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Title: Salona, Fairfax County, Virginia
Author: Anderson, Ellen
Language: English
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Copyright Status: Not copyrighted in the United States. If you live elsewhere check the laws of your country before downloading this ebook. See comments about copyright issues at end of book.

*** Start of this Doctrine Publishing Corporation Digital Book "Salona, Fairfax County, Virginia" ***

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  [Transcriber's Note:

  The "^" character is used to denote superscripted letters,
  e.g. "p^r." means "p" with a superscripted "r."]



                                _SALONA_

                            _FAIRFAX COUNTY
                                VIRGINIA_

                                   by
                             Ellen Anderson

             Fairfax County Office of Comprehensive Planning

                              February 1979


              Other Fairfax County Office of Comprehensive
          Planning historical publications are available from:

                   Fairfax County Publications Center
                      Massey Building, First Floor
                         4100 Chain Bridge Road
                        Fairfax, Virginia 22030


            Library of Congress Catalog Card Number 79-84335



                                CONTENTS


             Illustrations                                  v

             Acknowledgments                              vii

             Introduction                                   1

             I.    Langley and the Lees                     5

             II.   Salona and the Maffitts                 11

             III.  Salona for Sale                         25

             IV.   Salona and the Smoots                   28

             V.    Salona and the DuVals                   41

             VI.   Salona: The House and Outbuildings      45

             VII.  Preservation by Easement                53

             Chapter Notes                                 55

             Appendixes

                  A. Chain of Title, 1719-1974             71

                  B. Maffitt Inventory, 1828               77

                  C. Maffitt Slave Schedule                81

                  D. DuVal Deed of Easement                84

             List of Sources                               95



                                    ILLUSTRATIONS


             Salona location                                         2

             Thomas Lee's 1719 grant, "Langley"                      7

             Advertisement, land later called "Salona"               9

             The Reverend William Maffitt                           13

             William Maffitt, Jr.                                   25

             The Reverend William Maffitt's tombstone               27

             Civil War troops at Salona                             29

             McDowell's 1862 Civil War map                          30

             Wartime memorandum                                     32

             Smoot family portraits                                 34

             Jacob Gilliam Smoot and some family heirlooms          35

             G. M. Hopkins _Atlas_ map, 1879                        36

             The Salona Farm, 1890 and 1900                         37

             Rambler photo of Salona, 1914                          38

             Division of Smoot property, 1947                       40

             DuVal family portrait, 1957                            42

             Salona first and second floor plans                    46

             Salona attic floor plan                                47

             West wall                                              49

             Entrance hall                                          49

             Old stone house                                        50

             Springhouse                                            50

             Rear views of Salona mansion                           51

             Smokehouse                                             51

             Stone barn ruins                                       51

             Outdoor kitchen                                        52

             Old brick privy                                        52

             Permanent and temporary easement plat                  54



                ACKNOWLEDGMENTS


Many people have helped materially with the story of Salona. Peter
Maffitt, descendant of the Rev. William Maffitt, and Douglass and
Henry Mackall, descendants of one of Maffitt's sisters, generously
shared information on the Maffitt family and gave William Maffitt a
three-dimensional shape. John D. K. Smoot, Jane Smoot Wilson and
William Smoot, descendants of Jacob Smoot, recalled many stories of
their family and of Salona. Clive and Susan DuVal, present owners of
Salona, endured hours of interviews, photographing, and measuring of
the house and outbuildings.

Valuable assistance has also been given by Mike Rierson, Fairfax
County Park Authority, and W. Brown Morton, III, National Park
Service, who contributed useful information on the architectural
features and possible age of Salona; and William Elkjer measured and
drew up floor plans of Salona. The Rev. William Sengel of the Old
Presbyterian Meeting House, Jean Elliot, Frank Gapp, John Gott,
Winslow Hatch, Beth Mitchell, and Donie Rieger also contributed
information.

Librarians who have provided information and encouragement are Harva
Sheeler, Dot de Wilde, and Eric Grundset, Virginia Room, Fairfax
County Public Library; Mathilde Williams, Peabody Collection,
Georgetown Public Library; the helpful staff at the Archives
Division, Virginia State Library; and Ruth B. Lee, Historical
Foundation of the Presbyterian and Reformed Church, Montreat, North
Carolina.



                  Introduction


At the edge of the busy commercial area of the community of McLean,
hidden from the heavy traffic on Dolley Madison Boulevard by a
natural screen of trees and shrubs, stands the substantial brick
dwelling known as Salona. Only a portion of the original 466 acres
surrounds the house; the rest of the land has been converted into
church properties, shopping centers, residential subdivisions, and
other appurtenances of development.

Originally, the land was part of a large grant of 2,630 acres taken
out by Thomas Lee in 1719 from the Northern Neck proprietor, and
later named "Langley," a name which persists in the area to the
present day.

The Reverend William Maffitt of Maryland purchased the 466-acre
parcel in 1812, and he may have been the builder of the brick house
at Salona to which President James Madison fled when the British
burned the capital in August, 1814.

After the death of Maffitt, the property went through the hands of
several northerners who were part of the influx of Yankees just prior
to the outbreak of the Civil War. The parcel was divided into several
pieces.

Jacob G. Smoot of Georgetown, D.C., purchased 208 acres, including
the house, in 1853. He and his descendants owned Salona for almost
100 years--through the Civil War when Camp Griffin troops were
temporary residents in tent villages on Salona and surrounding
property and in the extended period of rebuilding during the
agricultural era following. They witnessed and were part of the
subdivision of lands for suburban tract housing.

As a reflection of changes experienced in the Washington metropolitan
area following World War II, Clive DuVal, a veteran, came from
New York to accept employment with the federal government. He and his
wife Susan purchased Salona with  the idea of restoring it and using
it for a family residence.

[Illustration]

The DuVals entered into a period of community participation which
repeatedly involved the house as a center for meetings, tours and
entertainment. Because it was a sound, comfortable, gracious old
house with historical associations and community significance, they
decided to grant a permanent historic and scenic easement to Fairfax
County in 1971, preserving the house, its brick outbuildings and
eight acres of land surrounding them in perpetuity. A temporary
easement for 44 additional acres of the Salona property was granted
at the same time, fitting in with the county's stated purpose to
shape the character, direction and timing of community development
through the preservation of open space land.

Because of its historical associations, the house was placed on the
Virginia State Landmarks Register and on the National Register of
Historic Places in 1973.



 I

 LANGLEY AND THE LEES


The brick house known as Salona stands solidly on a portion of the
original grant known as "Langley," a tract named by Thomas Lee for
ancestral Lee lands in Shropshire, England.

Thomas Lee was born in Westmoreland County, Virginia, in 1690, the
fifth son of Richard Lee, II, a member of the King's Council and
Naval Officer and Receiver of Customs for the Potomac. When Richard
died in 1714, young Thomas succeeded his father as Naval Officer for
the Potomac. Three years earlier, in 1711, he had been appointed
resident agent along with his uncle, Edmund Jenings, for Lady
Catherine Fairfax. She was proprietor of the Northern Neck grant of
over 5,000,000 acres of land originally made by Charles II in exile
to seven loyal followers, in 1649. She had become dissatisfied with
the management of her agents Micajah Perry and Robert Carter. While
his uncle was in England, Thomas Lee kept the books for the
proprietary and visited most of the farflung Fairfax property. After
his uncle returned to Virginia and took over the books, Lee used the
knowledge gained from his work with the Fairfax estate to acquire
grants of his own, among them, in 1719, the Langley tract of 2,862
acres on the Potomac River between Great Falls and Little Falls.
Because of the strategic location of this tract, he hoped to benefit
from the economic development of the western lands. While he never
realized this dream, he did become president of the King's Council
and, in 1749, acting governor of the Colony.[1]

After Thomas Lee's death in 1750, the Langley property went to his
eldest son, Philip Ludwell Lee, who also was a member of the King's
Council. A Royalist by preference he did not share the revolutionary
enthusiasms of his younger brothers, Richard Henry Lee, and Francis
Lightfoot Lee, signers of the Declaration of Independence. Moreover,
Philip Ludwell Lee, as administrator of his father's estate, was
responsible for paying their legacies to the younger children. These
legacies were never paid in full, an omission which further widened
the gap between him and his siblings.[2] In the tradition of his
father who had envisioned development of the upper Potomac, Philip
Ludwell Lee established the Town of Philee on 100 acres at the Little
Falls of the Potomac. Although he actually built warehouses there,
the town was doomed to failure.[3]

Philip Ludwell Lee died in 1775, and the Langley tract was divided
between his two daughters: Matilda, who married Henry (Light Horse
Harry) Lee, and Flora, who married Ludwell Lee of Belmont in Loudoun
County. Matilda inherited the portion on which Salona was built. If
any buildings existed on the tract at that time, it seems probable
that Matilda, as the elder daughter, would have been given the
section on which they were located.[4]

By an ironic twist of fate, in 1782, Matilda Lee, daughter of
die-hard Royalist Philip Ludwell Lee, married Henry Lee, a dashing
young officer in the American forces, whose brilliant military
exploits at Brandywine, Monmouth, and Paulus Hook (now Jersey City)
won him the esteem of General George Washington, the soubriquet of
"Light Horse Harry," and, in 1780, promotion to the rank of
lieutenant-colonel.

"Harry" Lee was the son of Henry Lee of Leesylvania, in Prince
William County, and Lucy Grymes Lee. His father was a member of the
House of Burgesses for many years and when the war with England
began, was in charge of recruiting and equipping troops for
Washington's army. After serving as a delegate to the Continental
Congress of 1785-88 and the Virginia Constitutional Convention of
1788, he was elected to the Virginia Legislature where he served
until 1791. His wife, Matilda, died in 1790, leaving him a son,
Henry. Matilda left the Langley tract to her son, with a life
interest to her husband.[5]

To assuage his grief, Harry Lee plunged deeper into politics and in
1791 was elected Governor of Virginia. Two years later he married
again, this time to Anne Hill Carter of Shirley. One of their sons was
Robert E. Lee, later commander-in-chief of the Armies of the
Confederacy. After a two-year term in Congress, Harry Lee's star began
to wane. His attempt to establish a town, Matildaville, at the Great
Falls of the Potomac, had failed, and his other land speculations had
gone sour. Eventually he spent two years in debtor's prison in
Westmoreland County, where he had once sat as a justice. In 1810, he
moved his family to Alexandria, and in 1812, was given a permanent
commission as a major-general in the United States Army, but his
failing health made it impossible for him to take part in the war
against England. He spent his last days in the West Indies, in a vain
attempt to recover his health. He died in 1818.[6]

[Illustration: _Thomas Lee's 1719 grant, adjoining Turberville,
showing the future 208-acre Smoot property at Salona._]

Harry's brother, Richard Bland Lee, did all he could to keep economic
ruin from devastating the former war hero, but managed only to get
himself deeper in debt. In 1808, during the period of financial
disaster, Harry Lee and his son sold the Langley tract to Richard
Bland Lee for $25,000. William Maffitt was a witness.[7]

No records or correspondence have yet appeared to indicate that any
of the Lees built a dwelling on the Langley tract. Thomas Lee had the
money, but architectural historians do not believe the house was
constructed during his lifetime. Philip Ludwell Lee could have built
on the tract, especially because of his town, Philee, on the Potomac,
but again the house does not appear to be old enough to have been
built during his lifetime.

Light Horse Harry Lee might have built the house when he was involved
with the development of Matildaville; estimated dates for the
construction range from 1790 to 1810. But after 1803 both Harry Lee
and his brother Richard Bland Lee were facing financial difficulties
and probably would not have built a large brick house on the Langley
tract at that time.

During Richard Bland Lee's ownership of Langley, the land was rented
to tenants.[8] A Lee descendant wrote in 1969 that "no Lee ever
resided at 'Langley.' During the Lee tenure, 1719-1839, the place was
always rented out."[9] So far, no listing of these tenants has been
discovered. The only person mentioned as a tenant is J. C. Scott.[10]
Scott has not been satisfactorily identified, although he may have
been John Caile Scott, grandson of Alexander Scott, owner of
Strawberry Vale.[11] He could have leased a portion of Langley and
even built a house on the property. That this was customary in those
days is shown by the terms of a lease agreement between Richard
Bland Lee and Henson Lewis, which reveals that Lewis leased 130 acres
of Lee's Cub Run tract on which he consented to pay taxes, plant and
maintain an apple orchard, and construct a brick or stone framed
dwelling at least 16 feet square and a brick or stone framed barn.
This lease clearly indicates that a tenant on the Langley tract might
have built Salona under the terms of a similar contract.[12]

[Illustration: _Advertisement for Salona_, Alexandria Gazette,
_November 18, 1811._]

A bible entry cited by Melvin Steadman in his book on Falls Church
reports that Thomas Sandford Wren "was born at Salona" on May 19,
1808, to Richard and Susannah (Adams) Wren.[13] According to
Steadman, Thomas Wren is buried in the El Nido Cemetery, but all of
the tombstones, with one exception, have been destroyed.[14] Because
the name "Salona" appears on a legal document for the first time in
1823, the reported entry seems still more curious. It is possible
that Salona may have been built or at least designed by one of the
Wren family. Susannah Adams Wren, Richard's wife, was a descendant of
the Adams family which had a mill adjacent to the Salona tract,
another tie to the area.[15]

Fairfax County tax records provide no clue to a possible date of
construction. In 1790, the Langley tract was carried on the rolls as
the property of the Ludwell Lee heirs and was so listed for more than
20 years. Only two significant changes appeared: one in 1792 when
more than 500 acres were sold, and again in 1811 after the sale of a
466-acre tract to Herbert. When William Maffitt first appeared on the
tax rolls as a landowner in 1813, the 466-acre tract was assessed at
$880 and his smaller tract at $79.[16]

William Herbert, who took over the 466 acres in payment of judgments
against Richard Bland Lee, had no apparent intention of living on the
property or of keeping it. A house must have existed on the property
when he bought it because when he advertised the property for sale in
the _Alexandria Gazette_ in November 1811, the copy mentioned "a
comfortable dwelling house, and out houses, a young thriving orchard
of the choicest fruit, a good garden paled in, and a spring of fine
water that has never been known to fail in the driest season, near
the house." There is no indication that the acreage was under
cultivation at that time.[17]

On March 10, 1812, the Reverend William Maffitt bought the 466-acre
tract from William Herbert. It was probably Maffitt who named the
estate "Salona."


 Chapter I Notes

 Langley and the Lees

 [1] Fairfax Harrison, _Landmarks of Old Prince William_ (Berryville,
Va.: Reprint, Chesapeake Book Company, 1964), pp. 146-149.

 [2] Gardner Cazenove Lee, Jr., _Lee Chronicle_ (New York: New York
University Press, 1957), pp. 5-6, 55-68; Beth Mitchell, _Beginning at
a White Oak: Patents and Northern Neck Grants of Fairfax County_
(Fairfax, Va.: Office of Comprehensive Planning, 1977), pp. 202-203.

 [3] Harrison, _Landmarks_, p. 149.

 [4] Lee, _Chronicle_, pp. 86-92; Edmund Jennings Lee, _Lee of
Virginia, 1642-1892_ (Philadelphia: By the author, 1895), pp.
165-167; April 19, 1782, Report of Appraisement and Division of
Philip Ludwell Lee's Estate, Westmoreland, Va.

 [5] Trevor N. Dupuy and Gay M. Hammerman, _People and Events of the
American Revolution_ (New York: R. R. Bowker Co., 1974), p. 359;
Virginia Dabney, _Virginia, The New Dominion_ (New York: Doubleday,
1971), pp. 170-71.

 [6] Lee, _Chronicle_, pp. 86-92.

 [7] Fairfax County, Virginia, Deed Book, J-2, p. 84.

 [8] Ibid., J-2, p. 245.

 [9] Ludwell Lee Montague letter to Eleanor Lee Templeman, May 4,
1969. No documentation was given for this statement. Copy in working
papers, Virginia Room, Fairfax County Central Library.

 [10] Diane Rafuse, _Maplewood_ (Fairfax, Va.: Office of Planning,
1970), Appendix D.

 [11] Rafuse, _Maplewood_, pp. 56-62.

 [12] Robert S. Gamble, _Sully: The Biography of a House_ (Chantilly,
Va.: The Sully Foundation, Ltd., 1973), p. 21.

 [13] Melvin Steadman, _Falls Church by Fence and Fireside_ (Falls
Church, Va.: Falls Church Public Library, 1964), p. 509.

 [14] Author's visit to El Nido Cemetery, off Old Dominion Drive, near
McLean.

 [15] Janice G. Artemel, A Preliminary Survey of the Literature on
James Wren. Unpublished study. Falls Church, Va.

 [16] Fairfax County real property tax books, 1790-1813. Virginia
State Library, Archives Division.

 [17] _Alexandria Gazette_, November 11, 18, 1811.



 II

 SALONA AND THE MAFFITTS


The first occupant of record of the house at Salona, William Maffitt,
is surrounded by legends. Supposedly, Maffitt built Salona in 1801.
Maffitt was from South Carolina. Maffitt went to Princeton. Maffitt
preached the funeral sermon for George Washington. Maffitt had a
boys' school at Salona. Maffitt lived at Salona with his wife
Harriotte Lee Turberville Maffitt, who deserted her three children by
her first marriage. Dolley Madison spent the night with the Maffitts
at Salona when she fled from the White House during the English
invasion of Washington.

The available documents give a different picture.

William Maffitt was born in Cecil County, Maryland, in 1769, eldest
son of Samuel and Ann Strawbridge Maffitt.[18] His father was a
justice of the peace, elder in the Presbyterian Church, owner of a
flourishing farm and a mill, and was a major under George Washington
during the American Revolution.

The Rev. Mr. John H. Johns made his contribution to the Maffitt
legends:

          The Rev. William Maffit [sic] was a son of
          Samuel Maffit, an elder of this church.
          Having been licensed October 9th, 1794, by
          New Castle Presbytery, he went, April 1st,
          1795, to Alexandria, Va., in Baltimore
          Presbytery. He had delicate health, and was
          pastor there for only a brief period, when
          he went to Salina [sic] six miles from
          Washington, and there became principal of a
          school, which he continued to teach for many
          years. He married twice, each time to a
          widow Lee, of the noted Lee family of
          Virginia. He died in 1828.[19]

Although many young men of Cecil County attended Princeton, the
University does not have Maffitt recorded as a student, and his name
does not appear in the official list of early Princeton
graduates.[20] He probably attended some theological school because
on October 9, 1794, the New Castle Presbytery appointed him to supply
various New Castle Presbytery congregations.[21] At that time, he
seems to have been teaching at the Wilmington Academy.[22]

On April 7, 1795, he was transferred to the Baltimore Presbytery,
with residence in Alexandria.[23] On April 14, 1795, he was hired by
the Alexandria Academy to teach Latin and English to 35 students for
the sum of 200 pounds a year.[24]

In 1798, George Washington wrote regarding the education of Martha
Washington's grandson, George Washington Parke Custis:

          If he (Custis) was to go to Alexandria, his
          Studies must be conducted at the Academy or
          in his own chamber. The first, after coming
          from a large and celebrated College, he
          would consider as degrading, and in the
          other case (being left alone) he would
          attend very little to them while Mr. Moffet
          was discharging the trust reposed in him at
          the Academy.[25]

An Alexandria historian, Mary Powell, wrote that: "The school was
attended by the best classes of Alexandria boys and able instruction
was given in the classics, history, and elocution." She also
observed: "The Rev. McWhirr and the Rev. Mr. Moffat were both
Presbyterian clergymen who taught during the lifetime of General
Washington. Mr. Leary succeeded Mr. Moffat ..."[26]

In 1801 the _Alexandria Gazette_ reported that the trustees of the
Alexandria Academy:

          express their satisfaction at the progress
          of every branch taught in the academy ...
          reading and spelling; the accurate and
          extensive knowledge of English grammar and
          of the Latin classics, reflect the highest
          honor on the capacity and diligence of Mr.
          Maffitt, the teacher.[27]

Maffitt remained at the Academy until 1804 when he notified the board
of trustees that he intended to "relinquish his situation as
principal" on June 8. No hint of his future plans was given.[28]

At least as early as 1799, Maffitt became a member of Masonic Lodge
22[29] and took part in other community activities befitting a
schoolmaster and minister. On December 24, 1799, the _Alexandria
Gazette_ reported:

          Friday next being St. John's Day, Brother
          Maffitt, at the request of Lodges 22 and 47,
          will deliver a Charity Sermon at the
          Presbyterian Meeting house at which all the
          brethren are requested to attend. N.B. it is
          expected that every brother will appear with
          his badge of mourning--and those of Lodge 22
          in full mourning.[30]

[Illustration: _A physiognotrace of "William Maffett, chaplain."
Courtesy of Alexandria-Washington Lodge No. 22, A. F. & A. M.,
Alexandria, Virginia._]

George Washington, a member of Lodge 22, had died on December 14,
1799, and the call was to a memorial service. Maffitt did not, as
legend claims, preach the funeral sermon, although he did march with
the clergy in the lodge's funeral procession from Alexandria to Mount
Vernon to attend the ceremony.[31]

Earlier in 1799, the minutes of the General Assembly of the
Presbyterian Church show that Rev. William Maffitt was assigned to
Bladensburg.[32] There is no record of his actual presence there and
he was not re-assigned.[33] For the rest of his life, his listings in
the minutes show him "without charge." Although Maffitt was a
licensed minister, there is some doubt that he was ever ordained.[34]

On January 14, 1800, the subscribers to the establishment of a
Washington Society met at Gadsby's Tavern and William Maffitt was
named to the committee to form the constitution and by-laws.[35] On
January 28, Maffitt was appointed chaplain of the society,[36] a post
which he held at least through 1803. On February 23, 1800, the
society was called to meet at Gadsby's at 10 a.m. "to move in
procession to the Presbyterian Meeting House where an oration will be
delivered by the Rev. Mr. Maffitt, commemorative of the distinguished
merits of the Illustrious Washington."[37] Again, on February 22,
1803, the Washington Society called on Maffitt to deliver a memorial
sermon on the first president "at the Presbyterian Church at 12
o'clock. There will be instrumental and vocal music and the day will
be announced by a discharge of 16 rounds from the Market Square."[38]

On February 18, 1801, the Rev. Mr. Maffitt was elected a director of
the Alexandria Library Co., and was re-elected to this post in 1802,
1803, and 1804.[39]

On May 5, 1803, the Rev. Dr. Muir, pastor of the Presbyterian Meeting
House, married the Rev. William Maffitt to Mrs. Harriotte
Turberville.[40] Harriotte (or Henrietta) was the daughter of Richard
Henry Lee, a brother of Philip Ludwell Lee, and his second wife, Anne
Gaskins Pinckard, widow of Thomas Pinckard. Harriotte was born
December 10, 1773 at Chantilly, the Richard Henry Lee estate in
Westmoreland County.[41] Her siblings included a younger sister Sarah
who married another cousin, Edmund Jennings Lee, and the youngest
son, Francis Lightfoot Lee.[42] Her first marriage in December, 1794,
was to Richard Lee Turberville, a cousin and neighbor, who died in
1799,[43] leaving his widow with their three children: Cornelia,
Richard, and George. Richard and Harriotte Turberville had settled at
Chantilly in Fairfax County and Richard apparently died there.[44]

When Harriotte and William Maffitt were married, he was still
principal of the Alexandria Academy, living in Alexandria, and active
in community affairs. But between June 8, 1804, the date of Maffitt's
resignation from the Academy, and early 1805, he moved to Chantilly
with his wife, their first child, and the three children of
Harriotte's first marriage. It is probable that the move took place
in 1804, soon after his resignation.

Legal guardian of the three Turberville children was Thomas Lee,
Harriotte's oldest brother.[45] After his death in 1805, William
Maffitt was named guardian.[46] In this capacity he had to keep
accurate accounts of his expenditures on behalf of the children and
of income received on their property, all of which were matters of
court record. These records indicate that Maffitt was living at
Chantilly at that time.

William and Harriotte had two daughters, both christened in the
Presbyterian Meeting House: Ann Lee, born March 23, 1804, and
christened on April 20, and Harriotte, born March 16, 1805, and
christened on April 17, 1805.[47] Harriotte died right after the
birth of the second daughter, probably on April 11 or 12, 1805,
because on April 12, Maffitt began paying rent to the three
Turberville heirs for the use of their property. This was recorded
for the first time in his accounts for 1805.[48]

That he had a school on the Chantilly estate seems highly probable,
because starting in 1805, he charged the two Turberville boys for
board and tuition, but not for transportation.[49] In 1805, Maffitt
was listed for the first time on the Fairfax County personal property
tax rolls.[50] In 1810, the county census listed him as having under
his roof two males under 10, five males between 10 and 16, one male
between 26 and 45, five females under 10, and one female between 26
and 45.[51]

The guardian accounts give some interesting insights into day-by-day
activities. Buying new shoes and mending old ones for the two boys
were constant expenses. Regular sums of money were sent to Mrs. Lee,
Harriotte's sister Sally, to pay for Cornelia Turberville's board,
education, and small purchases. Books and supplies were bought for
the boys. A large portion of the estate was rented out, and so were
some of the slaves. The chimney and cellar were repaired; a new barn
was built.[52]

The accounts also show that Cornelia Turberville was married to
Charles C. Stuart in 1817, rather than 1814, as some sources report.
Up to the time of the marriage, Maffitt referred to Cornelia as "C.
Turberville"; afterwards he formally termed her "Mistress Stuart." He
also listed money given George Turberville to buy articles to attend
his sister's wedding.[53] Historians credit Cornelia and her husband
with building a house named "Chantilly" in honor of the estate of her
grandfather, Richard Henry Lee, in Westmoreland County.[54] Yet the
Maffitt accounts specifically refer to "my rent of Chantilly" in
1814,[55] three years before the Turberville-Stuart marriage.
Moreover, a public sale was held "at Chantilly" in 1817,[56] with
cash paid to C. C. Stuart from its proceeds.[57]

Curiously, the accounts show that Maffitt continued to pay rent to
the Turberville heirs through 1814, the year when, for the first
time, we definitely know he was living at Salona. Does this mean that
Maffitt himself built Salona between 1812, when he purchased the
property, and 1814, or that the house already existed and was rented
to a tenant through the first part of 1814? That Maffitt was there in
August 1814 is proven by the documented fact that President Madison
stayed at Salona overnight with Mr. Maffitt.

Robert Gamble, in his volume on Sully, quotes a letter which states
that Richard Bland Lee, Jr., was under the tutelage of the Reverend
Mr. Maffitt at some time preceding 1805.[58] This again would suggest
that Maffitt had a school at Chantilly, close to Richard Bland Lee's
home at Sully. Another biographer mentions that

          Edmund Jennings (Lee) was born at
          Alexandria, then in the District of
          Columbia, on the 3rd of May, 1797.... Mr.
          Lee received his earliest educational
          training at the school of the Rev. Mr.
          Maffitt in Fairfax, a school of high repute
          at that day.[59]

Unfortunately no dates or locations are given by the letter-writer or
the biographer.

In his history of the Old Presbyterian Meeting House, William B.
McGroarty described Maffitt in a footnote as "a Presbyterian minister
who conducted a school for boys in Fairfax County near
Alexandria."[60] Neither Chantilly nor Salona was very close to
Alexandria.

A letter from A. C. Stuart to Elizabeth Collins Lee in 1805 states
that:

          Mr. Maffitt intended to leave the place
          where he now resides and purchase a small
          farm, that he, Frank (Francis Lightfoot Lee,
          Harriotte's youngest brother) intended to do
          the same, that they were to spend their time
          in the pursuit of agriculture, botany, and
          philosophy.[61]

Was this wish expressed because Chantilly was not Maffitt's property
but that of his stepchildren, because Maffitt was lonely without
Harriotte, or because he wanted to give up teaching for farming?
Somehow, from the guardianship accounts, it seems likely that Maffitt
did not farm the Turberville acres, but rented out whatever he could,
while he busied himself otherwise.

Usually the _Alexandria Gazette_ carried announcements of the
openings of new schools, but no announcement of Maffitt's school ever
seems to have appeared. Because Maffitt performed the marriage of
_Gazette_ publisher Samuel Snowden to Mary Longden on January 8,
1802,[62] such an announcement might have been expected. Neither did
the _Gazette_ report Maffitt's departure from the Alexandria area.

Probably Maffitt was still living at Chantilly when he married for
the second time between 1807 and 1811 before William Maffitt, Jr.,
was born. His second wife was Ann Beale Carter Carter
(1767-1852),[63] widow of Charles B. Carter. Ann, also known as
Nancy, was the daughter of Robert Wormely Carter of Sabine Hall in
Richmond County, and Winifred Beale.[64] William, Jr., the only child
of this marriage, was born in November, 1811, and christened in the
Presbyterian Meeting House in February 1812.[65]

In August 1812, Maffitt was appointed a trustee of an academy to be
established in Haymarket. Among those serving with him were Ludwell
Lee of Belmont, Francis Lightfoot Lee, then living at Sully, and
William Fitzhugh of Ravensworth.[66]

Meanwhile, in 1809, James Madison, Secretary of State under Thomas
Jefferson, had been elected President. On June 18, 1812, Madison
signed a declaration of war against England. The causes of the war,
sometimes called the Second War of Independence, were basically
several aspects of nationalism. Some resentment against the British
still smouldered, fanned by British contempt and condescension toward
her former colonists. Because many English sailors deserted their
ships to sail under American colors, British ships intercepted
American vessels and "impressed" their seamen. Furthermore, many
American politicians wanted to annex Canada.

Neither the war nor the President was popular with the people, who
thought the President weak and called the conflict "Mr. Madison's
War." Attempted American invasion of Canada was a fiasco and by
August 23, 1814, the British forces were so close to Washington that
the clear and present danger of an actual invasion of the American
capital seemed imminent.

John Graham, Chief Clerk in the Department of State, and two other
clerks, Stephen Pleasanton and Josiah King, packed the valuable
public records of the State Department in coarse linen bags which
Pleasanton had purchased earlier. These included the original
Declaration of Independence, articles of confederation, federal
constitution, treaties and laws and many other papers. Stephen
Pleasanton found conveyances, loaded the bags into them and took them
to a mill 3 miles beyond Georgetown, where they were concealed.
Pleasanton spent the night of August 23, 1814, at Salona with the
Rev. Mr. Maffitt. The next day, fearing that the mill might be too
accessible to the British, who were fast approaching Washington,
Pleasanton took the state papers to Leesburg for safety.[67]

Dolley Madison, the President's popular wife, could hear in the
President's House the sounds of cannon "from a skirmish at
Bladensburg." The President had gone to meet Gen. William H. Winder,
commander of the military district, and had left his wife
instructions to "take care of my self, and of the cabinet paper,
public and private."[68]

Writing to her sister, Lucy Todd, Dolley cooly reported that her
husband

          desires that I should be ready at a moment's
          warning to enter my carriage and leave the
          city.... I am accordingly ready; I have
          pressed as many cabinet papers into trunks
          to fill one carriage; our private property
          must be sacrificed, as it is impossible to
          procure wagons for its transportation.[69]

She continued the letter on Wednesday, August 24:

          Two messengers, covered with dust, come to
          bid me fly.... At this late hour, a wagon
          has been procured; I have had it filled with
          the plate and most valuable articles
          belonging to the house....

          Our kind friend, Mr. Carroll, has come to
          hasten my departure, and is in a very mad
          humor because I insist on waiting until the
          large picture of Gen. Washington is secured,
          and it requires to be unscrewed from the
          wall. The process was found too tedious for
          these perilous moments; I have ordered the
          frame to be broken, and the canvas taken out;
          it is done--and the precious portrait placed
          in the hands of two gentlemen of New York,
          for safekeeping.... When I shall again write
          to you, or where I shall be tomorrow, I
          cannot tell!![70]

Apparently Dolley spent the night of August 24 in a tent in the
American encampment at Tennallytown, and the next day crossed over
into Virginia where she spent the night of August 25 with Matilda Lee
Love at Rokeby. The roads were crowded with refugees and the exodus
was slow. As the Loves had often been guests at the President's
House, Dolley did not have to spend night with strangers. In her
reminiscences, Matilda Love wrote:

          In the following spring of 1814, it (the
          war) came more home to us, as the British
          got into our southern waters, and in August
          came up to Washington and burnt all the
          public buildings.... As I lived about ten
          miles from Washington, Mrs. Madison and a
          number of city people took refuge at my home
          the night the British took Washington....


They watched the flames of the burning capital from Rokeby that
night.[71]

Irving Brant, definitive biographer of Madison, writes of the
departure of the Madisons from the capital:

          The travels of President and Mrs. Madison
          after the battle have long been involved in
          obscurity and contradiction owing to the
          meagerness of early records (Dolley's
          letters about it were eaten by mice),
          uncertain memories and the derogatory
          stories circulated by political detractors.
          The facts bear little resemblance to the
          popular stories in which the Jones and
          Carroll families are nonexistent, Dolley
          wanders forlornly from house to house, while
          Madison, split in person rather than
          personality, simultaneously hides in a
          miserable hovel in the Virginia woods and
          flees in terror into the distant hills of
          Maryland.

          Actually, a clear record was left by
          participants and observers. The original plan
          was for Madison to join Secretary Jones and
          their families at Bellevue and proceed by way
          of the Little Falls bridge to Wiley's Tavern
          on Difficult Run near the Great Falls. From
          there the President and cabinet members would
          cross the Potomac and join the army. Time
          growing short, Madison changed the rendezvous
          to Foxall's Foundry. With that route from the
          White House clogged by the militia's flight,
          he sent Tench Ringgold to the foundry with
          word that he was crossing at Mason's Ferry
          and would meet his wife and party at Salona,
          the home of the Reverend John [sic] Maffitt,
          three miles above the Little Falls
          bridge....[72]

          Madison, Rush and Mason rode to Wren's Tavern
          at Falls Church. Monroe and Ringgold took the
          Leesburg road, stopped briefly at Rokeby, the
          home of Richard Henry Love, two miles above
          Little Falls, and went on to Wiley's Tavern.
          From Wren's Tavern the President went to the
          Minor home and from there to Salona, where he
          spent the night with the Maffitts. But Mrs.
          Madison failed to come. She and her party had
          stopped only a mile away at Rokeby, with her
          young friend Matilda Lee Love, an occasional
          overnight guest at the White House....

          The next morning, Madison went back to Wren's
          Tavern--looking for his wife, he told Colonel
          George Graham, who gave him a guard of two
          dragoons. Returning to Salona, the President
          learned that Mrs. Madison and the Jones and
          Carroll families had gone by on their way to
          Wiley's Tavern. He and Rush followed along
          the Old Dominion Road (Mason being detained
          for a time) and took refuge from the
          hurricane in a house at "The Crossroads" five
          miles from the Little Falls bridge.[73]

At midnight, the President went to the new Conn's Ferry above Great
Falls, and at daybreak he crossed the river into Montgomery County,
Maryland. Mrs. Madison stayed at Wiley's Tavern until the President
sent her word that Washington was clear of the enemy.[74]

A more romantic but apocryphal story of the Madison's flight from
Washington was written in 1914 by a columnist known as "The Rambler"
for the _Washington Star_.[75] In this version, Dolley crossed the
Potomac on "the Causeway Ferry," then passed Nelson's mill, went on
to Falls Church, and finally drove up "to Salona Hall, the home of
Parson Maffitt, and was welcomed by Mrs. Maffitt." He further
recounts that Mrs. Madison was refused shelter at two country places
before she reached Salona, though this did not seem reasonable.[76]

The oft-told story of Dolley Madison's having been refused sanctuary
on her way to Salona by several households is not borne out by all
published accounts. Apparently, the account which does have most
corroboration is that regarding the day following the night she and
her party stayed at Rokeby.

Mrs. Madison went on the next morning, August 25, to meet her husband
at a tavern near Great Falls, probably Wiley's on Difficult Run. This
had been prearranged, and on arrival she went upstairs to wait for
Mr. Madison. Shortly, the lady of the establishment called out to her
in rage, saying, "Miss Madison! If that's you, come down and go out!
Your husband has got mine out fighting, and d---- you, you shan't
stay in my house; so get out!" Other refugees joined in the outburst,
even those who had once been guests of the Madisons at the
President's mansion, and agreed she should be expelled from all
doors. Nearby, there was another tavern, and Mrs. Madison and her
party gained admittance there to wait for her husband's arrival later
that evening.[77]

After the excitement of Madison's visit was over, Salona must have
reverted to its normal calm. At last Maffitt had realized his dream
of farming; the personal property tax records and inventory of his
estate clearly define Salona as a working farm.

But his fortunes declined, if we can judge by his personal property
tax assessments. Maffitt was assessed for 18 horses and mules and 21
black slaves in 1812; in 1814, when a very detailed account was
rendered by the county, Maffitt was shown to have 19 slaves, 12
horses and mules and a coache (4-wheeled carriage) valued at $450. In
all of Fairfax County that year, only Thomas Fairfax, William
Robinson and Bushrod Washington had coaches of higher value than his
and their vehicles were evaluated at $500 each.

By the year of his death, 1828, only 13 slaves and 3 horses were
listed, and the total evaluation of his personal property was listed
at $150. The inventory of William Maffitt's estate did show that he
had 116 head of livestock on the place including horses, oxen, sheep,
hogs and cattle. He was growing turnips, corn, rye, oats, hay and
orchard grass. The long list of household furnishings included three
desks and two bookcases of high evaluation, indicating there were
books in them. (See appendix for full inventory.) The fortunes of his
widow, Ann Carter Maffitt, declined further, until by 1835, she was
dropped off the county's personal property tax rolls.[78]

For many years, William Maffitt had continued to serve as guardian to
his first wife's Turberville children. Although Cornelia Turberville
continued to live with her aunt in Alexandria until her marriage in
1817, her two brothers seem to have lived at Salona. In June 1815,
Richard Turberville drowned in the Potomac while visiting his cousin
Matilda Lee Love at nearby Rokeby.[79] Maffitt's accounts for June
23, 1815, report the expenditure of $37.50 for Richard's coffin. He
may have been buried in the graveyard on the Salona property.[80]

The other brother, George Turberville, at some time in childhood
became a deaf mute as the result of typhoid fever. Maffitt's accounts
do not reveal the date of the onset of this affliction, but they do
show that in April 1818 George entered "The Asylum" in Hartford,
Connecticut. At that time, Maffitt advanced George $100 for board and
tuition and $100 for travel.[81] George still returned to Salona for
vacations, because in July 1819, Harriotte Maffitt wrote to him:

          It is now my time to write to you my Dear
          Brother. We are glad the time is so near
          when we expect you. When you come home we
          will go to George Town to meet you. Dr. Muir
          has been here and he preached here. Aunt
          Whann and Aunt Sally Maffitt have been here.
          Uncle Whann has gone to travel. I hope you
          will be well acquainted with the History of
          the Bible and particularly the life and
          miracles of our Blessed Saviour. We have not
          heard from Chantilly for some time, I hope
          we will go up soon. Cousin Sally Lee is
          there. We expect Aunt Edmund Lee will come
          here very soon. Sister Cornelia expects Mrs.
          Mary Tollaver, your Cousin up to see her
          this summer. Do you know Mr. Harrison of
          Alexandria? He is coming here to preach for
          us in August. Do you love me? I pray to God
          to bless and preserve you. Old Mrs. Randle
          is very well we went to see her yesterday.
          When you come home you must go to see her
          with us. I saw Miss Betty Jones last
          Sabbathe. She asked me when I had heard from
          you answer my letter very soon if you
          please. Tell me how the deaf and dumb are
          and if they improve. You must love and obey
          your teachers. Papa Mama and all the girls
          send their affectionate love to you.

               I am your affectionate sister.

                       Harriotte Maffitt.[82]


          P.S.
          All the Boys send their
          respects to you.

Another letter, this one from William C. Woodbridge to the Reverend
William Maffitt from "Asylum," was dated February 21, 1820, and
referred to a fight between George Turberville and another student.
Woodbridge wrote:

          It seems he was ridiculed & resented it &
          was then challenged. He says he was wounded
          in the knee & his antagonist the same. We
          learned it from his boasting of it to our
          pupils. He now expresses entire
          disapprobation. He made the question to you
          by my request.

Woodbridge refers to George's independence and pride which must be
checked. Obviously, this letter was one of many exchanged between
Woodbridge and Maffitt regarding George's progress[83] and is
evidence that George wrote home to his stepfather as well as to his
sisters.

Although William Maffitt died before the Lewinsville Presbyterian
Church was founded, church historians claim him as a founding father,
saying that he was appointed by the Washington Presbytery to preach
and set up a mission near Langley.[84] Harriotte's letter may lend
credence to this, although there is no report of such an assignment
in the Minutes which list Maffitt only as "without charge" after
1800.[85]

One reason for this belief may have arisen because of a bequest in
the will of Elizabeth Lee Jones, the "Miss Betty Jones" of
Harriotte's letter. Daughter of Lettice Corbin Turberville and
Catesby Jones of Westmoreland County, Miss Betty lived at "Sharon" on
part of the George Turberville grant. Her will, dated April 16, 1822,
left four acres of her property "as a site for a church and
churchyard ... dedicated to the uses and purposes of divine worship
in such manner and subject to such rules as shall ... be prescribed
by the Rev'd William Maffitt" and eight other ministers: -- Carnahan,
Wells Andrews, William Hill, John Mathews, J. B. Hoge, William C.
Walton, M. Baker, and Samuel D. Hoge, all representatives of the
Presbyterian Church. William Maffitt was a witness to this will.
Apparently, this was Maffitt's primary connection with the
establishment of the Presbyterian Church at Lewinsville.[86]


 Chapter II Notes

 Salona and the Maffitts

 [18] Handwritten family tree, source unknown, in possession of Henry
Mackall, Fairfax, Virginia; interviews with Peter Maffitt, direct
descendant of William Maffitt, by the author.

 [19] John H. Johns, _History of the Rock Presbyterian Church of Cecil
County, Md._ (Oxford, Pa.: Oxford Press, 1872) p. 20; interviews with
Peter Maffitt by the author.

 [20] Princeton University, _General Catalogue, 1767-1845_. Peter
Maffitt also investigated and reported that William had not attended
the university. Founded in 1746 as the College of New Jersey,
Princeton did not have a theological school, as such, until 1812.
Because a persistent legend links Maffitt with South Carolina, the
author checked his possible attendance at the College of Charleston,
S.C. Surviving enrollment records beginning in 1790 (the college was
founded in 1770) show no William Maffitt. Both the College of William
and Mary and the University of Delaware reported no William Maffitt
listed in any surviving records.

 [21] An unsigned note from the Presbyterian Historical Society, 425
Lombard St., Philadelphia, Pa., to the author, dated December 30,
1976, states:

          A check of the Presbytery of New Castle
          Minutes for the dates you cited, revealed
          mention of Maffitt's name but presented no
          biographical data. The 7 April 1795 minute
          referred only to his transfer from New
          Castle to Baltimore Presbytery and that he
          would reside in Alexandria.

 [22] Letter from the University of Delaware to the author, April 4,
1977. Working papers, Virginia Room, Fairfax County Central Library.

 [23] Note to the author from the Presbyterian Historical Society,
December 30, 1976.

 [24] Board of Trustees, Alexandria Academy, Minutes, April, 1795.

 [25] Letter dated February 26, 1798, from George Washington to Dr.
David Stuart. George Washington, _The Writings of George Washington,
1749-1799_, John C. Fitzpatrick, ed. (Washington, D.C.: United States
Government Printing Office, 1941), Vol. 36, p. 170.

 [26] Mary G. Powell, _History of Old Alexandria, Va._ (Richmond, Va.:
William Byrd Press, 1928), p. 155. According to A. J. Morrison in
_The Beginnings of Public Education in Virginia, 1776-1860_
(Richmond, Va.: Virginia State Board of Education, 1917), while the
Alexandria Academy was incorporated in 1786 with George Washington as
one of the trustees, the school seemingly predated its incorporation.

 [27] _Alexandria Gazette_, November 4, 1801.

 [28] Board of Trustees, Alexandria Academy, Minutes, March, 1804.

 [29] This is evident only through announcements in the _Alexandria
Gazette_, and not in lodge records, although Maffitt's likeness, a
Raphael Peale physiognotrace, is displayed in the Lodge 22
headquarters now located in the George Washington Masonic Memorial in
Alexandria and is reproduced in this monograph. Lodge records list
Maffitt in 1804 as chaplain, but no other records show even the dates
of his initiation or transfer affiliation. F. L. Brockett, _The Lodge
of Washington_ (Alexandria, Va.: George E. French, c. 1875) wrote
profiles of 34 members of the lodge as of 1814, but these do not
include Maffitt. However, Brockett reported that in 1799 Maffitt's
charity sermon brought in a collection of $74.52, and his sermon of
1805, $91.67. "Charity sermons were preached on St. John's Day,
December 27, and the collection was used to assist the poor."

 [30] _Alexandria Gazette_, December 24, 1799.

 [31] The Reverend Thomas Davis, Rector of Christ Church, Alexandria,
preached the funeral sermon at Mount Vernon. The Reverend James Muir,
pastor of the Presbyterian Church of Alexandria, and Dr. Addison, an
Episcopal clergyman from Maryland, also attended the service. Charles
W. Stetson, _Washington and His Neighbors_ (Richmond, Va.: Garrett &
Massie, Inc., 1956), p. 298, quoting Tobias Lear.

 [32] Presbyterian Church in the United States of America, Minutes of
the General Assembly, 1798, p. 141. The preceding year, Maffitt was
listed simply as "licentiate."

 [33] Ibid., Minutes, 1800, p. 192. This year, and in succeeding
years, Maffitt is listed as "without charge." He did, however, carry
out various pastoral duties. In 1802, at the ordination of James
Inglis in the Presbyterian Meeting House, Maffitt "concluded the
services, after having exhorted the newly ordained pastor and the
people of his charge, in a short but impressive address," according
to the _Alexandria Gazette_ of April 30, 1802.

In May, 1808, Maffitt was a commissioner to the general assembly of
the Presbyterian Church at its meeting in Baltimore, along with
Reverend James Inglis. He was late in arriving and "took his seat the
4th day of the sessions." The minutes of May 23 (p. 399) report that

          The Reverend William Maffitt, of the
          Presbytery of Baltimore, appeared in the
          Assembly and stated that he had neglected to
          bring his commission. Two commissioners from
          the same Presbytery certified that Mr.
          Maffitt had been appointed by the Presbytery
          as commissioner to this Assembly. On motion:
          _Resolved_, that Mr. Maffitt be received as
          a member. And he accordingly took his seat.


 [34] Letter to the author from Ruth B. Lee, librarian of the
Historical Foundation of the Presbyterian and Reformed Church,
Montreat, N.C., dated March 29, 1977:

          As you will see the first reference to Mr.
          Maffitt is as a licentiate in Baltimore
          Presbytery. His only pastorate seems to have
          been in Bladensburg (later Hyattsville), and
          after this he is listed as being without
          charge. This means that he was not an active
          pastor in a church. He seems to have
          remained in Baltimore Presbytery, though of
          course he may have served outside the
          Presbytery at some time and still remained a
          member of that Presbytery. I question
          whether he was actually ordained by
          Newcastle Presbytery, since the ordination
          usually took place when a man was installed
          as the pastor of a church. The licentiate is
          the candidate for the ministry who is
          licensed to preach but is not yet ordained.


Minutes for 1809 (p. 238) and 1814 (p. 184) show Maffitt "without
charge." Minutes for 1824 list him in the Presbytery of the District
of Columbia as "near Georgetown, D.C." again without charge. The
present offices of the Presbytery of the District of Columbia have
his death date as his only record in their files.

 [35] _Alexandria Gazette_, January 30, 1800.

 [36] Ibid.

 [37] Ibid., February 10, 1800.

 [38] Ibid., February 21, 1803.

 [39] Alexandria Library Company, Minutes, 1801, 1802, 1803, 1804.

 [40] _Alexandria Gazette_, May 7, 1803. Although this marriage was
performed by the pastor of the Presbyterian Meeting house, it did not
take place in the church and is not listed in the church records.

 [41] Lee, _Chronicle_, p. 183.

 [42] Ibid., pp. 182-3.

 [43] Ibid., pp. 183, 273. Here is one of the sources of confusion, as
Lee states on page 183 that Henrietta was "married secondly to the
Rev. William Maffit (sic) of South Carolina."

 [44] Ibid., p. 183.

 [45] Fairfax County, Virginia, Will Book H, p. 55.

 [46] Ibid., I, p. 413.

 [47] Old Presbyterian Meeting House, Alexandria, Baptismal Records.

 [48] Fairfax County, Virginia, Will Book J, p. 338.

 [49] Ibid.

 [50] Fairfax County Personal Property Tax Records, 1805.

 [51] Fairfax County Census, 1810, #284.

 [52] Fairfax County, Virginia, Will Books J, pp. 241, 338; K, p. 143;
L, p. 294.

 [53] Ibid., L, pp. 294, 302-3.

 [54] Harrison, _Landmarks_; Lee, _Chronicle_.

 [55] Fairfax County, Virginia, Will Book L, pp. 294, 298.

 [56] Ibid., p. 304.

 [57] Ibid., p. 305.

 [58] Gamble, _Sully_, p. 50.

 [59] Lee, _Lee of Virginia_, p. 468.

 [60] McGroarty, _Presbyterian Meeting House_, p. 54, footnote.

 [61] Letter from Ann Calvert (Stuart) Robinson to Elizabeth Collins
Lee, October 19, 1806. Lee Family Papers, Section II, Richard Bland
Lee, Virginia Historical Society.

 [62] _Alexandria Gazette_, January 8, 1802.

 [63] Unsigned, undated note (1977) from Sabine Hall to the author
states that these dates are in a family Bible at the hall. No
marriage dates were sent, although they had been requested.

 [64] Robert Carter Randolph, _The Carter Tree_ (Richmond, Va.: By the
author, 1951), omits any mention of offspring of Ann's first marriage
but does list William Maffitt, II, as the only child of her second
marriage. However, the American Genealogical Research Institute,
History of the Carter Family_ (Washington, D.C.: 1972) states that
four children were born to Charles and Nancy Carter: John Hill who
never married; Susan, who married the Rev. Thomas Balch, pastor of
the New York Avenue Presbyterian Church; Mary Walker, who married
Commodore Thomas ap Catesby Jones; and Elizabeth, who married Alfred
Carter. Apparently the Carter children, the young Turberville boys,
and the Maffitts all lived together as one family after the
Maffitt-Carter marriage.

Charles B. Carter was a cousin of Ann's, who owned "Richmond Hill" in
Richmond County and "Mount Atlas" in Prince William. His grave is at
Mount Atlas and the tombstone bears the dates 1766-1807.


 [65] Young William grew up at Salona, received his M.D. from
Columbian College, (later part of George Washington University),
served in the Army Medical Corps, went to St. Louis, Missouri, in
1841, married Julie Chouteau, descendant of a founder of St. Louis,
in 1843, and died there in 1864. It is interesting to note that of
the seven members of his college class, he is the only one for whom
the college does not have a full record.

 [66] _Alexandria Gazette_, August 18, 1812.

 [67] Allan C. Clark, _Life and Letters of Dolly Madison_, letter from
Dolley Madison to her sister Lucy Todd, August 23, 1814.

 [68] Ethel Stephens Arnett, _Mrs. James Madison: The Incomparable
Dolley_ (Greensboro, N.C., Piedmont Press, 1972), p. 238, 243;
Dorothy Payne Todd Madison, _Memoirs and Letters of Dolly Madison_
(Boston: Houghton Mifflin, c. 1886), p. 108.

 [69] Clark, _Letters_, Madison to Todd, August 23, 1814.

 [70] Ibid., August 24, 1814. The portrait was started by Gilbert
Stuart and completed by an artist named Winstanley. A footnote on p.
184 quoted from Laura Carter Holloway Langford, _Ladies of the White
House_ states:

          Half a century later, when the White House
          was undergoing a renovation, this portrait
          was sent, with many others subsequently
          added to this solitary collection, to be
          cleaned and the frame burnished. The artist
          found on examination that the canvas had
          never been cut, since the rusted tacks,
          time-worn frame, and the size compared with
          the original picture, was the most
          conclusive evidence that Mrs. Madison did
          not cut it out with a carving knife, as many
          traditions have industrially circulated.

Matilda Lee Love was the daughter of Ludwell Lee of Belmont in
Loudoun County, granddaughter of Richard Henry Lee, and niece of
Harriotte Lee Turberville Maffitt. Her mother was Flora, sister of
Matilda Lee.

According to Mrs. Love's memoirs in the _Lee Chronicle_:

          Mr. Madison was a relation of my stepmother,
          Mrs. Lee, and was always very civil to us,
          and we dined and stayed at the President's
          several times. My father never would go
          there, as he opposed the Madisons to the day
          of his death ... I inherited from my mother,
          who was very wealthy, a farm near the little
          Falls of the Potomac, where we were to
          reside, and which I named Rokeby, after
          Scott's poem of that name, as Matilda was
          the heiress of Rokeby.

 [71] Arnett, _Mrs. James Madison_, pp. 243-46; Lee, _Chronicle_, p.
291.

 [72] Irving Brant, _James Madison: Commander in Chief, 1812-1836_,
pp. 306-8. Brant's error regarding Maffitt's first name has been
picked up by Walter Lord, _Dawn's Early Light_, p. 171: "James
Madison ... and the rest of the presidential party rode to Salona,
the home of the Reverend John Maffitt where Madison now expected to
meet his wife," and by Alan Lloyd, _The Scorching of Washington_, p.
170: "Madison crossed the Potomac by ferry-boat, trekking into the
adjacent hills toward the emergency rendezvous he had fixed with
Carroll: Salona, the home of an ecclesiastical friend named John
Maffitt."

When Alexandria historian Jean Elliot called Brant's attention to his
error in Maffitt's first name, Brant replied to her on July 12, 1973:

          My research cards are all in the Library of
          Congress, so I have no way of knowing
          whether I was misled by some earlier writing
          or went wrong on my own, but the matter of
          accuracy can be settled by the law of
          probability. There is no chance whatever
          that two preachers named John and William
          Maffitt co-existed in the same little
          community, at precisely the same time, with
          abundant evidence of William's existence and
          none of John's, in the records you cite.


 [73] Old Dominion Road (Drive) did not exist until the old trolley
tracks were removed in the 20th century. In a letter to Mrs.
Elizabeth Payne, Chairman of the Committee for the Marie Butler Leven
Preserve, Brant wrote on March 9, 1972: "I am not certain about the
road from Falls Church to Salona, whether it branched off from Kirby
Road at the site of the Nelson-Patterson Mill."

 [74] Brant, _James Madison_, pp. 307-9.

 [75] "The Rambler," _Sunday Star_, August 2, 1914.

 [76] Ibid.

 [77] Lee, _Chronicle_, p. 291; Arnett, _Mrs. James Madison_, pp.
245-6.

 [78] Fairfax County, Virginia, Personal Property Tax Books,
1812-1843. Microfilm, Virginia State Library, Archives Division.

 [79] Lee, _Chronicle_, Matilda Lee Love, p. 292.

 [80] Fairfax County, Virginia, Will Book I, p. 294. The graveyard no
longer exists.

 [81] Ibid.

 [82] Letter from Harriotte Maffitt to George Turberville, July 13,
1819. Copy provided by Henry and Douglass Mackall from original in
possession of George Turberville of Manassas.

 [83] Letter from William C. Woodbridge (director of The Asylum) to
the Reverend William Maffitt, September 21, 1820. Copy provided by
Henry and Douglass Mackall from original in possession of George
Turberville of Manassas.

 [84] Franklin B. Gillespie, _A Brief History of the Lewinsville
Presbyterian Church_, no date.

 [85] Presbyterian Church in the United States, Minutes.

 [86] Fairfax County, Virginia, Will Book N-1, p. 49; Fairfax County,
Virginia, Deed Book V-2, p. 85. Trudie Sundberg and John Gott point
out in the 1971 _Yearbook_ of the Historical Society of Fairfax
County, Vol. 11, p. 5, that the church never received Miss Jones'
four acres. Instead the property reverted to the estate of her
mother, Lettice Turberville Jones, and was sold at auction with the
rest of Lettice Jones' estate to pay off the creditors of Troilus
Lewin Turberville, her brother. The present Lewinsville Presbyterian
Church stands on acreage given by the heirs of Dr. Mottrom Ball, who
had married Martha Turberville, sister of Troilus and Lettice.



 III

 SALONA FOR SALE


After William Maffitt's death, his widow must have found life
difficult. She had to keep up the farm, care for the slaves, and
support her children and stepchildren. There was an outstanding debt
on Salona owed to her sister-in-law in Georgetown. William Maffitt
had mortgaged the property with Margaret Whann for $6,000 in 1823,
and had paid back almost half of the amount due prior to his
death.[87]

Ann Maffitt's state of mind was clearly revealed in a letter written
by her on July 22, 1828, to Col. George W. Hunter urging him to
reconsider his refusal to become administrator of her husband's
estate. She pleaded with him: "... I shall send my dear fatherless
(and I might almost add) friendless Son to you this morning who will
say everything he can to beg you not to desert us in our great time
of need...."[88]

[Illustration: _Dr. William Maffitt, Jr., Major, U. S. Army. Born
November 14, 1811, in Virginia. Died October 7, 1864, St. Louis,
Missouri. He was Reverend William Maffitt's only son._]

Apparently her appeal fell on deaf ears, for the court records show
that Robert C. Jackson was administrator. Margaret Whann brought a
chancery suit against the heirs of Maffitt in 1831 and bought Salona
at auction through her agent, Joseph McVean, for $2,650, only partial
repayment of the $3,716.54 still due her. Meanwhile, slaves and
personal property were sold, and small debts repaid. George W.
Hunter, the lawyer who had refused to serve as administrator, came to
a sale on May 20, 1829. John Hill Carter (Ann's son by her first
marriage), E. L. Carter (probably her youngest daughter, Elizabeth),
Thomas B. Balch (husband of her daughter Susan), Commodore Thomas ap
Catesby Jones (a close neighbor), and George L. Turberville
(Harriotte's son by her first marriage) all bought some of the slaves
and personal property. When the property evaluation was made, the
estate was worth $1,822.87-1/2. The inventory of Maffitt's personal
property, exclusive of his slaves, was $1,588.89-1/2. No total was
given for the value of the slaves. The court-appointed appraisers
were Nicholas Paine, William Swink, and Joseph Sewell. Although they
prepared their inventory in 1828, it was not reviewed and accepted by
the court until March, 1832.[89]

Margaret Maffitt had been born in Cecil County, Maryland, on April 7,
1780. According to Sarah Somervell Mackall, Margaret went to
Georgetown to visit her eldest sister Jane, wife of William Whann.
While there, Margaret met William's brother, David Whann, and they
were married on November 16, 1807. Until 1804, David had been a
purser in the U. S. Navy on the _Essex_. Later he became a paymaster
and traveled widely abroad. A captain in the D.C. Militia, he died of
sunstroke in May, 1813, while reviewing his men on the parade ground.
His widow "never received any compensation from the government" and
was left with two small children, a son and a daughter.[90]

Apparently Margaret permitted Ann Maffitt to remain at Salona until
1835 at least and possibly until 1842 when the property was sold to
Chapman Lee. In any case, Ann Maffitt and the three Maffitt children
did not sign a quitclaim to the property until 1835.[91] Margaret
Whann probably hired a tenant to maintain Salona as a working farm.
There are no indications that Mrs. Whann ever lived at Salona; the
deed to Lee refers to her as being "of Georgetown in the District of
Columbia."

Chapman Lee, who was living in Alexandria at the time of the sale,
bought the property in 1842.[92] He held the property for three
years, then divided it and sold 208 acres to Elisha Sherman "late of
Fairfield County, Connecticut."[93] The balance was conveyed to James
McVean and Samuel M. Whann. Eight years later, Elisha Sherman and
Anna, his wife, late of Fairfax County and "now of Washington County,
D.C.," sold to Jacob G. Smoot of Georgetown the tract "heretofore
called Langley but now called Salona"--208 acres.[94]

[Illustration: _The Maffitt grave is located in the Lewinsville
Presbyterian Church cemetery, McLean. Photo by the author, 1975._]


 Chapter III Notes

 Salona for Sale

 [87] Fairfax County, Virginia, Deed Books V-2, page 85; Z-2, page
403.

 [88] Letter from Ann B. Maffitt, dated July 22, 1828, to Col. George
W. Hunter. Copy in _Salona_ working papers, Virginia Room, Fairfax
County public library. Manuscripts Division, Alderman Library,
University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia. Col. Hunter later
served as administrator of the estate of Francis Lightfoot Lee of
Sully.

 [89] Fairfax County, Virginia, Will Books Q-1, page 271; V-2, page
85; Z-2, page 403. See appendix for inventories.

[90] Handwritten family tree, source unknown, in possession of Henry
Mackall; Sarah Somervell Mackall, _Early Days of Washington_
(Washington, D.C.: by the author, 1899).

 [91] Fairfax County, Virginia, Deed Book C-3, page 314.

 [92] Ibid., G-3, page 378.

 [93] Fairfax County, Virginia, Deed Book J-3, page 262.

 [94] Fairfax County, Virginia, Deed Book T-3, page 186.



 IV

 SALONA AND THE SMOOTS


William Smute, originally of Dutch ancestry, came to Virginia from
Scotland in 1633 and received a grant for 400 acres of land in 1642.
He removed to Maryland in 1646 and thereafter, the Smoot (Smout)
family activities as reported in local records showed periodic
involvement with public affairs of county, colony and nation.[95]

In a recent history of St. Mary's County, Maryland, William Barton
Smoot was listed as captain of the Lower Battalion of the county's
militia during the American Revolution[96] and a William Smoot was
recorded as a recruit for service in the War of 1812 by James Jarboe
of Great Mills.[97] Mentions were made throughout the eighteenth and
nineteenth centuries of Smoot activities having to do with railroads,
roads and schools.[98] The Smoot family also appears in the public
records of Charles County, Maryland. Some family members migrated to
Kentucky, others to Washington, D.C.[99]

Although Jacob Gilliam Smoot of Georgetown, D.C., purchased 208 acres
of property--Salona--in 1853, he also held property on High Street
(now Wisconsin Avenue) in Georgetown from which he probably obtained
income. His family spent winters in Georgetown. Smoot had attended
Charlotte Hall Academy in Maryland and his son William was a
graduate, in law, from Georgetown.[100] The Salona property was of a
size and assessed valuation consistently greater than over half of
the properties assessed in Fairfax County at the time. Smoot's
personal property including several slaves, was also well above
average in quantity and evaluation.[101]

Sometime following Smoot's purchase of Salona, he bought two prize
hunting dogs for a total of $5,000. The dogs later died from rabies.
Smoot was interested in establishing a good herd of cattle so he
purchased expensive registered Aberdeen Angus cattle prior to the
Civil War. During the war, the cattle were appropriated and eaten by
Union troops.[102] There were 50 cattle listed in the tax assessment
in 1857, but the herd had dropped to 12 by 1860. In that year, Smoot
was also assessed for 20 sheep and hogs. Gold, plate, silver,
jewelry, kitchen and house furnishings were evaluated at $500, far
above the average that year in Fairfax County.[103] The Smoots were a
relatively well-to-do family.

[Illustration: _The caption under this photograph reads: "The Battle
Hymn of the Republic--'A Hundred Circling Camps.' The Fifth Vermont
in 1861, with their Colonel L. A. Grant." From _The Photographic
History of the Civil War In Ten Volumes_, pp. 154-155. The rock
formation in the lower right hand corner can still be seen on Kurtz
Road near Salona._]

[Illustration: _The McDowell map of northeastern Virginia, 1862,
showing the section including Fort Marcy, Langley, Lewinsville and
the Smoot's "Salona" property._]

From October, 1861, to April, 1862, according to a strong Smoot
family tradition, Salona was used as the headquarters of the Army of
the Potomac. Camp Griffin, in fact, was an installation partly on
Salona and partly on adjoining farms and was part of the outer
defenses of Washington. General George McClellan's dispatches,
however, never used either Salona or Smoot's Hill as a source,
although he did use datelines of Fairfax Court House and Camp
Griffin. Military historians generally agree that McClellan was
living in Washington, D.C., at the time, and, therefore, as
commanding general, his residence would have been considered the
headquarters.[104]

It is certain that troops were camped there and that there was
skirmishing in the immediate vicinity of Salona. The following
incident was recorded by E. M. Woodward, adjutant in the Second
Pennsylvania Reserves:

          Early on the morning of the 9th (October
          1861) General Smith advanced his division
          from the neighborhood of Chain Bridge to
          Langley where deploying his skirmishers, he
          pushed forward a brigade on the Dranesville
          Pike, and took possession of Prospect Hill.
          With his main body he diverged from the pike
          at Langley to the left, advancing toward
          Lewinsville, which village he entered and
          occupied without opposition, leaving the
          main portion of his troops at Smoot's Hill
          and pushing on a detachment to occupy
          Miner's Hill....

          During the first ten days, the "long roll"
          was beaten and the men got under arms five
          times. On the night of the 11th the pickets
          in the neighborhood of Lewinsville were
          driven in and the next day the enemy
          consisting of at least three regiments of
          infantry, some cavalry and a battery of six
          guns were discovered near Miner's Hill,
          concealed in the woods, which led to the
          supposition that an attack was meditated the
          next morning. At noon the drums beat and the
          men got into fighting order. General
          McClellan and staff including the Comte de
          Paris and the Duc de Chartres rode over and
          remained during the night at Smoot's House,
          and at midnight the drums beat again and
          every preparation was made for an attack.

          It was a clear and beautiful night, the moon
          shone forth in its mild beauty, the stars
          twinkled with resplendant glory and not a
          cloud glided through the sky. The drums beat
          the long roll, the trumpets of cavalry and
          artillery sounded their shrill blasts and the
          bands of the infantry pealed forth their most
          soul-stirring strains. The camp-fires burned
          brightly, the glittering bayonets and sabres
          flashed in the light and every heart beat
          high with hope.... But alas, after remaining
          in position until daybreak, chilled with
          falling dews, the boys were doomed to
          disappointment. Beauregard had only been in a
          reconnaissance in force, to ascertain our
          position since the recent extension of our
          front.[105]

When the federal troops moved out of the encampment in March, 1862,
Captain W. A. Hawley and Lt. Col. W. B. Hazmand of the 102^d New York
Volunteer Battalion signed the following memorandum giving all army
materials left behind to Jacob Smoot:[106]

[Illustration: _Original memorandum in the possession of Clive and
Susan DuVal, Salona._]

The Smoots spent most of the war in Georgetown, returning at the end
in time to save some furniture and the main part of the house from
being burned. Both wings of the house, the garden and many fine trees
had been destroyed in their absence. They had filed petitions during
the war asking the federal government for compensation for their
losses. When federal troops had occupied Salona, Smoot had taken
eight slaves to Georgetown where his brother John was in the drygoods
business. During the investigation of his reparations claim it was
discovered that J. G. Smoot had signed the Ordinance of Secession in
the Lewinsville Precinct in Fairfax County on May 23, 1861. This act
disqualified him from receiving compensation.[107]

Following the war, the Smoots set about the arduous task of restoring
their farm to its former prosperity. By 1868, the aggregate value of
personal property at Salona was $1,085, and in that year, only one in
15 taxpayers in the county had a personal property tax evaluation of
over $1,000. A rosewood piano made its appearance, followed the next
year by the addition of a "pleasure carriage" and a watch.[108] In
1870, books and pictures owned by Smoot were valued at $25.00--the
vast majority of taxpayers had none assessed at all. By 1881, there
were four conveyances, 10 horses, 10 cattle, 15 sheep, books valued
at $50.00, two watches and two clocks. One of the clocks was probably
the chiming grandfather's clock made in Newburyport, Massachusetts,
which was built about 1817 and is still in the family.[109] A sewing
machine was also listed. It is interesting to note that by 1881, at
least half of the households in Fairfax County had such a
machine.[110]

Salona was a working farm with a large barn, smokehouse, ice pond,
and cabinetshop. Hogs, sheep, cattle and fowl were raised as well as
wheat and corn. The old stone house, thought by the family to have
been the oldest structure on the place, was surrounded by a peach
orchard. The Smoots grew scuppernong grapes, plums and apricots.
Italian grape vines adorned the arbor between the house and the brick
privy. Descendants say that the farm had a consistently high yield
per acre of corn and wheat, and that this information was faithfully
recorded in account books which were destroyed when the attic was
cleaned out or taken by vandals and lost.[111] But records in
gazetteers listed J. G. and William Smoot as principal farmers in the
Langley area for a period of more than 20 years.[112]

[Illustration: _Smoot family photographs, late 1800s._]

[Illustration: _This mahogany Sheraton writing cabinet was obtained
from England by the Kurtz importing firm in Georgetown, and was used
for many years by the Smoots at Salona._]

[Illustration: _These wine glass coolers are of deep blue glass with
lips on opposite sides. They were used to rinse wine glasses between
courses as different wines were served at Salona._]

[Illustration: _An unsigned charcoal portrait of Jacob Gilliam Smoot
of Salona._]

[Illustration: _The marble-topped washstand and the blue and gold
Haviland china were used by the Smoots at Salona._]

[Illustration: _Side chair with original horsehair seat._]

[Illustration: _These coin silver spoons, marked "M. W. Galt & Bro."
on the back, were hidden by Helen Calder Smoot, Jacob's wife, who,
according to family tradition, tied them around her waist beneath her
petticoat during the Civil War._]

_All photographs by
Gene Lebherz._


[Illustration: _Map from G. M. Hopkins_, Atlas of Fifteen Miles
Around Washington, _1879._]

[Illustration: _Salona farm, about 1900._]

[Illustration: _Salona farm, about 1890._]

Like William Maffitt, Jacob Smoot died intestate, in 1875. He was
survived by his widow Harriet and their four children, William S.,
Helen M., Harriet E., and Catherine C. After his widow died, each of
the children received one-fourth of the estate. Even before Jacob's
death, William Smoot, Sr., had taken over management of the farm
while his unmarried sisters kept house. Each of the sisters took one
of William's sons to raise. Jennie, William's wife, according to the
Smoot descendants, acted as hostess, greeting visitors and
entertaining them. Their son John moved to Georgetown; William Jr.,
went to Waterford to be the miller there; Gilliam stayed with his
parents and gradually took over the farm operations. Life at Salona
went on as usual, with no question of selling the farm or dividing
its acreage.

William S. Smoot, Sr., died in 1900 leaving his share of Salona by
will to his widow, Jennie K. Smoot. When she in turn died intestate,
their three children, John D. K., Calder Gilliam, and William S.,
Jr., shared her portion of the estate. Jacob's three daughters never
married, so their portions descended to their three nephews,
William's sons, John, Calder Gilliam (known by the family as
Gilliam), and William, Jr.

Both John and William died intestate. John's share of Salona was
divided among his widow, Julia B., and their children, Jane Smoot
Wilson, John D. K. Smoot, Jr., and Henry B. Smoot. William's share
went to his widow, Elizabeth, and their two sons, William S., III,
and John J.[113]

[Illustration: _"Salona," from an unpublished picture taken by "The
Rambler," about 1914. See_ Sunday Star_, "The Rambler," August 2,
1914._]

In 1914, The Rambler, a Washington Star columnist, visited Salona,
talked with the Smoots, and wrote a charming word picture of the
exterior of the house:

          You draw up in front of the garden which
          surrounds the house. A white-washed fence
          four boards high, incloses the garden.
          Inside are old cedars thick through the
          trunk and solemn in foliage. There are
          clumps of rose bushes and borders of
          jonquils. Stumps of trees that have been
          wrecked by wind or lightning support
          bark-bound flower boxes. A driveway curves
          to the left and a gravel path leads straight
          to the front porch before which the box
          trees are growing. The porch is capacious
          with a balcony on top. Under the porch and
          in the middle of the house is an arched
          doorway. On the left of the garden around
          the house is an apple orchard and on the
          right is a flourishing grape arbor. This is
          Salona. It is a fine, quiet and dignified
          old place.[114]

Some years later, in 1932, for the first time in history (as far as
it is known) Salona was open to view by the general public. It was
one of the occasions in local observance of the George Washington
Bicentennial Birthday Anniversary. Mrs. John Kurtz Smoot was the
official hostess and she and her house tour guides were dressed in
floor-length period costumes.[115]

World War II brought the end of the estate as a family farm. Gilliam
was growing older and was suffering from arthritis; help was almost
impossible to find. Unable to carry on with farming, Gilliam rented
the land to the Carper family as pasture and moved from the mansion
into a smaller house nearby. A family of Negro caretakers moved into
Salona for a time. After the Carper lease expired without renewal,
the caretakers left. William S. Smoot, III, occasionally lived on the
property, sometimes in a portion of the main house, and sometimes in
the old stone house, which he dreamed of remodeling. The main house
was rented to an antique dealer who, according to a Smoot descendant,
had the house "filled with junk from top to bottom."

Since they could no longer maintain Salona as a working farm and none
of them wanted to occupy the main house on a permanent basis, the
Smoots decided to partition the property. In 1948, Calder G. Smoot,
only surviving son of William S. and Jennie K. Smoot, Sr., received
as his share some 65 acres and the house. He did not, however, occupy
Salona.[116] In the late 1940s and early 1950s, small parcels of the
Salona property were sold to the McLean Baptist Church, the Salona
Shopping Center and Trinity Methodist Church.[117]

In the early 1950s, Salona was rented to the McLean Summer Theatre as
a dormitory for the actors. Reportedly, they left the house "a
shambles." The next tenants were a Danish captain and his family who
occupied the east wing.

In 1952, Calder Gilliam Smoot died "unmarried and intestate" and his
65 acres and the house became the joint property of his four nephews:
John D. K. Smoot, Jr., Henry B. Smoot, William S. Smoot, III, and
John J. Smoot, and of his niece, Jane Wilson Smoot. Most of this
property, in three separate land transactions, became the property of
Clive and Susan DuVal.[118]

[Illustration]


 Chapter IV Notes

 Salona and the Smoots

 [95] Harry Wright Newman, _The Smoots of Maryland and Virginia_
(Washington, D.C.: by the author, 1936), pp. 1-2.

 [96] Regina Combs Hammett, _History of St. Mary's County, Maryland_
(Ridge, Md.: by the author, 1977), pp. 73, 85, 87, 96, 100, 235-6,
246, 285, 437.

 [97] James Jarboe Papers, Manuscript Collection, Maryland Historical
Society, Baltimore. Cited in Hammett, _St. Mary's County_, p. 100.

 [98] Hammett, _St. Mary's County_, pp. 235-6, 246, 285.

 [99] Margaret Brown Klapthor and Paul Dennis Brown, _History of
Charles County, Maryland_ (La Plata: Charles County Tercentennary
Committee, 1958), pp. 52, 192.

 [100] Interview with John D. K. Smoot, Arlington, Virginia, January
18, 1979, by Nan Netherton.

 [101] Fairfax County, Virginia, Real and Personal Property Tax
Assessments, 1854-1900. Virginia State Library, Archives Division.

 [102] John Smoot interview, January 18, 1979.

 [103] Fairfax County, Virginia, Personal Property Tax Book, 1860.
Virginia State Library.

 [104] Letter from Dr. Benjamin Franklin Cooling, U. S. Army Military
History Institute, Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania, to Mrs. Ross D.
Netherton, Fairfax, Virginia, December 5, 1978. Working papers for
Salona, Virginia Room, Fairfax County Central Library.

 [105] Evan Morrison Woodward, _Our Campaign_ (Philadelphia: J. E.
Potter Co., 1865); McLean _Providence Journal_, February 11, 1977.
Although a number of accounts place Julia Ward Howe, wife of Dr.
Samuel Gridley Howe, in the vicinity when she received the
inspiration to write the words to "The Battle Hymn of the Republic",
the account of Mr. A. J. Bloor, assistant secretary of the U. S.
Sanitary Commission gives a different version. He and Dr. Howe met
Mrs. Howe and her party at Upton's Hill, near Seven Corners, where
they observed preparations for General George McClellan's grand
review of 70,000 troops. Her poem followed, written that night at the
Willard Hotel in Washington. Florence Howe Hall, _The Story of the
Battle Hymn of the Republic_ (Freeport, N.Y.: Books for Libraries
Press, reprint 1971), p. 62.


 [106] Original memorandum in possession of Susan and Clive DuVal, II,
Salona.

 [107] Interviews with Smoot family members by the author; Fairfax
County Ordinance of Secession, Lewinsville Precinct, #18, May 23,
1861. Fairfax County Courthouse, and copy, Virginia Room, Fairfax
County Central Library.

 [108] Interview with John D. K. Smoot, January 18, 1979; personal
property tax assessments, 1868, 1869, Virginia State Library.

 [109] Ibid.

 [110] Personal Property Tax Book, 1881. Virginia State Library.

 [111] Interviews with members of the Smoot family by the author.

 [112] Fairfax County Office of Comprehensive Planning, _Fairfax
County in Virginia: Selections from Some Rare Sources_ (Fairfax, Va.:
Office of Comprehensive Planning, 1974), pp. 126-127.

 [113] Fairfax County, Virginia, Deed Book 635, p. 471; interviews
with the Smoot family by the author.

 [114] "The Rambler," _The Sunday Star_, August 2, 1914.

 [115] _Washington Star_, May 20, 1932.

 [116] Fairfax County, Virginia, Deed Book 635, p. 471.

 [117] Interviews with Smoot family members by the author.

 [118] Fairfax County, Virginia, Deed Book 1041, p. 123; 1097, p. 32;
1322, p. 453.



 V

 SALONA AND THE DUVALS


Susan and Clive DuVal, II, arrived in northern Virginia in 1952,
hunting for an older house with interesting architectural features
and surrounding acreage. When they discovered Salona, it was occupied
by the Danish family who were in the east wing. They decided it was
just the house they wanted, unprepossessing though it appeared, full
of the musty odor of unoccupied houses, ill-treated by a succession
of temporary tenants and youthful vandals, and in poor repair inside
and out. Inspection of the house would have discouraged the average
home buyer but the DuVals had the desire and resources to do what was
necessary to rehabilitate the dwelling and to live in it.

The first of three tracts was purchased from the Smoot heirs in
January, 1953, and the DuVals spent about a year extensively
renovating the house and grounds before they moved in. Without
specific descriptions of the original house to use as guidelines,
they attempted to preserve as much as possible of the presumed
original dwelling while adapting it to modern living.[119]

Both of the DuVals are descendants of French Huguenots who immigrated
to New Amsterdam in the late eighteenth century. Both were born in
New York City. One of Mrs. DuVal's grandfathers was Jesse Metcalf, a
United States senator from Rhode Island, and her father was Frederic
H. Bontecow, a New York state senator. As other residents of Salona
had been before them, the DuVals were well educated, above the
average level of Fairfax County residents. Mrs. DuVal is a graduate
of Vassar, DuVal of Yale University Law School. And like some of
their predecessors, their income, cultural interests and extent of
community involvement are also well above the average for the time in
which they live.[120]

The DuVal family arrived in Fairfax County during a period when the
population growth was expanding rapidly, both from in-migration and
natural increase. With them the couple brought their three children,
Susan Lynde (Lyn), Clive, III, and David. Daniel, their fourth, was
born in 1953. Their experience was a reflection of the times--in the
1950 U. S. Census, Fairfax County's population was 98,557; in 1960,
it had increased to 248,897.[121]

[Illustration: _The DuVal family, about 1957. Left to right Daniel,
Susan Lynde, Clive II, Susan, David and Clive III. The English
setters, Christmas, Dusty and Belle, are also "members of the
family."_]

Also reflecting the Washington metropolitan area's typical experience
in the 1950s, DuVal came from elsewhere to accept employment with the
federal government, in his case, as Assistant General Counsel
(International Affairs) for the Department of Defense. He was,
typically, a World War II veteran, a former officer in the United
States Navy. From 1955 to 1959, he was general counsel for the United
States Information Agency. Since then, he has been in the private
practice of law. As did the majority of married women with children
in the decades 1950-1970, in Fairfax County, Mrs. DuVal stayed at
home with the children rather than taking a regular outside job,
except for her many volunteer projects in which she was regularly
involved in the McLean community.[122]

Salona became a place of hospitality, where social, political, arts
and educational events were held. The Woman's Club of McLean, the
McLean House Tour, the McLean Ballet Company, Children's Hospital,
the Fairfax YWCA, the McLean Boys Club, the Northern Virginia
Democratic Women's Club, Yale University students and the Historical
Society of Fairfax County, were among the many beneficiaries of the
DuVals' generosity in making Salona available for special
events.[123]

In 1965, DuVal ran for and was elected to the Virginia House of
Delegates, in which he served for three consecutive terms.[124] He
ran unsuccessfully for the United States Senate seat against Harry F.
Byrd, Jr., in the democratic primary in 1970, but was subsequently
elected to the Virginia State Senate in 1971 and 1975.[125]

Because of his deep interest in conservation and environmental
protection, DuVal received both the Virginia state award and the
National Wildlife Federation award in 1970 for being the outstanding
conservation legislator in the United States.[126] Consistent with
this demonstrated interest, the DuVals decided to take a major step
in conservation themselves. They entered into a perpetual easement
agreement in 1971 with the Board of Supervisors, Fairfax County,
Virginia, for the historic preservation of Salona, its surrounding
outbuildings and eight acres of land. In the same legal instrument, a
temporary easement for the remaining 44.3 acres was arranged for a
period of at least ten years.[127] A later amendment, in 1974,
provided for termination of the temporary easement only after January
1, 1990.[128]

In 1975, a patriotic organization, the Society of the United States
Daughters of 1812, obtained the DuVals' permission to place an
historic plaque at Salona to commemorate James Madison's visit there
in 1814. The bronze plaque was mounted in a foundation stone from
what are thought to have been old slave quarters. They once stood in
the side yard below the house. The plaque reads as follows:


               1784-1815

                SALONA


    "A place of great hospitality"

    Shelter for President Madison

            August, 1914

    When British burned Washington


Plaque placed by Virginia State Society

   National Society of United States

           Daughters of 1812


                 1975


 Chapter V Notes

 Salona and the DuVals

 [119] Fairfax County, Virginia, Deed Book 635, p. 471; interviews
with Susan and Clive DuVal by the author.

 [120] See Chapters II and IV; interviews with Clive and Susan DuVal
by the author.

 [121] Nan Netherton, Donald Sweig, Janice Artemel, Patricia Hickin
and Patrick Reed, _Fairfax County, Virginia: A History_ (Fairfax,
Va.: Fairfax County Board of Supervisors, 1978), p. 546.

 [122] Netherton, et al., _Fairfax County_, p. 659; interview with
Clive and Susan DuVal, January 11, 1979, by Nan Netherton; DuVal
family scrapbooks, Volumes I-VII, 1944-1978, Salona.

 [123] McLean _Providence Journal_, April 29, 1960; _Washington Post_,
April 23, 1961; Fairfax County _Sun-Echo_, January 15, 1965;
_Washington Star_, March 18, 1965; Fairfax County _Free Press
Newspapers_, September 29, 1966; _Globe_, May 14, 1970; Semi-Annual
meeting program, November 14, 1976; DuVal family scrapbooks, 1961 and
1963, Salona.

 [124] Virginia General Assembly, _Register of the General Assembly
from 1619-1976_ (Richmond, Va.: Virginia General Assembly, 1978).

 [125] Commonwealth of Virginia, _Manual of the Senate and House of
Delegates_ (Richmond, Va.: Department of Purchasing and Supply,
1978).

 [126] Program, National Wildlife Federation award ceremony, March 7,
1970, DuVal family scrapbook, Salona.

 [127] Fairfax County, Virginia, Deed Book 3418, p. 686.

 [128] Fairfax County, Virginia, Deed Book 4159, p. 436.



 VI

 SALONA: THE HOUSE AND OUTBUILDINGS


The date of construction and the name of the builder of the house
known as Salona are unknown.

There have been many changes to the mansion house, the outbuildings
and grounds through the years. The central house now has only one
wing instead of the earlier two. The large barn has been torn down;
only the substantial foundation bears witness to its size. A pile of
rubble marks the site of "the old stone house," thought by the Smoot
family to have been the oldest structure on the property. The
driveway entrance is off Buchanan Street instead of the Falls Road,
although evidence of the older driveway still exists. The rear
entrance road has been blocked by subdivision construction, although
its route remains visible across the south side of the property.
Perhaps the most decided changes are in the use of the land itself.
As McLean grew, the Salona farm shrank in area and its formerly
fertile acres were transformed into shopping centers, subdivisions,
streets and roads.

Architectural historians say that they cannot pin-point the exact
construction date of Salona, but believe it to have been between 1790
and 1810, a full twenty-year span. This belief is based in part on
examination of the types of nails used in the attic of the main
house, as well as the similarity of the "cross and Bible" door at the
north entrance to some of the doors at Sully, whose construction
began in 1793.[129] Many local sources claim that the house was built
in 1801 by William Maffitt,[130] but this supposition has not been
documented. The Smoot children were always told by their elders that
the house was started in 1790 and finished in 1801, and that Maffitt
was the builder. There was a residential structure on the land when
the 466 acres were advertised for sale in 1811.[131]

[Illustration]

Originally, the house was probably a rectangular two-story, five-bay
structure with flanking wings, which may have been frame. On the
north front, the brickwork is Flemish bond; on the other three sides
and the wing it is common bond. There are two interior end chimneys.
An elaborate bracketed cornice supports the gabled roof. This cornice
and the bracketed entrance porch with paired, squared columns show
definite Victorian influence and were probably originally added after
the Civil War. The DuVals altered the design slightly when they
renovated the house in 1952.

The most unusual feature of Salona is its wide T-shaped hall which
runs the full width of the north front of the central house, with the
main stairway rising at its west end directly across one of the front
windows. The long hall originally led to the wings on either end, but
these were apparently destroyed during the Civil War and only the
east wing was rebuilt in 1866. There is a fireplace in every room,
although most of the Federal-style mantels have been recently
installed in Salona and have come from old houses in North Carolina
and New England. There are chair rails on the walls of the living
room, dining room, and the first floor hallway. Extensive remodeling
was done by the present owners.[132] The T-shaped hall ends on the
solid wall behind the stairway on the west side, and on the east
leads directly into the post-Civil War wing which contains a small
sitting room, bathroom, and the kitchen. The smaller hall, the stem
of the T, runs perpendicular to the main hall with opposing entrance
doors at each end. The spacious living and dining rooms flank the
smaller hall, with entrances from the main hall.

[Illustration]

It is a Smoot family legend that Constantino Brumidi, the Italian
immigrant who painted many of the murals in the U. S. Capitol in
Washington, D.C., was given shelter by the Smoots, probably after the
Civil War, when he was destitute. As a token of his gratitude, he
decorated the ceilings of the living room and dining room with
flowers and fruits. No trace of these paintings now exists. However,
when the DuVals purchased Salona in 1952, there were clearly remains
of paintings on the walls and ceilings. But the plaster was in such
poor condition that it had to be completely replaced.

On the second floor, an upper hall, slightly smaller than the one
below, runs across the north front. It may once have been an open "T"
before modernization and the addition of two bathrooms by the DuVals.
To the right from the head of the stairs is the master bedroom with a
brick hearth and brick and wood mantel. The next bedroom, almost as
large, also contains a brick and wood mantel. In the east wing, the
hall leads directly into a den from which a stairway goes up to an
attic bedroom and bath, both added by the DuVals. The den also serves
as a passageway to a secondary hallway from which open two smaller
bedrooms separated by another stairway leading to the first floor
close to the kitchen. The unfinished portion of the attic is used for
storage. There is a partial basement, primarily under the east wing.

No copy of the original floor plan has been found. Records of the
Virginia Mutual Assurance Society in Richmond show that no fire
insurance was ever purchased from them on Salona, hence no floor plan
drawings are on file there.[133]

Because Maffitt died intestate, his estate was inventoried and
appraised. As a result, we know that the original house contained a
dining room furnished with a "set of three dining tables" and 24
Windsor chairs, which tends to support the tradition that the
original dining room was in the west wing, possibly occupying the
entire first floor of it.[134]

According to Smoot family legend, Salona was built entirely by
slaves, who made the brick from clay on the property. These legends
also claim that the woodwork was made by William Buckland who did the
woodwork at Gunston Hall in 1758. This seems unlikely as William
Buckland died in 1774. Smoot family legends also say that the house
was built by Maffitt, with construction starting in 1790 and ending
in 1801, and that the wings were larger than the main house.

Although the DuVals found no remnants of a west wing foundation when
they were doing extensive grading, there is visual evidence in the
brick mortar that a doorway and a window existed in the west end of
the main house. Moreover, architectural historians believe that the
placement of the kitchen and summer kitchen testify to the west
wing's existence. Furthermore, the Smoots agree that their older
relatives stated that the Yankees destroyed the west wing which was
never rebuilt.

[Illustration: _Salona entrance hall. Photo by the author, 1975._]

[Illustration: _West wall, showing evidence of a former doorway
opening. Photo by the author, 1975._]


 The Outbuildings

The old stone house was an enigma which fascinated the young Smoots.
They report that the house was built around an oversized stone
chimney in its center, with four fireplaces, two back-to-back on each
floor. Downstairs was one big room, with a winding stairway at one
end leading to the second floor where there were two rooms.
Unfortunately the building was in such disrepair when the DuVals
bought the property that they later had it razed in the interests of
safety. It was located north and east of the mansion house and was
referred to by one of the Smoots as "the trappers cabin."

The old stone spring house is still standing.

[Illustration: _Stonehouse ruins, Salona. Historic American Buildings
Survey, Library of Congress, 1958._]

[Illustration: _Springhouse and barn, Salona. Historic American
Buildings Survey, Library of Congress, 1958._]

[Illustration: _Rear view of the main house, Salona. Photo by the
author, 1975._]

[Illustration: _Foundation ruins of the old barn, Salona. Photo by
the author, 1975._]

[Illustration: _Rear view of the wing, Salona. Photo by the author,
1975._]

[Illustration: _Smokehouse, Salona. Photo by the author, 1975._]

[Illustration: smokehouse]

A number of early outbuildings are still in use at Salona. Close to
the house on the south is the outdoor brick kitchen, used by the
Smoots as a "summer kitchen," now by the DuVals as a guest house.
Diagonally opposite the east wing is a former brick smoke house now
used for storage. Farther to the southeast is a board and batten
corncrib. Some distance farther east are the ruins of a large bank
barn, whose thick stone foundations testify to its former size and
sturdiness. At the west end of the house, some distance away, is an
old three-hole brick privy, once approached through a grape arbor.

The DuVals have built a tennis court on a lower level of land on the
east.[135]

[Illustration: _The outside brick kitchen, now a guest house, Salona.
Photo by the author, 1975._]

[Illustration: _PRIVY_]

[Illustration: _The old brick privy, Salona. Photo by the author,
1975._]

[Illustration: _OLD KITCHEN OUT BUILDING_]


 Chapter VI Notes

 Salona: The House and Outbuildings

 [129] National Park Service and Fairfax County Park Authority.

 [130] Stated in Works Projects Administration, Writers' Program,
_Virginia, a Guide to the Old Dominion_ (Oxford University Press, New
York, 1941), p. 525.

 [131] Interviews between the author, Jane Wilson Smoot and William
Smoot; _Alexandria Gazette_, November 11, 1811.

 [132] Interview with Clive and Susan DuVal. January 5, 1979.

 [133] Virginia Mutual Assurance Society records, Virginia State
Library, Richmond, Virginia.

 [134] Fairfax County, Virginia, Will Book Q-1, p. 241. Also see
appendix.

 [135] Interviews with the DuVals and the Smoots.



 VII

 PRESERVATION BY EASEMENT


Because it was a "wonderfully sound, nice and comfortable, gracious
old house" with many pleasant and historical associations and
memories, the DuVals felt that Salona should be permanently
preserved.[136] In 1971, a permanent historic and scenic easement and
a temporary easement were drawn up by the DuVals, and signed on
behalf of the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors by County Executive
George Kelley.[137] (See appendix for full text of the document.)

Both easements were designed to assist the county's efforts to
protect and maintain "the scenic, historic, and recreational values
of land within the County." It also fitted in with the county
government's stated purpose to shape the character, direction and
timing of community development through the preservation of open
space land. The permanent easement was also given "to protect in
perpetuity the mansion known as 'Salona.'" It provides that "The
mansion house known as 'Salona' as such structure exists at the date
of the execution of this instrument, shall not be razed, demolished,
moved or relocated until such action is approved by the Board of
County Supervisors acting upon the advice of the Architectural Review
Board ... or until such structure becomes uninhabitable or demolished
through fire, storm or similar natural calamity."

Provision is also made for the protection of trees and shrubbery and
various uses permitted under the permanent easement.

The permanent easement includes the eight acres surrounding the
mansion; the temporary easement covers the remaining 44.3 acres.

On November 20, 1974, the deed of easement was amended, providing for
the termination of the temporary easement only after January 1, 1990.
The amendment was signed by the DuVals and Jean Packard, Chairman
acting for the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors.[138]

Salona was placed on the Virginia Landmarks Register on June 19,
1973,[139] and on the National Register of Historic Places on July
24, 1973.[140]

[Illustration]


 Chapter VII Notes

 Preservation by Easement

 [136] Interview with Clive and Susan DuVal, January 5, 1979, by Nan
Netherton, at Salona.

 [137] Deed of Easement, Fairfax County, Virginia, Deed Book 3418, p.
686, March 24, 1971.

 [138] Amending Deed of Easement, Fairfax County, Virginia, Deed Book
4159, p. 436, November 20, 1974.

 [139] Virginia State Landmarks Register, Landmarks Commission,
Richmond, Virginia.

 [140] National Register of Historic Places, U. S. Department of the
Interior, Washington, D.C.



                                                            APPENDIX A

                   SALONA
               CHAIN OF TITLE


4 August 1719       Northern Neck grant to Thomas
                    Lee for 2862 acres above the
                    falls of Potowmack River, two
                    miles above first or lower
                    falls. Northern Neck Grant
                    Book 5:240.

22 February 1749    Thomas Lee devised to Philip
                    Ludwell Lee. Will was probated
                    30 July 1751 in Westmoreland
                    County.

19 April 1782       Philip Ludwell Lee to Matilda Lee.
                    Tract was divided, Westmoreland.

10 August 1790      Henry Lee, Sr. (III) and
                    Matilda (Lee) Lee conveyed to
                    Henry Lee, Jr. (IV). Deed on
                    record in office of General
                    Court of Commonwealth.

7 June 1808         Henry Lee, Sr. and Henry
                    Lee, Jr., both of Westmoreland
                    County, sold for $25,000 to
                    Richard Bland Lee of Fairfax
                    County all of that tract called
                    Langley Farm containing 1600
                    acres. Fairfax County Deeds
                    J2:84.

18 July 1808        Richard Bland Lee and Elizabeth
                    his wife of Fairfax County sold
                    to William Maffitt who was to
                    reconvey to Elizabeth Lee. The
                    deed was for 300 acres--all
                    of tract of a farm lying on the
                    south or southeast side of the
                    road leading from the town of
                    Turberville to the Little Falls
                    of the Potomac, "now in occupation
                    of T. C. Scott," commonly
                    called Langley Farm. Fairfax
                    County Deeds J2:18.

19 July 1808        William Maffitt conveyed to
                    Elizabeth Lee--300 acres.
                    Fairfax County Deeds J2:6.

9 January 1809      Richard Bland Lee of Sully
                    and Elizabeth his wife mortgaged
                    two tracts of land: 529
                    acres of Sully and 1600 acres
                    of tract called Langley Farm.
                    Lee was indebted to Bushrod
                    Washington of Mount Vernon by
                    bond dated 9 January 1809 for
                    $10,034.28 which was due 1 March
                    1814. The land was conveyed to
                    Henry Smith Turner, Jefferson
                    County, Thomas Blackburn of
                    Fairfax County and Bushrod
                    Washington, Jr. of Westmoreland
                    County, to hold in trust for
                    use of Lee in case note not
                    paid. Fairfax County Deeds
                    J2:245.

10 May 1811         Richard Bland Lee and Elizabeth
                    his wife of Alexandria sold
                    to William Herbert for $6,987.85
                    (total of three judgments, interests
                    and costs obtained by
                    William Herbert against Richard
                    Bland Lee). Bushrod Washington
                    and Bushrod Washington, Jr. gave
                    release. The tract was 466 acres
                    on south side of Little Falls
                    Road. Fairfax County Deeds
                    L2:177.

10 March 1812       William Herbert and Sarah his
                    wife sold for $6,058 to William
                    Maffitt--466 acres. (Deed is
                    dated 10 March 1810, but the
                    release by Sarah Herbert refers
                    to deed of 10 March 1812.)
                    Fairfax County Deeds L2:368.

10 March 1812       Richard Bland Lee of Alexandria
                    and Elizabeth his wife sold for
                    $420 to William Maffitt of Fairfax
                    County--42 acres on south
                    side main road leading from the
                    town of Turberville to Little
                    Falls of Potomack adjacent to
                    466 acre tract sold by Lee to
                    William Herbert. Fairfax
                    County Deeds L2:416.

1 November 1823     William Maffitt mortgaged to
                    his sister, Margaret Whann, of
                    George Town, D.C. tract called
                    Salona "on which William Maffitt
                    now resides." Maffitt was indebted
                    to Whann for $6,000.
                    Fairfax County Deeds V2:85.

20 July 1831        Thomas Moss, Commissioner under
                    decree of Fairfax County Court
                    conveyed to Margaret Whann of
                    George Town, D.C. William Maffitt
                    had mortgaged Salona. He died
                    intestate and had not paid debt.
                    Whann brought suit against heirs
                    of Maffitt (in Chancery) for
                    sum $3,716. At sale 18 April
                    1831 Salona was sold to James
                    McVean, agent for Margaret Whann
                    for $2,650, the highest bid
                    made. Fairfax County Deeds
                    Z2:403.

29 July 1835        Ann B. Maffitt, widow of William
                    Maffitt, Revd. Reubin Post and
                    Harriett his wife, Ann. L. Maffitt
                    and William Maffitt, the only
                    children and heirs at law of
                    William Maffitt sold to Margaret
                    Whann the right of dower of Ann
                    B. Maffitt and interest of children
                    in Salona and smaller tract
                    adjoining thereto. Fairfax County
                    Deeds C3:314.

7 June 1842         Margaret Whann of George Town
                    sold for $7,500 to Chapman Lee
                    of Alexandria--all of Salona on
                    south side Little Falls Road and
                    42 acres of adjoining tract.
                    Fairfax County Deeds G3:378.

17 May 1845         James McVean of George Town
                    in D.C. (survivor of Samuel M.
                    Whann), party of the first part;
                    Chapman Lee of Fairfax County
                    and Laura E. his wife of the
                    second part; and Elisha Sherman,
                    late of Fairfield County, Connecticut
                    of the third part. On
                    8 June 1842 in order to secure
                    sum of $4,500 plus accruing
                    interest owed by Chapman Lee
                    to Margaret Whann, Lee conveyed
                    to James McVean and Samuel M.
                    Whann (since deceased) tract
                    called Salona containing 506
                    acres more or less. Lee sold
                    208 acres to Sherman for $5,421
                    and proposed to pay $2,079 to
                    McVean and receive himself $921
                    and leave sum of $2421 as lien
                    on land sold to Sherman.
                    Fairfax County Deeds J3:262.

1 July 1853         Elisha Sherman and Anna his
                    wife, late of Fairfax County
                    and "now of Washington County,
                    D.C." sold for $10,000 to Jacob
                    G. Smoot of Georgetown tract
                    heretofore called Langley but
                    now called Salona--208 acres
                    2 rods. Fairfax County Deeds
                    T3:186.

28 June 1948        Deed of Partition of land of
                    Jacob G. Smoot known as the
                    Smoot farm--208 acres. Jacob
                    G. Smoot died intestate. He
                    was survived by his four children:
                    William S. Smoot, Helen
                    M. Smoot, Harriet E. Smoot and
                    Catherine C. Smoot, and by his
                    widow, Harriet C. Smoot.

                    William S. Smoot died testate
                    devising his one-fourth interest
                    to Jennie K. Smoot who died
                    intestate leaving as her only
                    heirs at law three children:
                    John D. K. Smoot, Calder G.
                    Smoot and William S. Smoot,
                    Jr.

                    Helen M. Smoot, Harriet E.
                    Smoot and Catherine C. Smoot
                    died unmarried and intestate
                    leaving their three-fourths
                    interests to heirs at law,
                    their three nephews, John D.
                    K. Smoot, Calder G. Smoot
                    and William S. Smoot, Jr.

                    John D. K. Smoot died intestate
                    survived by widow and
                    three children, his only
                    heirs at law: Julia B. Smoot,
                    widow, Jane Smoot Wilson,
                    John D. K. Smoot, Jr. and
                    Henry B. Smoot.

                    William S. Smoot, Jr. died
                    leaving widow and two children:
                    Elizabeth J. Smoot,
                    widow and William S. Smoot
                    III and John J. Smoot.

                    The Smoot farm was divided
                    in three parts: to Calder G.
                    Smoot and to the heirs of
                    John D. K. Smoot and William
                    S. Smoot, Jr. Fairfax County
                    Deeds 635:471.

6 January 1953      John D. K. Smoot, Jr. and
                    Wilma his wife; Jane Smoot
                    Wilson and Nelson B. her husband;
                    Henry B. Smoot, unmarried;
                    William S. Smoot III
                    and Nancy W. his wife; and
                    John J. Smoot and Patricia
                    his wife sold to Clive L.
                    DuVal II and Susan B. his
                    wife 26.846 acres, part of
                    Lot #2 in partition which was
                    allocated to Calder G. Smoot
                    who died unmarried and intestate
                    leaving sole heirs at
                    law and next of kin four
                    nephews and one niece, named
                    above. Fairfax County Deeds
                    1041:123.

24 July 1953        William Smoot, Nancy Smoot,
                    John Smoot, Patricia Smoot,
                    Elizabeth Smoot deeded 11.305
                    acres to Clive and Susan DuVal.
                    Fairfax County Deeds 1097:32.

20 June 1955        John D. K. Smoot, Jr., Wilma
                    Smoot, Jane Smoot Wilson,
                    Nelson Wilson, Henry Smoot,
                    Dolores Smoot, William Smoot,
                    Nancy Smoot, John Smoot and
                    Patricia Smoot deeded 17.6351
                    acres to Clive and Susan DuVal.
                    Fairfax County Deeds 1322:453.

1 September 1955    Deed of Release. Fairfax
                    County Deed Book 1351, p. 150.

24 March 1971       Permanent easement on eight
                    acres, temporary easement for at
                    least ten years on 44.3 acres from
                    Susan and Clive DuVal to the
                    Fairfax County Board of Supervisors,
                    signed by George Kelley,
                    County Executive. Fairfax County
                    Deed Book 3418, p. 686.

20 November 1974    Amendment to deed of easement
                    by Susan and Clive DuVal to provide
                    for termination of the temporary
                    easement only after January 1,
                    1990. Fairfax County Deed Book
                    4159, p. 436.



                                                            APPENDIX B

                     FAIRFAX COUNTY WILL BOOK Q-1, p. 271

                               March 21^st 1832

                Inventory and Appraisement of the personal Estate
                          of W^m. Maffitt dec^d. to wit


  1 Bay horse $20 1 do $60 &
    1 do $25                         $105
  1 Carriage and Harness              100
  Colt, old iron $2 6 axes $2.50        4.50
  5 Shovels .75c, 4 brier scythes $1    1.75
  9 swingletrees $1.50 6 coulters       3.50
  3 mattaxs $1.50 6 broad hoes 75¢      2.25
  1 Cutting Box patent                 15.00
  Carpenters Tools                      3
  Copper boiler                         5"
  3 wedges & shares  $1.50
     4 hay forks 1.25                   2.75
  Corn at $2 per bar (30) barrels      60"
  33 old Barrels                        3"
  4 Scythes & Sheathes $1 4 hooks 75¢   1.75
  Grain Box                             1.50
  Old Sleigh Irons                      2.50
  2 Ox Yokes                            1"
  2 Wheel Barrows                       2"
  28 hogs $74 - 19 Pigs $9.50        $ 83.50
  3 Breeding Sows                       4.50
  1 Pair of Oxen (large)               25"
  1 do      do (Small)                 12"
  Red buffalo Cow                      10"
  Cow and Calf                          7"
  1 Spotted Cow Small horns             8"
  1 do          Sawed horns             5"
  1 do          red Sides               8"
  2 Calves $3 - 1 Bull $6               9"
  58 sheep at $1.25                    72.50
  65 Locust Posts @ 12¢                 8.12-1/2
  4 pieces of old Carpeting             4"
  one Rug                               2"
  No. 1 Bed Mattrass Curtain
    bedstead, bolsters, and piller     20"
  No. 2 Bed, Mattrass, bolster,
    piller and Stead                   20"
  No. 3 do as above                    15"
  Andirons, fender and Tongs            5"
  Washstand bowl and pitcher            1"
  Toilet Table Glass and 3 chairs       2.25
  Trunnel bedstead with two mattrasses
    & two bolsters                      5"
  1 Bedstead                            2"
  Trunnel bedstead, Mattrasses, 4
    pillows and 4 bolsters             10"
  No. 4 Bed, Mattrass & furniture      20"
  No. 5 do do 1^st Room                20"
  Fender, Tongs and A:Irons             2.50
  Tallo and Bucket                       .75
  9 p^r. Blankets                      25"
  Urn                                 $ 1.50
  one dozen Custard Cups                  14
  3 Tea Canisters and tin bucket        1.25
  8 Stone jars                          2"
  1 Small and large barrels               25
  1/2 bushel Measure                   12-1/2
  Coffee Mill and Saddle bags           1.25
  1 p^r. Andirons in Kitchen            4"
  Gridiron and Tea kettle               1.50
  4 Iron pots $6--2 spits $1.
    2 ovens $2                          9"
  2 Spiders $1.25 Frying pan 50c        1.75
  1 Brass Skillet                       3"
  Ladle and forks                        .12-1/2
  Sifter                                 .25
  1 doz: Small knives and forks         1.50
  1 do Large                            6"
  Pewter plates, Tin and Tubs           5"
  Spice mortar                          1"
  4 candlesticks, candle box            1"
  3 Decanters, 3 Glass pitchers         3.50
  Coffee pot                             .25
  one doz: Wine Glasses No. 1           1.75
  9  do    do                            .75
  9 Cordial Glasses                     1"
  6 Salt Glasses                         .75
  11 Jelly Glasses                      1"
  1 broken Caster                       2"
  1 Large pitcher                       1"
  1 Large bowl                           .50
  12 Table mats                         1"
  2 china bowls                          .12-1/2
  1 p^r. Andirons                        .25
  1 Large Carpet                       30"
  1 Table                               1.50
  3 sets plough Gear                  $ 4.50
  2 new Cart Wheels                    20"
  1 Iron plough                         5"
  1.75  2 Shovel ploughs                2"
  3.50  1 bar Shear plough              3"
  2 old broken ploughs                  1"
  3 Harrows                             6"
  2 Iron Mould boards                    .50
  1 double Swingletree                   .75
  1 cart $6 - 1 broken
       do. $3                           9"
  1 Grind Stone                          .50
  Ox Chain $1 fodderhouse
   $8                                   9"
  1 Wheel and pair Shakes               2"
  Orchard Grass and rye
    Straw                               2"
                                     --------
    Carried forward                  $379.75
    Amt. brot forward                $379.75
  2 Oats $9 - 3 stacks of
     hay $50                           59"
  5 Cotton Counterpanes              $ 10.00
  6 do     do                           4"
  5 Coloured ditto                      3"
  3 Trunks and Chests                   1.50
  24 Windsor chairs                     6"
  Set dining Tables 3                  18"
  one Large Table                       5"
  1 Small round Table and
      4 Waiters                         5"
  Candle Stand                          2"
  Writing Desk                          2"
  Sideboard                            20"
  2 Spoon and knife cases               6"
  6 different maps                      4.50
  Andirons, Shovel, Tongs,
    Fender       8"
  4 Candlesticks and oil Lamp           3"
  2 knife Boxes                         1"
  1 Small Table (long and
     Square)                            1"
  1 Bedstead, pillow and
    bolster                            18"
  30 Diaper Towels                      2.50
  8 pillow cases                        1.50
  10 Tongs $1.50 1 Small
     Table 75¢                          2.25
  1 Desk and bookcase                  25"
  One Bureau and book Case             20"
  p^r. Andions Tongs and poker          2.50
  one doz: small Tea plates             2"
  3 dozen Small plates                  4.50
  1    "    deep plates                 1.50
  Fruit Dishes                          1.50
  1 large Turien                         .50
  1 doz: Custard Cups                    .50
  Turien (2 Sets)                       1.50
  20 Cider barrels                    $ 5"
  6 Jugs                                1.50
  9 Demijohns                           9"
  11 pewter Candle moulds               1.75
  Kitchen Stove                        20"
  2 Barrels of bottles at
     3 cts. each                        2.88
  old boxes, Jugs, etc.                  .25
  2 basons and 2 Dishes
      /pewter/      2"
  1 Churn and Tray                       .50
  3 Jars and pail                        .75
  1 Table 25¢--1 large
   pot $2                               2.25
  2 Small pans                           .37-1/2
  1 Safe                                2"
  one large iron pot                    2.50
  2 ovens 75¢ 2 Smoothing
     Irons 75¢                          1.50
  2 Tubs 12-1/2¢ Carpet
    irons $1                            1.12-1/2
  p^r.  Scales                          2"
  Saddle and bridle                     2"
  p^r.  Steelyards                      2"
  lot of Wool at 20¢ per 8"            16.80
  Looking Glass No. 1                   6"
   do    do    No. 2                    6"
  Crop of Turnips 13 cts
    per bushel                         10"
  Pide Cow and Calf                    12"
  Gold Watch, Seal and key             50"
  Writing Desk                          1"
  2 Ink Stands                           .39
  One Globe                              .20
                                    ------------
                                    $1588.89-1/2
                                    ============



                                                            APPENDIX C

                     FAIRFAX COUNTY WILL BOOK Q-1, p. 274

                  Appraisement of Dower Negroes belonging to
                          William Maffitt's Estate


  Names                   Dower    Real       Age    Notable marks
                           Appt    Value
 1st lot Dick etc          $ 0      0           70

 Cato and Reid              10  "   350   " 48, 27   Reid cut over right
                                                        thumb

 2nd lot 1st Willis        100  "   350   "     26   Willis scar on
                                                        right hand

 2nd Jonathon              100  "   350   "     23   Scar on left thumb

 4. Polly & Child
  Mathew                    25  "   300   "     21   Child 8 months

 5. Allens                 100  "   300   "     19   scar on right Wrist

 6. Betty                   25  "   200         14

 7. Wait                    50  "   200   "     12   a burn on right
                                                       hand

 8. Cyntha                  25  "   150   "      9

 9. Edmund                  15  "   120   "      6

 2^n lot Dianah
 Catharine & Child              "   400   "

 3^rd lot Bob & family
 2 Abby & child Honey           "   300   "          Bob bald head

 3^rd Shirley              100  "   350   "

 4. Jonathon               100  "   350   "     23

 5. Alcey                   25  "   250   "

 6. Robert                  75  "   300   "

 7. Beverley                50  "   250   "

 4^th lot Kitty & child
 Mary, Ozekial &         blank  "   450   "          Kitty scar on
                                                        right cheek
 Thornton

 Jenney                    100  "   350   "

 5^th lot John's
 family                    100  "   300   "          John

 Matilda                   100  "   300   "

 Aleck                      "   "    "    "

 Fanny                      "   "    "    "

 Ellen                  blank   "   500   "

 Nancy                   25     "   275   "

 James                   75     "   300   "

 Armistead & Talbot      40     "   300   "          Armistead hand
                                                     burnt arm useless
                                                     and one Eye out
 Milly                   25         175

 Harry & wife           100         300         43

 Scylla Sam Mary                    350         38

 Joe                     75         300              16 Schlla, Sam an
                                                       infant, Mina

 Willis                  50         200         12

 Heny                    40         150         10

 Sam an infant                                   8

 Robins Family

 Robin his wife
 Marjory                100         250         50   Single lot

                                    350         40   Marjory, Julia and
                                                       Momy $350

 Eliza and children                 200         28

 W^m 3 yrs: Mary                                20   2^nd lot Eliza W^m
                                                       Mary James $400
 James an Infant                                10   real Value

 Molly & Child
 Richard                 10         300

 Robin                                          18

 Juay                    25         150         14

 Susan                   40         200         10

 Sampson                 40         200          8

 Jane                    20         150          7

 Julia                                           3

 Naris                                           2

 Anderson's Family

 Anderson               100         300         48

 Alcey, his Wife         35         150         40

 Ranald                  75         300         16

 Andrew                  75         300         14

 Edward                  50         200         12

 Single

 Ozekial, a boy          50         200         13

 Winny                                          45

 Betsy Martha            30         350          8-4

 Ellen and Child
 Lucy and Scylla       blank        350         27

 Sara, Lewis         $ blank        500          5

 7^th lot, Lewis,
 a Lad                  100         350         19   Lewis has a Scar
                                                       in the bend of
                                                       the right arm

 Sandy                   50         250          8

 Philip old              75         150         48   Philip on the
                                                       fingers of the
                                                       right hand

 Booter                 100         400         29   Booter a Scar on
                                                       fore finger 1st
                                                       joint on the left
                                                       hand

 8^th Lot

 Willy and child Mima  blank        300         20

 9^th lot old Lucy &
 husband Toby           125         400         27

 10^th Lot Martha        25          75         45

 Griffen                100         350         33

In obedience to an order of the County Court of Fairfax hereto annexed
and the appraisers therein named have inventoried and appraised all
and Singular the goods & chattles of William Maffitt dec^d. that were
presented to our view by the admr as herein before Stated Given under
our hands dec^r. 1828

                                   Rich^d. Darne

                                   William Swink

                                   Joseph Sewell

At A Court Continued and held for Fairfax County the 21^st day of
March 1832

This Inventory and Appraisement of the Estate of William Maffitt
dec^d. was returned and ordered to be recorded


                                   Teste W^m. Moss



                                                            APPENDIX D

  Fairfax County Deed Book
    3418, pages 686-697


       DEED OF EASEMENT

            THIS DEED, made this 24th day of March,
       1971, by and between Clive L. DuVal, 2nd and
       Susan B. DuVal, his wife, parties of the first
       part, hereinafter called the grantor, and the
       County of Fairfax, Virginia, party of the second
       part, hereinafter called County;

            WHEREAS, the County has an interest in
       protecting and maintaining the scenic, historic
       and recreational value of land within the County
       and;

            WHEREAS, the County also has a desire to
       shape the character, direction and timing of
       community development through the preservation of
       "open space" land and;

            WHEREAS, the governing body of the County
       has determined that the acceptance of the
       conveyance of certain interests in land less than
       the fee will assist in accomplishing these above
       stated objectives, and;

            WHEREAS, the grantor is the owner in fee
       simple of three certain parcels of land situate
       in Fairfax County, Virginia, containing in the
       aggregate 52.40897 acres of ground and being
       shown on the Tax Map of Fairfax County on Sheet
       30-2, Double Circle One, Parcel 40, and Sheet
       30-2, Double Circle One, Parcel 41, and Sheet
       30-2, Double Circle One, Parcel 46A, having
       acquired said property by deeds recorded in Deed
       Book 1097 at Page 32, Deed Book 1041 at Page 123,
       Deed Book 1322 at Page 456, and Deed Book 1322 at
       Page 453, of the land records of the County of
       Fairfax; and

            WHEREAS, the grantor desires to join in and
       participate in the maintenance of the character
       of the land described herein as open space land
       with scenic, historical and recreational value
       and to protect in perpetuity the mansion known as
       "Salona".

            NOW, THEREFORE THIS DEED OF EASEMENT
       WITNESSETH THAT for and in consideration of the
       foregoing provisions and of the following terms
       and conditions, grantor does hereby grant and
       convey unto the County two separate easements,
       one a perpetual or permanent easement and one a
       temporary easement for at least a ten year
       period, both hereinafter described, over and
       applicable to portions of the land heretofore
       described, and further, grantor does hereby
       covenant that he will in each particular abide by
       the terms and conditions hereof and will execute
       such further assurances and/or do such other
       things as may reasonably be necessary to ensure
       that any successor in interest to the land herein
       described will also abide by the terms and
       conditions of these easements as hereinafter set
       out.

            These easements are expressly covenanted by
       the grantor to run with the land and are not
       personal to him, and shall be binding upon any
       and all successors in interest to all or any part
       of the interests in the land herein described
       which may be now held or hereafter acquired by
       the grantor.

            There shall be made no use of the land
       herein described save and except in accord with
       the terms and conditions of these easements, and
       no structure shall be erected thereon or
       vegetation destroyed or altered, except in accord
       with these said terms and conditions, provided,
       however, that these terms and conditions may be
       amended at any time by an instrument signed by
       the grantor or his successor in interest and by
       the County and recorded among the land records of
       the said County.

  I. Terms and conditions of the Permanent Easement
     (Easement in Perpetuity)

     A. Uses permitted under the permanent easement shall
     be:

            1. Agriculture, including the tilling of
            soil, raising of crops, raising of livestock
            and poultry, and the maintenance and
            operation of dairies, mills, hatcheries,
            and/or other processing operations serving
            and required by the crops and/or livestock
            or poultry grown or raised upon the land
            described herein only.

            2. Nurseries, greenhouses, forestry, and
            horticultural enterprises, and the sale of
            the products of such uses, limited to sale of
            products grown on the land described herein.

            3. Water conservation, water supply, flood
            and drainage control, and impounding
            facilities.

            4. The single family dwelling, known as the
            "Salona" mansion and outbuildings and
            facilities, appurtenant thereto, whether or
            not occupied by grantor. Professional
            practice or medicine, dentistry, law, real
            estate or insurance sales, architecture, art
            or music instruction, engineering or land
            surveying, by an actual bona-fide resident of
            such dwelling is permitted.

  B. Uses, structures and acts expressly prohibited:

            1. No building or other structure under the
            permanent easement shall hereafter be
            erected or allowed to remain upon the land
            herein described, provided that buildings
            and structures existing at the date of
            execution hereof, and additions thereto
            which do not increase grade level floor area
            by more than one hundred percent shall be
            permitted, and that small outbuildings and
            recreational facilities, including a
            swimming pool, may be constructed not closer
            than 200 feet to the mansion house known as
            "Salona".

            2. The mansion house known as "Salona" as
            such structure exists at the date of the
            execution of this instrument, shall not be
            razed, demolished, moved or relocated until
            such action is approved by the Board of
            County Supervisors acting upon the advice of
            the Architectural Review Board as provided
            for in Section 30-2A.2 of the Code of Fairfax
            County or until such structure becomes
            uninhabitable or demolished through fire,
            storm or similar natural calamity.

            3. No commercial or industrial use shall be
            commenced or allowed to continue, unless
            expressly permitted in (A) above or in any
            duly executed and recorded amendment hereof.

            4. No sign, billboard, or other display shall
            be erected or allowed to remain on the
            property described herein, provided, that one
            sign of a size not greater than 25 square
            feet advertising the sale of the property or
            the products or activities available thereon
            may be erected.

            5. No major grading or topographic change
            shall be accomplished except by express
            permission, in writing, from the Director of
            County Development of Fairfax County, or the
            successor to his duties. Such permission
            shall only be granted in accordance with a
            grading plan prepared by or at the direction
            of the grantor or his successor in interest
            and approved by Fairfax County. Major grading
            shall be deemed to mean any grading performed
            by machine, other than hand-operated
            machines.

            6. No trees or shrubbery over 8 inches in
            diameter measured 5 feet above ground shall
            be cut down or removed except by express
            permission, in writing, from the Director of
            County Development of Fairfax County, or the
            successor to his duties, provided, however,
            that management of existing trees, shrubs or
            other vegetation, including trimming and
            removal, may be accomplished in accord with
            accepted professional practice at the time
            such work is performed, without such
            permission.

  II. Terms and conditions of the temporary easement.

      A. Uses permitted under the temporary easement
      shall be:

            1. Agriculture, including the tilling of
            soil, raising of crops, raising of livestock
            and poultry, and the maintenance and
            operation of dairies, mills, hatcheries,
            and/or other processing operations serving
            and required by the crops and/or livestock
            or poultry grown or raised upon the land
            described herein only.

            2. Nurseries, greenhouses, forestry, and
            horticultural enterprises, and the sale of
            the products of such uses, limited, however,
            to sale of products grown on the land
            described herein.

            3. Recreation, including, but not limited to,
            camping, picnicking, boating, fishing,
            swimming, horseback riding, golf courses
            (excluding miniature golf), driving ranges,
            and other similar outdoor activities, whether
            operated commercially or privately.

            4. Water conservation, water supply, flood
            and drainage control, and impoundment
            facilities.

            5. Three single family dwellings not more
            than 40 feet in height and related
            outbuildings, facilities and access roads,
            whether or not occupied by grantor, on lots
            of not less than one acre, including such
            grading and removal of trees and shrubbery as
            may be desirable or necessary in connection
            therewith. Professional practice of medicine,
            dentistry, law, real estate or insurance
            sales, architecture, art or music
            instruction, engineering or land surveying,
            by an actual bona-fide resident of such
            dwelling is permitted.

  B. Uses, structures and acts under the temporary
  easement expressly prohibited:

            1. No building or other structure, except as
            permitted in Paragraph IIA5 above, shall
            hereafter be erected or allowed to remain
            upon the land herein described, provided
            that buildings and structures existing at
            the date of execution hereof, and additions
            thereto which do not increase grade level
            floor area by more than one hundred percent
            shall be permitted.

            2. No commercial or industrial use shall be
            commenced or allowed to continue, unless
            expressly permitted in (A) above or in any
            duly executed and recorded amendment hereof.

            3. No sign, billboard, or other display shall
            be erected or allowed to remain on the
            property described herein, provided, that one
            sign of a size not greater than 25 square
            feet advertising the sale of the property or
            the products or activities available thereon
            may be erected adjacent to each separate
            public street upon which the land described
            herein has frontage.

            4. No major grading or topographic change
            shall be accomplished except by express
            permission, in writing, from the Director of
            County Development of Fairfax County, or the
            successor to his duties. Such permission
            shall only be granted by reference to a
            grading plan prepared by or at the direction
            of the grantor or his successor in interest.
            Major grading shall be deemed to mean any
            grading performed by machine, other than
            hand-operated machines.

            5. No trees or shrubbery over 8 inches in
            diameter measured 5 feet above ground shall
            be cut down or removed except by express
            permission, in writing, from the Director of
            County Development of Fairfax County, or the
            successor to his duties, provided, however,
            that management of existing trees, shrubs or
            other vegetation, including trimming and
            removal, may be accomplished in accord with
            accepted professional practice at the time
            such work is performed, without such
            permission.

  III. Description of Easements Conveyed

            1. The land subject to the rights and
            restrictions imposed herein for perpetuity
            (permanent easement) is described as
            follows: 8.09917 acres in and around the
            mansion house, "Salona", being a portion of
            the 52.40897 acres heretofore mentioned and
            more particularly described in a survey by
            Northern Virginia Survey as follows:

                 Beginning at an iron pipe marking the
                 Southeast corner of Lot 9, Section 4,
                 Salona Village, said point of beginning
                 being in the North Right of Way line of
                 Sothron Street; thence through the
                 land of DuVal. N. 74° 46' 20" E. 630.00
                 feet to a point; thence S. 15° 13' 40"
                 E. 560.00 feet to a point; thence S.
                 74° 46' 20" W. 630.00 feet to a point
                 in the East line of lot 10; thence with
                 the East line of lot 10, and continuing
                 through the land of DuVal, N. 15° 13'
                 40" W. 560.00 feet to the point and
                 place of beginning containing 8.09917
                 acres of land.

            2. The land subject to the rights and
            restrictions imposed hereby for a period of
            at least ten (10) years (temporary easement)
            is described as follows: 44.30980 acres of
            the approximately 52 acres of land
            heretofore mentioned more particularly
            described in a survey by Northern Virginia
            Surveys as follows:

                 Beginning at a point marking the
                 Intersection of the West line of
                 Buchanan Street (50' Right of Way) and
                 the South line of Sothron Street (50'
                 Right of Way); thence with the South
                 line of Sothron Street N. 70° 02' 30"
                 E. 25.00 feet to a point; thence with
                 the West line of Salona Village,
                 section 6, S. 19° 57' 30" E. 1728.67
                 feet to a point; thence with the North
                 line of Salona Village, section 8, N.
                 53° 30' 40" W. 499.41 feet to a point;
                 thence S. 75° 00' 00" W. 320.00 feet to
                 a point; thence N. 77° 35' 20" W. 11.81
                 feet to a point; thence with the land
                 of Goralski N. 7° 35' 20" W. 267.78
                 feet to a point; thence S. 82° 24' 40"
                 W. 186.24 feet to a point; thence S. 7°
                 35' 20" E. 200.00 feet; thence
                 continuing with the North line of
                 Salona Village, section 8, S. 82° 24'
                 40" W. 276.00 feet to a point; thence
                 with the East lines of Salona Village,
                 section 4, N. 15° 13' 40" W. 758.50
                 feet to a point; thence S. 74° 46' 20"
                 W. 200.00 feet to a point; thence N.
                 15° 13' 40" W. 444.90 feet to a point;
                 thence N. 74° 46' 20" E. 200.00 feet to
                 a point; thence N. 15° 13' 40" W.
                 976.54 feet to a point; thence with the
                 South line of Dolly Madison Blvd. (Rt.
                 123) N. 70° 33' 40" E. 722.74 feet to a
                 concrete Right of Way monument; thence
                 N. 76° 19' 10" E. 100.70 feet to a
                 concrete Right of Way monument; thence
                 S. 53° 23' 00" E. 25.79 feet to a
                 point; thence with the West line of
                 Buchanan Street, S. 19° 57' 30" E.
                 1021.16 feet to the point and place of
                 beginning containing 52.40897 acres of
                 land.

                 Excepting therefrom all that piece of
                 property more particularly described
                 above as the land subject to the
                 "permanent easement" containing 8.09917
                 acres of land.

  IV.    Termination of the rights, title, and interest
         of the County in the land herein described, acquired
         under the provisions of the temporary easement
         shall occur under, and only under, one of
         the following provisions:

          1. By deed of release and vacation of this
          easement executed by the County, accepted by
          grantor or his successor in interest, and
          recorded as provided by law.

          2. Immediately upon the filing by the County,
          or by any other body, public or private, or a
          condemnation action seeking property rights in
          the land described herein or any part thereof.

          3. Ninety days after the date of death of a
          grantor.

          4. Ten years from the date of this instrument;
          provided, however, that the temporary easement
          shall continue thereafter unless otherwise
          terminated as set out above or unless and until
          terminated by either party by the service upon
          the other party by certified mail of a written
          90 day notice of termination to be effected by
          the recordation among the land records of
          Fairfax County of a properly executed deed of
          release and vacation of said temporary easement
          which stipulates that the above mentioned
          90-day notice had been sent as required.

  V.    Termination of the rights, title and interest of
        the County in the land herein described acquired
        under the provisions of the permanent easement
        shall occur, and only under, the following provisions:

          1. By deed of release and vacation of this
          easement executed by the County, accepted by
          grantor or his successor in interest, and
          recorded as provided by law.

          2. Immediately upon the filing by the County,
          or by any other body, public or private, of a
          condemnation action seeking property rights in
          the land described herein or any part thereof.

  VI.   Future Density Determination

              If at any time the temporary easement is
          terminated as set out above and the 8.09917
          acres subject to the permanent easement is
          included in any Deed of Subdivision and
          Dedication for the development of the 44.30980
          acres previously subject to the temporary
          easement, the County of Fairfax, by its
          acceptance of this Deed of Easement agrees to
          include acreage of the permanent easement in
          the computation of the density to be permitted
          in the development of the acreage previously
          subject to the temporary easement.

  VII.  Definitions of terms

          1. "Grantor" shall be deemed to be singular or
          plural, male or female, as the context may
          require.

          2. "Successor in interest" shall be deemed to
          be singular or plural, male or female, as the
          context may require; where an act is required
          to be performed or the instrument is required
          to be executed, this term shall be deemed to
          mean all of the successors to all of the
          interests of all of the grantors.

          3. The parties hereto express their intent to
          effectuate the purposes of the Open Space Land
          Act (Chap. 13, Title 10, Code of Va. 1950
          Amended), and to that end consent to such
          constructions of terms not otherwise defined
          above as will accomplish such purpose.

       IN WITNESS of all of which, the parties hereto
  have set their hands and seals and acknowledged the
  execution hereof:

  SEAL                        ____________________(LS)

  ATTEST:___________          ____________________(LS)

                              Clive L. DuVal, 2d
                           s/
                              Susan B. DuVal    (LS)
                              ______________________
                               Grantors

  STATE OF VIRGINIA
                     to-wit:
  COUNTY OF FAIRFAX

       This 29 day of December, 1970, appeared before me
  in my State and County aforesaid Clive L. DuVal 2nd
  and Susan B. DuVal, and ____________, whose names are
  signed above as grantors, and acknowledged the said
  signatures as theirs.

                                  Mary Ellen Stears
                                  __________________
                                  Notary Public

         My commission expires:   My commission expires August
                                    18, 1974

                                  COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, VIRGINIA

                                  By G. J. Kelley, Jr.
                                     ______________________
                                        County Executive

  Attest: Edna Bicksler
  _____________________
       Clerk

  STATE OF VIRGINIA
                     to-wit:
  COUNTY OF FAIRFAX

       This 24th day of March, 1971, appeared before me
  in my County and State aforesaid, George J. Kelley,
  Jr. and acknowledged his signature affixed above as
  his, and further, having been first duly sworn, made
  oath that he is authorized by the Board of Supervisors
  of Fairfax County, Virginia, to execute this
  instrument on behalf of said County.

                         Hazel C. Shear
                       ________________________
                          Notary Public

  My commission expires: Jan. 31, 1972

       In the Clerk's Office of the Circuit
       Court of Fairfax County, Virginia
       APR 8, 1971 at 12:39 PM This instrument
       was received and, with the
       certificate annexed, admitted to
       record
           Teste:

              W. Franklin Gooding          Clerk



LIST OF SOURCES


Books

American Genealogical Research Institute. _History of the Carter
Family._ Washington, D.C.: 1972.

Arnett, Ethel Stephens. _Mrs. James Madison: The Incomparable Dolley._
Greensboro, N.C.: Piedmont Press, 1972.

Brant, Irving. _James Madison: Commander in Chief, 1812-1836._
Indianapolis: Bobbs Merrill, 1961.

Brockett, F. L. _The Lodge of Washington._ Alexandria, Va.: George E.
French, c. 1875.

Clark, Allan C. _Life and Letters of Dolly Madison._ W. F. Roberts
Co., 1914.

Commonwealth of Virginia. _Manual of the Senate and House of
Delegates._ Richmond, Va.: Department of Purchasing and Supply, 1978.

Fairfax County Office of Comprehensive Planning. _Fairfax County in
Virginia: Selections from Some Rare Sources._ Fairfax, Va.: Office of
Comprehensive Planning, 1974.

Gamble, Robert S. _Sully: The Biography of a House._ Chantilly, Va.:
The Sully Foundation, Ltd., 1973.

Gillespie, Franklin B. _A Brief History of the Lewinsville
Presbyterian Church._ n.d.

Hall, Florence Howe. _The Story of the Battle Hymn of the Republic._
Freeport, N.Y.: Books for Libraries Press, reprint 1971.

Hammett, Regina Combs. _History of St. Mary's County, Maryland._
Ridge, Md.: by the author, 1977.

Harrison, Fairfax. _Landmarks of Old Prince William._ Berryville, Va.:
Reprint, Chesapeake Book Company, 1964.

Johns, John H. _History of the Rock Presbyterian Church of Cecil
County, Md._ Oxford, Pa.: Oxford Press, 1872.

Klapthor, Margaret Brown and Brown, Paul Dennis. _History of Charles
County, Maryland._ La Plata: Charles County Tercentennary Committee,
1958.

Langford, Laura Carter Holloway. _Ladies of the White House; or in the
Home of the Presidents Being a Complete History of the Social and
Domestic Lives of the Presidents from Washington to Hayes, 1789-1880._
Philadelphia, Pa.: Bradley, 1880.

Lee, Edmund Jennings. _Lee of Virginia, 1642-1892._ Philadelphia: By
the author, 1895.

Lee, Gardner Cazenove, Jr. _Lee Chronicle._ New York: New York
University Press, 1957.

Lloyd, Alan. _The Scorching of Washington._ Washington, D.C.: R. B.
Luce, 1975.

Lord, Walter. _Dawn's Early Light._ New York: W. W. Norton Co., 1972.

Mackall, Sarah Somervell. _Early Days of Washington._ Washington,
D.C.: By the author, 1899.

Mitchell, Beth. _Beginning at a White Oak: Patents and Northern Neck
Grants of Fairfax County._ Fairfax, Va.: Office of Comprehensive
Planning, 1977.

Morrison, A. J. _The Beginnings of Public Education in Virginia,
1776-1860._ Richmond, Va.: Virginia State Board of Education, 1917.

Netherton, Nan, Sweig, Donald, Artemel, Janice, Hickin, Patricia, and
Reed, Patrick. _Fairfax County, Virginia: A History._ Fairfax, Va.:
Fairfax County Board of Supervisors, 1978.

Newman, Harry Wright. _The Smoots of Maryland and Virginia._
Washington, D.C.: By the author, 1936.

Powell, Mary G. _History of Old Alexandria, Va._ Richmond, Va.:
William Byrd Press, 1928.

Rafuse, Diane. _Maplewood._ Fairfax, Va.: Office of Planning, 1970.

Randolph, Robert Carter. _The Carter Tree._ Richmond, Va.: By the
author, 1951.

Steadman, Melvin. _Falls Church by Fence and Fireside._ Falls Church,
Va.: Falls Church Public Library, 1964.

Stetson, Charles W. _Washington and His Neighbors._ Richmond, Va.:
Garrett & Massie, Inc., 1956.

Virginia General Assembly. _Register of the General Assembly from
1619-1976._ Richmond, Va.: Virginia General Assembly, 1978.

Washington, George. _The Writings of George Washington, 1749-1799._
John C. Fitzpatrick, ed. Washington, D.C.: United States Government
Printing Office, 1941.

Woodward, Evan Morrison. _Our Campaign._ Philadelphia: J. E. Potter
Co., 1865.

Works Projects Administration, Writers' Program. _Virginia, a Guide to
the Old Dominion._ New York: Oxford University Press, 1941.


Periodicals and Newspapers

_Alexandria Gazette_, December 24, 1799; January 30, 1800; February
10, 1800; November 4, 1801; January 8, 1802; April 30, 1802; February
21, 1803; May 7, 1803; November 11, 18, 1811; August 18, 1812.

Fairfax County _Free Press Newspapers_, September 29, 1966.

Fairfax County _Sun-Echo_, January 15, 1965.

_Globe_, May 14, 1970.

Historical Society of Fairfax County, Virginia. _Yearbook_, Fairfax,
Va.: Historical Society, 1971.

McLean _Providence Journal_, April 29, 1960; February 11, 1977.

"The Rambler," _Sunday Star_, August 2, 1914.

_Washington Post_, April 23, 1961.

_Washington Star_, May 20, 1932; March 18, 1965.


Public Records

Fairfax County, Virginia, Deed Book, J-2; V-2; Z-2; C-3; G-3; J-3;
T-3; 635; 1041; 1097; 1322; 3418; 4159.

Fairfax County Ordinance of Secession, Lewinsville Precinct, #18, May
23, 1861. Fairfax County Courthouse, and copy, Virginia Room, Fairfax
County Central Library.

Fairfax County Personal Property Tax Records, 1805.

Fairfax County, Virginia, Personal Property Tax Books, 1812-1843.
Microfilm, Virginia State Library, Archives Division.

Fairfax County Real Property Tax Books, 1790-1813. Virginia State
Library, Archives Division.

Fairfax County, Virginia, Real and Personal Property Tax Assessments,
1854-1900. Virginia State Library, Archives Division.

Fairfax County, Virginia, Will Book H; I; J; K; L; N; Q.

Fairfax County Census, 1810, #284.

Virginia Mutual Assurance Society records, Virginia State Library,
Richmond, Virginia.


Unpublished Materials

Alexandria Academy Minutes, Board of Trustees. April, 1795; March,
1804.

Alexandria Library Company Minutes. 1801, 1802, 1803, 1804.

Artemel, Janice G. A Preliminary Survey of the Literature on James
Wren. Unpublished study. Falls Church, Virginia.

Letter from Dr. Benjamin Franklin Cooling, U.S. Army Military History
Institute, Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania, to Mrs. Ross D. Netherton,
Fairfax, Virginia. December 5, 1978. Working papers for _Salona_,
Virginia Room, Fairfax County Central Library.

DuVal family scrapbooks, Volumes I-VII, 1944-1978, Salona.

Interviews with Susan and Clive DuVal by the author.

Interview with Susan and Clive DuVal, January 11, 1979, by Nan
Netherton.

James Jarboe Papers. Manuscript Collection, Maryland Historical
Society, Baltimore.

Letter to the author from Ruth B. Lee, librarian of the Historical
Foundation of the Presbyterian and Reformed Church, Montreat, N.C.
March 29, 1977.

Letter from Ann B. Maffitt, dated July 22, 1828, to Col. George W.
Hunter. Copy in _Salona_ working papers, Virginia Room, Fairfax County
Public Library. Manuscripts Division, Alderman Library, University of
Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia.

Letter from Harriotte Maffitt to George Turberville, July 13, 1819.
Copy provided by Henry and Douglass Mackall from original in
possession of George Turberville of Manassas.

Interviews with Peter Maffitt by the author.

Ludwell Lee Montague letter to Eleanor Lee Templeman, May 4, 1969.

Old Presbyterian Meeting House, Alexandria, Baptismal Records.

Presbyterian Church in the United States of America, Minutes of the
General Assembly. 1798; 1808; 1809; 1814; 1824.

Letter from Ann Calvert (Stuart) Robinson to Elizabeth Collins Lee,
October 19, 1806. Lee Family Papers, Section II, Richard Bland Lee,
Virginia Historical Society.

Interviews with Smoot family members by the author.

Interview with John D. K. Smoot, by Nan Netherton, January 18, 1979.

Letter from the University of Delaware to the author, April 4, 1977.
Working papers, Virginia Room, Fairfax County Central Library.

Letter from William C. Woodbridge (director of The Asylum) to the
Reverend William Maffitt, September 21, 1820. Copy provided by Henry
and Douglass Mackall from original in possession of George Turberville
of Manassas.





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