Home
  By Author [ A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z |  Other Symbols ]
  By Title [ A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z |  Other Symbols ]
  By Language
all Classics books content using ISYS

Download this book: [ ASCII | HTML | PDF ]

Look for this book on Amazon


We have new books nearly every day.
If you would like a news letter once a week or once a month
fill out this form and we will give you a summary of the books for that week or month by email.

´╗┐Title: Finger plays for nursery and kindergarten
Author: Poulsson, Emilie, 1853-1939
Language: English
As this book started as an ASCII text book there are no pictures available.
Copyright Status: Not copyrighted in the United States. If you live elsewhere check the laws of your country before downloading this ebook. See comments about copyright issues at end of book.

*** Start of this Doctrine Publishing Corporation Digital Book "Finger plays for nursery and kindergarten" ***

This book is indexed by ISYS Web Indexing system to allow the reader find any word or number within the document.



transcribed by Linda Cantoni. This e-book was created from
a 1971 reprint published by Dover Publications, Inc., New
York.



[Transcriber's Note: The original book contains illustrations of the
hand gestures for the finger plays. In this plaintext e-book, the
gestures are described in brackets unless they are explained in, or
are obvious from, the original.]



FINGER PLAYS

FOR NURSERY AND KINDERGARTEN


BY

EMILIE POULSSON


[Illustration]


_Music By_

CORNELIA C. ROESKE


_Illustrations By_ L.J. BRIDGMAN


[D. Lothrop Company
Boston
1893]


[Illustration: "WHAT THE CHILD IMITATES, HE BEGINS TO
UNDERSTAND."--_Froebel._]



PREFACE.


"What the child imitates," says Froebel, "he begins to understand. Let
him represent the flying of birds and he enters partially into the
life of birds. Let him imitate the rapid motion of fishes in the water
and his sympathy with fishes is quickened. Let him reproduce the
activities of farmer, miller and baker, and his eyes open to the
meaning of their work. In one word let him reflect in his play the
varied aspects of life and his thought will begin to grapple with
their significance."

In all times and among all nations, finger-plays have been a delight
of childhood. Countless babies have laughed and crowed over
"Pat-a-cake" and other performances of the soft little hands; while
children of whatever age never fail to find amusement in playing

     "Here is the church,
       And here's the steeple,
     Open the doors,
       And here are the people!"

and others as well known.

Yet it is not solely upon the pleasure derived from them, that
finger-plays depend for their _raison d'etre_. By their judicious and
early use, the development of strength and flexibility in the tiny lax
fingers may be assisted, and dormant thought may receive its first
awakening call through the motions which interpret as well as
illustrate the phase of life or activity presented by the words.

The eighteen finger-plays contained in this book have already, through
publication in BABYLAND, been introduced to their especial public, and
have been much used in homes, though perhaps more in kindergartens. It
will readily be seen that while some of the plays are for the babies
in the nursery, others are more suitable for older children.

A baby-friend, ten months old, plays "All for Baby" throughout,
pounding and clapping gleefully with all his might--while children
seven or eight years of age play and sing "The Caterpillar," "How the
Corn Grew" and others with very evident enjoyment.

With a little study of the charming and expressive pictures with which
the artist, Mr. L.J. Bridgman, has so sympathetically illustrated the
rhymes, mothers and kindergartners have easily understood what motions
were intended. To elucidate still farther, however, the playing of
"The Merry Little Men" may be thus described:

During the singing of the first verse, the children look about in
every direction for the "little men," but keep the hands hidden. At
the beginning of the second verse, raise both hands to full view with
fingers outspread and quiet. At the words, "The first to come," etc.,
let the thumbs be shown alone, then the others as named in turn, till
all are again outspread as at the beginning of the second verse. In
the last verse the arms are moved from side to side, hands being
raised and fingers fluttering nimbly all the time. When displaying the
"busy little men," raise the hands as high as possible.

The music, composed by Miss Cornelia C. Roeske, will be found
melodious and attractive and especially suited to the voices and
abilities of the very young children for whom it is chiefly intended.

The harmonic arrangement is also purposely simple in consideration of
the many mothers and kindergartners who cannot devote time to
preparatory practice.

EMILIE POULSSON.

_Boston_, 1889.



CONTENTS.


                                                        PAGE

    I. THE LITTLE MEN                                      9

   II. THE LAMBS                                          14

  III. THE HEN AND CHICKENS                               17

   IV. THE LITTLE PLANT                                   21

    V. THE PIGS                                           25

   VI. A LITTLE BOY'S WALK                                29

  VII. THE CATERPILLAR                                    33

 VIII. ALL FOR BABY                                       37

   IX. THE MICE                                           41

    X. THE SQUIRREL                                       45

   XI. THE SPARROWS                                       49

  XII. THE COUNTING LESSON                                53

 XIII. MRS. PUSSY'S DINNER                                57

  XIV. HOW THE CORN GREW                                  61

   XV. THE MILL                                           65

  XVI. MAKING BREAD                                       69

 XVII. MAKING BUTTER                                      73

XVIII. SANTA CLAUS                                        77



DEDICATED

TO

LITTLE CHILDREN

AT HOME AND IN KINDERGARTEN

_BY THEIR FRIEND_,

EMILIE POULSSON.



[Illustration: NURSERY FINGER PLAYS]



[Illustration: I. THE LITTLE MEN.]

I.--THE LITTLE MEN.


Oh! where are the merry, merry Little Men
  To join us in our play?
And where are the busy, busy Little Men
  To help us work to-day?

[Illustration: MERRY LITTLE MEN]

[Illustration: BUSY LITTLE MEN]

  Upon each hand
  A little band
For work or play is ready.
  The first to come
  Is Master Thumb;
Then Pointer, strong and steady;

[Illustration: MASTER THUMB. [thumb extended]]

[Illustration: POINTER. [index finger extended]]

  Then Tall Man high;
  And just close by
The Feeble Man doth linger;
  And last of all,
  So fair and small,
The baby--Little Finger.

[Illustration: TALL MAN. [middle finger extended]]

[Illustration: THE FEEBLE MAN. [ring finger extended]]

[Illustration: THE BABY. [little finger extended]]

Yes! here are the merry, merry Little Men
  To join us in our play;
And here are the busy, busy Little Men
  To help us work to-day.

[Illustration]


[Music: THE MERRY LITTLE MEN.

EMILIE POULSSON.

CORNELIA C. ROESKE.

Oh! where are the merry, merry Little Men
To join us in our play?
And where are the busy, busy Little Men
To help us work to-day?

Upon each hand
A little band
For work or play is ready.
The first to come
Is Master Thumb;
Then Pointer, strong and steady;

Then Tall Man high;
And just close by
The Feeble Man doth linger;
And last of all,
So fair and small,
The baby--Little Finger.

Yes! here are the merry, merry Little Men
To join us in our play;
And here are the busy, busy Little Men
To help us work to-day.]



II.--THE LAMBS.


This is the meadow where all the long day
Ten little frolicsome lambs are at play.

[Illustration: THE MEADOW [hands clasped so arms form a circle]]

These are the measures the good farmer brings
Salt in, or cornmeal, and other good things.

[Illustration: THE MEASURES [hands cupped]]

This is the lambkins' own big water-trough;
Drink, little lambkins, and then scamper off!

[Illustration: THE TROUGH [hands held together and cupped]]

This is the rack where in winter they feed;
Hay makes a very good dinner indeed.

[Illustration: THE RACK [hands back to back with fingers interlaced
and raised]]

These are the big shears to shear the old sheep;
Dear little lambkins their soft wool may keep.

[Illustration: THE SHEARS [index and middle fingers extended
sideways]]

Here, with its big double doors shut so tight,
This is the barn where they all sleep at night.

[Illustration: THE BARN [hands clasped and held upward]]


[Music: THE LAMBS.

EMILIE POULSSON.

CORNELIA C. ROESKE.

1. This is the meadow where all the long day
   Ten little frolicsome lambs are at play.
   These are the measures the good farmer brings
   Salt in, or corn meal, and other good things.]

2. This is the lambkins' own big water-trough;
   Drink, little lambkins, and then scamper off!
   This is the rack where in winter they feed;
   Hay makes a very good dinner indeed.

3. These are the big shears to shear the old sheep;
   Dear little lambkins their soft wool may keep.
   Here, with its big double doors shut so tight,
   This is the barn where they all sleep at night.



[Illustration: III. THE HEN AND CHICKENS.]

III.--THE HEN AND CHICKENS.


Good Mother Hen sits here on her nest,
Keeps the eggs warm beneath her soft breast,
  Waiting, waiting, day after day.

[Illustration: ON THE NEST. [right hand horizontal with fingers
slightly curved; left hand in fist on top of right hand, with index
finger raised and curved]]

Hark! there's a sound she knows very well:
Some little chickens are breaking the shell,
  Pecking, pecking, pecking away.

[Illustration: BREAKING THE SHELL [fingers curved, thumb touching
middle finger]]

Now they're all out, Oh, see what a crowd!
Good Mother Hen is happy and proud,
  Cluck-cluck, cluck-cluck, clucking away.

[Illustration: HAPPY AND PROUD [fist with index finger raised and
curved]]

Into the coop the mother must go;
But all the chickens run to and fro,
  Peep-peep, peep-peep, peeping away.

[Illustration: THE COOP. [palm downward, fingers curved and
separated]]

[Illustration: "RUN TO AND FRO" [index and middle fingers "running"]]

Here is some corn in my little dish;
Eat, Mother Hen, eat all that you wish,
  Picking, picking, picking away.

[Illustration: EATING [left hand cupped, right fist with index finger
extended and curved]]

Happy we'll be to see you again,
Dear little chicks and good Mother Hen!
  Now good-by, good-by for to-day.


[Music: THE HEN AND CHICKENS.

EMILIE POULSSON.

CORNELIA C. ROESKE.

1. Good Mother Hen sits here on her nest,
   Keeps the eggs warm beneath her soft breast,
   Waiting, waiting, day after day.

2. Hark! there's a sound she knows very well:
   Some little chickens breaking the shell,
   Pecking, pecking, pecking away.

3. Now they're all out, oh, see what a crowd!
   Good Mother Hen is happy and proud,
   Cluck-cluck, cluck-cluck, clucking away.]

4. Into the coop the mother must go;
   While all the chickens run to and fro,
   Peep-peep, peep-peep, peeping away.

5. Here is some corn in my little dish;
   Eat, Mother Hen, eat all that you wish.
   Picking, picking, picking away.

6. Happy we'll be to see you again,
   Dear little chicks and good Mother Hen!
   Now good-bye, good-bye for to-day.



[Illustration: IV. THE LITTLE PLANT.]

IV.--THE LITTLE PLANT.


In my little garden bed
  Raked so nicely over,
First the tiny seeds I sow,
  Then with soft earth cover.

[Illustration: THE BED. [palms facing each other, curved fingers
touching]]

[Illustration: THE RAKE. [fingers extended downward]]

[Illustration: SEEDS I SOW. [fingers closed and curved, palm down]]

[Illustration: WITH SOFT EARTH COVER. [palms down and curved]]

Shining down, the great round sun
  Smiles upon it often;
Little raindrops, pattering down,
  Help the seeds to soften.

[Illustration: THE GREAT ROUND SUN. [arms extended over head and
curved]]

[Illustration: PATTERING.

DRUMMING WITH THE FINGER-TIPS.]

Then the little plant awakes!
  Down the roots go creeping.
Up it lifts its little head
  Through the brown mould peeping.

[Illustration: "DOWN THE ROOTS GO" [fingers downward with middle 3
fingers together]]

[Illustration: "LIFTS ITS LITTLE HEAD" [thumb extended upward]]

High and higher still it grows
  Through the summer hours,
Till some happy day the buds
  Open into flowers.

[Illustration: "OPEN INTO FLOWERS" [palm up, fingers curved]]

[Illustration: "STILL IT GROWS"

ELEVATING THE ARM AND RAISING THE THUMB FROM THE HAND]


[Music: THE LITTLE PLANT.

EMILIE POULSSON.

C.C. ROESKE.

1. In my little garden bed
   Rak'd so nicely over,
   First the tiny seeds I sow,
   Then with soft earth cover.
   Shining down, the great round sun
   Smiles upon it often;
   Little raindrops, patt'ring down,
   Help the seeds to soften.

2. Then the little plant awakes!
   Down the roots go creeping.
   Up it lifts its little head
   Thro' the brown mould peeping.
   High and higher still it grows
   Thro' the summer hours,
   Till some happy day the buds
   Open into flowers.]



[Illustration: V. THE PIGS.]

V.--THE PIGS.


Piggie Wig and Piggie Wee,
Hungry pigs as pigs could be,
For their dinner had to wait
Down behind the barnyard gate.

[Illustration: PIGGY WIG [fingers of both hands extended sideways with
tips touching, left thumb raised]]

[Illustration: PIGGY WEE [fingers of both hands extended sideways with
tips touching, right thumb raised]]

[Illustration: BEHIND THE GATE [fingers of both hands extended
sideways with tips touching]]

Piggie Wig and Piggie Wee
Climbed the barnyard gate to see,
Peeping through the gate so high,
But no dinner could they spy.

[Illustration: PEEPING THROUGH [fingers of both hands extended
sideways with tips touching; index fingers slightly lifted and thumb
tips sticking through gap]]

Piggie Wig and Piggie Wee
Got down sad as pigs could be;
But the gate soon opened wide
And they scampered forth outside.

[Illustration: OPENED WIDE [hands held sideways away from each other]]

[Illustration: SCAMPERED FORTH [fists downward, thumbs extended
downward]]

Piggie Wig and Piggie Wee,
What was their delight to see
Dinner ready not far off--
Such a full and tempting trough!

[Illustration: THE TROUGH [hands cupped together]]

Piggie Wig and Piggie Wee,
Greedy pigs as pigs could be,
For their dinner ran pell-mell;
In the trough both piggies fell.

[Illustration: IN THEY FELL [hands cupped together, thumbs downward]]


[Music: THE PIGS.

EMILIE POULSSON.

CORNELIA C. ROESKE.

1. Piggie Wig and Piggie Wee,
   Hungry pigs as pigs could be,
   For their dinner had to wait
   Down behind the barnyard gate.]

2. Piggie Wig and Piggie Wee
   Climbed the barnyard gate to see,
   Peeping through the gate so high,
   But no dinner could they spy.

3. Piggie Wig and Piggie Wee
   Got down sad as pigs could be;
   But the gate soon opened wide
   And they scampered forth outside.

4. Piggie Wig and Piggie Wee,
   What was their delight to see
   Dinner ready not far off--
   Such a full and tempting trough!

5. Piggie Wig and Piggie Wee,
   Greedy pigs as pigs could be,
   For their dinner ran pell-mell;
   In the trough both piggies fell.



[Illustration: VI. A LITTLE BOY'S WALK.]

VI.--A LITTLE BOY'S WALK.


A little boy went walking
  One lovely summer's day:
He saw a little rabbit
  That quickly ran away;

[Illustration: THE RABBIT [index and middle finger in "V" sign]]

[Illustration: RAN AWAY [same, with arm moving behind back]]

He saw a shining river
  Go winding in and out,
And little fishes in it
  Were swimming all about;

[Illustration: SHINING RIVER [hands describing a long curve]]

[Illustration: THE FISHES [fingers waggling downward]]

And, slowly, slowly turning,
  The great wheel of the mill;
And then the tall church steeple,
  The little church so still;

[Illustration: MILL WHEEL [hands turning over each other]]

[Illustration: CHURCH STEEPLE [hands clasped upward, index fingers
steepled]]

The bridge above the water;
  And when he stopped to rest,
He saw among the bushes
  A wee ground-sparrow's nest.

[Illustration: THE BRIDGE [palms downward, fingers straight and
interlaced, thumbs extended downward]]

[Illustration: THE NEST [hands cupped sideways to form circle]]

And as he watched the birdies
  Above the tree-tops fly,
He saw the clouds a-sailing
  Across the sunny sky.

[Illustration: ABOVE THE TREE-TOP FLY [arms and hands extended
upward]]

[Illustration: CLOUDS A-SAILING [one arm extended upward, fingers
curved]]

He saw the insects playing;
  The flowers that summer brings;
He said, "I'll go tell mamma!
  I've seen _so many_ things!"

[Illustration: INSECTS PLAYING [fingers waggling downward]]

[Illustration: FLOWERS [fingers of both hands extended straight
downward]]


[Music: A LITTLE BOY'S WALK.

EMILIE POULSSON.

CORNELIA C. ROESKE.

A little boy went walking
One lovely summer's day:
He saw a little rabbit
That quickly ran away;
He saw a shining river
Go winding in and out,
And little fishes in it
Were swimming all about.

And slowly, slowly turning,
The great wheel of the mill;
And then the tall church steeple,
The little church so still;
The bridge above the water;
And when he stopped to rest,
He saw among the bushes
A wee ground-sparrow's nest,

And as he watched the birdies
Above the tree-tops fly,
He saw the clouds a-sailing
Across the sunny sky.
He saw the insects playing;
The flowers that summer brings;
He said, "I'll go tell Mamma!
I've seen _so many_ things."]



[Illustration: VII. THE CATERPILLAR.]

VII.--THE CATERPILLAR.


Fuzzy little caterpillar,
Crawling, crawling on the ground!
Fuzzy little caterpillar,
Nowhere, nowhere to be found,
Though we've looked and looked and hunted
Everywhere around!

[Illustration: CRAWLING

(Move whole hand forward and wriggle the thumb)]

[Illustration: NOWHERE TO BE FOUND [fists downward]]

When the little caterpillar
Found his furry coat too tight,
Then a snug cocoon he made him
Spun of silk so soft and light;
Rolled himself away within it--
Slept there day and night.

[Illustration: ROLLED HIMSELF AWAY

(Rotate the thumb, then double into the hand)]

See how this cocoon is stirring!
Now a little head we spy--
What! Is _this_ our caterpillar
Spreading gorgeous wings to dry?
Soon the free and happy creature
Flutters gayly by.

[Illustration: STIRRING [fist downward, moving back and forth]]

[Illustration: A HEAD WE SPY [fist downward, thumb extended sideways]]

[Illustration: SPREADING GORGEOUS WINGS [hands back to back, thumbs
extended together]]

[Illustration: FLUTTERS BY

(Move palms to and fro)]


[Music: THE CATERPILLAR.

EMILIE POULSSON.

CORNELIA C. ROESKE.

1. Fuzzy little caterpillar,
   Crawling, crawling on the ground!
   Fuzzy little caterpillar,
   Nowhere, nowhere to be found,
   Tho' we've looked and looked and hunted
   Everywhere around!

2. When the little caterpillar
   Found his furry coat too tight,
   Then a snug cocoon he made him
   Spun of silk so soft and light;
   Rolled himself away within it--
   Slept there day and night.

3. See how this cocoon is stirring!
   Now a little head we spy--
   What! is _this_ our caterpillar
   Spreading gorgeous wings to dry?
   Soon the free and happy creature
   Flutters gaily by.]



[Illustration: VIII. ALL FOR BABY.]

VIII.--ALL FOR BABY.


Here's a ball for Baby,
Big and soft and round!
Here is Baby's hammer--
O, how he can pound!

[Illustration: A BALL [fingers of both hands curved and touching]]

[Illustration: THE HAMMER [one fist beating on another]]

Here is Baby's music--
Clapping, clapping so!
Here are Baby's soldiers,
Standing in a row!

[Illustration: CLAPPING]

[Illustration: SOLDIERS [fingers of both hands spread upward]]

Here's the Baby's trumpet,
Toot-too-toot! too-too!
Here's the way that Baby
Plays at "Peep-a-boo!"

[Illustration: TRUMPET [right fist at mouth, left fist touching
right]]

[Illustration: PLAYS AT "PEEP-A-BOO!" [fingers covering eyes]]

Here's a big umbrella--
Keep the Baby dry!
Here's the Baby's cradle--
Rock-a-baby-by!

[Illustration: UMBRELLA [left fist with index finger upward; right
hand extended flat over left index finger]]

[Illustration: CRADLE [fingers interlaced with index fingers
steepled]]


[Music: ALL FOR BABY.

EMILIE POULSSON.

CORNELIA C. ROESKE.

1. Here's a ball for Baby,
   Big and soft and round!
   Here is Baby's hammer--
   O, how he can pound!]

2. Here is Baby's music
   Clapping, clapping so!
   Here are Baby's soldiers,
   Standing in a row!

3. Here's the Baby's trumpet,
   Toot-too-toot! too-too!
   Here's the way that Baby
   Plays at "Peep-a-boo!"

4. Here's a big umbrella--
   Keeps the Baby dry!
   Here's the Baby's cradle--
   Rock-a-baby by!



[Illustration: IX. THE MICE.]

IX.--THE MICE.


Five little mice on the pantry floor,
Seeking for bread-crumbs or something more;

[Illustration: FIVE LITTLE MICE [hand extended upward]]

Five little mice on the shelf up high,
Feasting so daintily on a pie--

[Illustration: MICE ON THE SHELF [fingers of one hand curved downward
and resting on the backs of the fingers of the other hand]]

[Illustration: A PIE [fingers of both hands touching to form circle]]

But the big round eyes of the wise old cat
See what the five little mice are at.

[Illustration: BIG ROUND EYES [thumb and fingertips of each hand
forming circles]]

Quickly she jumps!--but the mice run away,
And hide in their snug little holes all day.

[Illustration: "MICE RUN AWAY"

Left hand lowered suddenly [Pounce of the cat] Right hand brought
behind the back [Mice run away]]

"Feasting in pantries may be very nice;
But home is the best!" say the five little mice.

[Illustration: HOME [fingers interlaced sideways]]


[Music: FIVE LITTLE MICE.

EMILIE POULSSON.

CORNELIA C. ROESKE.

1. Five little mice on the pantry floor,
   Seeking for bread crumbs or something more;
   Five little mice on the shelf up high,
   Feasting so daintily on a pie--
   But the big round eyes of the wise old cat
   See what the five little mice are at.
   Quickly she jumps! but the mice run away.
   And hide in their snug little holes all day.
   "Feasting in pantries may be very nice;
   But home is the best!" say the five little mice.]



[Illustration: X. THE SQUIRREL.]

X.--THE SQUIRREL


"Little squirrel, living there
In the hollow tree,
I've a pretty cage for you;
Come and live with me!

[Illustration: IN THE HOLLOW TREE [thumb and fingertips of left hand
forming circle; thumb of right hand sticking through circle]]

[Illustration: THE CAGE [palms facing each other, fingers slightly
curved and separated, tips touching]]

"You may turn the little wheel--
That will be great fun!
Slowly round, or very fast
If you faster run.

[Illustration: THE WHEEL [index fingers turning over each other]]

"Little squirrel, I will bring
In my basket here
Every day a feast of nuts!
Come, then, squirrel dear."

[Illustration: THE BASKET [palms upward, fingers interlace, thumb tips
touching]]

[Illustration: THE NUTS [fingertips of each hand touching to form
circles]]

But the little squirrel said
From his hollow tree:
"Oh! no, no! I'd rather far
Live here and be free!"

So my cage is empty yet,
And the wheel is still;
But my little basket here
Oft with nuts I fill.

If you like, I'll crack the nuts,
Some for you and me,
For the squirrel has enough
In his hollow tree.

[Illustration: CRACKING NUTS [one fist hammering on the other]]


[Music: THE SQUIRREL.

EMILIE POULSSON.

CORNELIA C. ROESKE.

1. "Little Squirrel, living there
   In the hollow tree,
   I've a pretty cage for you;
   Come and live with me!
   You may turn the little wheel--
   That will be great fun!
   Slowly round, or very fast
   If you faster run."

2. "Little Squirrel, I will bring
   In my basket here
   Every day a feast of nuts!
   Come then, squirrel dear."
   But the little squirrel said
   From his hollow tree:
   "Oh! no, no! I'd rather far
   Live here and be free."

3. So my cage is empty yet
   And the wheel is still;
   But my little basket here
   Oft with nuts I fill.
   If you like, I'll crack the nuts,
   Some for you and me,
   For the squirrel has enough
   In his hollow tree.]



[Illustration: XI. THE SPARROWS.]

XI.--THE SPARROWS.


"Little brown sparrows,
Flying around,
Up in the tree-tops,
Down on the ground,

"Come to my window,
Dear sparrows, come!
See! I will give you
Many a crumb.

[Illustration: FLYING AROUND

Fluttering the Fingers]

[Illustration: TREE TOPS [both hands extended upward]]

[Illustration: ON THE GROUND [palms downward, fingers resting on
ground]]

[Illustration: THE WINDOW [palms downward, fingers of one resting on
fingers of other to form square top]]

[Illustration: MANY A CRUMB [thumb rubbing fingertips]]

"Here is some water,
Sparkling and clear;
Come, little sparrows,
Drink without fear.

"If you are tired,
Here is a nest;
Wouldn't you like to
Come here to rest?"

All the brown sparrows
Flutter away,
Chirping and singing,
"We cannot stay;

"For in the tree-tops,
'Mong the gray boughs,
There is the sparrows'
Snug little house."

[Illustration: SOME WATER [hand cupped, palm up]]

[Illustration: A NEST [fingers of both hands interlaced to form
circle]]

[Illustration: THE HOUSE [palms together, fingers steepling]]

[Illustration: FLY AWAY

Raise Hands

Fluttering Fingers]


[Music: THE SPARROWS.

EMILIE POULSSON.

C.C. ROESKE.

1. "Little brown sparrows,
   Flying around,
   Up in the tree-tops,
   Down on the ground,
   Come to my window,
   Dear sparrows, come!
   See! I will give you
   Many a crumb."

2. "Here is some water,
   Sparkling and clear;
   Come, little sparrows,
   Drink without fear.
   If you are tired,
   Here is a nest;
   Wouldn't you like to
   Come here and rest?"

3. All the brown sparrows
   Flutter away,
   Chirping and singing,
   "We cannot stay;
   For in the tree-tops,
   'Mong the gray boughs,
   There is the sparrows'
   Snug little house."]



[Illustration: XII. THE COUNTING LESSON.]

XII.--THE COUNTING LESSON.


  (_Right hand._)
Here is the beehive. Where are the bees?
Hidden away where nobody sees.
Soon they come creeping out of the hive--
One!--two!--three! four! five!

[Illustration: THE BEEHIVE [fist with knuckles downward]]

[Illustration: ONE [same, thumb extended]]

[Illustration: TWO [same, plus index finger extended]]

[Illustration: THREE [same, plus middle finger extended]]

[Illustration: FOUR [same, plus ring finger extended]]

[Illustration: FIVE [all fingers extended downward]]

[Illustration: WORKER]

[Illustration: DRONE]

[Illustration: QUEEN]

  (_Left hand._)
Once I saw an ant-hill
  With no ants about;
So I said, "Dear little ants,
  Won't you please come out?"
Then as if the little ants
  Had heard my call--
One! two! three! four! _five_ came out!
  And that was all!

[Illustration: ANT-HILL [fist with palm downward]]

[Illustration: ONE [fist with knuckles downward, thumb extended]]

[Illustration: TWO [same, plus index finger extended]]

[Illustration: THREE [same, plus middle finger extended]]

[Illustration: FOUR [same, plus ring finger extended]]

[Illustration: FIVE [all fingers extended downward]]

[Illustration: Male]

[Illustration: Female]

[Illustration: Worker]


[Music: THE COUNTING LESSON.

EMILIE POULSSON.

C.C. ROESKE.

1ST VERSE.

1. Here is the beehive. Where are the bees?
   Hidden away where nobody sees.
   Soon they come creeping out of the hive--
   One!--two!--three! four! _five_!

2ND VERSE.

2. Once I saw an ant hill
   With no ants about;
   So I said, "Dear little ants,
   Won't you please come out?"
   Then as if the little ants
   Had heard my call--
   One! two! three! four! _five_ came out!
   And that was all!]



[Illustration: XIII. MRS. PUSSY'S DINNER.]

XIII.--MRS. PUSSY'S DINNER.


Mrs. Pussy, sleek and fat,
  With her kittens four,
Went to sleep upon the mat
  By the kitchen door.

[Illustration: MRS. PUSSY

(Right hand) [fist, thumb extended upward]]

[Illustration: KITTENS FOUR [four fingers extended upward]]

[Illustration: UPON THE MAT [fist, palm upward]]

Mrs. Pussy heard a noise--
  Up she jumped in glee:
"Kittens, maybe that's a mouse!
  Let us go and see!"

[Illustration: UP SHE JUMPED [open fist]]

Creeping, creeping, creeping on,
  Silently they stole;
But the little mouse had gone
  Back within its hole.

[Illustration: CREEPING [palm downward, fingers walking]]

[Illustration: MOUSE

(Left hand) [fist with knuckles downward, thumb extended]]

[Illustration: WITHIN ITS HOLE [fist with palm downward]]

"Well," said Mrs. Pussy then,
  "To the barn we'll go;
We shall find the swallow there
  Flying to and fro."

[Illustration: THE BARN [arms raised, fingertips touching]]

[Illustration: TO AND FRO [hands waving, fingers curved]]

So the cat and kittens four
  Tried their very best;
But the swallows flying fast
  Safely reached the nest!

[Illustration: NEST [hands cupped sideways to form circle]]

Home went hungry Mrs. Puss
  And her kittens four;
Found their dinner on a plate
  By the kitchen door.

[Illustration: PLATE [thumbs and index fingers touching to form
circle]]

As they gathered round the plate,
  They agreed 'twas nice
That it could not run away
  Like the birds and mice!


[Music: MRS. PUSSY'S DINNER.

EMILIE POULSSON.

C.C. ROESKE.

1. Mrs. Pussy, sleek and fat,
     With her kittens four,
   Went to sleep upon the mat
     By the kitchen door.]

2. Mrs. Pussy heard a noise--
     Up she jumped in glee:
   "Kittens, maybe that's a mouse!
     Let us go and see!"

3. Creeping, creeping, creeping on,
     Silently they stole;
   But the little mouse had gone
     Back within its hole.

4. "Well," said Mrs. Pussy then,
     "To the barn we'll go;
   We shall find the swallows there
     Flying to and fro."

5. So the cat and kittens four
     Tried their very best;
   But the swallows flying fast
     Safely reached the nest!

6. Home went hungry Mrs. Puss
     And her kittens four;
   Found their dinner on a plate
     By the kitchen door.

7. As they gathered round the plate,
     They agreed 'twas nice
   That it could not run away
     Like the birds and mice!



[Illustration: XIV. HOW THE CORN GREW.]

XIV.--HOW THE CORN GREW.


There was a field that waiting lay,
  All hard and brown and bare;
There was a thrifty farmer came
  And fenced it in with care.

[Illustration: THE FIELD. [two children facing each other with their
arms extended onto each other's shoulders]]

Then came a plowman with his plow;
  From early until late,
Across the field and back again,
  He plowed the furrows straight.

[Illustration: THE PLOW. [hands together sideways, thumbs extended
slightly upward]]

The harrow then was brought to make
  The ground more soft and loose;
And soon the farmer said with joy,
  "My field is fit for use."

[Illustration: THE HARROW. [palms downward, fingers curved and
separated]]

For many days the farmer then
  Was working with his hoe;
And little Johnny brought the corn
  And dropped the kernels--so!

[Illustration: THE HOE. [palm downward, fingers together and bent at
knuckles]]

[Illustration: DROPPED THE KERNELS--SO! [palm downward, fingers
curved]]

And there they lay, until awaked
  By tapping rains that fell,
Then pushed their green plumes up to greet
  The sun they loved so well.

[Illustration: TAPPING RAINS.

(Drumming with the fingers)]

[Illustration: POKED THEIR GREEN PLUMES UP. [fingers together
extending upward]]

Then flocks and flocks of hungry crows
  Came down the corn to taste;
But ba-ang!--went the farmer's gun
  And off they flew in haste.

[Illustration: THE GUN.

(Snap the fingers) [one arm extended, holding elbow with other hand]]

Then grew and grew the corn, until,
  When autumn days had come,
With sickles keen they cut it down,
  And sang the "Harvest Home."

[Illustration: THE SICKLE. [one arm extended and curved]]


[Music: HOW THE CORN GREW.

EMILIE POULSSON.

CORNELIA C. ROESKE.

1. There was a field that waiting lay,
     All hard and brown and bare;
   There was a thrifty farmer came
     And fenced it in with care,
   There was a thrifty farmer came
     And fenced it in with care.]

2. Then came a ploughman with his plough;
     From early until late,
   Across the field and back again,
     He ploughed the furrows straight.

3. The harrow then was brought to make
     The ground more soft and loose;
   And soon the farmer said with joy,
     "My field is fit for use."

4. For many days the farmer then
     Was working with his hoe;
   And little Johnny brought the corn
     And dropped the kernels--so!

5. And there they lay, until awaked
     By tapping rains that fell,
   Then pushed their green plumes up to greet
     The sun they loved so well.

6. Then flocks and flocks of hungry crows
     Came down the corn to taste;
   But ba-ang! went the farmer's gun,
     And off they flew in haste.

7. Then grew and grew the corn, until,
     When autumn days had come,
   With sickles keen they cut it down,
     And sang the "Harvest Home."



[Illustration: XV. THE MILL.]

XV.--THE MILL.


A merry little river
  Went singing day by day,
Until it reached a mill-dam
  That stretched across its way.

[Illustration: THE MILLDAM. [hand sideways, fingers straight]]

And there it spread its waters,
  A quiet pond, to wait
Until the busy miller
  Should lift the water-gate.

[Illustration: LIFT THE WATER-GATE. [hands sideways, bent at knuckles,
fingers straight]]

Then, hurrying through the gateway,
  The dashing waters found
A mighty millwheel waiting,
  And turned it swiftly round.

[Illustration: THE MILLWHEEL. [hands turning over one another]]

But faster turned the millstones
  Up in the dusty mill,
And quickly did the miller
  With corn the hopper fill.

[Illustration: THE MILLSTONES. [palms downward, fingers straight, one
hand moving in a circle on top of the other]]

And faster yet and faster
  The heavy stones went round,
Until the golden kernels
  To golden meal were ground.

"Now fill the empty hopper
  With _wheat_," the miller said;
"We'll grind this into flour
  To make the children's bread."

[Illustration: THE HOPPER. [hands cupped together]]

And still, as flowed the water,
  The mighty wheel went round;
And still, as turned the millstones,
  The corn and grain were ground.

And busy was the miller
  The livelong day, until
The water-gate he fastened,
  And silent grew the mill.


[Music: THE MILL.

EMILIE POULSSON.

CORNELIA C. ROESKE.

1. A merry little river
     Went singing day by day,
   Until it reached a mill-dam
     That stretched across its way.
   And there it spread its waters,
     A quiet pond, to wait
   Until the busy miller
     Should lift the water gate.]

2. Then, hurrying through the gateway,
     The dashing waters found
   A mighty millwheel waiting--
     And turned it swiftly round.
   But faster turned the millstone
     Up in the dusty mill,
   And quickly did the miller
     With corn the hopper fill.

3. And faster yet and faster
     The heavy stones went round,
   Until the golden kernels
     To golden meal were ground.
   "Now, fill the empty hopper
     With _wheat_," the miller said;
   "We'll grind this into flour
     To make the children's bread."

4. And still, as flowed the water,
     The mighty wheel went round;
   And still, as turned the millstones,
     The corn and grain were ground.
   And busy was the miller
     The livelong day, until
   The water gate he fastened,
     And silent grew the mill.



[Illustration: XVI. MAKING BREAD.]

XVI.--MAKING BREAD.


"The farmer and the miller
Have worked," the mother said,
"And got the flour ready,
So I will make the bread."
She scooped from out the barrel
The flour white as snow,
And in her sieve she put it
And shook it to and fro.

[Illustration: THE SCOOP. [hands cupped together]]

[Illustration: THE SIEVE. [fingers interlaced, palms upward, thumbs
meeting]]

Then in the pan of flour
A little salt she threw;
A cup of yeast she added,
And poured in water, too.
To mix them all together
She stirred with busy might,
Then covered it and left it
Until the bread was light.

[Illustration: PAN. [arms curved, fingers meeting]]

[Illustration: "SALT SHE THREW." [thumb and fingertips together]]

[Illustration: A CUP OF YEAST. [palm upward, fingers curved]]

[Illustration: STIRRING. [fingers together, stirring]]

[Illustration: COVERING. [palms downward, fingers slightly curved]]

More flour then she sifted
And kneaded well the dough,
And in the waiting oven
The loaves of bread did go.
The mother watched the baking,
And turned the loaves, each one,
Until at last, rejoicing,
She said, "My bread is done!"

[Illustration: KNEADING. [fists moving up and down]]

[Illustration: TURNED THE LOAVES. [fists turning sideways]]


[Music: MAKING BREAD.

EMILIE POULSSON.

C.C. ROESKE.

1. "The farmer and the miller
     Have work'd," the mother said,
   "And got the flour ready,
     So I will make the bread."
   She scooped from out the barrel
     The flour white as snow,
   And in her sieve she put it
     And shook it to and fro.]

2. Then in the pan of flour
     A little salt she threw;
   A cup of yeast she added,
     And poured in water, too.
   To mix them all together
     She stirred with busy might,
   Then covered it and left it
     Until the bread was light.

3. More flour then she sifted
     And kneaded well the dough,
   And in the waiting oven
     The loaves of bread did go.
   The mother watched the baking,
     And turned the loaves, each one,
   Until at last, rejoicing,
     She said, "My bread is done!"



[Illustration: XVII. MAKING BUTTER.]

XVII.--MAKING BUTTER.


Skim, skim, skim,
  With the skimmer bright;
Take the rich and yellow cream,
  Leave the milk so white.

[Illustration: SKIMMER. [palm upward, fingers slightly curved, moving
back and forth]]

Churn, churn, churn,
  Now 'tis churning day;
Till the cream to butter turn
  Dasher must not stay.

[Illustration: CHURNING. [fists holding imaginary churn-handle]]

Press, press, press;
  All the milk must be
From the golden butter now
  Pressed out carefully.

[Illustration: LADLE.

(for pressing) [sideways hand]]

[Illustration: BOWL. [curved arm]]

Pat, pat, pat;
  Make it smooth and round.
See! the roll of butter's done--
  Won't you buy a pound?

[Illustration: "PAT, PAT, PAT." [hand patting]]

[Illustration: A ROLL OF BUTTER. [fist]]

Taste, oh! taste,
  This is very nice;
Spread it on the children's bread,
  Give them each a slice.

[Illustration: SPREADING. [index finger of one hand on flat palm of
other hand]]


[Music: MAKING BUTTER.

EMILIE POULSSON.

C.C. ROESKE.

1. Skim, skim, skim,
     With the skimmer bright;
   Take the rich and yellow cream,
     Leave the milk so white.]

2. Churn, churn, churn,
     Now 'tis churning day;
   Till the cream to butter turn
     Dasher must not stay.

3. Press, press, press;
     All the milk must be
   From the golden butter now
     Pressed out carefully.

4. Pat, pat, pat,
     Make it smooth and round.
   See! the roll of butter's done--
     Won't you buy a pound?

5. Taste, oh! taste,
     This is very nice.
   Spread it on the children's bread,
     Give them each a slice.



[Illustration: XVIII. SANTA CLAUS.]

XVIII.--SANTA CLAUS.


O, clap, clap the hands,
  And sing out with glee
For Christmas is coming
  And merry are we!

[Illustration: CLAPPING

THROUGH THE FIRST AND LAST VERSES.]

Now swift o'er the snow
  The tiny reindeer
Are trotting and bringing
  Good Santa Claus near.

[Illustration: PAIR OF REINDEER [fingers of both hands downward,
thumbs interlaced]

IN SECOND AND FOURTH VERSES.]

Our stockings we'll hang,
  And while we're asleep
Then down through the chimney
  Will Santa Claus creep.

[Illustration: STOCKINGS. [four fingers hanging downward]]

[Illustration: DOWN THE CHIMNEY. [one fist on top of the other]]

[Illustration: SANTA CLAUS. [fist with thumb extended upward]]

He'll empty his pack,
  Then up he will come
And, calling his reindeer,
  Will haste away home.

[Illustration: UP HE WILL COME. [one fist on top of the other with
thumb extended upward]]

Then clap, clap the hands!
  And sing out with glee,
For Christmas is coming
  And merry are we!


[Music: SANTA CLAUS.

EMILIE POULSSON.

CORNELIA C. ROESKE.

1. O, clap, clap the hands,
   And sing out with glee!
   For Christmas is coming and merry are we!
   Now swift o'er the snow
   The tiny reindeer
   Are trotting and bringing
   Good Santa Claus near.

2. O, clap, clap the hands,
   And sing out with glee!
   For Christmas is coming and merry are we!
   Our stockings we'll hang,
   And while we're asleep
   Then down thro' the chimney
   Will Santa Claus creep.

3. O, clap, clap the hands,
   And sing out with glee!
   For Christmas is coming and merry are we!
   He'll empty his pack,
   Then up he will come
   And calling the reindeer,
   Will haste away home.]





*** End of this Doctrine Publishing Corporation Digital Book "Finger plays for nursery and kindergarten" ***

Doctrine Publishing Corporation provides digitized public domain materials.
Public domain books belong to the public and we are merely their custodians.
This effort is time consuming and expensive, so in order to keep providing
this resource, we have taken steps to prevent abuse by commercial parties,
including placing technical restrictions on automated querying.

We also ask that you:

+ Make non-commercial use of the files We designed Doctrine Publishing
Corporation's ISYS search for use by individuals, and we request that you
use these files for personal, non-commercial purposes.

+ Refrain from automated querying Do not send automated queries of any sort
to Doctrine Publishing's system: If you are conducting research on machine
translation, optical character recognition or other areas where access to a
large amount of text is helpful, please contact us. We encourage the use of
public domain materials for these purposes and may be able to help.

+ Keep it legal -  Whatever your use, remember that you are responsible for
ensuring that what you are doing is legal. Do not assume that just because
we believe a book is in the public domain for users in the United States,
that the work is also in the public domain for users in other countries.
Whether a book is still in copyright varies from country to country, and we
can't offer guidance on whether any specific use of any specific book is
allowed. Please do not assume that a book's appearance in Doctrine Publishing
ISYS search  means it can be used in any manner anywhere in the world.
Copyright infringement liability can be quite severe.

About ISYS® Search Software
Established in 1988, ISYS Search Software is a global supplier of enterprise
search solutions for business and government.  The company's award-winning
software suite offers a broad range of search, navigation and discovery
solutions for desktop search, intranet search, SharePoint search and embedded
search applications.  ISYS has been deployed by thousands of organizations
operating in a variety of industries, including government, legal, law
enforcement, financial services, healthcare and recruitment.



Home