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Title: An Annotated Checklist of Nebraskan Bats
Author: Jones, J. Knox, 1929-1992, Webb, Olin L.
Language: English
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Copyright Status: Not copyrighted in the United States. If you live elsewhere check the laws of your country before downloading this ebook. See comments about copyright issues at end of book.

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An Annotated Checklist of Nebraskan Bats

BY

OLIN L. WEBB and J. KNOX JONES, JR.


University of Kansas Publications
Museum of Natural History

Volume 5, No. 21, pp. 269-279
May 31, 1952


University of Kansas
LAWRENCE
1952



UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS PUBLICATIONS, MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY

Editors: E. Raymond Hall, Chairman, A. Byron Leonard,
Edward H. Taylor, Robert W. Wilson

Volume 5, No. 21, pp. 269-279
May 31, 1952


UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS
Lawrence, Kansas


PRINTED BY
FERD VOILAND, JR., STATE PRINTER
TOPEKA, KANSAS
1952

24-2965



An Annotated Checklist of Nebraskan Bats

BY

OLIN L. WEBB and J. KNOX JONES, JR.


HISTORY

The first mention of bats in Nebraska possibly was by Harrison Allen,
in his "Monograph of the Bats of North America" (1864:14, 20, 30, 35,
42), who listed _Nycticejus crepuscularis_ [= _Nycticeius humeralis_],
_Lasiurus borealis_, _Scotophilus carolinensis_ and _Scotophilus
fuscus_ [both = _Eptesicus fuscus_], and _Scotophilus noctivagans_ [=
_Lasionycteris noctivagans_], as collected in "Nebraska" (then Nebraska
Territory) by J. G. Cooper. Henry W. Setzer (in _litt._) reports that
none of the bats collected by Cooper now exists in the United States
National Museum and that no data pertaining to any of them are
available except that a single specimen of _Nycticeius humeralis_ was
traded to the British Museum in 1866. Cooper journeyed through parts of
the present state of Nebraska in the summer and autumn of 1857 and,
judging from Taylor's (1919:72-80) report of Cooper's travels, this was
the only time he entered any part of Nebraska Territory. The writers
are of the opinion that the specimens in question probably were
collected in Nebraska; but since Allen listed no exact localities or
dates of collection and since the specimens and data pertaining to them
are not now available, we have not included them here as Nebraskan
records.

In the first comprehensive account of Nebraskan mammals, Myron H. Swenk
(1908:137-139) listed six kinds of bats, _Myotis evotis_, _Myotis
californicus ciliolabrum_ [= _Myotis subulatus subulatus_],
_Lasionycteris noctivagans_, _Eptesicus fuscus_, _Lasiurus borealis_,
and _Lasiurus cinereus_, as occurring within the state. Zimmer
(1913:665) recorded _Nyctinomus mexicanus_ [= _Tadarida mexicana_] from
Nebraska. Subsequently, Swenk (1915:854) reported _Myotis lucifugus
lucifugus_ in the state and three years later (1918:411) he reported
_Eptesicus fuscus pallidus_ for the first time. The report of _M. l.
lucifugus_ seemingly was not substantiated by any actual specimens. The
addition of _Myotis volans interior_ (Quay, 1948:181) brought to ten
the number of species and subspecies of bats reported from the state.

In the present paper, _Myotis keenii septentrionalis_, _Myotis
lucifugus carissima_, and _Pipistrellus subflavus subflavus_ are
reported from Nebraska for the first time. Also, the first authentic
record of _Myotis lucifugus lucifugus_ is presented, along with
additional information on previously reported species. A total number
of 169 specimens from Nebraska was available for the present study.
This includes almost all of the known specimens preserved in all
collections as well as material obtained by us in the past six years.

Nebraska has no natural caves or caverns; however, there are two
extensive man-made limestone caves near Louisville, in Cass and Sarpy
counties, where four kinds of bats have been found. Two of these are
here reported as new to Nebraska. The quarries, one on either side of
the Platte River Valley, are in a horizontal stratum of limestone 40
feet in thickness, and are of the room and pillar type; that is to say,
the stone has been quarried away leaving rooms having supporting
pillars approximately every 50 feet. The average temperatures in summer
and winter within these tunnels, recorded over a period of several
years by the Ash Grove Lime and Portland Cement Company of Louisville,
are 65° F. and 50° F. respectively. The Kiewit Stone Quarry, abandoned
since 1936, is one-half mile west of Meadow, Sarpy County, and has one
remaining entrance measuring approximately 30 by 30 feet. This quarry
has an area of approximately one-fifth square mile and is usually
flooded with several feet of water. The other man-made cave, known
formerly as the National Stone Quarry, is one mile northeast of
Louisville, Cass County. This quarry was abandoned in September, 1938,
and until the winter of 1948-1949 had eight or nine entrances and two
air shafts. It was approximately one-third square mile in area. All the
openings to this quarry were covered in late 1949. Bats were first
observed in the National Stone Quarry by one of us (Webb) as early as
1939, less than a year after operations in the quarry ceased.


METHODS AND ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

     Records of Nebraskan bats are arranged in two categories;
     specimens examined and additional records. The latter refer
     to citations in the literature. Genera are arranged
     according to Simpson (1945:59, 60), and species are listed
     alphabetically under each genus. Specimens examined are in
     the personal collection of the authors unless otherwise
     indicated.

     In connection with this study the authors acknowledge the
     assistance of Drs. Edson H. Fichter, Department of
     Biological Sciences, Idaho State College, and E. Raymond
     Hall and Rollin H. Baker, University of Kansas Museum of
     Natural History for critical assistance with the manuscript.
     We are indebted to Mr. Richard B. Loomis, University of
     Kansas, for aid in collecting specimens; to Dr. Henry W.
     Setzer, United States National Museum, for providing
     information on possible early Nebraskan records; and to Mr.
     Fred Brammer, Ash Grove Lime and Portland Cement Company,
     Louisville, Nebraska, for information on, and permission to
     collect in, the quarries of that area. For the loan of
     specimens we are grateful to Dr. William H. Burt, University
     of Michigan Museum of Zoology, Dr. C. Bertrand Schultz,
     University of Nebraska State Museum, Dr. Otis Wade,
     University of Nebraska Department of Zoology, Miss Lucille
     Drury, Cleveland Museum of Natural History, Mr. W. E.
     Eigsti, Hastings Museum, Hastings, Nebraska, and to those in
     charge of the collections of the Nebraska Game, Forestation
     and Parks Commission.


ACCOUNTS OF SPECIES

~Myotis evotis evotis~ (H. Allen)

Long-eared Myotis

     _Vespertilio evotis_ H. Allen, Smithsonian Misc. Coll.,
     165:48, June, 1864 (part), type from Monterey, Monterey Co.,
     California.

     _Myotis evotis_, Miller, N. Amer. Fauna, 13:78, October 16,
     1897.

     _Distribution in Nebraska._--Pine Ridge area of northwestern
     part of state.

     _Record of occurrence._--Specimen examined, 1, as follows:
     SIOUX CO.: Warbonnet Canyon, 1 (Univ. Nebr. State Mus.).

_Remarks._--This specimen was taken by Merritt Cary on July 22, 1901.


~Myotis keenii septentrionalis~ (Trouessart)

Eastern Long-eared Myotis

     [_Vespertilio gryphus_] var. _septentrionalis_ Trouessart,
     Catal. Mamm. viv. foss., p. 131, 1897, type from Halifax,
     Halifax Co., Nova Scotia.

     _Myotis keenii septentrionalis_, Miller and Allen, Bull. U.
     S. Nat. Mus., 144:105, May 25, 1928.

     _Distribution in Nebraska._--Known from limestone quarries
     in Cass and Sarpy counties. Probably in other parts of
     extreme eastern Nebraska.

     _Records of occurrence._--Specimens examined, 35, as
     follows: CASS CO.: 1 mi. NE Louisville, 4. SARPY CO.: 1/2
     mi. W Meadow, 31 (some of these specimens have been
     deposited in other collections as follows: Private
     Collection of P. H. Krutzsch, 3; Private Collection of W. G.
     Frum, 2; Nebr. Game, Forestation and Parks Comm., 1; Univ.
     Kansas Mus. Nat. Hist., 2; Univ. Nebr. State Mus., 7).

_Remarks._--Although not so common as _Pipistrellus_ in the limestone
quarries, hibernating bats of this species frequently are found there,
usually as solitary individuals either in drill holes or clinging to
the walls of the quarries; occasionally, however, two or three bats
have been found together in a single drill hole.


~Myotis lucifugus carissima~ Thomas

Brown Myotis

     _Myotis (Leuconoe) carissima_ Thomas, Ann. and Mag. Nat.
     Hist., (ser. 7), 13:383, May, 1904, type from Yellowstone
     Lake, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming.

     _Myotis lucifugus carissima_, Cary, N. Amer. Fauna, 42:43,
     October 3, 1917.

     _Distribution in Nebraska._--Known from a single record in
     extreme northwestern Nebraska, but probably occurs
     throughout Panhandle of state.

     _Record of occurrence._--Specimen examined, 1, as follows:
     SIOUX CO.: Agate, 1 (Univ. Mich. Mus. Zool.).


~Myotis lucifugus lucifugus~ (Le Conte)

Brown Myotis

     _V[espertilio]. lucifugus_ Le Conte, McMurtrie's Cuvier,
     Animal Kingdom, 1:431, June, 1831, type from Georgia,
     probably from the Le Conte Plantation, near Riceboro,
     Liberty County.

     _Myotis lucifugus [lucifugus]_, Miller, N. Amer. Fauna,
     13:59, October 16, 1897.

     _Distribution in Nebraska._--Known only from the limestone
     quarry in Sarpy County, but probably occurs over most of
     eastern third of state.

     _Records of occurrence._--Specimens examined, 2, as follows:
     SARPY CO.: 1/2 mi. W Meadow, 2 (Univ. Kansas Mus. Nat.
     Hist., 1).

_Remarks._--Two bats of this subspecies were found in the quarry in
Sarpy County on December 30, 1949. None was found on subsequent visits
to the quarry, although three other species of bats have been found
there in large numbers. These specimens appear to be the first actual
records of _M. l. lucifugus_ in the state, although Swenk (1915:854,
and in subsequent lists) reported it as "uncommon eastwardly".

One of these bats, a male (KU 35076), possesses a peculiar dental
abnormality. Both of the second upper premolars (P3) are lacking,
although the mandibular dentition is normal. This condition has been
reported previously for this species by Frum (1946:176) in specimens
from West Virginia.


~Myotis subulatus subulatus~ (Say)

Small-footed Myotis

     _Vespertilio subulatus_ Say, Long's Exped. to Rocky Mts.,
     2:65 (footnote), 1823, type from the Arkansas River near La
     Junta, Otero Co., Colorado.

     _Myotis subulatus_, Warren, The Mammals of Colorado, G. P.
     Putnam's Sons, New York, 1910. p. 275.

     _Distribution in Nebraska._--Northern and western Nebraska.

     _Records of occurrence._--Specimens examined, 9, as follows:
     CHERRY CO.: Valentine, 1 (Univ. Nebr. Dept. Zool.). SHERIDAN
     CO.: Rushville, 1; 15 mi. N Rushville, 2. SIOUX CO.: Agate,
     1 (Univ. Kansas Mus. Nat. Hist.); Monroe Canyon, 5-1/2 mi.
     N, 2-1/2 mi. W Harrison, 2 (Nebr. Game, Forestation and
     Parks Comm.); Warbonnet Canyon, 2 (Univ. Nebr. State Mus.).

     Additional records: DAKOTA CO.: Crystal Lake, 1 (Stephens,
     1945:92). DAWES CO.: Chadron, 1 (Miller and Allen,
     1928:169). SIOUX CO.: Antelope Township, 1 (Quay, 1948:181);
     Sugarloaf Township, 1 (Quay, 1948:181).

_Remarks._--This bat is common along the Niobrara River in the
northwestern part of the state. Stephens (_loc. cit._) reports taking
a bat of this species in Dakota County in the northeastern corner of
Nebraska. This specimen was sent to Swenk at the University of Nebraska
for positive identification and was, according to Stephens, deposited
in the Swenk collection. No trace of the specimen can be found at the
present time. It is here assigned to _M. s. subulatus_.

_M. s. subulatus_ has been observed frequently in the Pine Ridge area,
generally in association with _Eptesicus fuscus pallidus_. Two
specimens were shot by us from many that were seen flying over a small
clearing in the pines in northern Sioux County on August 2, 1949.
Several _Eptesicus_ were also obtained there. One of us (Webb) took two
of these bats from their daytime retreat in a barn north of Rushville,
Sheridan County, on September 5, 1951, where _Eptesicus_ was also
found. They are known to inhabit hay barns at the Ft. Niobrara Game
Reserve, Cherry County, also in association with _Eptesicus_. Swenk
(1908:137) reports finding two of these bats under a loose strip of
pine bark in Sioux County.


~Myotis volans interior~ Miller

Hairy-winged Myotis

     _Myotis longricus interior_ Miller, Proc. Biol. Soc.
     Washington, 27:211, October 31, 1914, type from Twining,
     Taos Co., New Mexico.

     _Myotis volans interior_, Miller and Allen, Bull. U. S. Nat.
     Mus., 144:142, May 25, 1928.

     _Distribution in Nebraska._--Badlands area of extreme
     northwestern part of state.

     _Records of occurrence._--Specimens examined, 2, as follows:
     SIOUX CO.: Warbonnet Township, 8 mi. N Harrison, 2
     (Cleveland Mus. Nat. Hist.).

_Remarks._--Quay (1948:181) reported finding a colony of approximately
180 of these bats in northern Sioux County in the summer of 1944. They
were found in a crevice in a dry creek bed. He examined several dozen,
all females, two of which were saved as specimens.

The authors, while engaged in field work in this approximate locality
in the summers of 1948 and 1949, were unable to locate any of these
bats.


~Lasionycteris noctivagans~ (Le Conte)

Silver-haired Bat

     _V[espertilio], noctivagans_ Le Conte, McMurtrie's Cuvier,
     Animal Kingdom, 1:431, June, 1831, type from eastern United
     States.

     _Lasionycteris noctivagans_, Peters, Monatsber. k. preuss.
     Akad. Wissensch. Berlin, p. 648, 1865.

     _Distribution in Nebraska._--"Entire state, fairly common
     during migrations but probably not breeding within our
     limits" (Swenk, 1908:138).

     _Records of occurrence._--Specimens examined, 2, as follows:
     CLAY CO.: Inland, 1 (Hastings Museum, Hastings, Nebraska).
     FRANKLIN CO.: Campbell, 1 (Hastings Museum, Hastings,
     Nebraska).

     Additional records (Swenk, 1908:138): CUMING CO.: West
     Point. DOUGLAS CO.: Omaha. LANCASTER CO.: Lincoln. County
     undesignated: "Platte River".


~Pipistrellus subflavus subflavus~ (F. Cuvier)

Eastern Pipistrelle

     _V[espertilio]. subflavus_ F. Cuvier, Nouv. Ann. Mus. Hist.
     Nat. Paris, 1:17, 1832, type from eastern United States,
     probably Georgia.

     _Pipistrellus subflavus_, Miller, N. Amer. Fauna, 13:90,
     October 16, 1897.

     _Distribution in Nebraska._--Known from limestone quarries
     in Cass and Sarpy counties; probably ranging throughout
     eastern Nebraska.

     _Records of occurrence._--Specimens examined, 34, as
     follows: CASS CO.: 1 mi. NE Louisville, 4. SARPY CO.: 1/2
     mi. W Meadow, 30 (some of these specimens have been
     deposited in other collections as follows: Private
     Collection of P. H. Krutzsch, 3; Private Collection of W. G.
     Frum, 2; Univ. Kansas Mus. Nat. Hist., 4; Univ. Nebr. State
     Mus., 4).

_Remarks._--This bat is the most common of the four species that are
known to inhabit the quarries in Cass and Sarpy counties. Individuals
have been found both in drill holes and clinging to the walls of the
quarries. We have always found this bat to be solitary while in
hibernation.


~Eptesicus fuscus fuscus~ (Beauvois)

Big Brown Bat

     _Vespertilio fuscus_ Beauvois, Catal. Raisonné Mus. Peale,
     Philadelphia, p. 18, 1796, type from Philadelphia,
     Philadelphia Co., Pennsylvania.

     _Eptesicus fuscus_, Méhely, Magyarország denevéreinek
     monographiája (Monographia Chiropterorum Hungariae), pp.
     206, 338, 1900.

     _Distribution in Nebraska._--Eastern part of state.

     _Records of occurrence._--Specimens examined, 23, as
     follows: ADAMS CO.: Hastings, 1 (Hastings Museum, Hastings,
     Nebraska). CASS CO.: 1 mi. NE Louisville, 6; Plattsmouth, 1
     (Univ. Nebr. State Mus.). SARPY CO.: 1/2 mi. W Meadow, 15
     (Univ. Nebr. State Mus., 7).

_Remarks._--We have observed this bat hibernating in the limestone
quarries of Cass and Sarpy counties, where it was commonly found in
drill holes or clinging to the ceiling or walls. We have always found
this bat to be solitary while in hibernation, with one exception. On
January 31, 1949, a male and female were found in the same drill hole
in the Cass County quarry. The jolt of being knocked from the hole
separated the two bats, and upon examination the penis of the male was
noted to be extended and erected, indicating that the pair might have
been in the act of copulation.


~Eptesicus fuscus pallidus~ Young

Big Brown Bat

     _Eptesicus pallidus_ Young, Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci.
     Philadelphia, p. 408, October 2, 1908, type from Boulder,
     Boulder Co., Colorado.

     _Eptesicus fuscus pallidus_, Miller, Bull. U. S. Nat. Mus.,
     79:62, December 31, 1912.

     _Distribution in Nebraska._--Western half of state.

     _Records of occurrence._--Specimens examined, 34, as
     follows: CHERRY CO.: Ft. Niobrara Game Reserve, 19 (Nebr.
     Game, Forestation and Parks Comm., 17); Valentine, 2 (Univ.
     Nebr. Dept. Zool.). DAWES CO.: 10 mi. S Chadron, 1 (Univ.
     Mich. Mus. Zool.). KNOX CO.: Niobrara, 1. SHERIDAN CO.: 15
     mi. N Rushville, 2. SIOUX CO.: Glen, 1 (Univ. Nebr. State
     Mus.); Monroe Canyon, 5-1/2 mi. N, 2-1/2 mi. W Harrison, 1
     (Nebr. Game, Forestation and Parks Comm.); Warbonnet Canyon,
     7 (Univ. Nebr. State Mus.).

_Remarks._--A colony of approximately 100 of these bats was discovered
in the unused portion of a barn loft at Ft. Niobrara Game Reserve on
August 11, 1948. Although no temperature readings were taken, it was
estimated that the temperature was more than 100° F. in the loft. The
bats were congregated on rafters at the north end of the barn and when
disturbed, only a few members of the colony dropped from the rafters to
fly. Most of the bats crawled to new retreats between the rafters and
the corrugated iron roof of the building.


~Lasiurus borealis borealis~ (Müller)

Red Bat

     _Vespertilio borealis_ Müller, Natursyst. Suppl., p. 20,
     1776, type from New York.

     _Lasiurus borealis_ [_borealis_], Miller, N. Amer. Fauna,
     13:105, October 16, 1897.

     _Distribution in Nebraska._--State-wide in suitable habitat.

     _Records of occurrence._--Specimens examined, 14, as
     follows: LANCASTER CO.: Lincoln, 13 (Univ. Nebr. State Mus.,
     11; Univ. Nebr. Dept. Zool., 1). RICHARDSON CO.: 3 mi. SE
     Rulo, 1 (Nebr. Game, Forestation, and Parks Comm.).

     Additional records (Swenk, 1908:139): CUMING CO.: West
     Point. DOUGLAS CO.: Omaha. LANCASTER CO.: Lincoln. OTOE CO.:
     Nebraska City. RICHARDSON CO.: Humboldt.


~Lasiurus cinereus cinereus~ (Beauvois)

Hoary Bat

     _Vespertilio cinereus_ (misspelled _linereus_) Beauvois,
     Catal. Raisonné Mus. Peale, Philadelphia, p. 18, 1796, type
     from Philadelphia, Philadelphia Co., Pennsylvania.

     _Lasiurus cinereus_, H. Allen, Smithsonian Misc. Coll.,
     17:21, June, 1864.

     _Distribution in Nebraska._--State-wide in suitable habitat.

     _Records of occurrence._--Specimens examined, 11, as
     follows: CLAY CO.: Inland, 1 (Hastings Museum, Hastings,
     Nebraska). CUSTER CO.: Broken Bow, 2 (Univ. Mich. Mus.
     Zool.); Victoria Springs, 1 (Univ. Mich. Mus. Zool.). FURNAS
     CO.: Wilsonville, 1 (Hastings Museum, Hastings, Nebraska).
     LANCASTER CO.: Lincoln, 6 (Univ. Nebr. State Mus., 5; Univ.
     Nebr. Dept. Zool., 1).

     Additional records: CUMING CO.: West Point (Swenk,
     1908:139). DOUGLAS CO.: Omaha (Swenk, 1908:139). GAGE CO.:
     Beatrice (Swenk, 1908:139). LANCASTER CO.: Lincoln (Swenk,
     1908:139). County undesignated: Loup Fork (Miller,
     1897:114).


~Tadarida mexicana~ (Saussure)

Mexican Free-tailed Bat

     _Molossus mexicanus_ Saussure, Revue et Magasin de Zoologie,
     Ser. 2, 12:283, July, 1860, type from Cofre de Perote,
     13,000 feet, state of Veracruz, Mexico.

     _Tadarida mexicana_, Miller, Bull. U. S. Nat. Mus., 128:86,
     April 29, 1924.

     _Distribution in Nebraska._--Known only from Lincoln,
     Lancaster County.

     _Records of occurrence._--Specimen examined, 1, as follows:
     LANCASTER CO.: Lincoln, 1 (Univ. Nebr. State Mus.).

     Additional record (Zimmer, 1913:665): LANCASTER CO.:
     Lincoln.

_Remarks._--The Mexican free-tailed bat is probably rare in Nebraska.
The single specimen examined by us was obtained on June 27, 1931, from
a downtown business building in Lincoln. According to the label on the
specimen, it died in captivity on June 29 after giving birth to one
young on June 28. The bat reported by Zimmer (_loc. cit._) was also
taken in the business district of Lincoln. It was obtained on August
15, 1913.

In addition to the bats named above, six other kinds possibly occur in
Nebraska. These, along with an indication of the part of the state in
which each is to be looked for, are as follows:

     _Myotis grisescens_ Howell, southeastern part of state.

     _Myotis sodalis_ Miller and Allen, southeastern part of
     state.

     _Myotis thysanodes thysanodes_ Miller, northwestern part of
     state.

     _Nycticeus humeralis humeralis_ (Rafinesque), southeastern
     part of state.

     _Corynorhinus rafinesquii pallescens_ (Miller), northwestern
     part of state.

     _Tadarida molossa_ (Pallas), any part of state.


LITERATURE CITED

ALLEN, H.
    1864. Monograph of the bats of North America. Smithsonian Misc.
          Coll., 165:xxiii + 85, June, 1864.

FRUM, W. G.
    1946. Abnormality in dentition of _Myotis lucifugus_. Jour.
          Mamm., 27:176, May 14, 1946.

MILLER, G. S., JR.
    1897. Revision of the North American bats of the family
          Vespertilionidae. N. Amer. Fauna, 13:1-138, October 16, 1897.

MILLER, G. S., JR., and G. M. ALLEN
    1928. The American bats of the genera _Myotis_ and _Pizonyx_.
          Bull. U. S. Nat. Mus., 144:viii + 218, May 25, 1928.

QUAY, W. B.
    1948. Notes on some bats from Nebraska and Wyoming. Jour. Mamm.,
          29:181-182, May 14, 1948.

SIMPSON, G. G.
    1945. The principles of classification and a classification of
          mammals. Bull. Amer. Mus. Nat. Hist., 85:xvi + 350,
          October 5, 1945.

STEPHENS, T. C.
    1945. Say's bat in Nebraska. Jour. Mamm., 26:92, February 27, 1945.

SWENK, M. H.
    1908. A preliminary review of the mammals of Nebraska. Proc. Nebr.
          Acad. Sci., 8:61-144, 1908.

    1915. The birds and mammals of Nebraska. Nebr. Blue Book and
          Historical Register, pp. 851-855, 1915.

    1918. The birds and mammals of Nebraska. Nebr. Blue Book and
          Historical Register, pp. 407-411, December, 1918.

    1919. The birds and mammals of Nebraska. Univ. Nebr. Contrib.
          Dept. Ent., 23:1-21, March 1, 1919.

    1920. The birds and mammals of Nebraska. Nebr. Blue Book and
          Historical Register, pp. 479-483, December, 1920.

TAYLOR, W. P.
    1919. Notes on mammals collected principally in Washington and
          California between the years 1853 and 1874 by Dr. James Graham
          Cooper. Proc. Calif. Acad. Sci., 9:69-121, July 12, 1919.

ZIMMER, J. T.
    1913. A northwardly record of the free-tailed bat. Science (NS),
          38:665-666, November 7, 1913.

_Transmitted, March 27, 1952._


24-2965



       *       *       *       *       *

Transcriber's Notes

Italicized text is shown within _underscores_.

Bold text is shown within ~tildes~.





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ISYS search  means it can be used in any manner anywhere in the world.
Copyright infringement liability can be quite severe.

About ISYS® Search Software
Established in 1988, ISYS Search Software is a global supplier of enterprise
search solutions for business and government.  The company's award-winning
software suite offers a broad range of search, navigation and discovery
solutions for desktop search, intranet search, SharePoint search and embedded
search applications.  ISYS has been deployed by thousands of organizations
operating in a variety of industries, including government, legal, law
enforcement, financial services, healthcare and recruitment.



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