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Title: Pictorial Photography in America 1922
Author: Pictorial Photographers of America
Language: English
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Pictorial Photography in America 1922



Pictorial Photographers of America

New York

1922



_Committee of Selection_
DR. A. D. CHAFFEE
JOHN PAUL EDWARDS
G. W. HARTING
DR. ARNOLD GENTHE
GERTRUDE KASEBIER
O.C. REITER

_Advisory Committe from American Institute of Graphic Arts_
RAY GREENLEAF
HARRY A. GROESBECK, JR.
WILLIAM EDWIN RUDGE

_Publication Committee_
GUY GAYLOR CLARK
G. W. HARTING
DR. THERON W. KILMER
JOSEPH R. MASON
HENRY HOYT MOORE
CORNELIA WHITE
MILDRED RUTH WILSON
JERRY D. DREW, _Chairman_



ILLUSTRATIONS


A DECORATIVE PANEL
_By _Thos. O. Sheckell, _Salt Lake City, Utah_
IN A DANCER’S STUDIO
_By _Wayne Albee, _Seattle, Washington_
HOUSE-BOATS
_By _Ernest M. Pratt, _Los Angeles, Calif._
MAY I COME IN?
_By _Robert R. McGeorge, _Buffalo, N. Y._
THE DISTANT SAIL
_By _William Gordon Shields, _New York City_
GATEWAY, DINAN
_By _Dr. Chas. H. Jaeger, _New York City_
SILHOUETTES—EGYPT
_By _JULIA MARSHALL, _Duluth, Minn._
MOUNT EVERETT
_By _Robert B. Montgomery, _Brooklyn, N. Y._
THE BACK FENCE
_By _C. R. Herzler, _New York City_
ON DECK OF THE METAGAMA
_By _JOHAN HAGEMEYER, _San Francisco, Calif._
TIDEWATER
_By _Amelia H. McLean, _Bronxville, N. Y._
STREET VENDORS—ROME, ITALY
_By __H. A. Latimer, __Boston, Mass._
SUMMERTIME
_By _PAUL  WIERUM, _Chicago, Ill._
TORSO OF A DANCER
_By _Arnold Genthe, _New York City_
A MAINE FISHING VILLAGE
_By _EUGENE P. HENRY, _Brooklyn, N. Y._
SMOKE EATERS
_By _W.  H. ZERBE, _Richmond Hill, N. Y._
PUEBLO DWELLING
_By _Ernest Williams, _Los Angeles, Calif._
IN THE BERKSHIRES
_By _William Elbert Macnaughton, _New York City_
BEPPY
_By _HELEN W.  DREW, _Montclair, N. J._
EMPTIES
_By _K. B.  LAMBERT, _Glen Ridge, N. J._
THE WOODCHOPPER’S WOMAN
_By _HARRY C. PHIPPS, _Chicago, Ill._
THE DES PLAINES TRAIL
_By _E. E. GRAY, _Chicago, Ill._
MOTHER AND CHILD
_By _Clarence H. White, _New York City_
YE OLD BARN
_By _Olive Garrison, _Yonkers, N. Y._
INTERIOR
_By _JANE  REECE, _Dayton, Ohio_
PENNSYLVANIA STATION
_By _Dr. D. J. Ruzicka, _New York City_
CLOUDS OF MORNING
_By _Francis O. Libby, F.R.P.S., _Portland, Me._
THE CANYON
_By _Jerry D. Drew, _Montclair, N. J._
THE EAST RIVER
_By _John Paul Edwards, _San Francisco, Calif._
THE TRAIN SHED—PITTSBURGH
_By __W. W. Zieg, __Pittsburgh, Pa._
ODD MOMENTS IN BRITTANY
_By _GEORGE HENRY HIGH, _Chicago, Ill._
UZERCHES: "IL FAIT UN BON SOLEIL"
_By _DR. A. D. CHAFFEE, _New York  City_
A MISTY MORNING
_By _N. S. Wooldridge, _Pittsburgh, Pa._
PTARMIGAN IN WINTER
_By _Clark Blickensderfer, _Denver, Colo._
MARJORIE
_By _SOPHIE  L. LAUFFER, _New York City_
THE PATTERNED WALL
_By _Mildred Ruth Wilson, _Montclair, N. J._
THE SUNNY WINDOW
_By _Mary F. Boyd, _Chambersburg, Pa._
AT CLARENCE WHITE’S, CANAAN, CONN.
_By __Florence Burton Livingston, __Mohegan Lake, N.  Y._
STUDY OF A YOUNG GIRL
_By _CHARLES H. BROWN, _Santa Barbara, Calif._
IVY AND OLD GLASS
_By _Clara E. Sipprell, _New York City_
ROSE DANCE
_By _J.  ANTHONY BULL, _Cincinnati, Ohio_
A CONCERT IN THE NURSERY
_By _FRANK R. NIVISON, _Fall River, Mass._
GREY ATTIC
_By _Edward Weston, _Glendale, Calif._
MUD-PIES
_By _Cornelia F. White, _New York City_
CARVED WITH THE TOOLS OF TIME, THE SCULPTOR
_By _EDITH R. WILSON, _Mt. Vernon, N.  Y._
MORNING GLORY
_By _Otis Williams, _Los Angeles, Calif._
THE CIRCUS COMES TO TOWN
_By _THOMAS R. HARTLEY, _Pittsburgh, Pa._
SEAR AUTUMN
_By _Anson Herrick, _San Francisco, Cal._
THE BAZAR
_By _Margaret D. M. Brown, _Arlington, Poughkeepsie, N.  Y._
WANDERERS FROM HOME
_By _P. Douglas Anderson, _San Francisco, Calif._
DECORATIVE STUDY
_By _Henry A. Hussey, _Berkeley, Calif._
THE WAY UP
_By _Folsom Rich, _Chicago, Ill._
COLONEL MARSH
_By _E. L. Mix, _New York City_
SHADOW DESIGN
_By _G. W. Harting, _New York City_
AT GUINGAMP
_By _Mrs. Antoinette B. Hervey, _New York City_
KISSING THE PADRE’S HAND
_By _MYERS R. JONES, _Brooklyn, N. Y._
UNDER BROOKLYN BRIDGE
_By _A. E. SCHAAF, _Cleveland, Ohio_
THE BRIDGES
_By _Henry Hoyt Moore, _Brooklyn, N. Y._
WHIRLPOOL RAPIDS, NIAGARA
_By _WILLIAM A. ALCOCK, _New York City_
STUDY
_By _A. RALPH  STEINER, _New York City_
DOMESTIC SYMPHONY
_By _Margaret Watkins, _New York City_
MORNING SUNLIGHT
_By _Ira W. Martin, _New York City_
L’ESPRIT DE MANDALAY
_By _J. Ludger Rainville, _Portland, Me._
THE GORGE BELOW THE WHIRLPOOL, NIAGARA
_By _W. H. PORTERFIELD, _Buffalo, N.  Y._
PORTRAIT—GIRL IN BLACK
_By __Rabinovitch, __New York City_
THE TOILERS
_By _Edward Ostrom, Jr., _Brooklyn, N. Y._
FROM MY WINDOW
_By _Betty Gresh, _Norristown, Penn._
YOUNG AMERICAN
_By _Louis Fleckenstein, _Long Beach, Calif._
MESA DEL MAR
_By _G.  H. S. HARDING, _Berkeley, Calif._
SEINE BOATS
_By _William B. Imlach, _New York City_
THE MOON OF THE RED GODS
_By _LAURA GILPIN, _Colorado Springs, Colo._
HIGH SEAS
_By _Joseph Petrocelli, _New York City_
SIXTH AVENUE, NEW YORK CITY
_By _BEN J. LUBSCHEZ, _New York City_
HILLSIDE SHADOWS
_By _Charles K. Archer, _Pittsburgh, Pa._
MOTHER CAREY’S CHICKENS COME HOME TO ROOST
_By _HERBERT B. TURNER, _Boston,  Mass._
THE SCHOOL YARD
_By _Vernon E. Duroe, _Brooklyn, N. Y._



CONTENTS


SINCERITY
THE YEAR’S PROGRESS
ON IDEAS
THE PURPOSE OF THE PICTORIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS OF AMERICA
THE PICTORIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS OF AMERICA



SINCERITY


Art that endures is sincere.  It is universal in its appeal though it  may
have been produced in a remote corner of the world by one who was
unacquainted with the work of artists.

I remember going with a friend into a picture gallery in Chicago, where an
artist—I think his name was Bradford—was showing some sketches he had
brought back from the arctic regions.  “How true these are” I exclaimed.
“How  do you know?” said my companion, “you have never been to the North
Pole.”  “That is not necessary” I rejoined. “These studies have the truth
written in  every inch of them.”  The work proclaimed the sincerity of its
maker.

He who reverently observes life and wrests from its verities those
elements  which are in tune with his “ego”—transposes these into some
concrete form  without the damning desire for self aggrandizement,
pretense, or mere seeking  for originality—is building on good
foundations.  It is from an over-weening desire for originality that most
of the affectations of so called “Modern Art” proceed.

Natural individuality—the sincere personal vision of the artist—is an
inherited asset.  His work is the acquiring of a technique, the constant
patient practice and experiment in his particular craft.  This unending
exercise gives the artist power to state his message clearly—in the
simplest way.

The graphic artist is concerned with “_pictorial_” ideas.  These are
necessarily limited; they must be ideas possible of expression by light
and shade, by line, by form, by color.  The artist’s vision includes his
point of view.  He receives an impression and simultaneously determines
how he will express it.  He has, as it were, analyzed his subject and
decided at once on the form of its presentation—in the clay, on the
canvas, in the drawing or photograph.

Given the most favorable mechanical contrivances which science places
today at the disposal of the painter or photographer, the latter may
proceed in his work under the same maxims, the same theories, that guide
the painter.  His design may be as interesting, his key as aptly chosen,
his black and white (values) as colorful, his composition in the space as
distinguished.

If over and above his technical skill the photographer starts with a
“vital idea,” he may like the painter convey with his photograph “_the
moving thrill_” which is the final test of any work of art.

Then perchance, working patiently along the lines here barely indicated,
the artist may one day unconsciously achieve that coveted note of true
originality which marks a forward step to be hailed and recorded in the
great tradition.

                                                            Albert Sterner



THE YEAR’S PROGRESS


_By _HENRY HOYT MOORE

We cannot claim for our art any outstanding phenomenon like the interest
in the radio that has swept the country this year, or any remarkable
development in the science of photography like the invention a few years
ago of the Lumière plate.  The day may come when our exhibitions will show
masses of color on their walls which will make the water-colorists and the
miniaturists green with envy, but that day is not yet.  And I for one
would be sorry to see it come.  There is to me a charm about good monotone
photography that is all its own and that puts it on a plane with etching,
engraving, lithography, and other monotone processes.  Of course some
artists, strictly so called, object to regarding photography as anything
but a mechanical process, but the number of those who would make art a
close corporation is happily diminishing.

In fact, the recognition that photography is receiving from accredited
representatives of the fine arts makes its position no longer a doubtful
one.  Any of the arts may be used for commercial purposes, but that fact
does not take away from them their rightful place when they are used by
competent hands for aesthetic purposes.  The increasing number of museums
that are opening their exhibition halls to good photography is an evidence
that is obvious to all observers.  Caustic critics like Joseph Pennell may
decry photography, but many able artists and critics, attending
exhibitions of photography that are being held in many of our centers of
art, are having their eyes opened to the beauty of lens work in the hands
of men and women who use the camera with feeling and insight.  Then, too,
we must not forget the fact that some well-known artists, beginning with
D. O. Hill and continuing with Mrs. Kasebier, Frank Eugene, Steichen, and
others, have found in the practice of photography a more lasting fame than
in any other line of their effort.

Among notable exhibitions of the past year several should be mentioned. Of
course there are what might be called the historic exhibitions that have
won an established place, like the London Salon, the Royal Photographic
Exhibition, the Pittsburgh Salon, the Los Angeles Salon, the Portland
Exhibition, and others. More recently established exhibitions that are to
be noted are those of the San Francisco Pictorialists, the Oakland Salon,
the Canadian National at Toronto, the Buffalo Salon, and that of the
Pictorial Photographers of America at the opening of the Art Center in New
York City.  At many of these exhibitions pictures from the same exhibitors
were hung, and as the judges at practically all of them were different men
(and women), including professional artists, it is evident that there was
a consensus among the competent critics that these exhibitors at least are
doing worthy work.  But in that fact there is no cause for discouragement
to the novice, for new names are to be found in the catalogues of all the
exhibitions, and there is no league to keep out any individual’s pictures
anywhere.  That is one of the triumphs of our art—that, while judges may
sometimes err and exclude a good picture or select a poor one, there is a
general open-mindedness in recognizing merit wherever it exists.  A
well-known worker is pretty sure to have his photographs declined by the
judges in most of the photographic exhibitions if he falls below his
standard, and, on the other hand, a gifted beginner will quickly get a
place in the seats of the mighty if he can produce the photographs that
entitle him to distinction.

Some notable one-man exhibitions have been held since our last Annual was
published.  Among them should be mentioned those of the veterans Alfred
Stieglitz and Rudolph Eickemeyer in the Anderson Galleries in New York—and
it is a significant testimony to the lure of our art that these masters of
it have “come back”; those of Dr. H. B. Goodwin, of Stockholm, at the
Brown-Robertson Gallery, and E. O. Hoppe, of England, at Wanamaker’s, in
New York; that of Clarence H. White, of New York, at the Art Center; the
joint exhibition of prints of W. E. Macnaughtan and William A. Alcock, of
Brooklyn, at the New York Camera Club, and of F. J. Mortimer and Alexander
Keighley of England at the same place; and by Mrs. Antoinette B. Hervey,
Miss Sophie Lauffer, Nicholas Muray, and F. O. Libby, with numerous
others, that show the popularity of this method of placing good work
before the public.  Such exhibitions should be encouraged, for not only do
they stimulate the exhibitor to show worthy work, but they are in the
nature of spurs to the activity of every serious worker who has the
privilege of seeing them.

As to processes that are in favor, the bromoil and the bromoil transfer
still continue to attract a host of workers.  European workers seem still
to have access to better and cheaper materials for this work than we in
America, as is evidenced by the number and quality of the prints that are
produced in the Scandinavian countries and in Germany, where bromoil work
has even acquired a commercial status among professional photographers.

The question is sometimes raised whether the general public who attend
photographic exhibitions are interested in processes as such.  I think the
question must be answered in the negative.  It is the general effect that
interests the outsider, and he cares not whether the print is a gum, a
bromoil, a bromide, a platinum, or a palladiotype.  We must beware lest we
get enamored of a process rather than the result.  I say this with no
disrespect to the bromoilists, many of whom are gifted workers and endowed
with art feeling.  But we must remember that we are working to popularize
photography as an art as well as to demonstrate our own artistic feeling
and technical skill, and we ought not to lay too great stress on a
difficult branch of our work, to the discouragement of those who would
seek to share the delights of a beautiful recreation.  The problem must be
left to each individual.  The beauty of a bromoil print, for instance, is
supreme to its devotee: is its superiority to other processes worth the
time and the toil necessary to make it, which might be devoted to the
study of composition, of a wider range of subject, or to the mastery of
simpler processes?  Picture construction and print quality are after all
the main things in photography, not the medium we use.

There is no royal road to distinction in photography, but each year sees
some helps devised for the earnest worker, whether amateur or
professional.  For the amateur there is now an increasing variety of
cameras and photographic material.  New cameras are coming from abroad,
among them a small French moving-picture machine, the “Sept,” which can be
carried in the hand and with which, it is claimed, good “stills” may be
taken as well as good regulation movie pictures.  An auto-focus enlarger,
at a comparatively small price, has also been put on the market for
amateur use; and with the increasing use of small cameras and the adoption
of simpler methods this may prove a boon to those who wish to make bromide
enlargements more easily than they could by the older methods.  It is to
be regretted that platinum paper is not being manufactured in America for
photographic purposes, for the quality of a choice platinum print is still
regarded by many as unsurpassed, and many workers wish to see platinum
resume its old place among the photographer’s resources.  Many “spotlight”
machines and artificial illuminating devices have been put on the market,
and with these the photographer will be equipped to play on his sitters
the “light that never was on sea or land,” if he so desires.  But the
ingenious photographer who is quick to seize good lighting effects will
not need the aid of artificial lighting, anymore than did the early master
of photography, D. O. Hill, whose simple effects reached almost the
finality of lens art.

Just here I might add a word as to the increasing coalescence of the
amateur and the professional photographer in America.  Strictly speaking,
an amateur may be said to be one who gets no return in money for his work,
while the professional’s work is mainly financial in its object.  The
amateur photographer, however, finds his expenses heavy and the temptation
strong to sell his pictures; while in America the professional
photographer is frequently so much in love with the pictorial
possibilities of his work that he loses sight of the financial end of it.

For the worker to get the real enthusiasm and benefit from photography,
the thing now necessary to mark a distinct note of progress, or to make an
outstanding year, is to have a great international exhibition, similar to
the one held in Buffalo in 1910.  This, I am glad to say, is already
planned for next year, to be held in New York City, which, although the
great center of activity, has never had an exhibition of this kind.



ON IDEAS


_By _HEYWORTH CAMPBELL

Thackeray resigned the editorship of a British periodical only because he
could not endure the ordeal of rejecting the thousands of submitted
manuscripts.  This is a distressing phase of an Art Director’s duties and
to my mind his most sacred obligation.  No matter how hardened by
experience, a conscientious editor cannot fail to suffer for and with the
unhappy authors and artists whose work goes back with the proverbial pink
rejection slip.  Why are drawings and photographs rejected?  What is wrong
with the great mass of rejected material?  My observation is that they
suffer more from a lack of clear thinking and careful execution than from
a paucity of ideas.

The weird conceptions and grotesque ideas in back of most of the
unsolicited material submitted would make one easily believe that the
artists are inmates, or perfectly qualified to be inmates of asylums.  I
am seldom inclined or required to urge an artist to seek originality of
idea.  My constant plea, and what to my mind is a prerequisite, is an
optimistic point of view, a sound, intelligent thought rendered with, may
I say, reverence.

Struggling young artists are constantly advised to cultivate their
imagination.  What is imagination?  Arthur Brisbane defined this in the
most compact, tangible statement: “Imagination is nothing more than the
power to see and realize what others fail to see and realize.”  The
illusive idea that we are searching for is nothing hidden or mystic but
right before our very eyes.  We have only to “see and realize.”

It is conceded, I am sure, that the idea is the prime requisite of a
political cartoon.  A prominent cartoonist was once asked where he got his
ideas.  In reply he asked “what ideas?”  Men of ideas have brains that
function exactly as those of other normal well-ordered citizens.  They are
not gifted by strange kinks in their brain cells.  When the prominent
cartoonist is contemplating the banal act of shaving or putting in a new
furnace, his thoughts are no more or less exalted or lofty than when
creating a cartoon idea intended to sway public opinion.  Strange, isn’t
it, that considering the thousands of earnest thinking diligent-working
young students, that there are so few artists whose work reflects real
genius?  Strange that the standard of the Graphic Arts is as
discouragingly low as it is considering this army of talent.  But even
more strange that this contradiction to the law of averages is also
applicable to the field of sports—to a field so practical, tangible and
therefore measurable.  Every healthy-minded youngster born, has two early
ambitions: one to be a great baseball player, another to become President.
And yet the scouts and managers for the Big Leagues have difficulty in
discovering talent above the average.

In the field of Pictorial Photography, the average is exceedingly high.
This volume is a demonstration.  To be sure, if one seeks, one can quickly
discover atrocities in the galleries and on the printed page; but my
conviction is that the progress from the purely aesthetic standpoint has
kept pace with the mechanical and scientific strides made in Photography.

Quotations are generally sneered at, but they make excellent conclusions.
Some one once said: “All one’s life is music if one touched the notes
rightly and in tune.”  A very happy thought and true.  But finding the
right note is infinitely more difficult than the striking in tune.  Ideas,
to be sure, you must seek.  But orderly thought, patience and fine
craftsmanship in carrying out your idea frequently count for more than the
originality or brilliance of the idea itself.  Owing to the restlessness
of the world situation—wars and rumors of wars, strikes and overtendency
towards jazz and slang—there is already, especially in the work of
youngsters, too evident an urge to be different; different merely for the
sake of being different.

A thought possibly worthy of the deliberation of every artist is that
Distinction is a result, never the object, of a great mind.



    [A DECORATIVE PANEL, By Thos. O. Sheckell, Salt Lake City,  Utah]

                           A DECORATIVE PANEL
              _By _Thos. O. Sheckell, _Salt Lake City, Utah_


       [IN A DANCER’S STUDIO, By Wayne Albee, Seattle, Washington]

                          IN A DANCER’S STUDIO
                 _By _Wayne Albee, _Seattle, Washington_


          [HOUSE-BOATS, By Ernest M. Pratt, Los Angeles, Calif.]

                               HOUSE-BOATS
               _By _Ernest M. Pratt, _Los Angeles, Calif._


         [MAY I COME IN?, By Robert R. McGeorge, Buffalo, N. Y.]

                             MAY I COME IN?
                _By _Robert R. McGeorge, _Buffalo, N. Y._


       [THE DISTANT SAIL, By William Gordon Shields, New York City]

                            THE DISTANT SAIL
               _By _William Gordon Shields, _New York City_


         [GATEWAY, DINAN, By Dr. Chas. H. Jaeger, New York City]

                             GATEWAY, DINAN
                _By _Dr. Chas. H. Jaeger, _New York City_


          [SILHOUETTES—EGYPT, By Julia Marshall, Duluth, Minn.]

                            SILHOUETTES—EGYPT
                   _By _JULIA MARSHALL, _Duluth, Minn._


        [MOUNT EVERETT, By Robert B. Montgomery, Brooklyn, N. Y.]

                              MOUNT EVERETT
               _By _Robert B. Montgomery, _Brooklyn, N. Y._


            [THE BACK FENCE, By C. R. Herzler, New York City]

                             THE BACK FENCE
                   _By _C. R. Herzler, _New York City_


  [ON DECK OF THE METAGAMA, By Johan Hagemeyer, San Francisco,  Calif.]

                         ON DECK OF THE METAGAMA
              _By _JOHAN HAGEMEYER, _San Francisco, Calif._


           [TIDEWATER, By Amelia H. McLean, Bronxville, N. Y.]

                                TIDEWATER
                _By _Amelia H. McLean, _Bronxville, N. Y._


      [STREET VENDORS—ROME, ITALY, By H. A. Latimer, Boston,  Mass.]

                       STREET VENDORS—ROME, ITALY
                  _By __H. A. Latimer, __Boston, Mass._


               [SUMMERTIME, By Paul Wierum, Chicago, Ill.]

                               SUMMERTIME
                    _By _PAUL  WIERUM, _Chicago, Ill._


           [TORSO OF A DANCER, By Arnold Genthe, New York City]

                            TORSO OF A DANCER
                   _By _Arnold Genthe, _New York City_


     [A MAINE FISHING VILLAGE, By Eugene P. Henry, Brooklyn, N.  Y.]

                         A MAINE FISHING VILLAGE
                 _By _EUGENE P. HENRY, _Brooklyn, N. Y._


           [SMOKE EATERS, By W. H. Zerbe, Richmond Hill, N. Y.]

                              SMOKE EATERS
                _By _W.  H. ZERBE, _Richmond Hill, N. Y._


        [PUEBLO DWELLING, By Ernest Williams, Los Angeles, Calif.]

                             PUEBLO DWELLING
               _By _Ernest Williams, _Los Angeles, Calif._


    [IN THE BERKSHIRES, By William Elbert Macnaughton, New York  City]

                            IN THE BERKSHIRES
             _By _William Elbert Macnaughton, _New York City_


               [BEPPY, By Helen W. Drew, Montclair, N. J.]

                                  BEPPY
                 _By _HELEN W.  DREW, _Montclair, N. J._


              [EMPTIES, By K. B. Lambert, Glen Ridge, N. J.]

                                 EMPTIES
                 _By _K. B.  LAMBERT, _Glen Ridge, N. J._


       [THE WOODCHOPPER’S WOMAN, By Harry C. Phipps, Chicago, Ill.]

                         THE WOODCHOPPER’S WOMAN
                  _By _HARRY C. PHIPPS, _Chicago, Ill._


          [THE DES PLAINES TRAIL, By E. E. Gray, Chicago, Ill.]

                          THE DES PLAINES TRAIL
                     _By _E. E. GRAY, _Chicago, Ill._


         [MOTHER AND CHILD, By clarence H. White, New York City]

                            MOTHER AND CHILD
                 _By _Clarence H. White, _New York City_


             [YE OLD BARN, By Olive Garrison, Yonkers, N. Y.]

                               YE OLD BARN
                  _By _Olive Garrison, _Yonkers, N. Y._


                 [INTERIOR, By Jane Reece, Dayton, Ohio]

                                INTERIOR
                     _By _JANE  REECE, _Dayton, Ohio_


       [PENNSYLVANIA STATION, By Dr. D. J. Ruzicka, New York City]

                          PENNSYLVANIA STATION
                 _By _Dr. D. J. Ruzicka, _New York City_


    [CLOUDS OF MORNING, By Francis O. Libby, F.R.P.S., Portland,  Me.]

                            CLOUDS OF MORNING
             _By _Francis O. Libby, F.R.P.S., _Portland, Me._


             [THE CANYON, By Jerry D. Drew, Montclair, N. J.]

                               THE CANYON
                  _By _Jerry D. Drew, _Montclair, N. J._


      [THE EAST RIVER, By John Paul Edwards, San Francisco, Calif.]

                             THE EAST RIVER
             _By _John Paul Edwards, _San Francisco, Calif._


       [THE TRAIN SHED—PITTSBURGH, By W. W. Zieg, Pittsburgh,  Pa.]

                        THE TRAIN SHED—PITTSBURGH
                   _By __W. W. Zieg, __Pittsburgh, Pa._


     [ODD MOMENTS IN BRITTANY, By George Henry High, Chicago,  Ill.]

                         ODD MOMENTS IN BRITTANY
                 _By _GEORGE HENRY HIGH, _Chicago, Ill._


[UZERCHES: "IL FAIT UN BON SOLEIL", By Dr. A. D. Chaffee, New  York City]

                    UZERCHES: "IL FAIT UN BON SOLEIL"
                 _By _DR. A. D. CHAFFEE, _New York  City_


         [A MISTY MORNING, By N. S. Wooldridge, Pittsburgh, Pa.]

                             A MISTY MORNING
                 _By _N. S. Wooldridge, _Pittsburgh, Pa._


      [PTARMIGAN IN WINTER, By Clark Blickensderfer, Denver, Colo.]

                           PTARMIGAN IN WINTER
                _By _Clark Blickensderfer, _Denver, Colo._


             [MARJORIE, By sophie L. Lauffer, New York City]

                                MARJORIE
                 _By _SOPHIE  L. LAUFFER, _New York City_


     [THE PATTERNED WALL, By Mildred Ruth Wilson, Montclair, N.  J.]

                           THE PATTERNED WALL
               _By _Mildred Ruth Wilson, _Montclair, N. J._


          [THE SUNNY WINDOW, By Mary F. Boyd, Chambersburg, Pa.]

                            THE SUNNY WINDOW
                  _By _Mary F. Boyd, _Chambersburg, Pa._


   [AT CLARENCE WHITE’S, CANAAN, CONN., By Florence Burton Livingston,
                           Mohegan Lake, N. Y.]

                   AT CLARENCE WHITE’S, CANAAN, CONN.
        _By __Florence Burton Livingston, __Mohegan Lake, N.  Y._


   [STUDY OF A YOUNG GIRL, By charles H. Brown, Santa Barbara,  Calif.]

                          STUDY OF A YOUNG GIRL
              _By _CHARLES H. BROWN, _Santa Barbara, Calif._


         [IVY AND OLD GLASS, By Clara E. Sipprell, New York City]

                            IVY AND OLD GLASS
                 _By _Clara E. Sipprell, _New York City_


            [ROSE DANCE, By J. Anthony Bull, Cincinnati, Ohio]

                               ROSE DANCE
                _By _J.  ANTHONY BULL, _Cincinnati, Ohio_


   [A CONCERT IN THE NURSERY, By Frank R. Nivison, Fall River,  Mass.]

                        A CONCERT IN THE NURSERY
                _By _FRANK R. NIVISON, _Fall River, Mass._


             [GREY ATTIC, By Edward Weston, Glendale, Calif.]

                               GREY ATTIC
                  _By _Edward Weston, _Glendale, Calif._


             [MUD-PIES, By Cornelia F. White, New York City]

                                MUD-PIES
                 _By _Cornelia F. White, _New York City_


  [CARVED WITH THE TOOLS OF TIME, THE SCULPTOR, By Edith R. Wilson, Mt.
                              Vernon, N. Y.]

               CARVED WITH THE TOOLS OF TIME, THE SCULPTOR
                _By _EDITH R. WILSON, _Mt. Vernon, N.  Y._


          [MORNING GLORY, By Otis Williams, Los Angeles, Calif.]

                              MORNING GLORY
                _By _Otis Williams, _Los Angeles, Calif._


    [THE CIRCUS COMES TO TOWN, By Thomas R. Hartley, Pittsburgh,  Pa.]

                        THE CIRCUS COMES TO TOWN
                _By _THOMAS R. HARTLEY, _Pittsburgh, Pa._


           [SEAR AUTUMN, By Anson Herrick, San Francisco, Cal.]

                               SEAR AUTUMN
                _By _Anson Herrick, _San Francisco, Cal._


  [THE BAZAR, By Margaret D. M. Brown, Arlington, Poughkeepsie, N.  Y.]

                                THE BAZAR
       _By _Margaret D. M. Brown, _Arlington, Poughkeepsie, N.  Y._


  [WANDERERS FROM HOME, By P. Douglas Anderson, San Francisco,  Calif.]

                           WANDERERS FROM HOME
            _By _P. Douglas Anderson, _San Francisco, Calif._


         [DECORATIVE STUDY, By Henry A. Hussey, Berkeley, Calif.]

                            DECORATIVE STUDY
                 _By _Henry A. Hussey, _Berkeley, Calif._


               [THE WAY UP, By Folsom Rich, Chicago, Ill.]

                               THE WAY UP
                    _By _Folsom Rich, _Chicago, Ill._


               [COLONEL MARSH, By E. L. Mix, New York City]

                              COLONEL MARSH
                     _By _E. L. Mix, _New York City_


             [SHADOW DESIGN, By G. W. Harting, New York City]

                              SHADOW DESIGN
                   _By _G. W. Harting, _New York City_


        [AT GUINGAMP, By Mrs. Antoinette B. Hervey, New York City]

                               AT GUINGAMP
             _By _Mrs. Antoinette B. Hervey, _New York City_


     [KISSING THE PADRE’S HAND, By Myers R. Jones, Brooklyn, N.  Y.]

                        KISSING THE PADRE’S HAND
                  _By _MYERS R. JONES, _Brooklyn, N. Y._


        [UNDER BROOKLYN BRIDGE, By A. E. Schaaf, Cleveland, Ohio]

                          UNDER BROOKLYN BRIDGE
                   _By _A. E. SCHAAF, _Cleveland, Ohio_


           [THE BRIDGES, By Henry Hoyt Moore, Brooklyn, N. Y.]

                               THE BRIDGES
                 _By _Henry Hoyt Moore, _Brooklyn, N. Y._


    [WHIRLPOOL RAPIDS, NIAGARA, By William A. Alcock, New York  City]

                        WHIRLPOOL RAPIDS, NIAGARA
                 _By _WILLIAM A. ALCOCK, _New York City_


               [STUDY, By A. Ralph Steiner, New York City]

                                  STUDY
                 _By _A. RALPH  STEINER, _New York City_


         [DOMESTIC SYMPHONY, By Margaret Watkins, New York City]

                            DOMESTIC SYMPHONY
                  _By _Margaret Watkins, _New York City_


           [MORNING SUNLIGHT, By Ira W. Martin, New York City]

                            MORNING SUNLIGHT
                   _By _Ira W. Martin, _New York City_


      [L’ESPRIT DE MANDALAY, By J. Ludger Rainville, Portland, Me.]

                          L’ESPRIT DE MANDALAY
                _By _J. Ludger Rainville, _Portland, Me._


 [THE GORGE BELOW THE WHIRLPOOL, NIAGARA, By W. H. Porterfield,  Buffalo,
                                  N. Y.]

                 THE GORGE BELOW THE WHIRLPOOL, NIAGARA
                _By _W. H. PORTERFIELD, _Buffalo, N.  Y._


         [PORTRAIT—GIRL IN BLACK, By Rabinovitch, New York City]

                         PORTRAIT—GIRL IN BLACK
                   _By __Rabinovitch, __New York City_


          [THE TOILERS, By Edward Ostrom, Jr., Brooklyn, N. Y.]

                               THE TOILERS
                _By _Edward Ostrom, Jr., _Brooklyn, N. Y._


           [FROM MY WINDOW, By Betty Gresh, Norristown, Penn.]

                             FROM MY WINDOW
                  _By _Betty Gresh, _Norristown, Penn._


       [YOUNG AMERICAN, By Louis Fleckenstein, Long Beach, Calif.]

                             YOUNG AMERICAN
              _By _Louis Fleckenstein, _Long Beach, Calif._


          [MESA DEL MAR, By G. H. S. Harding, Berkeley, Calif.]

                              MESA DEL MAR
                _By _G.  H. S. HARDING, _Berkeley, Calif._


            [SEINE BOATS, By William B. Imlach, New York City]

                               SEINE BOATS
                 _By _William B. Imlach, _New York City_


  [THE MOON OF THE RED GODS, By Laura Gilpin, Colorado Springs,  Colo.]

                        THE MOON OF THE RED GODS
               _By _LAURA GILPIN, _Colorado Springs, Colo._


             [HIGH SEAS, By Joseph Petrocelli, New York City]

                                HIGH SEAS
                 _By _Joseph Petrocelli, _New York City_


    [SIXTH AVENUE, NEW YORK CITY, By Ben J. Lubschez, New York  City]

                       SIXTH AVENUE, NEW YORK CITY
                  _By _BEN J. LUBSCHEZ, _New York City_


        [HILLSIDE SHADOWS, By Charles K. Archer, Pittsburgh, Pa.]

                            HILLSIDE SHADOWS
                _By _Charles K. Archer, _Pittsburgh, Pa._


    [MOTHER CAREY’S CHICKENS COME HOME TO ROOST, By Herbert B. Turner,
                              Boston, Mass.]

               MOTHER CAREY’S CHICKENS COME HOME TO ROOST
                 _By _HERBERT B. TURNER, _Boston,  Mass._


          [THE SCHOOL YARD, By Vernon E. Duroe, Brooklyn, N. Y.]

                             THE SCHOOL YARD
                 _By _Vernon E. Duroe, _Brooklyn, N. Y._



THE PURPOSE OF THE PICTORIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS OF AMERICA


To stimulate and encourage those engaged and interested in the Art of
Photography; to honor those who have given valuable service to the
advancement of Photography; to form centers for intercourse and for
exchange of views; to facilitate the formation of centers where the
photographers may be always seen and purchased by the public; to enlist
the aid of museums and public libraries in adding photographic prints to
their departments; to stimulate public taste through exhibitions,
lectures, and publication; to invite exhibits of foreign work and
encourage participation in exhibitions held in foreign countries; to
promote education in this Art so as to raise the standards of Photography
in the United States of America.

                                    *



THE PICTORIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS OF AMERICA


Some five years ago a small group of photographers in New York City and
vicinity formed a nucleus for the institution of a society.  Its name was
ambitious—The Pictorial Photographers of America; its aims and objects
sounded visionary, almost fantastic.  Already many times printed, they
bear repetition and have been incorporated in a separate page in this
book.  In one sense these aims were visionary, because they were thought
out and formulated by men of vision, who now stand justified: in hardly
one of these directions have we failed to make important advance and in
many we have pushed far.  But we do not rest upon what we have done; in
none of these pursuits can we pause and say “It is accomplished”; much
remains to be achieved in every line; new activities constantly present
themselves; and the maintenance of each of our undertakings implies
continuance of effort nearly as strenuous as that of its initiative.

In the Art Center, from its inception as a mere idea, the Pictorial
Photographers of America have been active.  This Institution,
enthusiastically planned and rapidly carried forward, has been since
November, 1921, an accomplished fact. It is devoted to the development and
association of various Arts and Crafts, to interesting the public therein
and, particularly, to bringing producer and user together.  It is
compounded of the seven following Societies, to wit: Art Alliance of
America, Art Directors Club, American Institute of Graphic Arts, New York
Society of Craftsmen, Society of Illustrators, the Stowaways and the
Pictorial Photographers of America, which together own a fine, large,
centrally situated building, completely remodeled for their occupation and
divided into galleries, meeting rooms and executive offices.  The
Pictorial Photographers, besides holding their general meetings in one of
the larger rooms and sharing the lounge for social purposes, have now
their own room (with attendance) which, accessible day and evening, will
be a meeting place for our members, resident and non-resident, and a
center from which we may get into touch with one another; a place for the
continuous exhibition of prints upon the walls and in portfolios, where
art lovers, buyers and advertisers can see and, if they wish, arrange to
buy our work or come into communication with our workers; a reading room
supplied with recent photographic magazines and literature; and a
publicity bureau with a bulletin board displaying announcements of current
and future local and national photographic events.

The usual series of monthly meetings has been held throughout the past
season, with a larger attendance than heretofore.  Our first meeting was
the usual informal “get-together” dinner.  Our second took place in the
opening week of the Art Center: we held an informal reception during the
afternoon and in the evening gave a large dinner to our members and
friends.  Mrs. Ripley Hitchcock was our guest of honor. Our general
meeting followed, at which Mr. Ben J. Lubschez addressed a large audience
upon the “Story of the Motion Picture,” followed by Mr. Herbert J.
Seligman upon “Cinema Plastik.”  At our succeeding meetings we have had
the pleasure of listening to Mr. William H. Zerbe, Mr. Richard M. Coit,
Mr. Ira W. Martin, Mr. Pirie MacDonald, Mr. Edward Penfield, Mr. Fred Dana
Marsh and Mr. Alexander P. Milne.  Interest in the monthly print contests
held at these meetings has been maintained and the value of the feature
demonstrated by the gain in number and quality of the entries.  We hope
during the succeeding year to keep the monthly prints upon exhibition
until the following meeting, believing that this measure will both
stimulate those who show and benefit those who look.

As a part of the general exhibition of all the conjoined Societies
throughout the opening month of the Art Center (November, 1921) we
presented a collection of one hundred and sixty-two prints from our own
membership, filling one of the large galleries upon the ground floor.
This Exhibition, representing all parts of the country, was exceedingly
well received and, under the charge of the American Federation of Arts,
was afterwards shown in Corvallis, Oregon; Emporia, Kansas; College
Station, Texas; and Greeley, Colorado.

During the past summer we have shown at the Art Center a collection of
fifty prints from the Copenhagen Photographic Amateur Club.  We have thus
enjoyed the double privilege of in some measure returning the courtesy of
the Copenhagen Club, who invited us to cooperate in their Twenty-fifth
Anniversary Exhibition, and of seeing and showing representative and
distinguished work from the members of this Club.

A periodical Bulletin of the meetings, activities and news of the Society,
long contemplated, has been established, which through the ensuing year we
expect to issue monthly in the shape of an eight-page miniature magazine.
The Art Center has also undertaken the issue of a monthly Bulletin of the
conjoined Societies, in which we shall have our proportionate share.

In conjunction with the _Shadowland Magazine_ we have begun a series of
monthly print contests, in which the magazine offers to the winners not
only valuable prizes but expert reproduction and wide publicity.  Though
not many months in operation, entries and awards have been encouraging and
interest has been aroused abroad, even so far as China, as well as at
home.

We have become affiliated with _The Club Photographer_ of Great Britain,
contributing the articles and illustrations of the issue for April, 1922,
and have been invited to supply such material in the future for one number
per year.

It is interesting to note that, besides satisfactory sales at home, we
received from Japan two large orders for _Pictorial Photography in
America_ for 1921.

       -----------------------------------------------------------

Our year has been shadowed by the death of Edward R. Dickson, one of the
Society’s most enthusiastic founders and active promoters.  We can do no
better than to quote the brief memorial account of his life, written at
the time of his death by a few of his intimate friends.

“On March 5, 1922, occurred the untimely death of Edward R. Dickson, one
of the most eager and gifted workers in the group of men and women
devoting themselves to pictorial photography.  He was born in Quito,
Ecuador, forty-two years ago.  According to the custom in Ecuador, he, as
the eldest son, was sent abroad, to London, to finish his education.  He
returned home only to find that he had outgrown the thought and customs of
his country.  He therefore returned to England, and later, in 1903, came
to New York.  Here he joined the staff of the Marine Engine Corporation,
later merged with the Otis Elevator Company.  His chief interest, however,
was not in engineering but in art.  He was a friend and pupil of Clarence
H. White, and for many years devoted every moment of his spare time to
artistic creation. In 1917 he cut loose from his his business moorings and
embarked on the great adventure of his life.  Henceforth until his death
he devoted himself wholly to creative work in photography.

“The later years of his life were spent in that part of Manhattan, beyond
Dyckman Street, known as Inwood.  That section of the Island he very much
loved, and many of his pictures were taken in or around those wooded
heights overlooking Spuyten Duyvil.  These pictures include a series of
illustrations to Stephen Phillips’ poem, ‘Marpessa.’

“It was in October, 1913, that Mr. Dickson published the first number of
_Platinum Print_, ‘a journal of personal expression.’  Between that date
and October, 1917, eleven numbers of this remarkable magazine were
published, the last two under the title of _Photo-Graphic Art_.

“He was one of the founders in 1916 of the Pictorial Photographers of
America and was secretary to that organization until 1920.  In 1921 he
completed the editing of the ‘Poems of the Dance,’ an anthology
illustrated by his own photographs, which was published in the same year.
At the time of his death he was at work on other projects, which would
have been genuine contributions.

We have also been saddened by the death of Richard H. Rice, which occurred
last February and cost the country one of its wisest industrial leaders.
Becoming manager of the Lynn Works of the General Electric Company during
a great strike, he had made them famous for productive cooperation.  His
methods have been generally copied; and the confidence and support of his
twelve thousand workmen and women were due to his devotion and his
inviolable sense of justice.

Photography was his refuge from pressing affairs.  With the engineer’s
skill and interest in processes and a keen love of natural beauty, he
produced during his last decade half a hundred landscape studies of a
reticent and enduring beauty.  The scant leisure of his last winter had
been spent in preparing these for exhibition, and they remain as a
characteristic memorial to an unusual personality.

       -----------------------------------------------------------

In this book, our third Pictorial Annual, we offer the choice of our Jury
from nearly a thousand prints, selected without regard to membership in
the organization and solely with the intention of exhibiting the best that
America can produce.  We are grateful to all who have contributed, whether
successfully or not, for their encouragement and support, often by letter
as well as by entries; to the Jury of Selection for their careful,
painstaking judgment; to our Committee on Publication for its detailed and
arduous work; to our engravers and printers for their preparation and
presentation of our material; to all, in fact, who have cooperated in
making _Pictorial Photography in America for 1922_ a good record of
current American Photographic Art.

                                           AMASA DAY CHAFFEE, _President._
The Art Center
Sixty-five East Fifty-sixth Street,
New York City.
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