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Title: Sandwiches
Author: Rorer, Sarah Tyson Heston, 1849-1937
Language: English
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Copyright Status: Not copyrighted in the United States. If you live elsewhere check the laws of your country before downloading this ebook. See comments about copyright issues at end of book.

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                               Sandwiches


                          By MRS. S. T. RORER

                 Author of Mrs. Rorer's New Cook Book,
            Philadelphia Cook Book, Bread and Bread-Making,
                  and other Valuable Works on Cookery.


                      Revised and Enlarged Edition


                              PHILADELPHIA
                           ARNOLD AND COMPANY
                           420 SANSOM STREET



               Copyright, 1894, 1912, by Mrs. S. T. Rorer
                          All Rights Reserved


                  Printed at the Sign of the Ivy Leaf
                     in Sansom Street, Philadelphia
                      by George H Buchanan Company



CONTENTS


  SANDWICHES                                 7
    To Keep Sandwiches                       9
    Bread                                    9
    Yeast                                   10
    German Potato Bread                     11
    Nineteenth Century Bread                12
    White Bread                             12
    Nut Bread                               13
    Anchovy Sandwiches                      13
    Anchovy and Egg Sandwiches              14
    Cold Beef Sandwiches                    14
    Caviar Sandwiches No. 1                 15
    Caviar Sandwiches No. 2                 15
    Celery Sandwiches                       16
    Celery Salad Sandwiches                 16
    Rolled Bread and Butter Sandwiches      17
    Rolled Chicken Sandwiches               17
    Sandwiches à la Rorer                   18
    Chicken and Almond Sandwiches           19
    Chicken and Lettuce à la Kendall        19
    Princess Sandwiches                     20
    Windsor Sandwiches                      20
    Tea Biscuit Sandwiches                  21
    Cheese Sandwiches No. 1                 23
    Cheese Sandwiches No. 2                 23
    Cheese Sandwiches No. 3                 24
    Workman's Cheese Sandwiches             24
    German Sandwiches                       25
    Honolulu Sandwiches                     25
    My Favorite                             26
    Creole Sandwiches                       26
    Curry Sandwiches                        27
    Deviled Cheese Sandwiches               28
    Roquefort Sandwiches                    28
    Camembert Sandwiches                    28
    Cottage Cheese Sandwiches               29
    Salt-Cucumber Sandwiches                29
    Cucumber Sandwiches                     30
    Curried Oyster Sandwiches               31
    Curried Egg Sandwiches                  32
    Curried Sardine Sandwiches              32
    Curried Chicken Sandwiches              33
    Crab Sandwiches                         33
    Cream of Chicken Sandwiches             34
    Deviled Sandwiches                      35
    Egg Sandwiches No. 1                    35
    Egg Sandwiches No. 2                    36
    Fish Sandwiches                         36
    Flaked Fish Sandwiches                  36
    Spanish Sandwiches                      37
    Salmon Sandwiches                       37
    Swedish Sandwiches                      38
    French Chicken Sandwiches               39
    Game Sandwiches                         39
    German Sandwiches                       40
    Ham Sandwiches                          40
    Indian Sandwiches                       41
    Lettuce Sandwiches                      41
    Lobster Sandwiches                      42
    Lobster Salad Sandwiches                43
    Mutton Sandwiches                       43
    Mutton Club Sandwiches                  44
    English Mutton Sandwiches               45
    Spring Lamb Sandwiches                  45
    Turkish Sandwiches                      45
    Picnic Sandwiches                       46
    Potato Sandwiches                       47
    Salad Sandwiches                        47
    Fish Salad Sandwiches                   48
    Sardine Salad Sandwiches                48
    Sardine Sandwiches                      49
    Swiss Sandwiches                        49
    Tongue Sandwiches                       50
    Sandwich Dressing                       51
    Farmer's Sandwiches                     51
    Farmer's Egg Sandwiches                 52
    Deviled Beef Sandwiches                 52
    Corned Beef Sandwiches                  53
    Plain Corned Beef Sandwiches            53
    Sandwiches à la Stanley                 54
    English Salt-Beef Sandwiches            54
    Sandwiches à la Bernhardt               55
    East Indian Lentil Sandwiches           55
    Nut-Butter Sandwiches                   56
    Filipino Sandwiches                     56

  SWEET SANDWICHES                          57
    Cherry Sandwiches                       57
    Fig Sandwiches                          58
    Fruit and Nut Sandwiches                58
    Orange Marmalade Sandwiches             59
    Sponge Cake Sandwiches                  59
    Fresh Fruit Sandwiches                  60
    Raisin Sandwiches                       60
    Afternoon Teas                          61
    Nut and Apple Sandwiches                61
    Grape Fruit Sandwiches                  62
    Ginger Sandwiches                       62

  CANAPÉS                                   63
    Anchovy Canapés                         63
    Caviar Canapés                          63
    Swedish Canapés                         64
    Chopped Tongue Canapés                  64
    Sardine Canapés                         65
    Fish Canapés                            65
    Deviled Oyster Canapés                  66
    Pâté de Foie Gras Canapés               66
    Hot Canapés                             67
    Fish Canapés                            67
    Lobster Canapés                         69
    Sweetbread Canapés                      70
    Canapés à la Trinidad                   71
    Game Canapés                            72
    Lamb Canapés                            73
    Club-House Sandwiches                   74

  SCENTED SANDWICHES                        75
    Rose Sandwiches                         75
    Nasturtium Sandwiches                   76
    Violet Sandwiches                       76



SANDWICHES


Sandwiches may be made from one of three or four kinds of bread; whole
wheat bread, Boston brown or oatmeal bread, white bread and rye bread
made into square, deep loaves; in fact, all bread used for sandwiches
should be made especially for the purpose, so that the slices may be in
good form, and sufficiently large to cut into fancy shapes.

The butter may be used plain, slightly softened or it may be seasoned
and flavored with just a suspicion of paprika, a little white pepper,
and a few drops of Worcestershire sauce.

For ordinary sandwiches use the bread without toasting. For canapés,
toast is to be preferred. Sandwiches are principally used for buffet
lunches or evening sociables, where only a light, substantial lunch is
required. In these days they are made in great varieties. Almost all
sorts of meat, if properly seasoned, may be made into delicious
sandwiches. If the meat is slightly moistened with cream or olive oil,
sandwiches for traveling, provided each one is carefully wrapped in
oiled paper, will keep fresh three or four days. The small French rolls
may have the centres scooped out, the spaces filled with chicken salad
or chopped oysters, and served as sandwiches. The rolls may be made
especially for that purpose, not more than two inches long and one and a
half inches wide; with coffee, they make an attractive meal easily
served.

Ordinary sandwiches may be made either square, triangular, long, narrow,
round or crescent shaped. One slice of bread will usually make one round
sandwich and one crescent, provided the cutting is done economically.
Meat used for sandwiches should be chopped very fine and slightly
moistened with cream, melted butter, olive oil or mayonnaise dressing
well seasoned. Fish should be rubbed or pounded in a mortar; add enough
sauce tartare to make it sufficiently moist to easily spread.

Turkey, chicken, game, tongue, beef and mutton, with their proper
seasonings, moistened with either mayonnaise or French dressing, make
exceedingly nice sandwiches.


To Keep Sandwiches

It is frequently necessary to make sandwiches several hours before they
are needed. As they dry quickly they must be carefully wrapped or they
will be unpalatable. Wring from cold water two ordinary tea towels; put
one on top of the other. An old tablecloth will answer the purpose very
well. As fast as the sandwiches are made put them on top of the damp
towel; when you have the desired quantity, cover the top with moist
lettuce leaves; fold over the towels, and put outside of this a
perfectly dry, square cloth. Sandwiches will keep in this way for
several hours, and in perfectly good condition. On a very warm day they
may be covered all over with moist lettuce leaves; use the green ones
that are not so palatable or sightly for garnishing.


Bread

To make good sandwiches, especially when one is a long way from a city,
it is quite necessary to know how to make sandwich bread, which is quite
different, or should be, from ordinary bread. Compressed yeast is always
to be preferred, but if one cannot get it, the next best is good
home-made yeast. Bread for sandwiches must be baked in rather large
square pans, and must be just a little lighter and softer than bread for
the table. The following recipes will, I am sure, help the "out of town"
housewife. Nut bread is usually made into simple bread and butter
sandwiches; the nuts in the bread are quite sufficient filling.


Yeast

  4 good sized potatoes
  1 quart of boiling water
  2 tablespoonfuls of sugar
  1 tablespoonful of salt

Pare and grate the potatoes into the hot water, stir over the fire
until it reaches boiling point, and simmer gently for five minutes. Take
from the fire, add the sugar and salt, and when lukewarm add a cupful of
yeast, or two dry yeast cakes that have been moistened in a little
water, or one cake of compressed yeast. Turn the mixture into a jar and
cover with a saucer. Stir it down as fast as it comes to the top of the
jar. When it falls, or ceases to be very light, which will be five or
six hours, pour it into a bottle, put the cork in very loosely and stand
it in a cold place. Use one cupful of this to each two loaves of bread.


German Potato Bread

Boil one potato until tender; mash it through a sieve, add to it a half
pint of warm water and a teaspoonful of sugar. Stir in one cupful of
flour and one cupful of yeast; let this stand for two hours, or until
very light. It is better to make this at seven o'clock, so the bread may
be sponged at nine or ten. Scald a pint of milk, add to it a pint of
water, beat in a quart and a pint of flour. The batter should be thick
enough to drop, rather than pour from the spoon. Then stir in the potato
starter, and stand in a place about 65° Fahr. over night. Next morning
knead thoroughly, adding flour. Put this aside until very light, about
two hours, then mold into loaves, put it into square greased pans, and
when light bake in a moderately quick oven three-quarters of an hour.

This recipe will make two box loaves and a dozen rolls.


Nineteenth Century Bread

Scald a pint of milk, add a pint of water, a teaspoonful of salt, and
when lukewarm, one compressed yeast cake moistened in a little warm
water. Add sufficient whole wheat flour to make a batter, beat
thoroughly, cover and stand aside two and a half hours; then stir,
adding more whole wheat flour until you have a dough. Knead quickly,
separate into loaves, put each in a square greased pan, cover and stand
in a warm place about one hour, until very light. Slash the top with a
sharp knife, brush with water and bake in a moderate oven three-quarters
of an hour.


White Bread

Add a pint of water to a pint of scalded milk; when lukewarm add one
compressed yeast cake, moistened, and a teaspoonful of salt. Add
sufficient flour gradually, beating all the while, to make a dough.
Knead this dough until it is soft and elastic, and free from stickiness.
Put it into a greased bowl, stand it in a warm place three hours.
Separate it into loaves, knead five minutes, put the loaves in square
greased pans and stand aside until very light. Slash the top with a
sharp knife, brush with water, and bake in a moderate oven
three-quarters of an hour. This should make two loaves, or a dozen bread
sticks and a dozen rolls.


Nut Bread

   1 quart of flour
   4 level teaspoonfuls of baking powder
   1 teaspoonful of salt
   1 cupful of chopped nuts
  1½ cupfuls of milk

Add the baking powder and salt to the flour and sift them. Add the nuts,
mix thoroughly and gradually add the milk. Knead this into a loaf, put
it into a square pan, brush the top with melted butter, let it stand
twenty minutes, and bake in a moderate oven three-quarters of an hour.


Anchovy Sandwiches

Beat a quarter of a pound of butter to a cream, adding gradually two
tablespoonfuls of lemon juice, a saltspoonful of paprika, two
tablespoonfuls of anchovy paste. Spread this on thin slices of bread,
put two together, trim off the crusts, and cut into triangles.


Anchovy and Egg Sandwiches

Mash the yolks of four hard-boiled eggs with two tablespoonfuls of
melted butter or olive oil, add a half teaspoonful of salt, a dash of
paprika and a tablespoonful of anchovy paste or two mashed anchovies.
Spread this between thin slices of buttered bread, press the slices
together, trim off the crusts and cut into triangles.

Sardines may be used in the place of anchovies.


Cold Beef Sandwiches

Take the remains of cold roasted beef, and chop very fine; put it into
a bowl; to each half pint of meat, add a half teaspoonful of salt, a
tablespoonful of tomato catsup, a teaspoonful of Worcestershire sauce
and a teaspoonful of melted butter; work this together. Cut the crust
from the ends of a loaf of whole wheat bread; butter lightly and slice;
so continue until you have the desired number of slices; spread the
slices with a layer of the seasoned meat; put two slices together, and
cut into desired shapes.


Caviar Sandwiches No. 1

Beat a quarter of a pound of butter to a cream; add two tablespoonfuls
of onion juice, the same of lemon, a saltspoonful of paprika, and
gradually four tablespoonfuls of caviar. Spread this on thin slices of
brown bread or pumpernickel, put two together, press lightly and cut
into long, narrow shapes.


Caviar Sandwiches No. 2

Cut slices of bread in crescent-shaped pieces, butter one side and
toast. Have ready two hard-boiled eggs, remove yolks, put them through
sieve, chop whites very fine, and spread toast with layer of caviar;
then sprinkle over first a little of whites, then a little of the yolks
of the eggs. Put over in the form of a ring a piece of onion, the onion
having first been cut into thin slices, and then separated.


Celery Sandwiches

Cut slices of bread, butter one side and toast. Cut the white part of
celery into thin slices, cover it over the bread, then cover this with a
layer of mayonnaise dressing, cover with another piece of toast, cut
into squares and serve. All sandwiches of this kind must be used as soon
as made.


Celery Salad Sandwiches

Put four eggs into warm water; bring to the boiling point, and keep
there, without boiling, for fifteen minutes. Take the white portion from
one head of celery; wash and chop it very fine. Remove the shells from
the hard-boiled eggs, and either chop them very fine or put through a
vegetable press, and mix with them the celery; add a half teaspoonful of
salt and a dash of pepper. Butter the bread before you cut it from the
loaf. After you have a sufficient quantity cut, put over each slice a
layer of the mixed egg and celery; put right in the center of this a
teaspoonful of mayonnaise dressing, and sort of smooth it all over. Put
two pieces together and press them lightly. Trim off the crusts, and cut
the sandwiches into pieces about two inches wide and the length of the
slices.


Rolled Bread and Butter Sandwiches

Beat the butter to a cream. Remove the crusts from the loaf, butter each
slice before you cut it off, and roll at once. These may be tied with
narrow baby ribbon or wrapped at once in waxed paper, fringing and
twisting the ends.


Rolled Chicken Sandwiches

Trim the crusts from the entire loaf, butter each slice and cut it off
as thin as possible; spread it quickly with the mixture, roll and wrap
it at once in waxed paper. If the bread is home-made and cracks in the
rolling, put a colander over a kettle of boiling water, throw in it a
few slices at a time, as soon as they have softened spread them with
soft butter, then cover with the mixture, roll and wrap in waxed paper.

To make the mixture, chop sufficient cold boiled chicken to make a
pint. Rub together two level tablespoonfuls of butter and two of flour,
add slowly a half cupful of hot milk, stir over the fire for a minute,
then add the chicken, a level teaspoonful of salt, a half teaspoonful of
celery seed, a saltspoonful of white pepper, a dash of red pepper, a
teaspoonful of onion juice and a grating of nutmeg; mix and cool. This
will make four dozen rolled sandwiches.


Sandwiches à la Rorer

Chop sufficient white meat of cooked chicken to make a half pint.
Select two fine bunches of cress, and with a sharp knife shave it very
fine. Wash and dry the crisp portion from a head of lettuce. Put the
yolks of two eggs into a saucepan, add the juice from two lemons and
stir over hot water until the mixture is thick; take from the fire and
add slowly two tablespoonfuls of olive oil; add this to the chicken and
season with a half teaspoonful of salt and a dash of pepper. Butter a
slice of white bread, put over a rather thick layer of the chicken
mixture, then a slice of brown bread, buttered on both sides; cover this
with a thick layer of cress, dust it lightly with salt and pepper, then
another slice of white bread, buttered; press these firmly together,
trim the crusts and cut into fingers.


Chicken and Almond Sandwiches

Chop sufficient cold cooked chicken to make a half pint. Chop a quarter
of a pound of blanched almonds, add them to the chicken, add four
tablespoonfuls of cream, a half teaspoonful of salt and a dash of
pepper; mix thoroughly, put between thin slices of buttered bread and
cut into crescents or rounds.


Chicken and Lettuce à la Kendall

Put sufficient cold boiled chicken through the meat chopper to make a
half pint, pound it in a mortar or rub it in a bowl with the hard-boiled
yolks of four eggs, four tablespoonfuls of thick cream, a half
teaspoonful of salt, a dash of pepper, and if you have it, two
saltspoonfuls of celery seed; in the winter you may add a half cupful of
finely chopped celery. Butter thin slices of white bread, cover them
with this mixture, place on top a slice of brown bread buttered on both
sides, then a thick layer of shredded celery, with a tablespoonful of
mayonnaise in the middle, then another slice of buttered white bread;
press together, trim the crusts and cut into fingers.


Princess Sandwiches

Chop sufficient cold chicken to make a half pint, add the juice of half
a lemon, two tablespoonfuls of melted butter or olive oil, twelve
walnuts chopped very fine, a half teaspoonful of paprika and a half
teaspoonful of salt. Put this mixture between thin slices of buttered
bread, trim the crusts and cut into fingers.


Windsor Sandwiches

Chop sufficient cold boiled chicken to make a half pint, add a half
cupful of finely chopped celery, a half teaspoonful of salt, a dash of
pepper and four tablespoonfuls of cream; mix. Chop sufficient cold
boiled ham or tongue to make a half pint, add a tablespoonful of tomato
catsup, a few drops of Worcestershire sauce and a dash of pepper. Trim
the crusts from an entire loaf of bread, butter the end of the loaf and
cut off a thin slice, and so continue until you have the desired
quantity of bread.

Shred one head of Romaine or a bunch of cress. This of course must be
crisp and dry. Put a layer of the chicken mixture on the buttered side
of a slice of bread, put on top another slice of buttered bread, then a
thick layer of the shredded cress or Romaine. Put a thick layer of the
tongue mixture on another slice of bread and cover it over the cress.
Press firmly together and cut the slices directly into halves the long
way. Wrap in waxed paper or tie with baby ribbon. Served at afternoon
teas. If well made, they are the most elaborate and dainty of all
sandwiches.


Tea Biscuit Sandwiches

Put one quart of flour into a bowl; add four level teaspoonfuls of
baking powder, a teaspoonful of salt, and sift. Rub in two level
tablespoonfuls of butter and add sufficient milk to make a dough. This
dough must not be soft, but must be sufficiently stiff to handle
quickly. Knead quickly and roll into a sheet a quarter of an inch thick.
Cut into good-sized round biscuits; they must be at least two and a half
to three inches in diameter. Brush them with milk and bake in a quick
oven. When done, cut the center from each biscuit, leaving a wall one
inch thick; take out the crumb. Fill this space with deviled chicken.
Chop sufficient cold cooked chicken to make a pint; add gradually eight
tablespoonfuls of melted butter, cream or olive oil, a dash of cayenne,
a saltspoonful of white pepper, a saltspoonful of celery seed and a
saltspoonful of paprika. When thoroughly mixed fill the spaces just even
and send at once to the table. These are nice for porch suppers, and may
be served with either tea, coffee or chocolate, or may be used as an
accompaniment to mayonnaise of tomatoes.


Cheese Sandwiches No. 1

Butter thin slices of pumpernickel or brown bread; put between each two
slices a very thin layer of Swiss cheese, put two together, and cut into
triangles; garnish with cress.


Cheese Sandwiches No. 2

Chop fine a quarter of a pound of soft American cheese; put it into a
saucepan, add the yolk of one egg beaten with two tablespoonfuls of
cream, a saltspoonful of salt, a dash of red pepper and half a
teaspoonful of Worcestershire sauce. Have ready cut and buttered a
sufficient number of slices of bread, either white or whole wheat. Stir
the cheese over the fire until it is thoroughly melted; take from the
fire and when cool spread it between the slices of bread and butter;
that is, spread it on one slice and cover with the other; press two
together and cut into forms.


Cheese Sandwiches No. 3

Rub or pound until perfectly smooth or well mixed one tablespoonful of
butter, two tablespoonfuls of soft club-house cheese, a tablespoonful of
grated Parmesan, a saltspoonful of salt, and a teaspoonful of anchovy
paste; add a teaspoonful of tarragon vinegar and a half saltspoonful of
pepper. Cut the bread into thin slices, toast it until it is crisp, not
hard; spread this mixture on one slice, cover it with another, and cut
into shapes.


Workman's Cheese Sandwiches

Cut slices of brown bread about a half inch thick. Do not remove the
crusts. Take a half pint of cottage cheese; press it through a sieve;
add to it two tablespoonfuls of melted butter, a half teaspoonful of
salt and two tablespoonfuls of thick cream. Beat until smooth and light.
Spread each slice of bread thickly with the cheese mixture, then put a
very thin slice of white bread on top of the cheese, then cheese and
brown bread, press together. Have the outside brown bread with a layer
of cheese on each, and between the layers of cheese a slice of white
bread. These are palatable, and are very much better for the average
workman than bread and ham.


German Sandwiches

Put a half pound of Swiss cheese through the meat grinder; add to it the
yolks of two eggs, four tablespoonfuls of olive oil, a dash of cayenne
and a half teaspoonful of salt. Rub until you have a perfectly smooth
paste. Put this mixture between layers of buttered rye bread and serve.
Do not trim the crusts nor cut.


Honolulu Sandwiches

Put two Spanish sweet peppers (pimientos), one Neufchatel cheese, one
pared and quartered apple and twelve blanched almonds through the meat
grinder. These may be put through alternately, or mixed as you grind.
Rub the mixture, add a half teaspoonful of salt and a saltspoonful of
paprika. Spread this between thin slices of buttered white or brown
bread. Press, cut the crusts and cut into fingers.


My Favorite

  ½ pound of American cheese
  ½ cupful of thick sour cream
  1 teaspoonful of Worcestershire sauce
  1 tablespoonful of tomato catsup
  ½ teaspoonful of salt
  ½ teaspoonful of paprika

Chop or mash the cheese, add gradually the cream, and when smooth add
all the other ingredients. Spread this mixture on thin slices of
buttered bread, cover the top with chopped cress, then cover with
another slice of bread, press the two together, trim off the crusts and
cut into triangles.


Creole Sandwiches

Put a half pound of American cheese through your meat grinder, add to
it one Neufchatel cheese, mix well together; add one fresh peeled
chopped tomato. Peel the tomato and cut it into halves; squeeze out the
seeds and chop the flesh quite fine. Add one finely chopped sweet red
pepper. Add a half teaspoonful of salt and a little black pepper; mix
and spread between slices of white bread, or you may use one slice of
white with one slice of whole wheat bread. These are usually served cut
into rounds with an ordinary cake cutter. If you cut these economically
you can make one good sized round sandwich and a crescent from each, or
if you use a very small cutter you should make four round sandwiches.


Curry Sandwiches

Rub one Neufchatel or Philadelphia cream cheese to a paste. Add one
pimiento, chopped fine; a dozen almonds put through the meat grinder; a
dozen pecan meats, also ground; a tablespoonful of tomato catsup, a
level teaspoonful of curry and two tablespoonfuls of desiccated grated
cocoanut. Mix thoroughly, add sufficient olive oil to make a smooth
paste, and spread between thin, unbuttered slices of white bread; trim
the crusts and cut into long fingers. These are nice to serve with plain
lettuce salad at dinner.


Deviled Cheese Sandwiches

Put one pound of American cheese through your meat chopper. Add two
tablespoonfuls of tomato catsup, one teaspoonful of Worcestershire
sauce, a half teaspoonful of paprika, a dash of cayenne, two
tablespoonfuls of olive oil or melted butter, four tablespoonfuls of
sherry and a half teaspoonful of salt. Mix until perfectly smooth, and
spread between thin slices of buttered bread; trim the crusts and cut
into triangles.


Roquefort Sandwiches

Mash a quarter of a pound of Roquefort cheese, adding gradually
sufficient melted butter to make a paste. Spread this between slices of
buttered bread, press together, trim the crusts, and cut into fingers.


Camembert Sandwiches

Spread Camembert cheese between slices of buttered whole wheat bread,
trim the crusts and cut into shape. These may be served after lunch with
coffee, or are exceedingly nice for picnics or for afternoons where
coffee is served.


Cottage Cheese Sandwiches

These are nice for country picnics. The cottage cheese should be made
rather dry. After it has drained and is quite dry, moisten it by adding
either thick cream or melted butter; do not make it too soft. Add a
saltspoonful of black pepper and a palatable seasoning of salt. Spread
between slices of buttered whole wheat or white bread, press the two
together, trim the crusts and cut into shape.


Salt-Cucumber Sandwiches

Spread the bread, and cut the slices about half an inch thick. Then cut
a German or Holland cucumber into very thin slices; put these slices all
over the bread. Take the center from a head of lettuce; hold it
together, and slice it down in sort of shreds; put this over the
cucumber, and have ready some white meat of chicken, cut into the
thinnest possible slices, and cover the lettuce with chicken; then
sprinkle over more shredded lettuce and a little mayonnaise; put over
another slice of buttered bread; press the two together, trim into shape
and serve on a napkin in a pretty wicker basket.


Cucumber Sandwiches

These are very nice to serve with a fish course in place of bread or
rolls and a salad. Slice the cucumbers very thin and soak them in ice
water for one or two hours. They must be crisp and brittle and made just
at serving time. Beat together three tablespoonfuls of olive oil, one
tablespoonful of vinegar, a saltspoonful of salt and a dash of pepper;
stand this dressing on the ice until it thickens. Butter thin slices of
bread, cover them with a layer of cucumbers that have been drained and
dried on a napkin, sprinkle over the dressing, put on another layer of
buttered bread. Press together, trim the crusts and cut into triangles.
Heap these at once on a napkin and send to the table.


Curried Oyster Sandwiches

Butter a slice of bread before you take it off the loaf; cut it about a
half inch thick and remove the crusts. First of all, cover each slice
with a thin layer of hard-boiled egg that has been pressed through a
sieve or chopped very fine. In the center of this sandwich put the soft
parts of six pickled oysters. Put a tablespoonful of butter and one of
flour into a little saucepan; mix without melting; add a gill of thick
cream, a teaspoonful of onion juice and a teaspoonful of curry and a
half teaspoonful of turmeric. Bring to boiling point; beat and stand
away until perfectly cold. When you are ready to serve the sandwiches,
cover each one with a thin layer of this sauce; put a slice of bread on
top, press together, and serve. The sauce must not go over the
sandwiches until you are ready to serve; and then, remember, you have
but one layer between two slices of bread.


Curried Egg Sandwiches

Hard boil four eggs, remove the yolks from the whites; chop the whites
very, very fine, and press the yolks through a sieve. Add to the yolks
gradually four tablespoonfuls of melted butter or olive oil, a half
teaspoonful of salt, a teaspoonful of onion juice, a half teaspoonful of
curry, and rub until thoroughly smooth. Spread thin slices of bread,
cover them with a very thin layer of the yolk mixture, then a layer of
the chopped whites, another slice of buttered bread. Press together,
trim the crusts and cut into shapes.


Curried Sardine Sandwiches

Remove the heads, tails and bones from one large box of sardines. Rub
them to a paste, add a tablespoonful of melted butter, a half
teaspoonful of curry powder and a saltspoonful of salt. Spread this
mixture between slices of buttered bread, press the two together, trim
the crusts and cut into shape.


Curried Chicken Sandwiches

Chop sufficient cold boiled chicken to make a half pint. Rub together
one tablespoonful of butter and one tablespoonful of flour; add a half
cupful of cold milk, and stir over hot water until you have a smooth,
thick paste. Add the chicken gradually to this, mashing and rubbing all
the while. Add a level teaspoonful of curry powder, a half teaspoonful
of salt, a teaspoonful of onion juice and a teaspoonful of lemon juice.
When cold, spread between layers of buttered bread, trim the crusts and
cut into shapes.

Almost any bits of left-over meat may be substituted for the chicken and
made into sandwiches of this kind.


Crab Sandwiches

Remove the meat from six hard-boiled crabs; mix it with four
tablespoonfuls of mayonnaise dressing; put it between slices of bread
and butter and press two together; trim off the crusts, cut into
triangles and serve at once.

Crab and lobster sandwiches should not be allowed to stand for more than
an hour, and then must be wrapped carefully in a clean, damp cloth.


Cream of Chicken Sandwiches

Take sufficient white meat of chicken to make a half cup; chop and
pound it; reduce it to a paste. Put a teaspoonful of granulated gelatin
in two tablespoonfuls of cold water; then stand it over the fire until
it has dissolved. Whip a half pint of cream to a stiff froth. Add the
gelatin to the chicken; add a teaspoonful of grated horseradish and a
half teaspoonful of salt. Stir this until it begins to thicken, cool and
add carefully the whipped cream and stand it away until very cold. When
ready to make the sandwiches, butter the bread and cut the slices a
little thicker than the usual slices for sandwiches. Cover each slice
with this cream mixture; trim off the crusts and cut sandwiches into
fancy shapes. Garnish the top with olives cut into rings. In the center
of each sandwich make just a little mound of capers, using the olives at
the four corners; each sandwich may be garnished in a different way.
Little pieces of celery, with the white top attached, make also a pretty
garnish. These sandwiches are not covered with a second slice of bread.


Deviled Sandwiches

Chop a quarter of a pound of cold, boiled tongue very fine; add to it
two tablespoonfuls of olive oil, a dash of red pepper, a teaspoonful of
Worcestershire sauce, and a saltspoonful of paprika; mix and add the
hard-boiled yolks of three eggs that have been pressed through a sieve.
Put this between thin slices of bread and butter, and garnish with water
cress.


Egg Sandwiches No. 1

Take the hard-boiled yolks of six eggs and rub them to a paste, adding
gradually two tablespoonfuls of olive oil or thick cream. Add a dash of
paprika, one-half teaspoonful of salt, spread and finish precisely the
same as tongue sandwich.


Egg Sandwiches No. 2

Put thin slices of hard-boiled eggs between slices of brown bread and
butter; dust the egg slightly with salt and pepper. Trim the edges of
the sandwiches with either cress or lettuce, and cut into triangles or
squares.


Fish Sandwiches

Rub to a smooth paste a quarter of a pound of cold, boiled fish; add
half a teaspoonful of Worcestershire sauce, a tablespoonful of olive
oil, a half saltspoonful of salt, and a half saltspoonful of black
pepper. Spread the slices of bread on the loaf, cut them off about a
half inch in thickness; trim off the crusts, put on each slice dainty
lettuce leaves, and fill the center with the fish mixture. Cover with
another layer of buttered bread from which you have trimmed the crusts,
and press the two together.


Flaked Fish Sandwiches

Flake cold boiled white fleshed fish, dust it with salt and pepper and
sprinkle it with lemon juice. Butter thin slices of brown bread; do not
trim off the crusts. Put on one slice a layer of thin crisp cucumber,
cover this with flaked fish, put a tablespoonful of mayonnaise in the
center, put on another layer of chopped cress, then a slice of buttered
brown bread. Press together and cut into halves.


Spanish Sandwiches

Mash the hard-boiled yolks of three eggs, add twelve boiled shrimps,
either pounded in a mortar or chopped very fine. Add three
tablespoonfuls of olive oil or butter, a tablespoonful of tomato catsup,
two saltspoonfuls of paprika, four tablespoonfuls of chopped parsley, a
half teaspoonful of salt, and at last stir in four tablespoonfuls of
mayonnaise dressing. Spread this between thin slices of buttered bread,
trim the crusts and cut into shape.


Salmon Sandwiches

Flake cold boiled salmon, or open a can of salmon, drain it free from
oil and break the fish apart in good-sized flakes; sprinkle them with
salt, pepper and lemon juice. Butter slices of whole wheat or brown
bread, cover with a layer of the salmon, then a thick layer of chopped
cress or shredded celery. Put a tablespoonful of mayonnaise in the
middle and cover with another slice of buttered bread. Press together,
trim the crusts and cut into triangles.


Swedish Sandwiches

Flake any cold cooked fish, dust it with salt, pepper and lemon juice.
Rub the bottom of a bowl with a clove of garlic, add a half cupful of
mayonnaise, four finely chopped gherkins, twelve chopped olives and two
tablespoonfuls of capers. Mix and stir in two tablespoonfuls of finely
chopped parsley. Spread a thin layer of this dressing over a plain slice
of bread, do not butter the bread, cover it with fish, put on top a
crisp lettuce leaf, then cover with another slice of bread that has been
spread with the dressing. Press, trim the crusts and cut into fingers.


French Chicken Sandwiches

Chop the white meat of one chicken very fine; pound to a paste. Add
one-half teaspoonful of salt and a dash of red pepper. Cover one
tablespoonful of gelatin, with a tablespoonful of cold water, soak it
for about five minutes, then add to it ten tablespoonfuls of thick
cream; stand this over teakettle and stir until gelatin is dissolved.
Now, beat into this the chicken, stand it aside in a square pan until
cold. Cut the chicken into very thin slices; put a slice on a slice of
buttered bread; cover this with another slice of bread and cut into
shape.


Game Sandwiches

Remove the breasts from two partridges after they have been baked or
roasted. Chop the meat rather fine; reduce two sardines to a paste.
While you are mashing the sardines, add gradually about two
tablespoonfuls of soft butter, a dash of red pepper and a half
teaspoonful of salt. Spread the bread first with the sardine paste; then
sprinkle over the chopped game; dust this with salt and a little pepper;
cover with another slice of bread, press lightly; trim into shape.


German Sandwiches

Cut thin slices of rye bread; butter before you take them from the loaf.
Spread each slice with a thin layer of limburger cheese. Cut bologna
sausage into the thinnest possible slices; cover the limburger with the
sliced bologna, and then a thin piece of pumpernickel; cover with
another slice of bread that has been coated with a layer of cheese.
Press the two together; do not remove the crusts. Serve on a napkin in a
wicker basket.


Ham Sandwiches

Chop cold boiled ham very fine. To each cupful of this ham, after it
has been chopped, stir in two tablespoonfuls of melted butter, dash of
red pepper and about one-half teaspoonful of onion juice. Have bread
sufficiently stale to cut nicely. Remove end crust, butter and cut a
very thin slice; remove the crusts, and spread with the ham paste. Serve
same as tongue sandwiches.


Indian Sandwiches

Take two sardines, remove skin and bones, put them into mortar and pound
fine; add a teaspoonful of anchovy paste, a dash of salt and red pepper
and the hard-boiled yolks of six eggs, rubbed smooth; stir two
tablespoonfuls of olive oil into the mixture at the last. Cut bread into
slices about half an inch thick, remove crusts, then cut into
crescent-shaped pieces, toast, butter and cover with the mixture, serve
at once.


Lettuce Sandwiches

Have bread made into a large, square loaf, take off the crust from one
end, butter and then cut into slices. Take the white part of lettuce,
wash and wipe it perfectly dry; have ready three hard-boiled eggs,
remove the yolks, put them through a sieve and rub to a perfectly smooth
paste with four tablespoonfuls of very thick cream. Add one-half
tablespoonful lemon juice and then stir in about four tablespoonfuls of
whipped cream; season with red pepper and add teaspoonful of salt. Cover
slices of bread with leaves of lettuce, put on a goodly quantity of
dressing and then on top of this another slice of bread. This may be
served in squares tied together with ribbon, or they may be pressed and
cut into long narrow pieces. Of course, they must be made only a short
time before serving.


Lobster Sandwiches

Whole wheat bread or the ordinary Boston brown bread is the most
desirable for these sandwiches. Plunge the lobster into hot water; bring
to boiling point, and simmer gently three-quarters of an hour; remove
the meat, and cut it with a silver knife into dice. Now, sprinkle the
lobster with a little salt, red pepper and a tablespoonful of tarragon
vinegar. Allow it to stand for a few minutes, and then sprinkle over two
or three tablespoonfuls of melted butter. As soon as the butter has
chilled on the lobster, put a goodly layer over a slice of buttered
bread; cover with another slice of bread; press the two together, and
remove the crusts. Remember, there is only one layer of lobster between
two slices of bread.


Lobster Salad Sandwiches

Cut fine the solid portion from one boiled lobster, put it into a bowl,
dust it lightly with salt and pepper and sprinkle over two
tablespoonfuls of lemon juice. Make a half cupful of mayonnaise from the
yolk of one egg and eight tablespoonfuls of olive oil. Select crisp
lettuce leaves. Mix the mayonnaise with the lobster, put a thin layer
over a slice of buttered bread, cover with a lettuce leaf, put another
thin layer of lobster on top of the lettuce leaf, then a second slice of
buttered bread. Press firmly together, cut off the crusts and cut the
slices into halves long ways, or you may make it into three fingers.


Mutton Sandwiches

Chop a half pound of cold, cooked mutton very fine; add two
tablespoonfuls of cream or olive oil, a tablespoonful of capers, half a
teaspoonful of salt, and a saltspoonful of pepper; mix thoroughly.
Butter the slices on the loaf; cut them one-half inch thick, and trim
off the crusts. Spread thickly with the mixture; put at each of the four
corners a mint leaf; put on top another slice of buttered bread, from
which you have trimmed the crust, press the two together, and cut from
corner to corner making four triangles.

These sandwiches may also be flavored with tomato catsup.


Mutton Club Sandwiches

Cut brown bread into rounds or circles with an ordinary cake cutter.
Chop one-half pound of cold, boiled mutton rather fine; add two
tablespoonfuls of olive oil, half a teaspoonful of salt, and a
saltspoonful of paprika. Peel four or five quite solid tomatoes, cut
them into slices and push out the seeds. Put a slice of tomato on top of
a round of bread, fill the space from which you have taken the seeds
with the mutton mixture; put on top another round of buttered bread, and
press the two together. You may, if you like, put on top of the tomato a
lettuce leaf, and in the center of that half a teaspoonful of mayonnaise
dressing. Nice for luncheon on a warm day.


English Mutton Sandwiches

Chop sufficient cold boiled mutton to make a pint. Add to it two
tablespoonfuls of capers, a half teaspoonful of salt, six tablespoonfuls
of cream or olive oil and a saltspoonful of pepper. Mash carefully and
put between layers of buttered bread; trim the crusts and cut into
triangles.


Spring Lamb Sandwiches

Grind sufficient lamb to make a half pint, putting through the meat
grinder with the lamb the leaves from six stalks of mint. Add a half
teaspoonful of salt, two tablespoonfuls of melted butter or cream, and a
saltspoonful of pepper. Rub this to a paste and spread between toasted
English muffins. Leaves of mint may be put over the top of the lamb
before putting the muffins together.


Turkish Sandwiches

Chop sufficient cold roasted mutton to make a pint; add two solid
tomatoes from a can of tomatoes, or two fresh tomatoes, peeled, the
seeds pressed out and the flesh chopped fine. Add a half cupful of
piñons or pine nuts, and sufficient olive oil to bind the whole
together. Spread this between thin, warm milk or beaten biscuits and
serve for afternoon tea or supper.


Picnic Sandwiches

Take the ordinary French rolls; make a round opening in the top of
each, and then, with your finger, scoop out all the crumb, leaving the
roll in shape with a very small opening on top. Save the little piece of
crust from the top of the opening. Mix together four olives, one
gherkin, a tablespoonful of capers and one large green, sweet pepper,
chopped very fine. Chop fine two ounces of tongue, and mix it with the
white meat of one chicken, chopped fine. Mix together, and moisten with
a well-made mayonnaise dressing. Fill this into the roll, put on the
top, and arrange neatly on a napkin in a wicker basket; serve at once.
The rolls may be prepared and the mixture made some time before serving,
but the two should be put together at the last moment.


Potato Sandwiches

Mash four good-sized boiled potatoes; add a level teaspoonful of salt,
four tablespoonfuls of thick cream, and the yolks of four hard-boiled
eggs rubbed to a smooth paste, a saltspoonful of pepper, two
tablespoonfuls of olive oil; mix thoroughly until you have a perfectly
smooth paste. Put this between slices of brown bread and butter, trim
off the crusts, and cut into triangles. The top may be garnished with
cress or lettuce.


Salad Sandwiches

Chop fine half a pound of cold, cooked chicken; mix with it six
tablespoonfuls of mayonnaise dressing; add half a teaspoonful of salt
and a saltspoonful of pepper; put this between slices of bread and
butter, and cut into fancy shapes.

These sandwiches may also be trimmed with lettuce or cress, and almost
any meat may be substituted for the chicken. If beef is used, a
tablespoonful of tomato catsup may be added; with mutton a tablespoonful
of capers. Beef is much better garnished with cress, mutton with mint,
chicken with lettuce or celery.

Lobsters and crabs may be mixed with mayonnaise and used as a salad
sandwich; garnish of course with lettuce.


Fish Salad Sandwiches

Flake one can of salmon, or an equal quantity of cold boiled fish. Add
to it a half teaspoonful of salt, a dash of cayenne and one ordinary
cucumber, grated and drained. Just before serving time butter the bread,
cut it into thin slices, put over the top a layer of the flaked fish,
then a thin layer of mayonnaise or sandwich dressing and another
covering of bread. Press together, trim the crusts and cut directly
across the slice, making two long sandwiches about an inch and a half to
two inches wide.


Sardine Salad Sandwiches

These, like salmon sandwiches, are made from materials usually in every
household, and can be made at a moment's notice. Stir four
tablespoonfuls of oil into an egg, add a few drops of vinegar or lemon
juice. Remove the sardines from the oil, take off the tails and heads
and remove the bones. Mash them in a bowl, add a tablespoonful of
vinegar, or the same amount of lemon juice. If you have lettuce or
cress, either shred it, or put one leaf between the fish and the
buttered bread.


Sardine Sandwiches

Cut slices of bread about one-half an inch thick, butter and toast; trim
off the crust. Remove skin and bones from the sardines, lay them
carefully over toast; have ready, chopped very fine, some olives and
capers, mixed together; sprinkle these over the sardines, then a
teaspoonful of lemon juice to each sandwich. Cut into any shape you may
desire and they are ready to serve.


Swiss Sandwiches

Put half a pound of ordinary schmierkase into a bowl, rub it perfectly
smooth; add, a teaspoonful at a time, four tablespoonfuls of thick
cream, two tablespoonfuls of melted butter, half a teaspoonful of salt,
and a saltspoonful of pepper. Butter the slices of bread on the loaf;
cut each off about a half inch in thickness, trim off the crusts and
spread with the cheese mixture; put on top a layer of pumpernickel or
rye bread; on top of that another thin layer of cheese, and on top of
that another layer of white bread and butter; press these lightly
together. If the crusts have been trimmed off, cut the slices into three
or four finger shaped sandwiches. They should be the length of the slice
and about one inch wide. These are exceedingly nice garnished with
cress.

In arranging them for serving, put a layer of sandwiches and a layer of
cress all through the basket or dish.


Tongue Sandwiches

Chop cold boiled tongue very fine. To each cupful stir in two
tablespoonfuls of melted butter, dash of red pepper and about one-half
teaspoonful of onion juice. Have bread sufficiently stale to cut nicely.
Remove end crust, butter and cut a very thin slice; remove the crusts.
Spread it with the tongue paste, roll each sandwich carefully, tie with
narrow ribbon and put away until wanted. These can be made several hours
before serving.


Sandwich Dressing

Put four tablespoonfuls of vinegar and three of water into a saucepan
over the fire; add a half teaspoonful of salt and a half saltspoonful of
pepper. Beat the yolks of four eggs until creamy, add slowly to them the
hot mixture. Stir over hot water until it is the consistency of
mayonnaise dressing. Take from the fire and add carefully two level
tablespoonfuls of butter.


Farmer's Sandwiches

Butter each slice on the loaf, slice it off very thin. Remove the
crusts, lay a crisp lettuce leaf on one half the buttered slices, spread
with sandwich dressing and cover with a slice of buttered bread. Press
the two together and cut into triangles. Cress, Romaine, or bleached
chicory may be used in place of lettuce. These are more appetizing than
ordinary bread and butter sandwiches, and are made from materials found
in every household.


Farmer's Egg Sandwiches

Put six eggs into warm water, bring to a boil and keep at boiling point,
without boiling hard, for a half hour. Throw them into cold water,
remove the shells and cut them into slices lengthwise. A very fine wire
is best for cutting eggs. Butter the slices on the loaf, then cut them
off, cover with slices of hard-boiled eggs, dust lightly with salt and
pepper. Spread the eggs carefully with sandwich dressing, put on another
slice of buttered bread, press the two together and cut into triangles.
If you have lettuce or cress put a leaf over the dressing.


Deviled Beef Sandwiches

Chop remains of cold cooked beef very fine. To each pint add one
tablespoonful of tomato catsup, a dash of cayenne, two tablespoonfuls of
melted butter, a teaspoonful of Worcestershire sauce, a half teaspoonful
of paprika and a tablespoonful of onion juice. Rub to a paste and put
between thin slices of buttered bread, trim off the crusts and cut into
triangles.


Corned Beef Sandwiches

Chop sufficient cold cooked corned beef to make a pint. Add to it a
teaspoonful of horseradish, four tablespoonfuls of melted butter or
olive oil and four or five tablespoonfuls of finely-shredded water
cress. Put this between slices of buttered whole wheat or brown bread;
trim the crusts and cut into triangles.


Plain Corned Beef Sandwiches

Butter an equal quantity of white and whole wheat bread. Cut the cooked
corned beef into very thin slices. Put a slice on a slice of buttered
bread, put on top a teaspoonful of creamed horseradish sauce, spread it
out, cover with cress leaves, or crisp lettuce leaf, put on a slice of
whole wheat bread, press the two together, trim the crusts and cut into
fingers about one inch wide.

To make the creamed horseradish sauce, stir thick, dry whipped cream
into dry horseradish. If the horseradish is in vinegar, press out the
vinegar and then fold in the whipped cream.


Sandwiches à la Stanley

Cut cold beef loaf or roll into very thin slices. Bake three or four
bananas, and make a creamed horseradish sauce according to preceding
recipe. Butter white or whole wheat bread, put on first a slice of meat,
then just a thin layer of the mashed baked banana, then a teaspoonful of
horseradish sauce, and another slice of bread. Press together, trim the
crusts, cut into triangles and serve. These sandwiches should be served
soon after they are made.


English Salt-Beef Sandwiches

Whip a half cupful of cream until it is very stiff. Put four
tablespoonfuls of freshly grated horseradish or horseradish pressed free
from vinegar into a bowl, add the yolk of an egg and a saltspoonful of
salt; mix and fold in the whipped cream. Have ready very thin slices of
cold boiled salt beef. Butter thin slices of bread, put on a layer of
salt beef, then a thin layer of the horseradish sauce and another layer
of buttered bread. Press together, trim the crusts and cut into
triangles.


Sandwiches à la Bernhardt

Chop sufficient very rare cold roasted beef to make a half pint; mix
with it a dash of cayenne, a half teaspoonful of salt, a tablespoonful
of tomato catsup, a tablespoonful of mango chutney, two shallots, a half
clove of garlic and a tablespoonful of olive oil. Spread this on a thin
slice of buttered brown bread, cover it with leaves of cress, and then
put on another thin slice of buttered white bread. Press the two
together, cut into crescents or triangles.


East Indian Lentil Sandwiches

Take any left-over boiled or stewed lentils and press them through a
sieve. To each half cupful of this mixture add a half cupful of chopped
pecans, a level teaspoonful of curry and a saltspoonful of salt. Spread
thin slices of brown bread with butter, then put over a thick layer of
this mixture and cover with chopped parsley. Cover with another layer of
brown bread, press together, trim the crusts and cut into fingers.


Nut-Butter Sandwiches

Mix one glass of nut butter with two tablespoonfuls of olive oil and one
tablespoonful of chopped pimientos. Spread this on a slice of unbuttered
brown bread, cover with finely-chopped cress or shredded lettuce, place
on top a slice of buttered bread, press the two together, trim the
crusts and cut into fingers an inch wide.


Filipino Sandwiches

Add one grated pineapple to a tumbler of peanut butter, mix thoroughly,
add a tablespoonful of lemon juice, a dash of cayenne, a half
teaspoonful of paprika. Put this between thin slices of brown bread,
buttered; press together and cut into halves.



SWEET SANDWICHES


Under this heading we place all those dainty sandwiches that are made
from thin slices of bread and butter and a jam or fruit filling. They
are usually cut into circles; it is more economical to do this before
the bread is buttered, unless you can cut rounds from one side, and a
crescent above it. Almost any sweet may be used. Serve with chocolate or
coffee according to the fruit, either for an afternoon tea or an
"evening."


Cherry Sandwiches

Chop a quarter of a pound of candied cherries very fine, adding
occasionally as you chop them a few drops of orange juice, if you use
wine, a few drops of sherry. Mix thoroughly and spread over water thins,
making it a little deeper in the center than at the edges. These
sandwiches are better made from crackers than from bread. Arrange neatly
on a pretty glass dish, and they are ready to serve.


Fig Sandwiches

Split a dozen figs and scrape out the soft portion, rejecting the skins;
work this to a paste. Cut the slices of bread from the loaf, buttering
before you cut them; make them quite thin. Remove the crusts, and spread
this thick paste over the bread and roll carefully; press for a moment
until there is no danger of the roll opening; roll each in a piece of
tissue paper; twist the ends as you would an old-fashioned "secret," or
they may be tied with baby ribbon. These are exceedingly wholesome and
palatable.


Fruit and Nut Sandwiches

These are perhaps the most attractive of all the sweet sandwiches.

Put through the meat chopper a quarter of a pound of almonds with half
a pound of washed figs, the same quantity of dates, the same of raisins,
and a pound of pecan nuts; put them through alternately so that they
will be mixed in chopping. Pack the mixture into round baking powder
tins, pressing it down firmly, and stand it aside over night. When
wanted, dip the tin in hot water, loosen it with a knife and shake out
the mixture. With a sharp knife cut into very thin slices and put them
between two rounds of buttered bread. Serve with chocolate.

The combination may be varied; candied cherries, citron or any of the
candied fruits may be substituted for the dates and figs. Brazilian and
pine nuts may be substituted for a portion of the pecans.


Orange Marmalade Sandwiches

These sandwiches may be made precisely the same as fig sandwiches,
substituting the orange marmalade for the figs.


Sponge Cake Sandwiches

Bake a sponge cake in a square loaf; cut it into slices a quarter of an
inch thick; cut the slices into rounds with a small biscuit cutter. With
another small cutter take out the center leaving the ring; put this ring
on top of a solid round making sort of a patty as it were; fill the
spaces with a mixture of chopped candied fruit that has been soaked in
orange juice over night; cover the top with the meringue made from white
of egg and sugar; put them in the oven to brown, dish neatly and they
are ready to use. These cannot stand over an hour as the fruit will
soften the cake.


Fresh Fruit Sandwiches

These sandwiches are exceedingly nice to serve for afternoon teas. They
must be used soon after they are made. They will, however, if wrapped in
a damp napkin, keep for an hour, but as fruit is soft the bread is
liable to become moist, which spoils the sandwich.

Butter the bread and put between layers of sliced strawberries, dusted
with powdered sugar; or raspberries, or large blackberries cut into
halves; or peaches, finely chopped; or apple seasoned with a little
salt, pepper, olive oil and lemon juice; or sliced bananas with a dash
of lemon juice, are all nice.


Raisin Sandwiches

Put one-half pound of seeded raisins through the meat grinder, add a
quarter of a pound of almonds that have been blanched, dried and ground.
Add a half tumbler of quince jelly, mix thoroughly and put between thin
slices of buttered white bread. These sandwiches are very nice in place
of cake for afternoon teas or evening companies.


Afternoon Teas

Stone a quarter of a pound of dates, put them through a meat grinder,
add to them a half tumbler of nut butter, mix until smooth, add four
tablespoonfuls of sweet cream and a tablespoonful of orange juice. Put
this mixture between thin slices of white buttered bread, press
together, trim the crusts and cut into fingers or four small triangles.


Nut and Apple Sandwiches

Put a half cupful of _thick_ stewed apples into a bowl, add the grated
yellow rind of quarter of an orange and one cupful of finely chopped
mixed nuts. Spread this on saltines, Uneedas, or any crisp cracker. Put
on top another cracker and serve at once. These are very nice for
children's parties. Of course one may use buttered bread, either white
or brown.


Grape Fruit Sandwiches

Spread any crisp cracker with a thin layer of grape fruit marmalade, put
on top another cracker and serve at once.


Ginger Sandwiches

Put four or five pieces of ginger through your meat chopper. Stir this
paste into a half cupful of orange marmalade. Put between slices of
buttered bread, press them together, trim the crusts and cut into
fingers. These are nice for afternoon teas. Ginger and carrot marmalade
are also very nice.



CANAPÉS


These are slices of bread cut into fancy shapes, toasted or quickly
fried in hot oil, or they may be spread with butter and browned in a
quick oven. One slice only is used for each canapé. The mixture is
spread on top, the top garnished, and the canapé used at once.


Anchovy Canapés

Cover a round or square of toast with anchovies that have been mashed
and seasoned with a little tomato catsup. Put a little chopped celery
around the edge as a garnish and send at once to the table.


Caviar Canapés

Season the caviar with onion and a very little lemon juice; spread over
a round or square canapé, put chopped onion around the edge, garnish the
top with a hard-boiled egg; place on paper mats and send at once to the
table. These are used as first course at lunch or dinner.


Swedish Canapés

Cut thick slices of whole wheat or Graham bread, trim the crusts and
hollow out the centers, being careful not to make a hole all the way
through. Pound or mash the hard boiled yolks of three eggs with a
tablespoonful of anchovy paste or two anchovies, two tablespoonfuls of
butter and a dash of lemon juice. Cut a dill pickle lengthwise into
slices an eighth of an inch thick, then cut these slices into long
strips a half inch wide. Cut large pickled beets into strips of the same
width. Cut a dozen pimolas into halves. Butter the bread, fill with the
paste, put over the strips of dill pickle, leaving one inch between each
strip. Cross these with strips of pickled beets, put half of a pimola
into each square. Dish on paper mats. Serve as an appetizer before soup.


Chopped Tongue Canapés

Chop cold, cooked tongue very fine; season it with two tablespoonfuls
of olive oil and a dusting of pepper; spread it over the top of a round
of toasted bread; garnish the edge with the small leaves of cress, put a
little grated hard-boiled egg in the center and send at once to the
table.


Sardine Canapés

Remove the skin and pound the sardines to a paste; put a thick layer of
this paste over the top of a round of toasted bread. Cut one gherkin
into very thin slices, arrange them overlapping around the edge; put a
little finely chopped hard-boiled egg in the center, and they are ready
to serve.


Fish Canapés

Pound a quarter of a pound of cooked fish to a paste; season it with a
few drops of onion juice, a saltspoonful of salt, and a dash of black
pepper. Stir into it two tablespoonfuls of sauce tartare; spread this on
six or eight rounds of buttered bread browned in the oven; garnish the
tops with grated cucumber and send to the table.


Deviled Oyster Canapés

Cut slices of bread into squares, toast and remove the crusts. Remove
the hard part from a pint of pickled oysters, place oysters over bread,
close together and in rotation, dust thickly with red pepper; put over
as a thin covering a highly seasoned sauce mayonnaise, and serve. Do not
put over a second piece of bread.


Pâté de Foie Gras Canapés

For twenty-four sandwiches take one tureen of foie gras. Remove the
fat, and mash the foie gras to a perfectly smooth paste, adding
gradually four tablespoonfuls of soft, not melted, butter; add a dash of
cayenne and a half teaspoonful of salt and about ten drops of onion
juice, and press the whole through a sieve. Cut slices of bread into
fancy shapes and toast; crescents are very pretty. Cover each slice
thickly with this paste; garnish with hard-boiled white of egg, cut into
diamonds or tiny crescents, and olives cut into rings. Arrange neatly,
and they are ready to serve.


Hot Canapés

A canapé is the half of a sandwich, as it were. Minced meats of various
kinds are served on one slice of bread. In many books they are called
"uncovered sandwiches." The cold canapés are placed always among the
appetizers and served before the soup. They are made of such materials
as caviar, sardines, anchovies, pickled oysters, pickled lobster,
deviled shrimps, or a mixture of one or two of these materials.

A hot canapé, however, is served in the place of fish or as an entrée.
If they are dressed with either fish or shell-fish they will take the
place of that course. When made from chicken, sweetbreads or game,
should be served as an entrée, following the fish.


Fish Canapés

Pick apart sufficient cold cooked fish to make a half pint. Rub
together two level tablespoonfuls of butter and two of flour, add a half
pint of milk, stir until boiling, add a half teaspoonful of salt, a
teaspoonful of soy, a dash of red pepper and a half saltspoonful of
black pepper. When this is hot add the fish and four or five nice sliced
mushrooms; stand over hot water, without stirring, until the fish is
thoroughly heated. While this is heating, trim the crusts from six
slices of bread; toast the one side carefully. Have ready in your pastry
bag with a star tube a pint of light mashed potatoes; press in a
rope-like form, or in small rosettes, around the edge of the bread on
the untoasted side. Brush the bread with a little melted butter, put
them in the oven until the potatoes and bread are a golden brown. Dish
these on square paper mats on individual plates, fill the centers with
the creamed fish and send at once to the table.

Canned salmon may be used in the place of fresh boiled fish.


Lobster Canapés

  1 three-pound lobster
    The yolks of two eggs
  2 level tablespoonfuls of butter
  2 level tablespoonfuls of flour
  ½ pint of milk
  1 tablespoonful of chopped parsley
  1 level teaspoonful of salt
  1 saltspoonful of white pepper
  1 pint of mashed potatoes
  6 slices of bread

Toast the bread and arrange the potatoes according to the preceding
recipe. Rub the butter and flour together, add the milk; when boiling
add the seasoning and the lobster. When very hot stir in carefully the
well-beaten yolks of the eggs. Stir this until it is smoking hot, but be
careful not to boil, or it will curdle. Fill this on top of the toast
that has been garnished with potatoes, dust with chopped parsley and
send to the table.

Shrimps may be substituted for lobster.


Sweetbread Canapés

  1 pair calf's sweetbreads
  ½ can of mushrooms
  2 level tablespoonfuls of butter
  2 level tablespoonfuls of flour
  ½ pint of milk
  ½ teaspoonful of salt
  1 saltspoonful of pepper

Boil the sweetbreads carefully for three-quarters of an hour; throw
them into cold water; pick them apart, rejecting the membrane. Chop the
mushrooms very fine, add them to the sweetbreads. Rub the butter and
flour together, add the milk; when boiling add the salt, pepper,
sweetbreads and mushrooms; cover and stand over hot water ten to fifteen
minutes. Serve them on slices of bread, garnished with mashed potatoes
pressed through a star tube.


Canapés à la Trinidad

    Half the white meat from one boiled chicken
  1 pair of sweetbreads
  6 large fresh mushrooms
  2 level tablespoonfuls of butter
  2 level tablespoonfuls of flour
  ½ pint of milk
  2 yolks of hard-boiled eggs
  1 level teaspoonful of salt
  1 saltspoonful of pepper

Cut twelve slices of bread; trim the crusts so the slices will be of
even size. Cut out the centers from one-half the slices, leaving a wall
of one inch. Toast the solid slices. Brush the untoasted edge of the
bread with a little white of egg, lay on the rims and put them in the
oven to toast on the upper side. Pick the sweetbreads apart, after they
are carefully cooked, rejecting the membrane. Slice the mushrooms. Cut
the chicken into dice. Put the butter into a saucepan, add the
mushrooms, toss for a minute until the mushrooms are slightly softened,
then add the flour, mix, and add the milk, salt and pepper. Cover this
on the back part of the stove for ten or fifteen minutes until the
mushrooms are cooked; then add the meat. Stand this over hot water ten
or fifteen minutes. The toast should now be done and crisp. Arrange each
canapé on a square of lace paper on an individual heated dish, put the
mixture in the center, garnish with the yolk of the eggs pressed through
a sieve. Garnish the very top with a little chopped truffle or a little
chopped parsley. These are the handsomest of all hot canapés, and while
they are usually served following the soup at dinner, they may be used
for the main course at a ladies' luncheon, or at a supper.


Game Canapés

Cut any pieces of left-over game into dice. Put two tablespoonfuls of
butter and two of flour in a saucepan, add a half pint of stock. When
boiling add a half can of very fine mushrooms, a tablespoonful of
chopped ham, a tablespoonful of chopped parsley, a level teaspoonful of
salt and a saltspoonful of pepper. Bring this to a boil, add the game;
stand over hot water for fifteen or twenty minutes until the game has
absorbed part of the sauce, then add two tablespoonfuls of sherry or
Madeira, and fill into the square canapés made the same as in preceding
recipe.


Lamb Canapés

  2 cans, or one quart of cooked peas
  1 blade of mace
  2 level tablespoonfuls of butter
  2 level tablespoonfuls of flour
  ½ pint of stock
  1 teaspoonful of kitchen bouquet
  ½ teaspoonful of salt
  1 tablespoonful of chopped onion
  2 tablespoonfuls of claret
  1 saltspoonful of pepper

Put the butter and onion in a saucepan, shake it over the fire, then
add the cold boiled lamb, cut into blocks; you should have one pint.
When this is boiling add all the seasoning and stand the mixture over
hot water on the back of the stove while you make the canapés. Press the
peas through a sieve; the pulp must be quite dry; add to it a palatable
seasoning of salt and pepper and one or two tablespoonfuls of melted
butter. Put these in a pastry bag. Toast the bread on one side, put the
peas around in rope-like form, or roses, on the untoasted side, making a
border sufficiently high to hold the lamb. Stand in the oven until the
bread is carefully toasted. Arrange them on lace papers on heated
plates, fill the center with the lamb mixture and send to the table.


Club-House Sandwiches

Club-house sandwiches may be made in a number of different ways, but are
served warm as a rule on bread carefully toasted at the last moment. Put
on top of a square of toasted bread a thin layer of broiled ham or
bacon; on top of this a thin slice of Holland pickle, on top of that a
thin slice of cold roasted chicken or turkey, then a leaf of lettuce in
the center of which you put a teaspoonful of mayonnaise dressing; cover
this with another slice of buttered toast. Press the two together, and
cut from one corner to another making two large triangles, and send at
once to the table.

People not using ham may make a palatable sandwich by putting down
first a layer of cold boiled tongue, then a layer of Holland cucumber, a
layer of turkey or chicken, another layer of cucumber and the slice of
toast. Garnish with little pieces of water cress before putting on the
last slice.



SCENTED SANDWICHES


There is a group of rather æsthetic sandwiches made from thin slices of
bread and butter flavored or scented with flowers. Among those in common
use are clover, rose and the nasturtium.

The crust is trimmed off from the outside of the loaf; the loaf placed
down in a clean stone jar in a nest of clover blossoms; the butter is
put in a piece of cheese cloth and also covered with clover, and the jar
covered over night. The next morning the bread and butter will have the
flavor of clover.


Rose Sandwiches

In making rose sandwiches cover the bread and butter with rose leaves
over night. Put a few rose petals between the slices when making the
sandwiches.


Nasturtium Sandwiches

Cover the bread and butter with nasturtium flowers over night. In making
the sandwiches place at each corner of the slice a flower, so that in
cutting from corner to corner you have a little triangular sandwich
holding a nasturtium flower uncut.


Violet Sandwiches

These are made the same, covering the slice of bread and butter with
the petals of the violet.



ADDITIONAL RECIPES



INDEX


  Afternoon Teas, 61

  Anchovy Canapés, 63
          and Egg Sandwiches, 14
          Sandwiches, 13


  Beef, Corned, Sandwiches, 53
        Deviled, Sandwiches, 52
        English Salt, Sandwiches, 54
        Plain Corned, Sandwiches, 53

  Bread, 9
         German Potato, 11
         Nineteenth Century, 12
         Nut, 13
         White, 12


  Cake, Sponge, Sandwiches, 59

  Camembert Sandwiches, 28

  Canapés, 63
           à la Trinidad, 71
           Anchovy, 63
           Caviar, 63
           Chopped Tongue, 64
           Deviled Oyster, 66
           Fish, 65, 67
           Game, 72
           Hot, 67
           Lamb, 73
           Lobster, 69
           Pâté de Foie Gras, 66
           Sardine, 65
           Swedish, 64
           Sweetbread, 70

  Caviar Canapés, 63
         Sandwiches, No. 1, 15
                     No. 2, 15

  Celery Sandwiches, 16
         Salad Sandwiches, 16

  Cheese, Cottage, Sandwiches, 29
          Deviled, Sandwiches, 28
          Sandwiches, No. 1, 23
                      No. 2, 23
                      No. 3, 24
                      Workman's, 24

  Cherry Sandwiches, 57

  Chicken and Almond Sandwiches, 19
              Lettuce Sandwiches, à la Kendall, 19
          Cream of, Sandwiches, 34
          Curried, Sandwiches, 33
          French, Sandwiches, 39
          Rolled, Sandwiches, 17

  Chopped Tongue Canapés, 64

  Club-House Sandwiches, 74

  Club, Mutton, Sandwiches, 44

  Cold Beef Sandwiches, 14

  Corned Beef Sandwiches, 53

  Cottage Cheese Sandwiches, 29

  Crab Sandwiches, 33

  Cream of Chicken Sandwiches, 34

  Creole Sandwiches, 26

  Cucumber Sandwiches, 30

  Curried Chicken Sandwiches, 33
          Egg Sandwiches, 32
          Oyster Sandwiches, 31
          Sardine Sandwiches, 32

  Curry Sandwiches, 27


  Deviled Beef Sandwiches, 52
          Cheese Sandwiches, 28
          Oyster Canapés, 66
          Sandwiches, 35

  Dressing, Sandwich, 51


  East Indian Lentil Sandwiches, 55

  Egg, Curried, Sandwiches, 32
       Farmer's, Sandwiches, 52
       Sandwiches, No. 1, 35
                   No. 2, 36

  English Mutton Sandwiches, 45
          Salt-Beef Sandwiches, 54


  Farmer's Egg Sandwiches, 52
           Sandwiches, 51

  Fig Sandwiches, 58

  Filipino Sandwiches, 56

  Fish Canapés, 65, 67
       Salad Sandwiches, 48
       Sandwiches, 36

  Flaked Fish Sandwiches, 36

  French Chicken Sandwiches, 39

  Fresh Fruit Sandwiches, 60

  Fruit and Nut Sandwiches, 58
        Fresh, Sandwiches, 60
        Grape, Sandwiches, 62


  Game Canapés, 72
       Sandwiches, 39

  German Sandwiches, 25, 40
         Potato Bread, 11

  Ginger Sandwiches, 62

  Grape Fruit Sandwiches, 62


  Ham Sandwiches, 40

  Honolulu Sandwiches, 25

  Hot Canapés, 67


  Indian Sandwiches, 41


  Lamb Canapés, 73
       Spring, Sandwiches, 45

  Lentil, East Indian, Sandwiches, 55

  Lettuce Sandwiches, 41

  Lobster Canapés, 69
          Salad Sandwiches, 43
          Sandwiches, 42


  Marmalade, Orange, Sandwiches, 59

  Mutton, English, Sandwiches, 45
          Club Sandwiches, 44
          Sandwiches, 43

  My Favorite, 26


  Nasturtium Sandwiches, 76

  Nineteenth Century Bread, 12

  Nut and Apple Sandwiches, 61
      Bread, 13
      Butter Sandwiches, 56


  Orange Marmalade Sandwiches, 59

  Oyster, Curried, Sandwiches, 31
          Deviled, Canapés, 66


  Pâté de Foie Gras Canapés, 66

  Picnic Sandwiches, 46

  Plain Corned Beef Sandwiches, 53

  Potato Sandwiches, 47

  Princess Sandwiches, 20


  Raisin Sandwiches, 60

  Rolled Bread and Butter Sandwiches, 17
         Chicken Sandwiches, 17

  Roquefort Sandwiches, 28

  Rose Sandwiches, 75


  Salad, Celery, Sandwiches, 16
         Fish, Sandwiches, 48
         Lobster, Sandwiches, 43
         Sandwiches, 47
         Sardine, Sandwiches, 48

  Salmon Sandwiches, 37

  Salt, Cucumber Sandwiches, 29

  Sandwich Dressing, 51

  Sandwiches, 7
              à la Bernhardt, 55
                   Rorer, 18
                   Stanley, 54
              Anchovy, 13
                       and Egg, 14
              Camembert, 28
              Caviar, No. 1, 15
                      No. 2, 15
              Celery, 16
                      Salad, 16
              Cheese, No. 1, 23
                      No. 2, 23
                      No. 3, 24
              Chicken and Almond, 19
                          Lettuce, à la Kendall, 19
              Club-House, 74
              Cold Beef, 14
              Corned Beef, 53
              Cottage Cheese, 29
              Crab, 33
              Cream of Chicken, 34
              Creole, 26
              Cucumber, 30
              Curried Chicken, 33
                      Egg, 32
                      Oyster, 31
                      Sardine, 32
              Curry, 27
              Deviled, 35
                       Beef, 52
                       Cheese, 28
              East Indian Lentil, 55
              Egg, No. 1, 35
                   No. 2, 36
              English Mutton, 45
                      Salt-Beef, 54
              Farmer's, 51
                        Egg, 52
              Filipino, 56
              Fish, 36
                    Salad, 48
              Flaked Fish, 36
              French Chicken, 39
              Game, 39
              German, 25, 40
              Ham, 40
              Honolulu, 25
              Indian, 41
              Lettuce, 41
              Lobster, 42
                       Salad, 43
              Mutton, 43
                      Club, 44
              My Favorite, 26
              Nut-Butter, 56
              Picnic, 46
              Plain Corned Beef, 53
              Potato, 47
              Princess, 20
              Rolled Bread and Butter, 17
                     Chicken, 17
              Roquefort, 28
              Salad, 47
              Salmon, 37
              Salt-Cucumber, 29
              Sardine, 49
                       Salad, 48
              Scented, 75
              Spanish, 37
              Spring Lamb, 45
              Swedish, 38
              Sweet, 57
              Swiss, 49
              Tea Biscuit, 21
              To Keep, 9
              Tongue, 50
              Turkish, 45
              Windsor, 20
              Workman's Cheese, 24

  Sardine Canapés, 65
          Curried, Sandwiches, 32
          Salad Sandwiches, 48
          Sandwiches, 49

  Scented Sandwiches, 75
          Nasturtium, 76
          Rose, 75
          Violet, 76

  Spanish Sandwiches, 37

  Sponge Cake Sandwiches, 59

  Spring Lamb Sandwiches, 45

  Swedish Canapés, 64
          Sandwiches, 38

  Sweetbread Canapés, 70

  Sweet Sandwiches, 57
        Afternoon Teas, 61
        Cherry, 57
        Fig, 58
        Fresh Fruit, 60
        Fruit and Nut, 58
        Ginger, 62
        Grape Fruit, 62
        Nut and Apple, 61
        Orange Marmalade, 59
        Raisin, 60
        Sponge Cake, 59

  Swiss Sandwiches, 49


  Tea Biscuit Sandwiches, 21

  To Keep Sandwiches, 9

  Tongue, Chopped, Canapés, 64
          Sandwiches, 50

  Turkish Sandwiches, 45


  Violet Sandwiches, 76


  White Bread, 12

  Windsor Sandwiches, 20

  Workman's Cheese Sandwiches, 24


  Yeast, 10



SOME OTHER BOOKS

Published by

Arnold and Company


=Mrs. Rorer's NEW Cook Book=

A big book of 731 pages, abundantly illustrated. Its bigness is no
criterion of its goodness. The fact that it is the best work of the best
years of Mrs. Rorer's life; that it is a complete new book telling of
the things one needs to know about cooking, living, health, and the
easiest and best way of housekeeping--these are what make for goodness,
and place this book far in advance of any other of a like nature.

The New Cook Book covers all departments of cookery. A masterly
exposition of each subject is given, followed by recipes for the proper
preparation, cooking and serving of the various kinds of foods. There
are over 1500 recipes in the book.

The illustrations are an important feature. One set of pictures shows
the proper dressing of the table during a course dinner. Then there is a
complete set showing the method of carving meats, poultry, game, etc.;
and many others illustrating special features of the book.

Large 12mo, 731 pages, profusely and beautifully illustrated; bound in
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=Mrs. Rorer's Philadelphia Cook Book=

This is the standard book of Mrs. Rorer's that has been before the
public for a number of years. It has no connection with Mrs. Rorer's New
Cook Book. Each book is independent of the other, and the possession of
one forms no reason for doing without the other.

The Philadelphia Cook Book is full of good things, and, like all of Mrs.
Rorer's works, is eminently practical. It is a standard of excellence,
in that it is full of the brightest things in cookery; the recipes are
absolutely reliable, and the general instructions to housekeepers of the
most helpful and necessary character.

Nearly all cook books assume some knowledge and experience on the part
of those who use them, but Mrs. Rorer makes her explanations so clear,
and gives such definite directions, as to quantities, that the beginner
has no difficulty in successfully accomplishing all the book calls for.
Then there are frequent hints as to the proper use of left-overs, how to
market, and, in many ways, information is given that is alike useful to
the experienced cook as to the tyro in matters culinary.

The book is full of choice recipes, every one of which has been
successfully tested by Mrs. Rorer and found to come out right. This
alone is of incalculable benefit and ought to commend the book to the
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The use of this book in the home means better health, better living,
economy in the use of food, and a consequent saving in dollars and
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12mo, nearly 600 pages, with portrait of author; bound in cloth, $1.00
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This book has a twofold object:

  1. To show the value of vegetables in their relation to diet and
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  conditions of health, and thus have them perform their proper work.

  2. To give to the prudent housewife a knowledge of combinations of
  foods in the shape of toothsome recipes to take the place of meat, or
  as we call them--Meat Substitutes.

It goes without saying that we all know too little about the value of
vegetables as food. We eat them because they are palatable, not
realizing their immense importance as body builders. Here they are
classified, and thus made to give us a right idea of their use.

Then as to Meat Substitutes. It is not necessary to be a vegetarian to
desire a change from a meat diet. There are health reasons often
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or a desire for change and variety in the daily bill of fare may be
warrant enough. However we look at it here is the wonder book to point
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There is an abundance of the choicest and most palatable recipes, and
they are given in such a manner, that if the directions are followed,
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12mo, cloth, $1.50 net; by mail, $1.65


=Mrs. Rorer's Every Day Menu Book=

In the course of her teaching and editorial work, there have come to
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It contains a menu for every meal in the year, systematically arranged
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=Mrs. Rorer's Canning and Preserving=

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drying and pickling. The recipes are clearly and simply given. In the
new edition now presented, the author has brought the book up to date,
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A salad made from a succulent green vegetable and French dressing,
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During the summer, the dinner salad may be composed of any well-cooked
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chance to show his or her skill.

New Edition: revised and rewritten, with the addition of much new matter

12mo, cloth, 50 cents net; by mail, 55 cents


=Mrs. Rorer's Hot Weather Dishes=

Its name tells the whole story. It is the only book of the kind
published. Hot weather seems to suspend the inventive faculty of even
the best housekeepers, and at a season when the appetite needs every
help and encouragement, this book will be found of the greatest use.

12mo, cloth, 50 cents net; by mail, 55 cents


=Mrs. Rorer's Home Candy Making=

A veritable book of sweets, full of choice recipes, with complete
instructions for making the many delicacies that delight both young and
old. It is the result of careful practice in teaching beginners how to
make attractive and wholesome varieties of home-made candies. The
excellence of the recipes consists in their simplicity and faithfulness
to details.

12mo, cloth, 50 cents net; by mail, 55 cents


=Mrs. Rorer's Bread and Bread-Making=

The object of this book is two-fold. First, to give in a concise and
easily-managed form a set of recipes used in every household every day.
Secondly, to point out the reasons why failures so often occur, even
with perfect recipes, and how to guard against them.

12mo, cloth, 50 cents net; by mail, 55 cents


=Mrs. Rorer's Quick Soups= =New Ways for Oysters=

These two books were written in response to requests for information on
the subjects. Designed to meet the special wants of a numerous class of
housekeepers who are given to entertaining, and are so often at loss to
know what and how to prepare for their guests. The housekeeper will find
them very handy.

24mo, cloth, 25 cents net; by mail, 30 cents


=Household Accounts=

A simple method of recording the daily expenses of the family. The book
contains ruled pages, systematically and simply divided into spaces in
which are kept the purchases for each day of milk, butter, eggs, meat,
groceries, vegetables, etc. The daily expenses total up for the months,
and the months for the year. There are other forms for recording
expenses of help, light, heat and general household expenditures in
table and bed linens, china and kitchen utensils, etc.

Manilla boards, 25 cents net; by mail 30 cents


=Cakes, Cake Decorations and Desserts=

By CHARLES H. KING. The author tells his methods in his own practical
way, and gives abundant recipes. The book is illustrated by engravings
of numerous decorated pieces, and has a silhouette chart.

12mo, cloth, $1.00 net; by mail, $1.15



[ Transcriber's Note:

  The following is a list of corrections made to the original. The first
  line is the original line, the second the corrected one.

      Pâté de Foi Gras Canapés               66
      Pâté de Foie Gras Canapés               66

             Sweetbread, 69
             Sweetbread, 70

    Game Canapes, 72
    Game Canapés, 72

    Lamb Canapes, 73
    Lamb Canapés, 73

    Ninenteenth Century Bread, 12
    Nineteenth Century Bread, 12

    Pate de Foie Gras Canapes, 66
    Pâté de Foie Gras Canapés, 66

  day's lunch or supper.
  day's lunch or supper."

  =Mrs. Rorer's How to Use a Chafing Dish=
  =Mrs. Rorer's Sandwiches=

  =Mrs. Rorer's Sandwiches=
  =Mrs. Rorer's How to Use a Chafing Dish=

  them very handy
  them very handy.

  of numerous decorated pieces, and has a silhouette chart
  of numerous decorated pieces, and has a silhouette chart.
]





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