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Title: The Americans
Author: Schoonmaker, Edwin Davies
Language: English
As this book started as an ASCII text book there are no pictures available.
Copyright Status: Not copyrighted in the United States. If you live elsewhere check the laws of your country before downloading this ebook. See comments about copyright issues at end of book.

*** Start of this Doctrine Publishing Corporation Digital Book "The Americans" ***

This book is indexed by ISYS Web Indexing system to allow the reader find any word or number within the document.



by The Kentuckiana Digital Library)



  [Transcribers notes:
  Inconsistencies in hyphenation have been retained. Unusual spellings
  in dialogue have also been retained.
  Page 147 "." added ("BISHOP HARDBROOKE.")
  Page 170 "And" replacing "nd" ("And now a living thing.")
  Page 198 "." added ("EGERTON.")
  Page 252 "Harry" replacing "arry" ("HARRY EGERTON.")
  Page 259 "." added ("Bishop Hardbrooke.")
  Page 259 "." added ("We have been busy.")]



THE AMERICANS



THE AMERICANS

By

EDWIN DAVIES SCHOONMAKER

  NEW YORK
  MITCHELL KENNERLEY
  1913



COPYRIGHT 1913 BY MITCHELL KENNERLEY

PRESS OF J. J. LITTLE & IVES COMPANY, NEW YORK


TO MY FATHER AND MY BROTHER FRANK



AUTHOR'S NOTE


The drama here published is logically the third in a series of racial
dramas, as follows:

  1. _The Saxons_
  2. _The Slavs_
  3. _The Americans_
  4. _The Hindoos_

Of this series _The Saxons_, dealing with man's struggle for religious
liberty, has already been published. For reasons that need not be given,
it has been thought best to postpone _The Slavs_, which will present
man's battle for political liberty, and offer _The Americans_, the theme
of which is the industrial conflict that is now raging. _The Hindoos_, a
drama of spiritual unfoldment, will come in its order.



PERSONS OF THE DRAMA


  J. DONALD EGERTON             Lumber king and mill-owner
  AUGUSTUS JERGENS                               A partner
  SAM WILLIAMS                      Leader of the strikers
  GENERAL CHADBOURNE       In command of the State Militia
  CAPTAIN HASKELL                        Second in command
  REV. EZRA HARDBROOKE               Bishop of the Diocese
  JOHN. W. BRADDOCK                  Governor of the State
  RALPH ARDSLEY             Editor of the Foreston Courier
  CHIEF OF POLICE             Coöperating with the Militia
  GEORGE EGERTON                     Son of Donald Egerton
  HARRY EGERTON                      Son of Donald Egerton
  HARVEY ANDERSON            Former cowboy and Rough Rider
  BUCK BENTLEY                          One of the Militia
  WES DICEY                             A walking delegate
  JIM KING                              Supporter of Dicey
  ROME MASTERS                          Supporter of Dicey
  CAP SAUNDERS                                An old miner
  BILL PATTEN               Striker, off in search of work
  SILAS MAURY               Striker, off in search of work
  WILLIE MAURY                          Son of Silas Maury
  MARY EGERTON                      Wife of Donald Egerton
  GLADYS EGERTON                Daughter of Donald Egerton
  SYLVIA ORR                        Friend of Mrs. Egerton

A chauffeur, a butler, a doctor, a nurse, two maids, two detectives, two
sentries, strikers, strike-breakers, militiamen, guests at the
reception, etc.



  A land is not its timber but its people,
  And not its Art, my father, but its men.
  --HARRY EGERTON.



THE AMERICANS



ACT I

THE MINE


_Scene: On the mountains in a timber region of north-western America. In
every direction, as far as the eye can see, a wilderness of stumps with
piles of brush black with age and sinking from sheer rottenness into the
ground. Here and there a dead pine stands up high against the horizon.
In the distance, left, cleaving the range and extending on back under an
horizon of cold gray clouds, is seen the line of a river of which this
whole region is apparently the watershed, for everywhere the land slopes
toward it. In the remote distance, beyond the river, innumerable bare
buttes, and beyond these a gray stretch of plains. Down the mountains,
left, six or seven miles away, the river loops in and a portion of a
town is seen upon its banks. At this end of the town, upon a hill
overlooking the river, a large white mansion conspicuous for the timber
about it. At the farther end, a huge red saw-mill occupies the centre of
a vast field of yellow lumber piles, the tall black stack of the mill
clearly outlined against the gray of the land beyond._

_Back, a hundred yards or so, a road, evidently constructed years ago
when the logs were being taken out, comes up on the flats from the
direction of the town, turns sharply to the right and goes toward the
ridge. Beyond this road, just at the curve, standing out among the
stumps, an old stationary engine eaten up with rust and an abandoned
logging-wagon, the hind part resting upon the ground, the two heavy
wheels lying upon it. Farther back a small cabin falling into decay.
Here and there patches of creeping vines and rank grass cover the
ground, hiding in some places to a considerable depth the bases of the
stumps. But to the left, where it is evident a steep slope plunges down,
and also in the foreground, are open spaces with boulders and, scattered
about under a thin loam of rotted needles and black cones, the outlines
of a few flat stones. In the immediate foreground, left, a huge boulder,
weighing possibly four or five tons, barely hangs upon the slope, ready
at any moment, one would think, to slip and plunge down._

_Two men, Cap Saunders and Harvey Anderson, the latter down left, the
former to the right and farther back, are slowly coming forward. Each
has a camping outfit, a roll of blankets, etc., upon his back, and
carries in his hands a plaster cast of what would seem to be a
cross-section of a log. It is about two feet in diameter and three
inches thick. As they come along they try the casts on the various
stumps and carefully turn them about to see if they fit, then chip the
stump with a hatchet to indicate that it has been tried._

_Time: The evening of a day early in November in the present time._

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  And say two dollars profit on each log.

CAP SAUNDERS.

  That's low enough.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

                  Suppose a man could walk
  Over the mountains with a great big sack
  And pick two silver dollars from each stump.
  It's forty miles to where the trees begin,
  And on each side the river eight or ten.
  Think what he'd have.

CAP SAUNDERS.

  He's made work for them, Harvey.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Have millions, wouldn't he?

Cap Saunders.

                  I suppose he would.
  But where would this land be? There'd be no homes.
  And what are forests for but to cut down?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  You wouldn't hear him say, 'Now, Harvey, you
  Go in and get your sack full; I'll stay out';
  Or 'Now it's your turn, Cap.' Not on your life.
  He'd walk his legs off, but he'd have them all.
  Or what's more likely, he'd let others walk,
  And send his wagons out and get the sacks
  And have them brought in to him.

CAP SAUNDERS.

                  For myself
  I'd rather be out here though on the mountains
  Than live in his big mansion.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

                  So would I.
  But that don't mean I'd rather tramp the flats
  Picking up dollars for some other man.
  And I suppose the mill-boys feel the same.

CAP SAUNDERS.

  A fellow has to do the best he can.
  If he can stake himself, then off, I say,
  And pan for his own self. That's been my way.
  Sometimes I've struck pay dirt and sometimes not.
  And then I'd go and dig for a month or two
  For the other boys until I'd got my stake----

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Here is another like the one back there;
  Goes half way round as clean as anything;
  And the bark seems the same; but on this side----

CAP SAUNDERS.

     (_Who has left his cast and is hurrying forward excitedly_)

  Hold her a minute!

HARVEY ANDERSON.

                  No, it don't fit, Cap.
  The same old finger width it's always been.
  When the curve matches, then there's some damn knot;
  And when the knot's not there, it's something else.
  No, you can't stretch it. Now it's this side; see?
  'Twas best the way I had it. There you are.
  Might as well mark her.

CAP SAUNDERS.

                  It's a close miss, sure.
  It's like the one I found upon the ridge
  Week before last.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

                  The place where it don't match
  Is always on the side that you don't see
  Until your heart's jumped up.

     (_Chips the stump_)

                  That ends the day.

CAP SAUNDERS.

  I think I'll work a while.

     (_Starts back_)

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  The sun's gone down.

CAP SAUNDERS.

  I haven't heard the whistle of the mill.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Nor like to.

CAP SAUNDERS.

                  Ah! I keep forgetting that.
  When a man's heard her blow for years and years
  He can't be always thinking that she's stopped.
  I wonder how the strike is getting on.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  As everything gets on that's Egerton's.
  He'll cut them down as he's cut down the trees.

     (_Sits upon a stump and looks off up the valley, then turns and
     watches the old man busy with his cast_)

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Your old bones must be tired, Cap.

CAP SAUNDERS.

  How so?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  How long have you been hunting for this thing?

CAP SAUNDERS.

  Before this search, you mean?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Yes.

CAP SAUNDERS.

                  Off and on,
  Thirty or forty years.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  And won't give up?

CAP SAUNDERS.

  Not till I'm dead.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

                  You ought to have been an ox.
  You've got the wrong form, Cap. You think you'd be
  As patient if the prize was for yourself?

CAP SAUNDERS.

  When one's been on a trail for years and years
  It ain't the game he cares for; it's the chase.
  And like as not when he's brought down the buck
  He'll leave the carcass lying on the rocks,
  Taking a piece or two, then off again.
  As for what's done with it, I don't care that.
  But I would like to know where that tree stood.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  And you think the boys down there should be the same,
  The boys that saw the dollars from the logs,
  Sacking the silver up, be satisfied
  To have him take the silver, leaving them
  The bark on either side?

CAP SAUNDERS.

  I don't say that.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Give me the carcass when you find it, Cap,
  And you can have the chase. I'd like to know
  For one time in my life just how it feels
  To have your pockets full and taste the towns.
  And I think the boys that saw the logs down there
  Are more like me, Cap, than they are like you.

     (_Picks up his cast and comes forward_)

CAP SAUNDERS.

  Egerton ain't a-holdin' them. They can go
  If they ain't satisfied.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

                  Yes, they can go.
  They're like the red men, they can always go.

     (_In an open space in the foreground he puts his things down upon
     the ground. He goes right to a pile of brush, pulls out a black
     limb, and proceeds to break it across his knee, throwing the pieces
     in a little heap upon the ground_)

  They've got a Mayor down there, I suppose.
  What if he said, 'If you don't like my way,
  If you ain't satisfied, there's the road off there?'
  Or say the lad we've got in Washington--
  What if he said, 'If you don't like my way,
  There's ships there in the harbor?' Think we'd leave?
  You've had your eyes, Cap, on the ground so long
  That you've forgotten there's such things as men.

     (_The old man comes down to the stump which he and Anderson tried
     earlier in the scene. Anderson picks up his kindling and goes left
     and proceeds to start a fire. The night gathers quickly_)

CAP SAUNDERS.

     (_Trying the stump_)

  Be careful, Harvey, or they'll see the flame
  And think it's found already.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

                  I don't care.
  'Twould serve them right.

CAP SAUNDERS.

  They're watching at this hour.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  'Now we've got millions!' then say 'April Fool.'
  God, I don't blame them though; I'd do it too.

     (_Picks up a blanket and, sticking pieces of brush in the ground,
     hangs it between the fire and the town_)

CAP SAUNDERS.

  Aug. Jergens he'd be mighty mad, I tell you.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  If I could put men out, you bet I would.
  And when I found the gold I'd make her fly.
  You wouldn't catch me quarrelling with a lot
  Of fellows for the bones, I tell you that.
  I'd take a rump or two, then say, 'Light in
  And fill your bellies'; or, 'Come on; I'm rich;
  Let's take a turn together.' And I'd buy
  A train or two and we'd all take a spin
  Around the world. I'd make their hair stand up.
  I'd show those eastern fellows once or twice.

     (_Goes left and climbs up on the boulder and looks back over the
     waste_)

CAP SAUNDERS.

     (_Coming forward_)

  You'll have that rolling down if you don't mind.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  And that's one reason I'll be always broke,
  For I know how to spend, while Egerton
  And Jergens and those fellows down there don't,
  In spite of their big houses. They know how
  To quarrel with men and squeeze their last dime out,
  But they don't know how to say, 'By God, come on;
  Let's have a drink together; we're all friends.'

     (_The old man busies himself about the fire, preparing the evening
     meal. Anderson sits down on the boulder and looks off up the
     valley. Where the town was seen, lights begin to appear_)

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  You'll wake up some day, Cap, and look about
  And Harvey will be gone.

CAP SAUNDERS.

                  You don't mean that!
  You ain't took no offence at what I said?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Mad as the Devil, Cap.

CAP SAUNDERS.

                  Don't you know, Harvey,
  About the rolling stone?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

                There's some stones, Cap,
  Would rather have the motion than the moss.

CAP SAUNDERS.

  You're sure a wild one, Harvey; that you are.
  You'd stir a muss up, that's what you would do.

     (_Goes to the boulder and stands beside Anderson, and they both
     look off up the valley_)

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  The mansion all lit up--what's going on?

     (_They are silent_)

  It's a strange world, Cap, it's a funny world.
  You throw a piece of bread down; it draws ants,
  Red ants and black ants, little ants and big,
  And if you'll keep it up you'll have them here
  Building their hills about you; you know that.

CAP SAUNDERS.

     (_Returning to the fire_)

  It's wonderful how much some men can do.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Well, men are ants, and Egerton he's had bread.
  And he's kept throwing it down there in the valley,
  First crumb by crumb and later chunk by chunk,
  Until he's drawn them round him, thousands of them,
  And when they've come he's put them all to work.
  And to see them at it! I could spend my life
  Sitting upon the mountains on some rock
  That hangs above the town, watching them drudge.
  'Get me my logs out;' and they get his logs.
  'Now saw them; make me lumber;' and they do it,
  'Build me my railroad;' and they blast the rocks.
  'Now up with my big mansion on the hill,
  And carve me all my ants upon the walls,
  Some sawing logs, others with axes raised
  Hard at the big round boles, some half cut down;
  Make her look like a forest through and through.'
  And they've tugged at it till they've got it done.
  And all they've chopped and sawed and built is his,
  And he puts it in his pocket and sits down
  And they can't help themselves. They've got to eat,
  And Egerton he's the man that's----

     (_He has risen and stands looking back through the darkness_)

CAP SAUNDERS.

                  What do you say,
  Harvey, let's spend the night back in the cabin.
  It ain't the cold I mind, but from the air
  I wouldn't be surprised if it would snow.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  By God, Cap!

CAP SAUNDERS.

  Eh?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Looks like the boys had found it.

CAP SAUNDERS.

  You don't, don't say!

     (_Goes to the boulder_)

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Off there, beyond the knob.

     (_Bill Patten comes through the darkness, rear right. He looks
     about, then spies the men_)

BILL PATTEN.

  You got some grub that you can spare, boys?

     (_Goes near the men and gets their line of vision_)

                          That?
  It's the moon rising.

CAP SAUNDERS.

  Ah, I'm glad, I'm glad!

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Against the sky it looked like some far fire.

     (_Gets down from the boulder_)

BILL PATTEN.

  You're of the force that's huntin' for the mine?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  That's 'hunting' for it, yes.

BILL PATTEN.

  You'll find it.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Why?

BILL PATTEN.

  Egerton's luck.

     (_Calls back_)

  O Silas!

     (_To Anderson_)

                  'Tain't no use
  A-fightin' that old wolf or 'spectin' God
  To put his hand between J. D. and gold.
  He's got a devil that takes care of him.

     (_Silas Maury and his son Willie, a boy of twelve or thirteen,
     enter rear_)

BILL PATTEN.

  And the same devil blacks Aug. Jergens' boots.
  I'd like to get that man in some lone spot.

     (_They sit down. The workmen seize food and eat ravenously_)

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Mill-hands?

     (_Patten nods_)

  How's the strike?

BILL PATTEN.

                  I ain't a man
  To show the white while there's a chance to win.

SILAS MAURY.

  They've got till sun-down to report for work.

BILL PATTEN.

  They'll feel like dogs, too, goin' in that gate,
  After the bluff they've made, lickin' his hand.
  Me for some other town. I'd rather starve.

SILAS MAURY.

  They're 'ranging to bring in a lot of scabs
  To-morrow, when the Governor will be there.

BILL PATTEN.

  Much as to say, 'Now knock 'em!' Son of a bitch!

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  The Governor?

CAP SAUNDERS.

  What's the trouble?

BILL PATTEN.

  Cakes and pies.

SILAS MAURY.

  It's Egerton's big reception.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

     (_To Cap Saunders_)

                  Explains the lights.
  They're getting things in shape.

SILAS MAURY.

  Yes.

     (_He and Anderson walk a little way left and look back toward the
     mansion_)

BILL PATTEN.

                  When the boys
  First talked of strikin' when they made the cut
  I said, 'Don't do it. Egerton's a man--
  You'd better fight the Devil than fight him.
  He'll show no mercy on you if you cross him.'
  I guess they know by now that Bill was right.
  Sam Williams though he thinks he knows. 'Hang on.'
  All right, hang on; but you will see what comes.
  It's hell. I'd rather die out on some rock.

SILAS MAURY.

  There ain't no room for poor men in this world.
  I don't know what God ever made us for.

     (_He and Anderson return to the fire_)

BILL PATTEN.

  The man that's got no home's a lucky man.

SILAS MAURY.

  I said to Willie, 'I'm glad mother's dead.'

     (_A pause_)

WILLIE MAURY.

  Think she can see us, pa?

SILAS MAURY.

  I don't think so.

BILL PATTEN.

  She's better off.

SILAS MAURY.

                  That's true. I hope she can't.
  She died a-thinkin' Willie would be rich
  Some day, if they ever found the mine.

BILL PATTEN.

     (_Bitterly_)

  Give 'em your apples and expect the core.

SILAS MAURY.

  It came so quick, though, Bill; he didn't think.

BILL PATTEN.

  If he had just kept still and called to Chris
  And had him help and roll the log aside
  And then at night let some of us men know,
  We could have slipped it out and hidden it,
  And gone to Egerton and said, 'See here,
  We've found the log that you've been lookin' for
  These years and haven't found it----'

CAP SAUNDERS.

  You don't mean----

BILL PATTEN.

  'And if you'll do the square thing we'll cough up;
  If not, we'll go and find the mine ourselves.'

CAP SAUNDERS.

  You don't mean 'twas the boy that found the log!

SILAS MAURY.

  Willie here found it.

CAP SAUNDERS.

                  Well, well, well! H-u-rrah!
  Hurrah, I say!

     (_Throws his hat into the air. Harry Egerton comes through the
     darkness rear right_)

CAP SAUNDERS.

                  If I could call the men,
  Call up the men, my son, who've spent their lives
  Tryin' to get a peep of that there trunk--
  You hear that, boys, you up there in the air?

BILL PATTEN.

  He'd come to terms, all right, you bet your life.

HARRY EGERTON.

  Good evening, men. I'm turned around a bit,
  Or seem to be. Just where is Foreston?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  You see those lights down there?

     (_He walks back, left. Harry Egerton joins him, going across rear_)

HARRY EGERTON.

  That's east?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Correct.

HARRY EGERTON.

  And how far am I from it?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  About six miles.

HARRY EGERTON.

  From Foreston, I mean?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Six miles or more.

HARRY EGERTON.

  So far!

     (_He walks back a little way, then stops and looks off up the
     valley. Harvey Anderson comes forward and begins to break some
     brush to replenish the fire_)

CAP SAUNDERS.

  Who is it, Harvey?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  I don't know.

CAP SAUNDERS.

  And it had the sign cut in the bark, eh?

SILAS MAURY.

  Yes.

WILLIE MAURY.

  Two X's and a spade.

CAP SAUNDERS.

                  That's it, that's it!
  'Two X's and a spade, then dig nine feet.'
  There's two bits, son. How did it happen, dad?

SILAS MAURY.

  It came up into the mill with the other logs,
  Lookin' just like 'em, but Willie spied the sign--

WILLIE MAURY.

  Just as it was goin' into the saws.

SILAS MAURY.

  And shouted to Chris Knudson. Chris shut down;
  There was a crowd; and then Aug. Jergens come
  And had it hauled away.

CAP SAUNDERS.

                  If you and me
  Had been out here, son, when all these were trees
  And you'd a-spied that sign, I tell you what,
  I'd hung some nuggets round this little neck.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  You'd better wait until the moon comes out.
  It's a rough road back there.

HARRY EGERTON.

  There is a road?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  A logging road.

HARRY EGERTON.

     (_Coming forward, notices the casts upon the ground_)

  You're searching for the mine?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Cap and I here. These men are from the mill.

HARRY EGERTON.

     (_With interest_)

  From the mill down in Foreston, you mean?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Leaving in search of work.

HARRY EGERTON.

                  Are things so bad
  Down at the mill, my friends, that you must leave?
  Are others leaving? Have the men gone back?

     (_The men glare at him_)

CAP SAUNDERS.

  They'll have to soon, they say; their grub's give out.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  The Company has given them till to-morrow night
  To come to work or be shut out for good.

HARRY EGERTON.

  Have they brought in more men?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  They're arranging to.

HARRY EGERTON.

  I do not see, friends, what you hope to gain
  By leaving Foreston and wandering off
  In search of work. In the first place I know,
  As you perhaps do not, that Egerton
  Has given orders to the neighboring plants
  To take on no more men until this strike
  Is settled, till it's won. And, as you know,
  For forty miles around the mills are his,
  The camps are his. And where his power ends,
  Others begin that work in harmony
  With Egerton and Company. They are one,
  And have an understanding in some things
  Far more than you suspect.

     (_Patten and Maury rise and walk aside and whisper together_)

                  And they all know
  Whatever be the outcome of this strike
  The effect of it will reach them all at last.
  If you men win, mill-workers everywhere
  Will take new heart and stand for better things.
  But if the Company wins, others will say--
  And with no little weight--'We cannot pay
  The present scale of wages and compete
  With Egerton and Company.' So it will go
  Until the farthest mill in all this land
  Puts in its hand and takes a ten per cent
  Out of the wages of its workingmen.
  And there's no power on earth that can prevent it.

     (_Willie Maury rises and joins his father and Patten_)

  But even were this not true, were places open,
  The same conditions would confront you there
  As now confront you here. At any time
  Those who employ you have you in their power
  And can reduce your wages when they choose,
  Lay on you what conditions they see fit,
  And you must either yield or be turned forth
  To wander on again. I do not know
  Whether you men have families or not,
  But others have, and their cause is your own.
  You cannot wander on for evermore,
  Picking up here and there a chance day's work
  And hoping that to-morrow things will change,
  For changes do not come except through men.

     (_The men return to the fire_)

  And so I do not see just what it is
  You hope to gain by leaving Foreston.
  You cannot spend your lives on highways, friends.
  Where will you go? Have you some place in mind?

BILL PATTEN.

  It's none of your damn business where we go.
  We don't wear no man's collar.

SILAS MAURY.

  Bill is right.

BILL PATTEN.

  Nor Egerton's, nor no man's on this earth.

HARRY EGERTON.

  I beg your pardon, friends, I did not mean----

BILL PATTEN.

  We're twenty-one years old and we're free men.

HARRY EGERTON.

  I did not mean you had no right to go.
  You have.

BILL PATTEN.

  You bet we have.

SILAS MAURY.

                  You can't get men
  And want to scare us back, that's what you want,
  Talkin' as how the mills will shut us out.

HARRY EGERTON.

  I have no wish to scare you back, my friend.

BILL PATTEN.

  Then what's your proposition?

HARRY EGERTON.

  I have none.

BILL PATTEN.

  Come up to shake hands, eh, and say, Good-bye?

HARRY EGERTON.

  I chanced upon you here.

BILL PATTEN.

  'Chanced' hell! We know.

SILAS MAURY.

  If it's my rent you're after, if it's that,
  I think you might at least let that much go
  For what my boy did, findin' of the log.

HARRY EGERTON.

  Friends, you misunderstand me if you think
  That I am here to speak for any man,
  Or round you up, or lift one hand to stay
  Your coming or your going. You are free
  And can do what you please.

BILL PATTEN.

                  You bet we can,
  For all your bayonets.

HARRY EGERTON.

  _My_ bayonets?

BILL PATTEN.

  Yes.

SILAS MAURY.

  Think we don't know you, eh?

HARRY EGERTON.

                  I do not know,
  I do not know what I can say to you.
  I understand just how you----

SILAS MAURY.

     (_Plucks him by the sleeve and points off up the valley_)

                  There's your home,
  Off there in that big mansion on the hill.
  Go there and live your life; you're none of us.

HARRY EGERTON.

  My father is my father; I am I.

     (_The men prepare to leave. Cap Saunders rises and begins to pack
     up the things_)

HARRY EGERTON.

  We do not choose the gates through which we come
  Into this world, my friends. Nor you nor I
  Selected who should cradle us nor what home
  Should give us shelter. 'Tis what we do that counts,
  Not whence we come. Do not misjudge me, friends.
  Because I am a son of Egerton
  Deny me not the right to be a man.

SILAS MAURY.

  You wear our sweat in your fine clothes all right.

HARRY EGERTON.

  I wear, my friend, what my own hands have earned.
  Where will you go?

SILAS MAURY.

  We'll go where we can find----

BILL PATTEN.

  Don't tell him, Si. Don't you see through his game?
  Keeps askin' where we're goin'. Don't you see?
  He's a spy of the Company.

HARRY EGERTON.

                  Ah, you do not know
  Why I am here. God knows I did not come----

WILLIE MAURY.

  Thought we wouldn't know him.

SILAS MAURY.

  Poor men are fools.

WILLIE MAURY.

                  He's been
  Doggin' our footsteps.

BILL PATTEN.

                  You've been followin' us
  To find out where----

CAP SAUNDERS.

  Don't quarrel, men.

BILL PATTEN.

                  It's a good thing
  Your old man crushed me till I pawned my gun,
  Or, God, I'd kill you. Do you understand?

HARRY EGERTON.

  Hold on there, pard.

BILL PATTEN.

                  So he could have the mills
  Blacklist us. Curse you! And curse all your kind!
  You've ground us down until we're dogs, damn you.

SILAS MAURY.

  Come sneakin' round to----

HARRY EGERTON.

                  Friend, I did not come
  To spy on any man or seek you out
  Here on the mountains. For my hope has been----

BILL PATTEN.

  We'll blow you up some day, you mark my word.

HARRY EGERTON.

  That never one of you would leave the ranks
  In your great struggle in the valley there,
  But that you would stand fast, and somehow win
  In spite of everything, starvation, death.
  And I have done all that I could to help you.
  But you, my friends, O you must understand,
  As there are some things that you cannot do,
  So there are things I cannot.

CAP SAUNDERS.

  Get the pot.

     (_The boy picks up the coffee pot_)

HARRY EGERTON.

  How I came here I do not know myself.
  Some Power has led me though I know not why.
  I half remember that I could not sleep
  For voices round me in my father's hall,
  And rose and wandered forth, fleeing from something
  That seemed to follow me across the waste,
  A sighing and a thundering of men.
  All day, it seems, I've wandered over the mountains
  And all last night. Then from afar I spied
  Your fire here and came to learn my way.

SILAS MAURY.

  Your way lies that way and our way lies this.

     (_Patten, Maury, Cap Saunders and the boy go off through the
     darkness, right rear_)

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  You must be hungry, pard.

HARRY EGERTON.

                  No, thank you, no,
  Nothing to eat.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

                  'Tain't much, but what it is
  You're welcome to it.

HARRY EGERTON.

     (_Calling after the men_)

                  And you will go away
  And leave this great cause hanging in mid air?

VOICE OF SILAS MAURY.

  Tend to your business and we'll tend to ours.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Don't mind them; they're damn fools.

HARRY EGERTON.

                  _You_ understand
  What I have tried to say unto these men;
  You understand, I know.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  I think I do.

HARRY EGERTON.

  And something tells me we shall meet again.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Who knows? I'm tramping round, to-day one place,
  To-morrow another. I'm a rolling stone.
  I never have been one to keep the trails.
  Just knock about the States and watch the plains
  For something--I don't know--and yet 'twill come,
  And when she comes she'll shake her good and hard.
  I don't know what you're rolling in your mind,
  But, as you say, it's a great land we've got.
  I like to lie and feel her under my back
  And know she tumbles to the double seas
  Up to her hips in mile on mile of wheat.
  Beyond that moon are cities packed with men
  That overflow. The fields are filling up.
  They're climbing up the mountains of the West----

HARRY EGERTON.

     (_Looking after the men_)

  And going on beyond them.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

                  It's all right.
  They'll reach the coast off there or reach the ice,
  And then they'll have to turn or jump on off.
  And they won't jump off. It's too fine a land.
  Men throw away the hoofs but not the haunch.
  I sometimes see them in the dead of night
  Crawling like ants along her big broad back,
  With axe and pick and plow, building their hills
  And pushing on and on. It's a great land.
  And bread tastes good that's eaten in her air.
  And there's enough for all here----

HARRY EGERTON.

  Yes, ah, yes!

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  If we could just turn something upside down.
  I don't know what you've heard along the waste,
  But when you think it's time to ring a change,
  And when you draft your men and call the roll,
  Write Harvey Anderson up near the top.
  And here's my hand, pard. You can count on me.

HARRY EGERTON.

  We'll meet again.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

                  Hope so. I like your face,
  And like the way you talk. Good-night.

HARRY EGERTON.

  Good-night.

     (_Harvey Anderson takes up his pack and cast and goes off through
     the darkness after the other men. For a long time Harry Egerton
     stands looking after him. The fire has burned low_)

HARRY EGERTON.

  Not that, not that! And yet I know 'twill come.
  My God! my God! Is there no way, no way?

     (_Walks left and looks off up the valley_)

  My father! O my father!

     (_He breaks out crying and, staggering about, falls first upon his
     knees, then face forward upon the ground. Instantly it becomes
     pitch dark_)


THE DREAM VISION

     (_During the following, a shaft of light, falling upon Harry
     Egerton, shows him lying near the boulder. As he cries out, he
     partially rises, his form and face convulsed with anguish_)

FIRST VOICE.

     (_From up the mountain, full of pleasure_)

  Harry! Harry! Come to the heights!

SECOND VOICE.

     (_From the valley, full of sorrow_)

  Harry! Harry! Come to the valley!

THIRD VOICE.

     (_From far back, full of peace_)

  Harry! Harry! plunge into the darkness,
  The abysses and the waterfalls and silence!

THE THREE VOICES.

     (_In chorus_)

  We are Realities! We are Realities!

VOICE.

     (_From above_)

  One life to live!

FIRST VOICE.

  Come to me, Harry!

SECOND AND THIRD VOICES.

  She will grow old.

VOICE.

     (_From above_)

  One life to live!

SECOND VOICE.

  Come to me, Harry!

FIRST AND THIRD VOICES.

  You cannot help them; you've no power.

VOICE.

     (_From above_)

  One life to live!

THIRD VOICE.

  Come to me, Harry!

FIRST VOICE.

     (_Gayly_)

  Fool! fool!

SECOND VOICE.

  You cannot die; there is no death.

VOICE.

     (_From above_)

  Decide!

HARRY EGERTON.

  My God!

VOICE.

     (_From above_)

  Decide!

HARRY EGERTON.

  My God!

VOICE.

     (_As of a drunkard singing_)

  If you was in the gutter, Bill,
  And I was on the roof----

VOICES.

  You're going mad! You're going mad!

HARRY EGERTON.

  Mother! mother!

     (_Presently, about twenty feet up in the rear and on either side,
     faint lights begin to appear and faint sounds of music are heard.
     Gradually the lights brighten a little and the sounds of music
     become more and more audible until one becomes conscious that on
     the left an orchestra is playing and to the right a piano. One also
     becomes conscious of a vast and beautiful hall over the floor of
     which, as the music plays, the forms of dancers are gliding.
     Occasionally from here and there flashes a sparkle as of diamonds,
     and low rippling laughter is heard. In the foreground for a space
     of twelve or fifteen feet, cut off from the main hall by the
     faintest outlines of an immense arch, small groups of elderly
     people stand about watching the dancers, or saunter right and left
     into the adjoining apartments. In these apartments also people are
     seen moving about, and there is a hum of voices as of men and women
     in conversation. At no time does it become very light, and all that
     passes seems to pass in a dim shadow world._

     _It is sufficiently light, however, to enable one to discern the
     grotesque richness of the hall which, as one sees at a glance, is
     an elaborate representation of a pine forest, the boles of the
     trees standing out in beautiful irregularity along the walls, the
     boughs above in the semi-darkness seeming to disappear in some sort
     of cathedral roof. There, all about, singly and in clusters,
     innumerable small globes as though the cones were illuminated.
     Between the trees, also in relief and life-sized, figures of men at
     work getting out timber. Forward right, teams dragging logs, and,
     on the opposite wall, a distant view of a river with rafts floating
     down. Standing on stumps, huge figures support the arched doorways,
     of which there is one in the rear wall right, and one centre in
     each of the side walls. Left rear, the grand staircase with the
     glow of some hidden lamp shining upon the landing. Here the carved
     scene upon the wall is that of an inclined trestle-work, with logs
     going up apparently into some mill above. Below, crouched upon the
     newel-post and the lower rail, the carved figure of a large
     mountain lion with a frosted light in its open mouth. Forward from
     the arched doorway, left, there is no wall from about four feet up,
     and through this open space, faintly illumined by small hidden
     lamps, a greenness as of palms and flowers._

     _The music ceases and the couples break up. Later, the piano begins
     again, and just inside the main hall Gladys Egerton, in low
     décolleté and holding her skirts above her ankles, appears dancing
     ravishingly to the music of the piano_)

FIRST LADY.

  Isn't she charming!

SECOND LADY.

  And that's George that's playing.

     (_Holding her skirts high the girl executes a graceful high kick
     and there is a clapping of hands_)

MEN'S VOICES.

  Bravo! bravo! Once more like that, my kitten!

THIRD LADY.

  Dear, you may have my Chester!

     (_Laughter_)

FOURTH LADY.

  You dance superbly.

GLADYS EGERTON.

  I'll take your husband.

     (_Continues dancing_)

MRS. EGERTON.

  Why, Gladys Egerton!

A MAN'S VOICE.

  Just any time you want him, Gladys.

GLADYS EGERTON.

  All right.

A MAN.

     (_Appearing forward right_)

  Ladies, the Governor is telling stories.
  Out of politeness let's give him a crowd.

     (_Some of the ladies start right, others begin to move about_)

FIFTH LADY.

  She'd make a good catch.

SIXTH LADY.

  Either she or George would.

THIRD LADY.

     (_Calling aloud_)

  Here is another! Now there are thirteen of us.

     (_Laughter_)

FOURTH LADY.

  There you're on my toes. Marjorie's after George.

SIXTH LADY.

  Your Marge, my dear----

     (_Glances in the direction of Mrs. Egerton, then whispers_)

                  Your Marge may have the other.

FOURTH LADY.

  Thank you, dear Mrs. Casper, we'll have--gander.

     (_Laughter. They go out right_)

SEVENTH LADY.

  To have a son like that!

EIGHTH LADY.

  Yes, what a pity.

NINTH LADY.

  He hasn't anything like the grace of George.

SEVENTH LADY.

  Nor the accomplishments.

EIGHTH LADY.

  Nor the education.

SEVENTH LADY.

  He belongs down in the mill among the men.

EIGHTH LADY.

  One would have thought, though, at the first reception--
  If only for his mother's sake.

SEVENTH LADY.

  That's true.

NINTH LADY.

  How old she looks to-night.

GLADYS EGERTON.

     (_Who has been skipping to the music, whirls in from the main
     hall_)

  Mother is old.

NINTH LADY.

  I did not mean for you to overhear that.

GLADYS EGERTON.

  O that's all right. We always do that way.

     (_Continues dancing_)

  If you had on your heart what mother has
  You'd look old, too.

EIGHTH LADY.

  What did she mean by that?

GLADYS EGERTON.

  Leave us alone here just a little while.

     (_The women go out right_)

GLADYS EGERTON.

  Mother!

MRS. EGERTON.

  Yes, darling.

GLADYS EGERTON.

  Mother, where is Harry?

     (_Dances_)

MRS. EGERTON.

  I do not know.

GLADYS EGERTON.

                  It's very embarrassing.
  People are whispering. Mother, has no word come?

MRS. EGERTON.

  Have you asked your father?

GLADYS EGERTON.

  Yes.

     (_Dances_)

                  Mother, I'm sure
  Something has happened to him.

MRS. EGERTON.

                  Don't, my child,
  Don't say that.

GLADYS EGERTON.

     (_Mysteriously_)

  Why?

MRS. EGERTON.

  Go, child; people are watching us.

GLADYS EGERTON.

  _I_ know why! _I_ know why!

     (_Dances_)

          Let go! let go!

MRS. EGERTON.

  And please tell Donald that I'm waiting for him.

GLADYS EGERTON.

  You're going after flowers, mother; _I_ know.

MRS. EGERTON.

  Flowers, my child? What for?

GLADYS EGERTON.

  For Harry's grave.

MRS. EGERTON.

  Why Gladys, Gladys Egerton!

GLADYS EGERTON.

     (_Whirling back into the main hall_)

  _I_ know.

     (_She disappears into the conservatory, left. Alone, Mrs. Egerton
     stands a pathetic figure. She walks back into the deserted hall and
     stops and listens as though to the upper part of the walls. She
     then turns slowly and comes forward again. George Egerton enters
     quickly from the conservatory_)

GEORGE EGERTON.

  Mother!

MRS. EGERTON.

  Yes, George.

GEORGE EGERTON.

  This is disgraceful, mother.

MRS. EGERTON.

  I cannot help it, George.

GEORGE EGERTON.

  Where did he go?

MRS. EGERTON.

  I've told you, George. Now please don't bother me.

GEORGE EGERTON.

  People are whispering.

MRS. EGERTON.

  But what can I do?

GEORGE EGERTON.

  Call to them that he's up in bed with fever,
  Or say that he was brought home from the river drowned.

MRS. EGERTON.

     (_Calling aloud_)

  It's none of your business, people! Harry's my son.

     (_She comes forward_)

GEORGE EGERTON.

  That wasn't what I said. You are just like him.

     (_He turns back and re-enters the conservatory. Mrs. Egerton passes
     into the room forward right. The lights in the hall become dimmer_)

VOICES.

     (_From the walls_)

  Sam! Sam! Sam!

     (_There is a silence, then a sigh as of innumerable voices, then a
     silence and another sigh and still another_)

HARRY EGERTON.

  My father! O my father!

     (_From the conservatory comes a sound of laughter, and a beautiful
     girl runs in. A moment later the bloom of a large white
     chrysanthemum is thrown in after her. A young man enters. Other
     couples come in. George Egerton, evidently master of ceremonies,
     moves about here and there. A tuning of instruments is heard.
     People come from the side rooms. When all is in readiness, while
     the dancers, who have taken their positions, stand waiting for the
     music to begin, the sighing is again heard_)

GEORGE EGERTON.

     (_Exasperated by the delay_)

  What's the matter there, Melazzini?

     (_Excusing himself to his partner, he goes toward the conservatory,
     where the orchestra is stationed. As the sigh is repeated the
     couples gather together. At the third sigh they scatter, some of
     them running out through the middle door right, others hurrying
     forward, one or two of the girls laughing hysterically_)

GEORGE EGERTON.

  It's just the wind that's blowing through somewhere.

     (_The people disappear into the apartment right. Charles, the
     butler, and two maids, badly frightened, come in rear_)

GEORGE EGERTON.

  Close that door, Charles.

CHARLES.

  There's no door open, sir.

     (_The four come forward, the butler and maids briskly, George
     Egerton more slowly and with a sort of defiance. They, too, pass
     out right_)

VOICES.

     (_From the walls_)

  Sam! Sam! Sam!

     (_The sighs are repeated_)

HARRY EGERTON.

  My father! O my father!

     (_The mountain lion upon the newel-post spits the light from his
     mouth and it breaks upon the floor. The monster then gets down_)

LION.

  Chris!

A VOICE.

  Yes.

LION.

  Mike!

A VOICE.

  Here.

LION.

  Wes Dicey!

A VOICE.

  Sure.

HARRY EGERTON.

     (_As though a roll were being called_)

  Harvey Anderson!

LION.

  Whose voice was that?

A VOICE.

  Who's Harvey Anderson?

SECOND VOICE.

  There's some spy here.

LION.

  Come down, comrades!

VOICES.

     (_Above_)

                  We're fast! we're fast!
  Nails in our hands and feet!

THIRD VOICE.

  Who's that?

VOICES.

     (_Below_)

  They've danced upon my face! And mine!
  And mine! And mine! And mine! And mine!

A VOICE.

  I've been a door-jamb years and years!

VOICES.

     (_From round the walls_)

  We've held these arches up for ages!

VOICES.

     (_From far below_)

  We're the foundations! Help us, comrades!
  Down on the rock here--deeper! deeper!

VOICES.

  Help us, Sam Williams! Help us, Sam Williams!

LION.

  Come down, comrades!

VOICES.

     (_From far away_)

                  We're the windows!
  They made us sand, then made us shine!
  We've touched their faces and their hair!

VOICES.

     (_From up the stairs_)

  We're coming, and there's thousands of us!

VOICES.

     (_Far up_)

  We're holding up the roof!

LION.

                  Come down!
  You've held her up too long already!

     (_There has been a pounding of hammers and a creaking as of timbers
     being loosened. Sighs and groans fill the hall. The lights burn
     unsteadily, flashing or going out or glowing with a tint of blue_)

VOICES.

  Help us, Sam Williams! Help _us_! Help _us_!

OTHER VOICES.

  Let 'em alone! They're scabs! They're scabs!

     (_Carven figures, still rigid, come from the walls. From everywhere
     they come, in the most fantastic postures, some hopping with one
     leg lifted, some gliding with raised axes, others bent and in pairs
     carrying cross-cut saws, still others with peavies in their hands.
     Up through the floor all round come dark figures with torches in
     their caps. Stealthily and with muffled voices they gather about
     the Lion. Suddenly the pounding ceases and all is still_)

A VOICE.

  He's coming, and the Powers are with him!

SECOND VOICE.

  Justice is all we want!

SEVERAL VOICES.

  Right! Right!

LION.

  Are we one, comrades?

ALL.

  We're one! We're one!

A VOICE.

  Ask him to release us, Sam!

     (_Donald Egerton, with Governor Braddock and Bishop Hardbrooke at
     his heels, comes hurriedly through the centre door right_)

DONALD EGERTON.

     (_Peering about, sees the Figures_)

  What does this mean? Back to the walls!

LION.

  We are the walls!

FIGURES.

  We are the walls!

DONALD EGERTON.

  I made you what you are!

LION.

                  That's true!
  And we made you!

FIGURES.

  And we made you!

LION.

  We made each other!
  You are our father and we your mother!

FIGURES.

  That's true! That's true!

LION.

  And now make us as we made you!

GOVERNOR BRADDOCK.

  Be careful, Colonel Egerton.
  See that one there with axe uplifted!

DONALD EGERTON.

  Braddock, as a citizen of this commonwealth
  I call upon you to enforce the laws!

GOVERNOR BRADDOCK.

  My friends and fellow citizens.
  This is unwise, this course you are pursuing,
  And cannot in the end but injure you.
  The laws were made for these disputes,
  And you like others must obey.

LION.

  He made the laws!

FIGURES.

  He made the laws!

DONALD EGERTON.

  Hear that, Braddock! This is anarchy!

GOVERNOR BRADDOCK.

  I urge you to go peaceably to your homes!

LION.

  Our homes?

FIGURES.

  What homes?

LION.

  We have no homes!

     (_Egerton says something to the Governor_)

GOVERNOR BRADDOCK.

  Then by the----

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

                  One moment, brother Egerton;
  One moment, Governor; let me say a word.

     (_Steps toward the Figures_)

  My brothers,
  If hunger hath driven you here, then know I speak
  For one whose self was hungry, Jesus Christ;
  Yet was he meek and lamb-like. Why do you not
  Go to those places that have been prepared
  By charitable, Christian men and women
  For this very purpose, to relieve distress?
  If you are worthy you will there be fed.

FIGURES.

  Whited sepulchre! He's a whited sepulchre!

     (_They advance toward him_)

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  How dare you, armed with Labor's sacred tools
  Which our Lord's father sanctified when he
  Wrought at his wood in Nazareth, how dare you,
  With envy in your hearts, on murder bent,
  Intrude upon the quiet social hour
  Of honorable, law-abiding men?
  God sees you with your axes lifted there.
  And though you fear not law nor anything
  Of man, fear God, for he hath power
  And he can reach you in the uttermost
  Parts of the earth or air, as David saith.

FIGURES.

  The rich man's friend! The rich man's friend!

GOVERNOR BRADDOCK.

  Then by the power vested in me----

FIGURES.

  We are the power! We are the power!

GOVERNOR BRADDOCK.

  As Governor of this commonwealth
  I will call out the military!

FIGURES.

  We are the military! We are the military!

GOVERNOR BRADDOCK.

     (_Calls_)

  General Chadbourne!

PEOPLE.

     (_Who have been peering in forward right_)

  Chadbourne! Chadbourne!

     (_Egerton and the Bishop follow the Governor out centre right, and
     the people disappear_)

FIGURES.

     (_Aloud_)

  Release, release us from this spell!

LION.

  Release yourselves!

FIGURES.

     (_With tremendous surprise_)

  We can! We can!

     (_There are shouts and a thunder of tools falling upon the floor_)

SHOUTS.

  We're free! We're free!

OTHER SHOUTS.

  And seize the throats that nailed us fast!

HARRY EGERTON.

  Forget the past! Forget the past!

SHOUTS.

  An enemy! He's an enemy!

HARRY EGERTON.

  Release your brothers!

SHOUTS.

  To hell with the scabs!

     (_They rush through the house, right_)

VOICE OF DONALD EGERTON.

  Fire on them!

VOICE OF MRS. EGERTON.

                  No, no, Donald! Shed no blood!
  Think of their children!

VOICE OF DONALD EGERTON.

  Fire, I say!

MEN'S VOICES.

  We are your fathers and your brothers!

A DEEP VOICE.

  Fire!

     (_A pause_)

CRIES.

  Treason! Treason!

THE DEEP VOICE.

  Shoot them down!

     (_Shots are heard and noises as of a riot_)

HARRY EGERTON.

  My God! My God!

     (_The noises die away. In the darkness the walls are heard
     sighing_)

HARRY EGERTON.

  My father! O my father!

     (_A pause_)

VOICE.

     (_Forward right, in the darkness_)

  It's mine!

SECOND VOICE.

  It's mine!

FIRST VOICE.

  Let go that hand!

SECOND VOICE.

  I had it first!

FIRST VOICE.

  Hain't you the rubies?

     (_Sounds of quarrelling here and there_)

THIRD VOICE.

     (_Centre right_)

  Shut up your mouths! You'll have the police here!

VOICES.

     (_From the walls_)

  Brothers, help! We're fast! We're fast!

FOURTH VOICE.

  Pick up the rug, Pete! Let's be off!

     (_Forms of men loaded with the spoil of the mansion are seen
     hurrying out left_)

VOICES.

     (_Entering right_)

  'Tain't fair! 'Tain't fair!

FIFTH VOICE.

     (_Left_)

  Make for the river!

SIXTH VOICE.

  Sam, this ain't fair!

SAM.

     (_Entering right_)

  Hold on there, comrades!

VOICES.

  Some's got it all and some ain't none!

SAM.

  Put down that stuff!

CRIES.

                  That's right! That's right!
  An equal divvy! An equal divvy!

OTHER CRIES.

  No, no, you don't! That's mine! That's ours!

SAM.

  Comrades, we're one!

CRIES.

     (_Of those who have nothing_)

  We're one! We're one!

OTHER CRIES.

     (_Of those with their arms full_)

  Every man for himself! Every man for himself!

     (_Sounds of scuffling and fighting_)

CRIES.

  Let loose, God damn you! Knock him down!

     (_The sounds die away left_)

CRIES.

     (_Far left_)

  'Tain't fair! 'Tain't fair!

     (_The walls are heard sighing_)

VOICE.

     (_From above_)

                  Who will go down
  Where all is sorrow, woe, and strife,
  Where unshaped things are jostling into life?
  Who will go down?

HARRY EGERTON.

  I will.

VOICE OF MRS. EGERTON.

     (_Full of anguish_)

  Harry! Harry!

     (_There is a thundering and crashing in the darkness_)

HARRY EGERTON.

     (_Quickly staggering to his knees, then to his feet_)

  Here! here! Mother! mother!

     (_Instantly the darkness disappears. Morning is breaking over the
     mountains_)

HARRY EGERTON.

     (_Looks about. Clasps his head in his hands_)

  Horrible! horrible!

HARRY EGERTON.

     (_Sees the ashes of the fire. Recalls the incidents of the early
     night_)

  And went away.

     (_Notices that the boulder is gone. Looks down the slope, left_)

  The boulder thundering down the steep.
  I must have slept upon the ground.
  Ah, what is this?

     (_Gets down on his knees where the boulder lay_)

  The Mine! _The Mine!_ THE MINE!



ACT II

THE MILL


_Scene: A street showing, right, the great lumber plant of the Egerton
Company. Centre, occupying the greater part of the space between left
and right, a sort of common, overstrewn, as such places usually are,
with sawdust and waste sawings of the mill, extends back a hundred yards
or so to where the river sweeps in from behind a rising slope on the
left and disappears behind the high fence of the mill-yard on the right.
Across the river, right, the same denuded mountains as were seen in the
preceding Act, and, centre, the alluvial stretches of the valley
widening out into the plains. Left rear, on this side of the river, a
sort of hill comes in and upon its rather steep slope are rows of
roughly built plank houses which have evidently been standing many
years. They are all of one design and rest in the rear upon the ground,
the front being propped up on posts, in some cases six or eight feet
high. Of two or three of these shacks it would seem that the occupants
had tried to have a garden, for here and there are small green patches
as of late turnips, also tall stakes with withered bean vines clinging
to them. From the numerous footpaths that come down toward the mill-gate
it is evident that these shacks are the homes of the employees of the
Egerton Company. The mill-yard on the right is surrounded by a high
board-fence. New planks have recently been put in here and there, and on
top of the fence, apparently just strung, are several rows of bright new
barbed wire. Over the top of the fence and through the open gates of the
driveway which is in the corner, a portion of the latter having been cut
off for this purpose, are seen countless lumber stacks, and beyond
these, far back and facing left, a section of an enormous mill. Along
the comb of the roof, doubtless running its full length, is a large red
sign with white letters of which one sees only: RTON AND CO._

_Before the entrance to the mill-yard two of the State militia with
rifles upon their shoulders patrol the property, one of them pacing
right and left along the street in the foreground, the other backwards
and forwards in the open space that goes toward the river. About twenty
feet from the entrance stands a large red automobile, under which,
stretched upon his back, lies the chauffeur, with his hands up fixing
something._

_As the Scene opens, the two sentries, one of them rolling a cigarette,
the other with his gun behind his head and with his arms hanging over
it, stand listening back toward the mill, where a number of voices are
singing, 'There'll Be a Hot Time in the Old Town To-night.' When the
song is finished a cheer goes up._

_Time: The afternoon of the next day about four o'clock._

FIRST SENTRY.

  All I say is, keep your tobacco dry
  And don't go wiring the folks at home
  To have your supper warm to-morrow night.

CHAUFFEUR.

  They'll be to work, all right, you take my word.

FIRST SENTRY.

  There's such a thing as eating words until
  Your belly cries for something solider.

CHAUFFEUR.

     (_Pointing toward the mill_)

  You see that smoke back there.

FIRST SENTRY.

                  That's all right, too.
  A kid can start a fire.

CHAUFFEUR.

  Wait and see.

A MILITIAMAN.

     (_Who, half way back toward the mill, has climbed upon a lumber
     stack_)

  I nominate J. D. for Governor.

A VOICE.

     (_Farther back, commandingly_)

  Shut up your mouth up there!

SECOND VOICE.

  _Will_ you be good?

     (_The militiaman gets down from the stack_)

SECOND SENTRY.

  How large a force is it they're counting on?

CHAUFFEUR.

  It's not the force. It's the effect 'twill have.
  You let a dog run for another's bone,
  You'll see the last dog do some running too.

FIRST SENTRY.

  And do some fighting, maybe.

CHAUFFEUR.

                  That's up to you.
  The law protects men in their right to work.

     (_The sentries whisper together_)

CHAUFFEUR.

  The old man knows his business. All he says
  Is simply this, 'I'm bringing in the men.
  It's up to you to get them to the mill.'
  You see you don't know everything, my boy.

FIRST SENTRY.

  You work for Egerton, and I don't blame you,
  But when you come right down to solid facts--
  And if you'll clear your eye a bit you'll see it--
  He's got his match in this man Williams.

CHAUFFEUR.

  What!

SECOND SENTRY.

  He's got his match in this man Williams.

CHAUFFEUR.

  C-h-rist!

FIRST SENTRY.

  Figure it out yourself.

     (_He sees Wes Dicey who, with Jim King and Rome Masters, has just
     come in, right_)

  What do you want?

DICEY.

  He knows me.

CHAUFFEUR.

  He's all right.

     (_Careful to keep out of sight of the shacks on the slope, Dicey
     and his companions whisper together near the fence. The Second
     Sentry, as though he had been neglecting his duty, goes out right,
     patrolling his beat_)

FIRST SENTRY.

                  It's easy enough
  To figure it out, I say. There's thirteen men
  Returned to work in five weeks. In an hour
  You calculate four hundred will return.
  You fellows couldn't count nine pins for me.

     (_Dicey and his companions pull their hats down over their eyes,
     their collars up about their necks, and make briskly for the gate_)

FIRST SENTRY.

     (_Starts back on his beat_)

  Talk of a man like that running the State.
  He'd better learn to run his business first.

     (_George Egerton, looking spick and span, comes out of the
     mill-yard, putting on one of his gloves. He glances at Dicey and
     his companions as they pass in. Suddenly he turns and whistles
     after them and saunters back into the mill-yard as if to speak with
     them_)

GEORGE EGERTON.

     (_Coming out a little later_)

  O Jack, will you tell mother----

CHAUFFEUR.

  Yes, sir.

GEORGE EGERTON.

     (_Provoked_)

                  What?
  Why do you put it that way? Now I've forgot.

     (_Continues putting on his glove_)

  Tell mother I've inquired of the men
  And they've seen nothing of him.

CHAUFFEUR.

  Yes, sir.

GEORGE EGERTON.

  What?

CHAUFFEUR.

  Nothing of Harry, sir.

GEORGE EGERTON.

     (_Walks left, then comes back_)

  Jack.

CHAUFFEUR.

  Yes, sir.

GEORGE EGERTON.

                  Jack.

     (_Looks over in the car_)

  Did you find any hair-pins in the car
  This morning?

CHAUFFEUR.

  Not this morning.

GEORGE EGERTON.

     (_Takes a coin from his pocket and hands it to the chauffeur_)

  You'll take care.

     (_He goes out left, examining his face in a small mirror which he
     has taken out with the coin. The Second Sentry has come in right
     and stands reading a notice which is tacked on the fence_)

CHAUFFEUR.

  By sun-down, don't it?

SECOND SENTRY.

  Something of the sort.

CHAUFFEUR.

  And the wind sharpening up across the plains.
  They'll think twice, won't they, before they stay out?

SECOND SENTRY.

  Who signed this name here?

CHAUFFEUR.

  Eg--the boss himself.

SECOND SENTRY.

  Hell of a hand he writes.

CHAUFFEUR.

                  Your partner there
  Knows about as much of the situation here
  As a sea-turtle knows of sassafras.
  Talks of a match. There's been no match at all.
  The old man's never tried to start the mill.
  But let a thing like that go up some day.

     (_Buck Bentley with an empty nail keg in his hand comes from the
     mill-yard and sits down with his back to the farther gate-post and
     begins to fill his pipe_)

CHAUFFEUR.

  If you've heard thunder, one of those loud claps
  That ends the winter, and if you'd lived here
  And knew the old man's power, then you'd know
  I'm shooting low when I say they'll be here,
  If they don't all fall dead upon the way.
  They've got to make hay now. Days don't stand still
  When the old man is moving to and fro.

     (_Goes about oiling the machine_)

FIRST SENTRY.

     (_Coming forward_)

  If Williams comes, I'll tell you what he'll do.
  With the big force he'll have behind his back,
  He'll lock these gates and coop the old man up
  With Jergens and the Chief and all the rest.
  Then say, 'Now take me home.' You know the way.
  You'll take him to the big house on the hill.

     (_The Chauffeur turns and looks at him half in anger, half in
     contempt_)

FIRST SENTRY.

  You won't dare look at him that way.

SECOND SENTRY.

                  Dan's right.
  You fellows, you that shove those things about,
  You have a way of knowing who's the lord.

FIRST SENTRY.

  Exactly. And this man Williams up and down
  Is big as Egerton. And the old man's 'spike'
  Will touch him where the tailors say it should.
  And if it's lined with silk Williams won't care.
  He'll steer the big blow-out this afternoon
  And they won't know the difference. It's the front
  And the big planet here that people see;
  And Williams is as broad as Egerton.

     (_A militiaman comes hurrying from the mill-yard_)

MILITIAMAN.

  Who's got a cigarette to trade for news?
  You couldn't guess it in a thousand years.

SECOND SENTRY.

  We're going home.

MILITIAMAN.

  Guess high; guess something great.

FIRST SENTRY.

  The boys have met the strikers at the station
  And we're all going into action.

MILITIAMAN.

                  Nope.
  Something the old man's done.

SECOND SENTRY.

  What?

MILITIAMAN.

                  Put her there.

     (_The Sentry gives him a cigarette_)

  Ordered us down a big red tub of punch,
  With six or eight kegs of the foaming stuff.

     (_The Sentries stare comically at one another_)

MILITIAMAN.

  Well, my tin soldiers? Under a shot like that
  To stand as cold as you do!

     (_Shouts in the ear of the First Sentry_)

                  Punch, old man!

     (_To himself_)

  The wind of liquor and they've gone dead drunk!

FIRST SENTRY.

     (_Starts for the mill-gate, then turns_)

  Who said 'shut up' when some man back there cried
  'Hurrah for Egerton'?

MILITIAMAN.

  Cap. Haskell.

FIRST SENTRY.

     (_To the Second Sentry_)

  Eh?

SECOND SENTRY.

  Haskell to hell.

FIRST SENTRY.

     (_Shouting toward the mill_)

                  Hurrah for Egerton
  For Governor!

SECOND SENTRY.

  Hip hurrah!

FIRST SENTRY.

                  Up with you, Buck!
  We'll have no traitors in the camp, by God.
  Up on your pins and shout 'Hurrah!' three times.

     (_He seizes Bentley and they wrestle into the mill-yard_)

SECOND SENTRY.

  Eight kegs, you say?

MILITIAMAN.

     (_Slapping him on the back_)

                  And punch, old man, and punch!
  Reception punch!

     (_He hurries out toward the mill. Bentley enters, followed by the
     First Sentry_)

SECOND SENTRY.

  What do you think of that?

FIRST SENTRY.

     (_To the Chauffeur, with affected disdain_)

  Talk about Williams downing such a man!

FIRST SENTRY.

     (_Nodding toward the Chauffeur_)

  And he, too, in the employ of Egerton!

CHAUFFEUR.

  Fine pair of knaves! You'll drink his wine all right.

SECOND SENTRY.

     (_On his way out, points to the notice_)

  Look what a damn fine hand the old man writes.

     (_Goes out right_)

FIRST SENTRY.

     (_On his way back, to the Chauffeur_)

  It's a good thing that some men never tell.

     (_Walks slowly, rifle up; then from rear_)

  Hurrah for Egerton for Governor!

VOICE OF SECOND SENTRY.

     (_Out right_)

  Halt!

     (_A pause_)

  _Halt!_

     (_Buck Bentley rises from the keg and comes forward_)

DO YOU HEAR!

     (_The Chauffeur leaps from the car and hurries forward. There is a
     shot_)

FIRST SENTRY.

     (_Running forward_)

  Who is it?

MILITIAMAN.

     (_Hurrying from the mill-yard_)

  What was that?

     (_Voices are heard right. A moment later the Second Sentry enters
     with Harvey Anderson, who carries in his arms fragments of the cast
     that has been broken by the shot_)

SECOND SENTRY.

  Where in the hell have you been living
  That you don't know enough to stop when----

HARVEY ANDERSON.

                  Pard,
  If I'd stop every time some man said stop,
  I'd still be standing somewhere.

     (_He walks left, away from the others, who exchange glances as if
     amazed at the man's audacity. He lays the largest of the pieces
     upon the ground, then looks among the others in his arms. Donald
     Egerton and General Chadbourne, both evidently dressed for a
     function, the latter being in full military uniform, brand new,
     come quickly from the mill-yard, followed by Jergens and the Chief
     of Police_)

CHADBOURNE.

  What's the trouble?

SECOND SENTRY.

  This man came through the line. I called three times.

CHADBOURNE.

     (_To Harvey Anderson_)

  Don't you know better than do such a thing?

CAPTAIN HASKELL.

     (_Comes from the mill-yard, then turns and calls back_)

  Stay where you are. We'll attend to this affair.

EGERTON.

  What business have you here?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

                  I just came down
  To look about a bit.

JERGENS.

                  To look about!
  You think we're running a menagerie?
  Didn't you see these soldiers? What do you mean?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

     (_To the Chief of Police_)

  Just step back, pard. I'm neither dog nor bear.

     (_Back in the mill-yard militiamen are seen climbing on top of
     lumber piles to see what the trouble is_)

EGERTON.

  Came down from where?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  From up there on the mountains.

JERGENS.

  To look about for what?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

                  Just anything--
  Just anything that's 'round to see.

     (_He gets down and begins to fit the pieces together. The men watch
     him. Suddenly he stops and looks about him_)

                  Did I----

     (_He rises and goes right to where a piece of the cast lies upon
     the ground_)

CHIEF OF POLICE.

  Shall I take charge of him, Mr. Egerton?
  I'll lock him up if you say so.

CHADBOURNE.

     (_As Anderson returns_)

                  Don't you know
  That when a sentry challenges a man
  He's got the right to shoot him in his tracks?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  The risk's on me, pard.

CHADBOURNE.

  Eh!

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  The risk's on me.

CHADBOURNE.

  You take care, sir, how you're addressing me.

     (_Jergens walks rear, takes from his pocket some field glasses,
     which he polishes with a handkerchief. The Chauffeur joins him.
     Chadbourne turns and says something vicious to the Second Sentry_)

EGERTON.

  How came you by this thing?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

                  I'm of the men
  That Egerton sent out.

EGERTON.

                  Jergens, is he
  One of our men?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

     (_Glancing up_)

  You Egerton?

CHIEF OF POLICE.

  He is.

JERGENS.

  There's many of them that I never saw;
  But he's got that, so I suppose he is.

     (_He searches the mountains with his glasses. The rest contemplate
     him in silence. In Anderson's eyes, as he watches them, there is a
     strange, glad light. Indeed throughout the Scene his manner is that
     of a man who is hiding a tremendous triumph_)

HASKELL.

  He's out here with his glasses every day.

CHADBOURNE.

  One of the richest mines in all the West----

EGERTON.

  Very rich mine.

CHADBOURNE.

  So I have been informed.

CHIEF OF POLICE.

  Been lost for fifty years.

CHADBOURNE.

                  But with this thing----

     (_Indicating the cast_)

  You're almost sure to find it.

SECOND SENTRY.

     (_To First Sentry, evidently meaning Chadbourne_)

  A damn fool.

EGERTON.

  Yes, we expect the signal any day.

     (_Dicey, King, and Masters appear just inside the mill-yard and,
     catching the eye of the Chauffeur, point to Jergens, who, later,
     hands the glasses to the Chauffeur and goes to Dicey in the
     mill-yard_)

CHIEF OF POLICE.

  The citizens had arranged a demonstration.
  Flags were to go up that day and cannon boom,
  And Colonel Egerton was to make a speech.

EGERTON.

  Yes, Clayton, and I'll tell them something, too.

CHIEF OF POLICE.

  I guess they'll be ashamed to have it now.

EGERTON.

  Why didn't you stay out on the mountains?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Well----

EGERTON.

  Get tired?

JERGENS.

  Chief!

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Can't say----

EGERTON.

  Then what's the trouble?

     (_The Chief of Police joins Jergens and with the three men they
     disappear in the mill-yard_)

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Well, you see, Mr. Egerton, it's this way:
  A man can piece together things like this,
  But somehow you can't get hold of that in here
  That goes to pieces when your faith breaks up.

EGERTON.

  What do you mean?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

                  I never could find gold;
  It don't run in our family.

EGERTON.

                  Rather late
  In your discovery, it seems to me.
  Why didn't you think of it when you first went out?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Well, you know how it is. You've seen a stone
  Hang on a mountain side for years sometimes;
  You don't know why; you just don't notice it
  Until some morning--jump! she thunders down
  And wakes a whole town up; then you remember.

     (_He comes forward and looks off in the direction from which he
     came as though he were expecting someone_)

EGERTON.

     (_To Chadbourne_)

  A sort of luck, you see, this getting on.

CHADBOURNE.

  Predestination.

EGERTON.

                  Yes; if a man's rich
  He couldn't help but be. There's some old lamp,
  An heirloom in his family, that he rubs.
  And if he's poor, 'Hard luck.'

CHADBOURNE.

  Or been 'ground down.'

EGERTON.

  They're told so.

CHADBOURNE.

  Egerton's heel.

EGERTON.

  _Old_ Egerton's.

     (_They walk toward the automobile_)

CHADBOURNE.

  I don't know what the country's coming to.

EGERTON.

  Merchants are merchants, Chadbourne.

CHADBOURNE.

                  I suppose.
  Captain, will you get my overcoat?

     (_Haskell, who with the Chauffeur has been looking through the
     glasses, goes into the mill-yard. A number of militiamen who have
     been hanging around the gate gather about Anderson and they are
     soon having a good time together_)

EGERTON.

  What do they care for Country or for Art,
  Or any of the higher things of life?
  'Give us this day our daily trade.' We live,
  We manufacturers, to fill their tills.

CHADBOURNE.

  They're sowing dragons' teeth and they don't know it.

EGERTON.

  You'll see them to-morrow when I start the mill;
  They'll tip their hats when I pass through the streets.
  And you could comb the town: they never heard of
  Any petition to the Governor,
  Nor any contributions, not a one.
  They're all staunch friends of mine, and always have been.
  'Why, Colonel Egerton, he built this town,
  Our leading citizen.' I'll get them though.

CHADBOURNE.

  If you could shut down for a season, say.

EGERTON.

  That's just what I've been wanting to do, Chadbourne.
  Unfortunately, just now we're in a place
  Where we can't do as we would like to do;
  Or rather Jergens is.

CHADBOURNE.

  He told me.

EGERTON.

                  Yes,
  He's got to meet his margins.

CHADBOURNE.

  It's too bad.

     (_The militiamen laugh out at some story Anderson is telling them_)

EGERTON.

  So I can't strike them without striking him.

CHADBOURNE.

  I hope you'll find the mine.

A MILITIAMAN.

     (_Appearing at the gate_)

  'Phone, General.

EGERTON.

  I'll show them though that J. D. don't forget.

CHADBOURNE.

  Pardon me.

     (_He starts for the mill-yard. With a wave of his hand he orders
     the militiamen back through the gate_)

HARVEY ANDERSON.

     (_Aloud, as they draw away_)

                  And we charging up that Hill
  As if we didn't know what canned beef was,
  We, when we'd had slow elk[*] out on the plains.

[*] _Stolen cattle_

     (_Egerton goes rear to the Chauffeur and himself adjusts the
     glasses to his eyes_)

A MILITIAMAN.

     (_As they pass through the gate_)

  Stay and have one with us.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  After business hours.

EGERTON.

  Where did you leave off?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

                  Where the big rock hangs
  On the south slope up yonder.

     (_Dicey, King, and Masters come from the mill-yard, followed by
     Jergens. Dicey is dividing money with his companions_)

DICEY.

  Thank you, boss.

JERGENS.

  Then call me up.

DICEY.

  I will.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  It ain't there now.

     (_The three men go out around the corner right. Jergens joins
     Egerton and the Chauffeur. Harvey Anderson watches them in
     silence_)

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  And that's another reason I came down
  To hear those cannon boom and see those flags.
  You'll have a band play too?

     (_With his eyes fixed upon them he slowly shoves his foot through
     the cast and it falls to pieces. He stands still for a moment. He
     then picks up his hatchet and roll of blankets, and, going to the
     gate, throws them into the mill-yard. He does the same with the
     fragments of the cast, first carrying an armful which he empties
     inside, then coming back and picking up the last two or three
     pieces, which he jerks in after the others._

     _The First Sentry, coming from rear, signals to the Second Sentry,
     who is passing on his beat. The latter waits and, having heard what
     the former had to say, starts off_)

SECOND SENTRY.

     (_Evidently quoting Chadbourne_)

                 'Tried to get smart
  And hit the cast to see the pieces fly.'

     (_The First Sentry starts back on his beat, laughing_)

HARVEY ANDERSON.

     (_As the Second Sentry passes him_)

  It's steel you're shooting, ain't it?

SECOND SENTRY.

  Go to hell.

     (_Goes out_)

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  It's all right, partner.

     (_Like a great boy he stands tossing his hat into the air and
     trying to catch it. Egerton and Jergens regard him and seem to be
     saying something about him. Jergens goes into the mill-yard_)

EGERTON.

     (_Comes to Anderson_)

                  In the line of work,
  What have you ever done?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

                 Most everything,
  From punching cattle down to hunting gold.
  But chiefly knocked about among the States.

EGERTON.

  Drinking and gambling?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Some of that in too.

     (_The Chauffeur goes into the mill-yard_)

EGERTON.

  There's something in you that I like, my man.
  You go about things in a way. And then
  The daring that you showed. You're full of life;
  A man can see that. Tended cattle, eh?
  Think you could govern men and round them up
  If need be?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  I don't know.

     (_Tosses his hat into the air_)

EGERTON.

                  You don't belong
  To a Union?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  No.

EGERTON.

                  You're not the sort of man
  To stand dictation. You've a work to do,
  Men of your type. I think I heard you say
  That you were with the rangers at San Juan?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  I did some time down there.

EGERTON.

                  Well spent, my boy.
  I had a brother in the Civil War.

     (_Watches Anderson catching his hat_)

  That was a good one. I know how you feel;
  So full of life you don't care what comes on.
  'Out of the way!' It's rare enough these days.
  You'd be surprised what cowards most men are,
  Big six foot fellows who want to go to work;
  Offer it to them and they shake their heads
  Because they see some pickets round the corner.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  'Fraid of your soldiers?

EGERTON.

                  Pickets; Union men.
  They'd fly to arms quick enough if Charlie Hare--
  Charlie's our Mayor--said 'No more free speech.'
  But Williams he can say, 'No more free work.'
  They'd rather talk, you see, than be free men.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  That's a good phrase, 'Free Work.'

EGERTON.

  A good 'phrase,' yes.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  We ought to put that in our Bill of Rights.

EGERTON.

  Our Bill of Rights, my boy, 's no more than air.
  It's men to back it up. We've gone to seed
  In Sabbath speculations on men's rights.
  What we need now is Monday morning's work.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  This Williams, I suppose, has gotten rich
  Controlling all these men?

EGERTON.

                  That I don't know.
  It's not so much the few that he controls
  As the large numbers they intimidate.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Got to accept his terms or not work, eh?

EGERTON.

  They have a thing they call the 'Union Scale.'

     (_Looks at his watch_)

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  And these men that can't work, they stand for that,
  Having no voice at all in their affairs?

EGERTON.

  They don't see; they're a lot of ignorant men.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Why don't you show them?

     (_Egerton smiles, walks to the gate and listens, then comes back_)

EGERTON.

                  Out on the plains, my boy,
  Tending your cattle, did you speak with them
  And reason with them?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  With the cattle?

EGERTON.

  Yes.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  It all depends upon the mood they're in.
  Sometimes a man can just sit on his horse,
  If the feed's good; and sometimes in the night,
  If a storm's brewing, then it's best to sing;
  Go round them this way--

     (_Circles and sings one of the strange melodies of the cowboys_)

                  for they're restless then.

EGERTON.

  Sing to your cattle?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

                  Let them know you're friends
  All out together and a big storm on.

EGERTON.

  That's interesting.

     (_Anderson comes forward and looks off right, the direction from
     which he came, as though he were expecting some one_)

EGERTON.

                  We've got an opening here
  I think would suit you.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Well.

EGERTON.

                  In half an hour,
  Or less than that, there'll be a lot of men
  Come from the station, the force I'm bringing in,
  Guarded by soldiers; then, if I guess right,
  The Union--they'll be crowding here for work,
  Wanting to go to work, you understand,
  But with their eye on Williams. He'll say 'No.'
  But there's another faction will say 'Yes.'

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  And while they're balanced----

EGERTON.

                  That's just what I want.
  You've got a good cool head, and you know men.
  And then you have a way of putting things.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Make 'em a little speech?

EGERTON.

  I don't care how.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Just get 'em in your pen, eh?

EGERTON.

                  It's their last chance.
  And I can say, my boy, if you make good
  And prove to be the man we're looking for,
  I'll push you on as fast as you can go.
  My partner here was one that proved himself.
  And then next year we'll take my other mills
  And break this Union thing or we'll know why.
  A shot or two for your own land, you see.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Free Work.

EGERTON.

  Free Mills.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Free men.

     (_Starts left_)

EGERTON.

  You know the way?

     (_Egerton turns and goes into the mill-yard_)

SECOND SENTRY.

     (_Comes in right and meets the First Sentry, who has just come
     forward_)

  Damn stuck-up fool! Just because Egerton
  Invites him to his house.

FIRST SENTRY.

  He's got a corn.

SECOND SENTRY.

  I hope they'll tramp it off.

     (_The First Sentry quickly signals that some one is coming toward
     the gate_)

SECOND SENTRY.

  God, I don't care.

     (_The Chauffeur comes hurriedly from the mill-yard and goes and
     gets into the car. A moment later General Chadbourne and Captain
     Haskell appear_)

CHADBOURNE.

  And I'll be there till nine or ten o'clock,
  Or even later, for we've some important
  Matters to attend to. And besides
  It's going to be a very fine affair.

HASKELL.

  All right, sir.

CHADBOURNE.

                  You won't need me, though, I'm sure.
  Things seem to be all quiet at the station.

SECOND SENTRY.

     (_As he goes out_)

  Ass!

HASKELL.

  We'll break camp to-morrow, I suppose

CHADBOURNE.

  _That's_ what I had in mind a while ago!
  I'm glad you spoke of it. When they pass these gates,
  You be here, Haskell, and you get me word.
  I want to be the first to break the news
  To Egerton and the Governor; want to say:
  'I have the honor to report to you,
  Your Excellency,
  And it gives me pleasure to announce to you
  Upon the occasion of the opening
  Of your new mansion, Colonel Egerton,
  This bit of news, sir, from the military,
  And I offer it with our congratulations,
  The strike is over----'

VOICE OF JERGENS.

     (_Back in the mill-yard_)

  General Chadbourne!

CHADBOURNE.

                  Yes!--
  'The men have yielded and have gone to work;
  And all's been done without one drop of bloodshed,
  Thanks to the Governor and to your co-operation
  And to the splendid service of the boys.
  To-morrow we break camp and go our ways.
  Health to you and long life and peace hereafter
  In your new home.' Or something of the sort.
  I haven't whipped it into final shape.

HASKELL.

  And got off, I suppose, with glasses lifted.
  'Twill be a nice green feather in our cap.

CHADBOURNE.

  And duty done, it's well to have big friends.
  There's that old question of the armory;
  I'm going to try to jam it through this session.
  And besides that--

     (_Calls toward the gate_)

  What's up?

JERGENS.

     (_Enters with the Chief of Police_)

                  How large a force
  Did you send to the station?

CHADBOURNE.

  Why do you ask?

JERGENS.

  There's talk of violence among the men.

CHIEF OF POLICE.

  Some even go so far as to advocate
  Marching upon----

JERGENS.

                  That, Chief, may all be bluster.
  For this man Dicey--these men have a way
  Of making things look bad to extort money
  And earn them credit if they turn out well.

CHIEF OF POLICE.

  As a precaution though.

JERGENS.

  I've no objection.

     (_Egerton comes from the mill-yard_)

CHIEF OF POLICE.

  You'd better throw a guard about the house.
  You see it's out of my jurisdiction.

EGERTON.

  Coming to see me, eh?

JERGENS.

  I don't believe it.

     (_Chadbourne talks aside with Haskell_)

CHIEF OF POLICE.

  To see the Governor, they say.

EGERTON.

                  All right.

     (_Gets into the automobile_)

  They'll find him in the southwest room upstairs
  When the train comes. Have them clean off their feet.

RALPH ARDSLEY.

     (_Who has just come in, left_)

  Clean off whose feet?

EGERTON.

  Yours, Ardsley. Step right in.

     (_The Chief of Police goes out, left_)

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  What's the news now?

EGERTON.

                  The news is that you've got
  Barely an hour to get on your togs.

     (_Ardsley unbuttons his light overcoat and shows his full dress_)

EGERTON.

  You editors are smart men.

     (_Chadbourne gets in behind with Egerton, Ardsley in front with the
     Chauffeur_)

CHADBOURNE.

     (_As they go out right_)

  Don't forget, Haskell.

     (_Jergens lingers about as though undecided what to do. Finally he
     goes left and saunters down the street. Haskell enters the
     mill-yard. Later an old woman, who has evidently been waiting till
     the mill-owners left, comes down the hill-side rear left and begins
     to pick up sticks that lie scattered about in the sawdust_)

FIRST SENTRY.

     (_Who finally sees her_)

  Get out!

OLD WOMAN.

  They're thrown away.

BUCK BENTLEY.

     (_Who has come from the mill-yard and resumed his seat on the keg_)

  Let her alone.

OLD WOMAN.

  God help us if we can't have even sticks
  That's thrown out.

FIRST SENTRY.

  Let your old man go to work.

OLD WOMAN.

  Then let 'em pay fair wages. Ain't they all
  Wantin' to work? What's the poor to do,
  Things goin' up an' wages goin' down?
  What's the poor to do?

FIRST SENTRY.

  That's your look-out. Move on!

     (_He starts toward the old woman. Buck Bentley knocks the ashes
     from his pipe and goes toward the First Sentry_)

SECOND SENTRY.

     (_Who has been watching_)

  Know what you're doing, Buck?

     (_There is a fight. Bentley takes the rifle from the First Sentry
     who, in a rage, starts for the gate_)

FIRST SENTRY.

                  If this goes by
  I'll show the regiment a thing or two,
  I'll jump the Service, that's what I'll do.

     (_He hurries into the mill-yard. Bentley helps the old woman pick
     up the sticks_)

OLD WOMAN.

  I thought they'd never go. God bless you, son.

     (_Starts up the slope_)

SECOND SENTRY.

  We'll see, by God, who's running this shebang.

OLD WOMAN.

  You ain't heard nothin' from the station yet?

BUCK BENTLEY.

  No, mother.

     (_The old woman goes out. Bentley comes to the gate and sets the
     rifle against the fence_)

SECOND SENTRY.

     (_Talking into the mill-yard_)

  He even helped her fill her apron.

HASKELL.

     (_Entering with the First Sentry_)

  Have you gone crazy, Buck? What do you mean?

BUCK BENTLEY.

     (_Fills his pipe_)

  Is this the Company's property out here?

HASKELL.

  We've got our orders and that settles it.
  Don't settle it with you, eh?

A MILITIAMAN.

     (_From the top of a lumber stack_)

  Here they come!

FIRST SENTRY.

  In other words you'll do as you damn please.

     (_Haskell comes forward and looks down the street, left_)

HASKELL.

  Now shut your mouths.

FIRST SENTRY.

  I'm not through with this yet.

     (_Picks up his rifle and goes back on his beat_)

SECOND SENTRY.

  Damn pretty soldier you are.

HASKELL.

  Do you hear?

     (_Militiamen are seen climbing on top of the lumber stacks. Others
     appear at the gate. Captain Haskell walks left where a noise is
     heard down the street. Presently a squad of militia enters with
     fifteen or twenty strike-breakers. Behind them, with the officer in
     charge, comes Jergens, who is speaking to the crowd of strikers
     that follows. In front of the crowd walks Sam Williams. Mingling
     among the men are seen Dicey, King, and Masters. Some women and
     children straggle in and linger, left. On this side of the crowd,
     silent, watching everything, is Harvey Anderson_)

JERGENS.

  The world is big and we can get the men.

SAM WILLIAMS.

  That's all right, Mr. Jergens.

JERGENS.

                  All we want,
  And more too.

SAM WILLIAMS.

  That's all right.

JERGENS.

                  We've shown you that.
  If not, stick it out; that's all I've got to say.

SAM WILLIAMS.

  The point is now about the saws. Will you
  Put the guards on?

VOICE.

     (_From the crowd_)

  There where the boys were killed.

JERGENS.

  We will or will not, as it suits ourselves.

VOICE.

     (_From the crowd_)

  About our places, Sam.

SAM WILLIAMS.

                  If they come back,
  You'll give the boys the places that they had,
  All of them?

     (_The militia, with the strike-breakers, pass into the mill-yard_)

VOICE.

     (_From the crowd_)

  Will we get our places back?

JERGENS.

  The places that have not been filled are yours.
  As for discharging men that we've brought here,
  Not one.

     (_He says something to Haskell, then turns to the crowd_)

                  Now just one word. When these gates close,
  You're out. You understand that, do you? Out
  Not for to-day, to-morrow, or six weeks,
  But all time. You've got just ten minutes left.
  Then, Captain, close these gates.

HASKELL.

  All right, sir.

     (_Jergens passes into the mill-yard_)

VOICE.

     (_From the crowd_)

  Well?

ANOTHER VOICE.

  What do you say, Sam?

JIM KING.

                  Williams has had his say.
  And you see where we are.

ROME MASTERS.

  Hear Wes!

JIM KING.

  Wes!

SEVERAL.

  Sam!

SAM WILLIAMS.

  I don't know, comrades, as I ought to say,
  Seeing as I don't gain or lose in this.
  For I'm of them that have no place in there.
  But if you want my----

CRIES.

  Yes, go on! Go on!

SAM WILLIAMS.

  Well, comrades, it's the Union first with me.
  That props the rest. You take that prop away
  And everything comes down. We've climbed a bit
  Since we first organized. And what we've won,
  What is it that keeps it won? The Union, comrades,
  Is just another name for all of us.

JERGENS.

     (_Appearing at the gate_)

  Another thing. If you don't come to work
  We'll want those shacks up there. Remember that.

     (_Goes out_)

SAM WILLIAMS.

  And we need something bigger than we are,
  Don't we, if they do with their mills and lands?
  You heard Aug. Jergens what he said just now
  When Chris here called to him, 'But you unite.'
  You heard him say, 'That's none of your affair.'
  Then how's it their affair if we unite?
  Logs you can't handle, but you saw them up,
  Then you can handle them. It's the same with us;
  They want to handle us to suit themselves.
  Comrades, I don't see if you go in there
  How you'll not have to come out here again;
  Unless you mean to bear whatever comes.
  You'll hear no big voice, 'Then we'll all go out,'
  That's kept their hands from off you many a time.
  Or is it their mercy that you're counting on?
  Poor hold you've got there. One window yonder
  Of Egerton's big house would put the guards
  About the saws. But you hear what he says.
  And it's our lives he's talking of.

A WOMAN.

     (_To another who begins to cry_)

  Never mind.

SAM WILLIAMS.

  What is it that gives him power to talk that way?
  Why is it he can do that,

     (_Lifts his hand_)

                  and trains come in
  With soldiers? We can't do it. And they're two
  And we're four hundred.

JIM KING.

  That don't get us bread.

SAM WILLIAMS.

  Is it because they own the mills and lands?
  It's only when they own us that they're strong.
  Comrades, you've come now where the ways divide.
  There's bigger gates than these stand open here
  If you'll just stick together. 'Tain't to-day
  I'm thinking of. There's a green shore somewhere
  If you'll just turn your faces from that gate.
  But if you're going to give your Union up
  When they say if you don't we'll close these gates,
  You'll have no peace. They'll hold it over you
  To force you down. Comrades, the day will come
  When you'll regret it if you go in there,
  Giving your Union up. But that's with you.

CHRIS KNUDSON.

  Sam's right. We can't be slaves, men.

KING AND MASTERS.

  Wes! Hear Wes!

CHRIS KNUDSON.

  Let's march on out to Egerton's big house
  And call the Governor out and lay our case
  Before him.

CRIES.

  Right! That's right!

A VOICE.

                  First let's go home
  And get the women folk and all march out.

MIKE HAWLEY.

  You talk like fools. Ain't Braddock, too, a slave?
  He's 'bout as big to Egerton as your thumb.

WES DICEY.

  It seems to me like, boys, we're in a boat.
  We've pulled together hard as any men
  Tryin' to make the shore off there. But here
  She's leakin' and our biscuits have give out.
  The question now is, hadn't we better make
  For this shore here? It ain't the one we want;
  But here there's bread and water. But they say--
  And this it is that seems to rub Sam most--
  'Scuttle your boat or you don't land here.' Well,
  Scuttle her, then I say.

     (_Hisses from the crowd_)

                  Now you hold on.
  I love the Union much as any man.
  And I've stood by her, too, through thick and thin.
  Ain't I stood by her, boys?

JIM KING.

  Wes is our friend.

WES DICEY.

  And will again. Then what do I mean? Just this:
  It's a queer shore ain't got a cove or two
  Where you can hide her. I don't mean to say
  That Sam ain't done his best to captain us;
  He has. But here she is, she's goin' down,
  So I say land. For bread tastes mighty good,
  And air this time o' year won't keep you warm
  If you're turned out. Later, we get our strength,
  We'll patch her up and make for that green shore
  Sam talks of. But just now it's this or this.

     (_Points toward the mill, then to the ground_)

  And if we go down, then where's your Union? Eh?

A VOICE.

  He's right.

ROME MASTERS.

  But if we live, then it lives too.

WES DICEY.

  So it's the Union that I'm speakin' for.

JIM KING.

  He's speakin' for our wives and children too.

A VOICE.

  What about us whose places have been filled?

ANOTHER VOICE.

  You want us all to go down, eh?

SAM WILLIAMS.

  No!

SEVERAL.

  No!

HARVEY ANDERSON.

                  Pards,
  I'm one of Egerton's men, if you'll let me
  Butt in here just a minute with a word.
  You've seen two sides of this thing, but there's three.
  There's one big black one you don't face at all,
  Even your Captain here. You're all right, pard,
  In what you say about their mills and lands
  Not giving them power; it's their owning you.
  And if you'll just tear up that bill of sale
  And call the deal off, Egerton's big shadow
  That fills the valley, lengthening year by year
  Until your hair stands up, you'll be surprised
  How you can cover it with a six-foot pole.
  For it's on you he's standing.

WES DICEY.

  Who are you?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  But look here, pards, are you calling off this sale
  Or simply trying, as it seems to me,
  To make him take the goods at the old price?

HASKELL.

  What have you got to do with it?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

                  And what's the price?
  Where's all that gone?

     (_Points to the mountains_)

                  Were those just weeds up there
  That's been cleared off to get a better view?
  Or Christmas trees?

JIM KING.

  Who are you?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

                  And loaded, too,
  With food and clothes and homes and silks and gems
  And punch that bubbles till she runs down here,
  Flushing the soldier boys until they're gay
  And on their mettle. Is his name Egerton
  That planted all those pines?

     (_Points to the sky_)

WES DICEY.

  What's it to you?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Worked all these years and yet you've got no bread?

HASKELL.

     (_Coming toward him_)

  What business is it of yours what these men do?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Handled all that and yet you've got no roof
  To cover you!

BUCK BENTLEY.

     (_Following Haskell_)

  Look here, Cap.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

                  And this man comes
  And cracks his whip, 'We'll oust you.' What do you say?

BUCK BENTLEY.

  We came down here to see the square thing done,
  Not to take sides and try to break this strike.

     (_Haskell stares at him in amazement_)

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  What's your name?

BUCK BENTLEY.

  Bentley.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

                  I'll remember that.
  And my name's Anderson.

     (_They shake hands_)

HASKELL.

     (_Beckoning to the militiamen about the gate_)

                  Three or four of you.
  I give you ten days in the guard house, Buck.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  You won't be there two hours, pard, take my word.
  There's something going to drop here pretty soon.

HASKELL.

     (_Calls after the militiamen_)

  Tell Mr. Jergens to step here a minute.

     (_Bentley is led away into the mill-yard_)

HARVEY ANDERSON.

     (_To the crowd_)

  God playing Santa Claus among the pines--
  Why ain't you fellows had your stockings up?
  Or if you have, what are you doing here
  Weighing yourselves out on the same old scales,
  Men against bread? Pard, let me ask you this:
  Suppose you do land with your Union boat,
  The bosses on the shore saying all right;
  What is it you land for? Grub for another cruise?
  And you'll go back then to the fishing grounds
  And sink your nets again? Who'll get the catch
  This time? Them that's had it all these years?
  You've made a big haul here, it seems to me,
  Minnows and all. Hundreds of miles like that.
  When are you fellows going to dry your nets,
  Haul up your boat and say, 'Let's weigh the fish'?
  What do you say, pard?

SAM WILLIAMS.

  You a Union man?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  I don't know much about your Union, pard.
  It's all right, I suppose, far as it goes.
  But tell me this--and here's your black side, men--
  Long as they own the sea

     (_Points to the mountains and the plains_)

                  and own the shore,

     (_Points to the mill_)

  You think they'll care much, pard, who owns the boat?
  And how'll they not own you? You tell me that.

     (_Williams and the crowd stand silent_)

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  What do you say?

HASKELL.

     (_Watch in hand_)

  You've got two minutes left.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Two minutes left of freedom. What do you say?
  You've got no North to look to, you white men.

A WOMAN.

     (_With a child in her arms_)

  If you go in there, John, don't you come home.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Bully for you, sister!

THE WOMAN.

                  Don't you dare come home.
  We ain't starved with you, you to sell yourself.

WES DICEY.

  It's either go back, boys, or we'll be tramps.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  There's thousands of them off there good as you.
  You'd sell your soul to Egerton for bread.
  They keep theirs and go round the back door.

VOICE.

     (_From the crowd_)

  Well?

JIM KING.

  Listen to me.

SAM WILLIAMS.

                  Comrades, they can't start up;
  They've not the men.

WES DICEY.

                  Suppose they _don't_ start up?
  Suppose they shut down till the ice blocks there?
  Then where'll we be?

JIM KING.

  You'll hear the children cry.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Shut up your mouths or, if you're married men,
  Let your wives speak. 'You'll hear the children cry!'
  Where in the hell do you hail from any way?
  Or have they starved you till you've lost your grit?

HASKELL.

  One minute.

VOICE.

     (_From the crowd_)

  Bread!

ANOTHER.

  What will we do, Sam?

ANOTHER.

  Vote!

SAM WILLIAMS.

  I've said my last word.

WES DICEY.

  We've no time to vote.

VOICE.

     (_From afar, right_)

  Wait!

JIM KING.

  Be quick.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Hold on!

WES DICEY.

                  Boys, suppose they say,
  'First come, first served, and we don't need the rest'?

JIM KING.

     (_Calling attention to the first flakes of snow_)

  Look at these flakes, men!

     (_There is a stampede for the gate_)

AN OLD WOMAN.

  Run, Tommy!

HARVEY ANDERSON.

     (_Drawing from his pocket a long blue revolver_)

  Halt!
  The first man puts his foot inside that gate
  I'll kill him.

VOICE.

     (_Right as before, now near by_)

  One word before you go in there!

     (_Harry Egerton enters breathless_)

HARRY EGERTON.

  Pardon me; I have run some seven miles
  To be here ere the sun went down, for I
  Knew what it meant to you.

     (_Stands for a moment collecting himself_)

                  Men, my friends,
  What is it you are about to do?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  They're going back.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

     (_As Harry Egerton seems about to speak_)

  Now listen, boys, for now you'll hear a word
  That you'll remember till the crack o' doom.

HARRY EGERTON.

  I wouldn't do it, friends, if I were you.
  What will to-morrow be and the next day
  And years to come if you surrender now?
  You have your strength and right is on your side.
  I in my father's offices have struck
  The balances between you men and him.
  I know what part you've had of all these trees
  And what part he has had, and in my heart
  I know there is a balance on your side.
  Things can't go on forever in this way.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Now the snow falls they're afraid the wolf will howl.

HARRY EGERTON.

  Will you be stronger then a year from now,
  Your Union broken up, your wages less,
  And this defeat behind you dampening all?
  Or do you intend henceforth never to lift
  The voice of protest, silent whatever comes?
  God will provide, my friends. Do not give up.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

     (_Comes to him_)

  Tell 'em about it, partner.

HARRY EGERTON.

  Not yet.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Why?

HARRY EGERTON.

  Their enemies would say it was the gold.
  And we must show them that they're wrong.

A WORKMAN.

  Look out!

JERGENS.

     (_With a stick he has picked up comes from the mill-yard_)

  What do you mean by interfering here?

     (_He discovers Harvey Anderson talking with Harry Egerton and
     turns, evidently for an explanation, to Haskell_)

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  You've filed your claim though?

HARRY EGERTON.

  Yes.

     (_Jubilant, Harvey Anderson turns and, catching up one of the
     mill-boys, lifts him over his head and slides him down his back,
     holding him by the feet. Jergens advances toward him_)

A WORKMAN.

  Look out, comrade!

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  I wouldn't try it, pard, if I were you.

JERGENS.

     (_To the men_)

  You'll rue this day!

     (_To Harvey Anderson_)

  We'll fix you!

     (_To the militia_)

                  Close these gates!

     (_Glowers at Harry Egerton_)

  Clear these streets, Captain!

HARRY EGERTON.

  Stand where you are, my friends.

JERGENS.

  Captain, I order you to clear these streets.

HARRY EGERTON.

  Be careful, Captain Haskell, what you do.
  This is a public place.

A MILITIAMAN.

  What's the word, Cap.?

HASKELL.

     (_To the militiaman, irritably_)

  Who's in command here, I should like to know?

JERGENS.

  Your father will attend to you, young man.

     (_Beside himself with rage, disappears down the street, left_)

HARRY EGERTON.

  Now then go quietly to your homes, my friends,
  And I to-night will see what I can do.

SAM WILLIAMS.

     (_Comes toward him_)

  Mr. Egerton.

     (_Holds out his hand_)

HARRY EGERTON.

  Yes, Sam.

     (_Takes his hand_)

SAM WILLIAMS.

     (_To the crowd_)

                  Comrades,
  I never thought we'd live to see this day.

     (_The men crowd about them_)

HARRY EGERTON.

  Some of you men are hungry.

THE MEN.

                  We're all right!
  We're all right, Mr. Egerton!

HARRY EGERTON.

                  But never mind.
  We will begin a new age in this land.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Up with your hats, pards! God's on the mountains!

     (_Tosses his hat into the air. The workmen, in an almost religious
     ecstasy, go out left, crowding around Harry Egerton and Harvey
     Anderson. Dicey, King and Masters remain behind, whispering
     together, then follow the crowd. The militiamen, most of them
     silent with amazement at the scene they have witnessed, gradually
     disappear into the mill-yard_)

FIRST MILITIAMAN.

  I'm for young Egerton if it comes to that.

SECOND MILITIAMAN.

  Most of us boys are sons of workingmen.

THIRD MILITIAMAN.

  I never thought of that.

FOURTH MILITIAMAN.

                  Buck's about right, too, kids.
  We came here to see the square thing done,
  Not to be half-sole to the old man's boot.

FIRST MILITIAMAN.

  Let's set Buck free.

SECOND MILITIAMAN.

  What do you say, kids?

     (_They go into the mill-yard, talking earnestly_)

SECOND SENTRY.

  Dan!

     (_The First Sentry joins him and they whisper together_)

FIRST SENTRY.

     (_Starts with the other for the gate_)

  I've nothing against Buck.

SECOND SENTRY.

  Haskell's too fast.

     (_They enter the mill-yard_)



ACT III

THE MANSION

_Scene: The great reception hall in the Egerton mansion. One sees at a
glance that this is the original of the shadow hall shown in the
Dream-Vision in the First Act. The carved mountain lion crouches upon
the newel-post, and upon the walls the figures of men at work among the
pines are identical with those of the Vision. But here, seen under a
natural light, the grotesque grandeur of it all stands out in clear
relief. Forward, left and right, just where the great arch separating
the main hall comes down, groups of little pines in tubs lend a
freshness to the scene._

_A brilliant company is gathered. Everywhere, from gestures and lifted
eyes, it is evident that the mansion, especially the strange scene upon
the walls, is the chief topic of talk among the guests. Centre right,
about the piano, a number of young people are watching a couple that is
out upon the floor, apparently practising a new step. Near the pines,
forward left, General Chadbourne turns from the butler, with whom he has
been speaking, to shake hands with some ladies. Later, Ralph Ardsley
appears just inside the door, forward right, and holds up a glass of
wine. Two or three men notice him and nudge their companions, and one
after another saunter past Ardsley into the side room._

_Time: The same afternoon about five o'clock._

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  Get me the eye of Chadbourne.

FIRST MAN.

  General!

     (_Out on the floor the couple that is waltzing jostles an elderly
     lady_)

LADY IN BLACK.

  Why can't they wait until----

ELDERLY LADY.

                  Now run away.
  You've got all night for this tomfoolery.

MRS. EGERTON.

  George!

     (_The young people gradually drift out into the conservatory_)

CHADBOURNE.

     (_Rejoining the Butler_)

  For it's something that concerns the strike.

BUTLER.

  Yes, sir.

CHADBOURNE.

  And it's important.

BUTLER.

  Yes, sir.

SECOND MAN.

  General!

CHADBOURNE.

  And I'll be right out----

     (_Sees the lifted hand_)

                  I'll be right in here.

     (_Joins the Second Man, and the two, with Ardsley, disappear into
     the side room_)

YOUNG MATRON.

  Why do you men keep going out that way?

THIRD MAN.

     (_With a wink_)

  The Governor wants to see us.

     (_They go into the room, forward right_)

LADY WITH CONSPICUOUS COIFFURE.

     (_Entering forward left with Pale Lady_)

                  Indeed it would;
  To just have all the money that you want.

PALE LADY.

  And her new necklace, did you notice it?

LADY WITH CONSPICUOUS COIFFURE.

  Her mother's plain enough.

PALE LADY.

  There she goes now.

     (_They pass rear and mingle with the throng_)

FIRST MAN.

     (_Appearing forward right with a glass of wine_)

  You ladies, I presume, are temperance workers.

     (_'The punch! The punch!' is whispered about, and the people begin
     to pass out centre and forward right_)

FAT LADY.

  I mean to just taste everything there is.

     (_Goes out_)

LADY IN BLACK.

  Isn't it just too grand for anything!

PALE LADY.

  At night, though, I should think 'twould scare a body
  With all those horrid things upon the walls.

     (_They go out. A moment later Mrs. Egerton comes in and looks
     about as though she were seeking some one_)

MRS. EGERTON.

     (_To her daughter, who passes toward the conservatory_)

  Please don't keep showing it, Gladys.

GLADYS EGERTON.

  Marjorie!

     (_She enters the conservatory_)

MRS. EGERTON.

     (_Beckons to some one in the room forward left. The Butler
     appears_)

  Has no word come?

BUTLER.

                  Jack says that Mr. George inquired
  And they've seen nothing of him.

     (_He goes back into the room, forward left. Mrs. Egerton lingers a
     while, then returns to the room, forward right. Here, a moment
     later Ralph Ardsley appears_)

RALPH ARDSLEY.

     (_Calls to a group of four men back near the stairs_)

  Laggards! laggards!

     (_Bishop Hardbrooke and a fellow-townsman, each with a man who is
     evidently a stranger, come slowly forward_)

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  Isn't there aspiration in all this,

     (_Indicating the house_)

  A reaching out toward God, and a love, too,
  Of all that God hath made?

FELLOW-TOWNSMAN.

  The river there.

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  The walls will be here when the wine is gone.

FIRST STRANGER.

  But public sentiment.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  _Vox populi_.

FELLOW-TOWNSMAN.

  People don't stop to think of what he's done.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  Exactly. When an axe falls on one's toes,
  The service that it's been, that's out of mind.
  And yet you throw the bruise, the moment's pain,
  In one side, and in the other a cleared land
  With homes and fields----

SECOND STRANGER.

  That's true.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

                  And populous towns.
  The balance will be struck up yonder, brother.

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  Show me one man that's in the public eye
  Because he stands for something, towers above them,
  That hasn't had them yelping at his heels.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  You know the Editor of the Courier?

     (_The Strangers shake hands with Ardsley_)

SECOND STRANGER.

  You didn't come back.

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  I've troubles of my own.

     (_Walks back in the hall_)

SECOND STRANGER.

  We were together in the Legislature.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

     (_Stopping near the door, forward right, as if for a final word_)

  Speaking of Egerton, some years ago
  I saw that statue in the New York harbor,
  The sea mists blown about it, now the head
  And now an outflash of tremendous bronze
  About the waist. 'Is that the thing,' said I,
  'They talk so much about?' Next day 'twas clear.

FIRST STRANGER.

  Looked very different.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  It's the same with men.

     (_They go out_)

SECOND STRANGER.

  You going in?

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  I've got to find a man.

     (_The stranger goes out_)

     (_Ardsley calls toward the room, forward left_)

  What's the news from the mill, Charles?

BUTLER.

     (_Appears at the door_)

                  I haven't heard, sir.
  You reckon they'll go back, sir?

RALPH ARDSLEY.

                  Sure. Where's Gladys?

     (_The Butler walks back toward the conservatory_)

  Just tell her I asked about her.

BUTLER.

  Yes, sir.

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  Thank you.

     (_He goes into the room, forward right. The Butler returns to the
     opposite room. All the people have now withdrawn with the exception
     of Mrs. Orr, who has come in, centre right, and who lingers about
     as though she were listening to the upper part of the walls. Later,
     Mrs. Egerton re-enters, forward right, and glances back into the
     room from which she has come, to satisfy herself that her guests
     are occupied. Seeing her, Mrs. Orr comes forward, shaking her
     head_)

MRS. EGERTON.

  No?

MRS. ORR.

  No.

MRS. EGERTON.

  Nothing at all?

MRS. ORR.

  Nothing at all.

MRS. EGERTON.

  I never have been sure myself. Sometimes
  I've thought I heard it.

MRS. ORR.

                  I can understand
  How one could easily imagine it.

MRS. EGERTON.

  If you could be here when the house is still,
  Alone----

MRS. ORR.

                  In certain moods, perhaps I should.
  For certainly the trees seem most alive.
  I never would have thought it possible
  To make a forest live and life go on
  In wood as it does here. 'Tis wonderful.

     (_Mrs. Egerton glances across into the room, forward right, from
     which comes a sound of merriment_)

MRS. ORR.

  The very squirrels upon the limbs--see there,
  The young one with the pine cone in its mouth.
  And the faint far-awayness of the wood.

MRS. EGERTON.

     (_Confidentially_)

  Sylvia----

MRS. ORR.

                  Just now as the couple passed
  Practising, I overheard the girl,
  'It almost seems the real pines are here
  Dropping their needles on us while we dance.
  As Lillian says, you feel them in your hair.'
  Now, to my way of thinking, it would be
  Far easier to hear the pine trees sigh
  Than feel the needles.

MRS. EGERTON.

  It was not the pines.

MRS. ORR.

  You said a sighing.

     (_Mrs. Egerton says something to her_)

                  Why, Mary Egerton!
  How horrible!

MRS. EGERTON.

  It worries me at times.

MRS. ORR.

  You do not mean it! And the house just built!
  You foolish dear.

MRS. EGERTON.

  I know.

MRS. ORR.

     (_Aside_)

  How horrible!

MRS. EGERTON.

  Harry has always been a strange, strange boy;
  So different from the rest. What is it you hear?

MRS. ORR.

  Why, nothing, nothing at all. My dear, this is
  Really ridiculous. If it were old
  And there were cobwebs here and musty walls
  And rumors had come down of some old crime
  But with the timber, every stick of it
  Fresh from the forest, you might almost say
  Picked from your very garden, a pure bloom,
  Fashioned and shaped by your own husband's hand:
  How any one could fancy such a thing
  Is past my comprehension.

     (_A medley of voices is heard, forward right_)

MRS. EGERTON.

  Here they come.

A VOICE.

  Cover his eyes, some of you.

MRS. EGERTON.

  Let's not be seen.

     (_She starts back for the door, centre right_)

MRS. ORR.

  But we can't talk in there.

MRS. EGERTON.

  I'll slip away.

     (_They go out centre right. Amid laughter and a confusion of voices
     Ralph Ardsley and a fellow-townsman enter forward right leading
     Governor Braddock, whose eyes are blindfolded. Following these come
     Donald Egerton, General Chadbourne, Bishop Hardbrooke, members of
     the Governor's staff in uniform, and other guests_)

GOVERNOR BRADDOCK.

  You'll pay for this, gentlemen, you'll pay for this.

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  Further, Great Master?

     (_Egerton points back toward the centre of the hall. Himself and
     the group about him remain more in the foreground_)

EGERTON.

  That will do.

     (_They remove the handkerchief from the Governor's eyes_)

GOVERNOR BRADDOCK.

  Hi yi!

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  You see you wake in Paradise.

FIRST GUEST.

  Didn't expect it?

     (_Laughter_)

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  Your incorruptible administration.

FIRST STAFF MEMBER.

  You mean to tell us that you planned all this?

EGERTON.

  No, I conceived it, Weston; it's alive
  As I hope to show you. But more of that anon.

     (_Calls back to the Governor_)

  Does it meet your expectations?

STAFF MEMBERS.

     (_Who have gone rear_)

  Splendid! Splendid!

FELLOW-TOWNSMAN.

  And in the second story he's got his mill.

SECOND STAFF MEMBER.

     (_To Egerton_)

  You don't have strikes up there?

GOVERNOR BRADDOCK.

                  Well, Egerton,
  This is the grandest thing I ever saw.

EGERTON.

  I made my mind up, Braddock, years ago
  That when I'd sawed my fortune out of lumber
  I'd build a mansion where a man could see
  Just how I'd done it, starting with the raw,
  The standing timber, every phase of it;
  A sort of record of these busy times:
  For they won't last forever, these great days.

GENERAL CHADBOURNE.

  We never see the giants till they're gone.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  The day will come when we'll appreciate them.

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  Three cheers for one of them.

GUESTS.

  Hurrah! Hurrah!

EGERTON.

     (_Goes back a little, the group following him, and points right
     rear_)

  Back there you see the swamper clearing brush,
  Man's first assault upon primeval forests.
  And then the feller with his broader stroke
  Hewing a way for apple trees and cities,
  And incidentally moving on himself.
  And here you see my teams. And, by the way,
  They talk of how the horse has followed man
  In his march across the ages, but the tree
  That sheltered the lost saurian, think of that!

GOVERNOR BRADDOCK.

  You must have been a tree in some past life;
  You seem to love them so and understand them.

EGERTON.

  There's nothing in this world so beautiful
  As a pine forest, gentlemen, just at dawn;
  The infant breathing of a million needles.
  It's like our organ, Bishop, those soft tones.

     (_Comes forward_)

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  He ought to have lived in old cathedral days.

EGERTON.

  And here the rising rollways; then the drive,
  The river man.

     (_Points across left_)

GOVERNOR BRADDOCK.

                  Come out to get a view,
  A broader view.

THIRD STAFF MEMBER.

  You had men pose for this?

EGERTON.

  I'm following the tree.

FOURTH STAFF MEMBER.

  That fellow's face.

EGERTON.

  These 'broader views' don't interest me much.

GOVERNOR BRADDOCK.

  And you think this idea's capable of extension?

EGERTON.

  How do you mean?

GENERAL CHADBOURNE.

     (_Returning from a word with the Butler, to Ardsley who comes to
     meet him_)

  I don't see what's the matter.

GOVERNOR BRADDOCK.

  A while ago you said----

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  O it's all right.

GOVERNOR BRADDOCK.

  You were the first Captain of Industry
  In all America to build a house.
  That has a meaning in it.

EGERTON.

                  That's what I said;
  That has the least relation to the land.

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  This snow you'll see will bring them to their senses.

GOVERNOR BRADDOCK.

  Suppose you'd made your fortune out of copper?

FIRST STAFF MEMBER.

  Yes, we all build our houses out of timber.

SECOND STAFF MEMBER.

  Or cotton?

GUESTS.

  Ha, ha, ha!

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  Or oil?

SEVERAL.

  Yes.

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  How would you spiritualize the oil business?

EGERTON.

  Ardsley here wants to quote me in his paper.

GENERAL CHADBOURNE.

  The Lumber King upon the late decision.

EGERTON.

  It's Art, not rebates, that I'm speaking of.
  Couldn't I show my derricks on the walls?
  And back there red-skins striking fire from flint?
  Then our forefathers with their tallow-dips
  Watching the easy drills slip up and down?
  The tanks here--Ah, you laugh, you dilettanti.
  I'll tell you gentlemen what the trouble is:
  You're frightened by our natural resources,
  And you despise the life of your own land,
  The crude, tremendous life we're living here.
  The force is too much for you. You want polish.
  O I can prove it to you.

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  Now you'll get it.

EGERTON.

  Yes, Braddock, there's that Capitol Commission.
  I'd be ashamed.

GOVERNOR BRADDOCK.

  I knew 'twould come.

EGERTON.

                  And we
  Breathing the electric air of this great West,
  As rich in life as timber, herds and hops,
  Wheat fields and mines, and all these things to be
  Raised and translated by the brains of men.
  Think of a State dotted with lumber camps
  And buzzing day and night with saws and saws,
  And as far as the North Pole from old world customs,
  Wearing a capitol with Grecian columns
  With an old Roman Justice on her comb!
  You'd scorn to come here in a gaberdine
  Made by some dago in the days of Pompey.
  And yet you dress the State up in these things.
  No independence.

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  Governor?

FIRST STAFF MEMBER.

  Call the troops!

EGERTON.

  I'd rather cut the timber of this land
  And coin its spirit in a thing like this
  Than be a Roman Cæsar.

RALPH ARDSLEY.

                  Hip hurrah!
  That's what I call a fellow countryman.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  You see we're all Americans down here.

SECOND STAFF MEMBER.

  Now, Governor Braddock, show your stars and stripes.

GOVERNOR BRADDOCK.

  Yet you don't seem to dwell in unity.
  I recollect, and it's not years ago,
  Receiving a petition, and a large one--
  Some six or seven thousand?

THIRD STAFF MEMBER.

  About that.

GOVERNOR BRADDOCK.

  Demanding a withdrawal of some troops.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  We're not responsible for our lower classes.

EGERTON.

     (_Significantly_)

  You didn't withdraw them.

     (_An embarrassing silence_)

RALPH ARDSLEY.

     (_Slaps the Governor on the shoulder_)

  Good American!

FOURTH STAFF MEMBER.

     (_To Bishop Hardbrooke_)

  Jesus of Nazareth was a foreigner.

GOVERNOR BRADDOCK.

  The Bishop would hardly say so though.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

                  And you,
  You, Governor, do you go before the people
  With all you know? No secrets, not a one?

GOVERNOR BRADDOCK.

  O I'm not saying.

EGERTON.

  Editor Ardsley?

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  Here.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  It eases the heart, brother, to confess.

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  It's my stockholders, Bishop.

     (_Points to Egerton_)

EGERTON.

  General Chadbourne?

GENERAL CHADBOURNE.

  I, Colonel, get my orders from above.

     (_Points to the Governor_)

GOVERNOR BRADDOCK.

  We all do.

     (_Points to Egerton_)

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  Egerton?

EGERTON.

                  Then come along.
  I've got some good Americans up here
  Who don't send in petitions.

GOVERNOR BRADDOCK.

  A model mill.

FIRST STAFF MEMBER.

  Non-Union?

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  They're united in the walls.

     (_Laughter_)

EGERTON.

     (_As they start for the stairs_)

  Never you mind, gentlemen, 'twill not be long
  Until the model that I've built up here
  Will be the model everywhere.

GUESTS.

     (_Led by Ralph Ardsley_)

  Hurray!

     (_Attracted by the shouting, some ladies look in, forward right_)

A LADY.

  They do have such good times.

     (_They withdraw_)

GENERAL CHADBOURNE.

     (_From the steps to the Butler_)

  I'll be upstairs.

     (_Seeing the hall empty, the young people who have looked in
     occasionally from the conservatory, enter and take possession_)

RALPH ARDSLEY.

     (_From the landing_)

  Hello, Gladys!

GLADYS EGERTON.

  Hello, Ardsley!

RALPH ARDSLEY.

     (_Touching his throat_)

  Stunning.

GLADYS EGERTON.

  Thank you.

     (_Ardsley disappears after the others. Mrs. Orr enters, forward
     right, and is later joined by Mrs. Egerton_)

MRS. ORR.

  You surely have not spoken of this to him?

MRS. EGERTON.

  The other night I started to.

MRS. ORR.

  How could you!

     (_Mrs. Egerton glances back uneasily into the room_)

MRS. ORR.

  They're all right. Let's go here behind the pines.

MRS. EGERTON

     (_Beckons to the Butler_)

  Serve them the lunch now, Charles.

     (_The Butler goes into the room, forward right. The two women pass
     left, where they are somewhat shut in by the pines_)

MRS. ORR.

  What did he say?

MRS. EGERTON

  And then--I don't know--something in his face--
  Perhaps the wonder that I knew would come
  That such a thing--If people only knew--
  Donald is not the hard unfeeling man--
  And knowing this----

     (_She hesitates_)

MRS. ORR.

  And knowing what, my dear?

MRS. EGERTON.

  My heart rose up and I--I simply said
  That Harry had heard a sighing from the walls.
  I told him so much, for it's worried me.
  And he at once----

MRS. ORR.

     (_With spirit_)

  I know. 'The pines!'

MRS. EGERTON.

  'The pines!'

MRS. ORR.

  I knew it!

MRS. EGERTON.

  'The pines!' And walked the floor and laughed;
  And such a heart-free laugh I have not heard
  In twenty years. 'The pines!'

MRS. ORR.

  'The pines!' Of course.

MRS. EGERTON.

  Feeling----

MRS. ORR.

  Yes, yes!

MRS. EGERTON.

                  He had caught the very soul
  Of the forest.

MRS. ORR.

  And the triumph of it all!

MRS. EGERTON.

  Ah, no one knows how many, many years
  Donald has dreamed of this, how all his thought
  And all his----

     (_Stands regarding the young people dancing_)

MRS. ORR.

  One has but to look at it.

MRS. EGERTON.

  Yet not for it as his, not that at all,
  But for the building of it.

MRS. ORR.

  Of course.

MRS. EGERTON.

                  And now
  That it has taken form you cannot think
  How like a boy he is, how eagerly
  He flees here from the business of the day
  And how he walks about enjoying it.
  'Tis like the sea. When he is here alone
  The burden of his great business falls away
  And he is young again. I sometimes feel,
  Lying in bed at night and knowing he
  Is walking here alone, the lights turned low,
  And listening for the sighing of the pines,
  That somehow 'tis a woman he has made
  And that she whispers to him in these hours,
  Comes to him beautiful from out the pines
  After his long, long wooing of her----

MRS. ORR.

                  I see!
  Beautiful, beautiful! I see! I see!
  It needed that one breath to make it live.

MRS. EGERTON.

  To Donald, yes.

MRS. ORR.

                  Before it was a house,
  And now a living thing. I see! I see!

     (_Kisses the little pines_)

MRS. EGERTON.

  If one could only know it is not God
  Whispering through the walls of our new home
  Some dreadful word, and yet with voice so low.

MRS. ORR.

  My dear, your words are perfect Greek to me.

MRS. EGERTON.

  You know they say the men are suffering so.
  And Donald does not seem to see.

MRS. ORR.

     (_Vaguely_)

  The men?

MRS. EGERTON.

  Yes; Harry says that some are without bread.
  And we here--and the music and the lights.

MRS. ORR.

     (_In utter astonishment_)

  Why, Mary Egerton! You do not mean--
  You cannot mean that that suggested this,
  That vulgar thing, this beautiful idea!

MRS. EGERTON.

  If one could only help them, only help them!

MRS. ORR.

  The hunger of a lot of stupid men
  Who wish to tell your husband what to do,
  And he with a brain like this, and they with claws!

MRS. EGERTON.

  It all depends upon such little things,
  Things that we've never earned----

MRS. ORR.

     (_Mysteriously_)

  Harry, you say?

MRS. EGERTON.

  That fall right at our feet we don't know how.
  The chance of birth! What right have I to this
  Who've never done one thing to help the world,
  While they who work their lives out----

MRS. ORR.

  'Help the world!'

MRS. EGERTON.

  Can't even have the food and clothes they need.
  People have asked me why--that's why it is
  I've done my shopping in the city lately.
  You meet them in the stores and on the streets.
  And they're so thin, so worn with the long strike.
  Just think of children crying for mere bread!
  It's horrible. I thought this afternoon
  As I stood at the window looking out--
  Through the first snow the motor cars came up.
  I don't believe they even noticed it.
  It means so little to them. It's just snow.
  But in the workers' homes--I just can't think
  Of God as looking down with unconcern.
  I couldn't love Him if I thought He could.

MRS. ORR.

  I don't know what we're ever going to do.

MRS. EGERTON.

  If only some strong, gifted man would come
  And show us how, show us all how to live.
  We'd all be so much happier than we are.

MRS. ORR.

  I wish to goodness I could shut my ears
  And never hear that 'Help the world' again.
  You can't pick up a book or magazine,
  Even a fashion journal, or go out
  To see your friends, it seems----

     (_The men are seen coming down the stairs, the Governor and the
     Bishop on either side of Egerton. They are all laughing and having
     a good time_)

MRS. EGERTON.

                  I'm very sorry.
  It isn't the place. But I've been so distraught.
  Let us go in and put it all away.
  And you must never mention it. I can't bear
  To think of people talking.

MRS. ORR.

                  Hear them laugh!
  I wouldn't live with such a wicked man.

MRS. EGERTON.

  That isn't kind in you.

MRS. ORR.

                  In twenty years
  We'll all be wearing grave-clothes.

MRS. EGERTON.

  Sylvia!

MRS. ORR.

  There'll not be one retreat where we can go,
  We ladies of the _ancien régime_;
  We'll all be out, with not a single place
  Where we can make the tables ring with cards
  And laugh and just be gay. Even the pines,
  The beautiful pines, are tainted, and the snow.
  The winter long I'll never dare go out.
  I'll be afraid I'll catch this 'Help the world'
  And come home hearing things. You precious goose!
  You just shan't give way to this silly mood.
  And at the moment when you have about you
  The money and the best names in the State;
  Just everything that mortal heart can wish.

     (_They watch the men coming down the steps_)

  You ought to be so proud.

MRS. EGERTON.

  I am.

     (_The piano stops_)

A GIRL.

     (_Who has been waltzing_)

  O pshaw!

MRS. ORR.

  Even the Governor--don't you see, when he's with Donald
  And when his wife's with you, how they both show
  How all they are and all they hope to be
  They owe to Donald?

MRS. EGERTON.

  I know, I know.

A YOUNG MAN.

  Come on!

MRS. EGERTON.

  And he's so good, so good in many ways.

     (_The young people make for the conservatory_)

MRS. ORR.

  And yet so gay, so sensible with it all.

MRS. EGERTON.

  It isn't that I'm ungrateful, Sylvia.
  I'm never done with thanking God for all
  The blessings that I have.

MRS. ORR.

  Children and wealth.

MRS. EGERTON.

  And Donald, too.

MRS. ORR.

  O really!

A YOUNG MAN.

  Bring the score!

MRS. EGERTON.

  I can't help wishing, though, that he would see
  And do for others as he does for us.

     (_They stand listening_)

EGERTON.

  Just let your minds go out about the mountains.

     (_A pause_)

  Have you had too much punch, or what's the trouble?

     (_Laughter_)

MRS. ORR.

  Just hear how joyous hearted! Promise me----

MRS. EGERTON.

     (_In alarm_)

  He's telling them of the pines!

MRS. ORR.

  What would you do?

MRS. EGERTON.

     (_Beckons to the Butler, who is passing_)

  Tell Donald that I wish to speak with----

MRS. ORR.

     Stop!

EGERTON.

  It's something, gentlemen, that we all have need of.

MRS. ORR.

  Dear, if you ever dare tell Donald this
  And pass this ghastly whisper to his heart,
  I'll be the Secret Lady of the Pines;
  I'll whisper something. What if Donald knew
  Who's kept the strike afoot? The great unknown
  Contributor to the Citizens' Relief?
  Who had twelve hundred dollars in the bank,
  A present from a Christmas long ago?
  Twelve hundred and twelve hundred----!

MRS. EGERTON.

  It can't be!

MRS. ORR.

  We bankers' wives----

MRS. EGERTON.

  A mere coincidence.

MRS. ORR.

  It's not; he's checked it out. So! If you care
  Nothing for Donald's happiness, I do.

     (_She leaves Mrs. Egerton standing near the pines. Other ladies
     have begun to come in_)

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  What's underneath the forest?

MRS. ORR.

     (_With a strange smile, calling back_)

  I really will.

EGERTON.

  You give it up?

MRS. EGERTON.

  My noble, noble son!

GENERAL CHADBOURNE.

  He's waiting, gentlemen, till he finds the mine.

EGERTON.

  The man of parts!

SEVERAL.

  Of course.

EGERTON.

                  That's why I can't
  Take you down now. But when I find the mine
  And get the gold to puddling in the pots,
  If I can find me plastic metal workers
  That I can mould and hammer while they mould
  And hammer out my vision on the walls,
  I'll show you through some subterranean chambers
  Will set your eyes a-dazzle. In the dark,
  Lit by the torches in the miners' caps,
  You'll see the world of metals moving up
  Through human hands as here you see the tree.
  That's why my basement isn't finished yet.

CRIES.

  Good luck! Good luck!

EGERTON.

  I hope you'll be alive.

     (_He leaves the group and comes forward_)

GOVERNOR BRADDOCK.

  Magnificent conception.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  A great man.

EGERTON.

     (_To the Butler_)

  Call them in, Charles. Have all of them come in.

GOVERNOR BRADDOCK.

  Metals, then trees, then mills, then books and pictures.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  Raw matter on its spiral up to spirit.

EGERTON.

  While we're at riddles, gentlemen----

     (_Ladies come in, centre and forward right_)

EGERTON.

                  Come right in.
  If you'll allow me, friends, suppose you stand
  Where you can have my forest in your eye.

     (_He arranges them to face right_)

  I don't see, ladies, how you ever endure
  The dulness of these males. We've been at riddles.
  Come in. I've kept my best wine for the last.

     (_He steps back near the door, centre right_)

  Suppose you'd made an Adam out of clay,
  Worked years to get it to your satisfaction,
  And now you're looking at it, hands all washed
  And mind confronting, weighing what's been done.
  Suddenly you're aware of something standing by you
  That whispers in your left ear: 'Make a wish
  Within the power of God.' What would it be?

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  To see it walk about the garden, brother.

EGERTON.

  Suppose your Adam was a pine-wood, Bishop,
  That couldn't walk.

MRS. ORR.

     (_Ardently_)

  Then just to hear it breathe.

EGERTON.

  A woman's intuition!

     (_Looks to see who it is_)

  Sylvia Orr!

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  _Sylva_ a forest.

EGERTON.

  An old friend of mine.

     (_He gives a signal to some one_)

  A clear day in the pine-wood.

     (_Suddenly the hall is beautifully illuminated_)

GUESTS.

  Ah!

EGERTON.

                  With clouds,
  The dawn just breaking.

     (_The hall becomes gray and shadowy_)

  Ancient silence.

MRS. EGERTON.

     (_Half in terror_)

  Donald!

EGERTON.

  Let us be quiet now.

     (_The silence is broken by the ringing of a telephone bell in the
     room forward left_)

GENERAL CHADBOURNE.

  Ah!

MRS. ORR.

     (_Across to Mrs. Egerton_)

  Don't you dare!

     (_The Butler goes out to answer the telephone_)

GOVERNOR BRADDOCK.

  This age of bells and whistles.

GENERAL CHADBOURNE.

     (_Comes forward and takes his stand near the door forward left_)

  Just in time!

EGERTON.

  They don't concern me. We are far away
  With quiet all about us and the woods.

     (_The silence is intense_)

GENERAL CHADBOURNE.

     (_Rehearsing his speech_)

  ... And it gives me pleasure to announce to you
  Upon the occasion of the opening
  Of your new mansion, Colonel Egerton,
  This bit of news, sir, from the military;
  And I offer it with our congratulations:
  The strike is over;
  The men have yielded and have gone to work.
  And all's been done without one----

     (_Enter the Butler hurriedly_)

GENERAL CHADBOURNE.

  Here I am.

BUTLER.

     (_Passing him_)

  For Mr. Egerton.

GENERAL CHADBOURNE.

  No!

BUTLER.

     (_In a low voice over the crowd_)

  Mr. Egerton!

GENERAL CHADBOURNE.

  Isn't that Captain Haskell?

BUTLER.

  Mr. Jergens.

     (_Egerton comes forward, making his way through the crowd_)

GENERAL CHADBOURNE.

  Butler!

     (_The Butler goes to him and they talk_)

RALPH ARDSLEY.

     (_Calls after Egerton as he goes out left_)

  Good luck!

     (_Calls to Chadbourne_)

  This probably ends it.

GOVERNOR BRADDOCK.

  What's your opinion of these mysteries, Bishop?

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  I'm one of those that simply stand and wait.

GOVERNOR BRADDOCK.

  You don't believe in modern miracles.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  There are miracles and miracles, Governor Braddock.
  I try to keep elastic in these things,
  Steering a middle course with open mind.

RALPH ARDSLEY.

     (_Calls to Chadbourne_)

  Needed just this to crown the time we're having.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  We are living in an age in many ways
  Without a parallel. I sometimes think--
  If I may say it not too seriously--
  Of those last days we read of when the world
  Goes on its way unconscious of the end.
  We give and take in marriage, eat and drink,
  And meet our friends in social intercourse,
  And all the while a Spirit walks beside us,
  Enters our homes and writes upon our walls.
  There are whispers everywhere if we could hear them;
  And some of them grow louder with the days;
  And pools of quiet ruffle and show storms.
  You, Governor, feel the popular unrest
  As it manifests itself in politics,
  The shift of parties and of principles,
  Rocks that we used to think would never change.
  And brother Egerton in industry;
  He feels it.

EGERTON.

     (_Appearing at the door, excited, and keeping back so as not to be
     seen by the people_)

  Chadbourne!

     (_The General joins him and they disappear_)

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

                  I sincerely hope
  We're on the eve, however, of a day
  When trouble-makers in the ranks of Labor,
  Not only here in Foreston but elsewhere,
  May find it to their interest to respect,
  Nay, reverence as a thing ordained by God,
  The right of men to earn their daily bread,
  As well as profitable to obey the laws
  Without the unseemly presence of armed men.

     (_There is a clapping of hands. General Chadbourne appears just
     inside the door and beckons to Ardsley, who goes in to him_)

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  And I will take occasion here and now
  To say what you've been thinking all this while,
  And in the presence of the man himself:
  We are fortunate, my friends----

RALPH ARDSLEY.

     (_Appears and calls to one of the guests farther back_)

  The Governor.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  In having at the helm of our great State
  One who loves order more than he loves votes.

     (_General clapping of hands_)

SEVERAL.

  Good!

GUEST.

     (_In a low voice over the crowd_)

  Governor!

SEVERAL.

  That's good!

     (_The Governor bows_)

CRIES.

  Speech! Speech!

GOVERNOR BRADDOCK.

                  My friends,
  I quite agree with the Bishop.

SEVERAL.

  Ha, ha, ha!

GOVERNOR BRADDOCK.

  I don't mean in his estimate of me.

     (_More laughter. The Governor catches sight of the guest beckoning
     to him_)

GOVERNOR BRADDOCK.

  But here's my better half. You might ask her.
  Pardon me till I see----

RALPH ARDSLEY.

     (_Calls urgently to the Bishop in a voice that is barely heard_)

  Go on! Go on!

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  Society, my friends, is like this house,
  This mansion that we all so much admire.

     (_Ardsley stands impassive till the Governor has gone out and the
     Bishop has again got the attention of the people, then goes quickly
     into the side room_)

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  Imagine what a state of things we'd have
  If every wooden fellow in these walls,
  Not only here but in the mill upstairs,
  Should lend his heart to tongues of discontent
  Until his very tools became a burden.

A VOICE.

  Anarchy.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

                  Very true. Where would this be,
  This beautiful thing that Colonel Egerton
  Has built with so much labor and so much taste?
  And out there in the world where we all dwell,
  Where all of us have places in the walls,
  Some working with their hands on farms, in mines;
  Some building; some at forges; at machines
  Weaving our garments; others more endowed
  Loaned to us from the higher planes of being,
  Men of the Over-Soul, inventors, dreamers,
  Planners of longer railroads, bigger mills,
  The great preparers for the finer souls
  That build the dome, the finishers of things,
  Prophets of God, musicians, artists, poets,
  As we've all seen how Colonel Egerton
  In his third story has his books and pictures--
  Suppose a bitter wind of discontent
  Should shake the great walls of this social order,
  Set the first story men against the second,
  The second against the third, until the mass,
  Throwing their tools down on the world's great floor,
  Should clamor up the dome for pens and brushes,
  Shutting their eyes to the cold facts of life
  That we climb up Life's ladder by degrees--

     (_His attention is attracted for a moment to a group of men that
     has been collecting forward centre, evidently concerned with
     whatever it is that is going on in the side room_)

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

     (_Recovering himself quickly_)

  But I'm afraid, my friends----

SEVERAL.

  Go on! Go on!

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  I'm wasting good material for a sermon.

A MAN'S VOICE.

  Pearls before swine.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  I started to say brethren.

     (_Laughter_)

A LADY.

     (_In the foreground_)

  Isn't he just too bright for anything!

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  But now----

A MAN.

     (_Joining the group_)

  What's up?

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  To come home to the task
  That brother Egerton lays upon our ears.
  We have all of us read stories and seen things.

     (_Laughter_)

A VOICE.

  But ghosts of trees?

     (_General laughter_)

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  That, I admit, is rare.

     (_Mrs. Egerton, who, since the ringing of the telephone bell, has
     shown an increasing anxiety as to the message that has come, unable
     longer to contain herself, comes hurriedly forward through the
     people_)

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  Don't let us scare you, sister Egerton.

     (_Laughter. The people turn just in time to see Governor Braddock,
     General Chadbourne, and Ralph Ardsley with overcoats on and hats in
     their hands, stealing across to get out forward right. Mrs. Egerton
     hurries into the room from which they came_)

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  It's nothing.

     (_The three go out_)

VOICES.

  What's the matter? What's the matter?

PALE LADY.

  It's something terrible, I know it is.

LADY IN BLACK.

  We always have to pay for our good times.

     (_George Egerton and Gladys Egerton come quickly from the
     conservatory and enter the side room_)

ELDERLY LADY.

  I shouldn't wonder if those horrid strikers
  Were burning the mill.

LADY IN BLACK.

  Or may be some one's hurt.

LADY WITH THE CONSPICUOUS COIFFURE.

  Provoking, isn't it?

FAT LADY.

  What would we better do?

YOUNG MATRON.

     (_Calling out_)

  Please tell us what's the trouble.

     (_A silence_)

PALE LADY.

  I shall faint.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

     (_Coming forward_)

  It has been suggested, friends, in view of this
  Personal something that has happened here--
  I don't know what it is, but we all know
  In trouble how we like to be alone.
  Later I'll call them up and for us all
  Extend our sympathy when we know the cause.

     (_There is a movement of people departing_)

PINK LADY.

  I wonder who it is?

FAT LADY.

  They've shut the door.

LADY WITH THE CONSPICUOUS COIFFURE.

  'Twas more like anger; didn't you see his face?

LADY IN BLACK.

  When everything was so, so beautiful!

     (_They vanish with the other guests. A minute or so later the
     Butler enters, right rear, and walks as though dazed through the
     empty hall_)

A MAID.

     (_Appearing right rear_)

  Charlie!

SECOND MAID.

     (_Appears beside her_)

  What is it?

BUTLER.

     (_Without turning_)

  Trouble at the mill.

FIRST MAID.

  Charlie!

BUTLER.

  That's all I know.

SECOND MAID.

  A riot?

GLADYS EGERTON.

     (_Appearing forward left_)

                  Gone!
  Father, they've gone!

GEORGE EGERTON.

     (_Comes in quickly_)

  Look in the rooms.

     (_Goes rear_)

GLADYS EGERTON.

     (_Looks in the room forward right_)

  They've gone!

GEORGE EGERTON.

     (_Calls into the conservatory_)

  Chester! Marjorie! Well, I'll be damned!

GLADYS EGERTON.

  I hate him, O I hate him!

GEORGE EGERTON.

  That's what comes!

GLADYS EGERTON.

  What will we ever do! Just think of it!

GEORGE EGERTON.

     (_To the Butler_)

  Why do you stand that way?

     (_Comes to the door forward left_)

                  O do shut up,
  Mother.

     (_Donald Egerton comes in, putting on his overcoat_)

MRS. EGERTON.

     (_Following him_)

  Remember, Donald, he's our son.

GEORGE EGERTON.

  Always defending him! You make me sick.

MRS. EGERTON.

  You've always said you never in your life
  Lost hold upon yourself.

GLADYS EGERTON.

  No dance to-night.

EGERTON.

     (_To the Butler_)

  Tell Jack to bring the car to the front door.

     (_The Butler goes out centre right_)

GEORGE EGERTON.

  Wait, father, till I get my----

     (_Starts for the room forward left_)

MRS. EGERTON.

                  If he's done it--
  He has some reason, Donald. And you know
  Jergens has never liked him.

     (_Harry Egerton comes in right rear, his hat and shoulders covered
     with snow_)

MRS. EGERTON.

  Harry! Harry!

     (_She hurries to him and embraces him_)

HARRY EGERTON.

  Mother!

MRS. EGERTON.

  My son!

HARRY EGERTON.

  I'm sorry.

     (_George Egerton reappears_)

GLADYS EGERTON.

                  I just hate you!
  You selfish thing! See what you've done!

HARRY EGERTON.

  I'm sorry.

GEORGE EGERTON.

     (_With a sneer_)

  He's very sorry, sister.

EGERTON.

  A pretty son!

HARRY EGERTON.

  I hadn't the least intention, father----

GEORGE EGERTON.

  Damn you!

HARRY EGERTON.

  Who 'phoned it in?

MRS. EGERTON.

  What is it you've done, Harry?

GEORGE EGERTON.

     (_To the Butler and the Maids who have appeared at the doors_)

  Get away from there!

HARRY EGERTON.

  Father----

     (_Egerton Tosses His Overcoat Into the Side Room_)

MRS. EGERTON.

                  Harry, is it true
  You kept the men from going back to work?

HARRY EGERTON.

  I wanted to have a talk with father first.

EGERTON.

  Um!

GEORGE EGERTON.

     (_To his mother_)

  There!

MRS. EGERTON.

  But hear him, Donald.

HARRY EGERTON.

                  All my life
  I've wanted to say something to you, father;
  Especially since I went to work. You once,
  When I came home from college, you remember,
  And hadn't made my mind up what to do,
  What my life work should be----

EGERTON.

  A pretty son!

HARRY EGERTON.

  We talked together and you said that now
  Three things lay open to me, that I could choose
  And that you'd back me up. First, there was Art.
  And though you didn't say so, I could see
  You'd have been glad if I had chosen that.
  I had a talent for it, so you said,
  And I could study with the best of them.
  You'd set aside a hundred thousand dollars;
  And I could finish up by travelling,
  Seeing the beautiful buildings of the world;
  That I could take my time, then settle down
  And glorify my land: that's what you said.
  Then there was Public Life. You'd start me in
  By giving me the Courier. That, you said,
  Would give me at once a standing among men
  And training in political affairs.
  And that if I made good you'd see to it
  I had a seat in Congress, and in the end
  That probably I'd be Governor of the State.
  And then you paused. You didn't like the third.
  Business, you said, was an unpleasant life.
  'Twas all right as you'd used it, as a means,
  But as an end--And then you used words, father,
  That changed my life although you didn't know it--
  'Business, my son, is war; needful at times,
  But as a life,--you shook your head and sighed.
  With that we ended it, for some one came
  And I went out. Six years ago last June,
  The seventh of June; I can't forget the day.
  The sun was shining but a strange new light
  Lay over everything. All of a sudden
  It dawned upon my mind that I'd been reared
  Inside a garden full of flowers and trees,
  And only now had chanced upon the gate
  And stepped out. There was smoke upon the skies
  And a rumbling of strange wagons in the street.
  I was afraid. For every man I met
  Seemed just about to ask, 'What side are you on?'
  And I was twenty-one and didn't know.

EGERTON.

  You seem to have found out since you've been away.

HARRY EGERTON.

  I'd always thought 'twas garden everywhere.
  I walked on up the river and sat down
  Upon the logs up there, and night came on.
  And in the waters flowing at my feet
  The lighted land went by, cities and towns
  And the vast murmur and the daily life
  Of those that toil, the hunger and the care.
  And in my heart I knew that it was true,
  That what you said was true. And I came back
  Filled with such peace as I had never known.
  'I'll enter business, father.' And I did.
  I started at the bottom in the mill
  Helping the engineer, and from the saws
  Carried the lumber with the other men.
  Then in the yard. You always praised my work.
  I'm in the office now at twenty-seven,
  And Secretary of the Company.
  I think I know the business pretty well.
  You've said so. But somehow----

     (_He pauses_)

MRS. EGERTON.

  What is it, Harry?

HARRY EGERTON.

  In Public Life, if I had chosen that,
  And after six years' work that you approved,
  If one day I had come----

EGERTON.

  You want the mill.

HARRY EGERTON.

  'Father, I can't go on; my way is blocked
  And all my hopes are falling to the ground.'
  There's nothing, not one thing you wouldn't have done.
  Or if I had a building half way up,
  My masterpiece, a mighty capitol
  That finished would be known throughout the land,
  And I had met with interference, men
  Who had no vision--you know what I mean--
  And I had come to you, 'Father, I'm thwarted,'
  O I can see with one sweep of your hand
  How you would clear the skies.

EGERTON.

  You want the mill.

HARRY EGERTON.

  Yes, father.

EGERTON.

  I thought so.

HARRY EGERTON.

  I want the mill.

GEORGE EGERTON.

  And thought you'd blackmail father.

HARRY EGERTON.

                  Listen to me!
  For probably in all my life I'll never
  Speak to you as I'm speaking now, my father.

MRS. EGERTON.

  Donald, I beg of you----

GEORGE EGERTON.

  Well, I'll be----

MRS. EGERTON.

  George!

HARRY EGERTON.

  In these six years for one cause or another
  There've been three strikes that have cost the Company thousands
  In money, to say nothing of those things
  That all the money in the world can't buy.
  Now let me ask, my father, if this loss,
  Instead of springing from these strikes, had come
  Through breakdowns of the machinery, or in the camps
  Through failure to get the timber out in time,
  Wouldn't you have dismissed the man in charge?
  Then why do you let Jergens run the mill?
  Hasn't he failed, and miserably, with the men?

GEORGE EGERTON.

  What have you to do with it?

EGERTON.

  I'll attend to this.

     (_George Egerton walks away and stands by the pine trees, picking
     off and biting the needles_)

HARRY EGERTON.

  Is it because the earnings have increased?
  Think what it's cost you, father. In every mill
  Jergens has touched he's left a cursing there
  That's all come back on us. Why, my father,
  Our name's become a by-word through the State,
  'As hard as Egerton.' And when I think
  Of what might be, the good-will and the peace,
  The happiness! There's not the least excuse
  For this cut in wages, father, and you know it.

EGERTON.

  Um!

HARRY EGERTON.

  You can't help but know it. You've the books;
  You know what you've been making. But that aside:
  To come to what I would say: You've won this strike.
  You have the men in your power and you can say,
  'Go back,' and they'll go back. But you won't do it.

EGERTON.

  Won't I?

HARRY EGERTON.

                  Will you, when you know you're wrong?
  When you know you're losing friends who love what's right?
  Think of the sentiment against you, father.
  No, father, you don't know what's going on.

EGERTON.

  It seems I don't.

HARRY EGERTON.

                  If you knew how they live
  And the hard time they have to get along.
  It isn't fair, my father, it isn't fair.

GLADYS EGERTON.

     (_In tears, to her mother_)

  Yes, you don't care.

HARRY EGERTON.

                  Father, you love this land.
  There's never been a day in all your life,
  If there'd been war, you wouldn't have closed the mill
  And gone and died upon the field of battle
  If the country had called to you in her need.
  And I can see you how you'd scorn the man,
  If he were serving as a General,
  Who'd keep his rank and file as poorly fed
  And ragged as he could.

     (_The telephone bell rings_)

GLADYS EGERTON.

                  They're calling up
  To know about it!

GEORGE EGERTON.

     (_Starts for the room, then stops_)

  What shall I tell them, father?

GLADYS EGERTON.

  O have them come back, papa, have them come back!

EGERTON.

     (_Keeping his eye on Harry_)

  Tell them what you please.

     (_George goes out_)

HARRY EGERTON.

  Father, buy Jergens out.

GLADYS EGERTON.

     (_Calling into the room_)

  Tell them it's all right, brother, that it's nothing.

HARRY EGERTON.

  Give him his price and let him go his way----

EGERTON.

     (_Calling toward the room_)

  A misunderstanding.

HARRY EGERTON.

                  And let me run the mill.
  And let us see, my father, you and I,
  If we can't make that place of work down there
  As famous for its harmony as this house.
  A land is not its timber but its people,
  And not its Art, my father, but its men.
  Let's try to make this town a place of peace
  And helpfulness. What do you say, my father?

EGERTON.

  And that's your life work!

     (_Gladys goes into the room_)

MRS. EGERTON.

     (_Approaching him_)

  Donald----

EGERTON.

  Go away.

MRS. EGERTON.

  You've asked me why it is I cannot sleep.
  It's that, Donald, it's that! Give him the mill.
  They're human beings, Donald, like ourselves.

EGERTON.

  And you've been planning this!

HARRY EGERTON.

                  I had hoped, my father,
  That things would so arrange themselves that I--
  That you would make me manager of the mill.

MRS. EGERTON.

  Donald, it's your nobler self you hear.

EGERTON.

     (_Looks at him a long time_)

  What a fool----

     (_Turns away_)

                  what a fool I've been!

     (_Walks about_)

VOICES OF GEORGE AND GLADYS.

  The mine! Father!

     (_They come running in_)

  The mine! A rumor that the mine's been found!

EGERTON.

  Who is it?

GEORGE EGERTON.

  I don't know. They're on the wire.

     (_Egerton goes out_)

GEORGE EGERTON.

  All over town, they say.

     (_Brother and sister wait near the door, tense, listening_)

MRS. EGERTON.

     (_With a sigh_)

  Everything!

GLADYS EGERTON.

     (_Under her breath_)

                  George,
  Think of the things we'll have!

GEORGE EGERTON.

  Be still!

MRS. EGERTON.

     (_Turns and looks at Harry, whose face shows the sadness he feels
     at his father's refusal_)

                  Harry.
  Harry, are you well?

HARRY EGERTON.

                  Yes, mother.

     (_A pause_)

  Mother----

     (_Distant cannon are heard_)

GEORGE EGERTON.

  Hark!

GLADYS EGERTON.

     (_Starting back through the house_)

                  The mine! the mine!

     (_The servants appear_)

  Father has found the mine!

     (_Further booming is heard_)

GEORGE EGERTON.

  There go the guns! They're celebrating, father!

     (_He starts for the stairs and goes bounding up three steps at a
     time_)

GLADYS EGERTON.

     (_Calling after him_)

  We'll have them back and announce it! We'll have them back!

HARRY EGERTON.

  Mother, I've found the mine.

GLADYS EGERTON.

     (_Whirling round on her toe_)

  Now, now you see!

HARRY EGERTON.

  This morning on the mountains.

MRS. EGERTON.

  Can it be!

GLADYS EGERTON.

     (_Comes running forward_)

  I'll have my car now, won't I, daddy, daddy?

     (_She disappears into the room, forward left_)

MRS. EGERTON.

     (_Strangely_)

  I knew it! O I knew that He would come!

     (_Turns upon her son a look of awe_)

  Harry! Harry!

HARRY EGERTON.

  Father must do what's right.

MRS. EGERTON.

  You'll build a mill.

HARRY EGERTON.

  The ground is white with snow.

     (_Egerton appears in the doorway and stands looking at his son_)

GLADYS EGERTON.

     (_Clinging to his hand_)

  What is it, papa? What's the matter, daddy?

GEORGE EGERTON.

     (_Appearing upon the stairs_)

  They've run the flag up on the Court House, father!

EGERTON.

  That's what it means!

HARRY EGERTON.

  Father, I'll buy the mill.

EGERTON.

  That's what it means!

GLADYS EGERTON.

  What, daddy?

EGERTON.

  You'll hold my men!

HARRY EGERTON.

  I'll mortgage the mine and pay you, father.

GLADYS EGERTON.

  Oh!

EGERTON.

  And if I don't you'll back the men, eh?

GLADYS EGERTON.

  Oh!

     (_She backs toward George, who has come down the stairs_)

HARRY EGERTON.

  I'll pay you twice its value, father.

GEORGE EGERTON.

     (_At a word from Gladys_)

  What!

     (_Egerton drops his eyes for a moment and stands as though in deep
     thought_)

MRS. EGERTON.

  Be careful, Donald!

GLADYS EGERTON.

     (_To Harry_)

  I hate you!

GEORGE EGERTON.

     (_With a sneer_)

  Big man!

EGERTON.

                  George,
  Get Jergens.

GEORGE EGERTON.

     (_To Harry_)

  Mill-hand!

     (_Goes out left_)

EGERTON.

                  Tell him to lock the mill
  And have this notice tacked up on the gate,
  'Closed for a year.'

VOICE OF GEORGE.

  Good!

GLADYS EGERTON.

  Good!

EGERTON.

  I'll let her rot.

HARRY EGERTON.

  And winter coming on!

GLADYS EGERTON.

  I'm glad! I'm glad!

EGERTON.

  War or submission, eh?

HARRY EGERTON.

     (_Goes to his mother_)

  Mother.

     (_Kisses her_)

EGERTON.

  I'll show you----

HARRY EGERTON.

     (_Starting for the door_)

  Father, you'll remember in the years to be
  How I came to you one November day
  And asked your help to give this country peace.

EGERTON.

  Go to your rabble!

GLADYS EGERTON.

     (_Breaks out crying_)

  Think of it!

EGERTON.

                  I'll show you
  How you can buy me and my property!

HARRY EGERTON.

     (_From back in the hall_)

  Property was made for men.

EGERTON.

                  And don't you ever
  Darken that door!

HARRY EGERTON.

                  And you can't keep it idle
  While men depend upon it for their bread.

     (_He goes out_)

EGERTON.

     (_Roaring after him_)

  You dare to lay your hands upon that mill!

     (_He stands staring at the door_)

MRS. EGERTON.

     (_Wonderingly_)

  It wasn't our son! It wasn't our son!

     (_The cannon are heard in volley upon volley as of a town giving
     itself up to celebration_)

EGERTON.

     (_Calls into the room, left_)

  Tell him to go right down, that probably
  There'll be an attack upon it.

GLADYS EGERTON.

     (_Shaken with sobs_)

  Think of it!

MRS. EGERTON.

     (_As before_)

  That gleam about his brow! And now he's gone!

     (_She wanders back in the hall as in a dream_)

EGERTON.

  And to see Chadbourne----Are you listening?

VOICE OF GEORGE.

  Yes.

EGERTON.

  To Chadbourne that he has authority from me--
  From Egerton, to treat them all alike.

MRS. EGERTON.

     (_Vacantly, to her husband_)

  What have you done, Donald!

EGERTON.

                              That I expect
  The mill defended, let it cost what may.

GLADYS EGERTON.

  I hate him, O I hate him!

MRS. EGERTON.

     (_Who has come forward and stands facing him_)

  What have you done!



ACT IV


THE LIVING MILL

_Scene: Inside the mill, showing in front a sort of half storeroom, half
office shut in from the main body of the mill by a railing in the centre
of which is a gate that swings in and out. Far back in this main body of
the mill one sees a number of great gang saws from which off-carriers,
with freshly sawed slabs and lumber upon their rollers, branch right
from the main line that runs the full length of the mill. Through an
opening in the far end, whence the logs are drawn up an incline to the
saws, one sees as through a telescope a portion of the river and of the
mountains on the opposite bank. Up toward the front, left, in this main
body of the mill is a wide door that opens outside. In the foreground,
within the space partitioned off by the railing, a pair of stairs,
evidently connecting with the outdoors on the ground floor, comes up
rear left. Centre, against this left wall, a pole six or eight inches in
diameter, and to all appearances only recently set, goes up through a
hole in the roof. Upon the floor at the foot of the pole, from which two
long ropes hang down, lies a large American flag partially strung upon
the rope. Forward from the pole is a door which apparently is no longer
in use, a strip being nailed across it. About this end of the enclosure
are piles of window sash and kegs of nails. Centre rear, at right angles
to the side walls, so that one sitting upon a stool may look back into
the mill, is a long checkers' desk with two or three stools before it
and with the usual litter of papers, books, and a telephone upon it. In
the right wall, rear, where one coming up the stairs may walk straight
on and enter, is a door connecting with the main office._

_As the Scene opens, something very important seems to be going on in
this main office. A crowd of men, workmen and militiamen together, are
packed about the door, intent upon whatever it is that is transpiring
inside. Forward, away from the crowd, a small group, mostly of
militiamen, is gathered about two guards with rifles in their hands, who
have evidently just come in. Back, beyond the railing and close to the
crowd, a group of workmen about Wes Dicey is engaged in a heated
argument. And farther back in the mill, especially about the large door,
left, are bodies of men talking together. As the Scene opens, and for a
few minutes afterwards, some one up the pole is heard singing._

_Time: Saturday afternoon the week following the preceding Act._

A WORKMAN.

     (_Comes from the crowd to the militiamen_)

  Servin' the papers on the mine, you think?

MILITIAMAN.

  He's too damn proud to play the constable.

SECOND MILITIAMAN.

  Maybe it's terms from Egerton.

THIRD MILITIAMAN.

     (_To Fourth Militiaman, who has just come up the stairs with his
     shoulders hung with knapsacks_)

  Chadbourne's here.

SECOND WORKMAN.

  Egerton makes no terms till he's on top.

FIFTH MILITIAMAN.

  He'll have his hands full. Seen the evening papers?

     (_He unfolds a paper and a group gathers about him_)

CRIES.

     (_Near the door_)

  That's right! that's right!

THIRD WORKMAN.

     (_From the edge of the crowd_)

  What are they sayin', Mike?

FOURTH WORKMAN.

     (_On the edge of the crowd, looking toward the group about Dicey_)

  We can't hear nothin' with that racket there.

FIRST MILITIAMAN.

  It's his lost sheep he's after.

SECOND MILITIAMAN.

  Let him bark.

FOURTH WORKMAN.

  You've stood by us, boys, and we'll stand by you.

VOICE.

     (_From back in the mill_)

  Tell him we won't, no matter what he says!

     (_The Sixth Militiaman comes up the stairs, with four or five
     bugles, and shows surprise to see the crowd gathered_)

THIRD MILITIAMAN.

     (_In the group about the paper_)

  And Smith and Balding Brothers!

FOURTH WORKMAN.

  Lemme see it.

FIFTH MILITIAMAN.

  Give him a rouse. What say you. One, two, three.

SEVERAL.

  Hurrah for Harry Egerton! Hurrah!

VOICE.

     (_Rear_)

  Hurrah for the Living Mill!

A GENERAL SHOUT.

     (_Back in the mill_)

  The Living Mill!

FIFTH MILITIAMAN.

  I guess, by God, he knows where we stand now.

     (_They join the crowd about the door. Jim King comes through the
     gate in the railing, followed by Rome Masters, who is considerably
     intoxicated_)

JIM KING.

  And hug 'em round the neck, if I was you.
  That's what I'd do.

ROME MASTERS.

  Now you just stop that, Jim.

JIM KING.

  Why did you tell Aug. Jergens that you would?

ROME MASTERS.

  I ain't said nothin' about backin' down.
  But I ain't nothin' agin him.

JIM KING.

                  There you go!
  It does beat hell. You just keep saying that,
  That you ain't nothin' agin him, and you'll see.

VOICE.

     (_Near the door_)

  Who's to be judge what's for the Public Good?

ROME MASTERS.

  I ain't said that I wouldn't do the job.

JIM KING.

     (_Stands on tip-toe and looks over the crowd, then turns back to
     Masters_)

  Didn't you think and didn't I think and Wes
  That when they cut the pie we'd get our share,
  One big long table with no head and tail
  But all the boys the same, and everything
  Piled on it and divided?

     (_The group about Dicey become more noisy_)

VOICE.

     (_From the crowd_)

  Put him out!

     (_Dicey comes from the centre of the group and catches sight of
     King, who beckons to him_)

FIRST WORKMAN.

     (_From the group_)

  If you don't like it, Wes, why don't you leave?

SECOND WORKMAN.

     (_Following Dicey_)

  Why in the hell don't you leave? We're free men.

     (_Dicey, King and Masters walk over to the pile of sash, left_)

THIRD WORKMAN.

     (_Of the Dicey faction_)

  Offer 'em coppers for their Union cards.

FOURTH WORKMAN.

  And where's the mine that you was goin' to share?

FIFTH WORKMAN.

  You want old Egerton to have it, eh?

VOICE.

     (_Back in the mill_)

  Bring on the Constitution and let's vote!

CHRIS KNUDSON.

     (_Comes out of the crowd_)

  Don't use that name.

     (_To the Dicey faction_)

                  Let's have no trouble, men.
  This ain't no time to quarrel among ourselves.

     (_To the other party_)

  Try to remember, boys, it's his name, too.

     (_Suddenly there is a tremendous cheering by those about the door.
     A militiaman hurries from the crowd, grabs a bugle from the Sixth
     Militiaman and, darting out centre, starts to blow it_)

SIXTH MILITIAMAN.

     (_Excitedly_)

  Don't do that! Here!

MILITIAMAN.

     (_With the knapsacks_)

  Don't do that!

     (_The crowd begins to break up, many of the men climbing back over
     the railing into the mill proper_)

MILITIAMAN.

     (_Comes sliding down the pole_)

  What's the trouble?

JIM KING.

     (_Returning with Dicey and Masters_)

  They're out for their selves, damn 'em; we'll be too.

SEVENTH MILITIAMAN.

     (_Coming away with two or three others_)

  Young Egerton's pure gold if ever was.

WES DICEY.

  Don't make no move, though, Jim, till we see first.

     (_He separates himself from the other two, and they mingle with the
     men_)

EIGHTH MILITIAMAN.

  That's just the way they did the old man's farm.
  We had a place and didn't want to sell.
  That made no difference. Eminent Domain.
  'Out of the way there, home!'

VOICE.

     (_From back in the mill_)

  What did he say?

VOICE.

     (_Near the door_)

  Then if the Company can take men's lands
  To build their railroads through----

SECOND VOICE.

  That's a good point!

FIRST VOICE.

  And if you say the Law's the same for all,
  Then why can't we take theirs when we need bread?

FIFTH MILITIAMAN.

     (_Getting a group together_)

  Be smoking when he comes out.

FIRST MILITIAMAN.

  Stamper! Kids!

THIRD VOICE.

     (_Rear_)

  What Egerton wants, that's for the Public Good!

CHRIS KNUDSON.

  There, there you're not remembering it again!

     (_General Chadbourne comes from the office, followed by Captain
     Haskell, and after these Harry Egerton, Sam Williams, Harvey
     Anderson, Buck Bentley, and others. The militiamen make a big
     smoke_)

GENERAL CHADBOURNE.

  You'll not lay hands on property in this State.

HARRY EGERTON.

  The right of men to work is just as sacred
  As is the right of property, General Chadbourne,
  And more important to the general welfare.

GENERAL CHADBOURNE.

  These gates have stood wide open here for weeks.

SAM WILLIAMS.

  And on whose terms?

WORKMEN.

  That's the point; on whose terms?

GENERAL CHADBOURNE.

  Of course you'd like to make the terms yourselves.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Why shouldn't they?

HARRY EGERTON.

  What would you have men do?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  You say the State's been fair with them. All right.
  But it ain't the State that feeds them, it's the Mill;
  And it ain't the State that clothes them, it's the Mill;
  And it ain't the State they think of when they think
  Of better homes hereafter, it's the Mill.
  And there ain't no fairness that ain't fair in here,
  And there ain't no freedom that ain't free in here,
  Though there ain't no use of saying that to you.

SAM WILLIAMS.

  We have to live.

GENERAL CHADBOURNE.

     (_Ignoring Anderson, as he does throughout_)

                  Employers have the right
  To buy their labor in the open market,
  And if you fellows here can't meet the price----

VOICE.

     (_From the crowd_)

  You'd have us starve?

GENERAL CHADBOURNE.

                  You'll have to step aside
  And give way to some stronger men that can

SAM WILLIAMS.

  And you expect men to obey a law
  That gives no hope of anything but this?

GENERAL CHADBOURNE.

  You'd been to work and you'd been satisfied
  If some outsiders hadn't come along
  And fired your ignorant minds.

     (_Murmurs in the crowd_)

CHRIS KNUDSON.

  Hold your tongues, men.

HARRY EGERTON.

  Pardon me, General Chadbourne--

HARVEY ANDERSON.

     (_To Buck Bentley_)

  Land o' the free!

HARRY EGERTON.

  We are all of us outsiders in a way,
  Yourself as well as Harvey here and I.
  But in a way there's no such thing. We're men,
  And that which injures one injures us all.

GENERAL CHADBOURNE.

  I'm here on duty; quite a different thing.

HARRY EGERTON.

  What I have done I have done not without cause
  Nor hastily.

GENERAL CHADBOURNE.

                  You know yourself these men
  Would have been to work.

SAM WILLIAMS.

  We'd had to----

GENERAL CHADBOURNE.

  There you are!

SAM WILLIAMS.

  If it hadn't been for Mr. Egerton.

HARRY EGERTON.

  Yes, probably they would.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  That's just the point.

GENERAL CHADBOURNE.

  Then who is responsible?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  They'd gone to work.

HARRY EGERTON.

  For this, I am. But for conditions here----

GENERAL CHADBOURNE.

     (_To Captain Haskell_)

  Remember that.

WORKMEN.

  No! We! We seized the mill!

HARRY EGERTON.

  I led them.

BUCK BENTLEY.

  It was we unlocked the gates.

WORKMEN.

  But we marched in, so we're responsible.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  We won't dispute about who did it, partners.
  There's glory enough for all.

     (_Cheers_)

                  I'm in it too.

     (_He laughs_)

HARRY EGERTON.

  But for conditions that produced this strike
  God knows and I know it was not these men.
  I only wish that that was farther off.

GENERAL CHADBOURNE.

  If wrong's been done there's legal remedies.

HARRY EGERTON.

  Conditions, General, that outreach the law.

SAM WILLIAMS.

  For it's that 'open market'----

VOICE.

     (_From the crowd_)

  Who makes the law?

SAM WILLIAMS.

  Their legal right to buy the cheapest men
  And drive them just as hard and just as long
  As they can stand it.

BUCK BENTLEY.

  And no troops are sent.

CRIES.

     (_Some militiamen joining in_)

  That's right!

WORKMEN.

  No troops for us! No troops for us!

     (_This cry is caught up by the crowd and is carried on back through
     the mill. Chadbourne looks at the militiamen and unbuttons his
     overcoat and feels about in his pockets_)

HARRY EGERTON.

  Pardon me, General, if I speak right out,
  But I've seen wages lowered to buy lands,
  And I've seen bread taken from these men here
  To gamble with. There are some things, General Chadbourne,
  That can't go on. We've but one life to live
  And we just can't stand by and see some things
  And live. It's not worth while, it's not worth while.

BUCK BENTLEY.

  And while you're here I want to say a word,
  For possibly we won't see you any more,
  And they'll be asking of us up the State.
  I never thought of it----

GENERAL CHADBOURNE.

     (_Handing Haskell a notebook_)

  Take down their names.

BUCK BENTLEY.

  Till Mr. Egerton made his talk that day;
  But it's a fact and it stares you in the face:
  When Companies are wronged, or think they are,
  They touch the wires and the troops are sent,
  But when the men are wronged, or think they are,
  It's 'legal remedies.'

SAM WILLIAMS.

  That's well put, Comrade.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  That don't mean anything.

FIRST MILITIAMAN.

     (_To Haskell_)

  John Stamper.

FIRST GUARD.

                  I
  Guess you know me.

SECOND MILITIAMAN.

  And you can take mine, too.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Who ever saw the like of this before!

THIRD MILITIAMAN.

  Kelley.

SECOND GUARD.

  And mine.

HARRY EGERTON.

                  A hundred years from now
  They'll write them in the larger book of Fame.

FOURTH MILITIAMAN.

  This is the third time we've been out this year.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  You look like Israel Putnam and Paul Jones.

BUCK BENTLEY.

  We came down here to see the square thing done;
  But it's got to work both ways.

SIXTH MILITIAMAN.

  And mine.

SEVENTH MILITIAMAN.

  And mine.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

     (_To Chadbourne_)

  You're all right, partner, only you don't see
  The inside of this thing that's happened here.
  The day's gone by when two or three big men
  Could ride her to and fro for their own gain
  And lay her up and starve the crew. That's past.
  We're going to take the flags down of the Kings,
  Kings of Lumber, Kings of Cotton, Kings of Coal,
  From one end to the other of this land,
  And we'll all be Americans, North and South
  And East and West until you touch the seas.
  And there's the thing that's going to fly the mast.

     (_Points to the flag on the floor_)

  And when she climbs you'll hear the guns go off
  Announcing a new Independence here.

     (_Tremendous cheering_)

     (_Two militiamen are seen coming up the stairs, the one loaded with
     blankets, the other with ten or twelve rifles_)

GENERAL CHADBOURNE.

     (_To Harry Egerton_)

  And this is final, eh?

VOICE.

     (_From the crowd_)

  We'll hold the mill!

WORKMEN.

     (_Catching sight of the two militiamen_)

  And the mine too! That's right! And the mine too!

     (_Tremendous cheering_)

HARRY EGERTON.

  If you have any way to guarantee
  That these men who have worked here many years
  And faithfully, as I know, will have their right
  To work respected and at an honest wage,
  And that while there are profits to be shared
  There'll be no starving time among these men----

GENERAL CHADBOURNE.

  Don't think because you're Mr. Egerton
  That you're immune. You'll find the laws the same
  Whether you're Mr. Egerton or not.

     (_Starts for the stairs_)

  If need be I'll call out ten thousand men.

VOICE.

     (_Back in the mill_)

  Bring on the Constitution and let's vote!

FIFTH MILITIAMAN.

     (_With the paper_)

  You'll have your hands full if reports are true.

HARRY EGERTON.

  We none of us can tell what men will do.
  The times are changing and the days bring light.

GENERAL CHADBOURNE.

  You mean you'll stir up mutiny again?

HARRY EGERTON.

  I'll see they get the truth, then let them choose.
  That is a right we all have, General Chadbourne.

GENERAL CHADBOURNE.

  You'll have no chance to see them.

     (_Goes down the stairs, the two guards leading the way_)

HARRY EGERTON.

                  Very well.
  Just say to Governor Braddock it's with him.
  We'll keep right on at work. The gates shall be
  Open and the men shall come and go.

CAPTAIN HASKELL.

     (_To two militiamen who are busy stringing the flag on the rope_)

  Damn pretty men you are to raise a flag.
  You ought to have a red one.

FIRST MILITIAMAN.

  Go on, Haskell.

SECOND MILITIAMAN.

  We'll see what kind of men dare take it down.

CAPTAIN HASKELL.

  Wait till Court Martial sits.

     (_Disappears down the stairs. There is a movement of the workmen
     back into the mill_)

HARVEY ANDERSON.

     (_Shouting_)

  Now let's to work!

     (_The militiamen gather left, and to some of them the rifles,
     knapsacks, etc., are distributed. Buck Bentley, who has taken the
     bugles in his hands, walks to and fro_)

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  You'd better be off, Bentley, don't you think?
  They'll turn Hell upside down to get that mine.

BUCK BENTLEY.

  He wanted to say something to me.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

     (_Calls rear left to Harry Egerton, who is engaged with Dicey, a
     number of workmen being gathered about them_)

  Partner!

     (_They stand silent, watching the group_)

BUCK BENTLEY.

  Harry's too easy with him.

A WORKMAN.

     (_Leaving the group and passing rear, calls to Anderson_)

  The same old sore.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  You've noticed any change these past few days?

BUCK BENTLEY.

  In Egerton, you mean? Ain't it the strain
  Of breaking with his family?

     (_Harry Egerton starts toward them, but Dicey keeps after him, the
     men following_)

BUCK BENTLEY.

     (_To Anderson, who has turned aside and half pulled from his inside
     pocket a legal looking document_)

  What----

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  His will.

HARRY EGERTON.

     (_To Dicey_)

  It's a new day, my friend, a glorious day.

VOICE.

     (_Back in the mill_)

  'Twill soon be night!

HARRY EGERTON.

                  Try to forget the past
  And everything except that we are men
  Working together for the good of all.

WES DICEY.

  That ain't the point though, Mr. Egerton.

SAM WILLIAMS.

  You've got your vote, Wes, same as we have ours,
  You and your friends have. Why ain't that enough?
  Or is it that you think the few should rule?

WES DICEY.

  There's got to be good feelin' all around
  If it's to hold together as you say;
  It's got to be plumbed well. And I don't see,
  If it's to be a workers' commonwealth,
  How you can keep the mine out. Course it's yours
  And in a way you can do as you please,
  That is, if you was like most men you could;
  But bein' different, standin' for the right,
  We don't just see how you can say 'We'll keep
  The mine out and devote it to the Cause.'
  If the boys ain't the Cause, tell us what is.
  Maybe it's as we're ignorant and don't know.

HARRY EGERTON.

  Please do not put things in this bitter way.
  The Cause is what you've fought for all these years,
  A chance to live a freer, larger life.
  But in this struggle are you men alone?
  And shall we as we climb to better things
  Reach down no help to others, but hold fast
  To all we get?

SEVERAL.

  No! No!

HARRY EGERTON.

  Would that be right?

WES DICEY.

  Another point. For years and years we've had
  A Union here, and when the fight came on,
  'Twas as a Union that we made the fight.
  And Sam knows this is true, 'twas not so much
  The cut in wages, though, that took our strength,
  As 'twas their breakin' of the Union up
  As made us say 'By God, we'll fight or die.'
  Ain't that true, boys?

TWO OR THREE.

  That's true.

WES DICEY.

                  And then you come
  And took the stand you did as they'd no right
  To make slaves of us, closin' of the gates
  To make us knuckle down. And you said 'Come,'
  And the boys followed you, and here they are.
  And many of 'em, if I sound 'em right,
  Are wonderin' what we're here for. I'll ask Sam
  If he's in favor of the Open Shop.

SAM WILLIAMS.

  We formed our Union, Wes, when we were slaves,
  Same as in war times armies are called out.
  But when the war is over they go back.

WES DICEY.

  'Go back.'

SAM WILLIAMS.

  We're free men now.

CHRIS KNUDSON.

                  We've no foe now
  Except ourselves.

WES DICEY.

                  All of which means you'll vote
  In favor of admittin' every man
  To full rights here.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Look here, pard----

WES DICEY.

  Are you Sam?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  If it's the soldier boys you're knocking at,
  They don't intend to stay, most of them don't.
  But as I think they'll be invited to.

     (_Cheers_)

  Didn't they leave _their_ Union?

A MILITIAMAN.

  The damned dog.

SAM WILLIAMS.

  I mean to vote, Wes, for that Living Mill
  That Mr. Egerton has told us of.
  For that's the thing, or something like that thing,
  We've worked for all these years. And now it's come,
  A place where we can work and be free men,
  Having a say in things, as Harvey says,
  God help us if we can't get on as friends.

     (_Jim King takes Dicey aside, where Masters joins them_)

HARRY EGERTON.

     (_Coming to Bentley and the militiamen_)

  I want to thank you, Bentley, and you men,
  I want to thank you for the help you've been.
  You've played the noblest part I ever knew.

BUCK BENTLEY.

  We followed you.

HARRY EGERTON.

                  No. We have interests here,
  The rest of us have interests here; we've homes
  And families, and the fight was ours. But you,
  You'd never seen a one of us before.
  And you came here honorable men, and now
  You're traitors through the State, and mutineers.

BUCK BENTLEY.

  It's all right.

HARRY EGERTON.

  Yes, indeed, it is all right.

FIFTH MILITIAMAN.

  They'll be more, too.

SIXTH MILITIAMAN.

  He'll never call them out.

HARRY EGERTON.

  You've helped to make the history of this land,
  And there's not one of you will not be known
  And honored for it.

A MILITIAMAN.

  Half as much as you.

HARRY EGERTON.

  And now a little toast before you go.

     (_Shakes hands with them_)

  Bentley, Kelley, Stamper, and you all,
  Sam, and you, Harvey, Chris, and Mike, and Wes,
  You'll join us, you and Jim and Rome?

     (_The three remain aside talking together_)

HARRY EGERTON.

                  And you,
  And you back there, you of the Living Mill--
  For all time, shall we say it?

SUBDUED VOICES.

  For all time.

HARRY EGERTON.

     (_With a swift glance toward Dicey, King and Masters_)

  And give our lives, if need be, for this thing?

SUBDUED VOICES.

  And give our lives, if need be, for this thing.

HARRY EGERTON.

  This is a glorious day.

MILITIAMEN.

     (_Leaving_)

  So long! So long!

HARRY EGERTON.

  Wherever men get free they'll think of us.

WORKMEN.

  So long! So long!

BUCK BENTLEY.

                  And there was something else.
  The General came while you were speaking.

HARRY EGERTON.

  Ah!

BUCK BENTLEY.

  Something about some bugles you said get.

HARRY EGERTON.

  Yes, I forgot. I meant to show you these
  That a Committee brought this afternoon.

     (_Takes a paper from his pocket_)

  Read them in the meeting, Harvey.

CRIES.

  Read them now!

HARRY EGERTON.

  Some resolutions of the citizens,
  Who are glad we've gone on peaceably to work.
  And if at any time we need their help----

SAM WILLIAMS.

     (_Taking a bugle and holding it up to the crowd_)

  The citizens say blow these if we need help!
  Because we've gone on peaceably to work.

     (_Cheers_)

  It's work, you see, that wins, comrades.

CHRIS KNUDSON.

  That's right.

HARRY EGERTON.

  I trust, though, that they'll never need to blow.

BUCK BENTLEY.

  'Twill set the land on fire if they do.

A WORKMAN.

  The workingmen throughout the State will hear.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  They'll blow in relay, pards, from sea to sea.

     (_Harry Egerton stands and watches the militiamen depart. As
     Bentley goes down the stairs he turns and looks at Harry Egerton,
     who lifts his hand to his head in a sort of military salute_)

CHRIS KNUDSON.

  That's what they say about us, Wes, you know
  That when the thing we've fought is taken away
  We'll fight among ourselves.

WES DICEY.

     (_To Harry Egerton_)

                  I ain't a man,
  And never have been one, to set my views
  Against the boys' views. If they're satisfied
  And think the new way's better than the old,
  And if they'll vote for it, Wes and his friends
  Will have no grouch.

SEVERAL.

  That's all right.

A VOICE.

  Then come on.

HARRY EGERTON.

  To get along together, as Sam says,
  That's what we seek, my friend. The rest will come.

WES DICEY.

  It's for the boys I took the stand I did.

     (_The workmen go back into the mill. Harry Egerton watches Dicey
     until he is lost among the men that pass out rear_)

HARVEY ANDERSON.

     (_Who has been watching him_)

  Partner.

HARRY EGERTON.

     (_Who has started to follow the men_)

  What is it, Harvey?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  What's this mean?

HARRY EGERTON.

  We cannot be too patient with these men.
  It's a free mill we're trying to build, Harvey.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  'Tain't that I mean.

     (_Takes the will from his pocket_)

                  Why did you give me this?

HARRY EGERTON.

  As a precaution, Harvey.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

     (_To Jim King, who lingers about beyond the railing_)

  We'll be there.

HARRY EGERTON.

  If anything should happen to me, you know,
  My father would inherit everything.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Yes.

HARRY EGERTON.

  And God meant the mine for other things.
  And as administrators you and Sam
  And Buck I knew would carry on the work.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  But why just now? Come on and tell me, partner.
  There's something up. You ain't been like yourself.
  There's something on your heart. What is it, partner?
  It ain't the faction?

HARRY EGERTON.

  No.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

                  About the mine--
  That lie they told is eating in your heart.

HARRY EGERTON.

  Have I done anything that you know, Harvey,
  That could have wronged the men or any of them?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  You wronged them? What you mean?

HARRY EGERTON.

  In any way?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Why they'd die for you, partner. What you mean?

HARRY EGERTON.

  Come here to-night when we can be alone.
  There are some things I want to tell you, Harvey,
  That you and Sam and Buck must carry out.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

     (_Looks at him a long while, then lays his hands upon his
     shoulders_)

  We're on the eve of seeing things come true
  And there ain't nothing that can stop it, partner.

HARRY EGERTON.

  I don't know what I'd do without you, Harvey.

     (_They go back through the gate in the railing and out through the
     great door, left, whence the crowd has passed. Rome Masters comes
     furtively up the stairs and looks about. He then comes past the
     sash to the door, forward left, and begins to pull off the strip
     that is nailed across it. He has just loosened it when Jim King
     appears upon the stairs and gives a low whistle. Rome Masters
     quickly joins him and together they hurry back through the mill
     and out the great door, left. A moment later the First Guard comes
     up the stairs, followed by Ralph Ardsley and Bishop Hardbrooke_)

FIRST GUARD.

  I'll find him.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  If you please.

     (_The Guard goes back through the mill_)

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

                 I don't like this.
  The atmosphere's too charged with victory.

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  I don't believe they even know it's cold.

     (_Looks about_)

  It's wonderful the way he's handled things.
  It's that, I think, as much as anything
  That's won the confidence of the citizens.
  I was just sure they'd have a riot here.

     (_He gets up on one of the stools before the desk and takes from
     his overcoat pocket a newspaper which he spreads out before him_)

  I've thought about it, Bishop; don't you think
  That that injunction Egerton got out
  Against the mine, considering everything,
  The public feeling--if he has good grounds
  For claiming that his own men found the mine--
  Aside from the reflection on his son--
  A tactical mistake, don't you think so?

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  Best not allude to that.

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  I think so too.

     (_He reads the paper. The Bishop stands listening to the indistinct
     noises that come from the crowd outside_)

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  And yet you can't blame Jergens very much.
  Something has got to happen pretty soon.
  Amalgamated's off again, I see.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  Who is this Harvey Anderson?

RALPH ARDSLEY.

                  He's the rough
  That kept the men from going back that day.
  Drew his revolver. Big man here now. You see
  He'd been out on the mountains with a cast,
  One of the men the Company had out.
  So it's quite possible, as Jergens claims,
  That Anderson found the mine. For gold these days--
  To get possession of a mine like that--
  Men have been killed for less.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  But Harry----

RALPH ARDSLEY.

                  That,
  That's what I can't get down me, his collusion----

     (_Cheers outside_)

  It's probably Anderson haranguing them.
  I don't myself believe that Harry'd do it.

     (_Tremendous cheering_)

  There's certainly enthusiasm there.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  What is it, Editor Ardsley?

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  I don't know.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  What's it all mean? What's underneath it all?

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  We're neither of us, Bishop, what we were.
  We've lost our power. Something's happening
  That we don't understand.

     (_A pause_)

                  And done by men
  That live right here and walk the streets and talk,
  Buy vegetables and pass the time of day.
  I tell you, Bishop Hardbrooke, you can't tell.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

     (_Half to himself_)

  As though they had the Ark of the Covenant.

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  If any one had said to me last week
  That that despondent crowd of shabby men,
  After six weeks of battle against odds,
  And beaten into silence, starved and cold,
  Had in them the capacity for this--
  Who was it said we're always in a flux,
  That nothing's fixed? We don't know anything.
  It's like a case of type; to-day it spells
  Egerton and to-morrow M-o-b.
  To think of Donald Egerton at bay!
  Egad!

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

                  These shouts once rose about the Church,
  But somehow we don't hear them any more.

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  Don't think for a moment, Bishop, that you're alone.
  We never had the tumult and the shout
  That you had in old days, but it's all the same.
  The 'Power of the Press'! It makes me laugh.
  If I could find a little farm somewhere,
  I'd sell my stock to Egerton and get out
  And let the world go hang. I'm tired of it.

     (_Cheers outside_)

  Yes, there's a ring about it you don't hear
  Even in Conventions.

     (_The Guard enters the mill, back left, and comes through the gate
     in the railing_)

GUARD.

  In a moment.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  Thank you.

     (_The Guard goes out down the stairs_)

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  What's your opinion of the trouble, Bishop?

     (_To himself_)

  To think of Donald Egerton at bay!

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  We've had the matter up in Conference
  Several times.

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  Yes.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

                  But I somehow feel
  We don't get hold of it. The lower classes--
  They're going off. I don't believe it's Christ.
  You say they're leaving you; and General Chadbourne--
  Two thirds, I think you said, of his command.

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  Facing State's prison, too

     (_Cheers outside. The two men remain silent_)

RALPH ARDSLEY.

                  And Egerton--
  They certainly have left him. I thought last night
  As I sat looking up toward that new home--

     (_Cheers outside_)

  They'll never light it up again that way,
  The way it was that day. Did you ever see
  Anything to equal that reception hall?

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  What's in the boy that these men follow him,
  And all his life so quiet, almost timid?

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  'What go ye out into the wilderness for to see?'

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  Yes, if his cause were better.

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  There you are.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  But this audacious, this deliberate
  Stealing--though I hate to use the word--
  This seizing of the mill----

RALPH ARDSLEY.

                  Here he comes now.

     (_He gets down from the stool_)

  You do the talking, Bishop, the heavy part.

     (_Harry Egerton enters_)

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  Harry.

HARRY EGERTON.

  Bishop Hardbrooke.

RALPH ARDSLEY.

                  You don't seem
  To mind the cold or anything down here.

HARRY EGERTON.

  We have been busy.

RALPH ARDSLEY.

                  I should think so. Yes
  It's wonderful the way you've plunged right in
  To business.

HARRY EGERTON.

  Yes.

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  Things going pretty well?

HARRY EGERTON.

  Yes.

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  I'm glad.

HARRY EGERTON.

  You sent for me.

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  Yes.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

                  Harry,
  We've come to see if something can't be done
  To end this controversy and bring peace,
  An honorable peace to all concerned.
  A permanent state of strife is far from pleasant.
  There's nothing sadder in the life of man
  Than to see towns disrupted, classes arrayed
  Against each other, to say nothing, Harry,
  Of this far dearer tie that's straining here,
  That pains us all far more than we can tell.
  We've often had these troubles in the Church,
  Mostly in the past, of course, men differing
  Upon some point of doctrine or government.
  And my experience is that at the bottom
  There's something that at first was overlooked,
  Then, in the strife that followed, overwhelmed.
  There's common ground, there must be in these things.
  Look at the world; we pass along the street.
  We don't confront each other and block the way.
  Each yields a bit and so we all pass on.
  And in relationships it must be the same.
  We're one, my brother.

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  Like our fingers here.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  And when we're not, when interests seem to clash,
  It's just as sure as Death or anything
  Some law of God is being tampered with.
  And so we thought we'd come----

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  And now's the time.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  For, as you know, in town the feeling's growing
  That there's a sword impending over us
  Which the least breath will bring down on our heads.

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  And not in the town alone, but the whole State--
  They seem to have their eyes upon us here.
  You've seen the papers how the strikes are spreading.
  The mills at Upton and the plant at Sawyer,
  And down the State there's Smith and Balding Brothers,
  Heacox and Knight, twelve hundred men gone out,
  Demanding unconditionally the mills.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  Think of it, Harry, think of what this means!

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  Not satisfied with wages any more.

HARRY EGERTON.

  Pardon me.

     (_Walks rear and listens_)

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  He doesn't listen to what I say.

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  Not that you are to blame for it, we don't say that.
  But probably without your knowing it
  A fire or something's going out of you
  That's kindling this industrial upheaval;
  For it's your name they've made the war-cry, Harry.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  He even smiled when you spoke of the mills
  Closing.

RALPH ARDSLEY.

                  I don't think he meant it so.
  His heart's out there, though, that's as plain as day.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  Harry, if these shouts mean a final step,
  A closing up of things which if once closed
  Will render of no use any labor of ours,
  I beg of you to call this meeting off,
  At least until we see what we can do.

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  Postpone it, Harry, say till Monday morning.
  You know yourself how dangerous it is
  To wake men's hopes to a wild dream of power.
  They're never afterwards content with less
  Than that wild something that could never be.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  Yes, brother, let the Lord's day with its peace
  Breathe on this quarrel. Why do you say too late?

HARRY EGERTON.

     (_Who has come forward_)

  Because it's up there, Bishop, it's up there
  Above mere bread.

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  What does he mean by that?

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  I trust, my brother, that it is up there.

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  We don't just see what it is you are trying to do.

HARRY EGERTON.

  The statement I gave out last Saturday----

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  That was a week ago.

HARRY EGERTON.

  Yes.

RALPH ARDSLEY.

                  And since then
  Reports have come out that there's a move on foot
  To organize--I know not what to call it----

HARRY EGERTON.

  A Commonwealth of Workers.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  Then it's true!

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  Your purpose then is to retain the mill?

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  Purchase it?

HARRY EGERTON.

                  I don't know. We'll do what's fair.
  We've had to think first of supplying bread.
  That's left but little time for other things.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  But if the Company shouldn't choose to sell?

HARRY EGERTON.

  That is with them.

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  You mean you'll still hold on?

HARRY EGERTON.

  That will be my advice, yes.

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  But the Law.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  'Thou shalt not steal.'

     (_Harry Egerton walks rear and listens_)

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  Doesn't that beat the world!

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  It's his association with these roughs.

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  And they'll never dare lay hands upon them, Bishop.
  I tell you the Commonwealth's afraid to move.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  Has God no place in business, my young brother?

HARRY EGERTON.

     (_Returning_)

  Yes, Bishop Hardbrooke, and it's very strange
  You've never thought of that until to-day.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  A hidden meaning couched in that, I think.

HARRY EGERTON.

  This is the first time you've been in this mill
  Or near these workingmen in all these years.
  And now you come to plead my father's cause.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  I come for peace.

HARRY EGERTON.

                  Then why not weeks ago
  When there was strife? You heard the cry of the poor
  For six weeks, Bishop, and you never came.
  Why wait until the starving time is past?

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  I've rather arduous duties, my young brother.
  Besides my Church work there are Boards and Boards
  And meetings of this Charity and that
  That you in business know but little of.
  My interest in the poor is not unknown.

HARRY EGERTON.

  You've been in father's confidence for years.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  I'm proud to say I have.

HARRY EGERTON.

                  There's seldom passed
  A Sunday that he's not been in his pew.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  A creditable record.

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  I should say.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  And one that any son might emulate
  With profit, I should think.

HARRY EGERTON.

                  It's very strange
  My father doesn't know some things are wrong.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  You mean he doesn't see things as you do.

HARRY EGERTON.

  Yes, all my life I've wondered when I've seen
  Check after check go out with father's name
  To help along some Mission over sea
  Or roof some rising Charity at home,
  I've often wondered that he's never seen
  Those little shacks upon the hill out there
  Nor heard the cry of widows from these saws.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  I would suggest, my brother, that we leave
  The deeper things of God for quiet times
  And turn our minds to something nearer home.

HARRY EGERTON.

  I know of nothing nearer home than this,
  The cry of men for justice at our doors.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  Suppose we get the Company to agree
  To let bygones be bygones with the men,
  And to restore conditions as they were----

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  In other words to meet the men's demands.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  And put the guards they ask about the saws.
  That would remove the causes, would it not,
  Of the misunderstanding?

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  Every one.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  Would there be any valid reason then
  Why Peace should not return and all be friends
  As formerly?

HARRY EGERTON.

  For weeks they waited for it.

     (_Listens back_)

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  What's time to do with right and wrong, my brother?

HARRY EGERTON.

  But men in misery often have a vision
  Beyond the eye of prosperous days to see.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  If it was fair last week, then why not now?

HARRY EGERTON.

  They're building something fairer.

     (_Walks back_)

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  It's no use.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  On what foundations, Harry? All about
  I see the wreck and ruin of our land;
  Her altars down, her sacred institutions----

     (_Cheering outside_)

  Harry, I beg of you to stop and think
  What it has cost, this Law that you defy
  And cast before the swine of riotous feet.

     (_Continuous cheering_)

  I appeal to you, my brother----

HARRY EGERTON.

  Bishop Hardbrooke----

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  In the name of everything that you hold dear----

HARRY EGERTON.

  There's nothing you could say that could persuade me----

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  Think of your country plunged in civil war!

HARRY EGERTON.

  To stay even with a word what's rising there.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  Think of your mother, think of how she feels
  Sitting----

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  Here's Anderson!

HARRY EGERTON.

  What is it, Harvey?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

     (_Hurrying in_)

  Well, President of Free Mill Number One
  And many more hereafter!

     (_Goes quickly left and, seizing the rope, pulls the flag up on the
     pole_)

                  Up the mast,
  My beauty! Now you'll hear 'em raise the roof.

HARRY EGERTON.

  And Dicey----?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

                  Moved to make it unanimous.
  No opposition.

     (_Tremendous cheering outside_)

HARVEY ANDERSON.

     (_Comes right and takes Harry Egerton's two hands in his_)

  Well, boy?

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  It's no use, Bishop.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  You've dreamed it and it's a fact now, partner.

HARRY EGERTON.

  Yes.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  The years will multiply 'em.

HARRY EGERTON.

  Hear! Just hear!

     (_Prolonged cheering_)

RALPH ARDSLEY.

  Let's leave 'em and let 'em stew in their own juice.

HARRY EGERTON.

  The Living Mill!

     (_A volley of shots_)

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  There goes the boys' salute!

     (_Seizes Harry Egerton by the shoulders and lifts him off his
     feet_)

  Up with you, up into the skies with you!
  We've lived to see a day will live forever.
  And you come right on out and make your speech.

     (_Hurries back through the mill_)

HARRY EGERTON.

  I'll be there shortly, Harvey.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

                  I suppose
  There's no use in our talking any more.

HARRY EGERTON.

  I'm sorry, Bishop.

BISHOP HARDBROOKE.

  Then--Good-bye.

HARRY EGERTON.

  Good-bye.

     (_The Bishop and Ardsley go out down the stairs. Harry Egerton
     starts back toward the gate_)

JIM KING.

     (_Suddenly appears just beyond the railing_)

  There was a call just now 'fore you came in.
  I think it was your mother.

     (_Harry Egerton turns back to the desk and takes up the telephone.
     Jim King vanishes through the great door, left_)

HARRY EGERTON.

                  Forty-nine
  Grand View, please. Yes.

     (_A pause_)

                  Mother? I knew your voice.
  You called me up, one of the men said. No?

     (_A pause_)

  Or some one else.

     (_A pause_)

                  Yes, mother, very well.
  You're going to the city?

     (_A pause_)

                  That was it.
  I thought perhaps you had called me up to ask.

     (_A pause_)

  Four or five hundred pounds.

     (_A pause_)

                  Mixed, I should say.
  And such toys as you think children would like.

     (_A pause_)

  O you know more about such things than I.

     (_A pause_)

  Yes.

     (_A pause_)

                   Mother, while I think of it, has father
  Had any trouble with Jergens?

     (_A pause_)

                  Ah, I'm glad.
  I overheard him talking with some men
  The other night, and thought from what he said
  It might be father they were talking of.

     (_A pause. The door, forward left, opens slowly and Rome Masters
     comes stealthily in with a bar of iron in his hand, and moves
     toward Harry Egerton, whose back is to him_)

HARRY EGERTON.

  I'm very glad. You might ask father though.

     (_Cheering outside_)

  I'll have some news for you when you return.

     (_A pause_)

  Here in the mill. And I'll be Santa Claus.

     (_A pause_)

  That will be beautiful.

     (_A pause_)

                  And, mother----

     (_Masters strikes him_)

HARRY EGERTON.

  Ah!

     (_He sinks to the floor. Masters, iron in hand, flees down the
     stairs. The cheering outside continues. Then, as the noise
     subsides, there is heard a steady buzzing of the telephone as
     though some one were trying to get connection_)



ACT V


CHRISTMAS EVE

_Scene: Inside the large room of a newly built board cabin up at the
mine. Centre, rear, the open mouth of the tunnel, with the wall resting
upon the rocks above. Left, in this same wall, near the corner, a door
opening outside. Right, near the other corner, about four feet up from
the floor, a small oblong window through which one sees the snow lying
thick upon the mountains, and beyond the snow the dark of the sky with
the winter stars shining brightly. In the right wall, well back, a door
opens into a bedroom. Centre, in the opposite wall, a second door opens
into a sort of woodshed. Left, a little way to the rear from the centre
of the room, a heavy iron stove with chairs standing about. A woodbox is
over near the wall, left. Forward right, a table with a bugle lying upon
two or three sheets of loose paper, and, farther over, a heap of ore
samples in which, with the light of the near-by lamp falling upon them,
the gold is plainly visible._

_Harvey Anderson, his hat pulled low over his eyes, sits with his back
to the bedroom, staring at the stove. The only motion discernible is an
occasional pressing of the lip when he bites his moustache. Later, Mrs.
Egerton, careworn and evidently in deep distress, enters from the
bedroom and starts to say something to Harvey Anderson, but decides not
to. Instead she goes to the window and stands looking out as though she
were anxiously waiting for some one._

_Time: Christmas Eve._

MRS. EGERTON.

     (_In a low voice_)

  It's after midnight, for the lights are out
  Down in the town. It must be after one.

     (_Speaks back as though into the bedroom_)

  You think the guard would let him come right through?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Yes, mother.

MRS. EGERTON.

  I didn't mean to wake you, Harvey.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  I ain't been sleeping.

MRS. EGERTON.

  But it seems so long.

     (_Turns again to the window_)

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  The snow's so deep upon the mountains, mother.
  And Sam and Chris--I know they'd hurry on--
  They ain't come either.

NURSE.

     (_Entering from the bedroom_)

  It's stopped snowing now.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  It's getting colder. How's he seem to be?

NURSE.

  There's very little change. What time is it?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

     (_Looks at his watch_)

  Going on half past three.

     (_They look at one another_)

NURSE.

  Don't think such things.

     (_Anderson goes to the woodbox and looks in_)

MRS. EGERTON.

     (_At the window, to herself_)

  If I only knew! If I only knew he'd come!

NURSE.

     (_As Anderson goes into the woodshed_)

  He may have telegraphed for specialists.

     (_She glances toward Mrs. Egerton, then goes quietly to the door,
     rear left, and looks out_)

NURSE.

     (_Comes back_)

  I wish that there was something that I could do.

MRS. EGERTON.

  You made it plain that he must come at once?

NURSE.

  Yes, Mrs. Egerton. I told the truth.
  Some think it's better to deceive. I don't.
  And I find that people thank you in the end.

MRS. EGERTON.

  And they've been gone since nine.

NURSE.

                  Lie down a while,
  Won't you? I wish you would.

MRS. EGERTON.

  Isn't that some one?

NURSE.

     (_Goes to the window_)

  It's Mr. Bentley with the guard, I think.

     (_Mrs. Egerton leaves the window and walks about the room_)

MRS. EGERTON.

     (_Half to herself_)

  The stars are so low down, so beautiful;
  And the world so full of joy. Isn't it strange?
  To-day we're here and to-morrow somewheres else.

     (_She stops by the bedroom door and stands looking in_)

NURSE.

  He's so your boy.

MRS. EGERTON.

  Yes, yes.

NURSE.

                  And he loves you so.
  It's always 'mother' when he speaks at all;
  You and the mill.

     (_A pause_)

                  And then you'll always know
  There's never been a man in Foreston
  Been loved as he has been.

MRS. EGERTON.

                  But he's so young!
  And his work--He'd just begun. So little chance!

NURSE.

  I've nursed so many cases of old men,
  And men in prosperous circumstances, too,
  Who've had no friends at all, just relatives.

     (_Mrs. Egerton walks about_)

NURSE.

  And friends are so much closer, don't you think?

MRS. EGERTON.

  Has he never, never mentioned Donald's name
  In his delirium?

NURSE.

     (_Shakes her head_)

                  But then you know
  Those first weeks at the Hospital were a blank,
  Or almost so. And then when he came to
  After the operation----

MRS. EGERTON.

  Donald! Donald!

NURSE.

  I being a stranger, just a nurse, you know.
  In delirium of course it's different.
  But then I'd left the case.

     (_Harvey Anderson enters with an armful of wood_)

NURSE.

                  I was surprised
  When I got word from Mr. Anderson
  That you had let him--It's so far up here.

MRS. EGERTON.

  He wanted to so much.

NURSE.

                  They always do.
  But they don't always know what's best for them.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  But he was getting on so well.

NURSE.

  I know.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  There was no fever till four days ago.

NURSE.

     (_To Mrs. Egerton_)

  When I got here he was quite rational.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  And talked about the mine here and the mill.
  And figured out the timber that we'd need
  For next year's run. I don't know what it was.

     (_Quietly replenishes the fire_)

MRS. EGERTON.

     (_At the bedroom door_)

  He hasn't moved.

NURSE.

  It quite exhausted him.

MRS. EGERTON.

  You think he recognized me?

NURSE.

  I don't know.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

     (_Who has come to the table, picks up one of the sheets of paper_)

  And he was planning homes here for the men
  Upon the valley land, with flowers and trees.

NURSE.

  Wasn't it strange that he should hear the bells?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  I hadn't heard them till he spoke.

NURSE.

  Nor I.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  He seemed to know that it is Christmas Eve.

MRS. EGERTON.

  His speaking of the toys!

NURSE.

  Lie down a while.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  It's all right, mother, it's all right.

NURSE.

                  Won't you?
  We'll call you when he comes.

BUCK BENTLEY.

     (_Entering hurriedly from outside_)

  Here comes a light.

MRS. EGERTON.

     (_Collecting herself_)

  If there's anything, Harvey, anything I can do
  To help the work along, you'll come to me.
  Promise me that. And you must keep right on.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Yes, mother. We talked of that.

     (_Mrs. Egerton kisses him and goes into the bedroom_)

BUCK BENTLEY.

  How is he now?

NURSE.

  About the same.

     (_She goes to the window_)

BUCK BENTLEY.

  You didn't think he'd come.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  He's been six weeks, almost. But that's all right.
  Is the Doctor with him?

BUCK BENTLEY.

  Yes.

     (_Starts for the door_)

                  I'll tell the boys.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Then come back, Buck.

BUCK BENTLEY.

  I will.

     (_He goes out. Anderson stands staring at the door_)

NURSE.

                  I'm so, so glad.
  These weeks and weeks----It's been so hard to bear.
  You see when Death comes, Mr. Anderson--
  It ought to be a lesson to us all.
  You'll stay, of course.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  I? Sure.

NURSE.

                  He's felt so hard,
  So bitter toward you.

     (_Buck Bentley enters quickly. Looks from Harvey to the Nurse_)

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  What?----

BUCK BENTLEY.

  It's Sam and Chris.

     (_Sam Williams and Chris Knudson come in with a lantern_)

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  See anything of Egerton coming up?

     (_The men show surprise_)

BUCK BENTLEY.

  They sent for him.

SAM WILLIAMS.

  Is he as bad as that?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  He hasn't been himself.

     (_To Bentley, who starts out_)

                  Then come back.

BUCK BENTLEY.

  Yes.

     (_Anderson turns and shakes his head at the Nurse, who goes into
     the bedroom, closing the door after her_)

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  He spoke of both of you.

CHRIS KNUDSON.

  Too bad! too bad!

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  I thought you'd like to be here.

     (_They sit silent about the stove_)

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Colder.

CHRIS KNUDSON.

  Yes.

     (_They are silent_)

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Things going all right, Sam?

     (_Sam Williams nods_)

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  And in the camps?

CHRIS KNUDSON.

  Hundred and fifty men.

     (_They are silent_)

SAM WILLIAMS.

                  There's a report
  That Masters will turn State's evidence.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Good news.

CHRIS KNUDSON.

  The citizens are pressing on the case.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  They'll find the trail leads where we said.

CHRIS KNUDSON.

  That's sure.

SAM WILLIAMS.

  His throwing down the silver don't help though.

     (_They are silent_)

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  You see about those young pines, Chris. With spring
  We'll begin setting out as partner wished,
  And start all over with the land all green.

     (_They are silent_)

CHRIS KNUDSON.

  The boys will be so sorry.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

                  I don't mind,
  Now that it can't be, telling you of a plan----

     (_There is a slight noise in the bedroom. Anderson turns and
     listens; but everything becomes quiet again_)

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Of a surprise he had for Christmas day,
  For all of us and the families of the men.

NURSE.

     (_Appears at the door and calls quickly_)

  Harvey!

     (_Anderson starts for the bedroom. Suddenly Harry Egerton appears
     struggling with his mother and the Nurse. His head is bandaged and
     his face is covered with a six weeks' beard_)

HARRY EGERTON.

                  No, no! See there! see there! see there!
  They're here already!

     (_A shadowy line of workmen with their wives and children in their
     Sunday clothes comes in left_)

HARRY EGERTON.

     (_Shouting right_)

                  In the dry-kiln, Sam!
  And fetch the other barrel, Harvey.

MRS. EGERTON.

  Harry!

HARRY EGERTON.

  A Merry Christmas, friends, to all of you!
  I'm glad you've come!

     (_Shaking himself free_)

                  It's all right, it's all right!
  Candy, candy, candy, children!

     (_The children crowd about him_)

MRS. EGERTON.

  Harry!

HARRY EGERTON.

  Let them come! let them come! There! there! there!

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Partner!

HARRY EGERTON.

     (_Laughing_)

  Isn't it wonderful!

MRS. EGERTON.

  It's mother, Harry!

HARRY EGERTON.

  And here's a little doll and here's a sled!
  I brought them down over the chimney tops!

     (_Laughs. A little boy remains after the other children have gone
     back to their parents_)

HARRY EGERTON.

  A little horn?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Partner!

HARRY EGERTON.

  What golden hair!

     (_The little boy returns to the others_)

HARRY EGERTON.

     (_Advancing and shaking hands with the men and women, who file by
     him and pass out rear_)

  Next year, my friends, if everything goes well,
  We'll have some homes to hang up on the tree
  With big yards where the little ones can play.
  But this is children's day.

     (_Last in the line comes a figure in the garb of a workman, but
     with the tender, bearded face of the Christ_)

HARRY EGERTON.

     (_Looking at his brow_)

  Have you been hurt?

     (_The figure holds out both hands to him_)

HARRY EGERTON.

     (_At first wildly, but with growing calmness_)

  Harvey! Buck! Mother!

     (_The figure looks back one moment, then vanishes. Harry Egerton is
     seen falling into the arms of Harvey Anderson, who carries him into
     the bedroom. His mother and the Nurse follow. Sam Williams and
     Chris Knudson stand staring across at the door_)

SAM WILLIAMS.

  Our leader's gone, Chris.

CHRIS KNUDSON.

     Yes, I fear so.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

     (_Coming in and closing the bedroom door after him_)

  Partner's gone.

A GUARD.

     (_Pushing open the outside door_)

  Egerton's come.

     (_Donald Egerton enters, followed by the Doctor and two strange
     men, apparently surgeons, one of them carrying an instrument case.
     Egerton glances about and instinctively locates the bedroom, and at
     once goes toward it_)

HARVEY ANDERSON.

     (_To the Doctor_)

  Too late.

DOCTOR.

  Dead!

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Just this moment.

VOICE OF MRS. EGERTON.

     (_As Egerton opens the bedroom door_)

  Donald! Donald!

     (_The Doctor follows Egerton into the bedroom_)

CHRIS KNUDSON.

     (_Looking toward the door that the Doctor has shut_)

  Peace and good will on earth.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  He stood for that.

     (_They stand silent about the stove. Anderson picks up two chairs,
     which he takes over to the two strangers, who are standing by the
     table_)

CHRIS KNUDSON.

  There's things about us here that we don't see.

SAM WILLIAMS.

     (_Looking toward the bedroom_)

  I'm sorry--for his sake.

CHRIS KNUDSON.

  What will we do?

SAM WILLIAMS.

  You'll not desert us, comrade, now he's gone.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  'For all time; shall we say it?'

CHRIS KNUDSON.

  That last day.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  'And give our lives, if need be?'

SAM WILLIAMS.

  He gave his.

     (_Takes up the lantern_)

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  He hasn't left the Cause, Sam.

SAM WILLIAMS.

  True.

CHRIS KNUDSON.

                  That's true;
  He hasn't left the Cause.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

                  Here just last week,
  Sitting about the table, planning things,
  'The Cause will be here, Harvey, when we're gone,
  A beautiful river flowing through the land.'

CHRIS KNUDSON.

  There was the noblest boy this land's brought forth.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  And we must make it wider, Sam.

SAM WILLIAMS.

  Yes, yes.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Till the whole land is free. That's our work now.

SAM WILLIAMS.

  Yes, we must keep right on.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

                  That was his wish,
  That we should keep right on; and his mother's, too.
  Tell the boys that.

SAM WILLIAMS.

  We will.

CHRIS KNUDSON.

                  There ought to be
  A public funeral so the men could march.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  I'll speak to Mr. Egerton.

FIRST STRANGER.

     (_Indicating Anderson_)

  That's him.

     (_The two workmen go out_)

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Stop by the cabins and tell Buck. Good-night.

     (_He shuts the door and walks about, stopping occasionally by the
     stove, absorbed in thought_)

SECOND STRANGER.

  He'll hardly use us now.

FIRST STRANGER.

  Probably not.

     (_They take up pieces of the ore_)

FIRST STRANGER.

     (_To Anderson, who is walking about_)

  How much does this assay?

SECOND STRANGER.

  He didn't hear you.

EGERTON.

     (_Enters with the Doctor and speaks with him aside_)

  Drive down a mile or so and wait for me.

     (_Mrs. Egerton and the Nurse come in. Both are dressed for
     travelling_)

MRS. EGERTON.

     (_Walks toward the outer door, then suddenly turns_)

  O Donald, Donald, this is Christmas Eve!
  Think of this night in years gone by!

EGERTON.

     (_Tenderly_)

  Mary!

NURSE.

  'Thy will be done.'

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  It's all right, mother.

MRS. EGERTON.

  Harvey!

     (_She embraces him and goes out with the Nurse_)

EGERTON.

     (_To the Doctor_)

  And you'll attend to everything?

DOCTOR.

  Yes, Colonel.

     (_The Doctor goes out. Egerton shuts the door and stands for a
     moment apparently waiting till those who have just left get farther
     from the cabin. He then starts pacing to and fro as though he were
     undecided what to do. As he walks left toward Harvey Anderson his
     brow darkens. But as he turns right and draws near the bedroom the
     hard lines of his face relax. It is clear that a terrible struggle
     is going on within him_)

EGERTON.

     (_To Harvey Anderson_)

  You here alone?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

                  Yes, Mr. Egerton.
  But that don't matter if there's anything----

     (_Egerton stands for a moment, then resumes his walk_)

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  Is there something I can do?

EGERTON.

     (_Stopping midway between the bedroom and Anderson, to the
     strangers_)

  What do you say?

FIRST STRANGER.

  We'll do the best we can.

     (_The Second Stranger removes his overcoat. The First lifts the
     instrument case upon the table and begins to open it. Egerton walks
     toward the bedroom_)

HARVEY ANDERSON.

     (_Following him_)

                  I don't believe--
  I don't believe, though, Mr. Egerton,
  It's any use.

FIRST STRANGER.

     (_Suddenly covering Anderson with pistols which he has taken from
     the case_)

                  Keep those hands where they are.
  Bolt that door, Ned.

     (_The Second Detective bolts the outside door. He then comes to the
     table and takes from the case two pairs of handcuffs, a long black
     mackintosh, and a black cap_)

FIRST DETECTIVE.

  Search him.

SECOND DETECTIVE.

     (_Feels about Anderson's hips and sides_)

  Slip on this coat.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

     (_To Egerton, while the detective puts the coat on him_)

  Well, partner, I've seen men where Hell was loud
  Shoot from behind dead bodies but, by God,
  I've never seen them shoot from such as him.

     (_Nodding toward the bedroom_)

FIRST DETECTIVE.

  Quick now.

EGERTON.

  You know the way?

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  You beat them all.

FIRST DETECTIVE.

  We keep the road to the left.

EGERTON.

                  Over the mountains.
  You'll probably have some trouble.

FIRST DETECTIVE.

  We'll get there.

EGERTON.

  I'll have the Express wait for you at Lucasville.
  You ought to reach there----

     (_Looks at his watch_)

                  It's now five o'clock----
  By ten or eleven.

FIRST DETECTIVE.

  At the outside.

     (_The Second Detective hands to Egerton his son's will, which, in
     buttoning the coat up about Anderson, he has found in the latter's
     pocket_)

EGERTON.

     (_Looks into it a moment_)

  Um!

SECOND DETECTIVE.

  The guard will be off duty?

FIRST DETECTIVE.

                  I think so,
  But we've no time to lose.

     (_The Second Detective handcuffs himself to Anderson on the left
     side. The First Detective puts the cap on Anderson so that with the
     high collar of the coat turned up, only his eyes are visible under
     the poke_)

HARVEY ANDERSON.

  The black cap, eh?

     (_The First Detective then handcuffs himself to Anderson on the
     right side_)

EGERTON.

  You wire me when you reach the Capitol.

FIRST DETECTIVE.

  Yes, Mr. Egerton.

EGERTON.

  Go briskly now.

FIRST DETECTIVE.

     (_Showing Anderson his pistol_)

  Now not a word from you, you understand.

     (_He puts the pistol in his side overcoat pocket and keeps his hand
     on it_)

EGERTON.

  'Twill soon be morning.

HARVEY ANDERSON.

                  Yes, you'd better leave
  Before the land wakes up.

     (_The detectives, with Anderson between them, go out_)

EGERTON.

                  We'll see, my man--

     (_Puts the key on the outside of the door_)

  How you'll shake down the pillars of this land.

     (_He goes out and locks the door after him. A few moments pass.
     Suddenly at some distance outside a shot is heard. Again a few
     moments pass. Then, with a crash, the door is broken in and Buck
     Bentley, with the will in his hand, pulls himself hurriedly through
     the hole. He staggers to the table and seizes the bugle and blows a
     loud blast, then reels and, trying to steady himself, falls dead
     upon the floor, taking the table down with him. There is a
     clattering of the ore samples and a breaking of glass, and the lamp
     goes out, leaving the room in darkness. A half mile or so away, in
     the direction of Foreston, a bugle is heard, then, farther away,
     another, and fainter, another, and still another. And out through
     the window in the starlight of the Christmas morning soldiers with
     rifles in their hands are seen running rear left through the snow_)





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About ISYS® Search Software
Established in 1988, ISYS Search Software is a global supplier of enterprise
search solutions for business and government.  The company's award-winning
software suite offers a broad range of search, navigation and discovery
solutions for desktop search, intranet search, SharePoint search and embedded
search applications.  ISYS has been deployed by thousands of organizations
operating in a variety of industries, including government, legal, law
enforcement, financial services, healthcare and recruitment.



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