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´╗┐Title: A Bibliography of the writings in Prose and Verse of George Henry Borrow
Author: Wise, Thomas James, 1859-1937
Language: English
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Copyright Status: Not copyrighted in the United States. If you live elsewhere check the laws of your country before downloading this ebook. See comments about copyright issues at end of book.

*** Start of this Doctrine Publishing Corporation Digital Book "A Bibliography of the writings in Prose and Verse of George Henry Borrow" ***

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PROSE AND VERSE OF GEORGE HENRY BORROW***


Transcribed from the 1914 Richard Clay and Sons edition by David Price,
email ccx074@pglaf.org

             [Picture: Manuscript of Lord's Prayer in Romany]



A
BIBLIOGRAPHY
OF
THE WRITINGS IN PROSE AND VERSE
OF
GEORGE HENRY BORROW


                                    BY
                              THOMAS J. WISE

                                 LONDON:
                   PRINTED FOR PRIVATE CIRCULATION ONLY
                       BY RICHARD CLAY & SONS, LTD.
                                   1914

                               OF THIS BOOK
                         ONE HUNDRED COPIES ONLY
                            HAVE BEEN PRINTED.



PREFACE


The object of the present Bibliography is to give a concise account,
accompanied by accurate collations, of the original editions of the Books
and Pamphlets of George Borrow, together with a list of his many
contributions to Magazines and other Publications.  It will doubtless be
observed that no inconsiderable portion of the Bibliography deals with
the attractive series of Pamphlets containing Ballads, Poems, and other
works by Borrow which were printed for Private Circulation during the
course of last year.  Some account of the origin of these pamphlets, and
some information regarding the material of which they are composed, may
not be considered as inopportune or inappropriate.

As a writer of English Prose Borrow long since achieved the position
which was his due; as a writer of English Verse he has yet to come by his
own.

The neglect from which Borrow's poetical compositions (by far the larger
proportion of which are translations from the Danish and other tongues)
have suffered has arisen from one cause, and from one cause alone,--the
fact that up to the present moment only his earliest and, in the majority
of cases, his least successful efforts have been available to students of
his work.

In 1826, when Borrow passed his _Romantic Ballads_ through the Press, he
had already acquired a working knowledge of numerous languages and
dialects, but of his native tongue he had still to become a master.  In
1826 his appreciation of the requirements of English Prosody was of a
vague description, his sense of the rhythm of verse was crude, and the
attention he paid to the exigencies of rhyme was inadequate.  Hence the
majority of his Ballads, beyond the fact that they were faithful
reproductions of the originals from which they had been laboriously
translated, were of no particular value.

But to Borrow himself they were objects of a regard which amounted to
affection, and there can be no question that throughout a considerable
portion of his adventurous life he looked to his Ballads to win for him
whatever measure of literary fame it might eventually be his fortune to
gain.  In _Lavengro_, and other of his prose works, he repeatedly
referred to his "bundle of Ballads"; and I doubt whether he ever really
relinquished all hope of placing them before the public until the last
decade of his life had well advanced.

That the Ballad Poetry of the old Northern Races should have held a
strong attraction for Borrow is not to be wondered at.  His restless
nature and his roving habits were well in tune with the spirit of the old
Heroic Ballads; whilst his taste for all that was mythical or vagabond
(vagabond in the literal, and not in the conventional, sense of the word)
would prompt him to welcome with no common eagerness the old Poems
dealing with matters supernatural and legendary.  Has he not himself
recorded how, when fatigued upon a tiring march, he roused his flagging
spirits by shouting the refrain "_Look out_, _look out_, _Svend
Vonved_!"?

In 1829, three years after the _Romantic Ballads_ had struggled into
existence, Borrow made an effort to place them before a larger public in
a more complete and imposing form.  In collaboration with Dr. (afterwards
Sir John) Bowring he projected a work which should contain the best of
his old Ballads, together with many new ones, the whole to be supported
by the addition of others from the pen of Dr. Bowring. {0a}  A Prospectus
was drawn up and issued in December, 1829, and at least two examples of
this Prospectus have survived.  The brochure consists of two octavo pages
of letterpress, with the following heading:--

                               PROSPECTUS.

          _It is proposed to publish_, _in Two Volumes Octavo_,
  Price to Subscribers 1 pound 1_s._, to Non-Subscribers 1 pound 4_s._,
                        THE SONGS OF SCANDINAVIA,
                              TRANSLATED BY
                       DR. BOWRING AND MR. BORROW.

     DEDICATED TO THE KING OF DENMARK, BY PERMISSION OF HIS MAJESTY.



Then came a brief synopsis of the contents of the volumes, followed by a
short address on "the debt of justice due from England to Scandinavia."

Two additional pages were headed _List of Subscribers_, and were left
blank for the reception of names which, alas! were recorded in no
sufficient number.  The scheme lapsed, Borrow found his mission in other
fields of labour, and not until 1854 did he again attempt to revive it.

But in 1854 Borrow made one more very serious effort to give his Ballads
life.  In that year he again took them in hand, subjected many of them to
revision of the most drastic nature, and proceeded to prepare them
finally for press.  Advertisements which he drew up are still extant in
his handwriting, and reduced facsimiles of two of these may be seen upon
the opposite page.  But again Fate was against him, and neither _Koempe
Viser_ nor _Songs of Europe_ ever saw the light. {0b}

       [Picture: Manuscript of the Koempe Viser And Songs of Europe
                              advertisement]

After the death of Borrow his manuscripts passed into the possession of
his step-daughter, Mrs. MacOubrey, from whom the greater part were
purchased by Mr. Webber, a bookseller of Ipswich, who resold them to Dr.
William Knapp.  These Manuscripts are now in the hands of the Hispanic
Society, of New York, and will doubtless remain for ever the property of
the American people.  Fortunately, when disposing of the bulk of her
step-father's books and papers to Mr. Webber, Mrs. MacOubrey retained the
Manuscripts of the Ballads, together with certain other documents of
interest and importance.  It was from these Manuscripts that I was
afforded the opportunity of preparing the series of Pamphlets printed
last year.

The Manuscripts themselves are of four descriptions.  Firstly, the
Manuscripts of certain of the new Ballads prepared for the _Songs of
Scandinavia_ in 1829, untouched, and as originally written; {0c}
secondly, other of these new Ballads, heavily corrected by Borrow in a
later handwriting; thirdly, fresh transcripts, with the revised texts,
made in or about 1854, of Ballads written in 1829; and lastly some of the
more important Ballads originally published in 1826, entirely re-written
in 1854, and the text thoroughly revised.

As will be seen from the few examples I have given in the following
pages, or better still from a perusal of the pamphlets, the value as
literature of Borrow's Ballads as we now know them is immeasurably higher
than that hitherto placed upon them by critics who had no material upon
which to form their judgment beyond the _Romantic Ballads_, _Targum_, and
_The Talisman_, together with the sets of minor verses included in his
other books.  Borrow himself regarded his work in this field as superior
to that of Lockhart, and indeed seems to have believed that one cause at
least of his inability to obtain a hearing was Lockhart's jealousy for
his own _Spanish Ballads_.  Be that as it may--and Lockhart was certainly
sufficiently small-minded to render such a suspicion by no means
ridiculous or absurd--I feel assured that Borrow's metrical work will in
future receive a far more cordial welcome from his readers, and will meet
with a fuller appreciation from his critics, than that which until now it
has been its fortune to secure.

Despite the unctuous phrases which, in obedience to the promptings of the
Secretaries of the British and Foreign Bible Society {0d} whose interests
he forwarded with so much enterprise and vigor, he was at times
constrained to introduce into his official letters, Borrow was at heart a
Pagan.  The memory of his father that he cherished most warmly was that
of the latter's fight, actual or mythical, with 'Big Ben Brain,' the
bruiser; whilst the sword his father had used in action was one of his
best-regarded possessions.  To that sword he addressed the following
youthful stanzas, which until now have remained un-printed:



THE SWORD


    _Full twenty fights my father saw_,
       _And died with twenty red wounds gored_;
    _I heir'd what he so loved to draw_,
       _His ancient silver-handled sword_.

    _It is a sword of weight and length_,
       _Of jags and blood-specks nobly full_;
    _Well wielded by his Cornish strength_
       _It clove the Gaulman's helm and scull_.

    _Hurrah_! _thou silver-handled blade_,
       _Though thou'st but little of the air_
    _Of swords by Cornets worn on p'rade_,
       _To battle thee I vow to bear_.

    _Thou'st decked old chiefs of Cornwall's land_,
       _To face the fiend with thee they dared_;
    _Thou prov'dst a Tirfing in their hand_
       _Which victory gave whene'er_ '_twas bared_.

    _Though Cornwall's moors_ '_twas ne'er my lot_
       _To view_, _in Eastern Anglia born_,
    _Yet I her son's rude strength have got_,
       _And feel of death their fearless scorn_.

    _And when the foe we have in ken_,
       _And with my troop I seek the fray_,
    _Thou'lt find the youth who wields thee then_
       _Will ne'er the part of Horace play_.

    _Meanwhile above my bed's head hang_,
       _May no vile rust thy sides bestain_;
    _And soon_, _full soon_, _the war-trump's clang_
       _Call me and thee to glory's plain_.

These stanzas are interesting in a way which compels one to welcome them,
despite the poverty of the verse.  The little poem is a fragment of
autobiographical _juvenilia_, and moreover it is an original composition,
and not a translation, as is the greater part of Borrow's poetical work.

Up to the present date no Complete Collected Edition of Borrow's Works
has been published, either in this country or in America.  There is,
however, good reason for hoping that this omission will soon be remedied,
for such an edition is now in contemplation, to be produced under the
agreeable editorship of Mr. Clement Shorter.

It is, I presume, hardly necessary to note that every Book, Pamphlet, and
Magazine dealt with in the following pages has been described _de visu_.

                                                                  T. J. W.



CONTENTS

               PART I.--EDITIONES PRINCIPES                           PAGE

_PREFACE_                                                               ix

CELEBRATED TRIALS, 1825                                                  3

FAUSTUS, 1825                                                            4

ROMANTIC BALLADS, 1826:

   _First issue_                                                        11

   _Second issue_                                                       44

   _Third issue_                                                        47

TARGUM, 1835                                                            47

THE TALISMAN, 1835                                                      58

THE GOSPEL OF ST. LUKE, 1837                                            62

THE ZINCALI, 1841                                                       66

THE BIBLE IN SPAIN, 1843                                                69

REVIEW OF FORD'S "HAND-BOOK FOR TRAVELLERS IN SPAIN,"                   72
1845

A SUPPLEMENTARY CHAPTER TO "THE BIBLE IN SPAIN," 1913                   81

LAVENGRO, 1851                                                          85

THE ROMANY RYE, 1857                                                    88

THE SLEEPING BARD, 1860                                                 92

WILD WALES, 1862                                                        94

ROMANO LAVO-LIL, 1874                                                  103

THE TURKISH JESTER, 1884                                               110

THE DEATH OF BALDER, 1889                                              111

LETTERS TO THE BRITISH AND FOREIGN BIBLE SOCIETY, 1911                 113

LETTERS TO HIS WIFE, MARY BORROW, 1913                                 115

MARSK STIG, A BALLAD, 1913                                             116

THE SERPENT KNIGHT, AND OTHER BALLADS, 1913                            127

THE KING'S WAKE, AND OTHER BALLADS, 1913                               131

THE DALBY BEAR, AND OTHER BALLADS, 1913                                139

THE MERMAID'S PROPHECY, AND OTHER SONGS RELATING TO QUEEN              140
DAGMAR, 1913

HAFBUR AND SIGNE, A BALLAD, 1913                                       144

THE STORY OF YVASHKA WITH THE BEAR'S EAR, 1913                         153

THE VERNER RAVEN, THE COUNT OF VENDEL'S DAUGHTER, AND                  157
OTHER BALLADS, 1913

THE RETURN OF THE DEAD, AND OTHER BALLADS, 1913                        158

AXEL THORDSON AND FAIR VALBORG, 1913                                   165

KING HACON'S DEATH, AND BRAN AND THE BLACK DOG, 1913                   166

MARSK STIG'S DAUGHTERS, AND OTHER SONGS AND BALLADS, 1913              170

THE TALE OF BRYNILD, AND KING VALDEMAR AND HIS SISTER,                 177
1913

PROUD SIGNILD, AND OTHER BALLADS, 1913                                 181

ULF VAN YERN, AND OTHER BALLADS, 1913                                  182

ELLEN OF VILLENSKOV, AND OTHER BALLADS, 1913                           188

THE SONGS OF RANILD, 1913                                              191

NIELS EBBESEN AND GERMAND GLADENSWAYNE, 1913                           192

CHILD MAIDELVOLD, AND OTHER BALLADS, 1913                              195

ERMELINE, A BALLAD, 1913                                               203

THE GIANT OF BERN AND ORM UNGERSWAYNE, 1913                            207

LITTLE ENGEL, A BALLAD, 1913                                           208

ALF THE FREEBOOTER, LITTLE DANNEVED AND SWAYNE TROST, AND              212
OTHER BALLADS, 1913

KING DIDERIK AND THE FIGHT BETWEEN THE LION AND DRAGON,                215
AND OTHER BALLADS, 1913

THE NIGHTINGALE, THE VALKYRIE AND RAVEN, AND OTHER                     219
BALLADS, 1913

GRIMMER AND KAMPER, THE END OF SIVARD SNARENSWAYNE, AND                223
OTHER BALLADS, 1913

THE FOUNTAIN OF MARIBO, AND OTHER BALLADS, 1913                        227

QUEEN BERNGERD, THE BARD AND THE DREAMS, AND OTHER                     231
BALLADS, 1913

FINNISH ARTS, OR, SIR THOR AND DAMSEL THURE, 1913                      237

BROWN WILLIAM, THE POWER OF THE HARP, AND OTHER BALLADS,               238
1913

THE SONG OF DEIRDRA, KING BYRGE AND HIS BROTHERS, AND                  244
OTHER BALLADS, 1913

SIGNELIL, A TALE FROM THE CORNISH, AND OTHER BALLADS,                  247
1913

YOUNG SWAIGDER OR THE FORCE OF RUNES, AND OTHER BALLADS,               251
1913

EMELIAN THE FOOL, 1913                                                 253

THE STORY OF TIM, 1913                                                 254

MOLLIE CHARANE, AND OTHER BALLADS, 1913                                257

GRIMHILD'S VENGEANCE, THREE BALLADS, 1913                              262

LETTERS TO HIS MOTHER, ANN BORROW, 1913                                266

THE BROTHER AVENGED, AND OTHER BALLADS, 1913                           267

THE GOLD HORNS, 1913                                                   271

TORD OF HAFSBOROUGH, AND OTHER BALLADS, 1914                           273

THE EXPEDITION TO BIRTING'S LAND, AND OTHER BALLADS, 1914              275

                         PART II.

CONTRIBUTIONS TO PERIODICAL LITERATURE, ETC.                           283

                        PART III.

BORROVIANA: COMPLETE VOLUMES OF BIOGRAPHY AND CRITICISM                311

PART I.
EDITIONES PRINCIPES, ETC.


(1)  [CELEBRATED TRIALS: 1825]


Celebrated Trials, / and / Remarkable Cases / of / Criminal
Jurisprudence, / from / The Earliest Records / to / The Year 1825. /
[_Thirteen-line quotation from Burke_] / In Six Volumes. / Vol. I.
[_Vol. II_, _&c._] / London: / Printed for Knight and Lacey, /
Paternoster-Row. / 1825. / Price 3 pounds 12_s._ in Boards.

Collation:--Demy octavo.

Vol. I.  Pp. xiii + v + 550, with nine engraved Plates.

Vol. II. ,, vi + 574, with seven engraved Plates.

[P. 574 is misnumbered 140.]

Vol. III. ,, vi + 572, with three engraved Plates.

Vol. IV. ,, vi + 600, with five engraved Plates.

Vol. V. ,, vi + 684, with five engraved Plates.

Vol. VI. ,, viii + 576 + an _Index_ of 8 pages, together with six
engraved Plates.

Issued in drab paper boards, with white paper back-labels.  The leaves
measure 8.625 x 5 inches.

It is evident that no fewer than five different printing houses were
employed simultaneously in the production of this work.

The preliminary matter of all six volumes was printed together, and the
reverse of each title-page carries at foot the following imprint:
"_London_: / _Shackell and Arrowsmith_, _Johnson's-Court_,
_Fleet-Street_."

The same firm also worked the whole of the Second Volume, and their
imprint is repeated at the foot of p. 574 [misnumbered 140].

Vol. I bears, at the foot of p. 550, the following imprint: "_Printed by
W. Lewis_, 21, _Finch-Lane_, _Cornhill_."

Vol. III bears, at the foot of p. 572, the following imprint: "_J. and C.
Adlard_, _Printers_, / _Bartholomew Close_."

Vols. IV and VI bear, at the foot of pages 600 and 576 respectively, the
following imprint: "_D. Sidney & Co._, _Printers_ /
_Northumberland-street_, _Strand_."

Vol. V bears, at the foot of p. 684, the following imprint: "_Whiting and
Branston_, / _Beaufort House_, _Strand_."

Both Dr. Knapp and Mr. Clement Shorter have recorded full particulars of
the genesis of the _Celebrated Trials_.  Mr. Shorter devotes a
considerable portion of Chapter xi of _George Borrow and his Circle_ to
the subject, and furnishes an analysis of the contents of each of the six
volumes.  _Celebrated Trials_ is, of course, the _Newgate Lives and
Trials_ of _Lavengro_, in which book Borrow contrived to make a
considerable amount of entertaining narrative out of his early struggles
and failures.

There is a Copy of the First Edition of _Celebrated Trials_ in the
Library of the British Museum.  The Press-mark is 518.g.6.



(2)  [FAUSTUS: 1825]


Faustus: / His / Life, Death, / and / Descent into Hell. / Translated
from the German. / _Speed thee_, _speed thee_, / _Liberty lead thee_, /
_Many this night shall harken and heed thee_. / _Far abroad_, /
_Demi-god_, / _Who shall appal thee_! / _Javal_, _or devil_, _or what
else we call thee_. / Hymn to the Devil. / London: / W. Simpkin and R.
Marshall. / 1825.

                  [Picture: Title page of Fautus, 1825]

Collation:--Foolscap octavo, pp. xii + 251; consisting of: Half-title
(with imprint "_Printed by_ / _J. and C. Adlard_, _Bartholomew Close_" at
the foot of the reverse) pp. i-ii; Title-page, as above (with blank
reverse) pp. iii-iv; Preface (headed _The Translator to the Public_) pp.
v-viii; Table of _Contents_ pp. ix-xii; and Text pp. 1-251.  The reverse
of p. 251 is occupied by Advertisements of Horace Welby's _Signs before
Death_, and John Timbs's _Picturesque Promenade round Dorking_.  The
headline is _Faustus_ throughout, upon both sides of the page.  At the
foot of the reverse of p. 251 the imprint is repeated thus, "_J. and C.
Adlard_, _Bartholomew Close_."  The signatures are A (6 leaves), B to Q
(15 sheets, each 8 leaves), plus R (6 leaves).

Issued (in _April_, 1825) in bright claret-coloured linen boards, with
white paper back-label.  The leaves measure 6.75 x 4.25 inches.  The
published price was 7_s._ 6_d._

The volume has as _Frontispiece_ a coloured plate, engraved upon copper,
representing the supper of the sheep-headed Magistrates, described on pp.
64-66.  The incident selected for illustration is the moment when the
wine 'issued in blue flames from the flasks,' and 'the whole assembly sat
like so many ridiculous characters in a mad masquerade.'  This
illustration was not new to Borrow's book.  It had appeared both in the
German original, and in the French translation of 1798.  In the original
work the persons so bitterly satirized were the individuals composing the
Corporation of Frankfort.

In 1840 'remainder' copies of the First Edition of _Faustus_ were issued
with a new title-page, pasted upon a stub, carrying at foot the following
publishers' imprint, "_London_: / _Simpkin_, _Marshall & Co._ / 1840."
They were made up in bright claret-coloured linen boards, uniform with
the original issue, with a white paper back-label.  The published price
was again 7_s._ 6_d._

_Faustus_ was translated by Borrow from the German of Friedrich
Maximilian von Klinger.  Mr. Shorter suggests, with much reason, that
Borrow did not make his translation from the original German edition of
1791, but from a French translation published in Amsterdam in 1798.

The reception accorded to _Faustus_ was the reverse of favourable.  _The
Literary Gazette_ said (_July_ 16_th_, 1825):--

    "This is another work to which no respectable publisher ought to have
    allowed his name to be put.  The political allusion and metaphysics,
    which may have made it popular among a low class in Germany, do not
    sufficiently season its lewd scenes and coarse descriptions for
    British palates.  We have occasionally publications for the
    fireside,--these are only fit for the fire."

Borrow's translation of Klinger's novel was reprinted in 1864, without
any acknowledgment of the name of the translator.  Only a few stray words
in the text were altered.  But five passages were deleted from the
Preface, which, not being otherwise modified or supplemented, gave--as
was no doubt the intention of the publishers--the work the appearance of
a new translation specially prepared.  This unhallowed edition bears the
following title-page:

_Faustus_: / _His_ / _Life_, _Death_, _and Doom_. / _A Romance in Prose_.
/ _Translated from the German_. / [Quotation as in the original edition,
followed by a Printer's ornament.] / _London_: / _W. Kent and Co._,
_Paternoster Row_. / 1864.--Crown 8vo, pp. viii + 302.

"There is no reason to suppose," remarks Mr. Shorter (_George Borrow and
his Circle_, p. 104) "that the individual, whoever he may have been, who
prepared the 1864 edition of _Faustus_ for the Press, had ever seen
either the German original or the French translation of Klinger's book."

There is a copy of the First Edition of _Faustus_ in the Library of the
British Museum.  The Press-mark is N.351.

                [Picture: Title page of Romantic Ballads]



(3)  [ROMANTIC BALLADS: 1826]


Romantic Ballads, / Translated from the Danish; / and / Miscellaneous
Pieces; / By / George Borrow. / _Through gloomy paths unknown_-- / _Paths
which untrodden be_, / _From rock to rock I roam_ / _Along the dashing
sea_. / Bowring. / Norwich: / Printed and Published by S. Wilkin, Upper
Haymarket. / 1826.

Collation:--Demy octavo, pp. xii + 187; consisting of: Half-title (with
imprint "_Norwich_: / _Printed by S. Wilkin_, _Upper Haymarket_" upon the
centre of the reverse) pp. i-ii; Title-page, as above (with blank
reverse) pp. iii-iv; Table of _Contents_ (with blank reverse) pp. v-vi;
_Preface_ pp. vii-viii; Prefatory Poem _From Allan Cunningham to George
Borrow_ pp. ix-xi, p. xii is blank; Text of the _Ballads_ pp. 1-184; and
List of Subscribers pp. 185-187.  The reverse of p. 187 is blank.  There
are head-lines throughout, each page being headed with the title of the
Ballad occupying it.  The imprint is repeated at the foot of p. 184.  The
signatures are a (a half-sheet of 4 leaves), b (a quarter-sheet of 2
leaves), B to M (eleven sheets, each 8 leaves), and N (a half-sheet of 4
leaves), followed by an unsigned quarter-sheet of 2 leaves carrying the
List of Subscribers. {12}  Sigs.  G 5 and H 2 (pp. 89-90 and 99-100) are
cancel-leaves, mounted on stubs, in every copy I have met with.

Issued (in _May_ 1826) in dark greenish-grey paper boards, with white
paper back-label, lettered "_Romantic_ / _Ballads_ / _From the_ / _Danish
By_ / _G. Borrow_ / _Price_ 10/6 _net_."  The leaves measure 9 x 5.5
inches.

The volume of _Romantic Ballads_ was printed at Norwich during the early
months of 1826.  The edition consisted of Five Hundred Copies, but only
Two Hundred of these were furnished with the Title-page transcribed
above.  These were duly distributed to the subscribers.  The remaining
Three Hundred copies were forwarded to London, where they were supplied
with the two successive title-pages described below, and published in the
ordinary manner.

    "_I had an idea that_, _provided I could persuade any spirited
    publisher to give these translations to the world_, _I should acquire
    both considerable fame and profit_;_ not perhaps a world-embracing
    fame such as Byron's_, _but a fame not to be sneered at_, _which
    would last me a considerable time_, _and would keep my heart from
    breaking_;--_profit_, _not equal to that which Scott had made by his
    wondrous novels_, _but which would prevent me from starving_, _and
    enable me to achieve some other literary enterprise_.  _I read and
    re-read my ballads_, _and the more I read them the more I was
    convinced that the public_, _in the event of their being published_,
    _would freely purchase_, _and hail them with merited
    applause_"--["George Borrow and his Circle," 1913, p. 102.]

Allan Cunningham's appreciation of the manner in which Borrow had
succeeded in his effort to introduce the Danish Ballads to English
readers is well expressed in the following letter:

                                               27, _Lower Belgrave Place_,
                                                                 _London_.
                                                       16_th_ _May_, 1826.

    _My dear Sir_,

    _I like your Danish Ballads much_, _and though Oehlenslaeger seems a
    capital poet_, _I love the old rhymes best_.  _There is more truth
    and simplicity in them_;_ and certainly we have nothing in our
    language to compare with them_. . . . '_Sir John_' _is a capital
    fellow_, _and reminds one of Burns'_ '_Findlay_.'  '_Sir Middel_' _is
    very natural and affecting_, _and exceedingly well rendered_,--_so
    is_ '_The Spectre of Hydebee_.'  _In this you have kept up the true
    tone of the Northern Ballad_.  '_Svend Vonved_' _is wild and
    poetical_, _and it is my favourite_.  _You must not think me
    insensible to the merits of the incomparable_ '_Skimming_.'  _I think
    I hear his neigh_, _and see him crush the ribs of the Jute_.  _Get
    out of bed_, _therefore_, _George Borrow_, _and be sick or sleepy no
    longer_.  _A fellow who can give us such exquisite Danish Ballads has
    no right to repose_. . . .

                                                               _I remain_,
                                              _Your very faithful friend_,
                                                       _Allan Cunningham_.

                               _Contents_.

                                                           PAGE.

Introductory Verses.  By Allan Cunningham.  [_Sing_,       ix
_sing_, _my friend_; _breathe life again_]

The Death-Raven.  [_The silken sail_, _which caught the    1
summer breeze_]

I give herewith a reduced facsimile of the first page of
the original Manuscript of this Ballad.  No other MS. of
it is known to be extant.

Fridleif and Helga.  [_The woods were in leaf_, _and       21
they cast a sweet shade_]

Sir Middel.  [_So tightly was Swanelil lacing her vest_]   28

Previously printed (under the title _Skion Middel_, the
first line reading, "_The maiden was lacing so tightly
her vest_,") in _The Monthly Magazine_, _November_ 1823,
p. 308.  Apart from the opening line, the text of the
two versions (with the exception of a few trifling
verbal changes) is identical.

Another, but widely different, version of this Ballad is
printed in _Child Maidelvold and Other Ballads_, 1913,
pp. 5-10.  In this latter version the name of the
heroine is Sidselil in place of Swanelil, and that of
the hero is Child Maidelvold in place of Sir Middel.

Elvir-Shades.  [_A sultry eve pursu'd a sultry day_]       32

Considerable differences are to be observed between the
text of the Manuscript of _Elvir-Shades_ and that of the
printed version.  For example, as printed the second
stanza reads:

    _I spurr'd my courser_, _and more swiftly rode_,
       _In moody silence_, _through the forests green_,
    _Where doves and linnets had their lone abode_.

In the Manuscript it reads:

    _Immers'd in pleasing pensiveness I rode_
       _Down vistas dim_, _and glades of forest green_,
    _Where doves and nightingales had their abode_.

The Heddybee-Spectre.  [_I clomb in haste my dappled       37
steed_]

In 1829 Borrow discarded his original (1826) version of
_The Heddybee-Spectre_, and made an entirely new
translation.  This was written in couplets, with a
refrain repeated after each.  In 1854 the latter version
was revised, and represents the final text.  It
commences thus:

    _At evening fall I chanced to ride_,
    _My courser to a tree I tied_.
       _So wide thereof the story goes_.

    _Against a stump my head I laid_,
    _And then to slumber I essay'd_
       _So wide thereof the story goes_.

From the Manuscript of 1854 the ballad was printed
(under the amended title _The Heddeby Spectre_) in
_Signelil_, _A Tale from the Cornish_, _and Other
Ballads_, 1913, pp. 22-24.  Borrow afterwards described
the present early version as 'a paraphrase.'

Sir John.  [_Sir Lave to the island stray'd_]              40

There is extant a Manuscript of _Sir John_ which
apparently belongs to an earlier date than 1826.  The
text differs considerably from that of the _Romantic
Ballads_.  I give a few stanzas of each.

                          1826.

    _The servants led her then to bed_,
    _But could not loose her girdle red_!
    "_I can_, _perhaps_," _said John_.

    _He shut the door with all his might_;
    _He lock'd it fast_, _and quench'd the light_:
    "_I shall sleep here_," _said John_.

    _A servant to Sir Lave hied_:--
    "_Sir John is sleeping with the bride_:"
    "_Aye_, _that I am_," _said John_.

    _Sir Lave to the chamber flew_:
    "_Arise_, _and straight the door undo_!"
    "_A likely thing_!" _said John_.

    _He struck with shield_, _he struck with spear_--
    "_Come out_, _thou Dog_, _and fight me here_!"
    "_Another time_," _said John_.

                       _Early MS._

    _They carried the bride to the bridal bed_,
    _But to loose her girdle ne'er entered their head_--
       "_Be that my care_," _said John_.

    _Sir John locked the door as fast as he might_:
    "_I wish Sir Lave a very good night_,
       _I shall sleep here_," _said John_.

    _A messenger to Sir Lave hied_:
    "_Sir John is sleeping with thy young bride_!"
       "_Aye_, _that I am_!" _said John_.

    _On the door Sir Lave struck with his glove_:
    "_Arise_, _Sir John_, _let me in to my love_!"
       "_Stand out_, _you dog_!" _said John_.

    _He struck on the door with shield and spear_:
    "_Come out_, _Sir John_, _and fight me here_!"
       "_See if I do_!" _said John_.

May Asda.  [_May Asda is gone to the merry green wood_]    44

Aager and Eliza.  [_Have ye heard of bold Sir Aager_]      47

Saint Oluf.  [_St. Oluf was a mighty king_]                53

_Of Saint Oluf_ there are three MSS. extant, the first
written in 1826, the second in 1829, and the third in
1854.  In the two later MSS. the title given to the
Ballad is _Saint Oluf and the Trolds_.  As the latest
MS. affords the final text of the Poem, I give a few of
the variants between it and the printed version of 1826

                          1826.

    _St. Oluf built a lofty ship_,
    _With sails of silk so fair_;
    "_To Hornelummer I must go_,
    _And see what's passing there_."

    "_O do not go_," _the seamen said_,
    "_To yonder fatal ground_,
    _Where savage Jutts_, _and wicked elves_,
    _And demon sprites_, _abound_."

    _St. Oluf climb'd the vessel's side_;
    _His courage nought could tame_!
    "_Heave up_, _heave up the anchor straight_;
    _Let's go in Jesu's name_.

    "_The cross shall be my faulchion now_--
    _The book of God my shield_;
    _And_, _arm'd with them_, _I hope and trust_
    _To make the demons yield_!"

    _And swift_, _as eagle cleaves the sky_,
    _The gallant vessel flew_,
    _Direct for Hornelummer's rock_,
    _Through ocean's wavy blue_.

    '_Twas early in the morning tide_
    _When she cast anchor there_;
    _And_, _lo_! _the Jutt stood on the cliff_,
    _To breathe the morning air_:

    _His eyes were like the burning beal_--
    _His mouth was all awry_;
    _The truth I tell_, _and say he stood_
    _Full twenty cubits high_.

                          * * * * *

    "_Be still_, _be still_, _thou noisy guest_--
    _Be still for evermore_;
    _Become a rock and beetle there_,
    _Above the billows hoar_."

    _Up started then_, _from out the hill_,
    _The demon's hoary wife_;
    _She curs'd the king a thousand times_,
    _And brandish'd high her knife_.

    _Sore wonder'd then the little elves_,
    _Who sat within the hill_,
    _To see their mother_, _all at once_,
    _Stand likewise stiff and still_.

                          1854.

    _Saint Oluf caused a ship be built_,
       _At Marsirand so fair_;
    _To Hornelummer he'll away_,
       _And see what's passing there_.

    _Then answer made the steersman old_,
       _Beside the helm who stood_:
    "_At Hornelummer swarm the Trolas_,
       _It is no haven good_."

    _The king replied in gallant guise_,
       _And sprang upon the prow_:
    "_Upon the Ox {23} the cable cast_,
       _In Jesu's name let go_!"

    _The Ox he pants_, _the Ox he snorts_,
       _And bravely cuts the swell_--
    _To Hornelummer in they sail_
       _The ugly Trolds to quell_.

    _The Jutt was standing on the cliff_,
       _Which raises high its brow_;
    _And thence he saw Saint Oluf_, _and_
       _The Ox beneath him go_.

    _His eyes were like a burning beal_,
       _His mouth was all awry_,
    _The nails which feve'd his fingers' ends_
       _Stuck out so wondrously_.

    "_Now hold thy peace_, _thou foulest fiend_,
       _And changed be to stone_;
    _Do thou stand there_ '_till day of doom_,
       _And injury do to none_."

    _Then out came running from the hill_
       _The carline old and grey_;
    _She cursed the King a thousand times_,
       _And bade him sail away_.

    _Then wondered much the little Trolds_,
       _Who sat within the hill_,
    _To see their mother all at once_
       _Stand likewise stiff and still_.

The entire ballad should be compared with _King Oluf the
Saint_, printed in _Queen Berngerd_, _The Bard and the
Dreams_, _and Other Ballads_, 1913, pp 23-29.

The Heroes of Dovrefeld.  [_On Dovrefeld_, _in Norway_]    58

Another version of _The Heroes of Dovrefeld_, written in
1854, is extant in manuscript.  Unlike that of 1826,
which was in four line stanzas, this later version is
arranged in couplets, with a refrain repeated after
each.  It commences as follows:

    _On Dovrefeld in Norroway_
    _Free from care the warriors lay_.
       _Who knows like us to rhyme and rune_?

    _Twelve bold warriors there were seen_,
    _Brothers of Ingeborg the Queen_.
       _Who knows like us to rhyme and rune_?

    _The first the rushing storm could turn_,
    _The second could still the running burn_.
       _Who knows like us to rhyme and rune_?

Svend Vonved.  [_Svend Vonved sits in his lonely bower_]   61

In a Manuscript of 1830 the name employed is _Swayne
Vonved_.  There is no 1854 Manuscript of this Ballad.

The Tournament.  [_Six score there were_, _six score and   82
ten_]

_The Tournament_ was one of the Ballads entirely
rewritten by Borrow in 1854 for inclusion in the then
projected _Koempe Viser_.  The text of the later version
differed greatly from that of 1826, as the following
extracts will show:

                            1826.

    _Six score there were_, _six score and ten_,
       _From Hald that rode that day_;
    _And when they came to Brattingsborg_
       _They pitch'd their pavilion gay_.

    _King Nilaus stood on the turrets top_,
       _Had all around in sight_:
    "_Why hold those heroes their lives so cheap_,
       _That it lists them here to fight_?

    "_Now_, _hear me_, _Sivard Snaresvend_;
       _Far hast thou rov'd_, _and wide_,
    _Those warriors' weapons thou shalt prove_,
       _To their tent thou must straightway ride_."

                          * * * * *

    _There shine upon the eighteenth shield_
       _A man_, _and a fierce wild boar_,
    _Are borne by the Count of Lidebierg_;
       _His blows fall heavy and sore_.

    _There shines upon the twentieth shield_,
       _Among branches_, _a rose_, _so gay_;
    _Wherever Sir Nordman comes in war_,
       _He bears bright honour away_.

    _There shines on the one-and-twentieth shield_
       _A vase_, _and of copper_ '_tis made_;
    _That's borne by Mogan Sir Olgerson_:
       _He wins broad lands with his blade_.

    _And now comes forth the next good shield_,
       _With a sun dispelling the mirk_;
    _And that by Asbiorn Milde is borne_;
       _He sets the knights' backs at work_.

    _Now comes the four-and-twentieth shield_,
       _And a bright sword there you see_;
    _And that by Humble Sir Jerfing is borne_;
       _Full worthy of that is he_.

                          * * * * *

    _Sir Humble struck his hand on the board_;
       _No longer he lists to play_:
    _I tell you_, _forsooth_, _that the rosy hue_
       _From his cheek fast faded away_.

    "_Now_, _hear me_, _Vidrik Verlandson_;
       _Thou art so free a man_;
    _Do lend me Skimming_, _thy horse_, _this day_;
       _I'll pledge for him what I can_."

                          * * * * *

    _In came Humble_, _with boot and spur_,
       _He cast on the table his sword_:
    "_Sivard stands in the green wood bound_,
       _He speaks not a single word_.

    "_O_, _I have been to the wild forest_,
       _And have seiz'd the warrior stark_;
    _Sivard there was taken by me_,
       _And tied to the oak's rough bark_."

                          * * * * *

    _The queen she sat in the high_, _high loft_,
       _And thence look'd far and wide_:
    "_O there comes Sward Snaresvend_,
       _With a stately oak at his side_."

    _Then loud laugh'd fair Queen Gloriant_,
       _As she looked on Sivard full_:
    "_Thou wert_, _no doubt_, _in great_, _great need_,
       _When thou such flowers didst pull_."

                            1854.

    _There were seven and seven times twenty_
       _Away from Hald that went_;
    _And when they came to Brattingsborg_
       _There pitch'd they up their tent_.

    _King Nilaus stood on the turret's top_,
       _Had all around in sight_:
    "_If yonder host comes here to joust_
       _They hold their lives but light_.

    "_Now_, _hear me_, _Sivard Snarenswayne_,
       _One thing I crave of thee_;
    _To meet them go_, _for I would know_
       _Their arms_, _and who they be_."

                          * * * * *

    _There shine upon the eighteenth shield_
       _A Giant and a Sow_;
    _Who deals worse blows amidst his foes_,
       _Count Lideberg_, _than thou_?

    _Wherever Sir Nordman comes in war_
       _He winneth fame in field_;
    _Yon blooming rose and verdant boughs_
       _Adorn the twentieth shield_.

    _A copper kettle_, _fairly wrought_,
       _Upon the next you see_;
    '_Tis borne by one who realms has won_,
       _Sir Mogan good_, _by thee_!

    _Forth comes the two-and-twentieth shield_,
       _A sun mid mist and smoke_;
    _Of wrestler line full many a spine_
       _Has Asborn Milday broke_.

    _A glittering faulchion shines upon_
       _The four-and-twentieth shield_;
    _And that doth bear Sir Jerfing's heir_,
       _He's worthy it to wield_.

                          * * * * *

    _Young Humble struck his hand on the board_,
       _No longer he lists to play_;
    _I tell to you that the rosy hue_
       _From his cheek fast fled away_.

    "_Now hear me_, _Vidrik Verlandson_,
       _Thou art a man so free_;
    _Lend me thy horse to ride this course_,
       _Grey Skimming lend to me_."

                          * * * * *

    _In came Humble_, _with boot and spur_,
       _On the table cast his sword_:
    "_'Neath the green-wood bough stands Sivard now_,
       _He speaketh not a word_.

    "_O_, _I have been to the forest wild_,
       _And have seiz'd the warrior good_:
    _These hands did chain the Snarenswayne_
       _To the oak's bark in the wood_."

                          * * * * *

    _The Queen she sat in the chamber high_,
       _And thence look'd far and wide_:
    "_Across the plain comes the Snarenswayne_,
       _With an oak-tree at his side_."

    _Then loud laughed fair Queen Ellinore_,
       _As she looked on Sivard full_:
    "_Thou wast_, _I guess_, _in sore distress_
       _When thou such flowers didst pull_!"

A reduced facsimile of the first page of the Manuscript
of the 1854 version of _The Tournament_ will be found
herewith, facing page 28.

Vidrik Verlandson.  [_King Diderik sits in the halls of    98
Bern_]

_Vidrik Verlandson_ was another of the Ballads entirely
re-written by Borrow in 1854 for the proposed _Koempe
Viser_.  The text of the later version differed
extremely from that of 1826, as the following examples
will shew:

                          1826.

    "_A handsome smith my father was_,
       _And Verland hight was he_:
    _Bodild they call'd my mother fair_;
       _Queen over countries three_:

    "_Skimming I call my noble steed_,
       _Begot from the wild sea-mare_:
    _Blank do I call my haughty helm_,
       _Because it glitters so fair_:

    "_Skrepping I call my good thick shield_;
       _Steel shafts have furrow'd it o'er_:
    _Mimmering have I nam'd my sword_;
       '_Tis hardened in heroes' gore_:

    "_And I am Vidrik Verlandson_:
       _For clothes bright iron I wear_:
    _Stand'st thou not up on thy long_, _long legs_,
       _I'll pin thee down to thy lair_:

    "_Do thou stand up on thy long_, _long legs_,
       _Nor look so dogged and grim_;
    _The King holds out before the wood_;
       _Thou shall yield thy treasure to him_."

    "_All_, _all the gold that I possess_,
       _I will keep with great renown_;
    _I'll yield it at no little horse-boy's word_,
       _To the best king wearing a crown_."

    "_So young and little as here I seem_,
       _Thou shalt find me prompt in a fray_;
    _I'll hew the head from thy shoulders off_,
       _And thy much gold bear away_."

                          * * * * *

    _It was Langben the lofty Jutt_,
       _He wav'd his steel mace round_;
    _He sent a blow after Vidrik_;
       _But the mace struck deep in the ground_.

    _It was Langben the lofty Jutt_,
       _Who had thought his foeman to slay_,
    _But the blow fell short of Vidrik_;
       _For the good horse bore him away_.

    _It was Langben the lofty Jutt_,
       _That shouted in wild despair_:
    "_Now lies my mace in the hillock fast_,
       _As though_ '_twere hammered in there_!"

                          * * * * *

    "_Accursed be thou_, _young Vidrik_!
       _And accursed thy piercing steel_!
    _Thou hast given me_, _see_, _a wound in my breast_,
       _Whence rise the pains I feel_."

                          * * * * *

    "_Now hear_, _now hear_, _thou warrior youth_,
       _Thou canst wheel thy courser about_;
    _But in every feat of manly strength_
       _I could beat thee out and out_."

                            1854.

    "_My father was a smith by trade_,
       _And Verland Smith he hight_;
    _Bodild they call'd my mother dear_,
       _A monarch's daughter bright_.

    "_Blank do I call my helm_, _thereon_
       _Full many a sword has snapped_;
    _Skrepping I call my shield_, _thereon_
       _Full many a shaft has rapped_.

    "_Skimming I call my steed_, _begot_
       _From the wild mare of the wood_;
    _Mimmering have I named my sword_,
       '_Tis hardened in heroes' blood_.

    "_And I am Viderik Verlandson_,
       _Bright steel for clothes I wear_;
    _Stand up on thy long legs_, _or I_
       _Will pin thee to thy lair_!

    "_Stand up on thy long legs_, _nor look_
       _So dogged and so grim_;
    _The King doth hold before the wood_,
       _Thy treasure yield to him_!"

    "_Whatever gold I here possess_
       _I'll keep_, _like a Kemp of worth_;
    _I'll yield it at no horseboy's word_
       _To any King on earth_!"

    "_So young and little as I seem_
       _I'm active in a fray_;
    _I'll hew thy head_, _thou lubbard_, _off_,
       _And bear thy gold away_!"

                          * * * * *

    _It was Langben the Giant waved_
       _His steely mace around_;
    _He sent a blow at Vidrik_, _but_
       _The mace struck deep in the ground_.

    _It was Langben_, _the lofty Jutt_,
       _Had thought his foe to slay_;
    _But the blow fell short_, _for the speedy horse_
       _His master bore away_.

    _It was Langben_, _the lofty Jutt_,
       _He bellow'd to the heaven_:
    "_My mace is tight within the height_,
       _As though by a hammer driven_!"

                          * * * * *

    _Accurs'd be thou_, _young Vidrik_!
       _Accursed be thy steel_!
    _Thou'st given me a mighty wound_,
       _And mighty pain I feel_.

                          * * * * *

    "_Now hear_, _now hear_, _thou warrior youth_,
       _Thou well canst wheel thy steed_;
    _But I could beat thee out and out_
       _In every manly deed_."

In _Romantic Ballads_, and also in the Manuscript of
1854, this Ballad is entitled _Vidrik Verlandson_.  In
the Manuscript of 1829 it is entitled _Vidrik
Verlandson's Conflict with the Giant Langben_.  The text
of this Manuscript is intermediate between that of the
other two versions.

A reduced facsimile of the first page of the Manuscript
of the 1854 version of _Vidrik Verlandson_ is given
herewith, facing p. 35.

Elvir Hill.  [_I rested my head upon Elvir Hill's side_,   111
_and my eyes were beginning to slumber_]

In the Manuscript of 1829 this Ballad is entitled _Elfin
Hill_, and the text differs considerably from that
printed in 1826.  I give the opening stanzas of each
version.

                          1826.

    _I rested my head upon Elvir Hill's side_, _and my
    eyes were beginning to slumber_;
    _That moment there rose up before me two maids_,
    _whose charms would take ages to number_.

    _One patted my face_, _and the other exclaim'd_,
    _while loading my cheek with her kisses_,
    "_Rise_, _rise_, _for to dance with you here we have
    sped from the undermost caves and abysses_.

    "_Rise_, _fair-haired swain_, _and refuse not to
    dance_;_ and I and my sister will sing thee_
    _The loveliest ditties that ever were heard_, _and
    the prettiest presents will bring thee_."

    _Then both of them sang so delightful a song_, _that
    the boisterous river before us_
    _Stood suddenly quiet and placid_, _as though_
    '_twere afraid to disturb the sweet chorus_.

                          1829.

    _I rested my head upon Elfin Hill_, _on mine eyes
    was slumber descending_;
    _That moment there rose up before me two maids_,
    _with me to discourse intending_.

    _The one kissed me on my cheek so white_, _the other
    she whispered mine ear in_:
    "_Arise_, _arise_, _thou beautiful swain_! _for thou
    our dance must share in_.

    "_Wake up_, _wake up_, _thou beautiful swain_! _rise
    and dance_ '_mongst the verdant grasses_;
    _And to sing thee the sweetest of their songs I'll
    bid my elfin lasses_."

    _To sing a song then one began_, _in voice so sweet
    and mellow_,
    _The boisterous stream was still'd thereby_, _that
    before was wont to bellow_.

Waldemar's Chase.  [_Late at eve they were toiling on      115
Harribee bank_]

Previously printed in _The Monthly Magazine_, _August_
1824, p. 21.

The Merman.  [_Do thou_, _dear mother_, _contrive          117
amain_]

A later, and greatly improved, version of this Ballad
was included, under the title _The Treacherous Merman_,
in _The Serpent Knight and Other Ballads_, 1913, pp.
15-17.  An early draft of this later version bears the
title _Marsk Stig's Daughter_.

The Deceived Merman.  [_Fair Agnes alone on the            120
sea-shore stood_]

Previously printed in _The Monthly Magazine_, _March_
1825, pp. 143-144.

Cantata.  [_This is Denmark's holyday_]                    127

The Hail-Storm.  [_When from our ships we bounded_]        136

_The Hail Storm_ was reprinted in _Targum_, 1835, pp.
42-43, and again in _Young Swaigder or The Force of
Runes and Other Ballads_, 1913, pp. 14-15.  In each
instance very considerable variations were introduced
into the text.

The Elder-Witch.  [_Though tall the oak_, _and firm its    139
stem_]

Ode.  From the Gaelic.  [_Oh restless_, _to night_, _are   142
my slumbers_]

Bear Song.  [_The squirrel that's sporting_]               144

Previously printed, with some trifling differences in
the text, in _The Monthly Magazine_, _December_, 1824,
p. 432.

National Song.  [_King Christian stood beside the mast_]   146

Previously printed (under the title "_Sea Song_; _from
the Danish of Evald_") in _The Monthly Magazine_,
_December_, 1823, p. 437.

The Old Oak.  [_Here have I stood_, _the pride of the      149
park_]

Lines to Six-Foot Three.  [_A lad_, _who twenty tongues    151
can talk_]

Nature's Temperaments:

1.  Sadness.  [_Lo_, _a pallid fleecy vapour_]             155

2.  Glee.  [_Roseate colours on heaven's high arch_]       156

3.  Madness.  [_What darkens_, _what darkens_?--'_tis      158
heaven's high roof_]

In a revised Manuscript of uncertain date, but _c_
1860-70, this poem is entitled _Hecla and Etna_, the
first line reading:

    "_What darkens_?  _It is the wide arch of the sky_."

The Violet-Gatherer.  [_Pale the moon her light was        159
shedding_]

Ode to a Mountain-Torrent.  [_How lovely art thou in thy   164
tresses of foam_]

Previously printed in _The Monthly Magazine_, _October_,
1823, p. 244.

In _The Monthly Magazine_ the eighth stanza reads:

    _O pause for a time_,--_for a short moment stay_;
       _Still art thou streaming_,--_my words are in
    vain_;
    _Oft-changing winds_, _with tyrannical sway_,
       _Lord there below on the time-serving main_!

In Romantic Ballads it reads:

    _Abandon_, _abandon_, _thy headlong career_--
       _But downward thou rushest_--_my words are in
    vain_,
    _Bethink thee that oft-changing winds domineer_
       _On the billowy breast of the time-serving main_.

Runic Verses.  [_O the force of Runic verses_]             167

Thoughts on Death.  [_Perhaps_ '_tis folly_, _but still    169
I feel_]

Previously printed (under the tentative title _Death_,
and with some small textual variations) in _The Monthly
Magazine_, _October_, 1823, p. 245.

Birds of Passage.  [_So hot shines the sun upon Nile's     171
yellow stream_]

The Broken Harp.  [_O thou_, _who_, '_mid the forest       173
trees_]

Scenes.  [_Observe ye not yon high cliff's brow_]          175

The Suicide's Grave.  [_The evening shadows fall upon      182
the grave_]

NOTE.--Each poem to which no reference is attached, appeared for the
first time in this volume.

There is at present no copy of the First Issue of the First Edition of
_Romantic Ballads_, with the original Title-page, in the Library of the
British Museum.

                 [Picture: Manuscript of the Death Raven]

                    [Picture: Manuscript of Sir John]

            [Picture: Manuscript of Saint Oluf and the Trolds]

               [Picture: Manuscript of Svend Vonved--1830]

              [Picture: Manuscript of The Tournament, 1854]

             [Picture: Manuscript of Vidrik Verlandson--1854]

                   [Picture: Manuscript of Elvir Hill]

              [Picture: Manuscript of Marsk Stig's Daughter]



Second Issue: 1826


Romantic Ballads, / Translated from the Danish; / and / Miscellaneous
Pieces; / By / George Borrow. / _Through gloomy paths unknown_--/ _Paths
which untrodden be_, / _From rock to rock I roam_ / _Along the dashing
sea_. / Bowring. / London: / John Taylor, Waterloo Place, Pall Mall, /
1826.

Collation:--Demy octavo, pp. xii + 187.  The details of the collation
follow those of the First Issue described above in every particular, save
that, naturally, the volume lacks the two concluding leaves carrying the
List of Subscribers.

Issued in drab paper boards, with white paper back-label.  The published
price was Seven Shillings.

    "_Taylor will undertake to publish the remaining copies_.  _His
    advice is to make the price seven shillings_, _and to print a new
    title-page_, _and then he will be able to sell some for you I advise
    the same_," _etc._--[Allan Cunningham to George Borrow.]

There is a copy of the Second Issue of the First Edition of _Romantic
Ballads_ in the Library of the British Museum.  The Press-mark is 11565.
cc. 8.



_Third Issue_: 1826


Romantic Ballads, / Translated from the Danish; / and / Miscellaneous
Pieces; / By / George Borrow. / _Through gloomy paths unknown_--/ _Paths
which untrodden be_, / _From rock to rock I roam_ / _Along the dashing
sea_. / Bowring. / London: / Published by Wightman and Cramp, / 24
Paternoster Row. / 1826.

Collation:--Demy octavo, pp. xii + 187.  The details of the collation
follow those of the Second Issue described above in every particular.

Issued in drab paper boards, with white paper back-label.  The price was
again Seven Shillings.

In 1913 a type-facsimile reprint of the Original Edition of _Romantic
Ballads_ was published by Messrs. Jarrold and Sons of Norwich.  Three
hundred Copies were printed.



(4)  [TARGUM: 1835]


Targum. / Or / Metrical Translations / From Thirty Languages / and /
Dialects. / By / George Borrow. / "_The raven has ascended to the nest of
the nightingale_." / Persian Poem. / St. Petersburg. / Printed by Schulz
and Beneze. / 1835.

Collation:--Demy octavo, printed in half-sheets, pp. viii + 106;
consisting of: Title-page, as above (with a Russian quotation upon the
centre of the reverse) pp. i-ii; _Preface_ pp. iii-v; Table of _Contents_
pp. vi-viii, with a single _Erratum_ at the foot of p. viii; and Text of
the _Translations_ pp. 1-106.  There are no head-lines, the pages being
numbered centrally in Arabic numerals.  Beyond that upon the foot of the
title-page, there is no imprint.  The signatures are given in large
Arabic numerals, each pair of half-sheets dividing one number between
them; thus the first half-sheet is signed 1, the second 1*, the third 2,
the fourth 2*, &c.  The Register is therefore 1 to 7 (thirteen
half-sheets, each 4 leaves), followed by a single unsigned leaf (pp.
105-106), the whole preceded by an unsigned half-sheet carrying the
Title-page, Preface, and Table of Contents.  The book was issued without
any half-title.

Issued in plain paper wrappers of a bright green colour, lined with
white, and without either lettering or label.  The leaves measure 8 11/16
x 5.5 inches.

Borrow was happy in the title he selected for his book.  _Targum_, as Mr.
Gosse has pointed out, is a Chaldee word meaning an interpretation.  The
word is said to be the root of 'dragoman.'

_Targum_ was written by Borrow during his two years' residence at St.
Petersburg (August, 1833, to August, 1835), and was published in June of
the latter year.  One hundred copies only were printed.  As might
naturally be expected the book has now become of very considerable
rarity, but a small proportion of the original hundred copies being
traceable to-day.

A reduced facsimile of the Title-page is given herewith.

    "Just before completing this great work, the _Manchu New Testament_,
    Mr. Borrow published a small volume in the English language, entitled
    _Targum_, _or Metrical Translations from Thirty Languages and
    Dialects_.  The exquisite delicacy with which he has caught and
    rendered the beauties of his well-chosen originals, is a proof of his
    learning and genius.  The work is a pearl in literature, and, like
    pearls, it derives value from its scarcity, for the whole edition was
    limited to about a hundred copies."--[_John P. Hasfeld_, _in The
    Athenaeum_, _March_ 5_th_, 1836.]

    "Some days ago I was at Kirtof's bookshop on the Gaternaya Ulitza.  I
    wanted to buy a _Bible in Spain_ to send to Simbirsk (on the Volga),
    where they torment me for it every post-day.  The stock was all sold
    out in a few days after its arrival last autumn.  The bookseller
    asked me if I knew a book by Borrow called _Targum_, which was
    understood to have been written by him and printed at St. Petersburg,
    but he had never been able to light upon it; and the surprising thing
    was that the trade abroad and even in England did him the honour to
    order it.  I consoled him by saying that he could hardly hope to see
    a copy in his shop or to get a peep at it.  'I have a copy,'
    continued I, 'but if you will offer me a thousand roubles for the
    bare reading of it I cannot do you the favour.'  The man opened his
    eyes in astonishment.  'It must be a wonderful book,' said he.  'Yes,
    in that you are right, my good friend,' I replied."--[_John P.
    Hasfeld_.]

    "After he became famous the Russian Government was desirous of
    procuring a copy of this rare book, _Targum_, for the Imperial
    Library, and sent an Envoy to England for the purpose.  But the Envoy
    was refused what he sought, and told that as the book was not worth
    notice when the author's name was obscure and they had the
    opportunity of obtaining it themselves, they should not have it
    now."--[_A. Egmont Hake_, _in The Athenaeum_, _August_ 13_th_, 1881.]

                               _Contents_.

                                                                      PAGE

Ode to God.  [_Reign'd the Universe's Master ere were                    1
earthly things begun_]

Borrow reprinted this _Ode_ in _The Bible in Spain_,
1843, Vol. iii, p. 333.

Prayer.  [_O Thou who dost know what the heart fain would                2
hide_]

Death.  [_Grim Death in his shroud swatheth mortals each                 3
hour_]

Stanzas.  On a Fountain.  [_In the fount fell my tears_,                 4
_like rain_]

Stanzas.  The Pursued.  [_How wretched roams the weary                   4
wight_]

Odes.  From the Persian:

1.  [_Boy_, _hand my friends the cup_, '_tis time of                     5
roses now_]

2.  [_If shedding lovers' blood thou deem'st a matter                    5
slight_]

3.  [_O thou_, _whose equal mind knows no vexation_]                     6

Stanzas.  From the Turkish of Fezouli.  [_O Fezouli_,                    7
_the hour is near_]

Description of Paradise.  [_Eight Gennets there be_, _as                 8
some relate_]

O Lord!  I nothing crave but Thee.  [_O Thou_, _from whom               11
all love doth flow_]

Mystical Poem.  Relating to the worship of the Great                    13
Foutsa or Buddh.  [_Should I Foutsa's force and glory_]

Moral Metaphors:

1.  [_From out the South the genial breezes sigh_]                      19

2.  [_Survey_, _survey Gi Shoi's murmuring flood_!]                     20

The Mountain-Chase.  [_Autumn has fled and winter left                  21
our bounds_]

The Glory of the Cossacks.  [_Quiet Don_!]                              24

The Black Shawl.  [_On the shawl_, _the black shawl with                27
distraction I gaze_]

Song.  From the Russian of Pushkin.  [_Hoary man_,                      29
_hateful man_!]

The Cossack.  An ancient Ballad.  [_O'er the field the                  30
snow is flying_]

The Three Sons of Budrys.  [_With his three mighty sons_,               32
_tall as Ledwin's were once_]

The Banning of the Pest.  [_Hie away_, _thou horrid                     35
monster_!]

Woinomoinen.  [_Then the ancient Woinomoinen_]                          37

The Words of Beowulf, Son of Egtheof.  [_Every one                      39
beneath the heaven_]

The Lay of Biarke.  [_The day in East is glowing_]                      40

The title of this Ballad as it appears in the original
MS. is _The Biarkemal_.

The Hail-storm.  [_For victory as we bounded_]                          42

Previously printed (but with very considerable variations
in the text, the first line reading "_When from our ships
we bounded_") in _Romantic Ballads_, 1826, pp. 136-138.
A final version of the Ballad, written about 1854, was
printed in _Young Swaigder or The Force of Runes and
Other Ballads_, 1913, pp. 14-15.

The King and Crown.  [_The King who well crown'd does                   44
govern the land_]

Ode To a Mountain Torrent.  [_O stripling immortal thou                 45
forth dost career_]

Previously printed (but with an entirely different text,
the first line reading "_How lovely art thou in thy
tresses of foam_") in _The Monthly Magazine_, Vol. lvi.,
1823, p. 244.

Also printed in _Romantic Ballads_, 1826, pp. 164-166.

The first stanza of the _Ode_ as printed in _Targum_ does
not figure in the version given in _Romantic Ballads_,
whilst the third stanza of the _Romantic Ballads_ version
is not to be found in _Targum_.

Chloe.  [_O we have a sister on earthly dominions_!]                    47

Previously printed in _The Monthly Magazine_, Vol. lvi,
1823, p. 437.

National Song.  From the Danish of Evald.  [_King                       49
Christian stood beside the mast_]

Previously printed (under the title _Sea Song_; _from the
Danish of Evald_) in _The Monthly Magazine_, _December_,
1823, p. 437.

Also printed in _Romantic Ballads_, 1826, pp. 146-148;
and again in _The Foreign Quarterly Review_, Vol. vi,
_June_, 1830, p. 70.

The four versions of this _Song_, as printed in _The
Monthly Magazine_, in _Romantic Ballads_, in _The Foreign
Quarterly Review_, and in _Targum_, are utterly
different, the opening line being the only one which has
approximately the same reading in all.

Sir Sinclair.  [_Sir Sinclair sail'd from the Scottish                  51
ground_]

Previously printed in _The Foreign Quarterly Review_,
Vol. vi, _June_, 1830, p. 73.

Hvidfeld.  [_Our native land has ever teem'd_]                          56

Birting.  A Fragment.  [_It was late at evening tide_]                  59

This "Fragment" consists of fifteen stanzas from the
Ballad _The Giant of Berne and Orm Ungerswayne_, which
was printed complete, for Private Circulation, in 1913.
[_See post_, No. 40.]

Ingeborg's Lamentation.  [_Autumn winds howl_]                          62

The Delights of Finn Mac Coul.  [_Finn Mac Coul_ '_mongst               65
his joys did number_]

Carolan's Lament.  [_The arts of Greece_, _Rome and of                  67
Eirin's fair earth_]

To Icolmcill.  [_On Icolmcill may blessings pour_]                      68

The Dying Bard.  [_O for to hear the hunter's tread_]                   70

In the original Manuscript of this Poem the title reads
_The Wish of the Bard_; the text also differs
considerably from that which appears in _Targum_.

The Prophecy of Taliesin.  [_Within my mind_]                           73

The History of Taliesin.  [_The head Bard's place I                     74
hold_]

The original Manuscript of _The History of Taliesin_
possesses many points of interest.  In the first place,
in addition to sundry variations of text, it enables us
to fill up the words in the last line of stanza 3, and
the fourth line of stanza 7, which in the pages of
_Targum_ are replaced by asterisks.  The full lines read:

    _Where died the Almighty's Son_,

and

    _Have seen the Trinity_.

In the second place the Manuscript contains a stanza,
following upon the first, which does not occur in the
printed text.  This stanza reads as follows:

    _I with my Lord and God_
    _On the highest places trod_,
    _When Lucifer down fell_
    _With his army into hell_.
    _I know each little star_
    _Which twinkles near and far_;
    _And I know the Milky Way_
    _Where I tarried many a day_.

A reduced facsimile of the third page of this Manuscript
will be found herewith, facing page 54.

Epigram.  On a Miser who had built a Stately Mansion.                   77
[_Of every pleasure is thy mansion void_]

The Invitation.  [_Parry_, _of all my friends the best_]                78

The Rising of Achilles.  [_Straightway Achilles arose_,                 82
_the belov'd of Jove_, _round his shoulders_]

The Meeting of Odysses and Achilles.  [_Tow'rds me came                 85
the Shade of Peleidean Achilles_]

Hymn To Thetis and Neoptolemus.  [_Of Thetis I sing with                90
her locks of gold-shine_]

The Grave of Demos.  [_Thus old Demos spoke_, _as sinking               91
sought the sun the western wave_]

The Sorceries of Canidia.  [_Father of Gods_, _who rul'st               92
the sky_]

The French Cavalier.  [_The French cavalier shall have my               97
praise_]

Address To Sleep.  [_Sweet death of sense_, _oblivion of                98
ill_]

The Moormen's March From Granada.  [_Reduan_, _I but                   101
lately heard_]

The Forsaken.  [_Up I rose_, _O mother_, _early_]                      103

Stanzas.  From the Portuguese.  [_A fool is he who in the              104
lap_]

My Eighteenth Year.  [_Where is my eighteenth year_? _far              105
back_]

Song.  From the Rommany.  [_The strength of the ox_]                   106

Another version of this _Song_, bearing the title "_Our
Heart is heavy_, _Brother_," is printed in _Marsk Stig's
Daughters and other Songs and Ballads_, 1913, pp. 17-18.

NOTE.--Each poem to which no reference is attached, appeared for the
first time in this volume.

In 1892 _Targum_ was reprinted, together with _The Talisman_, by Messrs.
Jarrold & Sons, of Norwich, in an edition of 250 copies.

There is a copy of the First Edition of _Targum_ in the Library of the
British Museum.  The Press-mark is C.57.i.6.

                  [Picture: Title page of Targum, 1835]

                  [Picture: Manuscript of The Miarkemal]

             [Picture: Manuscript of The History of Taliesin]



 (5)  [THE TALISMAN: 1835]


The / Talisman. / From the Russian / of / Alexander Pushkin. / With other
Pieces. / St. Petersburg. / Printed by Schulz and Beneze, / 1835.

Collation:--Royal octavo, pp. 14; consisting of: Title-page, as above
(with a Russian quotation upon the centre of the reverse) pp. 1-2; and
Text of _The Talisman_ and other Poems pp. 3-14.  There are no
head-lines, the pages being numbered centrally in Arabic numerals.
Beyond that upon the title-page there is no imprint.  There are also no
signatures, the pamphlet being composed of a single sheet, folded to form
sixteen pages.  The last leaf is a blank.  The book was issued without
any half-title.

Issued stitched, and without wrappers.  The leaves measure 9.75 x 6.25
inches.

One Hundred Copies only were printed.

A reduced facsimile of the Title-page of _The Talisman_ is given
herewith.  It will be observed that the heavy letterpress upon the
reverse of the title shows through the paper, and is reproduced in the
photograph.

                               _Contents_.

                                                                      PAGE

The Talisman.  [_Where fierce the surge with awful                       3
bellow_]

The Mermaid.  [_Close by a lake_, _begirt with forest_]                  5

Ancient Russian Songs:

1.  [_The windel-straw nor grass so shook and trembled_]                 8

2.  [_O rustle not_, _ye verdant oaken branches_!]                       9

3.  [_O thou field of my delight so fair and verdant_!]                  9

Ancient Ballad.  [_From the wood a sound is gliding_]                   11

The Renegade.  [_Now pay ye the heed that is fitting_]                  13

NOTE.--The whole of the poems printed in _The Talisman_ appeared there
for the first time.

In 1892 Messrs. Jarrold & Sons published page for page reprints of
_Targum_ and _The Talisman_.  They were issued together in one volume,
bound in light drab-coloured paper boards, with white paper back-label,
and were accompanied by the following collective title-page:

_Targum_: / _or_, / _Metrical Translations from Thirty Languages_ / _and
Dialects_. / _And_ / _The Talisman_, / _from the Russian of Alexander
Pushkin_. / _With Other Pieces_. / _By_ / _George Borrow_. / _Author of_
"_The Bible in Spain_" _&c._ / _London_: / _Jarrold & Sons_, 3,
_Paternoster Buildings_.

In 1912 a small 'remainder' of _The Talisman_ came to light.  The 'find'
consisted of about Five Copies, which were sold in the first instance for
an equal number of Pence.  The buyer appears to have resold them at
progressive prices, commencing at Four Pounds and concluding at Ten
Guineas.

There is a copy of the First Edition of _The Talisman_ in the Library of
the British Museum.  The Press-mark is C.57.e.33.

               [Picture: Title page of The Talisman, 1835]



(6)  [THE GOSPEL OF ST. LUKE: 1837]


Embeo / e Majaro Lucas. / Brotoboro / randado andre la chipe griega,
acana / chibado andre o Romano, o chipe es / Zincales de Sese. / El
Evangelio segun S. Lucas, / traducido al Romani, / o dialecto de los
Gitanos de Espana. / 1837.

Collation:--Foolscap octavo, pp. 177, consisting of: Title-page, as above
(with Borrow's Colophon upon the reverse, followed by a quotation from
the _Epistle to the Romans_, Chap. XV. v. XXIV.) pp. 1-2; and Text of the
Gospel pp. 3-177.  The reverse of p. 177 is blank.  There are no
head-lines, the pages being numbered centrally in Arabic numerals.  There
is no printer's imprint.  The signatures are A to L (11 sheets, each 8
leaves), plus L repeated (two leaves, the second a blank).  The book was
issued without any half-title.

I have never seen a copy of the First Edition of Borrow's translation
into the dialect of the Spanish Gypsies of the Gospel of St. Luke in the
original binding.  No doubt the book (which was printed in Madrid) was
put up in paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, in accordance with the
usual Continental custom.

Most of the copies now extant are either in a modern binding, or in
contemporary brown calf, with marbled edges and endpapers.  The latter
are doubtless the copies sent home by Borrow, and bound in leather for
that purpose.  The leaves of these measure 6 x 4 inches.

As will be seen from the following extracts, it is probable that the
First Edition consisted of 250 copies, and that 50 of these were
forwarded to London:

    "In response to Borrow's letter of February 27th, the Committee
    resolved 'to authorise Mr. Borrow to print 250 copies of the Gospel
    of St. Luke, without the Vocabulary, in the Rummanee dialect, and to
    engage the services of a competent person to translate the Gospel of
    St. Luke by way of trial in the dialect of the Spanish
    Basque.'"--[_Letters of George Borrow to the British and Foreign
    Bible Society_, 1911, pp. 205-206.]

    "A small impression of the Gospel of St. Luke, in the Rommany, or
    Gitano, or Gipsy language, has been printed at Madrid, under the
    superintendence of this same gentleman, who himself made the
    translation for the benefit of the interesting, singular, degraded
    race of people whose name it bears, and who are very numerous in some
    parts of Spain.  He has likewise taken charge of the printing of the
    Gospel of St. Luke, in the Cantabrian, or Spanish Basque language, a
    translation of which had fallen into his hands."--[_Thirty-Fourth
    Annual Report of the British and Foreign Bible Society_, 1838, p.
    xliii.]

    "All the Testaments were stopped at the custom house, they were
    contained in two large chests. . . .  The chests, therefore, with the
    hundred Gospels in Gitano and Basque [probably 50 copies of each] for
    the Library of the Bible Society are at present at San Lucar in the
    custom house, from which I expect to receive to-morrow the receipt
    which the authorities here demand."--[_Borrow's letter to the Rev. A.
    Brandram_, _Seville_, _May_ 2_nd_, 1839.]

A Second Edition of the Gospel was printed in London in 1871.  The
collation is Duodecimo, pp. 117.  This was followed by a Third Edition,
London, 1872, the collation of which is also Duodecimo, pp. 117.  Both
bear the same imprint: "_London_: / _Printed by William Clowes and Sons_,
_Stamford Street_, / _and Charing Cross_."

For these London Editions the text was considerably revised.

The Gospel of St. Luke in the Basque dialect, referred to in the above
paragraphs, is a small octavo volume bearing the following title-page:

_Evangelioa_ / _San Lucasen Guissan_ / _El Evangelio segun S. Lucas_. /
_Traducido al vascuence_. / _Madrid_: / _Imprenta de la Campania
Tipografica_ / 1838.

The translation was the work of a Basque physician named Oteiza, and
Borrow did little more than see it through the press.  The book has,
therefore, no claim to rank as a Borrow _princeps_.

The measure of success which attended his efforts to reproduce the Gospel
of St. Luke in these two dialects is best told in Borrow's own words:

    "I subsequently published the Gospel of St. Luke in the Rommany and
    Biscayan languages.  With respect to the first, I beg leave to
    observe that no work printed in Spain ever caused so great and so
    general a sensation, not so much amongst the Gypsies, for whom it was
    intended, as amongst the Spaniards themselves, who, though they look
    upon the Roma with some degree of contempt, nevertheless take a
    strange interest in all that concerns them. . . .  Respecting the
    Gospel in Basque I have less to say.  It was originally translated
    into the dialect of Guipuscoa by Dr. Oteiza, and subsequently
    received corrections and alterations from myself.  It can scarcely be
    said to have been published, it having been prohibited and copies of
    it seized on the second day of its appearance.  But it is in my power
    to state that it is anxiously expected in the Basque provinces, where
    books in the aboriginal tongue are both scarce and dear."--[_Borrow's
    Survey of his last two years in Spain_, _printed in his Letters to
    the Bible Society_, 1911, pp. 360-361.]

There is a copy of the First Edition of _The Gospel of St. Luke in the
dialect of the Spanish Gypsies_ in the Library of the British Museum.
The Press-mark is C.51.aa.12.  The Museum also possesses a copy of the
Gospel in the Basque dialect; the Pressmark is C.51.aa.13.

              [Picture: Title page of Embeo e Majaro Lucas]



(7)  [THE ZINCALI: 1841]


The Zincali; / Or, / An Account / of the / Gypsies of Spain. / With / An
Original Collection of their / Songs and Poetry, / and / A Copious
Dictionary of their Language. / By / George Borrow, / Late Agent of the
British and Foreign Bible Society / in Spain. / "_For that_, _which is
unclean by nature_, _thou canst entertain no hope_: _no_ / _washing will
turn the Gypsy white_."--Ferdousi. / In Two Volumes. / Vol. I.  [_Vol.
II_] / London: / John Murray, Albemarle Street. / 1841.

                                _Vol. I_.

Collation:--Large duodecimo, pp. xvi + 362; consisting of: Half-title
(with imprint "_G. Woodfall and Son_, _Angel Court_, _Skinner Street_,
_London_" upon the centre of the reverse) pp. i-ii; Title-page, as above
(with blank reverse) pp. iii-iv; Dedication _To the Right Honourable the
Earl of Clarendon_, _G.C.B._ (with blank reverse) pp. v-vi; _Preface_ pp.
vii-xii; Table of _Contents_ pp. xiii-xvi; and Text pp. 1-362, including
a separate Fly-title (with blank reverse) to _The Zincali_, _Part II_.
There are headlines throughout, each verso being headed _The Zincali_,
whilst each recto carries at its head a note of the particular subject
occupying it.  The imprint is repeated at the foot of p. 362.  The
signatures are a (six leaves), b (two leaves), B to Q (15 sheets, each 12
leaves), plus R (two leaves).  Sig. R 2 is a blank.

                                _Vol. II_.

Collation:--Large duodecimo, pp. vi + 156 + vi + *135; consisting of:
Half-title (with imprint "_G. Woodfall and Son_, _Angel Court_, _Skinner
Street_, _London_" upon the centre of the reverse) pp. i-ii; Title-page,
as above (with blank reverse) pp. iii-iv; Table of _Contents_ pp. v-vi;
Fly-title to _The Zincali_, _Part III_ (with blank reverse) pp. 1-2; Text
of _Part III_ (including separate Fly-titles, each with blank reverse, to
_The Praise of Buddh_, _On the Language of the Gitanos_, and _Robber
Language_) pp. 3-156; Fly-title (with blank reverse) to _The Zincali_.
_Vocabulary of their Language_ pp. i-ii; _Advertisement to the
Vocabulary_ pp. iii-v; p. vi is blank; Text of the _Vocabulary_ pp.
*1-*113; p. *114 is blank; Fly-title (with blank reverse) to
_Miscellanies in the Gitano Language_ pp. *115-*116; _Advertisement_ to
the _Miscellanies_ p. *117; and Text of the _Miscellanies_ pp. *118-*135.
The reverse of p. *135 is blank.  There are head-lines throughout, each
verso being headed _The Zincali_, whilst each recto carries at its head a
note of the particular subject occupying it.  The imprint is repeated at
the foot of p. *135.  The signatures are a (2 leaves), b (one leaf), B to
G (6 sheets, each 12 leaves), H (6 leaves), A (3 leaves), B to E (4
sheets, each 12 leaves), F (9 leaves), and G (12 leaves).  B 6, B 8, and
B 12 are cancel-leaves.  The last leaf of Sig. G is occupied by a series
of Advertisements of _Works just Published_ by John Murray.

Issued (in _April_, 1841) in dark blue cloth boards, with white paper
back-label, lettered "_Borrow's_ / _Gypsies_ / _of_ / _Spain_. / _Two
Volumes_. / _Vol. I_. [Vol. II.]."  The leaves measure 7.875 x 4.75
inches.  The published price was 18_s._

Of the First Edition of _The Zincali_ Seven Hundred and Fifty Copies only
were printed.  A Second Edition, to which a new Preface was added, was
published in _March_, 1843, and a Third in _September_, 1843, each of
which was restricted to the same number of copies.  The Fourth Edition
appeared in 1846, the Fifth in 1870, the Sixth in 1882, the Seventh in
1888, and the Eighth in 1893.  The book has since been included in
various popular editions, and translated into several foreign languages.

Examples of _The Zincali_ may sometimes be met with bearing dates other
than those noted above.  These are merely copies of the editions
specified, furnished with new title-pages.

Included in the second volume of _The Zincali_ is a considerable amount
of verse, as follows:

                                                                      PAGE

RHYMES OF THE GITANOS.  [_Unto a refuge me they led_]                   13

THE DELUGE.  PART I.  [_I with fear and terror quake_]                  65

THE DELUGE.  PART II.  [_When I last did bid farewell_]                 75

THE PESTILENCE.  [_I'm resolved now to tell_]                           85

The whole of the above pieces are accompanied on the
opposite pages by the original texts from which Borrow
translated them.

POEM, RELATING TO THE WORSHIP OF THE GREAT FOUTSA OR                    94
BUDDH.  [_Should I Foutsa's force and glory_]

Previously printed in _Targum_, 1835, p. 13.

There is a copy of the First Edition of _The Zincali_ in the Library of
the British Museum.  The Press-mark is 1429.g.14.



(8)  [THE BIBLE IN SPAIN: 1843.]


The / Bible in Spain; / Or, the / Journeys, Adventures, and Imprisonments
/ Of an Englishman, / in / An Attempt to Circulate the Scriptures / in /
The Peninsula. / By George Borrow, / Author of "The Gypsies of Spain." /
In three volumes. / Vol. I.  [Vol. II, etc.] / London: / John Murray,
Albemarle Street. / 1843.

                                _Vol. I_.

Collation:--Large duodecimo pp. xxiv + 370; consisting of: Half-title
(with imprint "_G. Woodfall and Son_, _Angel Court_, _Skinner Street_,
_London_" upon the centre of the reverse) pp. i-ii; Title-page, as above
(with blank reverse) pp. iii-iv; _Contents of Vol. i_ pp. v-viii;
_Preface_ pp. ix-xxiv; and Text pp. 1-370.  There are head-lines
throughout, each verso being headed _The Bible in Spain_ together with
the number of the Chapter, whilst each recto carries at its head a note
of the particular subject occupying it, with the Chapter number repeated.
The imprint is repeated at the foot of p. 370.  The signatures are A to Q
(sixteen sheets, each 12 leaves), plus R (a half-sheet of 6 leaves).  The
last leaf of sig. R carries a series of Advertisements of books published
by John Murray.

                                _Vol. II_.

Collation:--Large duodecimo, pp. viii + 398; consisting of Half-title
(with imprint "_G. Woodfall and Son_, _Angel Court_, _Skinner Street_,
_London_" upon the centre of the reverse) pp. i-ii; Title-page, as above
(with blank reverse) pp. iii-iv; _Contents of Vol. ii._ pp. v-viii; and
_Text_ pp. 1-398.  There are headlines throughout, as in the first
volume.  The imprint is repeated at the foot of p. 398.  The signatures
are A (four leaves), B to R (sixteen sheets, each 12 leaves), plus S (8
leaves).  The last leaf of Sig. R carries a series of Advertisements of
books published by John Murray.

                               _Vol. III_.

Collation:--Large duodecimo, pp. viii + 391; consisting of: Half-title
(with imprint "_G. Woodfall and Son_, _Angel Court_, _Skinner Street_,
_London_" upon the centre of the reverse) pp. i-ii; Title-page, as above
(with blank reverse) pp. iii-iv; _Contents of Vol iii_ pp. v-viii; and
Text pp. 1-391.  There are headlines throughout, as in the two preceding
volumes.  The reverse of p. 391 is occupied by Advertisements of
_Romantic Ballads_, _Targum_, and _The Zincali_.  The imprint is repeated
at the foot of p. 391.  The signatures are a (2 leaves), b (2 leaves), B
to R (sixteen sheets, each 12 leaves), plus S (4 leaves).

Issued (in _December_, 1842) in deep claret-coloured cloth boards, with
white paper back-label, lettered "_The_ | _Bible_ | _in_ | _Spain_ |
_Vol. I_.  [_Vol. II_, &c.]."  The leaves measure 7.75 x 4.75 inches.
The published price was 27_s._

Although the title page of the First Edition of _The Bible in Spain_ is
dated 1843, there can be no doubt that the book was ready early in the
preceding December.  I have in my own library a copy, still in the
original cloth boards, with the following inscription in Borrow's
handwriting upon the flyleaf:

                     [Picture: Borrow's inscription]

Autographed presentation copies of Borrow's books are remarkably few in
number, I only know of four, in addition to the above.  One of these is
preserved in the Borrow Museum, at Norwich.

Of the First Edition of _The Bible in Spain_ One Thousand Copies were
printed.  The Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Editions were all
published in 1843.  By 1896 eighteen authorised editions had made their
appearance.  Since that date the book has been re-issued in numberless
popular editions, and has been translated into various foreign languages.

The following verses made their first appearance in _The Bible in Spain_:

                                                             VOL. I., PAGE

FRAGMENT OF A SPANISH HYMN.  [_Once of old upon                         67
a mountain_, _shepherds overcome with sleep_]

LINES FROM AN EASTERN POET.  [_I'll weary                              149
myself each night and each day_]

A GACHAPLA.  [_I stole a plump and bonny fowl_]                        175

                                                            VOL. II., PAGE

FRAGMENT OF A PATRIOTIC SONG.  [_Don Carlos is                         141
a hoary churl_]

SAINT JAMES.  [_Thou shield of that faith which                        176
in Spain we revere_]

A reduced facsimile of the first page of the
Manuscript of _Saint James_ will be found
facing the present page.

LINES.  [_May the Lord God preserve us from                            310
evil birds three_]

LINES.  [_A handless man a letter did write_]                          312

There is a copy of the First Edition of _The Bible in Spain_ in the
Library of the British Museum.  The press-mark is 1369.f 23.

              [Picture: Manuscript of The Hymn to St. James]



(9)  [REVIEW OF FORD'S "HAND-BOOK FOR TRAVELLERS IN SPAIN": 1845]


Art.--Hand-book for Travellers in Spain.  London: 2 Vols. / post 8vo.
1845.

Collation:--Folio, pp. 12.  There is no Title-page proper, the title, as
above, being imposed upon the upper portion of the first page, after the
manner of a 'dropped head.'  The head-line is _Spanish Hand-book_
throughout, upon both sides of the page.  There is no printer's imprint.
There are also no signatures; but the pamphlet is composed of three
sheets, each two leaves, making twelve pages in all.

Issued stitched, and without wrappers.  The leaves measure 13.5 x 8.5
inches.  The pamphlet is undated.  It was printed in 1845.

This _Review_ is unquestionably the rarest of the First Editions of
Borrow's Works.  No more than two copies would appear to have been struck
off, and both are fortunately extant to-day.  One of these was formerly
in the possession of Dr. William I. Knapp, and is now the property of the
Hispanic Society, of New York.  The second example is in my own library.
This was Borrow's own copy, and is freely corrected in his characteristic
handwriting.  A greatly reduced facsimile of the last page of the
pamphlet is given herewith.

In 1845 Richard Ford published his _Hand-Book for Travellers in Spain and
Readers at Home_ [2 Vols. 8vo.], a work, the compilation of which is said
to have occupied its author for more than sixteen years.  In conformity
with the wish of Ford (who had himself favourably reviewed _The Bible in
Spain_) Borrow undertook to produce a study of the _Hand-Book_ for _The
Quarterly Review_.  The above Essay was the result.

But the Essay, brilliant though it is, was not a 'Review.'  Not until
page 6 is the _Hand-Book_ even mentioned, and but little concerning it
appears thereafter.  Lockhart, then editing the _Quarterly_, proposed to
render it more suitable for the purpose for which it had been intended by
himself interpolating a series of extracts from Ford's volumes.  But
Borrow would tolerate no interference with his work, and promptly
withdrew the Essay, which had meanwhile been set up in type.  The
following letter, addressed by Lockhart to Ford, sufficiently explains
the position:

                                                                 _London_,
                                                      _June_ 13_th_, 1845.

    _Dear Ford_,

    '_El Gitano_' _sent me a paper on the_ "_Hand-Book_" _which I read
    with delight_.  _It seemed just another capital chapter of his_
    "_Bible in Spain_" _and I thought_, _as there was hardly a word of_
    '_review_,' _and no extract giving the least notion of the peculiar
    merits and style of the_ "_Hand-Book_," _that I could easily_ (_as is
    my constant custom_) _supply the humbler part myself_, _and so
    present at once a fair review of the work_, _and a lively specimen of
    our friend's vein of eloquence in exordio_.

    _But_, _behold_! _he will not allow any tampering_ . . . .  _I now
    write to condole with you_; _for I am very sensible_, _after all_,
    _that you run a great risk in having your book committed to hands far
    less competent for treating it or any other book of Spanish interest
    than Borrow's would have been_ . . ._ and I consider that_, _after
    all_, _in the case of a new author_, _it is the first duty of the_
    "_Quarterly Review_" _to introduce that author fully and fairly to
    the public_.

                                                       _Ever Yours Truly_,
                                                         _J. G. Lockhart_.

    "Our author pictures Gibraltar as a human entity thus addressing
    Spain:

    _Accursed land_!  _I hate thee_, _and far from being a defence_,
    _will invariably prove a thorn in thy side_.

    And so on through many sentences of excited rhetoric.  Borrow forgot
    while he wrote that he had a book to review--a book, moreover, issued
    by the publishing house which issued the periodical in which his
    review was to appear."--[_George Borrow and his Circle_, 1913, p.
    257].

In 1913 Borrow's _Review_ was reprinted in the following Pamphlet:

_A_ / _Supplementary Chapter_ / _to_ / _The Bible in Spain_ / _Inspired
by_ / _Ford's_ "_Handbook for Travellers in Spain_." / _By_ / _George
Borrow_ / _London_: / _Printed for Private Circulation_ / 1913.--Square
demy 8vo, pp. 46.  [See _post_, No. 10.]

    [Picture: Printed extract from the Review with hand-written notes]

   [Picture: Title page of Supplementary Chapter to The Bible in Spain,
                                  1913]



(10)  [A SUPPLEMENTARY CHAPTER TO "THE BIBLE IN SPAIN": 1913]


A / Supplementary Chapter / to / The Bible in Spain / Inspired by /
Ford's "Handbook for Travellers in Spain." / By / George Borrow / London:
/ Printed for Private Circulation / 1913.

Collation:--Square demy octavo, pp. 46; consisting of: Half-title (with
blank reverse) pp. 1-2; Frontispiece (with blank recto) pp. 3-4;
Title-page, as above (with blank reverse) pp. 5-6; _Prefatory Note_
(signed '_T. J. W._') pp. 7-10; and text of the _Chapter pp._ 11-46.
There are head-lines throughout, each verso being headed _A Supplementary
Chapter_, and each recto _To the Bible in Spain_.  Following p. 46 is a
leaf, with blank recto, and with the following imprint upon the reverse,
"_London_: / _Printed for Thomas J. Wise_, _Hampstead_, _N. W._ /
_Edition limited to Thirty Copies_."  The signatures are A to C (3
sheets, each 8 leaves), inset within each other.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, and with the
title-page reproduced upon the front.  The leaves measure 8.75 x 6.875
inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed.

The Frontispiece consists of a greatly reduced facsimile of the last
page, bearing Borrow's corrections, of the original edition of his
_Review of Ford's_ '_Hand-Book_.'

This _Supplementary Chapter to_ "_The Bible in Spain_" is a reprint of
the Review of Ford's _Hand-book for Travellers in Spain_ written by
Borrow in 1845 for insertion in _The Quarterly Review_, but withdrawn by
him in consequence of the proposal made by the Editor, John Gibson
Lockhart, that he should himself introduce into Borrow's Essay a series
of extracts from the _Handbook_.  [See _ante_, No. 9.]

Included in the _Prefatory Note_ is the following amusing squib, written
by Borrow in 1845, but never printed by him.  I chanced to light upon the
Manuscript in a packet of his still unpublished verse:

    _Would it not be more dignified_
    _To run up debts on every side_,
    _And then to pay your debts refuse_,
    _Than write for rascally Reviews_?
    _And lectures give to great and small_,
    _In pot-house_, _theatre_, _and town-hall_,
    _Wearing your brains by night and day_
    _To win the means to pay your way_?
    _I vow by him who reigns in_ [_hell_],
    _It would be more respectable_!

There is a copy of _A Supplementary Chapter to_ "_The Bible in Spain_" in
the Library of the British Museum.  The press-mark is C. 57. d. 19 (2).

               [Picture: Manuscript of verse on reviewing]



(11)  [LAVENGRO: 1851]


Lavengro; / The Scholar--The Gypsy--The Priest. / By George Borrow, /
Author of "The Bible in Spain," and "The Gypsies of Spain" / In Three
Volumes.--Vol. I.  [_Vol. II._, _&c._] / London: / John Murray, Albemarle
Street. / 1851.

                                _Vol. I_.

Collation:--Large duodecimo, pp. xviii {85} + 360; consisting of:
Half-title (with imprint "_London_: / _George Woodfall and Son_, / _Angel
Court_, _Skinner Street_" upon the centre of the reverse).  Pp. i-ii;
Title-page, as above (with Advertisements of _The Bible in Spain_ and
_The Zincali_ upon the reverse) pp. iii-iv; _Preface_ pp. v-xii; and Text
pp. 1-360.  At the foot of p. 360 the imprint is repeated thus, "_G.
Woodfall and Son_, _Printers_, _Angel Court_, _Skinner Street_,
_London_."  There are head-lines throughout, each page being headed with
the number of the chapter, together with the title of the individual
subject occupying it.  The signatures are A (nine leaves, a single leaf
being inserted between A 6 and A 7), and B to Q (fifteen sheets, each 12
leaves).

  A Portrait of Borrow, engraved by W. Holl from a painting by H. W.
Phillips, serves as Frontispiece.

                                _Vol. II_.

Collation:--Large duodecimo, pp. xii + 366; consisting of: Half-title
(with imprint "_London_: / _George Woodfall and Son_, / _Angel Court_,
_Skinner Street_" upon the centre of the reverse) pp. i-ii; Title-page,
as above (with Advertisements of _The Bible in Spain_ and _The Zincali_
upon the reverse) pp. iii-iv; _Contents_ of Vol. II pp. v-xi; p. xii is
blank; and Text pp. 1-366.  At the foot of p. 366 the imprint is repeated
thus, "_G. Woodfall and Son_, _Printers_, _Angel Court_, _Skinner
Street_, _London_."  There are head-lines throughout, as in the first
volume.  The signatures are _a_ (2 leaves), _b_ (4 leaves), B to Q
(fifteen sheets, each 12 leaves), plus R (3 leaves).

                               _Vol. III_.

Collation:--Large duodecimo, pp. xii + 426; consisting of: Half-title
(with imprint "_London_: / _George Woodfall and Son_, / _Angel Court_,
_Skinner Street_" upon the centre of the reverse) pp. i-ii; Title-page,
as above (with Advertisements of _The Bible in Spain_ and _The Zincali_
upon the reverse) pp. iii-iv; _Contents_ of Vol. III pp. v-xi; p. xii is
blank; and Text pp. 1-426.  At the foot of p. 426 the imprint is repeated
thus, "_G. Woodfall and Son_, _Printers_, _Angel Court_, _Skinner
Street_, _London_."  There are head-lines throughout, as in the first
volume.  The signatures are _a_ (2 leaves), _b_ (4 leaves), B to S
(seventeen sheets, each 12 leaves), T (6 leaves), and U (3 leaves).

Issued in dark blue cloth boards, with white paper back-labels, lettered
"_Lavengro_; / _the_ / _Scholar_, / _the Gypsy_, / _and_ / _the Priest_.
/ _By George Borrow_ / _Vol. i_. [_Vol. ii_., _&c._]"  The leaves measure
7.75 x 4.875 inches.  The edition consisted of 3,000 Copies.  The
published price was 30_s._

A Second Edition (miscalled _Third Edition_) was issued in 1872; a Third
(miscalled _Fourth_) in 1888; and a Fourth (miscalled _Fifth_) in 1896.
To the edition of 1872 was prefixed a new _Preface_, in which Borrow
replied to his critics in a somewhat angry and irritable manner.  Copies
of the First Edition of _Lavengro_ are to be met with, the three volumes
bound in one, in original publishers' cloth, bearing the name of the firm
of Chapman and Hall upon the back.  These copies are 'remainders.'  They
were made up in 1870.  It is by no means unlikely that in 1872 some
confusion prevailed as to the nature of this subsidiary issue, and that
it was mistaken for a Second Edition of the book.  If so the incorrect
numbering of the edition of that date, the actual Second Edition, may be
readily accounted for.

An important edition of _Lavengro_ is:

_Lavengro_ / _By George Borrow_ / _A New Edition_ / _Containing the
unaltered Text of the Original Issue_; / _some Suppressed Passages now
printed for the_ / _first time_; _MS. Variorum_, _Vocabulary and Notes_ /
_By the Author of_ / _The Life of George Borrow_ / _London_ / _John
Murray_, _Albemarle Street_ / 1900.--Crown 8vo, pp. xxviii + 569.

The book was reprinted in 1911.  The Editor was Dr. William Knapp.

An edition of _Lavengro_, with a valuable Introduction by Mr. Theodore
Watts-Dunton, was published by Messrs. Ward, Lock & Co., in 1893.  The
work is also included in _Everyman's Library_, and in other series of
popular reprints.

When put to press in February, 1849, the first volume of _Lavengro_ was
set up with the title-page reading as follows:--

_Life_, _A Drama_. / _By_ / _George Borrow_, _Esq._, / _Author of_ "_The
Bible in Spain_," _etc._ / _In Three Volumes_. / _Vol. i_. / _London_: /
_John Murray_, _Albemarle Street_. / 1849.

Only two examples of the volume with this interesting early title-page
are known to have survived.  One of these is now in the possession of the
Hispanic Society, of New York.  The other is the property of Mr. Otto
Kyllmann.

Later in the same year Murray advertised the work under the following
title:--

_Lavengro_, _An Autobiography_.  _By George Borrow_, _Esq._, _&c._

The same title was employed in the advertisements of 1850.

Mr. Clement Shorter possesses the original draft of the first portion of
_Lavengro_.  In this draft the title-page appears in its earliest form,
and describes the book as _Some Account of the Life_, _Pursuits_, _and
Adventures of a Norfolk Man_.  A facsimile of this tentative title was
given by Mr. Shorter in _George Borrow and his Circle_, 1913, p. 280.

    "Borrow took many years to write _Lavengro_.  'I am writing the
    work,' he told Dawson Turner, 'in precisely the same manner as _The
    Bible in Spain_, viz. on blank sheets of old account-books, backs of
    letters,' &c., and he recalls Mahomet writing the Koran on mutton
    bones as an analogy to his own 'slovenliness of manuscript.'  I have
    had plenty of opportunity of testing this slovenliness in the
    collection of manuscripts of portions of _Lavengro_ that have come
    into my possession.  These are written upon pieces of paper of all
    shapes and sizes, although at least a third of the book in Borrow's
    very neat handwriting is contained in a leather notebook.  The
    title-page demonstrates the earliest form of Borrow's conception.
    Not only did he then contemplate an undisguised autobiography, but
    even described himself as 'a Norfolk man.'  Before the book was
    finished, however, he repudiated the autobiographical note, and we
    find him fiercely denouncing his critics for coming to such a
    conclusion.  'The writer,' he declares, 'never said it was an
    autobiography; never authorised any person to say it was one.'  Which
    was doubtless true, in a measure."--[_George Borrow and his Circle_,
    1913, pp. 279-281].

There is a copy of the First Edition of _Lavengro_ in the Library of the
British Museum.  The Press-mark is 12622. f. 7.



(12.)  [THE ROMANY RYE: 1857]


The / Romany Rye; / A Sequel to "Lavengro." / By George Borrow, / Author
of / "The Bible in Spain," "The Gypsies of Spain," etc. / "_Fear God_,
_and take your own part_." / In Two Volumes.--Vol. I. [_Vol. II._] /
London: John Murray, Albemarle Street. / 1857. / [The Right of
Translation is reserved.]

                                _Vol. I_.

Collation:--Large duodecimo, pp. xii + 372; consisting of: Half-title
(with blank reverse) pp. i-ii; Title-page, as above (with imprint
"_London_: _Woodfall and Kinder_, _Printers_, / _Angel Court_, _Skinner
Street_" at the foot of the reverse) pp. iii-iv; Preface (styled
_Advertisement_) pp. v-vi; Table of _Contents_ pp. vii-xi; Extract from
_Pleasantries of the Cogia Nasr Eddin Efendi_ p. xii; and Text pp. 1-372.
The head-line is _The Romany Rye_ throughout, upon both sides of the
page; each page also bears at its head the number of the particular
Chapter occupying it.  At the foot of p. 372 the imprint is repeated
thus, "_Woodfall and Kinder_, _Printers_, _Angel Court_, _Skinner
Street_, _London_."  The signatures are A (a half-sheet of 6 leaves), B
to Q (15 sheets, each 12 leaves), plus R (a half-sheet of 6 leaves).

                                _Vol. II_.

Collation:--Large duodecimo, pp. viii + 375 + ix; consisting of:
Half-title (with blank reverse) pp. i-ii; Title-page, as above (with
imprint "_London_: _Woodfall and Kinder_, _Printers_, / _Angel Court_,
_Skinner Street_" at the foot of the reverse) pp. iii-iv; Table of
_Contents_ pp. v-vii; p. viii is blank; and Text pp. 1-375.  The reverse
of p. 375 is blank.  The volume is completed by eight unnumbered pages of
Advertisements of _Works by the Author of_ "_The Bible in Spain_" _ready
for the Press_.  There are head-lines throughout; up to, and including,
p. 244 the head-line is _The Romany Rye_, together with the numbers of
the Chapters, pp. 245-375 are headed _Appendix_, accompanied by the
numbers of the Chapters.  At the foot of the last of the eight unnumbered
pages carrying the Advertisements (Sig. R 12 verso) the imprint is
repeated thus, "_Woodfall and Kinder_, _Printers_, _Angel Court_,
_Skinner Street_, _London_."  The signatures are A (four leaves), plus B
to R (16 sheets, each 12 leaves).

Issued (on _April_ 30_th_, 1857) in dark blue cloth boards, with white
paper back-labels, lettered "_The_ / _Romany Rye_. / _By_ / _George
Borrow_. / _Vol. I_. [_Vol. II_.]"  The leaves measure 7.875 x 5 inches.

Of the First Edition of _The Romany Rye_ One Thousand Copies were
printed.  The published price was 21_s._  A Second Edition was published
in 1858, a Third in 1872, a Fourth in 1888, and a Fifth in 1896.  The
book is included in _Everyman's Library_, and in other series of popular
reprints.

The series of Advertisements of _Works_ by Borrow, announced as "Ready
for the Press," which occupy the last eight pages of the second volume of
_The Romany Rye_ are of especial interest.  No less than twelve distinct
works are included in these advertisements.  Of these twelve _The Bible
in Spain_ was already in the hands of the public, _Wild Wales_ duly
appeared in 1862, and _The Sleeping Bard_ in 1860.  These three were all
that Borrow lived to see in print.  Two others, _The Turkish Jester_ and
_The Death of Balder_, were published posthumously in 1884 and 1889
respectively; but the remaining seven, _Celtic Bards_, _Chiefs_, _and
Kings_, _Songs of Europe_, _Koempe Viser_, _Penquite and Pentyre_,
_Russian Popular Tales_, _Northern Skalds_, _Kings_, _and Earls_, and
_Bayr Jairgey and Glion Doo_: _The Red Path and the Black Valley_, were
never destined to see the light.  However, practically the whole of the
verse prepared for them was included in the series of Pamphlets which
have been printed for private circulation during the past twelve months.

As was the case with _Lavengro_, Borrow delayed the completion of _The
Romany Rye_ to an extent that much disconcerted his publisher, John
Murray.  The correspondence which passed between author and publisher is
given at some length by Dr. Knapp, in whose pages the whole question is
fully discussed.

Mr. Shorter presents the matter clearly and fairly in the paragraphs he
devotes to the subject:

    "The most distinctly English book--at least in a certain absence of
    cosmopolitanism--that Victorian literature produced was to a great
    extent written on scraps of paper during a prolonged Continental tour
    which included Constantinople and Budapest.  In _Lavengro_ we have
    only half a book, the whole work, which included what came to be
    published as _The Romany Rye_, having been intended to appear in four
    volumes.  The first volume was written in 1843, the second in 1845,
    and the third volume in the years between 1845 and 1848.  Then in
    1852 Borrow wrote out an advertisement of a fourth volume, which runs
    as follows:

    _Shortly will be published in one volume_.  _Price_ 10_s._  _The
    Rommany Rye_, _Being the fourth volume of Lavengro_.  _By George
    Borrow_, _author of The Bible in Spain_.

    But this volume did not make an appearance 'shortly.'  Its author was
    far too much offended with the critics, too disheartened it may be,
    to care to offer himself again for their gibes.  The years rolled on,
    and not until 1857 did _The Romany Rye_ appear.  The book was now in
    two volumes, and we see that the word _Romany_ had dropped an _m_. .
    . .

    The incidents of _Lavengro_ are supposed to have taken place between
    the 24_th_ of _May_ 1825, and the 18_th of July_ of that year.  In
    _The Romany Rye_ the incidents apparently occur between the 19_th_ of
    _July_ and the 3_rd_ of _August_ 1825.  In the opinion of Mr. John
    Sampson, the whole of the episodes in the five volumes occurred in
    seventy-two days."--[_George Borrow and his Circle_, 1913, pp.
    341-343.]

A useful edition of _The Romany Rye_ is:

_The Romany Rye_ / _A Sequel to_ "_Lavengro_" / _By George Borrow_ / _A
New Edition_ / _Containing the unaltered text of the Original_ / _Issue_,
_with Notes_, _etc._, _by the Author of_ / "_The Life of George Borrow_"
/ _London_ / _John Murray_, _Albemarle Street_ / 1900.--Crown 8vo. pp.
xvi + 403.

The book was edited by Dr. William Knapp.

There is a copy of the First Edition of _The Romany Rye_ in the Library
of the British Museum.  The Press-mark is 12622. f. 8.



(13)  [THE SLEEPING BARD: 1860]


The Sleeping Bard; / Or / Visions of the World, Death, and Hell, / By /
Elis Wyn. / Translated from the Cambrian British / By / George Borrow, /
Author of/ "The Bible in Spain," "The Gypsies of Spain," etc. / London: /
John Murray, Albemarle Street. / 1860.

Collation:--Crown octavo, pp. x + 128; consisting of: Title-page, as
above (with blank reverse) pp. i-ii; _Preface_ pp. iii-vii; p. viii is
blank; Fly-title to _A Vision of the Course of the World_ (with blank
reverse) pp. ix-x; and Text of the three _Visions_ pp. 1-128.  There are
head-lines throughout, each double-page being headed with the title of
the particular _Vision_ occupying it.  _A Vision of Hell_ is preceded by
a separate Fly-title (pp. 67-68) with blank reverse.  At the foot of p.
128 is the following imprint, "_James M. Denew_, _Printer_, 72, _Hall
Plain_, _Great Yarmouth_."  The sheets carry no register.  The book was
issued without any Half-title.  In some copies the Christian name of the
printer is misprinted _Jamms_.

Issued (in _June_, 1860) in magenta coloured cloth boards, lettered in
gold along the back, "_The Sleeping Bard_," and "_London_ / _John
Murray_" across the foot.  The published price was 5_s._; 250 copies were
printed.  Murray's connection with the work was nominal.  The book was
actually issued at Yarmouth by J. M. Denew, the printer by whom it was
produced.  The cost was borne by the author himself, to whom the majority
of the copies were ultimately delivered.

Some few copies of _The Sleeping Bard_ would appear to have been put up
in yellowish-brown plain paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges.  One such
example is in the possession of Mr. Paul Lemperley, of Cleveland, Ohio; a
second is in the library of Mr. Clement Shorter.  The leaves of both
these copies measure 8.75 x 5.75 inches.  The leaves of ordinary copies
in cloth measure 7.5 x 4.75 inches.  The translation was made in 1830.

The text of _The Sleeping Bard_ is divided into three sections.  Each of
these sections closes with a poem of some length, as follows:--

                                                                      PAGE

1.  The Perishing World.  [_O man_, _upon this building                 38
gaze_]

2.  Death the Great.  [_Leave land and house we must some               63
day_]

In the printed text the seventh stanza of _Death the
Great_ reads thus:

    _The song and dance afford_, _I ween_,
    _Relief from spleen_, _and sorrows grave_;
    _How very strange there is no dance_,
    _Nor tune of France_, _from Death can save_!

About the year 1871 Borrow re-wrote this stanza, as
follows:

    _The song and dance can drive_, _they say_,
    _The spleen away_, _and humour's grave_;
    _Why hast thou not devised_, _O France_!
    _Some tune and dance_, _from Death to save_?

As was invariably the case with Borrow, his revision was
a vast improvement upon the original version.

3.  The Heavy Heart.  [_Heavy's the heart with wandering               124
below_]

The Manuscript of _The Sleeping Bard_ was formerly in the
possession of Dr. Knapp.  It is now the property of the
Hispanic Society, of New York.  It extends to 74 pages
4to.

There is a copy of the First Edition of _The Sleeping Bard_ in the
Library of the British Museum.  The Press-mark is 12355. c. 17.



(14)  [WILD WALES: 1862]


Wild Wales: / Its People, Language, and Scenery. / By George Borrow, /
Author of "The Bible in Spain," etc. / "_Their Lord they shall praise_, /
_Their language they shall keep_, / _Their land they shall lose_, /
_Except Wild Wales_." / Taliesin: Destiny of the Britons. / In Three
Volumes.--Vol. I. [_Vol. II_, _&c._] / London: / John Murray, Albemarle
Street. / 1862. / The right of Translation is reserved.

                                 Vol. I.

Collation:--Large duodecimo, pp. xii + 410; consisting of: Half-title
(with advertisements of five of Borrow's _Works_ upon the reverse) pp.
i-ii; Title-page, as above (with imprint "_London_: / _Printed by
Woodfall and Kinder_, / _Angel Court_, _Skinner Street_" upon the centre
of the reverse) pp. iii-iv; Notice regarding the previous appearance of a
portion of the work in _The Quarterly Review_ (with blank reverse) pp.
v-vi; _Contents of Vol. I_ pp. vii-xi; p. xii is blank; and Text pp.
1-410.  There are head-lines throughout, each verso being headed _Wild
Wales_, whilst each recto is headed with the title of the particular
subject occupying it.  At the foot of p. 410 the imprint is repeated
thus: "_Woodfall and Kinder_, _Printers_, _Angel Court_, _Skinner
Street_, _London_."  The signatures are A (a half-sheet of 6 leaves), B
to S (17 sheets, each 12 leaves), plus T (2 leaves).  The second leaf of
Sig. T is a blank.

                                 Vol. II.

Collation:--Large duodecimo, pp. viii + 413; consisting of: Title-page,
as above (with imprint "_London_: / _Printed by Woodfall and Kinder_, /
_Angel Court_, _Skinner Street_" upon the centre of the reverse) pp.
i-ii; _Contents of Vol. II_ pp. v-vii; p. viii is blank; and Text pp.
1-413.  The reverse of p. 413 is blank.  There are head-lines throughout,
as in the first volume.  At the foot of p. 413 the imprint is repeated
thus, "_Woodfall and Kinder_, _Printers_, _Angel Court_, _Skinner
Street_, _London_."  The signatures are A (4 leaves), B to S (17 sheets,
each 12 leaves), plus T (4 leaves).  The last leaf of Sig. T is a blank.
The volume was issued without any Half-title.

                                Vol. III.

Collation:--Large duodecimo, pp. viii + 474; consisting of: Title-page,
as above (with imprint "_London_: / _Printed by Woodfall and Kinder_, /
_Angel Court_, _Skinner Street_" upon the centre of the reverse) pp.
i-ii; _Contents of Vol. III_ pp. iii-viii; and Text pp. 1-474.  There are
head-lines throughout, as in the first volume.  At the foot of p. 474 the
imprint is repeated thus, "_Woodfall and Kinder_, _Printers_, _Angel
Court_, _Skinner Street_, _London_."  The signatures are A (8 leaves), B
to U (18 sheets, each 12 leaves), plus X (10 leaves).  The last leaf of
Sig. H is a blank.  The volume was issued without any Half-title.

Issued (in _December_, 1862) in dark green cloth boards, with white paper
back-label, lettered "_Wild Wales_. / _By_ / _George Borrow_. / _Vol. I_
[Vol. ii, &c.]."  The leaves measure 7.625 x 4.875 inches.  The published
price was 30_s._; 1,000 copies were printed.

A Second Edition of _Wild Wales_ was issued in 1865, a Third Edition in
1888, and a Fourth Edition in 1896.  The book has since been included in
divers series of non-copyright works.

The following Poems made their first appearance in the pages of _Wild
Wales_:

                          VOL. I

                                                                      PAGE

CHESTER ALE.  [_Chester ale_, _Chester ale_!  _I could                  18
ne'er get it down_]

Another, widely different, version of these lines exist
in manuscript.  It reads as follows:

                 _On the Ale of Chester_.

    _Of Chester the ale has but sorry renown_,
          '_Tis made of ground-ivy_, _of dust_, _and of
    bran_;
    '_Tis as thick as a river belough a hugh town_,
          '_Tis not lap for a dog_, _far less drink for a
    man_.

SAXONS AND BRITONS.  [_A serpent which coils_]                          48

Previously printed in _The Quarterly Review_, _January_
1861, p. 42.

TRANSLATION OF A WELSH ENGLYN UPON DINAS BRAN.  [_Gone_,                61
_gone are thy gates_, _Dinas Bran on the height_!]

LINES FOUND ON THE TOMB OF MADOC.  [_Here after sailing                105
far I Madoc lie_]

THE LASSIES OF COUNTY MERION.  [_Full fair the gleisiad                153
in the flood_]

This was one stanza only, the fifth, of the complete poem
_The Cookoo's Song in Merion_, which Borrow translated
some years later, and which was first printed in
_Ermeline_, 1913, pp. 21-23.  The text of the two
versions of this stanza differ considerably.

STANZA ON THE STONE OF JANE WILLIAMS.  [_Though thou art               161
gone to dwelling cold_]

THE MIST.  [_O ho_! _thou villain mist_, _O ho_!]                      173

Although Borrow translated the whole poem, he omitted 24
lines (the 14 opening and 10 closing lines) when printing
it in _Wild Wales_.  Here are the missing lines, which I
give from the original Manuscript:

    _A tryste with Morfydd true I made_,
    '_Twas not the first_,_ in greenwood glade_,
    _In hope to make her flee with me_;
    _But useless all_, _as you will see_.

    _I went betimes_, _lest she should grieve_,
    _Then came a mist at close of eve_;
    _Wide o'er the path by which I passed_,
    _Its mantle dim and murk it cast_.
    _That mist ascending met the sky_,
    _Forcing the daylight from my eye_.
    _I scarce had strayed a furlong's space_
    _When of all things I lost the trace_.
    _Where was the grove and waving grain_?
    _Where was the mountain hill and main_?

                          * * * * *

    _Before me all affright and fear_,
    _Above me darkness dense and drear_,
    _My way at length I weary found_,
    _Into a swaggy willow ground_,
    _Where staring in each nook there stood_
    _Of wry mouthed elves a wrathful brood_.

    _Full oft I sank in that false soil_,
    _My legs were lamed with length of toil_.
    _However hard the case may be_
    _No meetings more in mist for me_.

Two of the above lines, somewhat differently worded, were
given in _Wild Wales_, Vol. i, p. 184.

LINES DESCRIPTIVE OF THE EAGERNESS OF A SOUL TO REACH                  251
PARADISE.  [_Now to my rest I hurry away_]

FILICAIA'S SONNET ON ITALY.  [_O Italy_! _on whom dark                 290
Destiny_]

TRANSLATION OF AN ENGLYN FORETELLING TRAVELLING BY STEAM.              341
[_I got up in Mona_, _as soon as_ '_twas light_]

TRANSLATION OF A WELSH STANZA ABOUT SNOWDON.  [_Easy to                360
say_ '_Behold Eryri_']

STANZAS ON THE SNOW OF SNOWDON.  [_Cold is the snow on                 365
Snowdon's brow_]

                         VOL. II

LINES FROM BLACK ROBIN'S ODE IN PRAISE OF ANGLESEY.                     33
[_Twelve sober men the muses woo_]

LINES ON A SPRING.  [_The wild wine of Nature_]                        112

THINGS WRITTEN IN A GARDEN.  [_In a garden the first of                158
our race was deceived_]

EL PUNTO DE LA VANA.  [_Never trust the sample when you                215
go your cloth to buy_]

LLANGOLLEN'S ALE.  [_Llangollen's brown ale is with malt               275
and hop rife_]

POVERTY AND RICHES.  AN INTERLUDE.  [_O Riches_, _thy                  328
figure is charming and bright_]

A reduced facsimile of the first page of the Manuscript
of this _Interlude_ is given herewith, facing page 99.

AN ODE TO SYCHARK.  BY IOLO GOCH.  [_Twice have I pledged              392
my word to thee_]

                         VOL. III

TRANSLATION OF A WELSH ENGLYN ON THE RHYADR.  [_Foaming                 12
and frothing from mountainous height_]

ODE TO OWEN GLENDOWER.  [_Here's the life I've sigh'd for               98
long_]

ODE TO A YEW TREE.  [_Thou noble tree_; _who shelt'rest                203
kind_]

LINES.  [_From high Plynlimmon's shaggy side_]                         219

ODE TO A YEW TREE.  [_O tree of yew_, _which here I spy_]              247

This is another, and extended, version of the _Ode_
printed on p. 203 of _Wild Wales_.  Yet another version,
differing from both, is printed in _Alf the Freebooter
and Other Ballads_, 1913, p. 27.

LINES FROM ODE TO THE PLOUGHMAN, BY IOLO GOCH.  [_The                  292
mighty Hu who lives for ever_]

Previously printed, with some verbal differences, in _The
Quarterly Review_, _January_ 1861, p. 40.

LINES ON A TOMB-STONE.  [_Thou earth from earth reflect                301
with anxious mind_]

ODE TO GRIFFITH AP NICHOLAS.  [_Griffith ap Nicholas_,                 327
_who like thee_]

The first six lines of this Ode had previously appeared
in _The Quarterly Review_, _January_ 1861, p. 50.

GOD'S BETTER THAN ALL.  [_God's better than heaven or                  335
aught therein_]

A reduced facsimile of the first page of the Manuscript
of _God's Better than All_ will be found facing the
present page.

AB GWILYM'S ODE TO THE SUN AND GLAMORGAN.  [_Each morn_,               377
_benign of countenance_]

There is a copy of the First Edition of _Wild Wales_ in the Library of
the British Museum.  The Press-mark is 10369. e. 12.

               [Picture: Manuscript of Poverty and Riches]

              [Picture: Manuscript of God's Better than all]



(15)  [ROMANO LAVO-LIL: 1874]


Romano Lavo-Lil: / Word-Book of the Romany; / or, / English Gypsy
Language. / With many pieces in Gypsy, illustrative of the way of /
Speaking and Thinking of the English Gypsies; / with Specimens of their
Poetry, and an account of certain Gypsyries / or Places Inhabited by
them, and of various things / relating to Gypsy Life in England. / By
George Borrow, / Author of "Lavengro," "The Romany Rye," "The Gypsies of
Spain," / "The Bible in Spain," etc. / "_Can you rokra Romany_? / _Can
you play the bosh_? / _Can you jal adrey the staripen_? / _Can you chin
the cost_?" / "_Can you speak the Roman tongue_? / _Can you play the
fiddle_? / _Can you eat the prison-loaf_? / _Can you cut and whittle_? /
London: / John Murray, Albemarle Street. / 1874.

Collation:--Crown octavo, pp. viii + 331; consisting of: Half-title (with
blank reverse) pp. i-ii; Title-page, as above (with imprint "_London_: /
_Printed by William Clowes and Sons_, / _Stamford Street and Charing
Cross_" upon the centre of the reverse) pp. iii-iv; Prefatory Note
regarding the _Vocabulary_ p. v; Advertisements of five _Works of George
Borrow_ p. vi; Table of _Contents_ pp. vii-viii; and Text pp. 1-331,
including Fly-titles (each with blank reverse) to each section of the
book.  The reverse of p. 331 is blank.  At the foot of p. 331 the imprint
is repeated thus, "_London_: _Printed by Wm. Clowes and Sons_, _Stamford
Street_ / _and Charing Cross_."  There are head-lines throughout, each
page being headed with the title of the particular subject occupying it.
The signatures, are A (a half-sheet of 4 leaves), B to X (20 sheets, each
8 leaves), Y (a half-sheet of 4 leaves), and Z (a quarter-sheet of 2
leaves).

Issued in dark blue cloth boards, with white paper back-label, lettered
"_Romano Lavo-Lil_; / _Word-Book_ / _of_ / _The Romany_. / _By_ / _George
Borrow_."  The leaves measure 7.75 x 4.875 inches.  The published price
was 10_s._ 6_d._

One Thousand Copies were printed.

The book was set up in type towards the end of 1873, and published early
in 1874.  Proof-sheets still exist bearing the earlier date upon the
title-page.

A considerable amount of Verse by Borrow made its first appearance in the
pages of _Romano Lavo-Lil_, as detailed in the following list:

                                _Contents_

                                                                      PAGE

LITTLE SAYINGS:

1.  [ _Whatever ignorance men may show_]                               109

2.  [_What must I do_, _mother_, _to make you well_?]                  111

3.  [_I would rather hear him speak than hear Lally                    115
sing_]

ENGLISH GYPSY SONGS:

1.  The Gypsy Meeting.  [_Who's your mother_, _who's your              175
father_?]

2.  Making a Fortune (1).  [_Come along_, _my little                   177
gypsy girl_]

3.  Making a Fortune (2).  [_Come along_, _my little                   179
gypsy girl_]

THE TWO GYPSIES.  [_Two gypsy lads were transported_]                  181

MY ROMAN LASS.  [_As I to the town was going one day_]                 183

This is the first stanza only of _The English Gypsy_.
The complete Song will be found in _Marsk Stig's
Daughters and Other_ _Songs and Ballads_, 1913, pp.
14-15.  Here is the concluding stanza, omitted in _Romano
Lavo-Lil_:

    _As I to the town was going one day_,
    _I met a young Roman upon the way_.
    _Said he_, "_Young maid will you share my lot_?"
    _Said I_, "_Another wife you've got_."
    "_No_, _no_!" _the handsome young Roman cried_,
    "_No wife have I in the world so wide_;
    _And you my wedded wife shall be_,
    _If you will share my lot with me_."

YES, MY GIRL.  [_If to me you prove untrue_]                           185

THE YOUTHFUL EARL.  [_Said the youthful earl to the Gypsy              185
girl_]

LOVE SONG.  [_I'd choose as pillows for my head_]                      187

WOE IS ME.  [_I'm sailing across the water_]                           189

THE SQUIRE AND LADY.  [_The squire he roams the good                   191
greenwood_]

GYPSY LULLABY.  [_Sleep thee_, _little tawny boy_!]                    193

OUR BLESSED QUEEN.  [_Coaches fine in London_]                         195

RUN FOR IT.  [_Up_, _up_, _brothers_!]                                 195

This is the first stanza only of the _Gypsy Song_,
printed complete in _Marsk Stig's Daughters and other
Songs and Ballads_, 1913, p. 16.

THE ROMANY SONGSTRESS.  [_Her temples they are aching_]                199

THE FRIAR.  [_A Friar Was preaching once with zeal and                 201
with fire_]

The Manuscript of these amusing verses, which were
translated by Borrow from the dialect of the Spanish
Gypsies, affords some curious variants from the published
text.  Here are the lines as they stand in the MS.:

    _A Friar_
    _Was preaching once with zeal and with fire_;
    _And a butcher of the plain_
    _Had lost a bonny swine_;
    _And the friar did opine_
    _That the Gypsies it had ta'en_.
    _So_, _breaking off_, _he shouted_, "_Gypsy ho_!
    _Hie home_, _and from the pot_
    _Take the butcher's porker out_,
    _The porker good and fat_,
    _And in its place throw_
    _A clout_, _a dingy clout_
    _Of thy brat_, _of thy brat_;
    _A clout_, _a dingy clout_,
    _of thy brat_."

MALBROUK.  FROM THE SPANISH GYPSY VERSION.  [_Malbrouk is              205
gone to the wars_]

SORROWFUL YEARS.  [_The wit and the skill_]                            211

FORTUNE-TELLING.  [_Late rather one morning_]                          240

THE FORTUNE-TELLER'S SONG.  [_Britannia is my name_]                   243

GYPSY STANZA.  [_Can you speak the Roman tongue_?]                     254

CHARLOTTE COOPER.  [_Old Charlotte I am called_]                       259

EPIGRAM.  [_A beautiful face and a black wicked mind_]                 262

LINES.  [_Mickie_, _Huwie and Larry bold_]                             272

LINES.  [_What care we_, _though we be so small_?]                     280

RYLEY BOSVIL.  [_The Gorgios seek to hang me_]                         296

RYLEY AND THE GYPSY.  [_Methinks I see a brother_]                     298

TO YOCKY SHURI.  [_Beneath the bright sun_, _there is                  301
none_, _there is none_]

LINES.  [_Roman lads Before the door_]                                 325

Upon page 122 of _Romano Lavo-Lil_, is printed a version of _The Lord's
Prayer_ cast into Romany by Borrow.  The original Manuscript of this
translation has survived, and its text presents some curious variations
from the published version.  A reduced facsimile of this Manuscript
serves as Frontispiece to the present Bibliography.

Accompanying the Manuscript of _The Lord's Prayer_ in Romany, is the
Manuscript of a translation made by Borrow into the dialect of the
English Gypsies.  This translation has never, so far as I am aware,
appeared in print.  It is an interesting document, and well worthy of
preservation.  A reduced facsimile of it will be found facing the present
page.

                [Picture: Manuscript of The Lord's Prayer]

A Second Edition of _Romano Lavo-Lil_ was issued by the same publisher,
John Murray, in 1888, and a Third in 1905.

There is a copy of the First Edition of _Romano Lavo-Lil_ in the Library
of the British Museum.  The Press-mark is 2278. c. 15.



(16)  [THE TURKISH JESTER: 1884]


The Turkish Jester; / Or, / The Pleasantries / of / Cogia Nasr Eddin
Effendi. / Translated from the Turkish / By / George Borrow. / Ipswich: /
W. Webber, Dial Lane. / 1884.

Collation:--Crown octavo, printed in half-sheets, pp. ii + 52; consisting
of: Title-page, as above (with Certificate of Issue upon the centre of
the reverse) pp. i-ii; and Text pp. 1-52.  There are no head-lines, the
pages being numbered centrally.  The book is made up in a somewhat
unusual manner, each half-sheet having a separately printed quarter-sheet
of two leaves imposed within it.  The register is therefore B to E (four
sections, each 6 leaves), plus F (2 leaves), the whole preceded by two
leaves, one of which is blank, whilst the other carries the Title-page.
There is no printer's imprint.  The book was issued without any
Half-title.  The title is enclosed within a single rectangular ruled
frame.

Issued in cream-coloured paper wrappers, with the title-page reproduced
upon the front, but reset in types of different character, and without
the ruled frame, and with the imprint reading _High Street_ in place of
_Dial Lane_.  Inside the front cover the Certificate of Issue is
repeated.  The leaves measure 7.75 x 5 inches.  The edition consisted of
One Hundred and Fifty Copies.  The published price was 7_s._ 6_d._

The Manuscript of _The Turkish Jester_ was formerly owned by Dr. Knapp,
and is now the property of the Hispanic Society, of New York.  It extends
to 71 pages 4to.  The translation was probably made about 1854, at the
time when Borrow was at work upon his _Songs of Europe_.  In 1857, the
book was included among the Advertisements appended to the second volume
of _The Romany Rye_.

There is a copy of the First Edition of _The Turkish Jester_ in the
Library of the British Museum.  The Press-mark is 758. b. 16.



(17)  [THE DEATH OF BALDER: 1889]


The / Death of Balder / From the Danish / of / Johannes Ewald / (1773) /
Translated by / George Borrow / Author of "Bible in Spain," "Lavengro,"
"Wild Wales," etc. / London / Jarrold & Sons, 3 Paternoster Buildings,
E.C. / 1889 / All Rights Reserved.

Collation:--Crown octavo, pp. viii + 77; consisting of: Half-title (with
Certificate of Issue upon the centre of the reverse) pp. i-ii;
Title-page, as above (with blank reverse) pp. iii-iv; _Preface_ and List
of _The Persons_ (each with blank reverse) pp. v-viii; and Text pp. 1-77.
The reverse of p. 77 is blank.  The head-line is _Death of Balder_
throughout, upon both sides of the page.  At the foot of p. 77 is the
following imprint, "_Printed by Ballantyne_, _Hanson & Co._ / _London and
Edinburgh_."  The signatures are A (4 leaves), and B to F (5 sheets, each
8 leaves).  Sig. F 8 is a blank.

Issued in dark brown 'diced' cloth boards, with white paper back-label.
The leaves measure 7.75 x 5 inches.  Two Hundred and Fifty Copies were
printed.  The published price was 7_s._ 6_d._

_The Death of Balder_ was written in 1829, the year during which Borrow
produced so many of his ballad translations, the year in which he made
his fruitless effort to obtain subscribers for his _Songs of
Scandinavia_.  On _December_ 6_th_ of that year he wrote to Dr.
[afterwards Sir] John Bowring:

    "I wish to shew you my translation of _The Death of Balder_, Ewald's
    most celebrated production, which, if you approve of, you will
    perhaps render me some assistance in bringing forth, for I don't know
    many publishers.  I think this will be a proper time to introduce it
    to the British public, as your account of Danish literature will
    doubtless cause a sensation."

Evidently no publisher was forthcoming, for the work remained in
manuscript until 1889, when, eight years after Borrow's death, Messrs.
Jarrold & Sons gave it to the world.  In 1857 Borrow included the Tragedy
among the series of Works advertised as "ready for the Press" at the end
of the second volume of _The Romany Rye_.  It was there described as "_A
Heroic Play_."

Although published only in 1889, _The Death of Balder_ was actually set
up in type three years earlier.  It had been intended that the book
should have been issued in London by Messrs. Reeves & Turner, and
proof-sheets exist carrying upon the title-page the name of that firm as
publishers, and bearing the date 1886.  It would appear that Mr. W.
Webber, a bookseller of Ipswich, who then owned the Manuscript, had at
first contemplated issuing the book through Messrs. Reeves & Turner.  But
at this juncture he entered into the employment of Messrs. Jarrold &
Sons, and consequently the books was finally brought out by that firm.
The types were not reset, but were kept standing during the interval.

Another version of the song of The Three Valkyrier, which appears in _The
Death of Balder_, pp. 53-54, was printed in _Marsk Stig's Daughters and
Other Songs and Ballads_, 1913, pp. 19-20.  The text of the two versions
differs entirely, in addition to which the 1913 version forms one
complete single song, whilst in that of 1889 the lines are divided up
between the several characters.

The Manuscript of _The Death of Balder_, referred to above, passed into
the hands of Dr. Knapp, and is now in the possession of the Hispanic
Society, of New York.  It consists of 97 pages 4to.  A transcript in the
handwriting of Mrs. Borrow is also the property of the Society.

There is a copy of the First Edition of _The Death of Balder_ in the
Library of the British Museum.  The Press-mark is 11755. f 9.



(18)  [LETTERS TO THE BIBLE SOCIETY: 1911]


Letters of / George Borrow / To the British and Foreign / Bible Society /
Published by Direction of the Committee / Edited by / T. H. Darlow /
Hodder and Stoughton / London New York Toronto / 1911.

Collation:--Octavo, pp. xviii + 471; consisting of: Half-title (with
blank reverse) pp. i-ii; Title-page, as above (with blank reverse) pp.
iii-iv; Dedication _To Williamson Lamplough_ (with blank reverse) pp.
v-vi; Preface vii-xi; Note regarding "the officials of the Bible Society
with whom Borrow came into close relationship" pp. xi-xii; _List of
Borrow's Letters_, _etc._, _printed in this Volume_ pp. xiii-xvii;
chronological _Outline of Borrow's career_ p. xviii; and Text of the
_Letters_, &c., pp. 1-471.  There are head-lines throughout, each verso
being headed _George Borrow's Letters_, and each recto _To the Bible
Society_.  Upon the reverse of p. 471 is the following imprint "_Printed
by T. and A. Constable_, _Printers to His Majesty_ / _at the Edinburgh
University Press_."  The signatures are _a_ (one sheet of 8 leaves), _b_
(a quarter-sheet of 2 leaves), A to 2 F (29 sheets, each 8 leaves) plus 2
G (a half-sheet of 4 leaves).  Sig. _a_ 1 is a blank.  A facsimile of one
of the Letters included in the volume is inserted as Frontispiece.

Issued in dark crimson buckram, with paper sides, lettered in gold across
the back, "_Letters of_ / _George_ / _Borrow_ / _To the_ / _Bible
Society_ / _Edited by_ / _T. H. Darlow_ / _Hodder &_ / _Stoughton_."  The
leaves measure 8.375 x 5.875 inches.  The published price was 7_s._ 6_d._

    "When Borrow set about preparing _The Bible in Spain_, he obtained
    from the Committee of the Bible Society the loan of the letters which
    are here published, and introduced considerable portions of them into
    that most picturesque and popular of his works.  Perhaps one-third of
    the contents of the present volume was utilised in this way, being
    more or less altered and edited by Borrow for the
    purpose."--[_Preface_, pp. ix-x].

The holographs of the complete series of Letters included in this volume
are preserved in the archives of the British and Foreign Bible Society.

There is a copy of _Letters of George Borrow to the British and Foreign
Bible Society_ in the Library of the British Museum.  The Press-mark is
010902.e.10.



(19)  [LETTERS TO MARY BORROW: 1913]


Letters / To his Wife / Mary Borrow / By / George Borrow / London: /
Printed for Private Circulation / 1913.

Collation:--Crown octavo, pp. 38; consisting of: Half-title (with blank
reverse) pp. 1-2; Title-page, as above (with blank reverse), pp. 3-4; and
Text of the _Letters_ pp. 5-38.  The head-line is _Letters to His Wife_
throughout, upon both sides of the page.  Following p. 38 is a leaf, with
blank reverse, and with the following imprint upon its recto, "_London_:
/ _Printed for Thomas J. Wise_, _Hampstead_, _N.W._ / _Edition limited to
Thirty Copies_."  The signatures are A (a half sheet of 4 leaves), plus B
and C (2 sheets, each 8 leaves), inset within each other.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, and with the
title-page reproduced upon the front.  The leaves measure 7.5 x 5 inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed.

Holograph Letters by Borrow are extremely uncommon, the number known to
be extant being far less than one might have supposed would be the case,
considering the good age to which Borrow attained.  His correspondents
were few, and, save to the officials of the Bible Society, he was not a
diligent letter-writer.  The holographs of this series of letters
addressed to his wife are in my own collection of Borroviana.

The majority of the letters included in this volume were reprinted in
_George Borrow and his Circle_.  _By Clement King Shorter_, 8vo, 1913.

There is a copy of _Letters to his Wife_, _Mary Borrow_, in the Library
of the British Museum.  The Press-mark is C. 44. d. 32.



(20)  [MARSK STIG: 1913]


Marsk Stig / A Ballad / By / George Borrow / London: / Printed for
Private Circulation / 1913.

Collation:--Crown octavo, pp. 40; consisting of: Half-title (with blank
reverse) pp. 1-2; Title-page, as above (with blank reverse) pp. 3-4; and
Text of the _Ballad_ pp. 5-40.  The head-line is _Marsk Stig_ throughout,
upon both sides of the page.  At the foot of p. 40 is the following
imprint, "_London_: / _Printed for Thomas J. Wise_, _Hampstead_, _N.W._ /
_Edition limited to Thirty Copies_."  The signatures are A (a half-sheet
of 4 leaves), plus B and C (2 sheets, each 8 leaves), inset within each
other.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, and with the
title-page reproduced upon the front.  The leaves measure 7.5 x 5 inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed.

_Marsk Stig_ consists of four separate Ballads, or _Songs_ as Borrow
styled them, the whole forming one complete and connected story.  The
plot is an old Danish legend of the same character as the history of
David and Bathsheba, Marsk Stig himself being the counterpart of Uriah
the Hittite.

The four _Songs_ commence as follows:--

                                                                      PAGE

1.  _Marsk Stig he out of the country rode_                              5
_To win him fame with his good bright sword_

2.  _Marsk Stig he woke at black midnight_,                             15
_And loudly cried to his Lady dear_

3.  _There's many I ween in Denmark green_                              23
_Who all to be masters now desire_

4.  _There were seven and seven times twenty_                           34
_That met upon the verdant wold_



_Marsk Stig_ was one of the ballads prepared by Borrow for _The Songs of
Scandinavia_ in 1829, and revised for the _Koempe Viser_ in 1854.  Both
Manuscripts are extant, and I give reproductions of a page of each.  It
will be observed that upon the margins of the earlier Manuscript Borrow
wrote his revisions, so that this Manuscript practically carries in
itself both versions of the ballad.  The Manuscript of 1829 is in the
possession of Mr. J. H. Spoor, of Chicago.  The Manuscript of 1854 is in
my own library.  As a specimen of _Marsk Stig_ I quote the following
stanzas:

    _It was the young and bold Marsk Stig_
       _Came riding into the Castle yard_,
    _Abroad did stand the King of the land_
       _So fair array'd in sable and mard_.

    "_Now lend an ear_, _young Marshal Stig_,
       _I have for thee a fair emprise_,
    _Ride thou this year to the war and bear_
       _My flag amongst my enemies_."

    "_And if I shall fare to the war this year_,
       _And risk my life among thy foes_,
    _Do thou take care of my Lady dear_,
       _Of Ingeborg_, _that beauteous rose_."

    _Then answer'd Erik_, _the youthful King_,
       _With a laugh in his sleeve thus answered he_:
    "_No more I swear has thy lady to fear_
       _Than if my sister dear were she_."

    _It was then the bold Sir Marshal Stig_,
       _From out of the country he did depart_,
    _In her castle sate his lonely mate_,
       _Fair Ingeborg_, _with grief at heart_.

    "_Now saddle my steed_," _cried Eric the King_,
       "_Now saddle my steed_," _King Eric cried_,
    "_To visit the Dame of beauteous fame_
       _Your King will into the country ride_."

                                  * * * * *

    "_Now list_, _now list_, _Dame Ingeborg_,
       _Thou art_, _I swear_, _a beauteous star_,
    _Live thou with me in love and glee_,
       _Whilst Marshal Stig is engag'd in war_."

    _Then up and spake Dame Ingeborg_,
       _For nought was she but a virtuous wife_:
    "_Rather_, _I say_, _than Stig betray_,
       _Sir King_, _I'd gladly lose my life_."

    "_Give ear_, _thou proud Dame Ingeborg_,
       _If thou my leman and love will be_,
    _Each finger fair of thy hand shall bear_
       _A ring of gold so red of blee_."

    "_Marsk Stig has given gold rings to me_,
       _And pearls around my neck to string_;
    _By the Saints above I never will prove_
       _Untrue to the Marshal's couch_, _Sir King_."

                                  * * * * *

    _It was Erik the Danish King_,
       _A damnable deed the King he wrought_;
    _He forc'd with might that Lady bright_,
       _Whilst her good Lord his battles fought_.

                                  * * * * *

    _It was the young Sir Marshal Stig_
       _Stepp'd proudly in at the lofty door_;
    _And bold knights then_, _and bold knight's men_,
       _Stood up the Marshal Stig before_.

    _So up to the King of the land he goes_,
       _And straight to make his plaint began_;
    _Then murmured loud the assembled crowd_,
       _And clench'd his fist each honest man_.

    "_Ye good men hear a tale of fear_,
       _A tale of horror_, _a tale of hell_--

                                                                  &c., &c.

There is a copy of _Marsk Stig A Ballad_ in the Library of the British
Museum.  The Press-mark is C. 44. d. 38.

                [Picture: Title page of Marsk Stig, 1913]

                [Picture: Manuscript of Marsk Stig--1829]

                [Picture: Manuscript of Marsk Stig--1854]



(21)  [THE SERPENT KNIGHT: 1913]


The Serpent Knight / and / Other Ballads / By / George Borrow / London: /
Printed for Private Circulation / 1913.

Collation:--Square demy octavo, pp. 35; consisting of: Half-title (with
blank reverse) pp. 1-2; Title-page, as above (with blank reverse) pp.
3-4; Table of _Contents_ (with blank reverse) pp. 5-6; and Text of the
_Ballads_ pp. 7-35.  There are head-lines throughout, each page being
headed with the title of the particular _Ballad_ occupying it.  Upon the
reverse of p. 35 is the following imprint: "_London_: / _Printed for
Thomas J. Wise_, _Hampstead_, _N.W._ / _Edition limited to thirty
copies_."  The signatures are A (a quarter-sheet of two leaves), plus B &
C (two sheets, each eight leaves), inset within each other.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, and with the
title-page reproduced upon the front.  The leaves measure 8.5 x 6.875
inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed.

                               _Contents_.

                                                                      PAGE

The Serpent Knight.  [_Signelil sits in her bower alone_]                7

The only extant MS. of this ballad originally bore the
title _The Transformed Knight_, but the word
_Transformed_ is struck out and replaced by _Serpent_, in
Borrow's handwriting.

Sir Olaf.  [_Sir Olaf rides on his courser tall_]                       10

_Sir Olaf_ is one of Borrow's most successful ballads.
The only extant Manuscript is written upon paper
water-marked with the date 1845, and was prepared for the
projected _Koempe Viser_.

The Treacherous Merman.  ["_Now rede me mother_," _the                  15
merman cried_]

This Ballad is a later, and greatly improved, version of
one which appeared under the title _The Merman_ only, in
the _Romantic Ballads_ of 1826.  The introduction of the
incident of the changing by magic of the horse into a
boat, furnishes a reason for the catastrophe which was
lacking in the earlier version.

In its final shape _The Treacherous Merman_ is another of
Borrow's most successful ballads, and it is evident that
he bestowed upon it an infinite amount of care and
labour.  An early draft of the final version [a reduced
facsimile of its first page will be found _ante_, facing
p. 40] bears the tentative title _Marsk Stig's Daughter_.
Besides the two printed versions Borrow certainly
composed a third, for a fragment exists of a third MS.,
the text of which differs considerably from that of both
the others.

The Knight in the Deer's Shape.  [_It was the Knight Sir                18
Peter_]

Facing the present page is a reduced facsimile of the
first page of the Manuscript of _The Knight in the Deer's
Shape_.

The Stalwart Monk.  [_Above the wood a cloister towers_]                24

_The Stalwart Monk_ was composed by Borrow about the year
1860.  Whether he had worked upon the ballad in earlier
years cannot be ascertained, as no other Manuscript
besides that from which it was printed in the present
volume is known to exist.

The Cruel Step-Dame.  [_My father up of the country                     30
rode_]

The Cuckoo.  [_Yonder the cuckoo flutters_]                             34

The complete Manuscript of _The Serpent Knight and Other Ballads_ is in
my own collection of Borroviana.

There is a copy of _The Serpent Knight and Other Ballads_ in the Library
of the British Museum.  The Press-mark is C. 44. d. 38.

                [Picture: Title page of The Serpent King]

         [Picture: Manuscript of The Knight in the Deer's Shape]



(22)  [THE KING'S WAKE: 1913]


The King's Wake / and Other Ballads / By / George Borrow / London: /
Printed for Private Circulation / 1913.

Collation:--Square demy octavo, pp. 23; consisting of: Half-title (with
blank reverse) pp. 1-2; Title-page, as above (with blank reverse) pp.
3-4; and Text of the _Ballads_ pp. 5-23.  There are head-lines
throughout, each page being headed with the title of the particular
_Ballad_ occupying it.  Upon the reverse of p. 23 is the following
imprint: "_London_: / _Printed for Thomas J. Wise_, _Hampstead_, _N.W._ /
_Edition limited to Thirty Copies_."  The signatures are A (a half-sheet
of four leaves), with B (a full sheet of eight leaves) inset within it.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, and with the
title-page reproduced upon the front.  The leaves measure 8.5 x 6.875
inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed.

                               _Contents_.

                                                                      PAGE

The King's Wake.  [_To-night is the night that the wake                  5
they hold_]

An early draft of this ballad has the title _The
Watchnight_.

Swayne Felding.  [_Swayne Felding sits at Helsingborg_]                 10

Of _Swayne Felding_ two Manuscripts are extant.  One,
originally destined for _The Songs of Scandinavia_, is
written upon white paper water-marked with the date 1828.
The other, written upon blue paper, was prepared for the
_Koempe Viser_ of 1854.  In the earlier MS. the ballad
bears the title _Swayne Felding's Combat with the Giant_;
the later MS. is entitled _Swayne Felding_ only.  The
texts of the two MSS. differ widely.

Innocence Defamed.  [_Misfortune comes to every door_]                  20

The heroic ballads included in these collections are all
far too long to admit of any one of them being given in
full.  As an example of the shorter ballads I quote the
title-poem of the present pamphlet, _The King's Wake_:

                   _THE KING'S WAKE_ {132}

    _To-night is the night that the wake they hold_,
    _To the wake repair both young and old_.

    _Proud Signelil she her mother address'd_:
    "_May I go watch along with the rest_?"

    "_O what at the wake wouldst do my dear_?
    _Thou'st neither sister nor brother there_.

    "_Nor brother-in-law to protect thy youth_,
    _To the wake thou must not go forsooth_.

    "_There be the King and his warriors gay_,
    _If me thou list thou at home wilt stay_."

    "_But the Queen will be there and her maiden crew_,
    _Pray let me go_, _mother_, _the dance to view_."

    _So long_, _so long begged the maiden young_,
    _That at length from her mother consent she wrung_.

    "_Then go_, _my child_, _if thou needs must go_,
    _But thy mother ne'er went to the wake I trow_."

    _Then through the thick forest the maiden went_,
    _To reach the wake her mind was bent_.

    _When o'er the green meadows she had won_,
    _The Queen and her maidens to bed were gone_.

    _And when she came to the castle gate_
    _They were plying the dance at a furious rate_.

    _There danced full many a mail-clad man_,
    _And the youthful King he led the van_.

    _He stretched forth his hand with an air so free_:
    "_Wilt dance_, _thou pretty maid_, _with me_?"

    "_O_, _sir_, _I've come across the wold_
    _That I with the Queen discourse might hold_."

    "_Come dance_," _said the King with a courteous
    smile_,
    "_The Queen will be here in a little while_."

    _Then forward she stepped like a blushing rose_,
    _She takes his hand and to dance she goes_.

    "_Hear Signelil what I say to thee_,
    _A ditty of love sing thou to me_."

    "_A ditty of love I will not_, _Sir King_,
    _But as well as I can another I'll sing_."

    _Proud Signil began_, _a ditty she sang_,
    _To the ears of the Queen in her bed it rang_.

    _Says the Queen in her chamber as she lay_:
    "_O which of my maidens doth sing so gay_?

    "_O which of my maidens doth sing so late_,
    _To bed why followed they me not straight_?"

    _Then answered the Queen the little foot page_:
    "'_Tis none of thy maidens I'll engage_.

    "'_Tis none I'll engage of the maiden band_,
    '_Tis Signil proud from the islet's strand_."

    "_O bring my red mantle hither to me_,
    _For I'll go down this maid to see_."

    _And when they came down to the castle gate_
    _The dance it moved at so brave a rate_.

    _About and around they danced with glee_,
    _There stood the Queen and the whole did see_.

    _The Queen she felt so sore aggrieved_
    _When the King with Signil she perceived_.

    _Sophia the Queen to her maid did sign_:
    "_Go fetch me hither a horn of wine_."

    _His hand the King stretched forth so free_:
    "_Wilt thou Sophia my partner be_?"

    "_O I'll not dance with thee_, _I vow_,
    _Unless proud Signil pledge me now_."

    _The horn she raised to her lips_, _athirst_,
    _The innocent heart in her bosom burst_.

    _There stood King Valdemar pale as clay_,
    _Stone dead at his feet the maiden lay_.

    "_A fairer maid since I first drew breath_
    _Ne'er came more guiltless to her death_."

    _For her wept woman and maid so sore_,
    _To the Church her beauteous corse they bore_.

    _But better with her it would have sped_,
    _Had she but heard what her mother said_.

There is a copy of _The King's Wake and Other Ballads_ in the Library of
the British Museum.  The Press-mark is C. 44. d. 38.

                 [Picture: Title page of The King's Wake]

                 [Picture: Manuscript of The King's Wake]



(23)  [THE DALBY BEAR: 1913]


The Dalby Bear / and Other Ballads / By / George Borrow / London: /
Printed for Private Circulation / 1913.

Collation:--Square demy octavo, pp. 20; consisting of: Half-title (with
blank reverse) pp. 1-2; Title-page, as above (with blank reverse) pp.
3-4; and Text of the _Ballads_ pp. 5-20.  There are head-lines
throughout, each page being headed with the title of the particular
_Ballad_ occupying it.  At the foot of p. 20 is the following imprint:
"_London_ / _Printed for Thomas J. Wise_, _Hampstead_, _N.W._ / _Edition
limited to Thirty Copies_."  The signatures are A (a quarter-sheet of two
leaves), with B (a full sheet of 8 leaves) inset within it.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, and with the
title-page reproduced upon the front.  The leaves measure 8.5 x 6.875
inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed.

                               _Contents_.

                                                                      PAGE

The Dalby Bear.  [_There goes a bear on Dalby moors_]                    5

Tygge Hermandsen.  [_Down o'er the isle in torrents                      9
fell_]

The ballad was printed from a Manuscript written in 1854.
I give a reduced facsimile of a page of an earlier
Manuscript written in 1830.

The Wicked Stepmother.  [_Sir Ove he has no daughter but                14
one_]

This ballad should be read in conjunction with _The
Wicked Stepmother_, _No. ii_, printed in _Young Swaigder
or The Force of Runes and Other Ballads_, 1913, pp.
23-37.

The complete Manuscript of _The Dalby Bear and Other Ballads_ is in the
library of Mr. Clement Shorter.

There is a copy of _The Dalby Bear and Other Ballads_ in the Library of
the British Museum.  The Press-mark is C. 44. d. 38.

                [Picture: Manuscript of Tygge Hermandsen]



(24.)  [THE MERMAID'S PROPHECY: 1913]


The / Mermaid's Prophecy / and other / Songs relating to Queen Dagmar /
By / George Borrow / London: / Printed for Private Circulation / 1913.

Collation:--Square demy octavo, pp. 30; consisting of Half-title (with
blank reverse) pp. 1-2; Title-page, as above (with blank reverse) pp.
3-4; and Text of the _Songs_ pp. 5-30.  There are head-lines throughout,
each page being headed with the title of the particular _Song_ occupying
it.  Following p. 30 is a leaf, with a notice regarding the American
copyright upon the reverse, and with the following imprint upon its
recto: "_London_: / _Printed for Thomas J. Wise_, _Hampstead_, _N.W._ /
_Edition limited to Thirty Copies_."  The signatures are A and B (two
sheets, each eight leaves), the one inset within the other.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, and with the
title-page reproduced upon the front.  The leaves measure 8.75 x 6.875
inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed.

                               _Contents_.

                                                                      PAGE

Songs relating to Queen Dagmar:

I.  King Valdemar's Wooing.  [_Valdemar King and Sir                     5
Strange bold_]

II.  Queen Dagmar's Arrival in Denmark.  [_It was                       14
Bohemia's Queen began_]

III.  The Mermaid's Prophecy.  [_The King he has caught                 19
the fair mermaid_, _and deep_]

Rosmer.  [_Buckshank bold and Elfinstone_]                              25

This ballad should be read in conjunction with _Rosmer
Mereman_, printed in _Young Swaigder or The Force of
Runes and Other Ballads_, 1913, pp. 16-22.

Of _The Mermaid's Prophecy_ there are two Manuscripts extant.  In the
earlier of these, written in 1829, the Poem is entitled _The Mermaid's
Prophecy_.  In the later Manuscript, written apparently about the year
1854, it is entitled _The Mermaid_ only.  From this later Manuscript the
Poem was printed in the present volume.

Unlike the majority of Borrow's Manuscripts, which usually exhibit
extreme differences of text when two holographs exist of the same Poem,
the texts of the two versions of _The Mermaid's Prophecy_ are practically
identical, the opening stanza alone presenting any important variation.
Here are the two versions of this stanza:

                                     1829

    The Dane King had the Mermaiden caught by his swains,
       _The mermaid dances the floor upon_--
    And her in the tower had loaded with chains,
       Because his will she had not done.

                                     1854

    The King he has caught the fair mermaid, and deep
       (_The mermaid dances the floor upon_)
    In the dungeon has placed her, to pine and to weep,
       Because his will she had not done.

There is a copy of _The Mermaid's Prophecy and other Songs relating to
Queen Dagmar_ in the Library of the British Museum.  The Press mark is C.
44. d. 38.



(25.)  [HAFBUR AND SIGNE: 1913]


Hafbur and Signe / A Ballad / By / George Borrow / London: / Printed for
Private Circulation / 1913.

Collation:--Square demy octavo, pp. 23; consisting of: Half-title (with
blank reverse) pp. 1-2; Title-page, as above (with blank reverse) pp.
3-4; and Text of the _Ballad_ pp. 5-23.  The head-line is _Hafbur and
Signe_ throughout, upon both sides of the page.  Upon the reverse of p.
23 is the following imprint: "_London_: / _Printed for Thomas J. Wise_,
_Hampstead_, _N.W._ / _Edition limited to Thirty Copies_."  The
signatures are A (a half-sheet of four leaves), with B (a full sheet of
eight leaves) inset within it.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, and with the
title-page reproduced upon the front.  The leaves measure 8.5 x 6.875
inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed.

                               _Contents_.

                                                                      PAGE

Hafbur and Signe.  [_Young Hafbur King and Sivard King                   5
They lived in bitter enmity_]



Of _Hafbur and Signe_ two Manuscripts are extant.  The first of these was
doubtless written in the early summer of 1830, for on _June_ 1_st_ of
that year Borrow wrote to Dr. Bowring:

    _I send you_ "_Hafbur and Signe_" _to deposit in the Scandinavian
    Treasury_ [i.e. among the _Songs of Scandinavia_].

The later Manuscript was written in or about the year 1854.

The earlier of these two Manuscripts is in the collection of Mr. Herbert
T. Butler.  The later Manuscript is in my own library.

As is usually the case when two Manuscripts of one of Borrow's ballads
are available, the difference in poetical value of the two versions of
_Hafbur and Signe_ is considerably.  Few examples could exhibit more
distinctly the advance made by Borrow in the art of poetical composition
during the interval.  Here are some stanzas from the version of 1854.

    _So late it was at nightly tide_,
       _Down fell the dew o'er hill and mead_;
    _Then lists it her proud Signild fair_
       _With all the rest to bed to speed_.

    "_O where shall I a bed procure_?"
       _Said Hafbur then_, _the King's good son_.
    "_O thou shalt rest in chamber best_
       _With me the bolsters blue upon_."

    _Proud Signild foremost went_, _and stepped_
       _The threshold of her chamber o'er_;
    _With secret glee came Hafbur_, _he_
       _Had never been so glad before_.

    _Then lighted they the waxen lights_,
       _So fairly twisted were the same_.
    _Behind_, _behind_, _with ill at mind_,
       _The wicked servant maiden came_

The following are the parallel stanzas from the version of 1830

    _So late it was in the nightly tide_,
       _Dew fell o'er hill and mead_;
    _Then listed her proud Signild fair_
       _With the rest to bed to speed_.

    "_O where shall I a bed procure_?"
       _Said Hafbour the King's good son_.
    "_In the chamber best with me thou shalt rest_,
       _The bolsters blue upon_."

    _Proud Signild foremost went and stepp'd_
       _The high chamber's threshold o'er_,
    _Prince Hafbour came after with secret laughter_,
       _He'd ne'er been delighted more_

    _Then lighted they the waxen lights_,
       _Fair twisted were the same_.
    _Behind_, _behind with ill in her mind_
       _The wicked servant came_.

I give herewith a reduced facsimile of the last page of each Manuscript.

                    [Picture: Hafbur and Signe--1830]

                    [Picture: Hafbur and Signe--1854]

There is a copy of _Hafbur and Signe A Ballad_ in the Library of the
British Museum.  The Press-mark is C. 44. d. 38.

                [Picture: Title page of Hafbur and Signe]



(26)  [THE STORY OF YVASHKA: 1913]


The Story / of / Yvashka with the Bear's Ear / Translated from the
Russian / By / George Borrow / London: / Printed for Private Circulation
/ 1913.

Collation:--Square demy octavo, pp. 23; consisting of: Half title (with
blank reverse) pp. 1-2; Frontispiece (with blank recto) pp. 3-4;
Title-page, as above (with blank reverse) pp. 5-6; _Introduction_ (by
Borrow) pp. 7-10; and Text of the _Story_ pp. 11-23.  The head-line is
_Yvashka with the Bears Ear_ throughout, upon both sides of the page.
Upon the reverse of p. 23 is the following imprint: "_London_: / _Printed
for Thomas J. Wise_, _Hampstead_, _N. W._ / _Edition limited to Thirty
Copies_."  The signatures are A (a half sheet of 4 leaves), and B (a full
sheet of 8 leaves), the one inset within the other.  The Frontispiece
consists of a reduced facsimile of the first page of the original
Manuscript in Borrow's handwriting.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, and with the
title-page reproduced upon the front.  The leaves measure 8.5 x 6.875
inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed.

_The Story of Yvashka_ was the second of three _Russian Popular Tales_,
which were contributed by Borrow to the pages of _Once a Week_ during
1862.  _The Story of Yvashka_ appeared in the number for _May_ 17_th_,
1862, Vol. vi, pp. 572-574.

The _Story_ was reprinted in _The Sphere_, _Feb._ 1_st_, 1913, p. 136.

The Text of _Yvashka_ as printed in _Once a Week_ differs appreciably
from that printed in _The Sphere_, and in the private pamphlet of 1913,
both of which are identical.  The Manuscript from which the two latter
versions were taken was the original translation.  The version which
appeared in _Once a Week_ was printed from a fresh Manuscript (which
fills 11 quarto pages) prepared in 1862.  A reduced facsimile of the
first page of the earlier Manuscript (which extends to 5.125 quarto
pages) will be found reproduced upon the opposite page.  In this
Manuscript the story is entitled _The History of Jack with the Bear's
Ear_.

Judging from the appearance of this MS., both paper and handwriting,
together with that of fragments which remain of the original MSS. of the
other two published _Tales_, it seems probable that the whole were
produced by Borrow during his residence in St. Petersburg.  Should such
surmise be correct, the _Tales_ are contemporary with _Targum_.

The _Once a Week_ version of _The Story of Yvashka_ was reprinted in _The
Avon Booklet_, Vol. ii, 1904, pp. 199-210.

There is a copy of _The Story of Yvashka_ in the Library of the British
Museum.  The Press-mark is C. 44. d. 37.

       [Picture: Manuscript of History of Jack with the Bear's Ear]



(27)  [THE VERNER RAVEN: 1913]


The Verner Raven / The Count of Vendel's / Daughter / and Other Ballads /
By / George Borrow / London: / Printed for Private Circulation / 1913.

Collation:--Square demy octavo, pp. 27; consisting of: Half-title (with
blank reverse) pp. 1-2; Title-page, as above (with a note regarding the
American copyright upon the centre of the reverse) pp. 3-4, and Text of
the _Ballads_ pp. 5-27.  There are headlines throughout, each page being
headed with the title of the particular _Ballad_ occupying it.  Upon the
reverse of p. 27 is the following imprint: "_London_ / _Printed for
Thomas J. Wise_, _Hampstead_, _N.W._ / _Edition limited to Thirty
Copies_."  The signatures are A (a quarter-sheet of 2 leaves), B (a half
sheet of 4 leaves), and C (a full sheet of 8 leaves), all inset within
each other.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, and with the
title-page reproduced upon the front.  The leaves measure 8.5 x 6.875
inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed.

                               _Contents_.

                                                                      PAGE

THE VERNER RAVEN.  [_The Raven he flies in the evening                   5
tide_]

THE COUNT OF VENDEL'S DAUGHTER.  [_Within a bower the                   12
womb I left_]

Previously printed in _Once a Week_, Vol. viii, _January_
3_rd_, 1863, pp. 35-36.

THE CRUEL MOTHER-IN-LAW.  [_From his home and his country               18
Sir Volmor should fare_]

THE FAITHFUL KING OF THULE.  [_A King so true and                       25
steady_]

THE FAIRIES' SONG.  [_Balmy the evening air_]                           27

NOTE.--Each poem to which no reference is attached, appeared for the
first time in this volume.

The Manuscript of _The Count of Vendel's Daughter_ is included in the
extensive collection of Borroviana belonging to Mr. F. J. Farrell, of
Great Yarmouth.

There is a copy of _The Verner Raven_, _The Count of Vendel's Daughter_,
_and Other Ballads_ in the Library of the British Museum.  The Press-mark
is C. 44. d. 38.



(28)  [THE RETURN OF THE DEAD: 1913]


The / Return of the Dead / and Other Ballads / By / George Borrow /
London: / Printed for Private Circulation / 1913.

Collation:--Square demy octavo, pp. 22; consisting of: Half-title (with
blank reverse) pp. 1-2; Title-page, as above (with blank reverse) pp.
3-4; and Text of the _Ballads_ pp. 5-22.  There are head-lines
throughout, each page being headed with the title of the particular
_Ballad_ occupying it.  Following p. 22 is a leaf, with blank reverse,
and with the following imprint upon its recto: "_London_: / _Printed for
Thomas J. Wise_, _Hampstead_, _N.W._ / _Edition limited to Thirty
copies_."  The signatures are A (a half-sheet of four leaves), with B (a
full sheet of eight leaves), inset within it.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, and with the
title-page reproduced upon the front.  The leaves measure 8.5 x 6.875
inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed.

                               _Contents_.

                                                                      PAGE

The Return of the Dead.  [_Swayne Dyring o'er to the                     5
island strayed_]

The Transformed Damsel.  [_I take my axe upon my back_]                 13

The Forced Consent.  [_Within her own fair castelaye_]                  15

Ingeborg's Disguise.  [_Such handsome court clothes the                 19
proud Ingeborg buys_]

Song.  [_I've pleasure not a little_]                                   22

As a further example of Borrow's shorter Ballads, I give _Ingeborg's
Disguise_ in full.  The entire series included in _The Return of the Dead
and Other Ballads_ ranks among the most uniformly successful of Borrow's
achievements in this particular branch of literature:--

                         _INGEBORG'S DISGUISE_ {161}

    _Such handsome court clothes the proud Ingeborg buys_,
    _Says she_, "_I'll myself as a courtier disguise_."

    _Proud Ingeborg hastens her steed to bestride_,
    _Says she_, "_I'll away with the King to reside_."

    "_Thou gallant young King to my speech lend an ear_,
    _Hast thou any need of my services here_?"

    "_O yes_, _my sweet lad_, _of a horseboy I've need_,
    _If there were but stable room here for his steed_.

    "_But thy steed in the stall with my own can be tied_,
    _And thou_ '_neath the linen shalt sleep by my side_."

    _Three years in the palate good service she wrought_
    _That she was a woman no one ever thought_.

    _She filled for three years of a horse-boy the place_,
    _And the steeds of the monarch she drove out to graze_.

    _She led for three years the King's steeds to the brook_,
    _For else than a youth no one Ingeborg took_.

    _Proud Ingeborg knows how to make the dames gay_,
    _She also can sing in such ravishing way_.

    _The hair on her head is like yellow spun gold_,
    _To her beauty the heart of the prince was not cold_.

    _But at length up and down in the palace she strayed_,
    _Her colour and hair began swiftly to fade_.

    _What eye has seen ever so wondrous a case_?
    _The boy his own spurs to his heel cannot brace_.

    _The horse-boy is brought to so wondrous a plight_,
    _To draw his own weapon he has not the might_.

    _The son of the King to five damsels now sends_,
    _And Ingeborg fair to their care he commends_.

    _Proud Ingeborg took they and wrapped in their weed_,
    _And to the stone chamber with her they proceed_.

    _Upon the blue cushions they Ingeborg laid_,
    _Where light of two beautiful sons she is made_.

    _Then in came the prince_, _smiled the babies to view_:
    "'_Tis not every horse-boy can bear such a two_."

    _He patted her soft on her cheek sleek and fair_:
    "_Forget my heart's dearest all sorrow and care_."

    _He placed the gold crown on her temples I ween_:
    "_With me shalt thou live as my wife and my Queen_."

The complete Manuscript of _The Return of the Dead and Other Ballads_ is
in my own library.

There is a copy of _The Return of the Dead and Other Ballads_ in the
Library of the British Museum.  The Press-mark is C.44.d.38.

             [Picture: Title page of The Return of the Dead]

               [Picture: Manuscript of Ingeborg's Disguise]



(29)  [AXEL THORDSON: 1913]


Axel Thordson / and Fair Valborg / A Ballad / By / George Borrow /
London: / Printed for Private Circulation / 1913.

Collation:--Square demy octavo, pp. 45; consisting of: Half-title (with
blank reverse) pp. 1-2; Title-page, as above (with a notice regarding the
American copyright upon the reverse) pp. 3-4; and text of _the Ballad_
pp. 5-45.  The head-line is _Axel Thordson and Fair Valborg_ throughout,
upon both sides of the page.  Upon the reverse of p. 45 is the following
imprint: "_London_: / _Printed for Thomas J. Wise_, _Hampstead_, _N.W._ /
_Edition limited to Thirty Copies_."  The signatures are A to C (Three
sheets, each eight leaves) inset within each other.  The last leaf of
Sig. C is a blank.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, and with the
title-page reproduced upon the front.  The leaves measure 8.5 x 6.875
inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed.

                               _Contents_.

                                                                      PAGE

Axel Thordson and Fair Valborg.  [_At the wide board at                  5
tables play_]

In some respects _Axel Thordson and Fair Valborg_ is the most ambitious
of Borrow's Ballads.  It is considerably the longest, unless we regard
the four "_Songs_" of which _Marsk Stig_ is comprised as forming one
complete poem.  But it is by no means the most successful; indeed it is
invariably in his shorter Ballads that we find Borrow obtaining the
happiest result.

Two Manuscripts of _Axel Thordson and Fair Valborg_ are available.  The
first was prepared in 1829 for the _Songs of Scandinavia_.  The second
was revised in 1854 for the _Koempe Viser_.  This later Manuscript is in
my own possession.  I give herewith a reduced facsimile of one of its
pages.

There is a copy of _Axel Thordson and Fair Valborg_ in the Library of the
British Museum.  The Press-mark is C.44.d.38.

             [Picture: Axel Thordson and Fair Valborg--1854]



(30)  [KING HACON'S DEATH: 1913]


King Hacon's Death / and / Bran and the Black Dog / Two Ballads / By /
George Borrow / London: / Printed for Private Circulation / 1913.

Collation:--Crown octavo, pp. 14; consisting of: Half-title (with blank
reverse) pp. 1-2; Title-page, as above (with blank reverse) pp. 3-4; and
Text of the _Two Ballads_ pp. 5-14.  There are head-lines throughout,
each page being headed with the title of the particular _Ballad_
occupying it.  Following p. 14 is a leaf, with blank reverse, and with
the following imprint upon its recto, "_London_: / _Printed for Thomas J.
Wise_, _Hampstead_, _N.W._ / _Edition limited to Thirty Copies_."  There
are no signatures, the pamphlet being composed of a single sheet, folded
to form sixteen pages.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, and with the
title-page reproduced upon the front.  The leaves measure 7.5 x 5 inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed.

                               _Contents_.

                                                                      PAGE

King Hacon's Death.  ["_And now has happened in our                      5
day_"]

Bran and the Black Dog.  ["_The day we went to the hills                11
to chase_"]

I venture to regard this ballad of the fight between Bran
and the Black Dog as one of Borrow's happiest efforts.
Here are some of its vigorous stanzas:

    _The valiant Finn arose next day_,
       _Just as the sun rose above the foam_;
    _And he beheld up the Lairgo way_,
       _A man clad in red with a black dog come_.

    _He came up with a lofty gait_,
       _Said not for shelter he sought our doors_;
    _And wanted neither drink nor meat_,
       _But would match his dog_ '_gainst the best of
    ours_.

                          * * * * *

    "_A strange fight this_," _the great Finn said_,
       _As he turn'd his face towards his clan_;
    _Then his face with rage grew fiery red_,
       _And he struck with his fist his good dog Bran_.

    "_Take off from his neck the collar of gold_,
       _Not right for him now such a thing to bear_;
    _And a free good fight we shall behold_
       _Betwixt my dog and his black compeer_."

    _The dogs their noses together placed_,
       _Then their blood was scatter'd on every side_;
    _Desperate the fight_, _and the fight did last_
       '_Till the brave black dog in Bran's grip died_.

                          * * * * *

    _We went to the dwelling of high Mac Cuol_,
       _With the King to drink_, _and dice_, _and throw_;
    _The King was joyous_, _his hall was full_,
       _Though empty and dark this night I trow_.

There is a copy of _King Hacon's Death and Bran and the Black Dog_ in the
Library of the British Museum.  The Pressmark is C. 44. d. 38.



(31)  [MARSK STIG'S DAUGHTERS: 1913]


Marsk Stig's / Daughters / and other / Songs and Ballads / By / George
Borrow / London: / Printed for Private Circulation / 1913.

Collation:--Crown octavo, pp. 21; consisting of: Half-title (with blank
reverse), pp. 1-2; Title-page, as above (with blank reverse), pp. 3-4;
Table of _Contents_, pp. 5-6; and Text of the _Songs and Ballads_, pp.
7-21.  The reverse of p. 21 is blank.  The head-line is _Songs and
Ballads_ throughout, upon both sides of the page.  The pamphlet concludes
with a leaf, with blank reverse, and with the following imprint upon its
recto: "_London_: / _Printed for Thomas J. Wise_, _Hampstead_, _N.W._ /
_Edition limited to Thirty Copies_."  There are no signatures, but the
pamphlet consists of a half-sheet (of four leaves), with a full sheet (of
eight leaves) inset within it.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, and with the
title-page reproduced upon the front.  The leaves measure 7.5 x 5 inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed.

                               _Contents_.

                                                                      PAGE

Marsk Stig's Daughters.  [_Two daughters fair the Marshal                7
had_]

The Three Expectants.  [_There are three for my death                   11
that now pine_]

Translation.  [_One summer morn_, _as I was seeking_]                   13

The English Gipsy:

He.  [_As I to the town was going one day_                              14
_My Roman lass I met by the way_]

She.  [_As I to the town was going one day_                             14
_I met a young Roman upon the way_]

The first of these two stanzas had been printed
previously in _Romano Lavo-Lil_, 1874, p. 183.

Gipsy Song.  [_Up_, _up_, _brothers_]                                   16

The first stanza of this _Song_ was printed previously
(under the title _Run for it_!) in _Romano Lavo-Lil_,
1874, p. 195.

Our Heart is Heavy, Brother.  [_The strength of the ox_]                17

Another version of this poem was printed previously
(under the title _Sorrowful Tears_, and with an entirely
different text) in _Romano Lavo-Lil_, 1874, p. 211.

In order to give some clear idea of the difference
between the two versions, I quote the opening stanza of
each:

                            1874.

    _The wit and the skill_
    _Of the Father of ill_,
       _Who's clever indeed_,
    _If they would hope_
    _With their foes to cope_
       _The Romany need_.

                            1913.

    _The strength of the ox_,
    _The wit of the fox_,
       _And the leveret's speed_;
    _All_, _all to oppose_
    _Their numerous foes_
       _The Romany need_.

Song.  [_Nastrond's blazes_]                                            19

Another version of this _Song_ was printed previously
(divided up, and with many textual variations) in _The
Death of Balder_, 1899, pp. 53-54.

Lines.  [_To read the great mysterious Past_]                           21

As a specimen of Borrow's lighter lyrical verse, as
distinguished from his Ballads, I give the text of the
_Translation_ noted above, accompanied by a facsimile of
the first page of the MS.:

                         TRANSLATION.

    One summer morn, as I was seeking
       My ponies in their green retreat,
    I heard a lady sing a ditty
       To me which sounded strangely sweet:

    _I am the ladye_, _I am the ladye_,
       _I am the ladye loving the knight_;
    _I in the green wood_, '_neath the green branches_,
       _In the night season sleep with the knight_.

    Since yonder summer morn of beauty
       I've seen full many a gloomy year;
    But in my mind still lives the ditty
       That in the green wood met my ear:

    _I am the ladye_, _I am the ladye_,
       _I am the ladye loving the knight_;
    _I in the green wood_, '_neath the green branches_,
       _In the night season sleep with the knight_.

A second Manuscript of this _Translation_ has the 'ditty'
arranged in eight lines, instead of in four.  In this MS.
the word _ladye_ is spelled in the conventional manner:

    _I am the lady_,
    _I am the lady_,
    _I am the lady_
       _Loving the knight_;
    _I in the greenwood_,
    '_Neath the green branches_,
    _Through the night season_
       _Sleep with the knight_.

_Note_.--Each poem to which no reference is attached appeared for the
first time in this volume.

There is a copy of _Marsk Stig's Daughters and other Songs and Ballads_
in the Library of the British Museum.  The Press-mark is C. 44. d. 38.

             [Picture: Title page of Marsk Stig's Daughters]

                 [Picture: Manuscript 'One summer morn']



(32)  [THE TALE OF BRYNILD: 1913]


The Tale of Brynild / and / King Valdemar and his Sister / Two Ballads /
By / George Borrow / London: Printed for Private Circulation / 1913.

Collation:--Square demy octavo, pp. 35; consisting of: Half-title (with
blank reverse) pp. 1-2; Title-page as above (with a notice regarding the
American copyright upon the reverse) pp. 3-4; and Text of the _Ballads_
pp. 5-35.  There are head-lines throughout, each page being headed with
the title of the particular _Ballad_ occupying it.  Upon the reverse of
p. 35 is the following imprint: "_London_: / _Printed for Thomas J.
Wise_, _Hampstead_, _N.W._ / _Edition limited to Thirty Copies_."  The
signatures are A (a quarter-sheet of two leaves), and B and C (two
sheets, each eight leaves), each inset within the other.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, and with the
title-page reproduced upon the front.  The leaves measure 8.5 x 6.875
inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed.

                               _Contents_.

                                                                      PAGE

The Tale of Brynild.  [_Sivard he a colt has got_]                       5

Of _The Tale of Brynild_, two manuscripts are extant,
written in 1829 and 1854 respectively.  The text of the
latter, from which the ballad was printed in the present
pamphlet, is immeasurably the superior.

King Valdemar and his sister.  [_See_, _see_, _with Queen               13
Sophy sits Valdemar bold_]

Mirror of Cintra.  [_Tiny fields in charming order_]                    34

The Harp.  [_The harp to everyone is dear_]                             35

There can be little doubt that the series of poems included in this
volume present Borrow at his best as a writer of Ballads.

There is a copy of _The Tale of Brynild and King Valdemar and his Sister_
in the Library of the British Museum.  The Pressmark is C. 44. d. 38.

               [Picture: Title page of The Tale of Brynild]



(33)  [PROUD SIGNILD: 1913]


Proud Signild / and / Other Ballads / By / George Borrow / London: /
Printed for Private Circulation / 1913.

Collation: Square demy octavo, pp. 28; consisting of: Half-title (with
blank reverse) pp. 1-2; Title-page, as above (with a notice regarding the
American copyright upon the reverse) pp. 3-4; and Text of the _Ballads_
pp. 5-28.  There are head-lines throughout, each page being headed with
the title of the particular _Ballad_ occupying it.  At the foot of p. 28
is the following imprint: "_London_: _Printed for Thomas J. Wise_,
_Hampstead_, _N.W._  _Edition limited to Thirty Copies_."  The signatures
are A (six leaves), and B (a full sheet of eight leaves), the one inset
within the other.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with the title-page reproduced
upon the front.  The leaves measure 8.5 x 6.875 inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed.

                               _Contents_.

                                                                      PAGE

Proud Signild.  [_Proud Signild's bold brothers have                     5
taken her hand_]

The Damsel of the Wood.  [_The Knight takes hawk_, _and                 16
the man takes hound_]

Damsel Mettie.  [_Knights Peter and Olaf they sat o'er                  22
the board_]

As is the case with quite a number of Borrow's ballads,
two Manuscripts of _Damsel Mettie_ have been preserved.
The earlier, composed not later than 1829, is written
upon paper water marked with the date 1828; the later is
written upon paper water-marked 1843.  The earlier
version has a refrain, "'_Neath the linden tree watches
the lord of my heart_," which is wanting in the later.
Otherwise the text of both MSS. is identical, the
differences to be observed between them being merely
verbal.  For example, the seventh couplet in the earlier
reads:

    _I'll gage my war courser_, _the steady and tried_,
    _That thou canst not obtain the fair Mettie_, _my
    bride_.

In the later MS. this couplet reads:

    _I'll gage my war courser_, _the steady and tried_,
    _Thou never canst lure the fair Mettie_, _my bride_.

There is a copy of _Proud Signild and Other Ballads_ in the Library of
the British Museum.  The Press-mark is C. 44. d. 38.



(34)  [ULF VAN YERN: 1913]


Ulf Van Yern / and / Other Ballads / By / George Borrow / London: /
Printed for Private Circulation / 1913.

Collation:--Square demy octavo, pp. 27; consisting of: Half-title (with
blank reverse) pp. 1-2; Title-page (with notice regarding the American
copyright upon the reverse) pp. 3-4; and Text of the _Ballads_ pp. 5-27.
There are head-lines throughout, each page being headed with the title of
the particular _Ballad_ occupying it.  Upon the reverse of p. 27 is the
following imprint: "_London_: / _Printed for Thomas J. Wise_,
_Hampstead_, _N.W._ / _Edition limited to Thirty Copies_."  The
signatures are A (a quarter-sheet of two leaves), B (a half-sheet of four
leaves), and C (a full sheet of eight leaves), all inset within each
other.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, and with the
title-page reproduced upon the front.  The leaves measure 8.5 x 6.875
inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed.

                               _Contents_.

                                                                      PAGE

Ulf Van Yern.  [_It was youthful Ulf Van Yern_]                          5

This ballad was here printed from the Manuscript prepared
for the projected _Koempe Viser_ of 1854.  In the MS of
1829 the ballad is entitled _Ulf Van Yern and Vidrik
Verlandson_.  The texts of the two versions differ widely
in almost every stanza.

The Chosen Knight.  [_Sir Oluf rode forth over hill and                 16
lea_]

Sir Swerkel.  [_There's a dance in the hall of Sir                      19
Swerkel the Childe_]

Finn and the Damsel, or The Trial of Wits.  ["_What's                   23
rifer than leaves_?" _Finn cried_]

Epigrams by Carolan:

1.  On Friars.  [_Would'st thou on good terms with friars               26
live_]

2.  On a surly Butler, who had refused him admission to                 26
the cellar.  [_O Dermod Flynn it grieveth me_]

Lines.  [_How deadly the blow I received_]                              27

The last four lines of this Poem had already served (but
with a widely different text) as the last four lines of
the _Ode from the Gaelic_, printed in _Romantic Ballads_,
1826, pp 142-143.

There is a copy of _Ulf Van Yern and Other Ballads_ in the Library of the
British Museum.  The Press-mark is C. 44. d. 38.

                  [Picture: Manuscript of Damsel Mattie]

                   [Picture: Manuscript of Sir Swerkel]



(35)  [ELLEN OF VILLENSKOV: 1913]


Ellen of Villenskov / and Other Ballads / By / George Borrow / London: /
Printed for Private Circulation / 1913.

Collation:--Square demy octavo, pp. 22; consisting of: Half-title (with
blank reverse) pp. 1-2; Title-page, as above (with blank reverse) pp.
3-4; and Text of the _Ballads_ pp. 5-22.  There are head-lines
throughout, each page being headed with the title of the particular
_Ballad_ occupying it.  Following p. 22 is a leaf, with blank reverse,
and with the following imprint upon its recto: "_London_: / _Printed for
Thomas J. Wise_, _Hampstead_, _N.W._ / _Edition limited to Thirty
Copies_."  The signatures are A (a half-sheet of four leaves), with B (a
full sheet of eight leaves) inset within it.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, and with the
title-page reproduced upon the front.  The leaves measure 8.5 x 6.875
inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed.

                               _Contents_.

                                                                      PAGE

Ellen of Villenskov.  [_There lies a wold in Vester Haf_]                5

Uranienborg.  [_Thou who the strand dost wander_]                       13

Previously printed, with an earlier and far inferior
text, under the title _The Ruins of Uranienborg_, in _The
Foreign Quarterly Review_.  _June_, 1830, pp. 85-86.

The Ready Answer.  [_The brother to his dear sister                     19
spake_]

Epigrams:

1.  _There's no living_, _my boy_, _without plenty of                   22
gold_

2.  _O think not you'll change what on high is designed_                22

3.  _Load not thyself with gold_, _O mortal man_, _for                  22
know_

NOTE.--Each poem to which no reference is attached, appeared for the
first time in this volume.

The Manuscripts of the poems included in _Ellen of Villenskov and Other
Ballads_ are in the Library of Mr. Clement K. Shorter.

There is a copy of _Ellen of Villenskov and Other Ballads_ in the Library
of the British Museum.  The Press-mark is C. 44. d. 38.



(36)  [THE SONGS OF RANILD: 1913]


The Songs of Ranild / By / George Borrow / London: / Printed for Private
Circulation / 1913.

Collation:--Square demy octavo, pp. 26; consisting of: Half-title (with
blank reverse) pp. 1-2; Title-page, as above (with blank reverse) pp.
3-4; and Text of the Poems pp. 5-26.  There are head-lines throughout,
each page being headed with the title of the particular poem occupying
it.  Following p. 26 is a leaf, with a notice regarding the American
copyright upon the reverse, and with the following imprint upon its
recto: "_London_: / _Printed for Thomas J. Wise_, _Hampstead_, _N.W._ /
_Edition limited to Thirty Copies_."  The signatures are A (six leaves),
and B (a full sheet of eight leaves), the one inset within the other.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, and with the
title-page reproduced upon the front.  The leaves measure 8.5 x 6.875
inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed.

                               _Contents_.

                                                                      PAGE

The Songs of Ranild:

Song the First.  [_Up Riber's street the dance they ply_]                5

Song the Second.  [_To saddle his courser Ranild cried_]                10

Song the Third.  [_So wide around the tidings bound_]                   13

Child Stig and Child Findal.  [_Child Stig and Child                    17
Findal two brothers were they_]

_The Songs of Ranild_ were first written in 1826, and
were finally prepared for press in 1854.  I give
herewith, facing p. 191, a facsimile, the exact size of
the original, of the first page of the first draft of
_Song the Third_.

The complete MS. from which these four Ballads were
printed is in the Library of Mr. J. A. Spoor, of Chicago.

There is a copy of _The Songs of Ranild_ in the Library of the British
Museum.  The Press-mark is C. 44. d. 38.

          [Picture: Manuscript of Songs Relating to Marsk Stig]



(37)  [NIELS EBBESEN: 1913]


Niels Ebbesen / and / Germand Gladenswayne / Two Ballads / By / George
Borrow / London: / Printed for Private Circulation / 1913.

Collation:--Square demy octavo, pp. 32; consisting of: Half-title (with
blank reverse) pp. 1-2; Title-page as above (with notice regarding the
American copyright upon the reverse) pp. 3-4; and Text of the _Ballads_
pp. 5-32.  There are head-lines throughout, each page being headed with
the title of the particular _Ballad_ occupying it.  At the foot of p. 32
is the following imprint: "_London_: / _Printed for Thomas J. Wise_,
_Hampstead_, _N.W._ / _Edition limited to Thirty Copies_."  The
signatures are A and B (two sheets, each eight leaves), the one inset
within the other.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, and with the
title-page reproduced upon the front.  The leaves measure 8.5 x 6.875
inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed.

                               _Contents_.

                                                                      PAGE

Niels Ebbesen.  [_All his men the Count collects_]                       5

Germand Gladenswayne.  [_Our King and Queen sat o'er the                22
board_]

There is a copy of _Niels Ebbesen and Germand Gladenswayne_ in the
Library of the British Museum.  The Press-mark is C. 44. d. 38.

                  [Picture: Title page of Niels Ebbesen]



(38)  [CHILD MAIDELVOLD: 1913]


Child Maidelvold / and Other Ballads / By / George Borrow / London: /
Printed for Private Circulation / 1913.

Collation:--Square demy octavo, pp. 27; consisting of: Half-title (with
blank reverse) pp. 1-2; Title-page, as above (with a notice regarding the
American copyright upon the reverse) pp. 3-4; and Text of the _Ballads_
pp. 5-27.  There are head-lines throughout, each page being headed with
the title of the particular _Ballad_ occupying it.  Upon the reverse of
p. 27 is the following imprint: "_London_: / _Printed for Thomas J.
Wise_, _Hampstead_, _N.W._ / _Edition limited to Thirty Copies_."  The
signatures are A (a quarter-sheet of two leaves), B (a half-sheet of four
leaves), and C (a full sheet of eight leaves), each inset within the
other.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, and with the
title-page reproduced upon the front.  The leaves measure 8.5 x 6.875
inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed.

                               _Contents_.

                                                                      PAGE

Child Maidelvold.  [_The fair Sidselil_, _of all maidens                 5
the flower_]

Another, but widely different and altogether inferior,
version of this beautiful and pathetic ballad--one of
Borrow's best--was printed (under the title _Skion
Middel_) in _The Monthly Magazine_, _November_, 1823, p.
308; and again (under the amended title _Sir Middel_, and
with a slightly revised text) in _Romantic Ballads_,
1826, pp. 28-31.  In these earlier versions the name of
the heroine is Swanelil in place of Sidselil, and that of
the hero is Sir Middel in place of Child Maidelvold.

Sir Peter.  [_Sir Peter and Kirstin they sat by the                     11
board_]

Ingefred and Gudrune.  [_Ingefred and Gudrune they sate                 15
in their bower_]

Sir Ribolt.  [_Ribolt the son of a Count was he_]                       20

As a further example of these Ballads I give _Ingefred and Gudrune_ in
full.

                         _INGEFRED AND GUDRUNE_ {199}

    _Ingefred and Gudrune they sate in their bower_,
    _Each bloomed a beauteous fragrant flower_--
       _So sweet it is in summer tide_!

    _A working the gold fair Ingefred kept_,
    _Still sate Gudrune_, _and bitterly wept_.

    "_Dear sister Gudrune so fain I'd know_
    _Why down thy cheek the salt tears flow_?"

    "_Cause enough have I to be thus forlorn_,
    _With a load of sorrow my heart is worn_.

    "_Hear_, _Ingefred_, _hear what I say to thee_,
    _Wilt thou to-night stand bride for me_?

    "_If bride for me thou wilt stand to-night_,
    _I'll give thee my bridal clothes thee to requite_.

    "_And more_, _much more to thee I'll give_,
    _All my bride jewels thou shalt receive_."

    "_O_, _I will not stand for bride in thy room_,
    _Save I also obtain thy merry bridegroom_."

    "_Betide me whatever the Lord ordain_,
    _From me my bridegroom thou never shalt gain_."

    _In silks so costly the bride they arrayed_,
    _And unto the kirk the bride they conveyed_.

    _In golden cloth weed the holy priest stands_,
    _He joins of Gudrune and Samsing the hands_.

    _O'er the downs and green grass meadows they sped_,
    _Where the herdsman watched his herd as it fed_.

    "_Of thy beauteous self_, _dear Damsel_, _take heed_,
    _Ne'er enter the house of Sir Samsing_, _I rede_.

    "_Sir Samsing possesses two nightingales_
    _Who tell of the Ladies such wondrous tales_.

    "_With their voices of harmony they can declare_
    _Whether maiden or none has fallen to his share_."

    _The chariot they stopped in the green wood shade_,
    _An exchange_ '_twixt them of their clothes they made_.

    _They change of their dress whatever they please_,
    _Their faces they cannot exchange with ease_.

    _To Sir Samsung's house the bride they conveyed_,
    _Of the ruddy gold no spare was made_.

    _On the bridal throne the bride they plac'd_,
    _They skinked the mead for the bride to taste_.

    _Then said from his place the court buffoon_:
    "_Methinks thou art Ingefred_, _not Gudrune_."

    _From off her hand a gold ring she took_,
    _Which she gave the buffoon with entreating look_.

    _Said he_: "_I'm an oaf_, _and have drunk too hard_,
    _To words of mine pay no regard_."

    '_Twas deep at night_, _and down fell the mist_,
    _To her bed the young bride they assist_.

    _Sir Samsing spoke to his nightingales twain_:
    "_Before my young bride sing now a strain_.

    "_A song now sing which shall avouch_
    _Whether I've a maiden or none in my couch_."

    "_A maid's in the bed_, _that's certain and sure_,
    _Gudrune is standing yet on the floor_."

    "_Proud Ingefred_, _straight from my couch retire_!
    _Gudrune come hither_, _or dread my ire_!

    "_Now tell me_, _Gudrune_, _with open heart_,
    _What made thee from thy bed depart_?"

    "_My father_, _alas_! _dwelt near the strand_,
    _When war and bloodshed filled the land_.

    "_Full eight there were broke into my bower_,
    _One only ravished my virgin flower_."

    _Upon her fair cheek he gave a kiss_:
    "_My dearest_, _my dearest_, _all sorrow dismiss_;

    "_My swains they were that broke into thy bower_,
    '_Twas I that gathered thy virgin flower_."

    _Fair Ingefred gained_, _because bride she had been_,
    _One of the King's knights of handsome mien_.

There is a copy of _Child Maidelvold and Other Ballads_ in the Library of
the British Museum.  The Press-mark is C. 44. d. 38.

                [Picture: Manuscript of Child Maidelvold]

              [Picture: Manuscript of Ingefred and Gudrune]



(39)  [ERMELINE: 1913]


Ermeline / A Ballad / By / George Borrow / London: / Printed for Private
Circulation / 1913.

Collation:--Square demy octavo, pp. 23; consisting of: Half-title (with
blank reverse) pp. 1-2; Title-page, as above (with blank reverse) pp.
3-4; and Text of the Poems pp. 5-23.  There are head-lines throughout,
each page being headed with the title of the particular poem occupying
it.  Upon the reverse of p. 23 is the following imprint: "_London_ /
_Printed for Thomas J. Wise_, _Hampstead_, _N.W._ / _Edition limited to
Thirty Copies_."  The signatures are A (a half-sheet of four leaves), and
B (a full sheet of eight leaves), the one inset within the other.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, and with the
title-page reproduced upon the front.  The leaves measure 8.5 x 6.875
inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed.

                               _Contents_.

                                                                      PAGE

Ermeline.  [_With lance upraised so haughtily_]                          5

The paper upon which the Manuscript of _Ermeline_ is
written is water-marked with the date 1843.  No other MS.
is forthcoming.

The Cuckoo's Song in Merion.  [_Though it has been my                   21
fate to see_]

The fifth stanza of this _Song_ was printed by Borrow in
_Wild Wales_, 1862, vol. i, p. 153.  The two versions of
this stanza offer some interesting variations of text; I
give them both:

                             1862

    _Full fair the gleisiad in the flood_,
       _Which sparkles_ '_neath the summer's sun_,
    _And fair the thrush in green abode_
       _Spreading his wings in sportive fun_,
    _But fairer look if truth be spoke_,
       _The maids of County Merion_.

                             1913

    _O fair the salmon in the flood_,
       _That over golden sands doth run_;
    _And fair the thrush in his abode_,
       _That spreads his wings in gladsome fun_;
    _More beauteous look_, _if truth be spoke_,
       _The maids of county Merion_.

There is a copy of _Ermeline A Ballad_ in the Library of the British
Museum.  The Press-mark is C. 44. d. 38.

                 [Picture: Title page for Giant of Bern]



(40)  [THE GIANT OF BERN: 1913]


The Giant of Bern / and Orm Ungerswayne / A Ballad / By / George Borrow /
London: / Printed for Private Circulation / 1913.

Collation:--Crown octavo, pp. 15; consisting of Half-title (with blank
reverse) pp. 1-2; Title-page, as above (with blank reverse) pp. 3-4; and
Text of the _Ballad_ pp. 5-15.  The head-line is _The Giant of Bern_
throughout, upon both sides of the page.  Upon the reverse of p. 15 is
the following imprint: "_London_: / _Printed for Thomas J. Wise_,
_Hampstead_, _N.W._ / _Edition limited to Thirty Copies_."  There are no
signatures, the pamphlet being composed of a single sheet, folded to form
sixteen pages.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, and with the
title-page reproduced upon the front.  The leaves measure 7.5 x 5 inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed.

                               _Contents_.

                                                                      PAGE

The Giant of Bern and Orme Ungerswayne.  [_It was the                    5
lofty jutt of Bern_, _O'er all the walls he grew_]

Fifteen stanzas, descriptive of the incident of Orm's
obtaining his father's sword from the dead man's grave,
were printed in _Targum_, 1835, pp. 59-61, under the
title _Birting_.  _A Fragment_.  The text differs greatly
in the two versions, that of the later (which, though not
printed until 1913, was written about 1854) is much the
superior.  As an example I give the first two stanzas of
each version:

                             1835

    _It was late at evening tide_,
    _Sinks the day-star in the wave_,
    _When alone Orm Ungarswayne_
    _Rode to seek his father's grave_.

    _Late it was at evening hour_,
    _When the steeds to streams are led_;
    _Let me now_, _said Orm the young_,
    _Wake my father from the dead_.

                             1913

    _It was so late at evening tide_,
       _The sun had reached the wave_,
    _When Orm the youthful swain set out_
       _To seek his father's grave_.

    _It was the hour when grooms do ride_
       _The coursers to the rill_,
    _That Orm set out resolved to wake_
       _The dead man in the hill_.

There is a copy of _The Giant of Bern and Orm Ungerswayne_ in the Library
of the British Museum.  The Press-mark is C. 44. d. 38.



(41)  [LITTLE ENGEL: 1913]


Little Engel / A Ballad / With a Series of / Epigrams from the Persian /
By / George Borrow / London: / Printed for Private Circulation / 1913.

Collation:--Square demy octavo, pp. 27; consisting of: Half-title (with
blank reverse) pp. 1-2; Title-page, as above (with blank reverse) pp.
3-4; and Text of the _Ballad_ and _Epigrams_ pp. 5-27.  There are
head-lines throughout, each page being headed with the title of the
particular Poem occupying it--save for pp. 23-27, which are headed
_Epigrams_.  Upon the reverse of p. 27 is the following imprint:
"_London_: / _Printed for Thomas J. Wise_, _Hampstead_, _N.W._ / _Edition
limited to Thirty Copies_."  The signatures are A (six leaves), and B (a
full sheet of eight leaves), the one inset within the other.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, and with the
title-page reproduced upon the front.  The leaves measure 8.5 x 6.875
inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed.

                               _Contents_.

                                                                      PAGE

Little Engel.  [_It was the little Engel_, _he_]                         5

An Elegy.  [_Where shall I rest my hapless head_]                       21

Epigrams.  From the Persian:

1.  [_Hear what once the pigmy clever_]                                 23

2.  [_The man who of his words is sparing_]                             23

3.  [_If thou would'st ruin_ '_scape_, _and blackest                    24
woe_]

4.  [_Sit down with your friends in delightful repose_]                 24

5.  [_The hungry hound upon the bone will pounce_]                      24

6.  [_Great Aaroun is dead_, _and is nothing_, _the man_]               25

7.  [_Though God provides our daily bread_]                             25

8.  The King and his Followers.  [_If in the boor's                     25
garden the King eats a pear_]

9.  The Devout Man and the Tyrant.  [_If the half of a                  26
loaf the devout man receives_]

10.  The Cat and the Beggar.  [_If a cat could the power                26
of flying enjoy_]

11.  The King and Taylor.  [_The taylor who travels in                  26
far foreign lands_]

12.  Gold Coin and Stamped Leather.  [_Of the children of               27
wisdom how like is the face_]

13.  [_So much like a friend with your foe ever deal_]                  27

The Manuscript of these _Epigrams_ bears instructive
evidence of the immense amount of care and labour
expended by Borrow upon his metrical compositions.
Reduced facsimiles of two of the pages of this Manuscript
are given herewith.  It will be observed that a full page
and a half are occupied by the thirteenth _Epigram_, at
which Borrow made no fewer than seven attempts before he
succeeded in producing a version which satisfied him.
The completed _Epigram_ is as follows:--

    _So much like a friend with your foe ever deal_,
    _That you never need dread the least scratch from his
    steel_;
    _But ne'er with your friend deal so much like a foe_,
    _That you ever must dread from his faulchion a blow_.

The original Manuscript of _Little Engel_, written in 1829, is in the
library of Mr. Edmund Gosse.  The Manuscript of 1854, from which the
ballad was printed, is in my own library.

There is a copy of _Little Engel_, _A Ballad_, &c., in the Library of the
British Museum.  The Press-mark is C. 44. d. 38.

                  [Picture: Title page of Little Engel]



(42)  [ALF THE FREEBOOTER: 1913]


Alf the Freebooter / Little Danneved and / Swayne Trost / and Other
Ballads / By / George Borrow / London: / Printed for Private Circulation
/ 1913.

Collation:--Square demy octavo, pp. 27; consisting of: Half-title (with
blank reverse) pp. 1-2; Title-page, as above (with a note regarding the
American copyright upon the centre of the reverse) pp. 3-4; and Text of
the _Ballads_ pp. 5-27.  There are headlines throughout, each page being
headed with the title of the particular _Ballad_ occupying it.  Upon the
reverse of p. 27 is the following imprint, "_London_: / _Printed for
Thomas J. Wise_, _Hampstead_, _N.W._ / _Edition limited to Thirty
Copies_."  The signatures are A (a quarter-sheet of 2 leaves), B (a
half-sheet of 4 leaves), and _C_ (a full sheet of 8 leaves), all inset
within each other.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, and with the
title-page reproduced upon the front.  The leaves measure 8.5 x 6.875
inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed.

                               _Contents_.

                                                                      PAGE

SIR ALF THE FREEBOOTER.  [_Sir Alf he is an Atheling_.]                  5

LITTLE DANNEVED AND SWAYNE TROST.  ["_O what shall I in                 14
Denmark do_?"]

SIR PALL, SIR BEAR, AND SIR LIDEN.  [_Liden he rode to                  20
the Ting_, _and shewed_]

BELARDO'S WEDDING.  [_From the banks_, _in mornings                     23
beam_]

THE YEW TREE.  [_O tree of yew_, _which here I spy_]                    27

Two earlier versions of this Ode were printed by Borrow
in _Wild Wales_, vol. iii, pp. 203 and 247.  The texts of
all three versions differ very considerably.

There is a copy of _Alf the Freebooter and Other Ballads_ in the Library
of the British Museum.  The Press-mark is C. 44. d. 38.

                    [Picture: Manuscript of Epigrams]

                    [Picture: Manuscript of Epigrams]



(43)  [KING DIDERIK: 1913]


King Diderik / and the Fight between the / Lion and Dragon / and Other
Ballads / By / George Borrow / London: / Printed for Private Circulation
/ 1913.

Collation:--Square demy octavo, pp. 27; consisting of: Half-title (with
blank reverse) pp. 1-2; Title-page, as above (with a note regarding the
American copyright upon the centre of the reverse) pp. 3-4; and Text of
the _Ballads_ pp. 5-27.  There are head-lines throughout, each page being
headed with the title of the particular _Ballad_ occupying it.  Upon the
reverse of p. 27 is the following imprint, "_London_: / _Printed for
Thomas J. Wise_, _Hampstead_, _N.W._ / _Edition limited to Thirty
Copies_."  The signatures are A (a quarter-sheet of 2 leaves), B (a
half-sheet of 4 leaves), and C (a full sheet of 8 leaves), all inset
within each other.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, and with the
title-page reproduced upon the front.  The leaves measure 8.5 x 6.875
inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed.

                               _Contents_.

                                                                      PAGE

KING DIDERIK AND THE LION'S FIGHT WITH THE DRAGON.                       5

[_From Bern rode forth King Diderik_]

There exists a single leaf of an early draft of another,
entirely different, version of this ballad.  Upon the
opposite page is a facsimile, the exact size of the
original, of this fragment.

DIDERIK AND OLGER THE DANE.  [_With his eighteen brothers               14
Diderik stark_]

OLGER THE DANE AND BURMAN.  [_Burman in the mountain                    21
holds_]

The complete Manuscript of _King Diderik_, _&c._, _and Other Ballads_, as
prepared for the _Songs of Scandinavia_ of 1829, is preserved in the
British Museum.

There is a copy of _King Diderik and the Fight between the Lion and
Dragon_, _&c._ in the Library of the British Museum.  The Press-mark is
C. 44. d. 38.

                   [Picture: King Diderik--Early draft]



(44)  [THE NIGHTINGALE: 1913]


The Nightingale / The Valkyrie and Raven / and Other Ballads / By /
George Borrow / London: / Printed for Private Circulation / 1913.

Collation:--Square demy octavo, pp. 27; consisting of: Half-title (with
blank reverse) pp. 1-2; Title-page, as above (with a note regarding the
American copyright upon the centre of the reverse) pp. 3-4; and Text of
the _Ballads_ pp. 5-27.  There are head-lines throughout, each page being
headed with the title of the particular _Ballad_ occupying it.  Upon the
reverse of p. 27 is the following imprint: "_London_: / _Printed for
Thomas J. Wise_, _Hampstead_, _N. W._ / _Edition limited to Thirty
Copies_."  The signatures are A (a quarter-sheet of 2 leaves), B (a
half-sheet of 4 leaves), and C (a full sheet of 8 leaves), all inset
within each other.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, and with the
title-page reproduced upon the front.  The leaves measure 8.5 x 6.875
inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed.

                               _Contents_.

                                                                      PAGE

THE NIGHTINGALE, OR THE TRANSFORMED DAMSEL.  [_I know                    5
where stands a Castellaye_]

THE VALKYRIE AND RAVEN.  [_Ye men wearing bracelets_]                   11

Previously printed in _Once a Week_, _August_ 2_nd_,
1862, pp. 152-156, where the Ballad was accompanied by a
full-page Illustration engraved upon wood.  [_See post_,
pp. 302-305.]

ERIK EMUN AND SIR PLOG.  [_Early at morn the lark sang                  21
gay_]

THE ELVES.  [_Take heed_, _good people_, _of yourselves_]               25

There are two Manuscripts of _The Elves_ available.  So
far as the body of the poem is concerned the texts of
these are identical, the fifth line alone differing
materially in each.  This line, as printed, reads:

    _The lass he woo' d_, _her promise won_.

In the earlier of the two MSS. it reads:

    _Inflamed with passion her he woo'd_.

A cancelled reading of the same MS. runs:

    _Whom when he saw the peasant woo'd_.

But the Ballad is furnished with a repeated refrain.
This refrain in the printed version reads:

    _Take heed_, _good people_, _of yourselves_;
    _And oh_! _beware ye of the elves_.

In the earlier MS. the refrain employed is:

    '_Tis wonderful the Lord can brook_
    _The insolence of the fairy folk_!

A reduced facsimile of the first page of the later MS.
will be found facing the present page.

The entire poem should be compared with _The Elf Bride_,
printed in _The Brother Avenged and Other Ballads_, 1913,
pp. 21-22.

FERIDUN.  [_No face of an Angel could Feridun claim_]                   26

EPIGRAMS:

1.  [_A worthless thing is song_, _I trow_]                             27

2.  [_Though pedants have essayed to hammer_]                           27

3.  [_When of yourself you have cause to speak_]                        27

_Note_.--Each poem to which no reference is attached, appeared for the
first time in this volume.

There is a copy of _The Nightingale_, _The Valkyrie and Raven_, _and
Other Ballads_ in the Library of the British Museum.  The Press-mark is
C. 44. d. 38.

                    [Picture: Manuscript of The Elves]



(45)  [GRIMMER AND KAMPER: 1913]


Grimmer and Kamper / The End of Sivard Snarenswayne / and Other Ballads /
By / George Borrow / London: / Printed for Private Circulation / 1913.

Collation:--Square demy octavo, pp. 28; consisting of: Half-title (with
blank reverse) pp. 1-2; Title-page, as above (with a note regarding the
American copyright upon the centre of the reverse) pp. 3-4; and Text of
the _Ballads_ pp. 5-28.  There are headlines throughout, each page being
headed with the title of the particular _Ballad_ occupying it.  At the
foot of p. 28 is the following imprint: "_London_: / _Printed for Thomas
J. Wise_, _Hampstead_, _N. W._ / _Edition limited to Thirty Copies_."
The signatures are A (a quarter-sheet of 2 leaves), B (a half-sheet of 4
leaves), and C (a full-sheet of 8 leaves), all inset within each other.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, and with the
title-page reproduced upon the front.  The leaves measure 8.5 x 6.875
inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed.

                               _Contents_.

                                                                      PAGE

GRIMMER AND KAMPER.  [_Grimmer walks upon the floor_]                    5

MIMMERING TAN.  [_The smallest man was Mimmering_]                      11

THE END OF SIVARD SNARENSWAYNE.  [_Young Sivard he his                  14
step-sire slew_]

The two Manuscripts, belonging to the years 1829 and 1854
respectively, of this ballad exhibit very numerous
differences of text.  As a brief, but sufficient, example
I give the second stanza as it occurs in each:

                             1829

    _It was Sivard Snareswayne_ [sic]
       _To his mother's presence hied_:
    "_Say_, _shall I go from thee on foot_,
       _Or_, _tell me_, _shall I ride_?"

                             1854

    _It was Sivard Snarenswayne_
       _To his mother's presence strode_:
    "_Say_, _shall I ride from hence_?" _he cried_,
       "_Or wend on foot my road_?"

SIR GUNCELIN'S WEDDING.  [_It was the Count Sir                         19
Guncelin_]

EPIGRAMS:

HONESTY.  [_No wonder honesty's a lasting article_]                     27

A POLITICIAN.  [_He served his God in such a fashion_]                  27

THE CANDLE.  [_For foolish pastimes oft_, _full oft_,                   27
_they thee ignite_]

EPIGRAM ON HIMSELF.  BY WESSEL [_He ate_, _and drank_,                  28
_and slip-shod went_]

There is a copy of _Grimmer and Kamper_, _The End of Sivard
Snarenswayne_, _and Other Ballads_ in the Library of the British Museum.
The Press-mark is C. 44. d. 38.

             [Picture: Manuscript of Sir Guncelin's Wedding]



(46)  [THE FOUNTAIN OF MARIBO: 1913]


The / Fountain of Maribo / and Other Ballads / By / George Borrow /
London: / Printed for Private Circulation / 1913.

Collation:--Square demy octavo, pp. 27; consisting of: Half-title (with
blank reverse) pp. 1-2; Frontispiece (with blank recto) pp. 3-4;
Title-page (with notice regarding the American copyright upon the centre
of the reverse) pp. 5-6; and Text of the _Ballads_ pp. 7-27.  There are
head-lines throughout, each page being headed with the title of the
particular _Ballad_ occupying it.  Upon the reverse of p. 27 is the
following imprint: "_London_: / _Printed for Thomas J. Wise_,
_Hampstead_, _N.W._ / _Edition limited to Thirty Copies_."  The
signatures are A (a quarter-sheet of two leaves), B (a half-sheet of four
leaves), and C (a full sheet of eight leaves), each inset within the
other.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, and with the
title-page reproduced upon the front.  The leaves measure 8.5 x 6.875
inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed.

The Frontispiece is a reduced facsimile of the first page of the original
Manuscript of _Ramund_.

                               _Contents_.

                                                                      PAGE

THE FOUNTAIN OF MARIBO, OR THE QUEEN AND THE ALGREVE.                    7
[_The Algreve he his bugle wound_]

Of _The Fountain of Maribo_ there are two Manuscripts
available, one written in 1829 and the other in 1854.
The text of these differs appreciably, that of the second
being as usual the superior.  Here are some stanzas from
each version:

                             1829

    The Algreve he his bugle wound,
       _The longest night_.
    The Queen in her bower heard the sound
       _Love me doth thrall_.

    The Queen her little foot boy address'd:
       _The longest night_.
    "Go, come to me hither the Algreve request."
       _Love me doth thrall_.

    In came the Algrave, 'fore the board stood he:
    "What wilt thou my Queen that thou'st sent for me?"

    "If I survive when my lord is dead,
    Thou shall rule o'er my gold so red."

                             1854

    The Algreve he his bugle wound
       _The long night all_--
    The Queen in bower heard the sound,
       _I'm passion's thrall_.

    The Queen her little page address'd,
       _The long night all_--
    "To come to me the Greve request,"
       _I'm passion's thrall_.

    He came, before the board stood he,
       _The long night all_--
    "Wherefore, O Queen, hast sent for me?"
       _I'm passion's thrall_,

    "As soon as e'er my lord is dead,
       _The long night all_--
    Thou shall rule o'er my gold so red,"
       _I'm passion's thrall_.

RAMUND.  [_Ramund thought he should a better man be_]                   13

A reduced facsimile of the first page of the manuscript
of _Ramund_ faces the present page.

ALF OF ODDERSKIER.  [_Alf he dwells at Odderskier_]                     22

There is a copy of _The Fountain of Maribo and Other Ballads_ in the
Library of the British Museum.  The Press-mark is C. 44. d. 38.

                     [Picture: Manuscript of Ramund]



(47)  [QUEEN BERNGERD: 1913]


Queen Berngerd / The Bard and the Dreams / and / Other Ballads / By /
George Borrow / London: / Printed for Private Circulation / 1913.

Collation:--Square demy octavo, pp. 31; consisting of: Half-title (with
blank reverse) pp. 1-2; Frontispiece (with blank recto) pp. 3-4;
Title-page, as above (with a note regarding the American copyright upon
the centre of the reverse) pp. 5-6; and Text of the _Ballads_ pp. 7-31.
There are headlines throughout, each page being headed with the title of
the particular _Ballad_ occupying it.  Upon the reverse of p. 31 is the
following imprint: "_London_: / _Printed for Thomas J. Wise_,
_Hampstead_, _N.W._ / _Edition limited to Thirty Copies_."  The
signatures are A and B (two sheets each eight leaves), the one inset
within the other.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, and with the
title-page reproduced upon the front.  The leaves measure 8.5 x6.75
inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed.

The Frontispiece consists of a reduced facsimile of the original
Manuscript, in Borrow's handwriting, of _The Bard and the Dreams_.

                               _Contents_.

                                                                      PAGE

QUEEN BERNGERD.  [_Long ere the Sun the heaven arrayed_]                 7

DAME MARTHA'S FOUNTAIN.  [_Dame Martha dwelt at                         13
Karisegaard_]

Previously printed (with some small differences of text)
in _The Foreign Quarterly Review_, June 1830, p. 83.

THE BARD AND THE DREAMS.  [_O'er the sweet smelling meads               16
with his lyre in his hand_]

KING OLUF THE SAINT.  [_King Oluf and his brother bold_]                23

Previously printed (with some slight differences of text)
in _The Foreign Quarterly Review_, _June_ 1830, pp.
59-61.

TO SCRIBBLERS.  [_Would it not be more dignified_]                      30

This delightful Squib, here first printed, was written by
Borrow upon the refusal by Lockhart to insert in _The
Quarterly Review_ Borrow's Essay suggested by Ford's
_Handbook for Travellers in Spain_, 1845, in the
unmutilated and unamended form in which the author had
written it.--[See _ante_, No. 10.]

TO A CONCEITED WOMAN.  [_Be still_, _be still_, _and                    31
speak not back again_]

_Note_.--Each poem, to which no reference is attached, appeared for the
first time in this volume.

There is a copy of _Queen Berngerd_, _The Bard and the Dreams_, _and
Other Ballads_ in the Library of the British Museum.  The Press-mark is
C. 44. d. 38.

             [Picture: Manuscript of The Bard and the Dreams]

                  [Picture: Title page of Finnish Arts]



(48)  [FINNISH ARTS: 1913]


Finnish Arts / Or / Sir Thor and Damsel Thure / A Ballad / By / George
Borrow / London: / Printed for Private Circulation / 1913.

Collation:--Square demy octavo, pp. 27; consisting of: Half-title (with
blank reverse) pp. 1-2; Frontispiece (with blank recto), pp. 3-4;
Title-page, as above (with notice regarding the American copyright upon
the centre of the reverse) pp. 5-6; and Text of the _Ballads_ pp. 7-27.
There are head-lines throughout, each page being headed with the title of
the particular _Ballad_ occupying it.  Upon the reverse of p. 27 is the
following imprint: "_London_: / _Printed for Thomas J. Wise_,
_Hampstead_, _N.W._ / _Edition limited to Thirty Copies_."  The
signatures are A (a quarter-sheet of two leaves), B (a half-sheet of four
leaves), and C (a full sheet of eight leaves), each inset within the
other.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, and with the
title-page reproduced upon the front.  The leaves measure 8.5 x 6.875
inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed.

The Frontispiece is a reduced facsimile of the first page of the original
Manuscript of _Finnish Arts_, _or Sir Thor and Damsel Thure_.

                               _Contents_.

                                                                      PAGE

FINNISH ARTS, OR, SIR THOR AND DAMSEL THURE.  [_Sir Thor                 7
was a knight of prowess tried_]

A reduced facsimile of the first page of the Manuscript
of _Finnish Arts_ will be found facing the present page.

A NEW SONG TO AN OLD TUNE.  [_Who starves his wife_]                    22

ODE FROM ANACREON.  [_The earth to drink does not                       24
disdain_]

LINES FROM THE ITALIAN.  ["_Repent_, _O repent_!" _said a               25
Friar one day_]

A DRINKING SONG.  [_O how my breast is glowing_]                        26

There is a copy of _Finnish Arts_, _Or Sir Thor and Damsel Thure_ in the
Library of the British Museum.  The Pressmark is C. 44. d. 38.

                  [Picture: Manuscript of Finnish Arts]



(49)  [BROWN WILLIAM: 1913]


Brown William / The Power of the Harp / and / Other Ballads / By / George
Borrow / London: / Printed for Private Circulation / 1913.

Collation:--Square demy octavo, pp. 31; consisting of: Half-title (with
blank reverse) pp. 1-2; Title-page, as above (with notice regarding the
American copyright upon the centre of the reverse) pp. 3-4; and Text of
the _Ballads_ pp. 5-31.  There are head-lines throughout, each page being
headed with the title of the particular _Ballad_ occupying it.  Upon the
reverse of p. 31 is the following imprint: "_London_ / _Printed for
Thomas J. Wise_, _Hampstead_, _N.W._ / _Edition limited to Thirty
Copies_."  The signatures are A and B (two sheets, each eight leaves),
the one inset within the other.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, and with the
title-page reproduced upon the front.  The leaves measure 8.5 x 6.875
inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed.

                               _Contents_.

                                                                      PAGE

BROWN WILLIAM.  [_Let no one in greatness too confident                  5
be_]

Previously printed in _Once a Week_, _January_ 4_th_,
1862, pp. 37-38.

THE POWER OF THE HARP.  [_Sir Peter would forth from the                12
castle ride_]

A reduced facsimile of one of the pages of the Manuscript
of _The Power of The Harp_ will be found facing herewith.

THE UNFORTUNATE MARRIAGE.  [_Hildebrand gave his sister                 18
away_]

THE WRESTLING-MATCH.  [_As one day I wandered lonely_,                  25
_in extreme distress of mind_]

THE WARRIOR.  FROM THE ARABIC.  [_Thou lov'st to look on                31
myrtles green_]

_Note_.--Each poem to which no reference is attached, appeared for the
first time in this volume.

There is a copy of _Brown William_, _The Power of the Harp_, _and Other
Ballads_ in the Library of the British Museum.  The Press-mark is C. 44.
d. 38.

              [Picture: Manuscript of The Power of the Harp]



(50)  [THE SONG OF DEIRDRA: 1913]


The Song of Deirdra / King Byrge and his Brothers / and / Other Ballads /
By / George Borrow / London: / Printed for Private Circulation / 1913.

Collation:--Square demy octavo, pp. 28; consisting of: Half-title (with
blank reverse) pp. 1-2; Title-page, as above (with a note regarding the
American copyright upon the centre of the reverse) pp. 3-4; and Text of
the _Ballads_ pp. 5-28.  There are head-lines throughout, each page being
headed with the title of the particular Ballad occupying it.  At the foot
of p. 28 is the following imprint: "_London_: / _Printed for Thomas J.
Wise_, _Hampstead_, _N.W._ / _Edition limited to Thirty Copies_."  The
signatures are A (a quarter-sheet of two leaves), B (a half-sheet of four
leaves), and C (a full sheet of eight leaves), all inset within each
other.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, and with the
title-page reproduced upon the front.  The leaves measure 8.5 x 6.75
inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed.

                               _Contents_.

                                                                      PAGE

THE SONG OF DEIRDRA.  [_Farewell_, _grey Albyn_, _much                   5
loved land_]

THE DIVER.  [_Where is the man who will dive for his                     8
king_]

Previously printed in _The New Monthly Magazine_, vol.
vii., 1823, pp. 540-542.

KING BYRGE AND HIS BROTHERS.  [_Dame Ingeborg three brave               18
brothers could boast_]

TURKISH HYMN TO MAHOMET.  [_O Envoy of Allah_, _to thee                 26
be salaam_]

_Note_.--Each poem to which no reference is attached appeared for the
first time in this volume.

There is a copy of _The Song of Deirdra_, _King Byrge and his Brothers_,
_and Other Ballads_ in the Library of the British Museum.  The Press-mark
is C. 44. d. 38.

                   [Picture: Title page of King Byrge]



(51)  [SIGNELIL: 1913]


Signelil / A Tale from the Cornish / and Other Ballads / By / George
Borrow / London: / Printed for Private Circulation / 1913.

Collation:--Square demy octavo, pp. 28; consisting of: Half-title (with
blank reverse) pp. 1-2; Title-page (with notice regarding the American
copyright upon the centre of the reverse) pp. 3-4; and Text of the
_Ballads_ pp. 5-28.  There are head-lines throughout, each page being
headed with the title of the particular _Ballad_ occupying it.  At the
foot of p. 28 is the following imprint: "_London_: / _Printed for Thomas
J. Wise_, _Hampstead_, _N.W._ / _Edition limited to Thirty Copies_."  The
signatures are A (a quarter-sheet of two leaves), B (a half-sheet of four
leaves), and C (a full sheet of eight leaves), all inset within each
other.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, and with the
title-page reproduced upon the front.  The leaves measure 8.5 x 6.875
inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed.

                               _Contents_.

                                                                      PAGE

SIGNELIL.  [_The Lady her handmaid to questioning took_]                 5

A TALE FROM THE CORNISH.  [_In Lavan's parish once of                    8
yore_]

Previously printed, with some trifling inaccuracies, in
Knapp's _Life_, _Writings_, _and Correspondence of George
Borrow_, 1899, vol. ii, pp. 91-95.

SIR VERNER AND DAME INGEBORG.  [_In Linholm's house_                    19
_The swains they were drinking and making carouse_]

THE HEDDEBY SPECTRE.  [_At evening fall I chanced to                    22
ride_]

An earlier, and utterly different, version of this ballad
was printed (under the tentative title _The
Heddybee-Spectre_) in _Romantic Ballads_, 1826, pp.
37-39.  Borrow afterwards described this earlier version
as "a paraphrase."

FROM GOUDELI.  [_Yestere'en when the bat_, _and the owl_,               25
_and his mate_]

PEASANT SONGS OF SPAIN:

1.  [ _When Jesu our Redeemer_]                                         27

2.  [_There stands a stone_, _a rounded stone_]                         28

_Note_.--Each poem to which no reference is attached appeared for the
first time in this volume.

There is a copy of _Signelil_, _a Tale from the Cornish_, _and Other
Ballads_ in the Library of the British Museum.  The Press-mark is C. 44.
d. 38.

                    [Picture: Manuscript of Signelil]



(52)  [YOUNG SWAIGDER: 1913]


Young Swaigder / or / The Force of Runes / and Other Ballads / By /
George Borrow / London: / Printed for Private Circulation / 1913.

Collation:--Square demy octavo, pp. 27; consisting of: Half-title (with
blank reverse) pp. 1-2; Title-page, as above (with a notice regarding the
American copyright upon the reverse) pp. 3-4; and Text of the _Ballads_
pp. 5-27.  There are head-lines throughout, each page being headed with
the title of the particular _Ballad_ occupying it.  Upon the reverse of
p. 27 is the following imprint: "_London_: / _Printed for Thomas J.
Wise_, _Hampstead_, _N.W._ / _Edition limited to Thirty Copies_."  The
signatures are A (a quarter-sheet of two leaves), B (a half-sheet of four
leaves), and C (a full sheet of eight leaves), each inset within the
other.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, and with the
title-page reproduced upon the front.  The leaves measure 8.5 x 6.875
inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed.

                               _Contents_.

                                                                      PAGE

YOUNG SWAIGDER, OR THE FORCE OF RUNES.  [_It was the                     5
young Swaigder_]

THE HAIL STORM.  [_As in Horunga Haven_]                                14

Previously printed in _Romantic Ballads_, 1826, pp.
136-138.  Again printed in _Targum_, 1835, pp. 42-43.

In each instance the text varied very considerably.  The
present version was written about 1854, and represents
the text as Borrow finally left it.  I quote the first
stanza of each version.  It will be seen that the
revision was progressive.

                             1826

    _When from our ships we bounded_,
    _I heard_, _with fear astounded_,
    _The storm of Thorgerd's waking_;
    _With flinty masses blended_,
    _Gigantic hail descended_,
    _And thick and fiercely rattled_
    _Against us there embattled_.

                             1835

    _For victory as we bounded_,
    _I heard_, _with fear astounded_,
    _The storm_, _of Thorgerd's waking_,
    _From Northern vapours breaking_.
    _Sent by the fiend in anger_,
    _With din and stunning clangour_,
    _To crush our might intended_,
    _Gigantic hail descended_.

                             1854

    _As in Horunga haven_
    _We fed the crow and raven_,
    _I heard the tempest breaking_,
    _Of demon Thorgerd's waking_;
    _Sent by the fiend in anger_,
    _With din and stunning clangor_,
    _To crush our might intended_,
    _Gigantic hail descended_.

Another translation of the same Ballad, extending to 84
lines, was printed in _Once a Week_, 1863, vol. viii, p.
686, under the title _The Hail-Storm_; _Or_, _The Death
of Bui_.

ROSMER MEREMAN.  [_In Denmark once a lady dwelt_]                       16

This ballad should be read in conjunction with _Rosmer_,
printed in _The Mermaid's Prophecy_, _and other Songs
relating to Queen Dagmar_, 1913, pp. 25-30.

THE WICKED STEPMOTHER.  NO. II.  [_Sir Peter o'er to the                23
island strayed_--]

This ballad should be compared with _The Wicked
Stepmother_, printed in _The Dalby Bear and Other
Ballads_, 1913, pp. 14-20.

_Note_.--Each poem to which no reference is attached, appeared for the
first time in this volume.

There is a copy of _Young Swaigder or The Force of Runes and Other
Ballads_ in the Library of the British Museum The Press-mark is C. 44. d.
38.



 (53)  [EMELIAN THE FOOL: 1913]


Emelian the Fool / A Tale / Translated from the Russian / By / George
Borrow / London: / Printed for Private Circulation / 1913.

Collation:--Crown octavo, pp. 37; consisting of: Half-title (with blank
reverse) pp. 1-2; Title-page, as above (with blank reverse) pp. 3-4;
_Introduction_ pp. 5-7; and Text of the _Tale_ pp. 8-37.  The reverse of
p. 37 is blank.  The head-line is _Emelian the Fool_ throughout, upon
both sides of the page.  The pamphlet is concluded by a leaf, with blank
reverse, carrying the following imprint upon its recto: "_London_: /
_Printed for Thomas J. Wise_, _Hampstead_, _N.W._ / _Edition limited to
Thirty Copies_."  The signatures are A (a half-sheet of 4 leaves), plus B
and C (2 sheets, each 8 leaves), inset within each other.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, and with the
title-page reproduced upon the front.  The leaves measure 7.5 x 5 inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed.

_Emelian the Fool_ first appeared in _Once a Week_, vol. vi, _March_
8_th_, 1862, pp. 289-294, where it formed the first of a series of three
_Russian Popular Tales_, in Prose, translated by George Borrow.

The _Tale_ was also included in _The Avon Booklet_, vol. ii, 1904, pp.
175-197.

There is a copy of _Emelian the Fool_ in the Library of the British
Museum.  The Press-mark is C. 57. e. 45 (1).



(54)  [THE STORY OF TIM: 1913]


The Story of Tim / Translated from the Russian / By / George Borrow /
London: / Printed for Private Circulation / 1913.

Collation:--Crown octavo, pp. 31; consisting of: Half-title (with blank
reverse) pp. 1-2; Title-page as above (with blank reverse) pp. 3-4;
_Introduction_ p. 5; and Text of the _Story_ pp. 6-31.  The head-line is
_The Story of Tim_ throughout, upon both sides of the page.  Upon the
reverse of p. 31 is the following imprint: "_London_: / _Printed for
Thomas J. Wise_, _Hampstead_, _N.W._ / _Edition limited to Thirty
Copies_."  The signatures are A and B (two sheets, each eight leaves),
the one inset within the other.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, and with the
title-page reproduced upon the front.  The leaves measure 7.5 x 5 inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed.

_The Story of Tim_ first appeared in _Once a Week_, vol. vii, _October_
4_th_, 1862, pp. 403-406, where it formed the third of a series of
_Russian Popular Tales_, in Prose, translated by George Borrow.

The _Story_ was also included in _The Avon Booklet_, vol. ii, 1904, pp.
211-229.

There is a copy of _The Story of Tim_ in the Library of the British
Museum.  The Press-mark is C. 57. e. 45 (2).

                [Picture: Title page of The Story of Tim]



(55)  [MOLLIE CHARANE: 1913]


Mollie Charane / and Other Ballads / By / George Borrow / London: /
Printed for Private Circulation / 1913.

Collation:--Square demy octavo, pp. 28; consisting of: Half-title (with
blank reverse) pp. 1-2; Title-page, as above (with notice regarding the
American copyright upon the centre of the reverse) pp. 3-4; and Text of
the _Ballads_ pp. 5-28.  There are headlines throughout, each page being
headed with the title of the particular _Ballad_ occupying it.  At the
foot of p. 28 is the following imprint: "_London_: / _Printed for Thomas
J. Wise_, _Hampstead_, _N.W._ / _Edition limited to Thirty Copies_."  The
signatures are A (a quarter-sheet of two leaves), B (a half-sheet of four
leaves), and C (a full sheet of eight leaves), each inset within the
other.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, and with the
title-page reproduced upon the front.  The leaves measure 8.5 x 6.875
inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed.

                               _Contents_.

                                                                      PAGE

MOLLIE CHARANE.  [_O_, _Mollie Charane_, _where got you                  5
your gold_?]

Previously printed in _Once a Week_, vol. vi, 1862, pp.
38-39.

THE DANES OF YORE.  [_Well we know from saga_]                           8

A SURVEY OF DEATH.  [_My blood is freezing_, _my senses                 11
reel_]

Another version of this poem was printed in _The Monthly
Magazine_, vol. lvi, 1823, p. 245; and reprinted (with
some small textual variations) in _Romantic Ballads_,
1826, pp. 169-170.  As the poem is a short one, and as
the two versions afford a happy example of the drastic
changes Borrow introduced into his text when revising his
Ballads, I give them both in full:

                             1823

    _Perhaps_ '_tis folly_, _but still I feel_
    _My heart-strings quiver_, _my senses reel_,
    _Thinking how like a fast stream we range_,
    _Nearer and nearer to life's dread change_,
    _When soul and spirit filter away_,
    _And leave nothing better than senseless clay_.

    _Yield_, _beauty_, _yield_, _for the grave does
    gape_,
    _And_, _horribly alter'd_, _reflects thy shape_;
    _For_, _oh_! _think not those childish charms_
    _Will rest unrifled in his cold arms_;
    _And think not there_, _that the rose of love_
    _Will bloom on thy features as here above_.

    _Let him who roams at Vanity Fair_
    _In robes that rival the tulip's glare_,
    _Think on the chaplet of leaves which round_
    _His fading forehead will soon be bound_,
    _And on each dirge the priests will say_
    _When his cold corse is borne away_,

    _Let him who seeketh for wealth_, _uncheck'd_
    _By fear of labour_, _let him reflect_
    _That yonder gold will brightly shine_
    _When he has perish'd_, _with all his line_;
    _Tho' man may rave_, _and vainly boast_,
    _We are but ashes when at the most_.

                             1913

    _My blood is freezing_, _my senses reel_,
    _So horror stricken at heart I feel_;
    _Thinking how like a fast stream we range_
    _Nearer and nearer to that dread change_,
    _When the body becomes so stark and cold_,
    _And man doth crumble away to mould_.

    _Boast not_, _proud maid_, _for the grave doth gape_,
    _And strangely altered reflects thy shape_;
    _No dainty charms it doth disclose_,
    _Death will ravish thy beauty's rose_;
    _And all the rest will leave to thee_
    _When dug thy chilly grave shall be_.

    _O_, _ye who are tripping the floor so light_,
    _In delicate robes as the lily white_,
    _Think of the fading funeral wreath_,
    _The dying struggle_, _the sweat of death_--
    _Think on the dismal death array_,
    _When the pallid corse is consigned to clay_!

    _O_, _ye who in quest of riches roam_,
    _Reflect that ashes ye must become_;
    _And the wealth ye win will brightly shine_
    _When burried are ye and all your line_;
    _For your many chests of much loved gold_
    _You'll nothing obtain but a little mould_.

DESIDERABILIA VITAE.  [_Give me the haunch of a buck to                 13
eat_]

Previously printed, with a slightly different text, and
arranged in six lines instead of in three four-line
stanzas, in _Lavengro_, 1851, vol. i, p. 306.

SAINT JACOB.  [_Saint Jacob he takes our blest Lord by                  14
the hand_]

THE RENEGADE.  [_Now pay ye the heed that is fitting_]                  19

Previously printed, with some small differences of text,
in _The Talisman_, 1835, pp. 13-14.

AN IMPROMPTU.  [_And darest thou thyself compare_]                      21

A HYMN.  [_O Jesus_, _Thou Fountain of solace and                       23
gladness_]

THE TRANSFORMED DAMSEL.  [_My father up of the country                  25
rode_]

This Ballad should be compared with _The Cruel
Step-dame_, printed in _The Serpent Knight and Other
Ballade_, 1913, pp. 30-33.  Also with _The Transformed
Damsel_, printed in _The Return of the Dead and Other
Ballads_, 1913, pp. 13-14.  The actions described in the
earlier stanzas follow closely those of the opening
stanzas of _The Cruel Step-dame_; whilst the incident of
the lover cutting a piece of flesh from his own breast to
serve as bait to attract his mistress, who, in the form
of a bird, is perched upon a branch of the tree above
him, is common to both the _Transformed Damsel_ ballads.

_Note_.--Each poem to which no reference is attached appeared for the
first time in this volume.

There is a copy of _Mollie Charane and Other Ballads_ in the Library of
the British Museum.  The Press-mark is C. 44. d. 38.

                [Picture: Manuscript of The Danes of Yore]



(56)  [GRIMHILD'S VENGEANCE: 1913]


Grimhild's Vengeance / Three Ballads / By / George Borrow / Edited / With
an Introduction / By / Edmund Gosse, C. B. / London: / Printed for
Private Circulation / 1913.

Collation:--Square demy octavo, pp. 40; consisting of: Half-title (with
blank reverse) pp. 1-2; Title-page, as above (with a note regarding the
American copyright upon the centre of the reverse) pp. 3-4;
_Introduction_ pp. 5-14; and text of the three _Ballads_ pp. 15-40.  The
head-line is _Grimhild's Vengeance_ throughout, upon both sides of the
page.  At the foot of p. 40 is the following imprint: "_London_: /
_Printed for Thomas J. Wise_, _Hampstead_, _N.W._ / _Edition limited to
Thirty Copies_."  The signatures are A (a half-sheet of four leaves), and
B and C (two sheets, each eight leaves), each inset within the other.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, and with the
title-page reproduced upon the front.  The leaves measure 8.5 x 6.875
inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed.

                               _Contents_.

                                                                      PAGE

GRIMHILD'S VENGEANCE.  SONG THE FIRST.  [_It was the                    15
proud Dame Grimhild Prepares the mead and beer_]

A reduced facsimile of page 2 of the 1854 Manuscript of
this _Song_ faces the present page.

GRIMHILD'S VENGEANCE.  SONG THE SECOND.  [_It was the                   24
proud Dame Grimhild The wine with spices blends_]

GRIMHILD'S VENGEANCE.  SONG THE THIRD.  [_O_, _where will               32
ye find kempions So bold and strong of hand_]

The Introduction furnished by Mr. Edmund Gosse to _Grimhild's Vengeance_
is undoubtedly by far the most illuminating and important contribution
yet made to the critical study of Borrow's Ballads, a study which has
hitherto been both meagre and inadequate.  Not only does Mr. Gosse handle
the three _Songs_ particularly before him, and make clear the
relationship they bear to each other, but he deals with the whole subject
of the origin of Borrow's Scandinavian Ballads, and traces fully and
precisely the immediate source from which their author derived them.  One
of Borrow's most vivid records Mr. Gosse calls into question, and proves
indisputably that it must henceforth be regarded, if not as a fiction, at
least as one more result of Borrow's inveterate habit of "drawing the
long bow,"--to wit the passages in _Lavengro_ wherein Borrow recounts his
acquisition of the "strange and uncouth-looking volume" at the price of a
kiss from the yeoman's wife, and the purpose which that volume served
him.

Of the first and second of the three Ballads included in _Grimhild's
Vengeance_ two Manuscripts are available.  The first of these was written
in 1829, and was intended to find a place in the _Songs of Scandinavia_
advertised at the close of that year.  The second Manuscript was written
in 1854, and was prepared for the projected volumes of _Koempe Viser_ of
that date.  Of the third Ballad there exists only a single Manuscript,
namely that produced in 1829.  Apparently in 1854 Borrow had relinquished
all hope of publishing the _Koempe Viser_ before he had commenced work
upon the third Ballad.  In the present volume the first two _Songs_ were
printed from the Manuscripts of 1854; the third _Song_ from the
Manuscript of 1829.

There is a copy of _Grimhild's Vengeance_ in the Library of the British
Museum.  The Press-mark is C. 44. d. 38.

   [Picture: Manuscript of Grimhild's Vengeance: Song the First--1854]



(57)  [LETTERS TO ANN BORROW: 1913]


Letters / To his Mother / Ann Borrow / and Other Correspondents / By /
George Borrow / London: / Printed for Private Circulation / 1913.

Collation:--Crown octavo, pp. 38; consisting of Half-title (with blank
reverse) pp. 1-2; Title-page, as above (with a notice regarding the
American copyright upon the centre of the reverse) pp. 3-4; and Text of
the _Letters_ pp. 5-38.  The head-line is _Letters to his Mother_
throughout, upon both sides of the page.  Following p. 38 is a leaf, with
blank recto, and with the following imprint upon the reverse: "_London_:
/ _Printed for Thomas J. Wise_, _Hampstead_, _N.W._ / _Edition limited to
Thirty Copies_."  The signatures are A (a half-sheet of four leaves),
plus B and C (two sheets, each eight leaves), each inset within the
other.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, and with the
title-page reproduced upon the front.  The leaves measure 7.5 x 5 inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed.

The series of letters contained in this volume were reprinted in _George
Borrow and his Circle_.  _By Clement King Shorter_, 8vo, 1913.  The whole
of the holographs are in Mr. Shorter's possession.

There is a copy of _Letters to his Mother_, _Ann Borrow_, in the Library
of the British Museum.  The Press-mark is C. 57. e. 46.



(58)  [THE BROTHER AVENGED: 1913]


The Brother Avenged / and / Other Ballads / By / George Borrow / London:
/ Printed for Private Circulation / 1913.

Collation:--Square demy octavo, pp. 32; consisting of Half-title (with
blank reverse) pp. 1-2; Title-page, as above (with a note regarding the
American copyright upon the centre of the reverse) pp 3-4; and Text of
the _Ballads_ pp. 5-32.  There are head-lines throughout, each page being
headed with the title of the particular Ballad occupying it.  At the foot
of p. 32 is the following imprint: "_London_: / _Printed for Thomas J.
Wise_, _Hampstead_, _N.W._ / _Edition limited to Thirty Copies_."  The
signatures are A and B (two sheets, each eight leaves), the one inset
within the other.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, and with the
title-page reproduced upon the front.  The leaves measure 8.5 x 6.875
inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed

                               _Contents_.

                                                                      PAGE

THE BROTHER AVENGED.  [_I stood before my master's                       5
board_]

Previously printed (with some textual variations) in _The
Foreign Quarterly Review_, vol. vi, _June_ 1830, pp
61-62.

THE EYES. {268}  [_To kiss a pair of red lips small_]                    9

HARMODIUS AND ARISTOGITON.  [_With the leaves of the                    12
myrtle I'll cover my brand_]

MY DAINTY DAME.  [_My dainty Dame_, _my heart's delight_]               14

GRASACH ABO OR THE CAUSE OF GRACE.  [_O_, _Baillie Na                   16
Cortie_! _thy turrets are tall_]

DAGMAR.  [_Sick in Ribe Dagmar's lying_]                                19

THE ELF BRIDE.  [_There was a youthful swain one day_]                  21

These stanzas should be compared with _The Elves_,
printed in _The Nightingale_, _The Valkyrie and Raven_,
_and Other Ballads_, 1913, pp. 25-26.

THE TREASURE DIGGER.  [_O_, _would that with last and                   23
shoe I had stay'd_]

THE FISHER.  [_The fisherman saddleth his good winged                   25
horse_]

THE CUCKOO.  [_Abiding an appointment made_]                            29

_Note_.--Each poem to which no reference is attached, appeared for the
first time in this volume.

There is a copy of _The Brother Avenged and Other Ballads_ in the Library
of the British Museum.  The Press-mark is C. 44. d. 38.

                   [Picture: Manuscript of Grasach Abo]



(59)  [THE GOLD HORNS: 1913]


The Gold Horns / Translated by / George Borrow / from the Danish of /
Adam Gottlob Oehlenschlager / Edited / with an Introduction by / Edmund
Gosse, C.B. / London: / Printed for Private Circulation / 1913.

Collation:--Square demy octavo, pp. 25; consisting of: Half-title (with
blank reverse) pp. 1-2; Title-page, as above (with a note regarding the
American copyright upon the centre of the reverse) pp. 3-4;
_Introduction_ pp. 5-9; and Text of _The Gold Horns_, the Danish and
English texts facing each other upon opposite pages, pp. 10-25.  The
reverse of p. 25 is blank.  There are head-lines throughout, each recto
being headed _The Gold Horns_, and each verso _Guldhornene_.  The book is
completed by a leaf, with blank reverse, and with the following imprint
upon its recto: "_London_: / _Printed for Thomas J. Wise_, _Hampstead_,
_N.W._ / _Edition limited to Thirty Copies_."  The signatures are A (a
half-sheet of four leaves), B (a quarter-sheet of two leaves), and C (a
full sheet of eight leaves), each inset within the other.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, and with the
title-page reproduced upon the front.  The leaves measure 8.5 x 6.875
inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed.

Although the poem was not printed until 1913, it is quite evident that
the translation was made by Borrow in or about the year 1826.  The paper
upon which the Manuscript is written is watermarked with the date 1824,
whilst the handwriting coincides with that of several of the pieces
included in the _Romantic Ballads of_ 1826.  "There can be little doubt,"
writes Mr. Gosse, "that Borrow intended _The Gold Horns_ for that volume,
and rejected it at last.  He was conscious, perhaps, that his hand had
lacked the skill needful to reproduce a lyric the melody of which would
have taxed the powers of Coleridge or of Shelley."

    "_The Gold Horns_ marks one of the most important stages in the
    history of Scandinavian literature.  It is the earliest, and the
    freshest, specimen of the Romantic Revival in its definite form.  In
    this way, it takes in Danish poetry a place analogous to that taken
    by _The Ancient Mariner_ in English poetry. . . .

    "Oehlenschlager has explained what it was that suggested to him the
    leading idea of his poem.  Two antique horns of gold, discovered some
    time before in the bogs of Slesvig, had been recently stolen from the
    national collection at Rosenberg, and the thieves had melted down the
    inestimable treasures.  Oehlenschlager treats these horns as the
    reward for genuine antiquarian enthusiasm, shown in a sincere and
    tender passion for the ancient relics of Scandinavian history.  From
    a generation unworthy to appreciate them, the _Horns_ had been
    withdrawn, to be mysteriously restored at the due romantic
    hour."--[_From the Introduction by Edmund Gosse_.]

There is a copy of _The Gold Horns_ in the Library of the British Museum.
The Press-mark is C. 57. d. 19.



(60)  [TORD OF HAFSBOROUGH: 1914]


Tord of Hafsborough / and Other Ballads / By / George Borrow / London: /
Printed for Private Circulation / 1914.

Collation:--Square demy octavo, pp. 32; consisting of: Half-title (with
blank reverse) pp. 1-2; Title-page, as above (with a note regarding the
American copyright upon the centre of the reverse) pp. 3-4; and Text of
the _Ballads_ pp. 5-32.  There are head-lines throughout, each page being
headed with the title of the particular _Ballad_ occupying it.  At the
foot of p. 32 is the following imprint: "_London_: / _Printed for Thomas
J. Wise_, _Hampstead_, _N.W._ / _Edition limited to Thirty Copies_."  The
signatures are A and B (two sheets, each eight leaves), the one inset
within the other.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, and with the
title-page reproduced upon the front.  The leaves measure 8.5 x 6.875
inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed.

                               _Contents_.

                                                                      PAGE

TORD OF HAFSBOROUGH.  [_It was Tord of Hafsborough_]                     5

FROM THE ARABIC.  [_O thou who fain would'st wisdom                     10
gain_]

THORVALD.  [_Swayne Tveskieg did a man possess_]                        11

Previously printed in _The Foreign Quarterly Review_,
vol. vi, 1830, p. 74.

PETER COLBIORNSEN.  ['_Fore Fredereksteen King Carl he                  16
lay_]

Previously printed in _The Foreign Quarterly Review_,
vol. vi, 1830, pp. 84-85.

KRAGELILL.  ['_Twas noised about_, '_twas noised about_]                21

ALLEGAST.  [_The Count such a store of gold had got_]                   25

EPIGRAMS:

1.  [_Assume a friend's face when a foeman you spy_]                    30

2.  [_The lion in woods finds prey of noble kind_]                      30

3.  [_Though God provides our daily bread_]                             30

4.  [_To trust a man I never feel inclined_]                            31

5.  [_A hunter who was always seeking game_]                            31

6.  [_The plans of men of shrewdest wit_]                               31

7.  [_Well was it said_, _long years ago_]                              31

8.  [_Who roams the world by many wants beset_]                         32

It is probable that the whole of these eight _Epigrams_
were derived by Borrow from Persian sources.

ON A YOUNG MAN WITH RED HAIR.  [_He is a lad of sober                   32
mind_]

_Note_.--Each poem to which no reference is attached, appeared for the
first time in this volume.

There is a copy of _Tord of Hafsborough and Other Ballads_ in the Library
of the British Museum.  The Press-mark is C. 44. d. 38.



(61)  [THE EXPEDITION TO BIRTING'S LAND: 1914]


The Expedition to / Birting's Land / and Other Ballads / By / George
Borrow / London: / Printed for Private Circulation / 1914.

Collation:--Square demy octavo, pp. 27; consisting of: Half-title (with
blank reverse) pp. 1-2; Title-page, as above (with a note regarding the
American copyright upon the centre of the reverse) pp. 3-4; and Text of
the _Ballads_ pp. 5-27.  There are head-lines throughout, each page being
headed with the title of the particular _Ballad_ occupying it.  Upon the
reverse of p. 27 is the following imprint: "_London_: / _Printed for
Thomas J. Wise_, _Hampstead_, _N.W._ / _Edition limited to Thirty
Copies_."  The signatures are A (a half-sheet of four leaves), B (a
quarter-sheet of two leaves), and C (a full sheet of eight leaves), inset
within each other.

Issued in bright green paper wrappers, with untrimmed edges, and with the
title-page reproduced upon the front.  The leaves measure 8.5 x 6.875
inches.

Thirty Copies only were printed.

                               _Contents_.

                                                                      PAGE

THE EXPEDITION TO BIRTING'S LAND.  [_The King he o'er the                5
castle rules_]

Of _The Expedition to Birting's Land_ no less than three
Manuscripts are extant.  The first was composed in 1826,
and was originally destined for inclusion in the
_Romantic Ballads_ of that date.  It is numbered to come
between _The Tournament_ and _Vidrik Verlandson_.  The
second was written in 1829, and was intended to find a
place in _The Songs of Scandinavia_.  The third was
prepared in 1854, with a view to its appearance in the
_Koempe Viser_.  In the two earlier versions the Ballad
bears the tentative title _The Expedition of King
Diderik's Warriors to Birting's Land_.  The texts of all
three differ very considerably, the final version being
that from which the Ballad was here printed.

THE SINGING MARINER.  [_Who will ever have again_]                      16

Previously printed in _The Monthly Magazine_, Vol. lvi,
1823, p. 335.

There exists an early Manuscript of this charming lyric,
differing entirely from the text as printed.  This early
version is written in couplets, instead of in four-line
stanzas.  Here is the first stanza, followed by the
equivalent couplet from the MS.:

                        Printed text.

    _Who will ever have again_,
    _On the land or on the main_,
    _Such a chance as happen'd to_
    _Count Arnaldos long ago_.

                             MS.

    _Who had e'er such an adventure the ocean's waves
    upon_,
    _As had the Count Arnaldos the morning of St. John_.

Upon the opposite page I give a facsimile of this early
Manuscript, the exact size of the original.  The tiny
waif affords a delightful specimen of Borrow's extremely
beautiful and graceful minute handwriting, of which one
or two other examples exist.  The paper upon which the
lines are written is evidently a leaf torn from a small
note-book.

YOUTH'S SONG IN SPRING.  [_O_, _scarcely is Spring a time               18
of pure bliss_]

THE NIGHTINGALE.  [_In midnight's calm hour the                         19
Nightingale sings_]

Previously printed in _The Monthly Magazine_, vol. lvi,
1823, p. 526.

LINES.  [_Say from what mine took Love the yellow gold_]                20

MORNING SONG.  [_From Eastern quarters now_]                            21

Previously printed in _The Foreign Quarterly Review_,
vol. vi, 1830, p. 65.

FROM THE FRENCH.  [_This world by fools is occupied_]                   22

THE MORNING WALK.  [_To the beech grove with so sweet an                23
air_]

Previously printed in _The Foreign Quarterly Review_,
vol. vi, 1830, pp. 80-81.

_Note_.--Each poem to which no reference is attached, appeared for the
first time in this volume.

There is a copy of _The Expedition to Birting's Land and Other Ballads_
in the Library of the British Museum.  The Press-mark is C. 44. d. 38.

                 [Picture: Manuscript of Singing Mariner]



_PART II_.
CONTRIBUTIONS TO PERIODICAL LITERATURE, ETC.


(1)  _The New Monthly Magazine_, Vol. vii, 1823.  Pp. 540-542.


THE DIVER, A BALLAD TRANSLATED FROM THE GERMAN.  [_Where is the man who
will dive for his King_?]

Reprinted in The Song of Deirdra and Other Ballads, 1913, pp. 8-17.



(2)  _The Monthly Magazine_, Vol. lvi, 1823.


                                 P. 244.

ODE TO A MOUNTAIN TORRENT.  [_How lovely thou art in thy tresses of
foam_]

Reprinted, with the text substantially revised, in _Romantic Ballads_,
1826, pp. 164-166.  Again reprinted in _Targum_, 1835, pp. 45-46.

The majority of Borrow's contributions to _The Monthly Magazine_ appeared
under the signature '_George Olaus Borrow_.'  Dr. Knapp has recorded that
he found in the Corporation Library at Norwich a book on ancient Danish
Literature, by Olaus Wormius, carrying several marginal notes in Borrow's
handwriting.  The suggestion that it was from this book that Borrow
derived the pseudonymous second Christian name which he employed in _The
Monthly Magazine_ is not an unreasonable one.

                                 P. 245.

DEATH.  [_Perhaps_ '_tis folly_, _but still I feel_]

Reprinted (under the amended title _Thoughts on Death_, and with some
small textual variations) in _Romantic Ballads_, 1826, pp. 169-170.

Another version of the same poem was printed (under the title _A Survey
of Death_, the first line reading _My blood is freezing_, _my senses
reel_) in _Mollie Charane and Other Ballads_, 1913, pp. 11-12.

                                 P. 246.

MOUNTAIN SONG.  [_That pathway before ye_, _so narrow and gray_]

                               Pp. 306-309.

DANISH POETRY AND BALLAD WRITING.  A Prose Essay, including, _inter
alia_, the following Ballad:

SKION MIDDEL.  [_The maiden was lacing so tightly her vest_]

Reprinted, under the amended title _Sir Middel_, the first line reading
"_So tightly was Swanelil lacing her vest_," in _Romantic Ballads_, 1826,
pp. 28-30.

Another, but widely different, version of this Ballad is printed in
_Child Maidelvold and Other Ballads_, 1913, pp. 5-10.  In this latter
version the name of the heroine is Sidselil in place of Swanelil, and
that of the hero is Child Maidelvold in place of Sir Middel.

                               Pp. 334-336.

LENORA.  [_When morning's gleam was on the hill_]

                                 P. 437.

CHLOE.  [_Oh_! _we have a sister on earthly dominions_]

Reprinted in _Targum_, 1835, pp. 47-48.

When gathering _Chloe_ into the pages of _Targum_ Borrow very
considerably revised the text.  Here is the concluding stanza of each of
the two versions:--

                                   1823

    _But God shook his sceptre_, _and thunder'd appalling_,
       _While winds swept the branches with turbulent sigh_;
    _Then trembled the host_, _but they heeded his calling_,
       _And bore the sweet maiden_, _yet praying_, _on high_.
    "_Ah_, _we had a sister on earthly dominions_!"
       _All sung_, _as thro' heaven they joyously trod_,
    _And bore_, _with flush'd faces_, _and fluttering pinions_,
       _The yet-praying maid to the throne of her God_.

                                   1835

    _Then frown'd the dread father_;_ his thunders appalling_
    _To rattle began_, _and his whirlwinds to roar_;
    _Then trembled the host_, _but they heeded his calling_,
    _And Chloe up-snatching_, _to heaven they soar_.
    _O we had a sister on earthly dominions_!
    _They sang as through heaven triumphant they stray'd_,
    _And bore with flush'd faces and fluttering pinions_
    _To God's throne of brightness the yet praying maid_.

                                 P. 437.

SEA-SONG.  [_King Christian stood beside the mast_]

In 1826 and 1835 the title was changed to _National Song_.

Borrow published no less than four versions of this _National Song_:

1.  In _The Monthly Magazine_, 1823, p. 437,

2.  In _Romantic Ballads_, 1826, pp. 146-148,

3.  In The Foreign Quarterly Review, 1830, pp. 70-71,

4.  In _Targum_, 1835, pp. 49-50.

Upon each occasion he practically rewrote the _Song_, so that all four
versions differ completely.  As an illustration of these differences I
give the first stanza of each version:

                                  1823.

    _King Christian stood beside the mast_,
       _In smoke and flame_;
    _His heavy cannon rattled fast_
    _Against the Gothmen_, _as they pass'd_:
    _Then sunk each hostile sail and mast_
       _In smoke and flame_.
    "_Fly_, (_said the foe_,) _fly_, _all that can_,
    _For who with Denmark's Christian_
       _Will ply the bloody game_?"

                                  1826.

    _King Christian stood beside the mast_
       _Smoke_, _mixt with flame_,
    _Hung o'er his guns_, _that rattled fast_
    _Against the Gothmen_, _as they passed_:
    _Then sunk each hostile sail and mast_
       _In smoke and flame_.
    "_Fly_!"_ said the foe_: "_fly_! _all that can_,
    _Nor wage_, _with Denmark's Christian_,
       _The dread_, _unequal game_."

                                  1830.

    _King Christian by the main-mast stood_
       _In smoke and mist_!
    _So pour'd his guns their fiery flood_
    _That Gothmen's heads and helmets bow'd_;
    _Their sterns_, _their masts fell crashing loud_
       _In smoke and mist_.
    "_Fly_," _cried they_, "_let him fly who can_,
    _For who shall Denmark's Christian_
       _Resist_?"

                                  1835.

    _King Christian stood beside the mast_
    _In smoke and mist_.
    _His weapons_, _hammering hard and fast_,
    _Through helms and brains of Gothmen pass'd_.
    _Then sank each hostile sail and mast_
    _In smoke and mist_.
    "_Fly_," _said the foe_, "_fly all that can_,
    _For who can Denmark's Christian_
    _Resist_?"

                                 P. 438.

THE ERL KING.  [_Who is it that gallops so lat on the wild_!]



(3)  _The Monthly Magazine_, Vol. lvii, 1824.


                                 P. 235.

BERNARD'S ADDRESS TO HIS ARMY.  [_Freshly blew the morning breeze_]

                                 P. 335.

THE SINGING MARINER.  [_Who will ever have again_]

Reprinted in _The Expedition to Birting's Land and Other Ballads_, 1914,
pp. 16-18.

                                 P. 431.

THE FRENCH PRINCESS.  [_Towards France a maiden went_]

                                 P. 526.

THE NIGHTINGALE.  [_In midnight's calm hour the Nightingale sings_]

Reprinted in _The Expedition to Birting's Land and Other Ballads_, 1914,
pp. 19-20.



(4)  _The Universal Review_, Vol. i, 1824.


                                 P. 391.

A REVIEW OF _Fortsetzung des Faust Von Goethe_.  _Von C. C. L. Schone_.
(_Berlin_.)

                                 P. 394.

A REVIEW OF _OElenschlager's Samlede digte_.  (_Copenhagen_.)

                               Pp. 491-513.

A REVIEW OF _Narrative of a Pedestrian Journey through Russia and
Siberian Tartary_, _from the Frontiers of China to the Frozen Sea_.  _By
Capt. John Dundas_, _R.N._  (_London_, 1824.)



(5)  _The Monthly Magazine_, Vol. lviii, 1824-1825.


                                Pp. 19-22.

DANISH TRADITIONS AND SUPERSTITIONS.  A Prose Essay.  _Part i_.
Including _inter alia_ the following Ballad:

WALDEMAR'S CHASE.  [_Late at eve they were toiling on Harribee bank_]

Reprinted in _Romantic Ballads_, 1826, pp. 115-116.

                                  P. 47.

WAR-SONG; WRITTEN WHEN THE FRENCH FIRST INVADED SPAIN.  [_Arise_, _ye
sons of injur'd Spain_]

                                 P. 432.

DANISH SONGS AND BALLADS.  No. 1, BEAR SONG.  [_The squirrel that's
sporting_]

Reprinted in _Romantic Ballads_, 1826, pp. 144-145.

                               Pp. 498-500.

DANISH TRADITIONS AND SUPERSTITIONS.  A Prose Essay.  _Part ii_.



(6)  _The Monthly Magazine_, Vol. lix, 1825.


                          Pp. 25-26 and 103-104.

DANISH TRADITIONS AND SUPERSTITIONS.  A Prose Essay.  _Parts iii and iv_.

                               Pp. 143-144.

THE DECEIVED MERMAN.  [_Fair Agnes left her mother's door_]

Reprinted (with very considerable changes in the text, the first line
reading "_Fair Agnes alone on the sea-shore stood_") in _Romantic
Ballads_, 1826, pp. 120-123.

In 1854 Borrow rewrote this Ballad, and furnished it with a new title
_Agnes and the Merman_.  The following stanzas taken from each, will
serve to show the difference between the two versions:--

                                  1826.

    _The Merman up to the church door came_;
    _His eyes they shone like a yellow flame_;

    _His face was white_, _and his beard was green_--
    _A fairer demon was never seen_.

    "_Now_, _Agnes_, _Agnes_, _list to me_,
    _Thy babes are longing so after thee_."

    "_I cannot come yet_, _here must I stay_
    _Until the priest shall have said his say_."

                                  1854.

    _In at the door the Merman treads_--
    _Away the images turned their heads_.

    _His face was white_, _his beard was green_,
    _His eyes were full of love_, _I ween_.

    "_Hear_, _Agnes_, _hear_! _'tis time for thee_
    _To come to thy home below the sea_."

    "_I cannot come yet_, _I here must stay_,
    _Until the priest has said his say_."

                          Pp. 308, 411, and 507.

DANISH TRADITIONS AND SUPERSTITIONS.  A Prose Essay.  _Parts v_, _vi_,
_and vii_.



(7)  _The Monthly Magazine_, Vol. lx, 1825.


                      Pp. 296-297 {291} and 424-425.

DANISH TRADITIONS AND SUPERSTITIONS.  A Prose Essay.  _Parts viii and
ix_.



(8)  _The Universal Review_, Vol. ii, 1825.


                               Pp. 315-331.

A REVIEW OF _The Devil's Elixir_; _from the German of Hoffman_.
(_London_, _Cadell_, 2 _vols_.)

                               Pp. 550-566.

A REVIEW OF _Danske Folkesagn_, _Samlede af J. M. Thiele_.
(_Copenhagen_, 1818-1823.)



(9)  _The Foreign Quarterly Review_, Vol. vi, No. xi, _June_, 1830, pp.
48-87.


A REVIEW OF _Dansk-norsk Litteraturlexicon_, 1818, AND _Den Danske
Digtekunsts Middelalder fra Arrebo til Tullin fremstillet i Academiske
Foreloesinger holdne i Aarene_, 1798-1800.

A long critical prose article by John Bowring, including, _inter alia_,
the following Ballads by George Borrow:--

1.  KING OLUF THE SAINT.  [_King Oluf and his brother bold_]

Reprinted in _Queen Berngerd_, _The Bard and the Dreams_, _and Other
Ballads_, 1913, pp. 23-29.

This is an entirely different Ballad from that which had appeared, under
the title _Saint Oluf_, in _Romantic Ballads_, 1826, pp. 53-57.

2.  THE BROTHER AVENGED.  [_I stood before my master's board_]

Reprinted, with some textual variations, in _The Brother Avenged and
Other Ballads_, 1913, pp. 5-8.

3.  AAGER AND ELIZA.  ['_Twas the valiant knight_, _Sir Aager_]

Previously printed, but with endless variations in the text, in _Romantic
Ballads_, 1826, pp. 47-52, where the first line reads, "_Have ye heard of
bold Sir Aager_."

As an example of the differences of text to be observed in the two
versions, I give three stanzas of each:

                                  1826.

    _Up his mighty limbs he gather'd_,
    _Took the coffin on his back_;
    _And to fair Eliza's bower_
    _Hasten'd_, _by the well-known track_.

    _On her chamber's lowly portal_,
    _With his fingers long and thin_,
    _Thrice he tapp'd_, _and bade Eliza_
    _Straightway let her bridegroom in_!

    _Straightway answer'd fair Eliza_,
    "_I will not undo my door_
    _Till I hear thee name sweet Jesus_,
    _As thou oft hast done before_."

                                  1830.

    _Up Sir Aager rose_, _his coffin_
       _Bore he on his bended back_.
    _Tow'ds the bower of sweet Eliza_
       _Was his sad and silent track_.

    _He the door tapp'd with his coffin_,
       _For his fingers had no skin_;
    "_Rise_, _O rise_, _my sweet Eliza_!
       _Rise_, _and let thy bridegroom in_."

    _Straightway answer'd fair Eliza_:
       "_I will not undo my door_
    '_Till thou name the name of Jesus_,
       _Even as thou could'st before_."



4.  MORNING SONG.  [From eastern quarters now]


Reprinted in _The Expedition to Birting's Land_, _and Other Ballads_,
1914, pp. 21-22.

5.  DANISH NATIONAL SONG.  [_King Christian by the main-mast stood_]

Previously printed:

1.  In _The Monthly Magazine_, Vol. lvi, 1823, p. 437.

2.  In _Romantic Ballads_, 1826, pp. 146-148.

Afterwards reprinted in _Targum_, 1835, pp. 49-50.

6.  THE SEAMAN.  [_A seaman with a bosom light_]

7.  SIR SINCLAIR.  [_Sir Sinclair sail'd from the Scottish ground_]

Reprinted in _Targum_, 1835, pp. 51-55.

8.  THORVALD.  [_Swayne Tveskieg did a man possess_]

Reprinted in _Tord of Hafsborough and Other Ballads_, 1914, pp. 11-15.

9.  WHEN I WAS LITTLE.  [_There was a time when I was very tiny_]

10.  BIRTH OF CHRIST.  [_Each spring_,--_when the mists have abandon'd
the earth_]

11.  TIME'S PERSPECTIVE.  [_Through the city sped a youth_]

12.  THE MORNING WALK.  [_To the beach grove with so sweet an air_]

Reprinted in _The Expedition to Birting's Land and Other Ballads_, 1914,
pp. 23-27.

13.  THE ASPEN.  [_What whispers so strange at the hour of midnight_]

14.  DAME MARTHA'S FOUNTAIN.  [_Dame Martha dwelt at Karisegaard_]

Reprinted in _Queen Berngerd_, _The Bard and the Dreams_, _and Other
Ballads_, 1913, pp. 13-15.

15.  PETER COLBIORNSEN.  ['_Fore Fredereksteen King Carl he lay_]

Reprinted in _Tord of Hafsborough and Other Ballads_, 1914, pp. 16-20.

16.  THE RUINS OF URANIENBORG.  [_Thou by the strand dost wander_]

Reprinted, but with much textual variation, in _Ellen of Villenskov and
Other Ballads_, 1913, pp. 13-18.



(10.)  _The Norfolk Chronicle_, August 18_th_, 1832.


A NOTE ON "THE ORIGIN OF THE WORD 'TORY'."

A short prose article, signed "_George Borrow_," and dated "_Norwich_,
_August_ 6."



(11)  _The Athenaeum_, _August_ 20, 1836, pp. 587-588.


THE GYPSIES IN RUSSIA AND IN SPAIN.

Two letters from Borrow, giving an account of his experiences of the
gypsies in Russia and in Spain.

    "All the episodes that he relates he incorporated in _The Bible in
    Spain_.  The two letters plainly indicate that all the time Borrow
    was in Spain his mind was more filled with the subject of the gypsies
    than with any other question.  He did his work well for the Bible
    Society no doubt . . . but there is a humourous note in the fact that
    Borrow should have utilised his position as a missionary--for so we
    must count him--to make himself thoroughly acquainted with gypsy
    folklore, and gypsy songs and dances."--[Shorter, _George Borrow and
    his Circle_, p. 240.]



(12)  _The Illustrated London News_, _December_ 8_th_, 1855, p. 685.


ANCIENT RUNIC STONE, RECENTLY FOUND IN THE ISLE OF MAN.

Reprinted in _George Borrow and his Circle_, by Clement King Shorter,
1913, pp. 301-303.



(13.)  _A Practical Grammar of the Antient Gaelic_.  By the Rev. John
Kelly, LL.D.  Edited by the Rev. William Gill, 8vo, 1859.


                                  p. xi.

TRANSLATION FROM THE MANX.  [_And what is glory_, _but the radiance of a
name_,--]

Borrow's statement in the closing paragraph (printed _post_, p. 299) of
his Essay on _The Welsh and their Literature_ renders it possible to
place this Translation to his credit.

                                 p. xix.

A LETTER FROM BORROW TO THE EDITOR, regarding Manx Ballads.



(14)  _ The Quarterly Review_, _January_, 1861, pp. 38-63.


THE WELSH AND THEIR LITERATURE.  A Prose Essay.

This Essay was in fact a review, by Borrow himself, of his own work _The
Sleeping Bard_.

    "In the autumn [of 1860] Borrow determined to call attention to it
    [_The Sleeping Bard_] himself.  He revamped an old article he had
    written in 1830, entitled _The Welsh and their Literature_, and sent
    it to Mr. Murray for _The Quarterly Review_. . . .  The modern
    literature and things of Wales were not introduced into the article .
    . . and it appeared anonymously in _The Quarterly Review_ for
    January, 1861.  It is in fact Borrow's own (and the only) review of
    _The Sleeping Bard_, which, however, had the decisive result of
    selling off the whole edition in a month."--[Knapp's _Life and
    Correspondence of George Borrow_, 1899, vol. ii, pp. 195-196.]

The Manuscript of this Essay, or Review, is not at present forthcoming.
But, fortunately, the MS. of certain paragraphs with which Borrow brought
the Essay to a conclusion, and which the Editor in the exercise of his
editorial function quite properly struck out, have been preserved.  The
barefaced manner in which Borrow anonymously praised and advertised his
own work fully justified the Editor's action.  I print these paragraphs
below.  My principal reason for doing so is this, that the closing lines
afford evidence of Borrow's authorship of other portions of Gill's
Introduction to his Edition of _Kelly's Manx Grammar_, 1859, beyond those
which until now have been attributed to his pen:

    "Our having mentioned _The Romany Rye_ gives us an opportunity of
    saying a few words concerning that work, to the merits of which, and
    likewise to those of _Lavengro_, of which it is the sequel, adequate
    justice has never been awarded.  It is a truly remarkable book,
    abounding not only with strange and amusing adventure, but with deep
    learning communicated in a highly agreeable form.  We owe it an
    _amende honorable_ for not having in our recent essay on Buddhism
    quoted from it some remarkable passages on that superstition, which
    are to be found in a conversation between the hero of the tale and
    the man in black.  Never was the subject of Buddhism treated in a
    manner so masterly and original.  But the book exhibits what is
    infinitely more precious than the deepest learning, more desirable
    than the most amusing treasury of adventure, a fearless, honest
    spirit, a resolution to tell the truth however strange the truth may
    appear to the world.

    "A remarkable proof of this is to be found in what is said in it
    respecting the Italians.  It is all very well at the present day,
    after the miracles lately performed in Italy by her sons, to say that
    Italy is the land to which we must look for great men; that it is not
    merely the country of singers, fiddlers, _improvisatori_, and
    linguists, but of men, of beings who may emphatically be called men.
    But who, three or four years ago, would have ventured to say as much?
    Why there was one and only one who ventured to say so, and that was
    George Borrow in his work entitled _The Romany Rye_.  Many other
    things equally bold and true he has said in that work, and also in
    its predecessor _Lavengro_.

    "In conclusion we wish to give Mr. Borrow a piece of advice, namely,
    that with all convenient speed he publish whatever works he has
    written and has not yet committed to the press.  Life is very
    precarious, and when an author dies, his unpublished writings are too
    frequently either lost to the world, or presented in a shape which
    all but stultifies them.  Of Mr. Borrow's unpublished writings there
    is a catalogue at the end of _The Romany Rye_, and a most remarkable
    catalogue it is, comprising works on all kinds of interesting
    subjects.  Of these, the one which we are most eager to see is that
    which is called _Wild Wales_, which we have no doubt whenever it
    appears will be welcomed as heartily as _The Bible in Spain_ was
    seventeen years ago, a book which first laid open the mysterious
    peninsula to the eyes of the world, and that the book on Wales will
    be followed by the one which is called _Wanderings in quest of Manx
    Literature_.  Now the title alone of that book is worth a library of
    commonplace works, for it gives the world an inkling of a thing it
    never before dreamed of, namely, that the little Celtic Isle of Man
    has a vernacular literature.  What a pity if the book itself should
    be eventually lost!  Here some person will doubtless exclaim,
    'Perhaps the title is all book, and there is no book behind it; what
    can Mr. Borrow know of Manx literature?'  Stay, friend, stay!  A Manx
    grammar has just appeared, edited by a learned and highly respectable
    Manx clergyman, in the preface to which are some beautiful and highly
    curious notices of Manx vernacular Gallic literature, which are,
    however, confessedly not written by the learned Manx clergyman, nor
    by any other learned Manxman, but by George Borrow, an Englishman,
    the author of _The Bible in Spain_ and _The Romany Rye_."

A number of translations from Welsh Poetry were introduced by Borrow into
this Essay.  They were all, as he explained in a footnote, derived from
his projected _Songs of Europe_.  With the exception of an occasional
stray couplet, or single line, the following list includes them all:--

1.  FROM IOLO GOCH'S "ODE TO THE PLOUGH MAN."  [_The mighty Hu with mead
would pay_]

Reprinted, with several changes in the text, in _Wild Wales_, 1862, Vol.
iii, pp. 292-293.

A further extract from the same _Ode_, "_If with small things we Hu
compare_" etc., is given in a footnote on p. 40.

2.  SAXONS AND BRITONS.  [_A serpent that coils_]

Reprinted (the first line reading _A serpent which coils_) in _Wild
Wales_, 1862, Vol. i, p. 48.

3.  THE DESTINY OF THE BRITONS.  [_Their Lord they shall praise_]

These lines were employed by Borrow in the following year as a motto for
the title-pages of _Wild Wales_.

4.  FROM AN ODE ON LLYWELYN, BY DAFYDD BENFRAS.  [_Llywelyn of the potent
hand oft wroght_]

5.  FROM AN ODE ON THE MANSION OF OWEN GLENDOWER, BY IOLO GOCH.  [_Its
likeness now I'll limn you out_]

6.  EPIGRAM ON THE RISING OF OWEN GLENDOWER.  [_One thousand four
hundred_, _no less and no more_]

7.  FROM AN ODE TO GRIFFITH AP NICHOLAS, BY GWILYM AP IEUAN HEN.
[_Griffith ap Nicholas_! _who like thee_]

Reprinted in _Wild Wales_, 1862, Vol. iii, p. 327.

8.  EPIGRAM ON A SPIDER.  [_From out its womb it weaves with care_]



(15)  _Once a Week_, Vol. vi, _January_ 4_th_, 1862, pp. 37-39.


BALLADS OF THE ISLE OF MAN.  TRANSLATED FROM THE MANX.  BY GEORGE BORROW:

1.  BROWN WILLIAM.  [_Let no one in greatness too confident be_]

Reprinted in _Mona Miscellany_, 1869, pp. 67-70.

Again reprinted (with the prose Introduction considerably curtailed) in
_Brown William_, _The Power of the Harp_, _and Other Ballads_, 1913, pp.
5-11.

2.  MOLLIE CHARANE.  [_O_, _Mollie Charane_, _where got you your gold_?]

Reprinted in _Mollie Charane and Other Ballads_, 1913, pp. 5-7.



(16)  _Once a Week_, Vol. vi, _March_ 8_th_, 1862, pp. 289-294.


EMELIAN THE FOOL.

The first of a series of three _Russian Popular Tales_, in Prose,
translated by George Borrow.

Also printed privately in pamphlet form, as follows:--

_Emelian the Fool_ / _A Tale_ / _Translated from the Russian_ / _By_ /
_George Borrow_ / _London_: / _Printed for Private Circulation_ /
1913.--Crown octavo, pp. 37.  [See _ante_, Part I, No. 53.]

The _Tale_ was included in _The Avon Booklet_, Vol. ii, 1904, pp.
175-197.

Borrow had projected a volume to contain a series of twelve _Russian
Popular Tales_, and this was included among the Works advertised as
"ready for the press" at the end of _The Romany Rye_.

Unfortunately the project failed to meet with success, and these three
_Tales_ were all that finally appeared.



(17)  _Once a Week_, Vol. vi, _May_ 17_th_, 1862, pp. 572-574.


THE STORY OF YVASHKA WITH THE BEAR'S EAR.

The second of a series of _Russian Popular Tales_, in Prose, translated
by George Borrow.

Reprinted in _The Sphere_, _February_ 1_st_, 1913, p. 136.

Also printed privately in pamphlet form as follows:--

_The Story_ / _of_ / _Yvashka with the Bear's Ear_ / _Translated from the
Russian_ / _By_ / _George Borrow_ / _London_: / _Printed for Private
Circulation_ / 1913.  Square demy octavo, pp. 23.  [See _ante_, Part I,
No. 26.]

The _Story_ was also included in _The Avon Booklet_, Vol. ii, 1904, pp.
199-210.



(18)  _Once a Week_, Vol. vii, _August_ 2_nd_, 1862, pp. 152-155.


HARALD HARFAGR.  A DISCOURSE BETWEEN A VALKYRIE AND A RAVEN, &c.  [_Ye
men wearing bracelets_]

Reprinted (under the amended title _The Valkyrie and Raven_) in _The
Nightingale_, _The Valkyrie and Raven_, _and Other Ballads_, 1913, pp.
11-20.

A Prose Introduction, which preceded the Ballad in _Once a Week_, was not
reprinted in _The Nightingale_, _The Valkyrie and Raven_, _and Other
Ballads_.

A facsimile (actual size) of a page of the Original Manuscript is given
herewith.

In _Once a Week_ this Ballad was accompanied by an Illustration, engraved
upon wood, representing the Valkyrie discoursing with the Raven.

     [Picture: Manuscript of Harold Harfagr = The Valkyrie and Raven]



(19)  _Once a Week_, Vol. vii, _October_ 4_th_, 1862, pp. 403-406.


THE STORY OF TIM.

The third (and last) of a series of _Russian Popular Tales_, in Prose,
translated by George Borrow.

Also printed privately in pamphlet form, as follows:--

_The Story of Tim_ / _Translated from the Russian_ / _By_ / _George
Borrow_ / _London_: / _Printed for Private Circulation_ / 1913-Crown
octavo, p. 31.  [See _ante_, Part I, No. 54.]

The _Story_ was also included in _The Avon Booklet_, Vol. ii, 1904, pp.
211-229.



(20)  _Once a Week_, Vol. viii, _January_ 3_rd_, 1863, pp. 35-36.


THE COUNT OF VENDEL'S DAUGHTER.  [_Within a bower the womb I left_]

Reprinted in _The Verner Raven_, _The Count of Vendel's Daughter_, _and
Other Ballads_, 1913, pp. 12-17.



(21)  _Once a Week_, Vol. viii, _December_ 12_th_, 1863, p. 686.


THE HAIL-STORM; OR, THE DEATH OF BUI.  [_All eager to sail_]

This Ballad differs entirely from those which appeared, under the title
_The Hail-Storm_ only, in _Romantic Ballads_, 1826, pp. 136-138, in
_Targum_, 1835, pp. 42-43, and in _Young Swaigder or The Force of Runes
and Other Ballads_, 1913, pp. 14-15.  Each of these three versions
consists of four eight-line stanzas; the present Ballad extends to 84
lines, arranged in irregular stanzas.



(22)  _Benjamin Robert Haydon_: _Correspondence and Table Talk_.  By
Frederic Wordsworth Haydon, 1876, Vol. i, pp. 360-361.


A LETTER FROM BORROW TO B. R. HAYDON.

Reprinted in _George Borrow and his Circle_.  By Clement King Shorter,
1913, p. 25.



(23)  _Life_, _Writings_, _and Correspondence of George Borrow_.  By
William I. Knapp, 2 Vols, 1899:


                           Vol. ii, pp. 91-95.

TALE FROM THE CORNISH.  [_In Lavan's parish once of yore_]

Reprinted (with some small textual revisions) in _Signelil_, _A Tale from
the Cornish_, _and Other Ballads_, 1913, pp. 8-18.

                             Vol. ii, p. 238.

HUNGARIAN GYPSY SONG.  [_To the mountain the fowler has taken his way_]

The two volumes contain, in addition, a considerable number of Letters
and other documents published therein for the first time.



(24)  _George Borrow_: _The Man and his Work_.  By R. A. J. Walling, 8vo,
1908.


SEVERAL LETTERS BY BORROW, ADDRESSED TO DR. [AFTERWARDS SIR JOHN]
BOWRING,

were printed for the first time in this volume.



(25)  _The Life of George Borrow_.  By Herbert Jenkins, 8vo, 1912.


SEVERAL LETTERS, AND PORTIONS OF LETTERS, BY BORROW,

were printed for the first time in this volume.



(26)  _The Fortnightly Review_, _April_, 1913, pp. 680-688.


NINE LETTERS FROM BORROW TO HIS WIFE.

The letters form a portion of an article by Mr. Clement Shorter, entitled
_George Borrow in Scotland_.

Eight of these letters had been printed previously in _Letters to his
Wife Mary Borrow_, 1913 [see _ante_, Part I, No. 19].  The remaining
letter was afterwards included in _Letters to his Mother Ann Borrow and
Other Correspondents_, 1913 [see _ante_, Part I, No. 57].



(27)  _George Borrow and his Circle_.  By Clement King Shorter, 8vo,
1913.


MANY LETTERS BY BORROW,

together with a considerable number of other important documents, were
first printed in this volume.

                                 _Note_.

The various Poems and Prose Articles included in the above list, to which
no reference is appended, have not yet been reprinted in any shape or
form.

                                 _Query_.

There exists a galley-proof of a Ballad by Borrow entitled _The Father's
Return_.  _From the Polish of Mickiewicz_.  The Ballad consists of
twenty-one four-line stanzas, and commences "_Take children your way_,
_for the last time to-day_."  This proof is set up in small type, and was
evidently prepared for insertion in some provincial newspaper.  This
paper I have not been able to trace.  Should its identity be known to any
reader of the present Bibliography I should be grateful for a note of it.

                                * * * * *

*** In _The Tatler_ for _November_ 26, 1913, appeared a short story
entitled _The Potato Patch_.  _By G. Borrow_.  This story was not by the
Author of _Targum_.  '_Borrow_' was a mis-print; the name should have
read '_G. Barrow_.'



_PART III_.
BORROVIANA: COMPLETE VOLUMES OF BIOGRAPHY AND CRITICISM.


(1)


George Borrow in / East Anglia / By / William A. Dutt / [_Quotation from
Emerson_] / London / David Nutt, 270-271, Strand / 1896.

Collation:--Crown octavo, pp. 80.

Issued in paper boards backed with cloth, with the title-page, slightly
abbreviated, reproduced upon the front cover.  Some copies are in
cream-coloured paper wrappers.



(2)


Life, Writings, / and Correspondence of / George Borrow / Derived from
Official and other / Authentic Sources / By William I. Knapp, Ph.D.,
LL.D. / Author and Editor of French and Spanish Text-Books / Editor of
"Las Obras de Boscan," "Diego de Mendoza," etc. / And late of Yale and
Chicago Universities / With Portrait and Illustrations / In Two Volumes /
Vol. I. [Vol. II.] / London / John Murray, Albemarle Street / New York:
G. P. Putnam's Sons / 1899.

Collation:--Demy octavo:

Vol. I. pp. xx + 402.

Vol. II. pp. x + 406, with an inserted slip carrying a List of _Errata_
for both Volumes.

Issued in dull green cloth boards, gilt lettered.



(3)


George Borrow / The Man and his Work / By / R. A. J. Walling / Author of
"A Sea Dog of Devon" / Cassell and Company, Limited / London, Paris, New
York, Toronto and Melbourne / MCMVIII.

Collation:--Crown octavo, pp. xii + 356.

Issued in dull red cloth boards, gilt lettered.

Several Letters from Borrow to Dr. [afterwards Sir John] Bowring were
first printed in this volume.



(4)


George Borrow / Von / Dr. Bernhard Blaesing. / Berlin / Emil Ebering /
1910.

Collation:--Royal octavo, pp. 78.

Issued in mottled-grey paper wrappers, with the title-page reproduced
upon the front.



(5)


Cymmrodorion / Society's / Publications. / George Borrow's Second / Tour
in Wales. / By / T. C. Cantrill, B.Sc., / and / J. Pringle. / From "Y
Cymmrodor," Vol. xxii. {313} / London: Issued by the Society, / New Stone
Buildings, 64, Chancery Lane.

Collation:--Demy octavo, pp. 11, without title-page, the title, as above,
appearing upon the front wrapper only.

Issued (in _April_, 1911) in bright green paper wrappers, with the title
in full upon the front.



(6)


George Borrow / The Man and his Books / By / Edward Thomas / Author of /
"The Life of Richard Jefferies," "Light and / Twilight," "Rest and
Unrest," "Maurice / Maeterlinck," Etc. / With Portraits and Illustrations
/ London / Chapman & Hall, Ltd. / 1912.

Collation:--Demy octavo, pp. xii + 333 + viii.

Issued in deep mauve coloured cloth boards, gilt lettered.



(7)


The Life of / George Borrow / Compiled from Unpublished / Official
Documents, his / Works, Correspondence, etc. / By Herbert Jenkins / With
a Frontispiece in Photogravure, and / Twelve other Illustrations / London
/ John Murray, Albemarle Street, W. / 1912.

Collation:--Demy octavo, pp. xxvi [misnumbered xxviii] + 496.

Issued in bright green cloth boards, gilt lettered.  A _Second Edition_
appeared in 1913.



(8)


George / Borrow / A Sermon preached in / Norwich Cathedral on / July 6,
1913 / By / H. C. Beeching, D.D., D.Litt. / Dean of Norwich / London /
Jarrold & Sons / Publishers.

Collation:--Crown octavo, pp. 12.

Issued in drab paper wrappers, with the title-page reproduced upon the
front, the words _Threepence Net_ being added at foot.



(9)


Souvenir / of the / George Borrow / Celebration / Norwich, July 5th, 1913
/ By / James Hooper / Prepared and Published for / the Committee /
Jarrold & Sons / Publishers / London and Norwich.

Collation:--Royal octavo, pp. 48, with a Portrait-Frontispiece, and
twenty-four Illustrations and Portraits.

Issued in white pictorial paper wrappers, with trimmed edges.



(10)


Catalogue of the Exhibition / Commemorative of George Borrow / Author of
"Lavengro" etc. held / at the Norwich Castle Museum. / July, 1913. /
Price 3_d._

Collation:--Post octavo, pp. 12.

Issued wire-stitched, without wrappers, and with trimmed edges.



(11)


George Borrow / and his Circle / Wherein may be found many / hitherto
Unpublished Letters / of Borrow and his Friends / By / Clement King
Shorter / Hodder and Stoughton / London New York Toronto / 1913.

Collation:--Square octavo, printed in half-sheets, pp. xix + 450; with a
Portrait of Borrow as Frontispiece, and numerous other Illustrations.

Issued in dark crimson paper boards, backed with buckram, gilt lettered.

There are several variations in this edition as compared with one
published simultaneously in America by Messrs. Houghton, Mifflin & Co. of
Cambridge, Mass.  These variations are connected with Borrow's attitude
towards the British and Foreign Bible Society, Mr. Shorter having taken
occasion to pass some severe strictures upon the obvious cant which
characterised the Bible Society in its relations with Borrow.  These
strictures, although supported by ample quotations from unpublished
documents, the London publishers, being a semi-religious house, persuaded
the author to cancel.



(12)


A / Bibliography / of / The Writings in Prose and Verse / of / George
Henry Borrow / By / Thomas J. Wise / London: / Printed for Private
Circulation only / By Richard Clay & Sons, Ltd. / 1914.

Collation:--Foolscap quarto, pp. xxii + 316, with Sixty-nine facsimiles
of Title-pages and Manuscripts.

Issued in bright green paper boards, lettered across the back, and with
the title-page reproduced upon the front.  One hundred copies only were
printed.

                                 LONDON:
                   PRINTED FOR PRIVATE CIRCULATION ONLY
                       BY RICHARD CLAY & SONS, LTD.
                                  1914.



Footnotes:


{0a}  The majority of the Manuscripts of Ballads written in or about 1829
are upon paper watermarked with the date 1828.  The majority of the
Manuscripts of Ballads written in or about 1854 are upon paper
watermarked with the date 1852.

{0b}  Among the advertisements at the end of _The Romany Rye_, 1857,
three works (1) _Celtic Bards_, _Chiefs_, _and Kings_, (2) _Songs of
Europe_, and (3) _Koempe Viser_, were announced as 'ready for the Press';
whilst a fourth, _Northern Skalds_, _Kings_, _and Earls_, was noted as
'unfinished.'

{0c}  No doubt a considerable number of the Ballads prepared for the
_Songs of Scandinavia_ in 1829, and surviving in the Manuscripts of that
date, were actually composed during the three previous years.  The
production of the complete series must have formed a substantial part of
Borrow's occupation during that "veiled period," the mists surrounding
which Mr. Shorter has so effectually dissipated.

{0d}  "What you have written has given me great pleasure, as it holds out
hope that I may be employed usefully to the Deity, to man, and to
myself."--[_From Borrow's letter to the Rev. J. Jowett_.]

    "Our Committee stumbled at an expression in your letter of yesterday
    . . . at which a humble Christian might not unreasonably take
    umbrage.  It is where you speak of becoming '_useful to the Deity_,
    _to man_, _and to yourself_.'  Doubtless you meant _the prospect of
    glorifying God_."--[_From the Rev. J. Jowett's reply_.]

    "The courier and myself came all the way without the slightest
    accident, my usual wonderful good fortune accompanying us."--[_From
    Borrow's letter to the Rev. A. Brandram_.]

    "You narrate your perilous journey to Seville, and say at the
    beginning of the description '_my usual wonderful good fortune
    accompanying us_.'  This is a mode of speaking to which we are not
    accustomed, it savours of the profane."--[_From the Rev. A.
    Brandram's reply_.]

{12}  In the majority of the extant copies of the book this List is not
present.

{23}  The name of the ship.

{85}  These preliminary pages are misnumbered viii-xx, instead of
vi-xviii.

{132}  A reduced facsimile of the first page of the Manuscript of _The
King's Wake_ will be found facing page 136.

{161}  Facing the following page will be found a reduced facsimile of the
first page of the Manuscript of _Ingeborg's Disguise_.

{199}  A reduced facsimile of the first page of the original Manuscript
of _Ingefred and Gudrune_ will be found facing page 200.

{268}  The Manuscript of this poem is in the possession of Mr. J. A.
Spoor, of Chicago, to whose courtesy I was indebted for the loan of it
when editing the present pamphlet.

{291}  Pages 296 and 297 are misnumbered 216 and 217.

{313}  _Y Cymmrodor_, vol. xxii, 1910, pp. 160-170.



Notes on the Doctrine Publishing Corporation Transcription


In the original book the facsimiles occupy a full page and do not carry a
page number.  In each the verso of the page is blank.  In both cases the
page counts towards the page number, which is why there are gaps in the
page numbering.

The inset nature of the facsimiles also means that in the book they break
the flow of the text and are sometimes not even in the section to which
they belong.  In the transcription they have usually been moved to the
end of the section to which they belong.  Their original page position is
given by their filename (e.g. p304.jpg was originally on page 304).

On page 48 in the paragraph starting "_Targum_ was written by Borrow",
the "but a small proportion" is as in the book, but should probably be
"but only", or "with".

On page 87 the book has "One of these is now, in the possession . . ."

On page 136 the book has no full-stop at the end of "_To the ears of the
Queen in her bed it rang_".

On page 144 "Edition limited to Thirty Copies" has no closing quote.

On page 231 "Edition limited to Thirty Copies" has no closing quote.

On page 253 the full-stop is missing after "reproduced upon the front."

On page 287 for "Freshly blew" the book has "Freshl blew".

The original book also had an errata which has been applied.  The
original errors were:

On page 86 the paragraph beginning "Issued in dark blue cloth boards..."
originally read:

    Issued in dark blue cloth boards, with white paper back-labels,
    lettered "_Borrow's_ / _Gypsies_ / _of_ / _Spain_. / _Two Volumes_. /
    _Vol. i_.  [_Vol. ii_.]."  The leaves measure 7.75 x 4.875 inches.
    The edition consisted of 3,000 Copies.  The published price was
    30_s._

On page 297 the book read "which Lockhart in the exercise of his
editorial", "fully justified Lockhart's action".





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