all occasions glad to be at
friendship with me, though we hate one another, and know it on both sides.
They gone, Mrs. Turner and I to walk in the garden .  .  .  .  So led her
home, and I back to bed.  This day Mr. Wren did give me, at the Board,
Commissioner Middleton's answer to the Duke of York's great letter; so
that now I have all of them.

23rd.  At my office busy all the morning.  At noon comes Mr. Evelyn to me,
about some business with the Office, and there in discourse tells me of
his loss, to the value of F 500, which he hath met with, in a late attempt
of making of bricks

     [At the end of the year 1666 a Dutchman of the Prince of Orange's
     party, named Kiviet, came over to England with proposals for
     embanking the river from the Temple to the Tower with brick,
     and was knighted by the king.  He was introduced to Evelyn, whom he
     persuaded to join with him in a great undertaking for the making of
     bricks.  On March 26th, 1667, the two went in search of brick-earth,
     and in September articles were drawn up between them for the purpose
     of proceeding in the manufacture.  In April, 1668, Evelyn subscribed
     50,000 bricks for the building of a college for the Royal Society,
     in addition to L50 given previously for the same purpose.  No more
     information on the subject is given in Evelyn's "Diary."]

upon an adventure with others, by which he presumed to have got a great
deal of money: so that I see the most ingenious men may sometimes be
mistaken.  So to the 'Change a little, and then home to dinner, and then
by water to White Hall, to attend the Commissioners of the Treasury with
Alderman Backewell, about L10,000 he is to lend us for Tangier, and then
up to a Committee of the Council, where was the Duke of York, and they did
give us, the Officers of the Navy, the proposals of the several bidders
for the victualling of the Navy, for us to give our answer to, which is
the best, and whether it be better to victual by commission or contract,
and to bring them our answer by Friday afternoon, which is a great deal of
work.  So thence back with Sir J. Minnes home, and come after us Sir W.
Pen and Lord Brouncker, and we fell to the business, and I late when they
were gone to digest something of it, and so to supper and to bed.

24th.  Up betimes and Sir D. Gawden with me, and I told him all, being
very desirous for the King's sake, as well as my own, that he may be kept
in it, and after consulting him I to the Office, where we met again and
spent most of the morning about this business, and no other, and so at
noon home to dinner, and then close with Mr. Gibson till night, drawing up
our answer, which I did the most part by seven at night, and so to Lord
Brouncker and the rest at his lodgings to read it, and they approved of
it.  So back home to supper, and made my boy read to me awhile, and then
to bed.

25th.  Up, and Sir D. Gawden with me betimes to confer again about this
business, and he gone I all the morning finishing our answer, which I did
by noon, and so to dinner, and W. Batelier with me, who is lately come
from Impington, beyond which I perceive he went not, whatever his pretence
at first was; and so he tells me how well and merry all are there, and how
nobly used by my cozen.  He gone, after dinner I to work again, and Gibson
having wrote our answer fair and got Brouncker and the rest to sign it, I
by coach to White Hall to the Committee of the Council, which met late,
and Brouncker and J. Minnes with me, and there the Duke of York present
(but not W. Coventry, who I perceive do wholly avoid to have to do
publickly in this business, being shy of appearing in any Navy business,
which I telling him the other day that I thought the King might suffer by
it, he told me that the occasion is now so small that it cannot be fatal
to the service, and for the present it is better for him not to appear,
saying that it may fare the worse for his appearing in it as things are
now governed), where our answer was read and debated, and some hot words
between the Duke of York and Sir T. Clifford, the first for and the latter
against Gawden, but the whole put off to to-morrow's Council, for till the
King goes out of town the next week the Council sits every day.  So with
the Duke of York and some others to his closet, and Alderman Backewell
about a Committee of Tangier, and there did agree upon a price for pieces
of eight at 4s. 6d. Present the Duke of York, Arlington, Berkeley, Sir J.
Minnes, and myself. They gone, the Duke of York did tell me how hot
Clifford is for Child, and for removing of old Officers, he saying plainly
to-night, that though D. Gawden was a man that had done the best service
that he believed any man, or any ten men, could have done, yet that it was
for the King's interest not to let it lie too long in one hand, lest
nobody should be able to serve him but one.  But the Duke of York did
openly tell him that he was not for removing of old servants that have
done well, neither in this place, nor in any other place, which is very
nobly said.  It being 7 or 8 at night, I home with Backewell by coach, and
so walked to D. Gawden's, but he not at home, and so back to my chamber,
the boy to read to me, and so to supper and to bed.

26th.  Could sleep but little last night, for my concernments in this
business of the victualling for Sir D. Gawden, so up in the morning and he
comes to me, and there I did tell him all, and give him my advice, and so
he away, and I to the office, where we met and did a little business, and
I left them and by water to attend the Council, which I did all the
morning, but was not called in, but the Council meets again in the
afternoon on purpose about it.  So I at noon to Westminster Hall and there
stayed a little, and at the Swan also, thinking to have got Doll Lane
thither, but elle did not understand my signs; and so I away and walked to
Charing Cross, and there into the great new Ordinary, by my Lord
Mulgrave's, being led thither by Mr. Beale, one of Oliver's, and now of
the King's Guards; and he sat with me while I had two grilled pigeons,
very handsome and good meat: and there he and I talked of our old
acquaintances, W. Clerke and others, he being a very civil man, and so
walked to Westminster and there parted, and I to the Swan again, but did
nothing, and so to White Hall, and there attended the King and Council,
who met and heard our answer.  I present, and then withdrew; and they sent
two hours at least afterwards about it, and at last rose; and to my great
content, the Duke of York, at coming out, told me that it was carried for
D. Gawden at 6d. 8d., and 8 3/4d.; but with great difficulty, I
understand, both from him and others, so much that Sir Edward Walker told
me that he prays to God he may never live to need to plead his merit, for
D. Gawden's sake; for that it hath stood him in no stead in this business
at all, though both he and all the world that speaks of him, speaks of him
as the most deserving man of any servant of the King's in the whole
nation, and so I think he is: but it is done, and my heart is glad at it.
So I took coach and away, and in Holborne overtook D. Gawden's coach, and
stopped and went home, and Gibson to come after, and to my house, where D.
Gawden did talk a little, and he do mightily acknowledge my kindness to
him, and I know I have done the King and myself good service in it.  So he
gone, and myself in mighty great content in what is done, I to the office
a little, and then home to supper, and the boy to read to me, and so to
bed.  This noon I went to my Lady Peterborough's house, and talked with
her about the money due to her Lord, and it gives me great trouble, her
importunity and impertinency about it.  This afternoon at Court I met with
Lord Hinchingbroke, newly come out of the country, who tells me that
Creed's business with Mrs. Pickering will do, which I am neither troubled
nor glad at.

27th (Lord's day).  Up, and to my office to finish my journall for five
days past, and so abroad and walked to White Hall, calling in at Somerset
House Chapel, and also at the Spanish Embassador's at York House, and
there did hear a little masse: and so to White Hall; and there the King
being gone to Chapel, I to walk all the morning in the Park, where I met
Mr. Wren; and he and I walked together in the Pell-Mell, it being most
summer weather that ever was seen: and here talking of several things: of
the corruption of the Court, and how unfit it is for ingenious men, and
himself particularly, to live in it, where a man cannot live but he must
spend, and cannot get suitably, without breach of his honour: and did
thereupon tell me of the basest thing of my Lord Barkeley, one of the
basest things that ever was heard of of a man, which was this: how the
Duke of York's Commissioners do let his wine-licenses at a bad rate, and
being offered a better, they did persuade the Duke of York to give some
satisfaction to the former to quit it, and let it to the latter, which
being done, my Lord Barkeley did make the bargain for the former to have
L1500 a-year to quit it; whereof, since, it is come to light that they
were to have but L800 and himself L700, which the Duke of York hath ever
since for some years paid, though this second bargain hath been broken,
and the Duke of York lost by it, [half] of what the first was.  He told me
that there hath been a seeming accommodation between the Duke of York and
the Duke of Buckingham and Lord Arlington, the two latter desiring it; but
yet that there is not true agreement between them, but they do labour to
bring in all new creatures into play, and the Duke of York do oppose it,
as particularly in this of Sir D. Gawden.  Thence, he gone, I to the
Queen's Chapel, and there heard some good singing; and so to White Hall,
and saw the King and Queen at dinner and thence with Sir Stephen Fox to
dinner: and the Cofferer with us; and there mighty kind usage, and good
discourse.  Thence spent all the afternoon walking in the Park, and then
in the evening at Court, on the Queen's side; and there met Mr. Godolphin,
who tells me that the news, is true we heard yesterday, of my Lord
Sandwich's being come to Mount's Bay, in Cornwall, and so I heard this
afternoon at Mrs. Pierce's, whom I went to make a short visit to. This
night, in the Queen's drawing-room, my Lord Brouncker told me the
difference that is now between the three Embassadors here, the Venetian,
French, and Spaniard; the third not being willing to make a visit to the
first, because he would not receive him at the door; who is willing to
give him as much respect as he did to the French, who was used no
otherwise, and who refuses now to take more of him, upon being desired
thereto, in order to the making an accommodation in this matter, which is
very pretty.  So a boat staying for me all this evening, I home in the
dark about eight at night, and so over the ruins from the Old Swan home
with great trouble, and so to hear my boy read a little, and supper and to
bed.  This evening I found at home Pelling and Wallington and one Aldrige,
and we supped and sung.

28th.  Up betimes, and Knepp's maid comes to me, to tell me that the
women's day at the playhouse is to-day, and that therefore I must be
there, to encrease their profit.  I did give the pretty maid Betty that
comes to me half-a-crown for coming, and had a baiser or two-elle being
mighty jolie.  And so I about my business.  By water to St. James's, and
there had good opportunity of speaking with the Duke of York, who desires
me again, talking on that matter, to prepare something for him to do for
the better managing of our Office, telling me that, my Lord Keeper and he
talking about it yesterday, my Lord Keeper did advise him to do so, it
being better to come from him than otherwise, which I have promised to do.
Thence to my Lord Burlington's houses the first time I ever was there, it
being the house built by Sir John Denham, next to Clarendon House; and
here I visited my Lord Hinchingbroke and his lady; Mr. Sidney Montagu
being come last night to town unexpectedly from Mount's Bay, where he left
my Lord well, eight days since, so as we may now hourly expect to hear of
his arrival at Portsmouth.  Sidney is mighty grown; and I am glad I am
here to see him at his first coming, though it cost me dear, for here I
come to be necessitated to supply them with L500 for my Lord.  He sent him
up with a declaration to his friends, of the necessity of his being
presently supplied with L2000; but I do not think he will get one.
However, I think it becomes my duty to my Lord to do something
extraordinary in this, and the rather because I have been remiss in
writing to him during this voyage, more than ever I did in my life, and
more indeed than was fit for me.  By and by comes Sir W. Godolphin to see
Mr. Sidney, who, I perceive, is much dissatisfied that he should come to
town last night, and not yet be with my Lord Arlington, who, and all the
town, hear of his being come to town, and he did, it seems, take notice of
it to Godolphin this morning: so that I perceive this remissness in
affairs do continue in my Lord's managements still, which I am sorry for;
but, above all, to see in what a condition my Lord is for money, that I
dare swear he do not know where to take up L500 of any man in England at
this time, upon his word, but of myself, as I believe by the sequel hereof
it will appear.  Here I first saw and saluted my Lady Burlington, a very
fine-speaking lady, and a good woman, but old, and not handsome; but a
brave woman in her parts.  Here my Lady Hinchingbroke tells me that she
hath bought most of the wedding-clothes for Mrs. Dickering, so that the
thing is gone through, and will soon be ended; which I wonder at, but let
them do as they will.  Here I also, standing by a candle that was brought
for sealing of a letter, do set my periwigg a-fire, which made such an odd
noise, nobody could tell what it was till they saw the flame, my back
being to the candle.  Thence to Westminster Hall and there walked a
little, and to the Exchequer, and so home by water, and after eating a bit
I to my vintner's, and there did only look upon su wife, which is mighty
handsome; and so to my glove and ribbon shop, in Fenchurch Street, and did
the like there.  And there, stopping against the door of the shop, saw
Mrs. Horsfall, now a late widow, in a coach.  I to her, and shook her by
the hand, and so she away; and I by coach towards the King's playhouse,
and meeting W. Howe took him with me, and there saw "The City Match;" not
acted these thirty years, and but a silly play: the King and Court there;
the house, for the women's sake, mighty full.  So I to White Hall, and
there all the evening on the Queen's side; and it being a most summerlike
day, and a fine warm evening, the Italians come in a barge under the
leads, before the Queen's drawing-room; and so the Queen and ladies went
out, and heard them, for almost an hour: and it was indeed very good
together; but yet there was but one voice that alone did appear
considerable, and that was Seignor Joanni.  This done, by and by they went
in; and here I saw Mr. Sidney Montagu kiss the Queen's hand, who was
mighty kind to him, and the ladies looked mightily on him; and the King
come by and by, and did talk to him. So I away by coach with Alderman
Backewell home, who is mighty kind to me, more than ordinary, in his
expressions.  But I do hear this day what troubles me, that Sir W.
Coventry is quite out of play, the King seldom speaking to him; and that
there is a design of making a Lord Treasurer, and that my Lord Arlington
shall be the man; but I cannot believe it. But yet the Duke of Buckingham
hath it in his mind, and those with him, to make a thorough alteration in
things; and, among the rest, Coventry to be out.  The Duke of York did
this day tell me how hot the whole party was in the business of Gawden;
and particularly, my Lord Anglesey tells me, the Duke of Buckingham, for
Child against Gawden; but the Duke of York did stand stoutly to it.  So
home to read and sup, and to bed.

29th (Tuesday, Michaelmas day).  Up, and to the Office, where all the
morning.



                THE DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS M.A. F.R.S.

            CLERK OF THE ACTS AND SECRETARY TO THE ADMIRALTY

   TRANSCRIBED FROM THE SHORTHAND MANUSCRIPT IN THE PEPYSIAN LIBRARY
MAGDALENE COLLEGE CAMBRIDGE BY THE REV. MYNORS BRIGHT M.A. LATE FELLOW
                      AND PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE

                              (Unabridged)

                      WITH LORD BRAYBROOKE'S NOTES

                        EDITED WITH ADDITIONS BY

                        HENRY B. WHEATLEY F.S.A.

                          DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS.
                                OCTOBER
                                  1668

     [In this part of the "Diary" no entry occurs for thirteen days,
     though there are several pages left blank.  During the interval
     Pepys went into the country, as he subsequently mentions his having
     been at Saxham, in Suffolk, during the king's visit to Lord Crofts,
     which took place at this time (see October 23rd, host).  He might
     also probably have gone to Impington to fetch his wife.  The pages
     left blank were never filled up.--B.]

October 11th (Lord's day').  Up and to church, where I find Parson Mills
come to town and preached, and the church full, most people being now come
home to town, though the season of year is as good as summer in all
respects.  At noon dined at home with my wife, all alone, and busy all the
afternoon in my closet, making up some papers with W. Hewer and at night
comes Mr. Turner and his wife, and there they tell me that Mr. Harper is
dead at Deptford, and so now all his and my care is, how to secure his
being Storekeeper in his stead; and here they and their daughter, and a
kinswoman that come along with them, did sup with me, and pretty merry,
and then, they gone, and my wife to read to me, and to bed.

12th.  Up, and with Mr. Turner by water to White Hall, there to think to
enquire when the Duke of York will be in town, in order to Mr. Turner's
going down to Audley Ends about his place; and here I met in St. James's
Park with one that told us that the Duke of York would be in town
to-morrow, and so Turner parted and went home, and I also did stop my
intentions of going to the Court, also this day, about securing Mr.
Turner's place of Petty-purveyor to Mr. Hater.  So I to my Lord
Brouncker's, thinking to have gone and spoke to him about it, but he is
gone out to town till night, and so, meeting a gentleman of my Lord
Middleton's looking for me about the payment of the L1000 lately ordered
to his Lord, in advance of his pay, which shall arise upon his going
Governor to Tangier, I did go to his Lord's lodgings, and there spoke the
first time with him, and find him a shrewd man, but a drinking man, I
think, as the world says; but a man that hath seen much of the world, and
is a Scot.  I offered him my service, though I can do him little; but he
sends his man home with me, where I made him stay, till I had gone to Sir
W. Pen, to bespeak him about Mr. Hater, who, contrary to my fears, did
appear very friendly, to my great content; for I was afraid of his
appearing for his man Burroughs.  But he did not; but did declare to me
afterwards his intentions to desire an excuse in his own business, to be
eased of the business of the Comptroller, his health not giving him power
to stay always in town, but he must go into the country.  I did say little
to him but compliment, having no leisure to think of his business, or any
man's but my own, and so away and home, where I find Sir H. Cholmly come
to town; and is come hither to see me: and he is a man that I love
mightily, as being, of a gentleman, the most industrious that ever I saw.
He staid with me awhile talking, and telling me his obligations to my Lord
Sandwich, which I was glad of; and that the Duke of Buckingham is now
chief of all men in this kingdom, which I knew before; and that he do
think the Parliament will hardly ever meet again; which is a great many
men's thoughts, and I shall not be sorry for it.  He being gone, I with my
Lord Middleton's servant to Mr. Colvill's, but he was not in town, and so
he parted, and I home, and there to dinner, and Mr. Pelling with us; and
thence my wife and Mercer, and W. Hewer and Deb., to the King's playhouse,
and I afterwards by water with them, and there we did hear the Eunuch
(who, it seems, is a Frenchman, but long bred in Italy) sing, which I
seemed to take as new to me, though I saw him on Saturday last, but said
nothing of it; but such action and singing I could never have imagined to
have heard, and do make good whatever Tom Hill used to tell me.  Here we
met with Mr. Batelier and his sister, and so they home with us in two
coaches, and there at my house staid and supped, and this night my
bookseller Shrewsbury comes, and brings my books of Martyrs, and I did pay
him for them, and did this night make the young women before supper to
open all the volumes for me.  So to supper, and after supper to read a
ridiculous nonsensical book set out by Will. Pen, for the Quakers; but so
full of nothing but nonsense, that I was ashamed to read in it. So they
gone, we to bed.

     [Penn's first work, entitled, "Truth exalted, in a short but sure
     testimony against all those religions, faiths, and worships, that
     have been formed and followed, in the darkness of apostacy; and for
     that glorious light which is now risen, and shines forth, in the
     life and doctrine of the despised Quakers .  .  .  .  by W. Penn,
     whom divine love constrains, in holy contempt, to trample on Egypt's
     glory, not fearing the King's wrath, having beheld the Majesty of
     Him who is invisible:"  London, 1668.--B.]

13th.  Up, and to the office, and before the office did speak with my Lord
Brouncker, and there did get his ready assent to T. Hater's having of Mr.
Turner's place, and so Sir J. Minnes's also: but when we come to sit down
at the Board, comes to us Mr. Wren this day to town, and tells me that
James Southern do petition the Duke of York for the Storekeeper's place of
Deptford, which did trouble me much, and also the Board, though, upon
discourse, after he was gone, we did resolve to move hard for our Clerks,
and that places of preferment may go according to seniority and merit.
So, the Board up, I home with my people to dinner, and so to the office
again, and there, after doing some business, I with Mr. Turner to the Duke
of Albemarle's at night; and there did speak to him about his appearing to
Mr. Wren a friend to Mr. Turner, which he did take kindly from me; and so
away thence, well pleased with what we had now done, and so I with him
home, stopping at my Lord Brouncker's, and getting his hand to a letter I
wrote to the Duke of York for T. Hater, and also at my Lord Middleton's,
to give him an account of what I had done this day, with his man, at
Alderman Backewell's, about the getting of his L1000 paid;

     [It was probably for this payment that the tally was obtained, the
     loss of which caused Pepys so much anxiety.  See November 26th,
     1668]

and here he did take occasion to discourse about the business of the Dutch
war, which, he says, he was always an enemy to; and did discourse very
well of it, I saying little, but pleased to hear him talk; and to see how
some men may by age come to know much, and yet by their drinking and other
pleasures render themselves not very considerable.  I did this day find by
discourse with somebody, that this nobleman was the great Major-General
Middleton; that was of the Scots army, in the beginning of the late war
against the King.  Thence home and to the office to finish my letters, and
so home and did get my wife to read to me, and then Deb to comb my head .
.  .  .

14th.  Up, and by water, stopping at Michell's, and there saw Betty, but
could have no discourse with her, but there drank.  To White Hall, and
there walked to St. James's, where I find the Court mighty full, it being
the Duke or York's birthday; and he mighty fine, and all the musick, one
after another, to my great content.  Here I met with Sir H. Cholmly; and
he and I to walk, and to my Lord Barkeley's new house; there to see a new
experiment of a cart, which; by having two little wheeles fastened to the
axle-tree, is said to make it go with half the ease and more, than another
cart but we did not see the trial made.  Thence I home, and after dinner
to St. James's, and there met my brethren; but the Duke of York being gone
out, and to-night being a play there; and a great festival, we would not
stay, but went all of us to the King's playhouse, and there saw "The
Faythful Shepherdess" again, that we might hear the French Eunuch sing,
which we did, to our great content; though I do admire his action as much
as his singing, being both beyond all I ever saw or heard. Thence with W.
Pen home, and there to get my people to read, and to supper, and so to
bed.

15th.  Up, and all the morning at the office, and at home at dinner,
where, after dinner, my wife and I and Deb. out by coach to the upholsters
in Long Lane, Alderman Reeve's, and then to Alderman Crow's, to see
variety of hangings, and were mightily pleased therewith, and spent the
whole afternoon thereupon; and at last I think we shall pitch upon the
best suit of Apostles, where three pieces for my room will come to almost
L80: so home, and to my office, and then home to supper and to bed.  This
day at the Board comes unexpected the warrants from the Duke of York for
Mr. Turner and Hater, for the places they desire, which contents me
mightily.

16th.  Up, and busy all the morning at the office, and before noon I took
my wife by coach, and Deb., and shewed her Mr. Wren's hangings and bed, at
St. James's, and Sir W. Coventry's in the Pell Mell, for our satisfaction
in what we are going to buy; and so by Mr. Crow's, home, about his
hangings, and do pitch upon buying his second suit of Apostles-the whole
suit, which comes to L83; and this we think the best for us, having now
the whole suit, to answer any other rooms or service.  So home to dinner,
and with Mr. Hater by water to St. James's: there Mr. Hater, to give Mr.
Wren thanks for his kindness about his place that he hath lately granted
him, of Petty Purveyor of petty emptions, upon the removal of Mr. Turner
to be Storekeeper at Deptford, on the death of Harper. And then we all up
to the Duke of York, and there did our usual business, and so I with J.
Minnes home, and there finding my wife gone to my aunt Wight's, to see her
the first time after her coming to town, and indeed the first time, I
think, these two years (we having been great strangers one to the other
for a great while), I to them; and there mighty kindly used, and had a
barrel of oysters, and so to look up and down their house, they having
hung a room since I was there, but with hangings not fit to be seen with
mine, which I find all come home to-night, and here staying an hour or two
we home, and there to supper and to bed.

17th.  Up, and to the office, where all the morning sitting, and at noon
home to dinner, and to the office all the afternoon, and then late home,
and there with much pleasure getting Mr. Gibbs, that writes well, to write
the name upon my new draught of "The Resolution;" and so set it up, and
altered the situation of some of my pictures in my closet, to my
extraordinary content, and at it with much pleasure till almost 12 at
night.  Mr. Moore and Seymour were with me this afternoon, who tell me
that my Lord Sandwich was received mighty kindly by the King, and is in
exceeding great esteem with him, and the rest about him; but I doubt it
will be hard for him to please both the King and the Duke of York, which I
shall be sorry for.  Mr. Moore tells me the sad condition my Lord is in,
in his estate and debts; and the way he now lives in, so high, and so many
vain servants about him, that he must be ruined, if he do not take up,
which, by the grace of God, I will put him upon, when I come to see him.

18th (Lord's day).  Up, and with my boy Tom all the morning altering the
places of my pictures with great pleasure, and at noon to dinner, and then
comes Mr. Shales to see me, and I with him to recommend him to my Lord
Brouncker's service, which I did at Madam Williams's, and my Lord receives
him.  Thence with Brouncker to Lincolne's Inn, and Mr. Ball, to visit Dr.
Wilkins, now newly Bishop of Chester: and he received us mighty kindly;
and had most excellent discourse from him about his Book of Reall
Character: and so I with Lord Brouncker to White Hall, and there saw the
Queen and some ladies, and with Lord Brouncker back, it again being a
rainy evening, and so my Lord forced to lend me his coach till I got a
hackney, which I did, and so home and to supper, and got my wife to read
to me, and so to bed.

19th.  Up, and to my office to set down my Journall for some days past,
and so to other business.  At the office all the morning upon some
business of Sir W. Warren's, and at noon home to dinner, and thence out by
coach with my wife and Deb. and Mr. Harman, the upholster, and carried
them to take measure of Mr. Wren's bed at St. James's, I being resolved to
have just such another made me, and thence set him down in the Strand, and
my wife and I to the Duke of York's playhouse; and there saw, the first
time acted, "The Queene of Arragon," an old Blackfriars play, but an
admirable one, so good that I am astonished at it, and wonder where it
hath lain asleep all this while, that I have never heard of it before.
Here met W. Batelier and Mrs. Hunt, Deb.'s aunt; and saw her home--a very
witty woman, and one that knows this play, and understands a play mighty
well.  Left her at home in Jewen Street, and we home, and to supper, and
my wife to read to me, and so to bed.

20th.  Up, and to the office all the morning, and then home to dinner,
having this day a new girl come to us in the room of Nell, who is lately,
about four days since, gone away, being grown lazy and proud.  This girl
to stay only till we have a boy, which I intend to keep when I have a
coach, which I am now about.  At this time my wife and I mighty busy
laying out money in dressing up our best chamber, and thinking of a coach
and coachman and horses, &c.; and the more because of Creed's being now
married to Mrs. Pickering; a thing I could never have expected, but it is
done about seven or ten days since, as I hear out of the country. At noon
home to dinner, and my wife and Harman and girl abroad to buy things, and
I walked out to several places to pay debts, and among other things to
look out for a coach, and saw many; and did light on one for which I bid
L50, which do please me mightily, and I believe I shall have it.  So to my
tailor's, and the New Exchange, and so by coach home, and there, having
this day bought "The Queene of Arragon" play, I did get my wife and W.
Batelier to read it over this night by 11 o'clock, and so to bed.

21st.  Lay pretty long talking with content with my wife about our coach
and things, and so to the office, where Sir D. Gawden was to do something
in his accounts.  At noon to dinner to Mr. Batelier's, his mother coming
this day a-housewarming to him, and several friends of his, to which he
invited us.  Here mighty merry, and his mother the same; I heretofore took
her for a gentlewoman, and understanding.  I rose from table before the
rest, because under an obligation to go to my Lord Brouncker's, where to
meet several gentlemen of the Royal Society, to go and make a visit to the
French Embassador Colbert, at Leicester House, he having endeavoured to
make one or two to my Lord Brouncker, as our President, but he was not
within, but I come too late, they being gone before: but I followed to
Leicester House; but they are gore in and up before me; and so I away to
the New Exchange, and there staid for my wife, and she come, we to Cow
Lane, and there I shewed her the coach which I pitch on, and she is out of
herself for joy almost.  But the man not within, so did nothing more
towards an agreement, but to Mr. Crow's about a bed, to have his advice,
and so home, and there had my wife to read to me, and so to supper and to
bed.  Memorandum: that from Crow's, we went back to Charing Cross, and
there left my people at their tailor's, while I to my Lord Sandwich's
lodgings, who come to town the last night, and is come thither to lye: and
met with him within: and among others my new cozen Creed, who looks mighty
soberly; and he and I saluted one another with mighty gravity, till we
come to a little more freedom of talk about it.  But here I hear that Sir
Gilbert Pickering is lately dead, about three days since, which makes some
sorrow there, though not much, because of his being long expected to die,
having been in a lethargy long.  So waited on my Lord to Court, and there
staid and saw the ladies awhile: and thence to my wife, and took them up;
and so home, and to supper and bed.

22nd.  Up, and W. Batelier's Frenchman, a perriwigg maker, comes and
brings me a new one, which I liked and paid him for: a mighty genteel
fellow.  So to the office, where sat all the morning, and at noon home to
dinner, and thence with wife and Deb. to Crow's, and there did see some
more beds; and we shall, I think, pitch upon a camlott one, when all is
done.  Thence sent them home, and I to Arundell House, where the first
time we have met since the vacation, and not much company: but here much
good discourse, and afterwards my Lord and others and I to the Devil
tavern, and there eat and drank, and so late, with Mr. Colwell, home by
coach; and at home took him with me, and there found my uncle Wight and
aunt, and Woolly and his wife, and there supped, and mighty merry.  And
anon they gone, and Mrs. Turner staid, who was there also to talk of her
husband's business; and the truth is, I was the less pleased to talk with
her, for that she hath not yet owned, in any fit manner of thanks, my late
and principal service to her husband about his place, which I alone ought
to have the thanks for, if they know as much as I do; but let it go: if
they do not own it, I shall have it in my hand to teach them to do it.  So
to bed.  This day word come for all the Principal Officers to bring them
[the Commissioners of Accounts] their patents, which I did in the
afternoon, by leaving it at their office, but am troubled at what should
be their design therein.

23rd.  Up, and plasterers at work and painters about my house.
Commissioner Middleton and I to St. James's, where with the rest of our
company we attended on our usual business the Duke of York.  Thence I to
White Hall, to my Lord Sandwich's, where I find my Lord within, but busy,
private; and so I staid a little talking with the young gentlemen: and so
away with Mr. Pierce, the surgeon, towards Tyburne, to see the people
executed; but come too late, it being done; two men and a woman hanged,
and so back again and to my coachmaker's, and there did come a little
nearer agreement for the coach, and so to Duck Lane, and there my
bookseller's, and saw his moher, but elle is so big-bellied that elle is
not worth seeing.  So home, and there all alone to dinner, my wife and W.
Hewer being gone to Deptford to see her mother, and so I to the office all
the afternoon.  In the afternoon comes my cozen, Sidney Pickering, to
bring my wife and me his sister's Favour for her wedding, which is kindly
done, and he gone, I to business again, and in the evening home, made my
wife read till supper time, and so to bed.  This day Pierce do tell me,
among other news, the late frolick and debauchery of Sir Charles Sidly and
Buckhurst, running up and down all the night with their arses bare,
through the streets; and at last fighting, and being beat by the watch and
clapped up all night; and how the King takes their parts; and my Lord
Chief Justice Keeling hath laid the constable by the heels to answer it
next Sessions: which is a horrid shame.  How the King and these gentlemen
did make the fiddlers of Thetford, this last progress, to sing them all
the bawdy songs they could think of.  How Sir W. Coventry was brought the
other day to the Duchesse of York by the Duke, to kiss her hand; who did
acknowledge his unhappiness to occasion her so much sorrow, declaring his
intentions in it, and praying her pardon; which she did give him upon his
promise to make good his pretences of innocence to her family, by his
faithfulness to his master, the Duke of York.  That the Duke of Buckingham
is now all in all, and will ruin Coventry, if he can: and that W. Coventry
do now rest wholly upon the Duke of York for his standing, which is a
great turn.  He tells me that my Lady Castlemayne, however, is a mortal
enemy to the Duke of Buckingham, which I understand not; but, it seems,
she is disgusted with his greatness, and his ill usage of her.  That the
King was drunk at Saxam with Sidly, Buckhurst, &c., the night that my Lord
Arlington come thither, and would not give him audience, or could not
which is true, for it was the night that I was there, and saw the King go
up to his chamber, and was told that the King had been drinking.  He tells
me, too, that the Duke of York did the next day chide Bab. May for his
occasioning the King's giving himself up to these gentlemen, to the
neglecting of my Lord Arlington: to which he answered merrily, that, by
God, there was no man in England that had heads to lose, durst do what
they do, every day, with the King, and asked the Duke of York's pardon:
which is a sign of a mad world.  God bless us out of it!

24th.  This morning comes to me the coachmaker, and agreed with me for
L53, and stand to the courtesy of what more I should give him upon the
finishing of the coach: he is likely also to fit me with a coachman. There
comes also to me Mr. Shotgrave, the operator of our Royal Society, to show
me his method of making the Tubes for the eyes, which are clouterly done,
so that mine are better, but I have well informed myself in several things
from him, and so am glad of speaking with him.  So to the office, where
all the morning, and then to dinner, and so all the afternoon late at the
office, and so home; and my wife to read to me, and then with much content
to bed.  This day Lord Brouncker tells me that the making Sir J. Minnes a
bare Commissioner is now in doing, which I am glad of; but he speaks of
two new Commissioners, which I do not believe.

25th (Lord's day).  Up, and discoursing with my wife about our house and
many new things we are doing of, and so to church I, and there find Jack
Fenn come, and his wife, a pretty black woman: I never saw her before, nor
took notice of her now.  So home and to dinner, and after dinner all the
afternoon got my wife and boy to read to me, and at night W. Batelier
comes and sups with us; and, after supper, to have my head combed by Deb.,
which occasioned the greatest sorrow to me that ever I knew in this world,
for my wife, coming up suddenly, did find me embracing the girl .  .  .  .
I was at a wonderful loss upon it, and the girle also, and I endeavoured
to put it off, but my wife was struck mute and grew angry, and so her
voice come to her, grew quite out of order, and I to say little, but to
bed, and my wife said little also, but could not sleep all night, but
about two in the morning waked me and cried, and fell to tell me as a
great secret that she was a Roman Catholique and had received the Holy
Sacrament, which troubled me, but I took no notice of it, but she went on
from one thing to another till at last it appeared plainly her trouble was
at what she saw, but yet I did not know how much she saw, and therefore
said nothing to her.  But after her much crying and reproaching me with
inconstancy and preferring a sorry girl before her, I did give her no
provocation, but did promise all fair usage to her and love, and foreswore
any hurt that I did with her, till at last she seemed to be at ease again,
and so toward morning a little sleep, and so I with some little repose and
rest

26th.  Rose, and up and by water to White Hall, but with my mind mightily
troubled for the poor girle, whom I fear I have undone by this, my [wife]
telling me that she would turn her out of doors.  However, I was obliged
to attend the Duke of York, thinking to have had a meeting of Tangier
to-day, but had not; but he did take me and Mr. Wren into his closet, and
there did press me to prepare what I had to say upon the answers of my
fellow-officers to his great letter, which I promised to do against his
coming to town again, the next week; and so to other discourse, finding
plainly that he is in trouble, and apprehensions of the Reformers, and
would be found to do what he can towards reforming, himself.  And so
thence to my Lord Sandwich's, where, after long stay, he being in talk
with others privately, I to him; and there he, taking physic and keeping
his chamber, I had an hour's talk with him about the ill posture of things
at this time, while the King gives countenance to Sir Charles Sidly and
Lord Buckhurst, telling him their late story of running up and down the
streets a little while since all night, and their being beaten and clapped
up all night by the constable, who is since chid and imprisoned for his
pains.  He tells me that he thinks his matters do stand well with the
King, and hopes to have dispatch to his mind; but I doubt it, and do see
that he do fear it, too.  He told me my Lady Carteret's trouble about my
writing of that letter of the Duke of York's lately to the Office, which I
did not own, but declared to be of no injury to G. Carteret, and that I
would write a letter to him to satisfy him therein.  But this I am in pain
how to do, without doing myself wrong, and the end I had, of preparing a
justification to myself hereafter, when the faults of the Navy come to be
found out however, I will do it in the best manner I can.  Thence by coach
home and to dinner, finding my wife mightily discontented, and the girle
sad, and no words from my wife to her.  So after dinner they out with me
about two or three things, and so home again, I all the evening busy, and
my wife full of trouble in her looks, and anon to bed, where about
midnight she wakes me, and there falls foul of me again, affirming that
she saw me hug and kiss the girle; the latter I denied, and truly, the
other I confessed and no more, and upon her pressing me did offer to give
her under my hand that I would never see Mrs. Pierce more nor Knepp, but
did promise her particular demonstrations of my true love to her, owning
some indiscretions in what I did, but that there was no harm in it.  She
at last upon these promises was quiet, and very kind we were, and so to
sleep, and

27th.  In the morning up, but my, mind troubled for the poor girle, with
whom I could not get opportunity to speak, but to the office, my mind
mighty full of sorrow for her, to the office, where all the morning, and
to dinner with my people, and to the office all the afternoon, and so at
night home, and there busy to get some things ready against to-morrow's
meeting of Tangier, and that being done, and my clerks gone, my wife did
towards bedtime begin to be in a mighty rage from some new matter that she
had got in her head, and did most part of the night in bed rant at me in
most high terms of threats of publishing my shame, and when I offered to
rise would have rose too, and caused a candle to be light to burn by her
all night in the chimney while she ranted, while the knowing myself to
have given some grounds for it, did make it my business to appease her all
I could possibly, and by good words and fair promises did make her very
quiet, and so rested all night, and rose with perfect good peace, being
heartily afflicted for this folly of mine that did occasion it, but was
forced to be silent about the girle, which I have no mind to part with,
but much less that the poor girle should be undone by my folly. So up with
mighty kindness from my wife and a thorough peace, and being up did by a
note advise the girle what I had done and owned, which note I was in pain
for till she told me she had burned it.  This evening Mr. Spong come, and
sat late with me, and first told me of the instrument called
parallelogram,

     [This useful instrument, used for copying maps, plans, drawings, &c.
     either of the same size, or larger or smaller than the originals, is
     now named a pantograph.]

which I must have one of, shewing me his practice thereon, by a map of
England.

28th.  So by coach with Mr. Gibson to Chancery Lane, and there made oath
before a Master of Chancery to the Tangier account of fees, and so to
White Hall, where, by and by, a Committee met, my Lord Sandwich there, but
his report was not received, it being late; but only a little business
done, about the supplying the place with victuals.  But I did get, to my
great content, my account allowed of fees, with great applause by my Lord
Ashly and Sir W. Pen.  Thence home, calling at one or two places; and
there about our workmen, who are at work upon my wife's closet, and other
parts of my house, that we are all in dirt.  So after dinner with Mr.
Gibson all the afternoon in my closet, and at night to supper and to bed,
my wife and I at good peace, but yet with some little grudgings of trouble
in her and more in me about the poor girle.

29th.  At the office all the morning, where Mr. Wren first tells us of the
order from the King, came last night to the Duke of York, for signifying
his pleasure to the Sollicitor-General for drawing up a Commission for
suspending of my Lord Anglesey, and putting in Sir Thomas. Littleton and
Sir Thomas Osborne, the former a creature of Arlington's, and the latter
of the Duke of Buckingham's, during the suspension. The Duke of York was
forced to obey, and did grant it, he being to go to Newmarket this day
with the King, and so the King pressed for it. But Mr. Wren do own that
the Duke of York is the most wounded in this, in the world, for it is done
and concluded without his privity, after his appearing for Lord Anglesey,
and that it is plain that they do ayme to bring the Admiralty into
Commission too, and lessen the Duke of York. This do put strange
apprehensions into all our Board; only I think I am the least troubled at
it, for I care not at all for it: but my Lord Brouncker and Pen do seem to
think much of it.  So home to dinner, full of this news, and after dinner
to the office, and so home all the afternoon to do business towards my
drawing up an account for the Duke of York of the answers of this office
to his late great letter, and late at it, and so to bed, with great peace
from my wife and quiet, I bless God.

30th.  Up betimes; and Mr. Povy comes to even accounts with me, which we
did, and then fell to other talk.  He tells, in short, how the King is
made a child of, by Buckingham and Arlington, to the lessening of the Duke
of York, whom they cannot suffer to be great, for fear of my Lord
Chancellor's return, which, therefore, they make the King violent against.
That he believes it is impossible these two great men can hold together
long: or, at least, that the ambition of the former is so great, that he
will endeavour to master all, and bring into play as many as he can.  That
Anglesey will not lose his place easily, but will contend in law with
whoever comes to execute it.  That the Duke of York, in all things but in
his cod-piece, is led by the nose by his wife.  That W. Coventry is now,
by the Duke of York, made friends with the Duchess; and that he is often
there, and waits on her.  That he do believe that these present great men
will break in time, and that W. Coventry will be a great man again; for he
do labour to have nothing to do in matters of the State, and is so usefull
to the side that he is on, that he will stand, though at present he is
quite out of play.  That my Lady Castlemayne hates the Duke of Buckingham.
That the Duke of York hath expressed himself very kind to my Lord
Sandwich, which I am mighty glad of.  That we are to expect more changes
if these men stand.  This done, he and I to talk of my coach, and I got
him to go see it, where he finds most infinite fault with it, both as to
being out of fashion and heavy, with so good reason that I am mightily
glad of his having corrected me in it; and so I do resolve to have one of
his build, and with his advice, both in coach and horses, he being the
fittest man in the world for it, and so he carried me home, and said the
same to my wife.  So I to the office and he away, and at noon I home to
dinner, and all the afternoon late with Gibson at my chamber about my
present great business, only a little in the afternoon at the office about
Sir D. Gawden's accounts, and so to bed and slept heartily, my wife and I
at good peace, but my heart troubled and her mind not at ease, I perceive,
she against and I for the girle, to whom I have not said anything these
three days, but resolve to be mighty strange in appearance to her.  This
night W. Batelier come and took his leave of us, he setting out for France
to-morrow.

31st.  Up, and at the office all the morning.  At noon home to dinner with
my people, and afternoon to the office again, and then to my chamber with
Gibson to do more about my great answer for the Duke of York, and so at
night after supper to bed well pleased with my advance thereon.  This day
my Lord Anglesey was at the Office, and do seem to make nothing of this
business of his suspension, resolving to bring it into the Council, where
he seems not to doubt to have right, he standing upon his defence and
patent, and hath put in his caveats to the several Offices: so, as soon as
the King comes back again, which will be on Tuesday next, he will bring it
into the Council.  So ends this month with some quiet to my mind, though
not perfect, after the greatest falling out with my poor wife, and through
my folly with the girl, that ever I had, and I have reason to be sorry and
ashamed of it, and more to be troubled for the poor girl's sake, whom I
fear I shall by this means prove the ruin of, though I shall think myself
concerned both to love and be a friend to her.  This day Roger Pepys and
his son Talbot, newly come to town, come and dined with me, and mighty
glad I am to see them.

     ETEXT EDITOR'S BOOKMARKS:

     A book the Bishops will not let be printed again
     All things to be managed with faction
     Being the people that, at last, will be found the wisest
     Business of abusing the Puritans begins to grow stale
     Cannot get suitably, without breach of his honour
     Caustic attack on Sir Robert Howard
     Doe from Cobham, when the season comes, bucks season being past
     Forgetting many things, which her master beat her for
     Glad to be at friendship with me, though we hate one another
     I away with great content, my mind being troubled before
     My wife having a mind to see the play "Bartholomew-Fayre"
     My wife, coming up suddenly, did find me embracing the girl
     Presbyterian style and the Independent are the best
     Ridiculous nonsensical book set out by Will. Pen, for the Quaker
     Shows how unfit I am for trouble
     Sir, your faithful and humble servant
     The most ingenious men may sometimes be mistaken
     Their ladies in the box, being grown mighty kind of a sudden
     Vexed me, but I made no matter of it, but vexed to myself
     With hangings not fit to be seen with mine



                THE DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS M.A. F.R.S.

            CLERK OF THE ACTS AND SECRETARY TO THE ADMIRALTY

    TRANSCRIBED FROM THE SHORTHAND MANUSCRIPT IN THE PEPYSIAN LIBRARY
 MAGDALENE COLLEGE CAMBRIDGE BY THE REV. MYNORS BRIGHT M.A. LATE FELLOW
                      AND PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE

                              (Unabridged)

                      WITH LORD BRAYBROOKE'S NOTES

                        EDITED WITH ADDITIONS BY

                        HENRY B. WHEATLEY F.S.A.

                          DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS.
                                NOVEMBER
                                  1668

November 1st (Lord's day).  Up, and with W. Hewer at my chamber all this
morning, going further in my great business for the Duke of York, and so
at noon to dinner, and then W. Hewer to write fair what he had writ, and
my wife to read to me all the afternoon, till anon Mr. Gibson come, and he
and I to perfect it to my full mind, and so to supper and to bed, my mind
yet at disquiet that I cannot be informed how poor Deb. stands with her
mistress, but I fear she will put her away, and the truth is, though it be
much against my mind and to my trouble, yet I think that it will be fit
that she should be gone, for my wife's peace and mine, for she cannot but
be offended at the sight of her, my wife having conceived this jealousy of
me with reason, and therefore for that, and other reasons of expense, it
will be best for me to let her go, but I shall love and pity her.  This
noon Mr. Povy sent his coach for my wife and I to see, which we like
mightily, and will endeavour to have him get us just such another.

2nd.  Up, and a cold morning, by water through bridge without a cloak, and
there to Mr. Wren at his chamber at White Hall, the first time of his
coming thither this year, the Duchess coming thither tonight, and there he
and I did read over my paper that I have with so much labour drawn up
about the several answers of the officers of this Office to the Duke of
York's reflections, and did debate a little what advice to give the Duke
of York when he comes to town upon it.  Here come in Lord Anglesy, and I
perceive he makes nothing of this order for his suspension, resolving to
contend and to bring it to the Council on Wednesday when the King is come
to town to-morrow, and Mr. Wren do join with him mightily in it, and do
look upon the Duke of York as concerned more in it than he.  So to visit
Creed at his chamber, but his wife not come thither yet, nor do he tell me
where she is, though she be in town, at Stepney, at Atkins's.  So to Mr.
Povy's to talk about a coach, but there I find my Lord Sandwich, and
Peterborough, and Hinchingbroke, Charles Harbord, and Sidney Montagu; and
there I was stopped, and dined mighty nobly at a good table, with one
little dish at a time upon it, but mighty merry.  I was glad to see it:
but sorry, methought, to see my Lord have so little reason to be merry,
and yet glad, for his sake, to have him cheerful.  After dinner up, and
looked up and down the house, and so to the cellar; and thence I slipt
away, without taking leave, and so to a few places about business, and
among others to my bookseller's in Duck Lane, and so home, where the house
still full of dirt by painters and others, and will not be clean a good
while.  So to read and talk with my wife till by and by called to the
office about Sir W. Warren's business, where we met a little, and then
home to supper and to bed.  This day I went, by Mr. Povy's direction, to a
coachmaker near him, for a coach just like his, but it was sold this very
morning.

3rd.  Up, and all the morning at the Office.  At noon to dinner, and then
to the Office, and there busy till 12 at night, without much pain to my
eyes, but I did not use them to read or write, and so did hold out very
well.  So home, and there to supper, and I observed my wife to eye my eyes
whether I did ever look upon Deb., which I could not but do now and then
(and to my grief did see the poor wretch look on me and see me look on
her, and then let drop a tear or two, which do make my heart relent at
this minute that I am writing this with great trouble of mind, for she is
indeed my sacrifice, poor girle); and my wife did tell me in bed by the by
of my looking on other people, and that the only way is to put things out
of sight, and this I know she means by Deb., for she tells me that her
Aunt was here on Monday, and she did tell her of her desire of parting
with Deb., but in such kind terms on both sides that my wife is mightily
taken with her.  I see it will be, and it is but necessary, and therefore,
though it cannot but grieve me, yet I must bring my mind to give way to
it.  We had a great deal of do this day at the Office about
Clutterbucke,--[See note to February 4th, 1663-64]--I declaring my dissent
against the whole Board's proceedings, and I believe I shall go near to
shew W. Pen a very knave in it, whatever I find my Lord Brouncker.

4th.  Up, and by coach to White Hall; and there I find the King and Duke
of York come the last night, and every body's mouth full of my Lord
Anglesey's suspension being sealed; which it was, it seems, yesterday; so
that he is prevented in his remedy at the Council; and, it seems, the two
new Treasurers did kiss the King's hand this morning, brought in by my
Lord Arlington.  They walked up and down together the Court this day, and
several people joyed them; but I avoided it, that I might not be seen to
look either way.  This day also I hear that my Lord Ormond is to be
declared in Council no more Deputy Governor of Ireland, his commission
being expired: and the King is prevailed with to take it out of his hands;
which people do mightily admire, saying that he is the greatest subject of
any prince in Christendome, and hath more acres of land than any, and hath
done more for his Prince than ever any yet did.  But all will not do; he
must down, it seems, the Duke of Buckingham carrying all before him.  But
that, that troubles me most is, that they begin to talk that the Duke of
York's regiment is ordered to be disbanded; and more, that undoubtedly his
Admiralty will follow: which do shake me mightily, and I fear will have
ill consequences in the nation, for these counsels are very mad.  The Duke
of York do, by all men's report, carry himself wonderfull submissive to
the King, in the most humble manner in the world; but yet, it seems,
nothing must be spared that tends to, the keeping out of the Chancellor;
and that is the reason of all this.  The great discourse now is, that the
Parliament shall be dissolved and another called, which shall give the
King the Deane and Chapter lands; and that will put him out of debt.  And
it is said that Buckingham do knownly meet daily with Wildman and other
Commonwealth-men; and that when he is with them, he makes the King believe
that he is with his wenches; and something looks like the Parliament's
being dissolved, by Harry Brouncker's being now come back, and appears
this day the first day at White Hall; but hath not been yet with the King,
but is secure that he shall be well received, I hear.  God bless us, when
such men as he shall be restored!  But that, that pleases me most is, that
several do tell me that Pen is to be removed; and others, that he hath
resigned his place; and particularly Spragg tells me for certain that he
hath resigned it, and is become a partner with Gawden in the Victualling:
in which I think he hath done a very cunning thing; but I am sure I am
glad of it; and it will be well for the King to have him out of this
Office.  Thence by coach, doing several errands, home and there to dinner,
and then to the Office, where all the afternoon till late at night, and so
home.  Deb. hath been abroad to-day with her friends, poor girle, I
believe toward the getting of a place.  This day a boy is sent me out of
the country from Impington by my cozen Roger Pepys' getting, whom I
visited this morning at his chamber in the Strand and carried him to
Westminster Hall, where I took a turn or two with him and Sir John Talbot,
who talks mighty high for my Lord of Ormond: and I perceive this family of
the Talbots hath been raised by my Lord.  When I come home to-night I find
Deb. not come home, and do doubt whether she be not quite gone or no, but
my wife is silent to me in it, and I to her, but fell to other discourse,
and indeed am well satisfied that my house will never be at peace between
my wife and I unless I let her go, though it grieves me to the heart.  My
wife and I spent much time this evening talking of our being put out of
the Office, and my going to live at Deptford at her brother's, till I can
clear my accounts, and rid my hands of the town, which will take me a year
or more, and I do think it will be best for me to do so, in order to our
living cheap, and out of sight.

5th.  Up, and Willet come home in the morning, and, God forgive me! I
could not conceal my content thereat by smiling, and my wife observed it,
but I said nothing, nor she, but away to the office.  Presently up by
water to White Hall, and there all of us to wait on the Duke of York,
which we did, having little to do, and then I up and down the house, till
by and by the Duke of York, who had bid me stay, did come to his closet
again, and there did call in me and Mr. Wren; and there my paper, that I
have lately taken pains to draw up, was read, and the Duke of York pleased
therewith; and we did all along conclude upon answers to my mind for the
Board, and that that, if put in execution, will do the King's business.
But I do now more and more perceive the Duke of York's trouble, and that
he do lie under great weight of mind from the Duke of Buckingham's
carrying things against him; and particularly when I advised that he would
use his interest that a seaman might come into the room of W. Pen, who is
now declared to be gone from us to that of the Victualling, and did shew
how the Office would now be left without one seaman in it, but the
Surveyour and the Controller, who is so old as to be able to do nothing,
he told me plainly that I knew his mind well enough as to seamen, but that
it must be as others will.  And Wren did tell it me as a secret, that when
the Duke of York did first tell the King about Sir W. Pen's leaving of the
place, and that when the Duke of York did move the King that either
Captain Cox or Sir Jer. Smith might succeed him, the King did tell him
that that was a matter fit to be considered of, and would not agree to
either presently; and so the Duke of York could not prevail for either,
nor knows who it shall be.  The Duke of York did tell me himself, that if
he had not carried it privately when first he mentioned Pen's leaving his
place to the King, it had not been done; for the Duke of Buckingham and
those of his party do cry out upon it, as a strange thing to trust such a
thing into the hands of one that stands accused in Parliament: and that
they have so far prevailed upon the King that he would not have him named
in Council, but only take his name to the Board; but I think he said that
only D. Gawden's name shall go in the patent; at least, at the time when
Sir Richard Browne asked the King the names of D. Gawden's security, the
King told him it was not yet necessary for him to declare them.  And by
and by, when the Duke of York and we had done, and Wren brought into the
closet Captain Cox and James Temple About business of the Guiney Company,
and talking something of the Duke of Buckingham's concernment therein, and
says the Duke of York, "I will give the Devil his due, as they say the
Duke of Buckingham hath paid in his money to the Company," or something of
that kind, wherein he would do right to him.  The Duke of York told me how
these people do begin to cast dirt upon the business that passed the
Council lately, touching Supernumeraries, as passed by virtue of his
authority there, there being not liberty for any man to withstand what the
Duke of York advises there; which, he told me, they bring only as an
argument to insinuate the putting of the Admiralty into Commission, which
by all men's discourse is now designed, and I perceive the same by him.
This being done, and going from him, I up and down the house to hear news:
and there every body's mouth full of changes; and, among others, the Duke
of York's regiment of Guards, that was raised during the late war at sea,
is to be disbanded: and also, that this day the King do intend to declare
that the Duke of Ormond is no more Deputy of Ireland, but that he will put
it into Commission.  This day our new Treasurers did kiss the King's hand,
who complimented them, as they say, very highly, that he had for a long
time been abused in his Treasurer, and that he was now safe in their
hands.  I saw them walk up and down the Court together all this morning;
the first time I ever saw Osborne, who is a comely gentleman.  This day I
was told that my Lord Anglesey did deliver a petition on Wednesday in
Council to the King, laying open, that whereas he had heard that his
Majesty had made such a disposal of his place, which he had formerly
granted him for life upon a valuable consideration, and that, without any
thing laid to his charge, and during a Parliament's sessions, he prayed
that his Majesty would be pleased to let his case be heard before the
Council and the judges of the land, who were his proper counsel in all
matters of right: to which, I am told, the King, after my Lord's being
withdrawn, concluded upon his giving him an answer some few days hence;
and so he was called in, and told so, and so it ended. Having heard all
this I took coach and to Mr. Povy's, where I hear he is gone to the Swedes
Resident in Covent Garden, where he is to dine.  I went thither, but he is
not come yet, so I to White Hall to look for him, and up and down walking
there I met with Sir Robert Holmes, who asking news I told him of Sir W.
Pen's going from us, who ketched at it so as that my heart misgives me
that he will have a mind to it, which made me heartily sorry for my words,
but he invited me and would have me go to dine with him at the
Treasurer's, Sir Thomas Clifford, where I did go and eat some oysters;
which while we were at, in comes my Lord Keeper and much company; and so I
thought it best to withdraw.  And so away, and to the Swedes Agent's, and
there met Mr. Povy; where the Agent would have me stay and dine, there
being only them, and Joseph Williamson, and Sir Thomas Clayton; but what
he is I know not.  Here much extraordinary noble discourse of foreign
princes, and particularly the greatness of the King of France, and of his
being fallen into the right way of making the kingdom great, which [none]
of his ancestors ever did before.  I was mightily pleased with this
company and their discourse, so as to have been seldom so much in all my
life, and so after dinner up into his upper room, and there did see a
piece of perspective, but much inferior to Mr. Povy's.  Thence with Mr.
Povy spent all the afternoon going up and down among the coachmakers in
Cow Lane, and did see several, and at last did pitch upon a little
chariott, whose body was framed, but not covered, at the widow's, that
made Mr. Lowther's fine coach; and we are mightily pleased with it, it
being light, and will be very genteel and sober: to be covered with
leather, and yet will hold four.  Being much satisfied with this, I
carried him to White Hall; and so by coach home, where give my wife a good
account of my day's work, and so to the office, and there late, and so to
bed.

6th.  Up, and presently my wife up with me, which she professedly now do
every day to dress me, that I may not see Willet, and do eye me, whether I
cast my eye upon her, or no; and do keep me from going into the room where
she is among the upholsters at work in our blue chamber.  So abroad to
White Hall by water, and so on for all this day as I have by mistake set
down in the fifth day after this mark.

     [In the margin here is the following: "Look back one leaf
     for my mistake."]

In the room of which I should have said that I was at the office all the
morning, and so to dinner, my wife with me, but so as I durst not look
upon the girle, though, God knows, notwithstanding all my protestations I
could not keep my mind from desiring it.  After dinner to the office
again, and there did some business, and then by coach to see Roger Pepys
at his lodgings, next door to Arundell House, a barber's; and there I did
see a book, which my Lord Sandwich hath promised one to me of, "A
Description of the Escuriall in Spain;" which I have a great desire to
have, though I took it for a finer book when he promised it me.  With him
to see my cozen Turner and The., and there sat and talked, they being
newly come out of the country; and here pretty merry, and with The. to
shew her a coach at Mr. Povy's man's, she being in want of one, and so
back again with her, and then home by coach, with my mind troubled and
finding no content, my wife being still troubled, nor can be at peace
while the girle is there, which I am troubled at on the other side. We
past the evening together, and then to bed and slept ill, she being
troubled and troubling me in the night with talk and complaints upon the
old business.  This is the day's work of the 5th, though it stands under
the 6th, my mind being now so troubled that it is no wonder that I fall
into this mistake more than ever I did in my life before.

7th.  Up, and at the office all the morning, and so to it again after
dinner, and there busy late, choosing to employ myself rather than go home
to trouble with my wife, whom, however, I am forced to comply with, and
indeed I do pity her as having cause enough for her grief.  So to bed, and
there slept ill because of my wife.  This afternoon I did go out towards
Sir D. Gawden's, thinking to have bespoke a place for my coach and horses,
when I have them, at the Victualling Office; but find the way so bad and
long that I returned, and looked up and down for places elsewhere, in an
inne, which I hope to get with more convenience than there.

8th (Lord's day).  Up, and at my chamber all the morning, setting papers
to rights, with my boy; and so to dinner at noon.  The girle with us, but
my wife troubled thereat to see her, and do tell me so, which troubles me,
for I love the girle.  At my chamber again to work all the afternoon till
night, when Pelling comes, who wonders to find my wife so dull and
melancholy, but God knows she hath too much cause.  However, as pleasant
as we can, we supped together, and so made the boy read to me, the poor
girle not appearing at supper, but hid herself in her chamber.  So that I
could wish in that respect that she was out of the house, for our peace is
broke to all of us while she is here, and so to bed, where my wife mighty
unquiet all night, so as my bed is become burdensome to me.

9th.  Up, and I did by a little note which I flung to Deb. advise her that
I did continue to deny that ever I kissed her, and so she might govern
herself.  The truth is that I did adventure upon God's pardoning me this
lie, knowing how heavy a thing it would be for me to the ruin of the poor
girle, and next knowing that if my wife should know all it were impossible
ever for her to be at peace with me again, and so our whole lives would be
uncomfortable.  The girl read, and as I bid her returned me the note,
flinging it to me in passing by.  And so I abroad by [coach] to White
Hall, and there to the Duke of York to wait on him, who told me that Sir
W. Pen had been with him this morning, to ask whether it would be fit for
him to sit at the Office now, because of his resolution to be gone, and to
become concerned in the Victualling.  The Duke of York answered, "Yes,
till his contract was signed:"  Thence I to Lord Sandwich's, and there to
see him; but was made to stay so long, as his best friends are, and when I
come to him so little pleasure, his head being full of his own business, I
think, that I have no pleasure [to] go to him.  Thence to White Hall with
him, to the Committee of Tangier; a day appointed for him to give an
account of Tangier, and what he did, and found there, which, though he had
admirable matter for it, and his doings there were good, and would have
afforded a noble account, yet he did it with a mind so low and mean, and
delivered in so poor a manner, that it appeared nothing at all, nor any
body seemed to value it; whereas, he might have shewn himself to have
merited extraordinary thanks, and been held to have done a very great
service: whereas now, all that cost the King hath been at for his journey
through Spain thither, seems to be almost lost.  After we were up, Creed
and I walked together, and did talk a good while of the weak report my
Lord made, and were troubled for it; I fearing that either his mind and
judgment are depressed, or that he do it out of his great neglect, and so
my fear that he do all the rest of his affairs accordingly.  So I staid
about the Court a little while, and then to look for a dinner, and had it
at Hercules-Pillars, very late, all alone, costing me 10d.  And so to the
Excise Office, thinking to meet Sir Stephen Fox and the Cofferer, but the
former was gone, and the latter I met going out, but nothing done, and so
I to my bookseller's, and also to Crow's, and there saw a piece of my bed,
and I find it will please us mightily.  So home, and there find my wife
troubled, and I sat with her talking, and so to bed, and there very
unquiet all night.

10th.  Up, and my wife still every day as ill as she is all night, will
rise to see me out doors, telling me plainly that she dares not let me see
the girle, and so I out to the office, where all the morning, and so home
to dinner, where I found my wife mightily troubled again, more than ever,
and she tells me that it is from her examining the girle and getting a
confession now from her of all .  .  .  . which do mightily trouble me, as
not being able to foresee the consequences of it, as to our future peace
together.  So my wife would not go down to dinner, but I would dine in her
chamber with her, and there after mollifying her as much as I could we
were pretty quiet and eat, and by and by comes Mr. Hollier, and dines
there by himself after we had dined, and he being gone, we to talk again,
and she to be troubled, reproaching me with my unkindness and perjury, I
having denied my ever kissing her.  As also with all her old kindnesses to
me, and my ill-using of her from the beginning, and the many temptations
she hath refused out of faithfulness to me, whereof several she was
particular in, and especially from my Lord Sandwich, by the sollicitation
of Captain Ferrers, and then afterward the courtship of my Lord
Hinchingbrooke, even to the trouble of his lady. All which I did
acknowledge and was troubled for, and wept, and at last pretty good
friends again, and so I to my office, and there late, and so home to
supper with her, and so to bed, where after half-an-hour's slumber she
wakes me and cries out that she should never sleep more, and so kept
raving till past midnight, that made me cry and weep heartily all the
while for her, and troubled for what she reproached me with as before, and
at last with new vows, and particularly that I would myself bid the girle
be gone, and shew my dislike to her, which I will endeavour to perform,
but with much trouble, and so this appeasing her, we to sleep as well as
we could till morning.

11th.  Up, and my wife with me as before, and so to the Office, where, by
a speciall desire, the new Treasurers come, and there did shew their
Patent, and the Great Seal for the suspension of my Lord Anglesey: and
here did sit and discourse of the business of the Office: and brought Mr.
Hutchinson with them, who, I hear, is to be their Paymaster, in the room
of Mr. Waith.  For it seems they do turn out every servant that belongs to
the present Treasurer: and so for Fenn, do bring in Mr. Littleton, Sir
Thomas's brother, and oust all the rest.  But Mr. Hutchinson do already
see that his work now will be another kind of thing than before, as to the
trouble of it.  They gone, and, indeed, they appear, both of them, very
intelligent men, I home to dinner, and there with my people dined, and so
to my wife, who would not dine with [me] that she might not have the girle
come in sight, and there sat and talked a while with her and pretty quiet,
I giving no occasion of offence, and so to the office [and then by coach
to my cozen Roger Pepys, who did, at my last being with him this day
se'nnight, move me as to the supplying him with L500 this term, and L500
the next, for two years, upon a mortgage, he having that sum to pay, a
debt left him by his father, which I did agree to, trusting to his honesty
and ability, and am resolved to do it for him, that I may not have all I
have lie in the King's hands.  Having promised him this I returned home
again, where to the office], and there having done, I home and to supper
and to bed, where, after lying a little while, my wife starts up, and with
expressions of affright and madness, as one frantick, would rise, and I
would not let her, but burst out in tears myself, and so continued almost
half the night, the moon shining so that it was light, and after much
sorrow and reproaches and little ravings (though I am apt to think they
were counterfeit from her), and my promise again to discharge the girle
myself, all was quiet again, and so to sleep.

12th.  Up, and she with me as heretofore, and so I to the Office, where
all the morning, and at noon to dinner, and Mr. Wayth, who, being at my
office about business, I took him with me to talk and understand his
matters, who is in mighty trouble from the Committee of Accounts about his
contracting with this Office for sayle-cloth, but no hurt can be laid at
his door in it, but upon us for doing it, if any, though we did it by the
Duke of York's approval, and by him I understand that the new Treasurers
do intend to bring in all new Instruments, and so having dined we parted,
and I to my wife and to sit with her a little, and then called her and
Willet to my chamber, and there did, with tears in my eyes, which I could
not help, discharge her and advise her to be gone as soon as she could,
and never to see me, or let me see her more while she was in the house,
which she took with tears too, but I believe understands me to be her
friend, and I am apt to believe by what my wife hath of late told me is a
cunning girle, if not a slut.  Thence, parting kindly with my wife, I away
by coach to my cozen Roger, according as by mistake (which the trouble of
my mind for some days has occasioned, in this and another case a day or
two before) is set down in yesterday's notes, and so back again, and with
Mr. Gibson late at my chamber making an end of my draught of a letter for
the Duke of York, in answer to the answers of this Office, which I have
now done to my mind, so as, if the Duke likes it, will, I think, put an
end to a great deal of the faults of this Office, as well as my trouble
for them.  So to bed, and did lie now a little better than formerly, but
with little, and yet with some trouble.

13th.  Up, and with Sir W. Pen by coach to White Hall, where to the Duke
of York, and there did our usual business; and thence I to the
Commissioners of the Treasury, where I staid, and heard an excellent case
argued between my Lord Gerard and the Town of Newcastle, about a piece of
ground which that Lord hath got a grant of, under the Exchequer Seal,
which they were endeavouring to get of the King under the Great Seal. I
liked mightily the Counsel for the town, Shaftow, their Recorder, and Mr.
Offly.  But I was troubled, and so were the Lords, to hear my Lord fly out
against their great pretence of merit from the King, for their sufferings
and loyalty; telling them that they might thank him for that repute which
they have for their loyalty, for that it was he that forced them to be so,
against their wills, when he was there: and, moreover, did offer a paper
to the Lords to read from the Town, sent in 1648; but the Lords would not
read it; but I believe it was something about bringing the King to trial,
or some such thing, in that year.  Thence I to the Three Tuns Tavern, by
Charing Cross, and there dined with W. Pen, Sir J. Minnes, and
Commissioner Middleton; and as merry as my mind could be, that hath so
much trouble upon it at home.  And thence to White Hall, and there staid
in Mr. Wren's chamber with him, reading over my draught of a letter, which
Mr. Gibson then attended me with; and there he did like all, but doubted
whether it would be necessary for the Duke to write in so sharp a style to
the Office, as I had drawn it in; which I yield to him, to consider the
present posture of the times and the Duke of York and whether it were not
better to err on that hand than the other.  He told me that he did not
think it was necessary for the Duke of York to do so, and that it would
not suit so well with his nature nor greatness; which last, perhaps, is
true, but then do too truly shew the effects of having Princes in places,
where order and discipline should be.  I left it to him to do as the Duke
of York pleases; and so fell to other talk, and with great freedom, of
public things; and he told me, upon my several inquiries to that purpose,
that he did believe it was not yet resolved whether the Parliament should
ever meet more or no, the three great rulers of things now standing
thus:--The Duke of Buckingham is absolutely against their meeting, as
moved thereto by his people that he advises with, the people of the late
times, who do never expect to have any thing done by this Parliament for
their religion, and who do propose that, by the sale of the Church-lands,
they shall be able to put the King out of debt: my Lord Keeper is utterly
against putting away this and choosing another Parliament, lest they prove
worse than this, and will make all the King's friends, and the King
himself, in a desperate condition: my Lord Arlington know not which is
best for him, being to seek whether this or the next will use him worst.
He tells me that he believes that it is intended to call this Parliament,
and try them with a sum of money; and, if they do not like it, then to
send them going, and call another, who will, at the ruin of the Church
perhaps, please the King with what he will for a time.  And he tells me,
therefore, that he do believe that this policy will be endeavoured by the
Church and their friends--to seem to promise the King money, when it shall
be propounded, but make the King and these great men buy it dear, before
they have it. He tells me that he is really persuaded that the design of
the Duke of Buckingham is, by bringing the state into such a condition as,
if the King do die without issue, it shall, upon his death, break into
pieces again; and so put by the Duke of York, who they have disobliged,
they know, to that degree, as to despair of his pardon.  He tells me that
there is no way to rule the King but by brisknesse, which the Duke of
Buckingham hath above all men; and that the Duke of York having it not,
his best way is what he practices, that is to say, a good temper, which
will support him till the Duke of Buckingham and Lord Arlington fall out,
which cannot be long first, the former knowing that the latter did, in the
time of the Chancellor, endeavour with the Chancellor to hang him at that
time, when he was proclaimed against.  And here, by the by, he told me
that the Duke of Buckingham did, by his friends, treat with my Lord
Chancellor, by the mediation of Matt. Wren and Matt. Clifford, to fall in
with my Lord Chancellor; which, he tells me, he did advise my Lord
Chancellor to accept of, as that, that with his own interest and the Duke
of York's, would undoubtedly have assured all to him and his family; but
that my Lord Chancellor was a man not to be advised, thinking himself too
high to be counselled: and so all is come to nothing; for by that means
the Duke of Buckingham became desperate, and was forced to fall in with
Arlington, to his [the Chancellor's] ruin.  Thence I home, and there to
talk, with great pleasure all the evening, with my wife, who tells me that
Deb, has been abroad to-day, and is come home and says she has got a place
to go to, so as she will be gone tomorrow morning.  This troubled me, and
the truth is, I have a good mind to have the maidenhead of this girl,
which I should not doubt to have if je could get time para be con her.
But she will be gone and I not know whither.  Before we went to bed my
wife told me she would not have me to see her or give her her wages, and
so I did give my wife L10 for her year and half a quarter's wages, which
she went into her chamber and paid her, and so to bed, and there, blessed
be God! we did sleep well and with peace, which I had not done in now
almost twenty nights together.  This afternoon I went to my coachmaker and
Crow's, and there saw things go on to my great content. This morning, at
the Treasury-chamber, I did meet Jack Fenn, and there he did shew me my
Lord Anglesey's petition and the King's answer: the former good and stout,
as I before did hear it: but the latter short and weak, saying that he was
not, by what the King had done, hindered from taking the benefit of his
laws, and that the reason he had to suspect his mismanagement of his money
in Ireland, did make him think it unfit to trust him with his Treasury in
England, till he was satisfied in the former.

14th.  Up, and had a mighty mind to have seen or given her a little money,
to which purpose I wrapt up 40s. in paper, thinking to have given her a
little money, but my wife rose presently, and would not let me be out of
her sight, and went down before me into the kitchen, and come up and told
me that she was in the kitchen, and therefore would have me go round the
other way; which she repeating and I vexed at it, answered her a little
angrily, upon which she instantly flew out into a rage, calling me dog and
rogue, and that I had a rotten heart; all which, knowing that I deserved
it, I bore with, and word being brought presently up that she was gone
away by coach with her things, my wife was friends, and so all quiet, and
I to the Office, with my heart sad, and find that I cannot forget the
girl, and vexed I know not where to look for her.  And more troubled to
see how my wife is by this means likely for ever to have her hand over me,
that I shall for ever be a slave to her--that is to say, only in matters
of pleasure, but in other things she will make [it] her business, I know,
to please me and to keep me right to her, which I will labour to be
indeed, for she deserves it of me, though it will be I fear a little time
before I shall be able to wear Deb, out of my mind.  At the Office all the
morning, and merry at noon, at dinner; and after dinner to the Office,
where all the afternoon, doing much business, late.  My mind being free of
all troubles, I thank God, but only for my thoughts of this girl, which
hang after her.  And so at night home to supper, and then did sleep with
great content with my wife.  I must here remember that I have lain with my
moher as a husband more times since this falling out than in I believe
twelve months before.  And with more pleasure to her than I think in all
the time of our marriage before.

15th (Lord's day).  Up, and after long lying with pleasure talking with my
wife, and then up to look up and down our house, which will when our
upholster hath done be mighty fine, and so to my chamber, and there did do
several things among my papers, and so to the office to write down my
journal for 6 or 7 days, my mind having been so troubled as never to get
the time to do it before, as may appear a little by the mistakes I have
made in this book within these few days.  At noon comes Mr. Shepley to
dine with me and W. Howe, and there dined and pretty merry, and so after
dinner W. Howe to tell me what hath happened between him and the
Commissioners of late, who are hot again, more than ever, about my Lord
Sandwich's business of prizes, which I am troubled for, and the more
because of the great security and neglect with which, I think, my Lord do
look upon this matter, that may yet, for aught I know, undo him.  They
gone, and Balty being come from the Downs, not very well, is come this day
to see us, I to talk with him, and with some pleasure, hoping that he will
make a good man.  I in the evening to my Office again, to make an end of
my journall, and so home to my chamber with W. Hewer to settle some
papers, and so to supper and to bed, with my mind pretty quiet, and less
troubled about Deb. than I was, though yet I am troubled, I must confess,
and would be glad to find her out, though I fear it would be my ruin.
This evening there come to sit with us Mr. Pelling, who wondered to see my
wife and I so dumpish, but yet it went off only as my wife's not being
well, and, poor wretch, she hath no cause to be well, God knows.

16th.  Up, and by water to White Hall, and there at the robe chamber at a
Committee for Tangier, where some of us--my Lord Sandwich, Sir W.
Coventry, and myself, with another or two--met to debate the business of
the Mole, and there drew up reasons for the King's taking of it into his
own hands, and managing of it upon accounts with Sir H. Cholmley.  This
being done I away to Holborne, about Whetstone's Park, where I never was
in my life before, where I understand by my wife's discourse that Deb. is
gone, which do trouble me mightily that the poor girle should be in a
desperate condition forced to go thereabouts, and there not hearing of any
such man as Allbon, with whom my wife said she now was, I to the Strand,
and there by sending Drumbleby's boy, my flageolet maker, to Eagle Court,
where my wife also by discourse lately let fall that he did lately live, I
find that this Dr. Allbon is a kind of poor broken fellow that dare not
shew his head nor be known where he is gone, but to Lincoln's Inn Fields I
went to Mr. Povy's, but missed him, and so hearing only that this Allbon
is gone to Fleet Street, I did only call at Martin's, my bookseller's, and
there bought "Cassandra," and some other French books for my wife's
closet, and so home, having eat nothing but two pennyworths of oysters,
opened for me by a woman in the Strand, while the boy went to and again to
inform me about this man, and therefore home and to dinner, and so all the
afternoon at the office, and there late busy, and so home to supper, and
pretty pleasant with my wife to bed, rested pretty well.

17th.  Up, and to the Office all the morning, where the new Treasurers
come, their second time, and before they sat down, did discourse with the
Board, and particularly my Lord Brouncker, about their place, which they
challenge, as having been heretofore due, and given to their predecessor;
which, at last, my Lord did own hath been given him only out of courtesy
to his quality, and that he did not take it as a right at the Board: so
they, for the present, sat down, and did give him the place, but, I think,
with an intent to have the Duke of York's directions about it. My wife and
maids busy now, to make clean the house above stairs, the upholsters
having done there, in her closet and the blue room, and they are mighty
pretty.  At my office all the afternoon and at night busy, and so home to
my wife, and pretty pleasant, and at mighty ease in my mind, being in
hopes to find Deb., and without trouble or the knowledge of my wife.  So
to supper at night and to bed.

18th.  Lay long in bed talking with my wife, she being unwilling to have
me go abroad, saying and declaring herself jealous of my going out for
fear of my going to Deb., which I do deny, for which God forgive me, for I
was no sooner out about noon but I did go by coach directly to Somerset
House, and there enquired among the porters there for Dr. Allbun, and the
first I spoke with told me he knew him, and that he was newly gone into
Lincoln's Inn Fields, but whither he could not tell me, but that one of
his fellows not then in the way did carry a chest of drawers thither with
him, and that when he comes he would ask him.  This put me into some
hopes, and I to White Hall, and thence to Mr. Povy's, but he at dinner,
and therefore I away and walked up and down the Strand between the two
turnstiles, hoping to see her out of a window, and then employed a porter,
one Osberton, to find out this Doctor's lodgings thereabouts, who by
appointment comes to me to Hercules pillars, where I dined alone, but
tells me that he cannot find out any such, but will enquire further.
Thence back to White Hall to the Treasury a while, and thence to the
Strand, and towards night did meet with the porter that carried the chest
of drawers with this Doctor, but he would not tell me where he lived,
being his good master, he told me, but if I would have a message to him he
would deliver it.  At last I told him my business was not with him, but a
little gentlewoman, one Mrs. Willet, that is with him, and sent him to see
how she did from her friend in London, and no other token.  He goes while
I walk in Somerset House, walk there in the Court; at last he comes back
and tells me she is well, and that I may see her if I will, but no more.
So I could not be commanded by my reason, but I must go this very night,
and so by coach, it being now dark, I to her, close by my tailor's, and
she come into the coach to me, and je did baiser her . .  .  .  I did
nevertheless give her the best council I could, to have a care of her
honour, and to fear God, and suffer no man para avoir to do con her as je
have done, which she promised.  Je did give her 20s. and directions para
laisser sealed in paper at any time the name of the place of her being at
Herringman's, my bookseller in the 'Change, by which I might go para her,
and so bid her good night with much content to my mind, and resolution to
look after her no more till I heard from her. And so home, and there told
my wife a fair tale, God knows, how I spent the whole day, with which the
poor wretch was satisfied, or at least seemed so, and so to supper and to
bed, she having been mighty busy all day in getting of her house in order
against to-morrow to hang up our new hangings and furnishing our best
chamber.

19th.  Up, and at the Office all the morning, with my heart full of joy to
think in what a safe condition all my matters now stand between my wife
and Deb, and me, and at noon running up stairs to see the upholsters, who
are at work upon hanging my best room, and setting up my new bed, I find
my wife sitting sad in the dining room; which enquiring into the reason
of, she begun to call me all the false, rotten-hearted rogues in the
world, letting me understand that I was with Deb. yesterday, which,
thinking it impossible for her ever to understand, I did a while deny, but
at last did, for the ease of my mind and hers, and for ever to discharge
my heart of this wicked business, I did confess all, and above stairs in
our bed chamber there I did endure the sorrow of her threats and vows and
curses all the afternoon, and, what was worse, she swore by all that was
good that she would slit the nose of this girle, and be gone herself this
very night from me, and did there demand 3 or L400 of me to buy my peace,
that she might be gone without making any noise, or else protested that
she would make all the world know of it.  So with most perfect confusion
of face and heart, and sorrow and shame, in the greatest agony in the
world I did pass this afternoon, fearing that it will never have an end;
but at last I did call for W. Hewer, who I was forced to make privy now to
all, and the poor fellow did cry like a child, [and] obtained what I could
not, that she would be pacified upon condition that I would give it under
my hand never to see or speak with Deb, while I live, as I did before with
Pierce and Knepp, and which I did also, God knows, promise for Deb. too,
but I have the confidence to deny it to the perjury of myself.  So, before
it was late, there was, beyond my hopes as well as desert, a durable
peace; and so to supper, and pretty kind words, and to bed, and there je
did hazer con eile to her content, and so with some rest spent the night
in bed, being most absolutely resolved, if ever I can master this bout,
never to give her occasion while I live of more trouble of this or any
other kind, there being no curse in the world so great as this of the
differences between myself and her, and therefore I do, by the grace of
God, promise never to offend her more, and did this night begin to pray to
God upon my knees alone in my chamber, which God knows I cannot yet do
heartily; but I hope God will give me the grace more and more every day to
fear Him, and to be true to my poor wife.  This night the upholsters did
finish the hanging of my best chamber, but my sorrow and trouble is so
great about this business, that it puts me out of all joy in looking upon
it or minding how it was.

20th.  This morning up, with mighty kind words between my poor wife and I;
and so to White Hall by water, W. Hewer with me, who is to go with me
every where, until my wife be in condition to go out along with me
herself; for she do plainly declare that she dares not trust me out alone,
and therefore made it a piece of our league that I should alway take
somebody with me, or her herself, which I am mighty willing to, being, by
the grace of God, resolved never to do her wrong more.  We landed at the
Temple, and there I bid him call at my cozen Roger Pepys's lodgings, and I
staid in the street for him, and so took water again at the Strand stairs;
and so to White Hall, in my way I telling him plainly and truly my
resolutions, if I can get over this evil, never to give new occasion for
it.  He is, I think, so honest and true a servant to us both, and one that
loves us, that I was not much troubled at his being privy to all this, but
rejoiced in my heart that I had him to assist in the making us friends,
which he did truly and heartily, and with good success, for I did get him
to go to Deb. to tell her that I had told my wife all of my being with her
the other night, that so if my wife should send she might not make the
business worse by denying it.  While I was at White Hall with the Duke of
York, doing our ordinary business with him, here being also the first time
the new Treasurers.  W. Hewer did go to her and come back again, and so I
took him into St. James's Park, and there he did tell me he had been with
her, and found what I said about my manner of being with her true, and had
given her advice as I desired. I did there enter into more talk about my
wife and myself, and he did give me great assurance of several particular
cases to which my wife had from time to time made him privy of her loyalty
and truth to me after many and great temptations, and I believe them
truly.  I did also discourse the unfitness of my leaving of my employment
now in many respects to go into the country, as my wife desires, but that
I would labour to fit myself for it, which he thoroughly understands, and
do agree with me in it; and so, hoping to get over this trouble, we about
our business to Westminster Hall to meet Roger Pepys, which I did, and did
there discourse of the business of lending him L500 to answer some
occasions of his, which I believe to be safe enough, and so took leave of
him and away by coach home, calling on my coachmaker by the way, where I
like my little coach mightily.  But when I come home, hoping for a further
degree of peace and quiet, I find my wife upon her bed in a horrible rage
afresh, calling me all the bitter names, and, rising, did fall to revile
me in the bitterest manner in the world, and could not refrain to strike
me and pull my hair, which I resolved to bear with, and had good reason to
bear it.  So I by silence and weeping did prevail with her a little to be
quiet, and she would not eat her dinner without me; but yet by and by into
a raging fit she fell again, worse than before, that she would slit the
girl's nose, and at last W. Hewer come in and come up, who did allay her
fury, I flinging myself, in a sad desperate condition, upon the bed in the
blue room, and there lay while they spoke together; and at last it come to
this, that if I would call Deb. whore under my hand and write to her that
I hated her, and would never see her more, she would believe me and trust
in me, which I did agree to, only as to the name of whore I would have
excused, and therefore wrote to her sparing that word, which my wife
thereupon tore it, and would not be satisfied till, W. Hewer winking upon
me, I did write so with the name of a whore as that I did fear she might
too probably have been prevailed upon to have been a whore by her carriage
to me, and therefore as such I did resolve never to see her more.  This
pleased my wife, and she gives it W. Hewer to carry to her with a sharp
message from her.  So from that minute my wife begun to be kind to me, and
we to kiss and be friends, and so continued all the evening, and fell to
talk of other matters, with great comfort, and after supper to bed.  This
evening comes Mr. Billup to me, to read over Mr. Wren's alterations of my
draught of a letter for the Duke of York to sign, to the Board; which I
like mighty well, they being not considerable, only in mollifying some
hard terms, which I had thought fit to put in.  From this to other
discourse; and do find that the Duke of York and his master, Mr. Wren, do
look upon this service of mine as a very seasonable service to the Duke of
York, as that which he will have to shew to his enemies in his own
justification, of his care of the King's business; and I am sure I am
heartily glad of it, both for the King's sake and the Duke of York's, and
my own also; for, if I continue, my work, by this means, will be the less,
and my share in the blame also.  He being gone, I to my wife again, and so
spent the evening with very great joy, and the night also with good sleep
and rest, my wife only troubled in her rest, but less than usual, for
which the God of Heaven be praised.  I did this night promise to my wife
never to go to bed without calling upon God upon my knees by prayer, and I
begun this night, and hope I shall never forget to do the like all my
life; for I do find that it is much the best for my soul and body to live
pleasing to God and my poor wife, and will ease me of much care as well as
much expense.

21st.  Up, with great joy to my wife and me, and to the office, where W.
Hewer did most honestly bring me back the part of my letter to Deb.
wherein I called her whore, assuring me that he did not shew it her, and
that he did only give her to understand that wherein I did declare my
desire never to see her, and did give her the best Christian counsel he
could, which was mighty well done of him.  But by the grace of God, though
I love the poor girl and wish her well, as having gone too far toward the
undoing her, yet I will never enquire after or think of her more, my peace
being certainly to do right to my wife.  At the Office all the morning;
and after dinner abroad with W. Hewer to my Lord Ashly's, where my Lord
Barkeley and Sir Thomas Ingram met upon Mr. Povy's account, where I was in
great pain about that part of his account wherein I am concerned, above
L150, I think; and Creed hath declared himself dissatisfied with it, so
far as to desire to cut his "Examinatur" out of the paper, as the only
condition in which he would be silent in it.  This Povy had the wit to
yield to; and so when it come to be inquired into, I did avouch the truth
of the account as to that particular, of my own knowledge, and so it went
over as a thing good and just--as, indeed, in the bottom of it, it is;
though in strictness, perhaps, it would not so well be understood.  This
Committee rising, I, with my mind much satisfied herein, away by coach
home, setting Creed into Southampton Buildings, and so home; and there
ended my letters, and then home to my wife, where I find my house clean
now, from top to bottom, so as I have not seen it many a day, and to the
full satisfaction of my mind, that I am now at peace, as to my poor wife,
as to the dirtiness of my house, and as to seeing an end, in a great
measure, to my present great disbursements upon my house, and coach and
horses.

22nd (Lord's day).  My wife and I lay long, with mighty content; and so
rose, and she spent the whole day making herself clean, after four or five
weeks being in continued dirt; and I knocking up nails, and making little
settlements in my house, till noon, and then eat a bit of meat in the
kitchen, I all alone.  And so to the Office, to set down my journall, for
some days leaving it imperfect, the matter being mighty grievous to me,
and my mind, from the nature of it; and so in, to solace myself with my
wife, whom I got to read to me, and so W. Hewer and the boy; and so, after
supper, to bed.  This day my boy's livery is come home, the first I ever
had, of greene, lined with red; and it likes me well enough.

23rd.  Up, and called upon by W. Howe, who went, with W. Hewer with me, by
water, to the Temple; his business was to have my advice about a place he
is going to buy--the Clerk of the Patent's place, which I understand not,
and so could say little to him, but fell to other talk, and setting him in
at the Temple, we to White Hall, and there I to visit Lord Sandwich, who
is now so reserved, or moped rather, I think, with his own business, that
he bids welcome to no man, I think, to his satisfaction. However, I bear
with it, being willing to give him as little trouble as I can, and to
receive as little from him, wishing only that I had my money in my purse,
that I have lent him; but, however, I shew no discontent at all.  So to
White Hall, where a Committee of Tangier expected, but none met.  I met
with Mr. Povy, who I discoursed with about publick business, who tells me
that this discourse which I told him of, of the Duke of Monmouth being
made Prince of Wales, hath nothing in it; though he thinks there are all
the endeavours used in the world to overthrow the Duke of York.  He would
not have me doubt of my safety in the Navy, which I am doubtful of from
the reports of a general removal; but he will endeavour to inform me, what
he can gather from my Lord Arlington.  That he do think that the Duke of
Buckingham hath a mind rather to overthrow all the kingdom, and bring in a
Commonwealth, wherein he may think to be General of their Army, or to make
himself King, which, he believes, he may be led to, by some advice he hath
had with conjurors, which he do affect. Thence with W. Hewer, who goes up
and down with me like a jaylour, but yet with great love and to my great
good liking, it being my desire above all things to please my wife
therein.  I took up my wife and boy at Unthank's, and from there to
Hercules Pillars, and there dined, and thence to our upholster's, about
some things more to buy, and so to see our coach, and so to the
looking-glass man's, by the New Exchange, and so to buy a picture for our
blue chamber chimney, and so home; and there I made my boy to read to me
most of the night, to get through the Life of the Archbishop of
Canterbury.  At supper comes Mary Batelier, and with us all the evening,
prettily talking, and very innocent company she is; and she gone, we with
much content to bed, and to sleep, with mighty rest all night.

24th.  Up, and at the Office all the morning, and at noon home to dinner,
where Mr. Gentleman, the cook, and an old woman, his third or fourth wife,
come and dined with us, to enquire about a ticket of his son's, that is
dead; and after dinner, I with Mr. Hosier to my closet, to discourse of
the business of balancing Storekeeper's accounts, which he hath taken
great pains in reducing to a method, to my great satisfaction; and I shall
be glad both for the King's sake and his, that the thing may be put in
practice, and will do my part to promote it.  That done, he gone, I to the
Office, where busy till night; and then with comfort to sit with my wife,
and get her to read to me, and so to supper, and to bed, with my mind at
mighty ease.

25th.  Up, and by coach with W. Hewer to see W. Coventry; but he gone out,
I to White Hall, and there waited on Lord Sandwich, which I have little
encouragement to do, because of the difficulty of seeing him, and the
little he hath to say to me when I do see him, or to any body else, but
his own idle people about him, Sir Charles Harbord, &c.  Thence walked
with him to White Hall, where to the Duke of York; and there the Duke, and
Wren, and I, by appointment in his closet, to read over our letter to the
Office, which he heard, and signed it, and it is to my mind, Mr. Wren
having made it somewhat sweeter to the Board, and yet with all the advice
fully, that I did draw it up with.  He [the Duke] said little more to us
now, his head being full of other business; but I do see that he do
continue to put a value upon my advice; and so Mr. Wren and I to his
chamber, and there talked: and he seems to hope that these people, the
Duke of Buckingham and Arlington, will run themselves off of their legs;
they being forced to be always putting the King upon one idle thing or
other, against the easiness of his nature, which he will never be able to
bear, nor they to keep him to, and so will lose themselves. And, for
instance of their little progress, he tells me that my Lord of Ormond is
like yet to carry it, and to continue in his command in Ireland; at least,
they cannot get the better of him yet.  But he tells me that the Keeper is
wrought upon, as they say, to give his opinion for the dissolving of the
Parliament, which, he thinks, will undo him in the eyes of the people.  He
do not seem to own the hearing or fearing of any thing to be done in the
Admiralty, to the lessening of the Duke of York, though he hears how the
town talk's full of it.  Thence I by coach home, and there find my cozen
Roger come to dine with me, and to seal his mortgage for the L500 I lend
him; but he and I first walked to the 'Change, there to look for my uncle
Wight, and get him to dinner with us. So home, buying a barrel of oysters
at my old oyster-woman's, in Gracious Street, but over the way to where
she kept her shop before.  So home, and there merry at dinner; and the
money not being ready, I carried Roger Pepys to Holborn Conduit, and there
left him going to Stradwick's, whom we avoided to see, because of our long
absence, and my wife and I to the Duke of York's house, to see "The
Duchesse of Malfy," a sorry play, and sat with little pleasure, for fear
of my wife's seeing me look about, and so I was uneasy all the while,
though I desire and resolve never to give her trouble of that kind more.
So home, and there busy at the Office a while, and then home, where my
wife to read to me, and so to supper, and to bed.  This evening, to my
great content, I got Sir Richard Ford to give me leave to set my coach in
his yard.

26th.  Up, and at the Office all the morning, where I was to have
delivered the Duke of York's letter of advice to the Board, in answer to
our several answers to his great letter; but Lord Brouncker not being
there, and doubtful to deliver it before the new Treasurers, I forbore it
to next sitting.  So home at noon to dinner, where I find Mr. Pierce and
his wife but I was forced to shew very little pleasure in her being there
because of my vow to my wife; and therefore was glad of a very bad
occasion for my being really troubled, which is, at W. Hewer's losing of a
tally of L1000, which I sent him this day to receive of the Commissioners
of Excise.  So that though I hope at the worst I shall be able to get
another, yet I made use of this to get away as soon as I had dined, and
therefore out with him to the Excise Office to make a stop of its payment,
and so away to the coachmaker's and several other places, and so away
home, and there to my business at the office, and thence home, and there
my wife to read to me, and W. Hewer to set some matters of accounts right
at my chamber, to bed.

27th.  Up, and with W. Hewer to see W. Coventry again, but missed him
again, by coming too late, the man of [all] the world that I am resolved
to preserve an interest in.  Thence to White Hall, and there at our usual
waiting on the Duke of York; and that being done, I away to the Exchequer,
to give a stop, and take some advice about my lost tally, wherein I shall
have some remedy, with trouble, and so home, and there find Mr. Povy, by
appointment, to dine with me; where a pretty good dinner, but for want of
thought in my wife it was but slovenly dressed up; however, much pleasant
discourse with him, and some serious; and he tells me that he would, by
all means, have me get to be a Parliament-man the next Parliament, which
he believes there will be one, which I do resolve of.  By and by comes my
cozen Roger, and dines with us; and, after dinner, did seal his mortgage,
wherein I do wholly rely on his honesty, not having so much as read over
what he hath given me for it, nor minded it, but do trust to his integrity
therein.  They all gone, I to the office and there a while, and then home
to ease my eyes and make my wife read to me.

28th.  Up, and all the morning at the Office, where, while I was sitting,
one comes and tells me that my coach is come.  So I was forced to go out,
and to Sir Richard Ford's, where I spoke to him, and he is very willing to
have it brought in, and stand there; and so I ordered it, to my great
content, it being mighty pretty, only the horses do not please me, and,
therefore, resolve to have better.  At noon home to dinner, and so to the
office again all the afternoon, and did a great deal of business, and so
home to supper and to bed, with my mind at pretty good ease, having this
day presented to the Board the Duke of York's letter, which, I perceive,
troubled Sir W. Pen, he declaring himself meant in that part, that
concerned excuse by sickness; but I do not care, but am mightily glad that
it is done, and now I shall begin to be at pretty good ease in the Office.
This morning, to my great content, W. Hewer tells me that a porter is
come, who found my tally in Holborne, and brings it him, for which he
gives him 20s.

29th (Lord's day).  Lay long in bed with pleasure with my wife, with whom
I have now a great deal of content, and my mind is in other things also
mightily more at ease, and I do mind my business better than ever and am
more at peace, and trust in God I shall ever be so, though I cannot yet
get my mind off from thinking now and then of Deb., but I do ever since my
promise a while since to my wife pray to God by myself in my chamber every
night, and will endeavour to get my wife to do the like with me ere long,
but am in much fear of what she lately frighted me with about her being a
Catholique; and I dare not, therefore, move her to go to church, for fear
she should deny me; but this morning, of her own accord, she spoke of
going to church the next Sunday, which pleases me mightily. This morning
my coachman's clothes come home; and I like the livery mightily, and so I
all the morning at my chamber, and dined with my wife, and got her to read
to me in the afternoon, till Sir W. Warren, by appointment, comes to me,
who spent two hours, or three, with me, about his accounts of Gottenburgh,
which are so confounded, that I doubt they will hardly ever pass without
my doing something, which he desires of me, and which, partly from fear,
and partly from unwillingness to wrong the King, and partly from its being
of no profit to me, I am backward to give way to, though the poor man do
indeed deserve to be rid of this trouble, that he hath lain so long under,
from the negligence of this Board.  We afterwards fell to other talk, and
he tells me, as soon as he saw my coach yesterday, he wished that the
owner might not contract envy by it; but I told him it was now manifestly
for my profit to keep a coach, and that, after employments like mine for
eight years, it were hard if I could not be justly thought to be able to
do that.

     [Though our journalist prided himself not a little upon becoming
     possessed of a carriage, the acquisition was regarded with envy and
     jealousy by his enemies, as will appear by the following extract
     from the scurrilous pamphlet, "A Hue and Cry after P. and H. and
     Plain Truth (or a Private Discourse between P. and H.)," in which
     Pepys and Hewer are severely handled: "There is one thing more you
     must be mightily sorry for with all speed.  Your presumption in your
     coach, in which you daily ride, as if you had been son and heir to
     the great Emperor Neptune, or as if you had been infallibly to have
     succeeded him in his government of the Ocean, all which was
     presumption in the highest degree.  First, you had upon the fore
     part of your chariot, tempestuous waves and wrecks of ships; on your
     left hand, forts and great guns, and ships a-fighting; on your right
     hand was a fair harbour and galleys riding, with their flags and
     pennants spread, kindly saluting each other, just like P[epys] and
     H[ewer]. Behind it were high curled waves and ships a-sinking, and
     here and there an appearance of some bits of land."]

He gone, my wife and I to supper; and so she to read, and made an end of
the Life of Archbishop Laud, which is worth reading, as informing a man
plainly in the posture of the Church, and how the things of it were
managed with the same self-interest and design that every other thing is,
and have succeeded accordingly.  So to bed.

30th.  Up betimes, and with W. Hewer, who is my guard, to White Hall, to a
Committee of Tangier, where the business of Mr. Lanyon

     [John Lanyon, agent of the Navy Commissioners at Plymouth.  The
     cause of complaint appears to have been connected with his contract
     for Tangier.  In 1668 a charge was made against Lanyon and Thomas
     Yeabsley that they had defrauded the king in the freighting of the
     ship "Tiger" ("Calendar of State Papers," 1668-69, p. 138).]

took up all the morning; and where, poor man!  he did manage his business
with so much folly, and ill fortune to boot, that the Board, before his
coming in, inclining, of their own accord, to lay his cause aside, and
leave it to the law, but he pressed that we would hear it, and it ended to
the making him appear a very knave, as well as it did to me a fool also,
which I was sorry for.  Thence by water, Mr. Povy, Creed, and I, to
Arundell House, and there I did see them choosing their Council, it being
St. Andrew's-day; and I had his Cross

     [The cross of St. Andrew, like that of St. Patrick, is a saltire.
     The two, combined with the red cross of St. George, form the Union
     flag.]

set on my hat, as the rest had, and cost me 2s., and so leaving them I
away by coach home to dinner, and my wife, after dinner, went the first
time abroad to take the maidenhead of her coach, calling on Roger Pepys,
and visiting Mrs. Creed, and my cozen Turner, while I at home all the
afternoon and evening, very busy and doing much work, to my great content.
Home at night, and there comes Mrs. Turner and Betty to see us, and supped
with us, and I shewed them a cold civility for fear of troubling my wife,
and after supper, they being gone, we to bed.  Thus ended this month, with
very good content, that hath been the most sad to my heart and the most
expenseful to my purse on things of pleasure, having furnished my wife's
closet and the best chamber, and a coach and horses, that ever I yet knew
in the world: and do put me into the greatest condition of outward state
that ever I was in, or hoped ever to be, or desired: and this at a time
when we do daily expect great changes in this Office: and by all reports
we must, all of us, turn out.  But my eyes are come to that condition that
I am not able to work: and therefore that, and my wife's desire, make me
have no manner of trouble in my thoughts about it.  So God do his will in
it!

     ETEXT EDITOR'S BOOKMARKS:

     Calling me dog and rogue, and that I had a rotten heart
     Have me get to be a Parliament-man the next Parliament
     I have a good mind to have the maidenhead of this girl
     Resolve never to give her trouble of that kind more
     Should alway take somebody with me, or her herself
     There being no curse in the world so great as this



                THE DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS M.A. F.R.S.

            CLERK OF THE ACTS AND SECRETARY TO THE ADMIRALTY

   TRANSCRIBED FROM THE SHORTHAND MANUSCRIPT IN THE PEPYSIAN LIBRARY
MAGDALENE COLLEGE CAMBRIDGE BY THE REV. MYNORS BRIGHT M.A. LATE FELLOW
                      AND PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE

                              (Unabridged)

                      WITH LORD BRAYBROOKE'S NOTES

                        EDITED WITH ADDITIONS BY

                        HENRY B. WHEATLEY F.S.A.

                          DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS.
                                DECEMBER
                                  1668

December 1st.  Up, and to the office, where sat all the morning, and at
noon with my people to dinner, and so to the office, very busy till night,
and then home and made my boy read to me Wilkins's Reall Character, which
do please me mightily, and so after supper to bed with great pleasure and
content with my wife.  This day I hear of poor Mr. Clerke, the solicitor,
being dead, of a cold, after being not above two days ill, which troubles
me mightily, poor man!

2nd.  Up, and at the office all the morning upon some accounts of Sir D.
Gawden, and at noon abroad with W. Hewer, thinking to have found Mr. Wren
at Captain Cox's, to have spoke something to him about doing a favour for
Will's uncle Steventon, but missed him.  And so back home and abroad with
my wife, the first time that ever I rode in my own coach, which do make my
heart rejoice, and praise God, and pray him to bless it to me and continue
it.  So she and I to the King's playhouse, and there sat to avoid seeing
Knepp in a box above where Mrs. Williams happened to be, and there saw
"The Usurper;" a pretty good play, in all but what is designed to resemble
Cromwell and Hugh Peters, which is mighty silly.  The play done, we to
White Hall; where my wife staid while I up to the Duchesse's and Queen's
side, to speak with the Duke of York: and here saw all the ladies, and
heard the silly discourse of the King, with his people about him, telling
a story of my Lord Rochester's having of his clothes stole, while he was
with a wench; and his gold all gone, but his clothes found afterwards
stuffed into a feather bed by the wench that stole them.  I spoke with the
Duke of York, just as he was set down to supper with the King, about our
sending of victuals to Sir Thomas Allen's fleet hence to Cales [Cadiz] to
meet him.  And so back to my wife in my coach, and so with great content
and joy home, where I made my boy to make an end of the Reall Character,
which I begun a great while ago, and do please me infinitely, and indeed
is a most worthy labour, and I think mighty easy, though my eyes make me
unable to attempt any thing in it.  To-day I hear that Mr. Ackworth's
cause went for him at Guildhall, against his accusers, which I am well
enough pleased with.

3rd.  Up betimes, and by water with W. Hewer to White Hall, and there to
Mr. Wren, who gives me but small hopes of the favour I hoped for Mr.
Steventon, Will's uncle, of having leave, being upon the point of death,
to surrender his place, which do trouble me, but I will do what I can. So
back again to the Office, Sir Jer. Smith with me; who is a silly, prating,
talking man; but he tells me what he hears, that Holmes and Spragg now
rule all with the Duke of Buckingham, as to seabusiness, and will be great
men: but he do prophesy what will be the fruit of it; so I do.  So to the
Office, where we sat all the morning; and at noon home to dinner, and then
abroad again, with my wife, to the Duke of York's playhouse, and saw "The
Unfortunate Lovers;" a mean play, I think, but some parts very good, and
excellently acted.  We sat under the boxes, and saw the fine ladies; among
others, my Lady Kerneguy, a who is most devilishly painted.  And so home,
it being mighty pleasure to go alone with my poor wife, in a coach of our
own, to a play, and makes us appear mighty great, I think, in the world;
at least, greater than ever I could, or my friends for me, have once
expected; or, I think, than ever any of my family ever yet lived, in my
memory, but my cozen Pepys in Salisbury Court.  So to the office, and
thence home to supper and to bed.

4th.  Up, and with W. Hewer by water to White Hall, and there did wait as
usual upon the Duke of York, where, upon discoursing something touching
the Ticket-Office, which by letter the Board did give the Duke of York
their advice, to be put upon Lord Brouncker, Sir J. Minnes did foolishly
rise up and complain of the Office, and his being made nothing of; and
this before Sir Thomas Littleton, who would be glad of this difference
among us, which did trouble me mightily; and therefore I did forbear to
say what I otherwise would have thought fit for me to say on this
occasion, upon so impertinent a speech as this doting fool made--but, I
say, I let it alone, and contented myself that it went as I advised, as to
the Duke of York's judgment, in the thing disputed.  And so thence away,
my coach meeting me there and carrying me to several places to do little
jobs, which is a mighty convenience, and so home, where by invitation I
find my aunt Wight, who looked over all our house, and is mighty pleased
with it, and indeed it is now mighty handsome, and rich in furniture.  By
and by comes my uncle, and then to dinner, where a venison pasty and very
merry, and after dinner I carried my wife and her to Smithfield, where
they sit in the coach, while Mr. Pickering, who meets me there, and I, and
W. Hewer, and a friend of his, a jockey, did go about to see several pairs
of horses, for my coach; but it was late, and we agreed on none, but left
it to another time: but here I do see instances of a piece of craft and
cunning that I never dreamed of, concerning the buying and choosing of
horses.  So Mr. Pickering, to whom I am much beholden for his kindness
herein, and I parted; and I with my people home, where I left them, and I
to the office, to meet about some business of Sir W. Warren's accounts,
where I vexed to see how ill all the Comptroller's business is likely to
go on, so long as ever Sir J. Minnes lives; and so troubled I was, that I
thought it a good occasion for me to give my thoughts of it in writing,
and therefore wrote a letter at the Board, by the help of a tube, to Lord
Brouncker, and did give it him, which I kept a copy of, and it may be of
use to me hereafter to shew, in this matter.  This being done, I home to
my aunt, who supped with us, and my uncle also: and a good-humoured woman
she is, so that I think we shall keep her acquaintance; but mighty proud
she is of her wedding-ring, being lately set with diamonds; cost her about
L12: and I did commend it mightily to her, but do not think it very
suitable for one of our quality.  After supper they home, and we to bed.

5th.  Up, after a little talk with my wife, which troubled me, she being
ever since our late difference mighty watchful of sleep and dreams, and
will not be persuaded but I do dream of Deb., and do tell me that I speak
in my dreams and that this night I did cry, Huzzy, and it must be she, and
now and then I start otherwise than I used to do, she says, which I know
not, for I do not know that I dream of her more than usual, though I
cannot deny that my thoughts waking do run now and then against my will
and judgment upon her, for that only is wanting to undo me, being now in
every other thing as to my mind most happy, and may still be so but for my
own fault, if I be catched loving any body but my wife again.  So up and
to the office, and at noon to dinner, and thence to office, where late,
mighty busy, and despatching much business, settling papers in my own
office, and so home to supper, and to bed.  No news stirring, but that my
Lord of Ormond is likely to go to Ireland again, which do shew that the
Duke of Buckingham do not rule all so absolutely; and that, however, we
shall speedily have more changes in the Navy: and it is certain that the
Nonconformists do now preach openly in houses, in many places, and among
others the house that was heretofore Sir G. Carteret's, in Leadenhall
Streete, and have ready access to the King.  And now the great dispute is,
whether this Parliament or another; and my great design, if I continue in
the Navy, is to get myself to be a Parliament-man.

6th (Lord's day).  Up, and with my wife to church; which pleases me
mightily, I being full of fear that she would never go to church again,
after she had declared to me that she was a Roman Catholique.  But though
I do verily think she fears God, and is truly and sincerely righteous, yet
I do see she is not so strictly so a Catholique as not to go to church
with me, which pleases me mightily.  Here Mills made a lazy sermon, upon
Moses's meeknesse, and so home, and my wife and I alone to dinner, and
then she to read a little book concerning speech in general, a translation
late out of French; a most excellent piece as ever I read, proving a soul
in man, and all the ways and secrets by which nature teaches speech in
man, which do please me most infinitely to read.  By and by my wife to
church, and I to my Office to complete my Journall for the last three
days, and so home to my chamber to settle some papers, and so to spend the
evening with my wife and W. Hewer talking over the business of the Office,
and particularly my own Office, how I will make it, and it will become, in
a little time, an Office of ease, and not slavery, as it hath for so many
years been.  So to supper, and to bed.

7th.  Up by candlelight, the first time I have done so this winter, but I
had lost my labour so often to visit Sir W. Coventry, and not visited him
so long, that I was resolved to get time enough, and so up, and with W.
Hewer, it being the first frosty day we have had this winter, did walk it
very well to W. Coventry's, and there alone with him an hour talking of
the Navy, which he pities, but says he hath no more mind to be found
meddling with the Navy, lest it should do it hurt, as well as him, to be
found to meddle with it.  So to talk of general things: and telling him
that, with all these doings, he, I thanked God, stood yet; he told me,
Yes, but that he thought his continuing in, did arise from his enemies my
Lord of Buckingham and Arlington's seeing that he cared so little if he
was out; and he do protest to me that he is as weary of the Treasury, as
ever he was of the Navy.  He tells me that he do believe that their heat
is over almost, as to the Navy, there being now none left of the old stock
but my Lord Brouncker, J. Minnes, who is ready to leave the world, and
myself.  But he tells me that he do foresee very great wants and great
disorders by reason thereof; insomuch, as he is represented to the King by
his enemies as a melancholy man, and one that is still prophesying ill
events, so as the King called him Visionaire, which being told him, he
said he answered the party, that, whatever he foresaw, he was not afeard
as to himself of any thing, nor particularly of my Lord Arlington, so much
as the Duke of Buckingham hath been, nor of the Duke of Buckingham, so
much as my Lord Arlington at this time is.  But he tells me that he hath
been always looked upon as a melancholy man; whereas, others that would
please the King do make him believe that all is safe: and so he hath heard
my Lord Chancellor openly say to the King, that he was now a glorious
prince, and in a glorious condition, because of some one accident that
hath happened, or some one rub that hath been removed; "when," says W.
Coventry, "they reckoned their one good meal, without considering that
there was nothing left in the cup board for to-morrow."  After this and
other discourse of this kind, I away, and walked to my Lord Sandwich's,
and walked with him to White Hall, and took a quarter of an hour's walk in
the garden with him, which I had not done for so much time with him since
his coming into England; and talking of his own condition, and
particularly of the world's talk of his going to Tangier.  I find, if his
conditions can be made profitable and safe as to money, he would go, but
not else; but, however, will seem not averse to it, because of
facilitating his other accounts now depending, which he finds hard to get
through, but yet hath some hopes, the King, he says, speaking very kindly
to him.  Thence to a Committee of Tangier, and so with W. Hewer to
Westminster to Sir R. Longs office, and so to the Temple, but did nothing,
the Auditor not being within, and so home to dinner, and after dinner out
again with my wife to the Temple, and up and down to do a little business,
and back again, and so to my office, and did a little business, and so
home, and W. Hewer with me, to read and talk, and so to supper, and then
to bed in mighty good humour. This afternoon, passing through Queen's
Street, I saw pass by our coach on foot Deb., which, God forgive me, did
put me into some new thoughts of her, and for her, but durst not shew
them, and I think my wife did not see her, but I did get my thoughts free
of her soon as I could.

8th.  Up, and Sir H. Cholmly betimes with me, about some accounts and
moneys due to him: and he gone, I to the Office, where sat all the
morning; and here, among other things, breaks out the storm W. Hewer and I
have long expected from the Surveyor,--[Colonel Middleton.]--about W.
Hewer's conspiring to get a contract, to the burdening of the stores with
kerseys and cottons, of which he hath often complained, and lately more
than ever; and now he did it by a most scandalous letter to the Board,
reflecting on my Office: and, by discourse, it fell to such high words
between him and me, as can hardly ever be forgot; I declaring I would
believe W. Hewer as soon as him, and laying the fault, if there be any,
upon himself; he, on the other hand, vilifying of my word and W. Hewer's,
calling him knave, and that if he were his clerk, he should lose his ears.
At last, I closed the business for this morning with making the thing
ridiculous, as it is, and he swearing that the King should have right in
it, or he would lose his place.  The Office was cleared of all but
ourselves and W. Hewer; but, however, the world did by the beginning see
what it meant, and it will, I believe, come to high terms between us,
which I am sorry for, to have any blemish laid upon me or mine, at this
time, though never so unduly, for fear of giving occasion to my real
discredit: and therefore I was not only all the rest of the morning vexed,
but so went home to dinner, where my wife tells me of my Lord Orrery's new
play "Tryphon," at the Duke of York's house, which, however, I would see,
and therefore put a bit of meat in our mouths, and went thither; where,
with much ado, at half-past one, we got into a blind hole in the 18d.
place, above stairs, where we could not hear well, but the house infinite
full, but the prologue most silly, and the play, though admirable, yet no
pleasure almost in it, because just the very same design, and words, and
sense, and plot, as every one of his plays have, any one of which alone
would be held admirable, whereas so many of the same design and fancy do
but dull one another; and this, I perceive, is the sense of every body
else, as well as myself, who therefore showed but little pleasure in it.
So home, mighty hot, and my mind mightily out of order, so as I could not
eat any supper, or sleep almost all night, though I spent till twelve at
night with W. Hewer to consider of our business: and we find it not only
most free from any blame of our side, but so horrid scandalous on the
other, to make so groundless a complaint, and one so shameful to him, that
it could not but let me see that there is no need of my being troubled;
but such is the weakness of my nature, that I could not help it, which
vexes me, showing me how unable I am to live with difficulties.

9th.  Up, and to the Office, but did little there, my mind being still
uneasy, though more and more satisfied that there is no occasion for it;
but abroad with my wife to the Temple, where I met with Auditor Wood's
clerk, and did some business with him, and so to see Mr. Spong, and found
him out by Southampton Market, and there carried my wife, and up to his
chamber, a bye place, but with a good prospect of the fields; and there I
had most infinite pleasure, not only with his ingenuity in general, but in
particular with his shewing me the use of the Parallelogram, by which he
drew in a quarter of an hour before me, in little, from a great, a most
neat map of England--that is, all the outlines, which gives me infinite
pleasure, and foresight of pleasure, I shall have with it; and therefore
desire to have that which I have bespoke, made.  Many other pretty things
he showed us, and did give me a glass bubble, to try the strength of
liquors with.

     [This seems to refer to the first form of the Hon. Robert Boyle's
     hydrometer, which he described in a paper in the "Philosophical
     Transactions" for June, 1675, under the title of a "New Essay
     instrument."  In this paper the author refers to a glass instrument
     exhibited many years before by himself, "consisting of a bubble
     furnished with a long and slender stem, which was to be put into
     several liquors to compare and estimate their specific gravity."
     Boyle describes this glass bubble in a paper in "Philosophical
     Transactions," vol. iv., No. 50, p. 1001, 1669, entitled, "The
     Weights of Water in Water with ordinary Balances and Weights."]

This done, and having spent 6d. in ale in the coach, at the door of the
Bull Inn, with the innocent master of the house, a Yorkshireman, for his
letting us go through his house, we away to Hercules Pillars, and there
eat a bit of meat: and so, with all speed, back to the Duke of York's
house, where mighty full again; but we come time enough to have a good
place in the pit, and did hear this new play again, where, though I better
understood it than before, yet my sense of it and pleasure was just the
same as yesterday, and no more, nor any body else's about us. So took our
coach and home, having now little pleasure to look about me to see the
fine faces, for fear of displeasing my wife, whom I take great comfort
now, more than ever, in pleasing; and it is a real joy to me. So home, and
to my Office, where spent an hour or two; and so home to my wife, to
supper and talk, and so to bed.

10th.  Up, and to the Office, where busy all the morning: Middleton not
there, so no words or looks of him.  At noon, home to dinner; and so to
the Office, and there all the afternoon busy; and at night W. Hewer home
with me; and we think we have got matter enough to make Middleton appear a
coxcomb.  But it troubled me to have Sir W. Warren meet me at night, going
out of the Office home, and tell me that Middleton do intend to complain
to the Duke of York: but, upon consideration of the business, I did go to
bed, satisfied that it was best for me that he should; and so my trouble
was over, and to bed, and slept well.

11th.  Up, and with W. Hewer by water to Somerset House; and there I to my
Lord Brouncker, before he went forth to the Duke of York, and there told
him my confidence that I should make Middleton appear a fool, and that it
was, I thought, best for me to complain of the wrong he hath done; but
brought it about, that my Lord desired me I would forbear, and promised
that he would prevent Middleton till I had given in my answer to the
Board, which I desired: and so away to White Hall, and there did our usual
attendance and no word spoke before the Duke of York by Middleton at all;
at which I was glad to my heart, because by this means I have time to draw
up my answer to my mind.  So with W. Hewer by coach to Smithfield, but met
not Mr. Dickering, he being not come, and so he [Will] and I to a cook's
shop, in Aldersgate Street; and dined well for 19 1/2 d., upon roast beef,
pleasing ourselves with the infinite strength we have to prove Middleton a
coxcomb; and so, having dined, we back to Smithfield, and there met
Dickering, and up and down all the afternoon about horses, and did see the
knaveries and tricks of jockeys.  Here I met W. Joyce, who troubled me
with his impertinencies a great while, and the like Mr. Knepp, who, it
seems, is a kind of a jockey, and would fain have been doing something for
me, but I avoided him, and the more for fear of being troubled thereby
with his wife, whom I desire but dare not see, for my vow to my wife.  At
last went away and did nothing, only concluded upon giving L50 for a fine
pair of black horses we saw this day se'nnight; and so set Mr. Dickering
down near his house, whom I am much beholden to, for his care herein, and
he hath admirable skill, I perceive, in this business, and so home, and
spent the evening talking and merry, my mind at good ease, and so to bed.

12th.  Up, and to the office, where all the morning, and at noon home to
dinner, and so the like mighty busy, late, all the afternoon, that I might
be ready to go to the drawing up of my answer to Middleton to-morrow, and
therefore home to supper and to bed.  I hear this day that there is fallen
down a new house, not quite finished, in Lumbard Street, and that there
have been several so, they making use of bad mortar and bricks; but no
hurt yet, as God hath ordered it.  This day was brought home my pair of
black coach-horses, the first I ever was master of. They cost me L50, and
are a fine pair.

13th (Lord's day).  Up, and with W. Hewer to the Office, where all the
morning, and then home to a little dinner, and presently to it again all
alone till twelve at night, drawing up my answer to Middleton, which I
think I shall do to very good purpose--at least, I satisfy myself therein;
and so to bed, weary with walking in my Office dictating to him [Hewer].
In the night my wife very ill, vomited, but was well again by and by.

14th.  Up, and by water to White Hall to a Committee of Tangier, where,
among other things, a silly account of a falling out between Norwood, at
Tangier, and Mr. Bland, the mayor, who is fled to Cales [Cadiz].  His
complaint is ill-worded, and the other's defence the most ridiculous that
ever I saw; and so everybody else that was there, thought it; but never
did I see so great an instance of the use of grammar, and knowledge how to
tell a man's tale as this day, Bland having spoiled his business by
ill-telling it, who had work to have made himself notorious by his
mastering Norwood, his enemy, if he had known how to have used it. Thence
calling Smith, the Auditor's clerk at the Temple, I by the Exchange home,
and there looked over my Tangier accounts with him, and so to dinner, and
then set him down again by a hackney, my coachman being this day about
breaking of my horses to the coach, they having never yet drawn.  Left my
wife at Unthank's, and I to the Treasury, where we waited on the Lords
Commissioners about Sir D. Gawden's matters, and so took her up again at
night, and home to the office, and so home with W. Hewer, and to talk
about our quarrel with Middleton, and so to supper and to bed.  This day I
hear, and am glad, that the King hath prorogued the Parliament to October
next; and, among other reasons, it will give me time to go to France, I
hope.

15th.  Up, and to the Office, where sat all the morning, and the new
Treasurers there; and, for my life, I cannot keep Sir J. Minnes and others
of the Board from shewing our weakness, to the dishonour of the Board,
though I am not concerned but it do vex me to the heart to have it before
these people, that would be glad to find out all our weaknesses. At noon
Mrs. Mary Batelier with us, and so, after dinner, I with W. Hewer all the
afternoon till night beginning to draw up our answer to Middleton, and it
proves troublesome, because I have so much in my head at a time to say,
but I must go through with it.  So at night to supper and to bed.

16th.  I did the like all day long, only a little at dinner, and so to
work again, and were at it till 2 in the morning, and so W. Hewer, who was
with me all day, home to his lodging, and I to bed, after we had finished
it.

17th.  Up, and set my man Gibson and Mr. Fists to work to write it over
fair, while I all the morning at the office sitting.  At noon home to
them, and all the afternoon looking over them and examining with W. Hewer,
and so about to at night I to bed, leaving them to finish the writing it
fair, which they did by sitting up most of the night, and so home to bed.

18th.  All the morning at the office about Sir W. Warren's accounts, my
mind full of my business, having before we met gone to Lord Brouncker, and
got him to read over my paper, who owns most absolute content in it, and
the advantage I have in it, and the folly of the Surveyor.  At noon home
to dinner; and then again to the office a while, and so by hackney coach
to Brooke House, and there spoke with Colonel Thomson, I by order carrying
them [the Commissioners of Accounts] our Contract-books, from the
beginning to the end of the late war.  I found him finding of errors in a
ship's book, where he shewed me many, which must end in the ruin, I doubt,
of the Controller, who found them not out in the pay of the ship, or the
whole Office.  But I took little notice of them to concern myself in them,
but so leaving my books I home to the Office, where the office met, and
after some other business done, fell to mine, which the Surveyor begun to
be a little brisk at the beginning; but when I come to the point to touch
him, which I had all the advantages in the world to do, he become as calm
as a lamb, and owned, as the whole Board did, their satisfaction, and
cried excuse: and so all made friends; and their acknowledgment put into
writing, and delivered into Sir J. Minnes's hand, to be kept there for the
use of the Board, or me, when I shall call for it; they desiring it might
be so, that I might not make use of it to the prejudice of the Surveyor,
whom I had an advantage over, by his extraordinary folly in this matter.
But, besides this, I have no small advantage got by this business, as I
have put several things into my letter which I should otherwise have
wanted an opportunity of saying, which pleases me mightily.  So Middleton
desiring to be friends, I forgave him; and all mighty quiet, and fell to
talk of other stories, and there staid, all of us, till nine or ten at
night, more than ever we did in our lives before, together.  And so home,
where I have a new fight to fight with my wife, who is under new trouble
by some news she hath heard of Deb.'s being mighty fine, and gives out
that she has a friend that gives her money, and this my wife believes to
be me, and, poor wretch!  I cannot blame her, and therefore she run into
mighty extremes; but I did pacify all, and were mighty good friends, and
to bed, and I hope it will be our last struggle from this business, for I
am resolved never to give any new occasion, and great peace I find in my
mind by it. So to supper, she and I to bed.

19th.  Up, and to the office, where all the morning, and at noon, eating
very little dinner, my wife and I by hackney to the King's playhouse, and
there, the pit being full, satin a box above, and saw "Catiline's
Conspiracy," yesterday being the first day: a play of much good sense and
words to read, but that do appear the worst upon the stage, I mean, the
least diverting, that ever I saw any, though most fine in clothes; and a
fine scene of the Senate, and of a fight, that ever I saw in my life. But
the play is only to be read, and therefore home, with no pleasure at all,
but only in sitting next to Betty Hall, that did belong to this house, and
was Sir Philip Howard's mistress; a mighty pretty wench, though my wife
will not think so; and I dare neither commend, nor be seen to look upon
her, or any other now, for fear of offending her.  So, our own coach
coming for us, home, and to end letters, and so home, my wife to read to
me out of "The Siege of Rhodes," and so to supper, and to bed.

20th (Lord's day).  Up, and with my wife to church, and then home, and
there found W. Joyce come to dine with me, as troublesome a talking
coxcombe as ever he was, and yet once in a year I like him well enough. In
the afternoon my wife and W. Hewer and I to White Hall, where they set me
down and staid till I had been with the Duke of York, with the rest of us
of the Office, and did a little business, and then the Duke of York in
good humour did fall to tell us many fine stories of the wars in Flanders,
and how the Spaniards are the [best] disciplined foot in the world; will
refuse no extraordinary service if commanded, but scorn to be paid for it,
as in other countries, though at the same time they will beg in the
streets: not a soldier will carry you a cloak-bag for money for the world,
though he will beg a penny, and will do the thing, if commanded by his
Commander.  That, in the citadel of Antwerp, a soldier hath not a liberty
of begging till he hath served three years.  They will cry out against
their King and Commanders and Generals, none like them in the world, and
yet will not hear a stranger say a word of them but he will cut his
throat.  That, upon a time, some of the Commanders of their army
exclaiming against their Generals, and particularly the Marquis de
Caranen, the Confessor of the Marquis coming by and hearing them, he stops
and gravely tells them that the three great trades of the world are, the
lawyers, who govern the world; the churchmen, who enjoy the world; and a
sort of fools whom they call souldiers, who make it their work to defend
the world.  He told us, too, that Turenne being now become a Catholique,
he is likely to get over the head of Colbert, their interests being
contrary; the latter to promote trade

     [This reminds us of the famous reply, 'Laissez nous affaire', made
     to Colbert by the French merchants, whose interests he thought to
     promote by laws and regulations.--B.]

and the sea, which, says the Duke of York, is that that we have most cause
to fear; and Turenne to employ the King and his forces by land, to
encrease his conquests.  Thence to the coach to my wife, and so home, and
there with W. Hewer to my office and to do some business, and so set down
my Journall for four or five days, and then home to supper and read a
little, and to bed.  W. Hewer tells me to-day that he hears that the King
of France hath declared in print, that he do intend this next summer to
forbid his Commanders to strike--[Strike topsails]--to us, but that both
we and the Dutch shall strike to him; and that he hath made his captains
swear it already, that they will observe it: which is a great thing if he
do it, as I know nothing to hinder him.

21st.  My own coach carrying me and my boy Tom, who goes with me in the
room of W. Hewer, who could not, and I dare not go alone, to the Temple,
and there set me down, the first time my fine horses ever carried me, and
I am mighty proud of them, and there took a hackney and to White Hall,
where a Committee of Tangier, but little to do, and so away home, calling
at the Exchange and buying several little things, and so home, and there
dined with my wife and people and then she, and W. Hewer, and I by
appointment out with our coach, but the old horses, not daring yet to use
the others too much, but only to enter them, and to the Temple, there to
call Talbot Pepys, and took him up, and first went into Holborne, and
there saw the woman that is to be seen with a beard.  She is a little
plain woman, a Dane: her name, Ursula Dyan; about forty years old; her
voice like a little girl's; with a beard as much as any man I ever saw,
black almost, and grizly; they offered to shew my wife further
satisfaction if she desired it, refusing it to men that desired it there,
but there is no doubt but by her voice she is a woman; it begun to grow at
about seven years old, and was shaved not above seven months ago, and is
now so big as any man's almost that ever I saw; I say, bushy and thick.
It was a strange sight to me, I confess, and what pleased me mightily.
Thence to the Duke's playhouse, and saw "Macbeth."  The King and Court
there; and we sat just under them and my Lady Castlemayne, and close to
the woman that comes into the pit, a kind of a loose gossip, that pretends
to be like her, and is so, something.  And my wife, by my troth, appeared,
I think, as pretty as any of them; I never thought so much before; and so
did Talbot and W. Hewer, as they said, I heard, to one another.  The King
and Duke of York minded me, and smiled upon me, at the handsome woman near
me but it vexed me to see Moll Davis, in the box over the King's and my
Lady Castlemayne's head, look down upon the King, and he up to her; and so
did my Lady Castlemayne once, to see who it was; but when she saw her, she
looked like fire; which troubled me. The play done, took leave of Talbot,
who goes into the country this Christmas, and so we home, and there I to
work at the office late, and so home to supper and to bed.

22nd.  At the office all the morning, and at noon to the 'Change, thinking
to meet with Langford about my father's house in Fleet Streete, but I come
too late, and so home to dinner, and all the afternoon at the office busy,
and at night home to supper and talk, and with mighty content with my
wife, and so to bed.

23rd.  Met at the Office all the morning, and at noon to the 'Change, and
there met with Langford and Mr. Franke, the landlord of my father's house
in Fleet Streete, and are come to an arbitration what my father shall give
him to be freed of his lease and building the house again.  Walked up and
down the 'Change, and among others discoursed with Sir John Bankes, who
thinks this prorogation will please all but the Parliament itself, which
will, if ever they meet, be vexed at Buckingham, who yet governs all.  He
says the Nonconformists are glad of it, and, he believes, will get the
upperhand in a little time, for the King must trust to them or nobody; and
he thinks the King will be forced to it. He says that Sir D. Gawden is
mightily troubled at Pen's being put upon him, by the Duke of York, and
that he believes he will get clear of it, which, though it will trouble me
to have Pen still at the Office, yet I shall think D. Gawden do well in
it, and what I would advise him to, because I love him.  So home to
dinner, and then with my wife alone abroad, with our new horses, the
beautifullest almost that ever I saw, and the first time they ever carried
her, and me but once; but we are mighty proud of them.  To her tailor's,
and so to the 'Change, and laid out three or four pounds in lace, for her
and me; and so home, and there I up to my Lord Brouncker, at his lodgings,
and sat with him an hour, on purpose to talk over the wretched state of
this Office at present, according to the present hands it is made up of;
wherein he do fully concur with me, and that it is our part not only to
prepare for defending it and ourselves, against the consequences of it,
but to take the best ways we can, to make it known to the Duke of York;
for, till Sir J. Minnes be removed, and a sufficient man brought into W.
Pen's place, when he is gone, it is impossible for this Office ever to
support itself. So home, and to supper and to bed.

24th.  A cold day.  Up, and to the Office, where all the morning alone at
the Office, nobody meeting, being the eve of Christmas.  At noon home to
dinner, and then to the Office busy, all the afternoon, and at night home
to supper, and it being now very cold, and in hopes of a frost, I begin
this night to put on a waistcoat, it being the first winter in my whole
memory that ever I staid till this day before I did so.  So to bed in
mighty good humour with my wife, but sad, in one thing, and that is for my
poor eyes.

25th (Christmas-day).  Up, and continued on my waistcoat, the first day
this winter, and I to church, where Alderman Backewell, coming in late, I
beckoned to his lady to come up to us, who did, with another lady; and
after sermon, I led her down through the church to her husband and coach,
a noble, fine woman, and a good one, and one my wife shall be acquainted
with.  So home, and to dinner alone with my wife, who, poor wretch!  sat
undressed all day, till ten at night, altering and lacing of a noble
petticoat: while I by her, making the boy read to me the Life of Julius
Caesar, and Des Cartes' book of Musick

     ["Musicae Compendium."  By Rene Des Cartes, Amsterdam, 1617;
     rendered into English, London, 1653, 4to.  The translator, whose
     name did not appear on the title, was William, Viscount Brouncker,
     Pepys's colleague, who proved his knowledge of music by the
     performance.]

--the latter of which I understand not, nor think he did well that writ
it, though a most learned man.  Then, after supper, I made the boy play
upon his lute, which I have not done twice before since he come to me; and
so, my mind in mighty content, we to bed.

26th.  Lay long with pleasure, prating with my wife, and then up, and I a
little to the Office, and my head busy setting some papers and accounts to
rights, which being long neglected because of my eyes will take me up much
time and care to do, but it must be done.  So home at noon to dinner, and
then abroad with my wife to a play, at the Duke of York's house, the house
full of ordinary citizens.  The play was "Women Pleased," which we had
never seen before; and, though but indifferent, yet there is a good design
for a good play.  So home, and there to talk, and my wife to read to me,
and so to bed.

27th (Lord's day).  Walked to White Hall and there saw the King at chapel;
but staid not to hear anything, but went to walk in the Park, with W.
Hewer, who was with me; and there, among others, met with Sir G. Downing,
and walked with him an hour, talking of business, and how the late war was
managed, there being nobody to take care of it, and telling how, when he
was in Holland, what he offered the King to do, if he might have power,
and they would give him power, and then, upon the least word, perhaps of a
woman, to the King, he was contradicted again, and particularly to the
loss of all that we lost in Guinny.  He told me that he had so good spies,
that he hath had the keys taken out of De Witt's

     [The celebrated John de Witt, Grand Pensionary of Holland, who,
     a few years afterwards, was massacred, with his brother Cornelius,
     by the Dutch mob, enraged at their opposition to the elevation of
     William of Orange to the Stadtholdership, when the States were
     overrun by the French army, and the Dutch fleets beaten at sea by
     the English.  The murder of the De Witts forms one of the main
     incidents of Alexandre Dumas's "Black Tulip."]

pocket when he was a-bed, and his closet opened, and papers brought to
him, and left in his hands for an hour, and carried back and laid in the
place again, and keys put into his pocket again.  He says that he hath
always had their most private debates, that have been but between two or
three of the chief of them, brought to him in an hour after, and an hour
after that, hath sent word thereof to the King, but nobody here regarded
them.  But he tells me the sad news, that he is out of all expectations
that ever the debts of the Navy will be paid, if the Parliament do not
enable the King to do it by money; all they can hope for to do out of the
King's revenue being but to keep our wheels a-going on present services,
and, if they can, to cut off the growing interest: which is a sad story,
and grieves me to the heart.  So home, my coach coming for me, and there
find Balty and Mr. How, who dined with me; and there my wife and I fell
out a little about the foulness of the linen of the table, but were
friends presently, but she cried, poor heart!  which I was troubled for,
though I did not give her one hard word.  Dinner done, she to church, and
W. How and I all the afternoon talking together about my Lord Sandwich's
suffering his business of the prizes to be managed by Sir R. Cuttance, who
is so deep in the business, more than my Lord knows of, and such a
loggerhead, and under such prejudice, that he will, we doubt, do my Lord
much wrong.  In the evening, he gone, my wife to read to me and talk, and
spent the evening with much pleasure, and so to supper and to bed.

28th.  Up, called up by drums and trumpets; these things and boxes [??]
having cost me much money this Christmas already, and will do more.  My
wife down by water to see her mother, and I with W. Hewer all day together
in my closet making some advance in the settling of my accounts, which
have been so long unevened that it troubles me how to set them right,
having not the use of my eyes to help me.  My wife at night home, and
tells me how much her mother prays for me and is troubled for my eyes; and
I am glad to have friendship with them, and believe they are truly glad to
see their daughter come to live so well as she do.  So spent the night in
talking, and so to supper and to bed.

29th.  Up, and at the Office all the morning, and at noon to dinner, and
there, by a pleasant mistake, find my uncle and aunt Wight, and three more
of their company, come to dine with me to-day, thinking that they had been
invited, which they were not; but yet we did give them a pretty good
dinner, and mighty merry at the mistake.  They sat most of the afternoon
with us, and then parted, and my wife and I out, thinking to have gone to
a play, but it was too far begun, and so to the 'Change, and there she and
I bought several things, and so home, with much pleasure talking, and then
to reading, and so to supper and to bed.

30th.  Up, and vexed a little to be forced to pay 40s. for a glass of my
coach, which was broke the other day, nobody knows how, within the door,
while it was down; but I do doubt that I did break it myself with my
knees.  After dinner, my wife and I to the Duke's playhouse, and there did
see King Harry the Eighth; and was mightily pleased, better than I ever
expected, with the history and shows of it.  We happened to sit by Mr.
Andrews, our neighbour, and his wife, who talked so fondly to his little
boy.  Thence my wife and I to the 'Change; but, in going, our neere horse
did fling himself, kicking of the coachbox over the pole; and a great deal
of trouble it was to get him right again, and we forced to 'light, and in
great fear of spoiling the horse, but there was no hurt. So to the
'Change, and then home, and there spent the evening talking, and so to
supper and to bed.

31st.  Up, and at the Office all the morning.  At noon Capt. Ferrers and
Mr. Sheres

     [Henry Sheres accompanied Lord Sandwich in his embassy to Spain, and
     returned to England in September, 1667, bearing letters from the
     ambassador (see September 8th, 22nd, 27th).  He was an officer in
     the Ordnance, and served under Lord Dartmouth at the demolition of
     the Mole at Tangier in 1683.  He was knighted about 1684.  He
     translated Polybius (2 vols. 8vo., 1693), and also some of the
     "Dialogues" of Lucian, included in the translation published in 1711
     (3 vols. 8vo.).  Pepys bequeathed him a ring, and he died about
     1713.]

come to me to dinner, who did, and pretty pleased with their talk of
Spayne; but my wife did not come down, I suppose because she would not,
Captain Ferrers being there, to oblige me by it.  They gone, after dinner,
I to the office, and then in the evening home, being the last day of the
year, to endeavour to pay all bills and servants' wages, &c., which I did
almost to L5 that I know that I owe in the world, but to the publique; and
so with great pleasure to supper and to bed, and, blessed be God! the year
ends, after some late very great sorrow with my wife by my folly, yet
ends, I say, with great mutual peace and content, and likely to last so by
my care, who am resolved to enjoy the sweet of it, which I now possess, by
never giving her like cause of trouble.  My greatest trouble is now from
the backwardness of my accounts, which I have not seen the bottom of now
near these two years, so that I know not in what condition I am in the
world, but by the grace of God, as far as my eyes will give me leave, I
will do it.

     ETEXT EDITOR'S BOOKMARKS:

     Craft and cunning concerning the buying and choosing of horses
     Did see the knaveries and tricks of jockeys
     Hath not a liberty of begging till he hath served three years
     He told me that he had so good spies
     Laissez nous affaire--Colbert
     Nonconformists do now preach openly in houses
     Offered to shew my wife further satisfaction if she desired
     Seeing that he cared so little if he was out
     Tell me that I speak in my dreams

     ETEXT EDITOR'S BOOKMARKS, DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS, 1668 N.S., COMPLETE:

     A book the Bishops will not let be printed again
     Act against Nonconformists and Papists
     All things to be managed with faction
     And will not kiss a woman since his wife's death
     And the woman so silly, as to let her go that took it
     And they did lay pigeons to his feet
     As all other women, cry, and yet talk of other things
     At work, till I was almost blind, which makes my heart sad
     Beating of a poor little dog to death, letting it lie
     Being very poor and mean as to the bearing with trouble
     Being the people that, at last, will be found the wisest
     Best fence against the Parliament's present fury is delay
     Bite at the stone, and not at the hand that flings it
     Bookseller's, and there looked for Montaigne's Essays
     Bought Montaigne's Essays, in English
     Bristol milk (the sherry) in the vaults
     Burned it, that it might not be among my books to my shame
     Business of abusing the Puritans begins to grow stale
     But get no ground there yet
     But this the world believes, and so let them
     But what they did, I did not enquire
     But if she will ruin herself, I cannot help it
     Calling me dog and rogue, and that I had a rotten heart
     Cannot get suitably, without breach of his honour
     Cannot be clean to go so many bodies together in the same water
     Carry them to a box, which did cost me 20s., besides oranges
     Caustic attack on Sir Robert Howard
     City to be burned, and the Papists to cut our throats
     City pay him great respect, and he the like to the meanest
     Coach to W. Coventry about Mrs. Pett, 1s.
     Come to see them in bed together, on their wedding-night
     Cost me L5, which troubles me, but yet do please me also
     Craft and cunning concerning the buying and choosing of horses
     Declared, if he come, she would not live with me
     Did see the knaveries and tricks of jockeys
     Disorder in the pit by its raining in, from the cupola
     Doe from Cobham, when the season comes, bucks season being past
     Down to the Whey house and drank some and eat some curds
     Eat some butter and radishes
     Endangering the nation, when he knew himself such a coward
     Espinette is the French term for a small harpsichord
     Ever have done his maister better service than to hang for him?
     Family governed so nobly and neatly as do me good to see it
     Fear what would become of me if any real affliction should come
     Fear that the goods and estate would be seized (after suicide)
     Fears some will stand for the tolerating of Papists
     Force a man to swear against himself
     Forced to change gold, 8s. 7d.; servants and poor, 1s. 6d.
     Forgetting many things, which her master beat her for
     Frequent trouble in things we deserve best in
     Glad to be at friendship with me, though we hate one another
     Greater number of Counsellors is, the more confused the issue
     Hath not a liberty of begging till he hath served three years
     Have me get to be a Parliament-man the next Parliament
     He that will not stoop for a pin, will never be worth a pound
     He told me that he had so good spies
     How natural it is for us to slight people out of power
     I know not how in the world to abstain from reading
     I have a good mind to have the maidenhead of this girl
     I could have answered, but forbore
     I away with great content, my mind being troubled before
     I know not whether to be glad or sorry
     In my nature am mighty unready to answer no to anything
     Inventing a better theory of musique
     It may be, be able to pay for it, or have health
     King, "it is then but Mr. Pepys making of another speech to them"
     L'escholle des filles, a lewd book
     Lady Castlemayne do rule all at this time as much as ever
     Laissez nous affaire--Colbert
     Little company there, which made it very unpleasing
     Little pleasure now in a play, the company being but little
     Live of L100 a year with more plenty, and wine and wenches
     Made him admire my drawing a thing presently in shorthand
     Making their own advantages to the disturbance of the peace
     My wife having a mind to see the play "Bartholomew-Fayre"
     My wife hath something in her gizzard, that only waits
     My wife, coming up suddenly, did find me embracing the girl
     My wife's neglect of things, and impertinent humour
     My heart beginning to falsify in this business
     Never saw so many sit four hours together to hear any man
     No pleasure--only the variety of it
     No man was ever known to lose the first time
     Nonconformists do now preach openly in houses
     Not eat a bit of good meat till he has got money to pay the men
     Offered to shew my wife further satisfaction if she desired
     Parliament being vehement against the Nonconformists
     Pictures of some Maids of Honor: good, but not like
     Presbyterian style and the Independent are the best
     Resolve never to give her trouble of that kind more
     Resolved to go through it, and it is too late to help it now
     Ridiculous nonsensical book set out by Will. Pen, for the Quaker
     Rough notes were made to serve for a sort of account book
     Saw two battles of cocks, wherein is no great sport
     Saw "Mackbeth," to our great content
     Seeing that he cared so little if he was out
     She loves to be taken dressing herself, as I always find her
     Should alway take somebody with me, or her herself
     Shows how unfit I am for trouble
     Sir, your faithful and humble servant
     Slabbering themselves, and mirth fit for clownes
     So out, and lost our way, which made me vexed
     So time do alter, and do doubtless the like in myself
     Suffered her humour to spend, till we begun to be very quiet
     Tell me that I speak in my dreams
     The factious part of the Parliament
     The manner of the gaming
     The most ingenious men may sometimes be mistaken
     The devil being too cunning to discourage a gamester
     Their ladies in the box, being grown mighty kind of a sudden
     There being no curse in the world so great as this
     There setting a poor man to keep my place
     This kind of prophane, mad entertainment they give themselves
     Though I know it will set the Office and me by the ears for ever
     To be enjoyed while we are young and capable of these joys
     Tried the effect of my silence and not provoking her
     Trouble, and more money, to every Watch, to them to drink
     Troubled me, to see the confidence of the vice of the age
     Turn out every man that will be drunk, they must turn out all
     Uncertainty of beauty
     Up, finding our beds good, but lousy; which made us merry
     Vexed me, but I made no matter of it, but vexed to myself
     Weather being very wet and hot to keep meat in.
     When he was seriously ill he declared himself a Roman Catholic
     Where I expect most I find least satisfaction
     Where a pedlar was in bed, and made him rise
     Whip a boy at each place they stop at in their procession
     Whom I find in bed, and pretended a little not well
     With hangings not fit to be seen with mine
     Without importunity or the contrary
     Work that is not made the work of any one man





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