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Title: Raemaekers' Cartoon History of the War, Volume 3 - The Third Twelve Months of War
Author: Raemaekers, Louis, 1869-1956
Language: English
As this book started as an ASCII text book there are no pictures available.
Copyright Status: Not copyrighted in the United States. If you live elsewhere check the laws of your country before downloading this ebook. See comments about copyright issues at end of book.

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      Small capitals were converted to ALL CAPITALS.



RAEMAEKERS' CARTOON HISTORY OF THE WAR


[Illustration: (signed) Louis Raemaekers]


RAEMAEKERS' CARTOON HISTORY OF THE WAR

Compiled by J. Murray Allison

Editor of _Raemaekers' Cartoons_, _Kultur in Cartoons_, _The
Century Edition de Luxe Raemaekers' Cartoons_, _etc._

VOLUME THREE

The Third Twelve Months of War



New York
The Century Co.
1919

Copyright, 1919, by
The Century Co.

VOLUME THREE



_THE PEACE MOVE_

       *       *       *       *       *

BERLIN, AUGUST 6, 1914


     (The Berlin papers declared that the population, mad with joy,
     drank champagne and danced in the streets.)

I draw the sword that with God's help I have kept all these years in the
scabbard. I have drawn the sword which without victory and without honor
I cannot sheath again. All of you will see to it that only in honor is
it returned to the scabbard. _You are my guaranty that I can dictate
peace to my enemies._

    _The_ KAISER _to his Guards at Potsdam_,
    _August, 1914_.

[Illustration]



_"ARE YOU READY TO MAKE MUNITIONS FOR GERMANY?"_

       *       *       *       *       *


The first official charges on the subject were issued on November 9 at
Havre by Baron Beyens, Belgian Foreign Minister, as follows:

"The German Government is rounding up in large numbers in the towns and
villages of occupied Belgium, such as Alost, Ghent, Bruges, Courtrai,
and Mons,--to name only the first to be victims of the measures,--all
men fit to bear arms, rich and poor, irrespective of class, whether
employed or unemployed, hunchbacks, cripples, and one-armed men alone
are excepted. These men are torn in thousands from their families;
fifteen thousand from Flanders alone are sent God knows where. Whole
trainloads are seen going east and south."


CARDINAL MERCIER REPLIES


Cardinal Mercier, Primate of Belgium, in behalf of the Belgian bishops,
issued a proclamation of protest on November 7, addressed to the neutral
nations and appealing for their aid in opposing the proceeding. His
protest is in these terms:

"The military authorities are daily deporting thousands of inoffensive
citizens in order to set them to forced labor.

"As early as October 19 we sent a protest to the governor-general, a
copy of which was also sent to the representatives of the Holy See in
Brussels, Spain, the United States, and the Netherlands. The
governor-general, in reply, refused to take any steps."

[Illustration]



_ANOTHER EXAMPLE OF KULTUR_

_Fritz: "We must see if there is any money or jewelry in these coffins
before we retire."_

       *       *       *       *       *


At Cartigny the Germans opened five vaults, each with a chapel above it,
by tearing apart the stones. They did the same thing at Ronsoy, at
Becquincourt, at Dompierre, at Bouvincourt, and at Herbecourt. At Nurly,
Roisel, Bernes, they even broke into coffins. In the enclosed ground
serving as a private cemetery for the Rohan family at Manancourt they
buried a great number of their soldiers, and, an inconceivable thing,
established a kitchen in the interior of the Rohan mausoleums and
latrines among their family tombs. In the crypt, where indescribable
disorder reigns, almost all the compartments are empty. A child's
coffin, taken from one of them, was stripped of its lead. A heavy leaden
casket, half drawn from another compartment, bears on its lid marks of a
chisel. A block of marble, in which is seen a small excavation, has been
thrown among the débris; it bears the inscription: "Here rests the heart
of Mme. Amelie de Musnier de Folleville, Countess of Boissy, who died at
Paris, July 16, 1830, at the age of thirty-two years and ten months."

    _French Official Report of German
    Barbarities in France, June 1, 1916._

[Illustration]



_CANADA ON VIMY RIDGE_

       *       *       *       *       *


The capture of two thousand prisoners by the Canadians is not
surprising, as the whole ridge was honeycombed with dugouts, in which
the Germans sheltered themselves.

Up to the present moment the great offensive had been held up just at
the point below the Canadian lines, which fact caused Vimy Ridge to be
styled the "hinge" of the enemy's retreat from the Somme, and the
Canadians have been very impatient for the "hinge" to move.

    _Toronto Mail, August 10, 1916._

[Illustration]



_William_: _I wonder how long my dear friend and Ally will be able to
stand this._

       *       *       *       *       *


The offensive began on June 4, and the total captures to August 12 were
as follows:

                    Prisoners
    Officers            7,757
    Men               350,845
    Guns                  405
    Machine-guns        1,326
    Bomb-throwers         338
    Caissons              292


    _Russian Official, August 12, 1916._

[Illustration]



_William: "Here's luck, Hindenburg."_

_Hindenburg: "Where?"_

       *       *       *       *       *


The kaiser has dismissed General von Falkenhayn, chief of the general
staff, and has appointed Field-Marshal von Hindenburg chief of the
general staff and General von Ludendorff first quartermaster-general.

    _Berlin Official Telegram, August 30, 1916._

[Illustration]



_The Old Frenchman: "Our guns come nearer."_

       *       *       *       *       *


12:30 A.M. In coöperation with the French on our immediate right we
attacked the enemy at several points.

We have captured part of Ginchy and the whole of Guillemont. Our front
now runs some five hundred yards east of Guillemont from Ginchy to near
Falfemont Farm.

On the east side of Mouquet Farm we have also gained ground.

We have captured several hundred prisoners.

Between our right and the Somme the French have made substantial
progress and captured a considerable number of prisoners.

Fighting continues.

Our aircraft did most useful work in coöperating with the artillery and
infantry.

The enemy's aëroplanes, which made desperate attempts to interfere, were
successfully engaged in many aërial fights and driven off with a loss of
three machines destroyed and at least four others damaged, while we lost
three.

12:10 P.M. Last night was generally quiet.

Fighting is in progress this morning near Mouquet Farm, south of
Thiepval, and on the banks of the Ancre; also on our right about
Falfemont Farm. We have gained ground.

Last night we carried out a successful raid on the enemy's trenches
north of Monchy, capturing prisoners.

    _British Official, September 5, 1916._

[Illustration]



_TANKS_

       *       *       *       *       *


At 6:20 A.M. on September 15, 1916, the infantry assault commenced, and
at the same moment the bombardment became intense. Our new heavily
armored cars, known as "tanks," now brought into action for the first
time, successfully coöperated with the infantry, and, coming as a
surprise to the enemy rank and file, gave valuable help in breaking down
their resistance.

The advance met with immediate success on almost the whole of the front
attacked. At 8:40 A.M. "tanks" were seen to be entering Flers, followed
by large numbers of troops. Fighting continued in Flers for some time,
but by 10 A.M. our troops had reached the north side of the village, and
by midday had occupied the enemy's trenches for some distance beyond.

    _British Official, September 15, 1916._

[Illustration]



_THE SLAYING OF THE FIERY DRAGONS_

_Two airships fell victims to the enemy's defensive of London._

_German Official._

       *       *       *       *       *


Twelve German airships took part in a raid on London and various Eastern
and East Midland counties on Saturday night and early on Sunday morning,
but on their return journey the raiders numbered only 10.

The other two had been left behind in Essex. One was brought down in
flames not far from London, and its crew were all killed; the second
came to earth near the coast, and its crew of twenty-two surrendered.

Both the lost airships are big vessels of a new pattern.

    _British Official, September 24, 1916._

[Illustration]



_King Tino at Athens to his brother-in-law William at Potsdam: "Please
return me my runaway Army Corps. I want it to shoot my constitutional
subjects."_

       *       *       *       *       *


The Hellenic Government entirely disavows the action of Colonel
Hazzopoulos, commander at Kavala.

The Greek Government demands from Germany that these troops shall be
brought to the Swiss frontier, that they may be conducted to a
Mediterranean port, and there be embarked on ships to be sent by the
Greek Government, so as to bring them back to Greece.

The Greek Government guarantees that they will not be stopped, or made
to serve any enemy of Germany.

    _Note from the Hellenic Government
    to Germany, September 26, 1916._

[Illustration]



_Mr. Lloyd George to Neutrals: "Don't stand in our way to victory."_

       *       *       *       *       *


The whole world, including neutrals of the highest purposes and
humanitarians with the best motives, must know that there can be no
outside interference at this stage. Britain asked no intervention when
she was not prepared to fight. She will tolerate none now that she is
prepared until Prussian military despotism is broken beyond repair.

    D. LLOYD GEORGE, _London, September 28, 1916._

[Illustration]



_THE CROWN PRINCE PREACHES TO AMERICA_

       *       *       *       *       *


We are all tired of bloodshed, we all want peace. England is the power
responsible for the continuation of the hopeless effort to crush us. In
the twentieth century of the Christian era mankind might have been
expected to have arrived at some maturity of thought and behavior. No
one can witness, as you during the last fortnight have witnessed, the
spectacle presented by this appalling sacrifice, this inconceivable
suffering preposterously out of proportion to any result obtained,
without wondering whether reason has fled from the earth.

    GERMAN CROWN PRINCE _to Correspondent
    of New York American. October, 1916._

[Illustration]



_"I am 'operating' at, but not inside your gate; tomorrow I come inside
with a letter from the Kaiser."_


On Sunday, October 8, the world was startled by the news that the U-53
was sinking British and neutral vessels near Nantucket Shoals Lightship,
a hundred miles from Newport, U. S. A., and leaving the crews and
passengers in small boats on the open sea. The underseas craft had
stationed itself in the steamer lane where nearly all incoming and
outgoing vessels from New York must pass, and its day's work consisted
in sending five ships to the bottom, as follows:

    The _Strathdene_, a British freighter.
    The _West Point_, a British freighter.
    The _Stephano_, a British passenger liner.
    The _Bloomersdijk_, a Dutch freighter.
    The _Christian Knudsen_, Norwegian freighter.

    _New York Times, October 9, 1916._

[Illustration]



_THE SUPER ANARCHIST_

       *       *       *       *       *


In letting loose these things and in introducing them into war, Germany
has been the great anarchist who has let loose on the world a greater
and a more terrible anarchy than any individual anarchist ever dreamed
of.

Unless there is some means of restraining these things, future war will,
by the developments of science, be made even more terrible and horrible
than this war, because Germany has thrown down all the barriers that
civilisation had previously built up so as to keep the horrors of war
within bounds.

    VISCOUNT GREY, _Minister for Foreign Affairs,
    London, October 23, 1916._

[Illustration]



_Fritz: "This is no longer civilized war--they are stronger than we."_

       *       *       *       *       *


Under the title "The Devil's Chariot" the "Düsseldorfer
Generalanzeiger's" correspondent on the Western front describes the
British "tanks" and their effect on the astonished German soldiers. As
the German trench posts came out of their holes in the foggy dawn of
September 16 and raised heads again after the heavy iron-blows of the
night and looked toward the English, their blood froze in their veins as
two mysterious monsters came creeping over the crater fields.

The monster approached slowly, hobbling, moving from side to side,
rocking and pitching, but it came nearer. Nothing obstructed it; a
supernatural force seemed to drive it onwards. Some one in the trenches
cried "the devil comes," and that word ran down the line like lightning.
Suddenly tongues of fire licked out of the armored shine of the iron
caterpillar, shells whistled over our heads, and a terrible concert of
machine-gun orchestra filled the air. The mysterious creature had
surrendered its secret, and sense returned with it, and toughness and
defiance, as the English waves of infantry surged up behind the devil's
chariot.

    _Times Special Correspondent, October 24, 1916._

[Illustration]



_HOUP LA!!_

       *       *       *       *       *


On the Verdun front, after an intense artillery preparation, the
projected attack on the right bank of the Meuse was launched at twenty
minutes before twelve this morning.

The enemy line, attacked on a front of seven kilometers (nearly four and
a half miles), was broken through everywhere to a depth which at the
middle attained a distance of three kilometers (nearly two miles).

The village and fort of Douaumont are in our hands.

Prisoners are pouring in. Up to the present thirty-five hundred,
including about one hundred officers, have been counted. The quantity of
material captured cannot yet be estimated.

    _French Official, October 27, 1916._

[Illustration]



_BROTHERS IN ARMS_

       *       *       *       *       *


Soldiers of France,

I am very happy to have been able to realise a desire which I have had
at heart for a long time, and to express to you my profound admiration
for your heroic exploits, for your dash as well as your tenacity, and
those magnificent military virtues which are the proud heritage of the
French Army.

Under the brilliant leadership of your eminent general-in-chief and his
distinguished collaborators you, officers, non-commissioned officers,
and soldiers, have deserved well of your dear country, which will
forever be grateful to you for your brave efforts in safeguarding and
defending it.

My armies are very proud to fight by your side and to have you as
comrades. May the bonds which unite us hold firm and the two countries
remain thus intimately united for ever.

Soldiers,--Accept my most cordial and sincere greetings. I have no doubt
that you will bring this gigantic struggle to a victorious conclusion,
and, in the name of my soldiers and my country, I beg to address to you
my warmest congratulations and best wishes.

    KING GEORGE V,
    _Order of the Day, France, October 27, 1916._

[Illustration]



_"PERHAPS THIS ONE WILL KILL MY BOY ON THE YSER"_

       *       *       *       *       *

     (Belgians have been forced to labor in Germany's munition
     works.)


Several of these Belgians who were put at work in Berlin managed to get
away and come to see me. They gave me a harrowing account of how they
had been seized in Belgium and made to work in Germany at making
munitions to be used probably against their own friends. I said to the
Chancellor, "There are Belgians employed in making shells contrary to
all rules of war and the Hague conventions." He said, "I do not believe
it." I said, "My automobile is at the door. I can take you in four
minutes to where thirty Belgians are working on the manufacture of
shells." But he did not find time to go.

Americans must understand that the Germans will stop at nothing to win
this war, and that the only thing they respect is force.

    JAMES W. GERARD,
    _"My Four Years in Germany."_

[Illustration]



_Tirpitz: "Because we have sunk 30 or 40 of your merchantmen you dare to
refuse our U-Boats entrance to your harbours. That is an unneutral and
unfriendly act against Germany."_

       *       *       *       *       *


The German note to Norway of October 20 is seriously written, but is in
no respect an ultimatum. The Norwegian Government has returned no answer
hitherto, but is in conference with prominent politicians of all
parties. All is calm here, but business is somewhat depressed owing to
the damage inflicted by submarines on shipping.

On October 13, Norway prohibited belligerent submarines from using her
territorial waters, except for the purpose of saving life under stress
of weather. A violent press campaign against Norway followed in Germany,
but no indication has hitherto been given of the nature of the note
presented by Germany to Norway on October 20.

    _London Times Correspondent,
    Christiania, October 29, 1916._

[Illustration]



_SLAVE TRANSPORT FROM GHENT_

       *       *       *       *       *

     (Two thousand French women have been deported from Ghent to
     work in German munition factories.)


The raids have taken place at Courtrai, Alost, Termonde, Bruges, Ghent,
Mons, and in numerous rural and industrial communes. The men were
assembled, examined like cattle, and those found strongest sent away to
unknown destinations.

At Bruges, the burgomaster, an old man of eighty, who since the
beginning of the occupation has given an example of noble patriotism,
has been deposed for having refused to help the German military
administration in its revolting task. The town was fined 100,000 marks
($25,000) for each day's delay in the enrolment of the victims.

    _Belgian Government Official
    Protest against Deportation,
    November, 1916._

[Illustration]



_THE NEW KINGDOM OF POLAND_

       *       *       *       *       *


The liberation of Poland is closely connected with the victory of
Germany and her allies, who alone are interested in the existence of a
free Poland, and for whose sake Poland must not go back to Russia.
Germany's security demands that for all future times the Russian armies
shall not be able to use a militarily consolidated Poland as an invasion
gate to Silesia and West Prussia.

To Poland liberated from Russian rule we offer the possibility of
seeking support in the Central Powers and in firm alliance with them of
leading a free life in its own state, politically and economically.
Especially for the near future, the Poles will have a strong claim on
our assistance.

    _Proclamation by_ GENERAL VON BESELER,
    _Governor of Warsaw, November 5, 1916._

[Illustration]



_Belgian civilians are deported by the army in occupation to the
munition works in Germany to prevent their moral decay._

       *       *       *       *       *


The situation which we denounce to the civilised world may be summed up
as follows: Four hundred thousand workmen are reduced to unemployment
through no fault of their own, and largely inconvenience the German
occupation. Sons, husbands, fathers, respectful of public order, bow to
their unhappy lot. With their most pressing needs provided for, they
await with dignity the end of their period of trial.

Now, suddenly, parties of soldiers begin to enter by force these
peaceful homes, tearing youth from parent, husband from wife, father
from children. They bar with the bayonet the door through which wives
and mothers wish to pass to say farewell to those departing. They herd
their captives in groups of tens and twenties and push them into cars.
As soon as the train is filled, the officer in charge brusquely waves
the signal for departure. Thus thousands of Belgians are being reduced
to slavery.

    CARDINAL MERCIER _in behalf of
    Bishops of Belgium, November 7, 1916._

[Illustration]



_THE NEW KINGDOM OF POLAND_

       *       *       *       *       *


The rulers of the allied powers of Austria-Hungary and Germany have
given notification of their resolution to form of the Polish territory
delivered from Russian tyranny the new autonomous Kingdom of Poland.
Your most ardent desire, entertained in vain for more than a century, is
thus fulfilled.

The importance and danger of this war-time and regard for our armies
standing before the enemy oblige us for the present to keep the
administration of your new state still in our hands. Readily, however,
we will give, with your aid, to the new Poland by degrees those public
institutions which guarantee her consolidation, development, and safety.
Of these the Polish Army is the most important.

    _Proclamation by_ GOV. GENERAL VON BESELER,
    _Warsaw, Poland, November 10, 1916._

[Illustration]



_THE EYES OF THE ARMY_

       *       *       *       *       *

THE ROYAL FLYING CORPS


In this combination between infantry and artillery the Royal Flying
Corps played a highly important part. The admirable work of this corps
has been a very satisfactory feature of the battle. Under the conditions
of modern war the duties of the Air Service are many and varied. They
include the regulation and control of artillery fire by indicating
targets and observing and reporting the results of rounds; the taking of
photographs of enemy trenches, strong points, battery positions, and of
the effect of bombardments; and the observation of the movements of the
enemy behind his lines.

The greatest skill and daring has been shown in the performance of all
these duties, as well as in bombing expeditions. Our Air Service has
also coöoperated with our infantry in their assaults, signaling the
position of our attacking troops and turning machine-guns upon the enemy
infantry and even upon his batteries in action.

    SIR DOUGLAS HAIG'S _Official Report on
    the Somme Battle, December, 1916._

[Illustration]



_"DO NOT MISS HIM THIS TIME, TINO"_

       *       *       *       *       *


It is assumed here that the agreement on the part of the Greek
Government to surrender six batteries terminates the Allied control of
the Greek railways and the postal and telegraphic censorship.

_Telegram from Athens, December 3, 1916._

[Illustration]



_SCENE IN THE GREAT PEACE PANTOMIME. THE ROBBER'S CAVE, GERMANIA
GUARDING THE DOOR._

_Robber Chief to his Gang: "Boys, it's time for us to get away with the
swag."_

       *       *       *       *       *


In a deep moral and religious sense of duty toward his nation and,
beyond it, toward humanity, the emperor now considers that the moment
has come for official action toward peace. His majesty, therefore, in
complete harmony and in common with our allies, decided to propose to
the hostile powers to enter peace negotiations. This morning I
transmitted a note to this effect to all the hostile powers through the
representatives of those powers which are watching over our interests
and rights in the hostile states.

    BETHMANN-HOLLWEG,
    _Reichstag, December 12, 1916._

[Illustration]



_AFTER THE FALL OF BUKHAREST_

_Chorus, "Long live the diplomacy of our enemies."_

       *       *       *       *       *


The Germans announce the occupation of Bukharest. The evacuation of the
city was clearly imminent, and for some time past there has been little
hope that it could be saved. As a recent semi-official statement from
Bukharest intimated, the forts had been disarmed and the Rumanians never
intended to defend it if the field defences before it could not be held.

    _Times Correspondent, December 15, 1916._

[Illustration]



_THE FRENCH VICTORY AT VERDUN_

_The Crown Prince leaves Pepper Hill to occupy a second line of defence
prepared beforehand._

       *       *       *       *       *


The French have achieved a splendid victory before Verdun.

The capture of the strongly fortified position of Poivre Ridge was
decisive in its effect upon the fighting along the whole line. The ridge
was turned, and when the Germans, abandoning everything in their flight,
found their retreat cut off, they surrendered in hundreds.

    _Times Correspondent, December 17, 1916._

[Illustration]



_WHILE THEY TALK PEACE_

_U-Boat Officer: "We have done for their ship. Now fire quick into their
life-boats!"_

       *       *       *       *       *


The degree of savagery which the Germans have attained in their
submarine policy of sinking merchant-ships at sight would appear to have
reached its climax in the sinking of the British steam-ship
_Westminster_, proceeding in ballast from Torre dell' Annunziata to Port
Said. On December 14 this vessel was attacked by a German submarine,
without warning, when 180 miles from the nearest land, and struck by two
torpedoes in quick succession, which killed four men. She sank in four
minutes.

This ruthless disregard of the rules of international law was followed
by a deliberate attempt to murder the survivors. The officers and crew,
while effecting their escape from the sinking ship in boats, were
shelled by the submarine at a range of three thousand yards. The master
and chief engineer were killed outright and their boat sunk. The second
and third engineers and three of the crew were not picked up, and are
presumed to have been drowned.

Great Britain, in common with all other civilised nations, regards the
sinking without warning of merchant-ships with detestation.

    _British Admiralty Report,
    December 19, 1916._

[Illustration]



_THE PEACE MOVE (II)_

       *       *       *       *       *

BERLIN, DECEMBER 14, 1916

     (The Berlin papers related that, after the German peace
     proposal had been announced, hundreds of thousands waited in
     the streets during the night for the answers from the Allies.)

Soldiers: In agreement with the sovereigns of my allies, and with the
consciousness of victory, I have made an offer of peace to the enemy.
Whether it will be accepted is still uncertain. Until that moment
arrives you will fight on.


    _The_ KAISER _to the Army, December, 1916._

Fully conscious of the gravity of this moment, but equally conscious of
its requirements, the allied Governments, closely united to one another
and in perfect sympathy with their peoples, refuse to consider a
proposal which is empty and insincere.

Once again the Allies declare that no peace is possible so long as they
have not secured reparation for violated rights and liberties, the
recognition of the principle of nationality and of the free existence of
small States, so long as they have not brought about a settlement
calculated to end once and for all forces which have constituted a
perpetual menace to the nations, and to afford the only effective
guarantee for the future security of the world.

    _Joint Reply of Entente Allies to
    German Peace Proposal,
    December 30, 1916._

[Illustration]



_HURRAH! "WAR ON ALL NEUTRALS AT LAST"_

       *       *       *       *       *


Neutral ships which navigate the barred zones will do so at their own
risk. Even though provision be made that neutral ships which on February
1st are en route to ports in the barred zones will be spared during an
appropriate period, it is nevertheless urgently advisable that they be
directed by all means available into other routes. Neutral ships which
are lying in harbors in the barred zones can with equal security still
leave the barred zones if they depart before February 5 and take the
shortest route to a free zone.

    _German Note Presented to the United
    States Ambassador,_ MR. GERARD,
    _Amsterdam, January 31, 1917._

[Illustration]



_THE CONVICTS' STRIPES_

_America and China: "You order us to paint convicts' stripes on our
ships. We will not. Wear them yourselves."_

       *       *       *       *       *


Sailing of regular American passenger steamers may continue undisturbed
after February 1, 1917, if

(A) The port of destination is Falmouth.

(B) Sailing to or coming from that port course is taken via the Scilly
Islands and a point fifty degrees north, twenty degrees west.

(C) The steamers are marked in the following way, which must not be
allowed to other vessels in American ports: On ship's hull and
superstructure three vertical stripes one meter wide, each to be painted
alternately white and red. Each mast should show a large flag checkered
white and red, and the stern the American national flag. Care should be
taken that, during dark, national flag and painted marks are easily
recognizable from a distance, and that the boats are well lighted
throughout.

    _German Note Announcing "Unlimited"
    Submarine Warfare, January 31, 1917._

[Illustration]



_"GO ON, WILLIAM! A TRUE HOHENZOLLERN NEVER GETS ENOUGH BLOOD"_

       *       *       *       *       *


Under the convention belligerents have the right to search hospital
ships, and the German Government has, therefore, an obvious remedy in
case of suspicion--a remedy which they have never utilised.

From the German Government's statement that hospital ships will no
longer be tolerated within the limits mentioned, only one conclusion can
be drawn, namely, that it is the intention of the German Government to
add yet other and more unspeakable crimes against law and humanity to
the long list which disgraces their record.

    _Foreign Office Statement,
    February 9, 1917._

[Illustration]



_Germany: "Till now you have left the fighting to me and kept splendidly
neutral--don't part from that splendid attitude!"_

       *       *       *       *       *


We regret the rupture with a nation who, by her history, seemed to be
predestined to work together with us, not against us, for common ideals.
But since our honest desire for peace has only encountered hostile
ridicule on the part of our enemies, there is no more "going back," but
only "ahead" possible for us.

    _German Memorandum,
    February 27, 1917._

[Illustration]



_THE REBIRTH OF RUSSIA_

(_A new and powerful Russia rises like a Phoenix from the ashes of the
old reactionary regime._)

       *       *       *       *       *


It is with sentiments of the most profound satisfaction that the peoples
of Great Britain and of the British Dominions across the seas have
learned that their great Ally Russia now stands with the nations which
base their institutions upon responsible government.

Much as we appreciate the loyal and steadfast coöperation which we have
received from the late Emperor and the armies of Russia during the past
two and a half years, yet I believe that the revolution whereby the
Russian people have based their destinies on the sure foundation of
freedom is the greatest service which they have yet made to the cause
for which the Allied peoples have been fighting since August, 1914.

It reveals the fundamental truth that this war is at bottom a struggle
for popular government as well as for liberty. It shows that through the
war, the principle of liberty, which is the only sure safeguard of peace
in the world, has already won one resounding victory. It is the sure
promise that the Prussian military autocracy which began the war, and
which is still the only barrier to peace, will itself before long be
overthrown.

    _Telegram from_ MR. LLOYD GEORGE
    _to_ PRINCE LVOFF,
    _Russian Provisional Government.
    March, 1917._

[Illustration]



    _"WE BOMBARDED THE FORT
    OF LONDON"_
    _--German Official._

       *       *       *       *       *


Latest police reports show that the casualties so far reported in
to-day's air-raid are:--

              _Killed_           _Injured_
    Men             55 Men             223
    Women           16 Women           122
    Children        26 Children         94
                   ---                ----
    Total           97 Total           439

No damage of a military or naval nature was done.

The following German official report was issued on Wednesday:--

    Killed              104
    Seriously injured   154
    Slightly injured    269
                       ----
                        527

including 120 children killed or injured.

To-day our airmen dropped bombs on the Fort of London.

    _British Official, June 13, 1917._

[Illustration]



_William to Japan: "I will never again make drawings about 'The Yellow
Peril' if you will help me against 'The American Peril.'"_

       *       *       *       *       *


On February first we intend to begin submarine warfare without
restriction. In spite of this it is our intention to endeavor to keep
the United States neutral. If this attempt is not successful, we propose
an alliance on the following basis with Mexico:

That we shall make war together and together make peace; we shall give
general financial support, and it is understood that Mexico is to
reconquer her lost territory of New Mexico, Texas, and Arizona. The
details are left to you for settlement.

You are instructed to inform the President of Mexico of the above in the
greatest confidence as soon as it is certain that there will be an
outbreak of war with the United States, and suggest that the President
of Mexico shall on his own initiative communicate with Japan suggesting
the latter's adherence at once to this plan, and at the same time offer
to mediate between Germany and Japan.

Please call to the attention of the President of Mexico that the
employment of ruthless submarine warfare now promises to compel England
to make peace in a few months.

    ZIMMERMANN'S _Letter to Mexico,
    Written January 19,
    Published March 1, 1917._

[Illustration]



_THE PRESIDENT'S HANDICAP_

_President Wilson, who wishes to take measures to safeguard his
country's interests and honor against Hun piracy and intrigue, finds his
hands tied and his appeals flouted by German Americans, pacifists, and
professors of "friendly diplomacy."_

       *       *       *       *       *


Sharp opposition arose yesterday to the requisite resolution in the
Senate under the leadership of Senators La Follette and Stone and a few
cranky Western radicals. Senator La Follette, who, besides being of
pacifist tendencies, represents Wisconsin, where the German vote is
strong, had all along been expected to take advantage of the privilege
of unlimited debate in order to try to kill the resolution.

    _Times Correspondent
    Washington, March 4, 1917._

[Illustration]



_Germany: "We have turned the richest lands of France into a gigantic
region of Death."_

_Christ: "Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these ye
have done it unto me."_

       *       *       *       *       *


Our retreat from the old positions on the Ancre and the Somme has
nullified the projected great Anglo-French spring offensive against our
center on the Western front.

Long strips of territory, having a width of from ten to twelve
kilometers (from six and one-fourth to seven and one-half miles), and
running along the whole of our position, have been turned into "dead
ground." No villages or farm remains standing on this glacis, no road is
passable, and no bridge, railway-line, or embankment remains standing.
Before our new positions runs, like a gigantic ribbon, the empire.

    _Lokalanzeiger, March 18, 1917._

[Illustration]



_Attila: "You have burned and plundered the villages and poisoned the
wells. What a hero you are, William!"_

       *       *       *       *       *


The commandant of outposts will direct the destruction of the various
localities. The final and complete destruction of Grévillers,
Biefvillers, Aubin, and Avesnes will begin at the hour of X-2. To
provide the detachments for setting fire to houses each commandant in
the sector will furnish two sub-officers and twenty men from the B
battalions, and two stretcher-bearers with litters. The destruction of
Favreuil, Beugnatre, and Frémicourt will begin on the second day of the
retirement at the hour of X-3. The destruction of Morchies will be
executed in the morning of the third day of the retirement, at about
five o'clock.... The destruction of Louverval, Boursies, Demicourt will
begin on the third day of the retirement. For these operations the
commandant of pioneers will arrange with the commandant of outposts of
Division S, Sector III., Major von Uechtritz, at Doignies, in such
manner that all the details of destruction not carried out under orders
of the commandant of outposts shall be executed later by Division S.

The lighting of the incendiary fires shall be executed under command of
the officers by the different detachments. The destruction of all wells
is important.

    TIEDE (F. D. R.)
    BAESSLER, OBERLEUTNANT.
    _German Official._

[Illustration]



_FOR HOLY RUSSIA AND HUMANITY!_

_Russian patriotism tramples on the traitorous pro-German dragon whose
breath has paralyzed Russia in the field and at home. The kaiser sees
and slinks away._

       *       *       *       *       *


Before retiring into the background the Executive Committee of the Duma,
under M. Rodzianko, issued on March 20 the following noteworthy appeal
to the nation:

A great event has happened. By one mighty effort the Russian people have
overthrown the old order of things. A new free Russia has been born. In
the course of nine long years all the rights won by the people were
taken away from it one by one. The country was once again thrown into
the abyss of arbitrariness and autocracy. All attempts to bring the
Government to reason proved fruitless, and the great world-war into
which our country was drawn by the enemy found it in a state of moral
disorganisation, with a Government separated from the people,
indifferent to the fate of the country, and sunk in the disgrace of
vices of every kind....

The people were obliged to take over the power in the State into their
own hands. The unanimous revolutionary impulse of the people, animated
by the sense of the importance of the hour, and the resoluteness of the
Duma, have created a Provisional Government which deems it to be its
sacred and responsible duty to realise the people's aspirations and to
lead the country on to the bright road of free civic organisation.

    M. RODZIANKO,
    _The Duma, March 20, 1917._

[Illustration]



_THE TWO GIANTS_

_Germany: "I destroy!" America: "I create!"_

       *       *       *       *       *


Among the many steps which are being taken by the Government to meet the
emergency created by the submarine menace is the graduating of the first
and second classes in the Naval Academy. The first class will be
graduated on March 29, and the second class several weeks later. This
measure will provide 374 additional naval officers.

    _Reuter, Washington, March 20, 1917._

[Illustration]



_William to General von Fleck: "We must save these beautiful things from
destruction and fire."_

       *       *       *       *       *


All the reports which have reached us confirm the report that the enemy
has systematically pillaged and ravaged the evacuated zone, mostly
without reasons of a military nature. General von Fleck, the Commander
of the 17th German Army Corps, in leaving Ham carried away the furniture
of the house which he occupied in the town.

    _French Official, March 22, 1917._

[Illustration]



_Uncle Sam: "So we are only a dollar making people, are we?"_

       *       *       *       *       *


Germany never had the slightest intention of attacking the United States
of America, and does not intend to do so now. Germany never desired war
against the United States of America, and she does not desire it to-day.
How did things develop? We told the United States more than once that we
announced the unrestricted use of the submarine weapon in the
expectation that England could be made to observe in her blockade policy
the laws of humanity and international agreements.

If the American nation regards this as a reason for declaring war
against the German nation, with which it has lived in peace for more
than a hundred years; if by this action it wants to increase bloodshed,
not we shall have to bear the burden of responsibility for it. The
German nation, which feels neither hatred nor hostility towards the
United States of America, will also bear this and overcome it.

    HERR VON BETHMANN-HOLLWEG,
    _Berlin, March 29, 1917._

[Illustration]



_In the Office of a German Newspaper in America_

_"My tear vellow, as long as you not forget to wave now and again a
leedle American flag, you can safely go on committing high treason in
the interest of our Vaterland."_

       *       *       *       *       *


Aid and comfort to our German enemy assume a peculiarly insidious and
subtle form, as we are warned by leading papers in various parts of the
country, in the attempts of certain journals to confuse the minds of the
American people about our motives in entering the war, and to implant
seeds of suspicion and distrust concerning our Allies.

_Literary Digest, April, 1917._

[Illustration]



_BECAUSE IT IS THY WAR, IT IS MY WAR_

       *       *       *       *       *


God of the Ages, our father's God, and our God, whose holy influence has
shaped and guided the destiny of our Republic from its inception, we
wait upon that influence to guide us in the present crisis which has
been thrust upon us.

Diplomacy has failed; moral suasion has failed; every appeal to reason
and justice has been swept aside. We abhor war and love peace. But if
war has been, or shall be, forced upon us, we pray that the heart of
every American citizen shall throb with patriotic zeal; that a united
people may rally around our President to hold up his hands in every
measure that shall be deemed necessary to protect American lives and
safeguard our inherent rights.

Let thy blessings, we beseech Thee, attend the Congress now convened in
extraordinary session under extraordinary conditions which call for
extraordinary thought, wise counsel, calm and deliberate legislation;
that its resolves and all its enactments may spring spontaneously from
loyal and patriotic hearts; that our defenders on land and sea may be
amply supplied with the things which make for strength and efficiency.

And, O God, our Heavenly Father, let Thy strong arm uphold, sustain, and
guide us in a just and righteous cause; for Thine is the kingdom, the
power, and glory, forever. Amen.

    REV. DR. HENRY M. COUDEN,
    _In Congress, U. S. A.,
    April 2, 1917._

[Illustration]



_"THE STARS AND STRIPES IN THE SERVICE OF HUMANITY"_

       *       *       *       *       *


We are now about to accept gage of battle with this natural foe to
liberty, and shall, if necessary, spend the whole force of the nation to
check and nullify its pretensions and its power. We are glad, now that
we see the facts with no veil of false pretense about them, to fight
thus for the ultimate peace of the peoples included: for the rights of
nations great and small and the privilege of men everywhere to choose
their way of life and of obedience. The world must be made safe for
democracy. Its peace must be planted upon the tested foundations of
political liberty. We have no selfish ends to serve. We desire no
conquest, no dominion. We seek no indemnities of ourselves, no material
compensation for the sacrifices we shall freely make. We are but one of
the champions of the rights of mankind. We shall be satisfied when those
rights have been made as secure as the faith and the freedom of nations
can make them.

    PRESIDENT WILSON'S
    _Address to Congress,
    April 2, 1917._

[Illustration]



_PROUD TO FIGHT_

       *       *       *       *       *


There are, it may be, many months of fiery trial and sacrifice ahead of
us. It is a fearful thing to lead this great peaceful people into war,
into the most terrible and disastrous of all wars, civilization itself
seeming to be in the balance. But the right is more precious than peace,
and we shall fight for the things which we have always carried nearest
our hearts--for democracy, for the right of those who submit to
authority to have a voice in their own governments, for the rights and
liberties of small nations, for a universal dominion of right by such a
concert of free peoples as shall bring peace and safety to all nations
and make the world itself at last free. To such a task we can dedicate
our lives and our fortunes, everything that we are and everything that
we have, with the pride of those who know that the day has come when
America is privileged to spend her blood and her might for the
principles that gave her birth and happiness and the peace which she has
treasured. God helping her, she can do no other.

    PRESIDENT WILSON'S
    _Address to Congress,
    April 2, 1917._

[Illustration]



_"ACCORDING TO PLAN"_

_Hindenburg: "We lost Vimy Ridge, about 12,000 prisoners, 125 guns, 70
mortars, 175 machine-guns, all according to pl...."_

_William: "Shut up!"_

       *       *       *       *       *


Hard fighting took place again this afternoon on the northern end of
Vimy Ridge, in which we gained further important positions and took a
number of prisoners and machine-guns.

In the direction of Cambrai we have advanced our line north of the
village of Louverval.

Such counter-attacks as the enemy has attempted at different points
along our front have met with no success.

The number of prisoners taken by us since the opening of our attack
yesterday morning now exceeds 11,000, including 235 officers.

We have also captured over 100 guns, among them a number of heavy guns
up to 8-inch calibre, 60 trench mortars, and 163 machine-guns.

_British Official, April 10, 1917._

[Illustration]



_WELCOME TO STOCKHOLM!_

_The German Delegates: "Ils viennent jusque dans nos bras ...."_

       *       *       *       *       *


According to the statements of an Austrian officer, a deserter, the
German chancellor has sent a number of German Socialists to Stockholm to
interview the representatives of Russian Socialists and negotiate for a
separate peace.

Another Austrian deserter alleges that peace is being spoken of less
frequently than formerly in the Austrian Army, and that everybody hopes
the internal disorders in Russia will help in bringing about her
destruction.

    _Russian Official,
    Petrograd, April 14, 1917._

[Illustration]



_Austria: "Why won't you trust me, Little Red Riding Hood?"_

       *       *       *       *       *


As it was herewith clearly demonstrated to the entire world, and
especially to the people of Russia, that Russia was no longer forced to
fight for her defences and for the freedom of her people, it should, in
view of the conformity of the aims of the governments of the allies and
of the Russian Provisional Government, not be difficult to find a way
toward an understanding. This the less as the emperor (Charles) in
agreement with the allied monarchs cherishes the hope of living in
future in peace and friendship with a Russian people which, as regards
its internal and external conditions of life, will be secured and
content.

    _Austrian Government to Russia,
    April 15, 1917._

[Illustration]



_KULTUR V. CIVILISATION_

       *       *       *       *       *


On the evening of April 17 the S.S. _Donegal_ and _Lanfranc_, while
transporting wounded to British ports, were torpedoed without warning.

The _Lanfranc_, in addition to 234 wounded British officers and men,
carried 167 wounded German prisoners, a medical personnel of 52, and a
crew of 123.

    _British Admiralty Official,
    April 17, 1917._

[Illustration]



_American Soldier: "Remember we have plenty of lamp-posts for
traitors."_

       *       *       *       *       *


It's about time for the hamstringers that are lurking in the tall grass
and the sabotagists who are trying to throw monkey-wrenches into the war
machinery to shut off and up or look for unpleasant consequences.

These hidden-hangers do not come out in the open, even to the extent of
the semi-treasonable sentiments of the Pro-German Socialists at St.
Louis. If they did, it wouldn't be necessary to pay any attention to
them. They work in a more insidious way. Under the guise of American
citizenship they rise up every now and then, individuals or
organizations of doubtful origin and purpose, to demand why the United
States is in the war and what its intentions are....

Americans are in no mood to tolerate national sabotage of this sort any
more than plain and open aid and comfort to the enemy. Every man of
common sense knows why we are in the war and what we want to do. We are
in it because we were forced into it by outrageous aggressions and
because we are determined to make the world safe for American democracy.

_Chicago Herald, May, 1917._

[Illustration]



_THE SOCIALIST BAIT FOR RUSSIA_

       *       *       *       *       *


At the last sitting of the executive committee of the Council of
Workmen's and Soldiers' Delegates, M. Borgbjerg, on behalf of the Labour
parties of Scandinavia--Danish, Swedish, and Norwegian--conveyed an
official invitation to all Socialist parties in Russia to the proposed
international conference at Stockholm.

_Reuter, Petrograd, May 8, 1917._

[Illustration]



_ON LAND AND WATER_

_The End of the Hindenburg Line?_

       *       *       *       *       *


The Washington correspondent of the Associated Press states that
Congress will be asked to appropriate $1,000,000,000 (£200,000,000) for
the building of an American merchant fleet to overcome the submarine
menace.

       *       *       *       *       *

The program of the Shipping Board contemplates the diversion to the
Government of the product of every steel-mill in the United States and
the cancelation of existing contracts between the mills and private
consumers, and, where necessary, the payment of damages by the
Government to the parties whose contracts are canceled. The Board
estimates that from five to six million tons of steel and wooden vessels
will be constructed by the Government in the next two years.

    _Associated Press,
    Washington, May 8, 1917._

[Illustration]



_"A POISON-GAS ATTACK ON NEW RUSSIA"_

       *       *       *       *       *


Isolated groups of certain classes of the population, lacking
conscientiousness, seek to realize their aspirations by the medium of
violence, and threaten to destroy the discipline of internal policy and
to create anarchy.

The Provisional Government believes it to be its duty to declare frankly
that this state of things, which renders the administration of the
country difficult, may lead the country to internal disorganisation and
defeat at the front. The phantom of anarchy and civil war threatening
liberty arises before Russia.

    _Russian Provisional
    Government Proclamation,
    Petrograd, May 9, 1917._

[Illustration]



_A FOOL'S PARADISE_

       *       *       *       *       *


As affairs are going now, it will be impossible to save the country.
Perhaps the time is near when we will have to tell you that we can no
longer give you the amount of bread you expect or other supplies on
which you have a right to count. The process of the change from slavery
to freedom is not going on properly. We have tasted freedom and are
slightly intoxicated. What we need is sobriety and discipline.

You could suffer and be silent for ten years, and obey the orders of a
hated Government. You could even fire upon your own people when
commanded to do so. Can you now suffer no longer?

We hear it said that we no longer need the front because they are
fraternizing there. But are they fraternizing on all the fronts? Are
they fraternizing on the French front? No, comrades, if you are going to
fraternize, then fraternize everywhere. Are not enemy forces being
thrown over upon the Anglo-French front, and is not the Anglo-French
advance already stopped? There is no such thing as a "Russian front,"
there is only one general Allied front.

    KERENSKY, _Russian Minister of Justice,
    May 14, 1917._

[Illustration]



_THE UNITED STATES FOR CONSCRIPTION_

_William: "Do you mean to say that you are really going to do
something?"_

       *       *       *       *       *


The day here named is the time upon which all shall present themselves
for assignment to their tasks. It is for that reason destined to be
remembered as one of the most conspicuous moments in our history. It is
nothing less than the day upon which the manhood of the country shall
step forward in one solid rank in defense of the ideals to which this
nation is consecrated. It is important to those ideals no less than to
the pride of this generation in manifesting its devotion to them, that
there be no gaps in the ranks.

    _From_ PRESIDENT WILSON'S _Proclamation
    of the Draft Law, May 18, 1917._

[Illustration]



_John Bull: "A hearty welcome! Come in, Mate."_

       *       *       *       *       *


Sir Edward Carson was the chief speaker at a luncheon given at Princes
Restaurant on the 17th inst., by the Navy League to the chairman and
committee of the Navy League of the United States. The gathering was
representative of the British Parliament and Navy, and several American
Naval officers were among the guests.

The Duke of Buccleuch, who presided, gave the toasts of "The King" and
"The President of the United States."

Mr. Irwin Laughlin (Councillor to the United States Embassy), in
responding, expressed regret that the Ambassador was unable to be
present. He would like to say, in thanking his Grace for the very
flattering and agreeable words he had been good enough to utter in
regard to the President, and the alliance, that he was sure both the
President and the Ambassador felt that the binding force of any alliance
sprang not from a matter of treaties, but from a reciprocal confidence
in mutual aims.

    _British Admiralty, Official,
    May 22, 1917._

[Illustration]



_Tommy: "Look here, Bill, here's a bit of old Hindenburg's line."_

       *       *       *       *       *


Sir Douglas Haig, who has never yet made a premature claim of success,
has been able to announce that ten miles of the vaunted Hindenburg line
have passed into the possession of his gallant troops. The Germans say
that "there is no Hindenburg line," and in one respect at least they are
correct. Our Special Correspondent, in a despatch published in this
issue, declares that the Hindenburg line is "now undiscoverable." The
attacking forces gained possession of a very long stretch of pulverized
ground, but the line itself had been battered out of recognition.

    _The Times, May 25, 1917._

[Illustration]



_A GOOD START_

       *       *       *       *       *


A brief _résumé_ of what the United States have accomplished during the
seven weeks which have elapsed since they entered the war may not be
without interest as demonstrating America's complete participation in
the war and her ability to give immediate and powerful aid.

A selective Draft Bill which will ultimately give an Army of 2,000,000
men has passed Congress, and will be put into operation forthwith. The
loan legislation has passed Congress, and the law is already in
operation with prospects of the greatest success; $750,000,000 has
already been advanced to the Allies.

    _British Press Bureau,
    May 27, 1917._

[Illustration]



_THE DECISION OF THE SEAMEN'S AND FIREMEN'S UNION_

_"Don't think, my beauty, that we are going to ship you to those German
friends of yours at Stockholm."_

       *       *       *       *       *


The following telegram, signed by Mr. Havelock Wilson as President of
the Sailors' and Firemen's Union, has been sent to the Council of
Workmen's and Soldiers' Delegates in Petrograd:

     Comrades, I am instructed by the Committee of the National
     Sailors' and Firemen's Union of Great Britain and Ireland,
     representing 100,000 organized seamen, to inform you that we
     have decided not to work on any ship which conveys delegates to
     Petrograd or Stockholm until such delegates give an undertaking
     in writing that no war settlement can be made with Germany
     until the German Government make restitution to the relatives
     of Allied and neutral seamen who have been murdered when
     endeavouring to escape from their sinking ships that were
     torpedoed by German submarines. We desire that you will make
     inquiries as to the noble part played by the British Seamen's
     Union towards the Russian revolutionary party in 1905 and 1906,
     when, you will find, we were the true friends of Russian
     democracy.

    _June, 1917._

[Illustration]



_GERMANY'S PEACE AGENTS CAUGHT IN THEIR OWN TRAP_

       *       *       *       *       *

THE GRIMM EPISODE


The German conspiracy for a separate peace received a severe setback
when the General Congress of Workmen's and Soldiers' Delegates of all
Russia, by a vote of 640 to 121, approved the attitude of the Government
in expelling from Russia Robert Grimm, a Swiss Socialist pacifist, who
had received the following communication, when in Petrograd, from M.
Hoffman, member of the Swiss Federal Council:

     "Germany will not undertake an offensive so long as she
     considers it possible to arrive at an understanding with
     Russia. Numerous conversations with prominent politicians lead
     me to believe that Germany is seeking to conclude with Russia a
     mutually honorable peace, and a peace which would result in the
     re-establishment of close economic and commercial relations
     with Russia; the financial support of Germany to Russia for her
     restoration; no intervention in the internal affairs of Russia;
     a friendly understanding with regard to Poland, Lithuania, and
     Courland; and the restoration to Russia of her occupied
     territories, in return for the districts of Austria invaded by
     Russia. I am convinced that if the allies of Russia desired it,
     Germany and her allies would be ready immediately to open peace
     negotiations."

    _Current History, June, 1917._

[Illustration]



_THE FALL OF THE MARK_

       *       *       *       *       *


The exchange value of the mark fell to-day to the lowest point yet
recorded here, namely, 35.40 florins per 100 marks. The Austrian crown
also touched its lowest, the exchange being 22.40fl.

The mark has fallen since June from 36.15fl. to the value above
mentioned. The pre-war rate was 59.25fl.

    _Amsterdam, June 7, 1917._

[Illustration]



_AMERICA'S CHOICE_

_America refuses the olive branch from "the ugly talons of the sinister
power."_

    _President Wilson's Address on
    Flag Day, June 14, 1917._

       *       *       *       *       *


We know now clearly, as we knew before we ourselves were engaged in the
war, that we are not enemies of the German people, and they are not our
enemies. They did not originate, or desire, this hideous war, or wish
that we should be drawn into it, and we are vaguely conscious that we
are fighting their cause, as they will some day see it themselves, as
well as our own. They themselves are in the grip of the same sinister
power that has stretched its ugly talons out and drawn blood from us.

    PRESIDENT WILSON,
    _Washington, June 14, 1917._

[Illustration]



_OLD AND NEW GLORY_

_"For Liberty, Humanity, and Justice we are coming, 10,000,000 of us."_

       *       *       *       *       *


My Fellow-Citizens: We meet to celebrate Flag Day because this flag
which we honor and under which we serve is the emblem of our unity, our
power, our thought, and purpose as a nation. It has no other character
than that which we give it from generation to generation. The choices
are ours. It floats in majestic silence above the hosts that execute
those choices, whether in peace or in war. And yet, though silent, it
speaks to us--speaks to us of the past, of the men and women who went
before us and of the records they wrote upon it. We are about to carry
it into battle, to lift it where it will draw the fire of our enemies.
We are about to bid thousands, hundreds of thousands, it may be
millions, of our men, the young, the strong, the capable men of the
nation, to go forth and die beneath it on fields of blood far away--for
what? For some unaccustomed thing? For something for which it has never
sought the fire before?

These are questions which must be answered. We are Americans. We in our
turn serve America, and can serve her with no private purpose. We must
use her flag as she has always used it. We are accountable at the bar of
history and must plead in utter frankness what purpose it is we seek to
serve.

    PRESIDENT WILSON, _Washington,
    Flag Day, June 14, 1917._

[Illustration]



_YOU DARED TO FIND US OUT!_

_Baron Von Rautenfels (Diplomatic Messenger from Berlin to Norway): "Not
how the bombs came here, but that you dared to open my luggage, is all
that matters to Germany."_

       *       *       *       *       *


The police on Saturday arrested a certain Baron von Rautenfels, who
declares that he was born in Finland, but is now a German subject, and
two Finlanders. At their lodgings and in the luggage of these persons
the police found nearly a ton of explosives of a very powerful variety.
Part of these explosives was made up to resemble coal briquettes, and
was all ready to be mixed with the coal in ships' bunkers. The baron's
luggage also contained cigarettes and tobacco mixed with carborundum,
which can be used to ruin engines or machinery. The baron and the other
arrested persons declare that the bombs and other explosives were to be
used in Finland.

    _Christiania, June 24, 1917._

[Illustration]



_FRATERNIZING ON THE GALICIAN FRONT AS GENERAL BRUSILOFF UNDERSTANDS IT_

       *       *       *       *       *


M. Kerensky (the Russian War Minister) and General Brusiloff have
organised a new offensive in Galicia which has had a magnificent
success, a tremendous blow being struck at the enemy. The news of
victory has transformed Petrograd, and the pessimism that was paralyzing
the people has given way to a flood of eager patriotism.

    _Times Correspondent,
    Petrograd, July 4, 1917._

[Illustration]



_THE FALL OF THE CHILD SLAYER_

       *       *       *       *       *


Three airships only were able to approach the outskirts of London.

One of them appeared over the northern districts at about 2:15 A.M.,
where she was at once picked up by searchlights and heavily engaged by
anti-aircraft guns and aëroplanes. After a few minutes the airship was
seen to burst into flame and to fall rapidly towards the earth. The ship
was destroyed; the wreckage, engines, and the half-burned bodies of the
crew being found at Cuffley, near Enfield.

    _British Official, September 3, 1916._

[Illustration]



_AT THE WORLD'S JUDGMENT SEAT_

       *       *       *       *       *


Since the first day the war has been to us nothing but the defence of
our right to existence and freedom. Therefore we were able first and
alone to declare our readiness for peace negotiations. I spoke on July
9, 1915, and afterwards repeatedly with sufficient clearness on the
subject. Mr. Asquith and Lord Robert Cecil do not get rid of my words by
asserting that Germany had announced none, or only intolerable and
humiliating peace conditions. We did our part, nor does any one dare to
demand that we should make offers to-day when the enemy, as M. Briand
recently did, characterises the conclusion of peace to-day as weakness
for the memory of the dead. They continue the war because they hope to
be able to attain their Utopian war aims.

    BETHMANN-HOLLWEG,
    _Berlin, October 5, 1916._

[Illustration]



_"WE'LL GIVE THESE YANKEES A TASTE OF OUR STEEL"_

       *       *       *       *       *


Eight vessels (including one passenger liner) have been torpedoed so far
by the _U-53_, which has caused a sensation since her appearance in
Newport Harbor only to move again in a few hours. As far as is known no
lives have been lost. The crew of one vessel is not yet accounted for.

    _Times Correspondent,
    New York, October 9, 1916._

[Illustration]



_"We are willing now to make peace so that you may enjoy still more the
blessings of our Kultur."_

       *       *       *       *       *


A German Embassy official, who stipulated that his name must not be
used, said that the terms include "practically" the restoration of the
_status quo ante bellum_ (including the return of Germany's colonies),
the creation of new kingdoms of Poland and Lithuania, and changes in the
Balkan boundaries, but at least part of Serbia and Rumania to be
restored.

    _Times Correspondent,
    New York, December 12, 1916._

[Illustration]



_THE KAISER HAS ORDERED HIS PEOPLE A FIRE-EATING DIET_

       *       *       *       *       *


Conjointly with the allied rulers I proposed to our enemies to enter
forthwith into peace negotiations. Our enemies refused my offer. Their
hunger for power desires Germany's destruction. The war will be
continued. Before God and humanity I declare that on the enemy
Governments alone falls the heavy responsibility for all the further
terrible sacrifices from which I wished to save you.

With justified indignation at our enemies' arrogant crime and with
determination to defend our holiest possessions and secure the
Fatherland's happy future, you will become as steel. Our enemies did not
want the understanding offered by me. With God's help our arms will
enforce it.

    THE KAISER, _January 6, 1917_.

[Illustration]



_"DIGNITY AND IMPUDENCE," NEW VERSION_

_President Wilson to the impudent arch-Hun: "Guess I'll soon find a way
to get at him!"_

       *       *       *       *       *


Neutrals cannot expect that Germany, forced to fight for her existence,
shall, for the sake of neutral interest, restrict the use of an
effective weapon if her enemy is permitted to continue to apply at will
methods of warfare violating the rules of international law. Such a
demand would be incompatible with the character of neutrality, and the
German Government is convinced that the Government of the United States
does not think of making such a demand, knowing that the Government of
the United States has repeatedly declared that it is determined to
restore the principle of the freedom of the seas from whatever quarter
it has been violated.

    _German Note to_ PRESIDENT WILSON,
    _February 3, 1917_.

[Illustration]



_"UNRESTRICTED" PIRACY_

_William: "Now we will give England the death-stroke."_

       *       *       *       *       *


The total English tonnage is stated to be about 20,000,000 gross
register tons, and is accounted for as follows: Requisitioned for
military purposes, 8,500,000 tons; engaged in coastal trade, 500,000
tons; under repairs, 1,000,000 tons; plying "in the interest of the
Allies," 2,000,000 tons; remaining for the supply of England, 8,000,000
tons "at most." It is added that, as a matter of fact, the statistics
for July to September, 1916, show only about 6,750,000 tons of English
shipping as plying to England, and it is estimated that, with the
addition of 900,000 tons of non-English enemy tonnage and 3,000,000 tons
of neutral tonnage, England is dependent upon a round total of
10,750,000 gross register tons.

    _The Lokalanzeiger, February 4, 1917._

[Illustration]



_William: "I say, Capelle, are you sure we have taken the right road?"_

       *       *       *       *       *


This is a conflict not of armies, but of industries and economic
resources. Mr. Lloyd George once said that the last £100,000,000 might
win the war. The United States not only has the last £100,000,000, but
it has many times £100,000,000. The day that this country enters the war
the economic resources of the Allies will be doubled. We can practically
care for France while recruiting an army of our own. The German General
Staff may delude itself into believing that it has challenged the
immediate war-power of 100,000 men. What it is really challenging is a
war-power of 200,000,000,000 dollars (£40,000,000,000) and a financial
and industrial system that can be indefinitely mobilized.

    _The New York World,
    February 6, 1917._

[Illustration]



_A GOOD JOKE_

_The Hun Barbarian to the Hollander: "I gave you my word--did you really
expect me to keep it?"_

       *       *       *       *       *


News of the wholesale destruction of Dutch vessels, after the
"solicitude" so considerately shown for their safety by the German
authorities, has provoked a degree of feeling far surpassing any
hitherto aroused, even by the many "unfortunate occurrences" of a
similar nature which Holland has previously experienced at German hands.

    _Reuter, Amsterdam, February 25, 1917._

[Illustration]



_"I hope, dear Holland, this explanation is all you want."_

_Holland: "Yes, thank you, it is quite sufficient."_

       *       *       *       *       *


Seven Dutch Steamers which left Falmouth on February 22 were attacked
about 5 P.M. of the same day by a German submarine, without their papers
being examined. Three of the ships are known to have been sunk, one has
been towed into harbor, the other three, says a Lloyd's telegram, "might
still be afloat."

If the Dutch reports are correct that these seven vessels perished, this
will be deeply regretted, but responsibility for it falls on the
ship-owners, who preferred to send out their vessels on February 22 on a
promise of relative security instead of waiting until March 17, when
absolute security was promised. The report of the submarines has not yet
arrived.

We regret the rupture with a nation who, by her history, seemed to be
predestined to work together with us, not against us, for common ideals.
But since our honest desire for peace has only encountered hostile
ridicule on the part of our enemies, there is no more "going back," but
only "ahead" possible for us.

    _Imperial Chancellor, Berlin, February 27, 1917._

[Illustration]



_President Wilson: "Say! you are using false cards."_

_William: "Yes, but only as a precaution."_

       *       *       *       *       *


The revelation takes the form of a letter from Herr Zimmermann, the
German Foreign Secretary, to Eckardt, the German Minister in Mexico,
which was forwarded through Count Bernstorff and dated January 19. The
letter announces unrestricted submarine warfare for February first, and
instructs Eckardt to negotiate an offensive alliance with General
Carranza, who should approach Japan, apparently with the object
ultimately of getting her to join in an attack upon the United States.

    _Times Correspondent, Washington,
    March 1, 1917._

[Illustration]



_THE BERLIN-BAGDAD SNAKE_

_"Alas! poor dear snake is dead."_

       *       *       *       *       *


Sir Stanley Maude, telegraphing on March 11, announces that the British
forces occupied Bagdad early that morning.

The English operations in Mesopotamia have been accompanied by a great
success. The British flag floats over Bagdad and in all the bazaars of
the East the news will resound that the _feringhi_ have beaten the
warriors of the padishah, and captured the city which for long centuries
was invested with the garment of story and fairy tale.

    _British Press Bureau, March 14, 1917._

[Illustration]



_HELPING HINDENBURG HOME_

       *       *       *       *       *


During the past few days a tract of land between the region of Arras and
the Aisne was evacuated by us in accordance with plans. The movements,
prepared long beforehand, were carried out without disturbance by the
hesitating, pursuing enemy. The rear-guard troops, by their prudent and
heroic conduct, screened the evacuation of the positions and the
departure of the forces.

    _German Official Communiqué, March 19, 1917._

[Illustration]



_Uncle Sam: "So you are going to sink my ships on sight, are you?"_

_Tirpitz: "I ... I ... don't think!"_

       *       *       *       *       *


President Wilson has authorised the Navy Department to spend £23,000,000
to speed up naval construction and to purchase auxiliary craft. This
expenditure was recently authorised by Congress.

    _Reuter, March 20, 1917._

[Illustration]



_POISONED WELLS_

       *       *       *       *       *


Whole towns and villages have been pillaged, burned, destroyed; private
houses have been stripped of all their furniture, which the enemy has
carried off; fruit-trees have been torn up or rendered useless for all
future production; springs and wells have been poisoned. The
comparatively few inhabitants who were not evacuated to the rear were
left with the smallest possible ration of food, while the enemy took
possession of the stocks provided by the Neutral Relief Committee and
intended for the civil population.

The fact has been established by our military authorities in the
recaptured districts (says this instruction) and notably at Péronne,
where the branch of the banque de France was pillaged and the strong
rooms were found broken open and empty, that a very large number of
securities have been stolen by the German troops in their retreat.

    _French Official Protest, March 24, 1917._

[Illustration]



_THE OUTCAST_

       *       *       *       *       *


I am not now thinking of the loss of property involved, immense and
serious as that is, but only of the wanton and wholesale destruction of
the lives of non-combatant men, women, and children, engaged in pursuits
which have always, even in the darkest periods of modern history, been
deemed innocent and legitimate. Property can be paid for; the lives of
peaceful and innocent people cannot be.

The present German warfare against commerce is warfare against mankind.
It is a war against all nations.

American ships have been sunk and American lives taken in ways which it
has stirred us very deeply to learn of, but the ships and people of
other neutral and friendly nations have been sunk and overwhelmed in the
waters in the same way.

    PRESIDENT WILSON,
    _Washington, April 2, 1917._

[Illustration]



_"STILL THEY COME"_

       *       *       *       *       *


According to new reports, our troops during the battle of April 16
between Soissons and Rheims broke up very important German forces. In
expectation of our attack the enemy had brought up nineteen divisions.

According to the accounts of prisoners, formal orders had been given to
hold out at any cost on the first position, which had been deepened. The
losses suffered by the Germans were heavy not only during the battle,
but on the preceding days.

The number of unwounded prisoners taken by us between Soissons and
Rheims now reaches eleven thousand.

    _French Communiqué, April 11, 1917._

[Illustration]



_Tommy: "You'll soon see the Stars and Stripes."_

_Fritz: "Just seen some."_

       *       *       *       *       *


Our gains reported this morning north of the Vimy Ridge have been
secured and our positions strengthened.

During the fighting on the 9-10th inst. we captured prisoners from all
infantry regiments of six German divisions--namely, 79th Reserve
Division, First Bavarian Reserve Division, 14th Bavarian Division, 11th
Division, 17th Reserve Division, and 18th Reserve Division.

    _British Official, April 12, 1917._

[Illustration]



_William to Herr Scheidemann: "The Turks believe I am a Mahomedan, try
to make the Russian socialists believe I am a Democrat."_

       *       *       *       *       *


A Berlin telegram published by the "Cologne Gazette" states that Herr
Scheidemann, leader of the German Socialist Majority Party, has gone
with other German Socialists to Stockholm, in order to get into touch
with Russian Socialists.

    _Reuter, April 12, 1917._

[Illustration]



_GERMANY'S WAR AIMS_

_Bethmann-Hollweg to Anti-Annexationist and Pro-Annexationist: "I cannot
disclose details, but I perfectly agree with both of you."_

       *       *       *       *       *


What is Herr von Bethmann-Hollweg still waiting for? If he now makes a
frank and bold statement in the sense of the Russian peace formula three
States will stand together, namely, Russia, Germany, and
Austria-Hungary.

    _Vorwärts, May 7, 1917._

[Illustration]



_The Ober-Hof-Socialist: "Yes! we must make a peace without
annexations."_

       *       *       *       *       *


At the last sitting of the executive committee of the Council of
Workmen's and Soldiers' Delegates, M. Borgbjerg, on behalf of the Labor
parties of Scandinavia--Danish, Swedish, and Norwegian--conveyed an
official invitation to all Socialist parties in Russia to the proposed
international conference at Stockholm.

M. Borgbjerg said that, having had interviews with the German Social
Democrats, he was able to communicate to the executive committee the
peace terms proposed by the official Social Democratic Party, i. e., the
majority section.

These, M. Borgbjerg proceeded, recognised the right of nations to
freedom of development, and advocated the introduction of compulsory
international arbitration; the restitution by Germany of all conquered
territories; a plebiscite in Russian Poland, with freedom to choose
between independence, annexation by Russia, or annexation by Germany;
the restoration of independence to Belgium, Serbia, and Rumania, and the
restoration to Bulgaria of the Bulgarian districts of Macedonia, and the
granting to Serbia of a free port on the Adriatic. As to
Alsace-Lorraine, they are of opinion that a rectification of the
Lorraine frontier could be secured by means of an amicable
understanding. The program of the minority section was wider in scope.

    _Reuter, May 8, 1917._

[Illustration]



_"No war or at the worst only a sham war was all that America could do,
was it?"_

       *       *       *       *       *


Flotillas of American destroyers have been sent to the submarine zone,
where they are now effectively coöperating with the Allied Navies.

One Army division, a force of Marines, and nine regiments of Engineers
have been ordered to France.

Ten thousand doctors, in addition to many nurses, have been ordered to
England and France, and hundreds have already gone.

Together with the Americans who are already serving in the British and
French Armies these additional units will shortly give a total of
100,000 Americans in France, equalling five German divisions.

    _British Press Bureau, May 27, 1917._

[Illustration]



_AIR RAID ON LONDON_

_German Airman: "One for the babies!"_

       *       *       *       *       *


Latest police reports show that the casualties so far reported in
to-day's air raid are:

          _Killed_                _Injured_
    Men               55     Men              223
    Women             16     Women            122
    Children          26     Children          94
                     ---                     ----
    Total             97     Total            439

No damage of a military or naval nature was done.

    _British Communiqué, June 13, 1917._

[Illustration]



_Ferdinand: "I am much too popular to be treated like Tino or
Nicholas."_

       *       *       *       *       *


The High Commissioners of France, Great Britain, and Russia, having
demanded by their note of yesterday the abdication of King Constantine
and the appointment of his successor, the undersigned prime minister and
minister of foreign affairs has the honor to bring to your Excellency's
knowledge that the king, solicitous as always solely for the interest of
Greece, has decided to leave the country with the crown prince, and to
designate as his successor Prince Alexander.

    M. ZAIMIS, _June 13, 1917._

[Illustration]



_REPRISALS_

_The Only Answer_

       *       *       *       *       *


The important announcement that the City will be warned in future when
an air raid is threatened was made on Sunday by the Lord Mayor, at a
meeting at the London Opera House, called to demand reprisals for air
raids. A resolution calling on the Government to undertake air reprisals
on German towns and cities was passed, amidst great cheering.

    _London, June 19, 1917._

[Illustration]



_A DISGUISE THAT WAS TOO THIN_

_Bethmann-Hollweg: "That Socialist's disguise is no good, All Highest.
Let's try another clerical peace trick."_

       *       *       *       *       *


All over the world attempts were made to create distrust of German
Social Democracy. We were described as being really war agitators,
obedient servants of German Imperialism. The memorandum on our peace
work which we delivered at Stockholm will, we hope, destroy many
misunderstandings and many prejudices which are based on them.

Of course the misstatements and slanders have already begun again.

    HERR SCHEIDEMANN,
    _Stockholm, June 29, 1917._

[Illustration]



_Dr. Michaelis: "The concentration of the Russian Army compelled Germany
to seize the sword. There was no choice left to us."_

       *       *       *       *       *


We must keep before our eyes daily the events of three years ago, which
are fixed in history and show that we were forced into war by Russia's
secret mobilization, which was the great danger for Germany. To have
participated in a conference while the Russian mobilization proceeded
would have been political suicide.

    HERR MICHAELIS,
    _Berlin, July 27, 1917._

[Illustration]



_THE NEW ST. GEORGE_

_"Give us the means and we will slay this German dragon that threatens
our towns, our women, and children."_

       *       *       *       *       *


Southend was bombed by about a dozen German aëroplanes this evening
while the place was full of holiday-makers. The attack lasted a quarter
of an hour and resulted in the death of twenty-three people, the
majority of whom were women and children. About forty people were
injured. One of the victims was a little girl, who was terribly mangled,
and another was a woman, who was also badly mutilated.

    _Times, August 17, 1917._

[Illustration]



_GERMAN "MILITARIST" SOCIALISM_

       *       *       *       *       *


Does not the cartoonist Raemaekers fail in this cartoon? The artist
Raemaekers is inspired--here as always. But does the cartoonist succeed
this time in burning the right idea, his idea, into the reader's brain?

Here is the real Kaiser and here are real German workingmen. It is they
who are carrying the burden of Kaiserism. All this is convincing. But do
not other workingmen in other countries carry burdens?

The failure is only at first glance. Raemaekers is not concerned to
reproduce the conventional cartoon of workingmen carrying a burden of
other classes on their shoulders. The point lies not in the burden, but
in the nature of the burden, the contrast, so perfectly portrayed,
between the character of the Kaiser and the characters of his proud and
willing slaves. The Kaiser, crafty and contemptuous, but neither so
ignorant nor so stupid as to be wholly unconscious of the foolish and
contemptible position he occupies! The workingmen evidently once strong,
intelligent and enthusiastic, though now blinded and crippled, are
utterly unconscious of what they are doing. Carrying the heavy burden of
Kaiserism seems no more to them than their day's work.

You see Raemaekers knows both Kaiser and workingmen, and so will have
nothing to do with the conventional portraits of either. The Kaiser is
neither a beast nor a fool--however foolish his position may be. The
workingmen are neither labor heroes ready to revolt, nor conscious and
beaten serfs.

    WILLIAM ENGLISH WALLING.

[Illustration]



_THE ANNEXATION OF AMERICA_

_"I think, All Highest, we had better not insist upon the annexation of
America."_

       *       *       *       *       *


In the inscription "Ten Million Men between 21 and 30" on the Statue of
Liberty, Raemaekers has as usual gone to the heart of things. Ten
million trained citizen soldiers!!! What an insurance of peace and
security against attack or insult. Universal Citizen Military Education
and Training.

From the beginning the first article in our Internatíonal Creed has been
the Monroe Doctrine--America for Americans. If the result of the present
war shall be to add two additional items to that creed, namely Universal
Military Education and Training, and the United States, the First Air
Power in the world, it will be worth all that it costs, and this great
nation can go on in peace and security to work out the mighty destiny
awaiting it.

Raemaekers' placing "All Highest" and his aide upon the conning tower of
a submarine, suggests another most vital matter at this present time.

The submarine has held the world's spotlight for the last two years. Its
deadly efficiency is universally conceded. That deadly efficiency is the
direct result of Admiral von Tirpitz's unyielding insistence on a
centralized, independent, untrammeled Department for the submarine.

    PEARY.

[Illustration]



_A REHEARSAL_

_"When I say, Down with Wilson! you all cheer!"_

[Illustration]



_AT THE HOLLAND FRONTIER_

       *       *       *       *       *


Whether the war be long or short, the quickest road to peace is the road
straight ahead of us, with no division among the American people.

    WILLIAM JENNINGS BRYAN.

[Illustration]



_RESTITUTION AND REPARATION_

       *       *       *       *       *


The Prussian theory of right and justice is this: "What is mine is mine.
What is yours is also mine if I want it."

This idea is deep buried beneath the thick bone of the Prussian head. He
holds it with stolid stupidity and deep, prehistoric crudity, like a pig
or an idiot. He cannot understand that there are any rights higher than
Prussian greed. "If I want it, it is mine because I want it." It is the
logic of the primitive human animal, the caveman.

Cornered and accused of his thefts he clings to his loot like the pig
that has stolen a carrot. When asked to disgorge he is shocked by the
suggestion. "But they are mine! I wanted them, so they are mine!" he
says. Right and Justice answer, "They are not yours; you stole them."
"Maybe so!" says the Prussian. "But just the same they are mine--I stole
them a long time ago."

The logic of the Prussian fills ten thousand volumes. It is written in
hundred-line paragraphs and six-inch words. It can be condensed into two
short words--piggish greed; piggish because it knows neither right nor
justice, greed because it is greed.

    ELLIS PARKER BUTLER.

[Illustration]



_"SOMETHING'S WRONG. SHE DOESN'T SEEM TO INSPIRE CONFIDENCE"_

       *       *       *       *       *


It is Germany's "Kultur," her spiritual code, that is responsible for
America's entrance into the war; her gruesome sacrifice to Moloch of all
which distinguishes humanity from the brute and the savage. It is her
philosophy which has made us her horrified but resolute foe.

The fruits of her spirit stand forth alike in her speech and acts.
"Kultur is a spiritual organization of the world, which does not exclude
bloody savagery. It raises the dæmoniac to sublimity. It is above
morality, reason, science," so wrote a Teutonic expounder in the first
year of the war. "We have become a nation of wrath; we think only of the
war. We execute God Almighty's will, and the edicts of His justice we
will fulfil, imbued with holy rage, in vengeance upon the ungodly. God
calls us to murderous battles, even if worlds should thereby fall to
ruins," so wrote one of Germany's poets. "Whoever cannot prevail upon
himself to approve from the bottom of his heart the sinking of the
_Lusitania_, whoever cannot conquer his sense of the gigantic cruelty to
unnumbered perfectly innocent victims--and give himself up to honest
delight at this victorious exploit of German defensive power--him we
judge to be no true German," so wrote one of her pastors. And for
hideous, ruthless deeds which violate every sanctity and deify falsehood
we need but cite her slaughter of children and the aged, her poisoning
of wells, her shooting of nurses, her sinking of hospital ships, her
brutal deportations and all the revolting sinuosities of her spy system.

    ROBERT GRANT.

[Illustration]



_"WHEN I WAS A CHILD, IT WAS YOU WHO SAVED ME"_

       *       *       *       *       *


Whether it is that an invigorating climate has given our Anglo-Saxon
blood a piquant Gallic flavor or because Europe sent us for ancestors
only those light-hearted and adventurous souls with a spirit akin to
that we admire in the French people, true it is that Americans have
always had an especial liking for France and the French. They were our
first allies as they are the latest. From Lafayette and Rochambeau to
Joffre and Viviani, a host of Frenchmen have won the affectionate regard
of Americans and are numbered with our national heroes.

With their French allies Americans can work in most cordial
understanding and sympathy. That subtle spirit of unselfish dedication
to country which has won for the French the admiration of the world
consecrates the alliance of the peoples who are giving their sons in
common sacrifice to save liberty to the world. Out of the heat and
turmoil of war bonds are being forged between the Allied nations which
time and circumstance can never sever. On that alliance the hope of
civilization depends; from it may come, in God's good time, some great
forward step in the march of progress which began at a manger in
Bethlehem.

    MYRON T. HERRICK,
    _Cleveland, Ohio, March, 1918_.

[Illustration]



_FOR MERIT_

       *       *       *       *       *


If, as the artist suggests, and the plainest reading of the facts of the
fruitless Verdun assault seems to confirm, lives of men were squandered
in a reckless attempt to save the princeling's face (which was, in fact,
beyond saving), then does he richly deserve the grim decoration with
which in the name of infamy he is here invested--the Order of Butchery,
with knives. And you may view the crosses upon the pathetic mounds
before Verdun as so many entries in the Recording Angel's ledger.

    JOSEPH THORP.

[Illustration]





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software suite offers a broad range of search, navigation and discovery
solutions for desktop search, intranet search, SharePoint search and embedded
search applications.  ISYS has been deployed by thousands of organizations
operating in a variety of industries, including government, legal, law
enforcement, financial services, healthcare and recruitment.



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