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Title: French Dishes for American Tables
Author: Caron, Pierre
Language: English
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Copyright Status: Not copyrighted in the United States. If you live elsewhere check the laws of your country before downloading this ebook. See comments about copyright issues at end of book.

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[Transcriber's Note: Bold text is surrounded by =equal signs= and
italic text is surrounded by _underscores_.]


    FRENCH DISHES

    FOR

    AMERICAN TABLES.


    BY
    PIERRE CARON
    (FORMERLY CHEF D'ENTREMETS AT DELMONICO'S).

    TRANSLATED BY
    MRS. FREDERIC SHERMAN.


    NEW YORK:
    D. APPLETON AND COMPANY,
    1, 3, AND 5 BOND STREET.
    1886.



    COPYRIGHT, 1885,
    BY D. APPLETON AND COMPANY.



A FEW GENERAL REMARKS.


THE object of this volume is to present to the public a number of
attractive receipts in a form so clear and concise as to render their
execution practicable and comparatively easy. This is a need which we
believe has long been felt; those books of value on the subject of
cookery hitherto published generally having been written in French,
and those which have appeared in English, while perhaps containing
something of merit, usually so abound in the use of technical terms
as to harass and puzzle the inexperienced. The general directions
also are usually of such vague and incomprehensible a character as
to render their meaning quite unintelligible to the reader. In view
of these difficulties, we have endeavored to avoid those terms not
generally understood, and to condense each receipt as much as possible,
compatible with a clear and thorough understanding of the subject. We
have also studied simplicity of language, so that our book may come
within the comprehension of all classes, and that which we consider of
importance, to cooks themselves. We believe that we will not be met
with indignant protest in venturing to assert that cooking as an art
is greatly neglected in America, this fact being only too frequently
and universally deplored. The wealthy who may afford a _chef_, or very
experienced cook, are vastly in the minority of those who suffer from
the incapability of cooks, and also from the lack of knowledge on their
own part, leading to the neglect of one of the most important factors
of comfortable living. We think, however, that the number of people of
moderate income, desiring to live well, and yet within their means,
is very large; and it is to these, as well as to the more affluent,
that we hope this book may be of use, for, while economy is not its
_sole_ object, the variety of receipts for palatable dishes which may
be prepared at small cost is very large. On the other hand, of course,
there are a great number of dishes which are obviously expensive; but
these may be distinguished at a glance.

In conclusion, we would remark that, as we know the furnishings of
American kitchens to be very meager, we have forborne the mention of
particular utensils for the preparation of certain dishes. There are,
however, a few articles which are indispensable if the best results are
expected--viz., a Dutch oven, for roasting meats, poultry, and game,
_before_ the fire, and _not_ in the oven of the range, which bakes
instead of roasting, and so dries up the juices of the meats.

A mortar and pestle will also be required when "pounding" is
mentioned, as for chicken, meats, almonds, etc.

A fine sieve is necessary for the straining of sauces; and two flannel
bags, kept scrupulously clean, one for the purpose of straining soups
and the other for straining jellies.


SOUPS AND SAUCES.

It must be constantly borne in mind that soups must be always allowed
to simmer gently, and _never_ to boil fast, except where express
directions are given to that effect. Always be particular to remove
every particle of scum whenever it rises. When stock is put away on ice
to become cold for the next day's use, remove the fat on the top with a
spoon, wipe over the top of the jelly with a cloth dipped in hot water,
and then, with a dry cloth, wipe the jelly dry. It, however, seems to
us a good plan to keep the stock-pot always filled, the stock simmering
on the fire, so as to be at hand when needed for the preparation of
different soups and sauces. In fact, this seems almost indispensable
where a variety of dishes is required. The same rule in regard to slow
boiling also applies to sauces.


BROILING.

Be careful to always grease the bars of your gridiron before laying
on it the object to be broiled. It is better to broil on a gridiron
_before_ the fire than on one which is placed on top of the range.
Season with salt and pepper while broiling, and not after the object
is taken from the fire.


FRYING.

Be careful that your frying-pan is very clean, as anything adhering to
the bottom of the pan is apt to burn, and therefore spoil the object
to be fried. To fry well, the fat should always be very hot, as its
success depends entirely on this. To judge of the proper temperature
of the fat, when it becomes quite still, dip the prongs of a fork in
cold water, and allow a few drops to fall into the fat, which, if it
crackles, is sufficiently hot. Or, drop a small piece of bread into
the fat, and if it fries instantly a light brown, the desired result
is reached. Dripping and butter should be clarified before using, the
former in the following manner: Put the dripping in a saucepan, on
the fire, and when boiling pour it into a bowl, into which you have
previously put half a pint of cold water. When cold, with a knife cut
around the edge and remove the cake of dripping. Scrape off all the
sediment adhering to the bottom of the cake, which wipe dry with a
clean cloth.

Many persons prefer lard rather than dripping for frying.

Butter is clarified in the following manner: Put some butter in a
saucepan on the fire, and when boiling remove the scum from the top,
and pour the clear butter gently into the pan which is required for
use.

It is quite indispensable to good cooking that every dish requiring
to be served hot should never be allowed to wait in the kitchen, but
should be served with the greatest promptitude possible, as a dish
prepared with every imaginable care will be sure to fail of its effect
if served lukewarm or cold. The first quality in a cook, therefore,
should be punctuality, which should be encouraged and appreciated by
the guests.



_The receipts as here given are all for eight persons._



FRENCH DISHES FOR AMERICAN TABLES.



CHAPTER I.

_SOUPS._


1. =Consommé, or Stock.= Put in a stock-pot a roast fowl (or the
carcass and remains of a fowl), a knuckle of veal, three pounds of
beef, and three quarts of water. When the scum begins to rise, skim
carefully until it quite ceases to appear. Then add a carrot, a
turnip, an onion, a leek, two cloves, a little celery, and a little
salt. Simmer very gently four hours. Remove every particle of grease,
and strain through a flannel kept for the purpose. This soup is the
foundation of most soups and sauces. To clarify: when necessary that
the soup should be very clear, clarify it in the following manner:
Put in a saucepan a pound of chopped raw beef (off the round is
preferable), which mix with an egg and two glasses of water, and pour
into your consommé. Simmer very gently for an hour, and strain.

2. =Bouillon, or Beef Broth.= Put into a stock-pot three pounds of
a shin of beef, one pound of a knuckle of veal, and three quarts of
water, and simmer gently. As soon as the scum begins to rise, skim
carefully until it quite ceases to appear. Then add salt, two carrots,
the same of onions, leeks, turnips, and a little celery. Simmer gently
four hours, strain, and serve.

3. =Bouillon Maigre.= Take six medium-sized carrots, as many turnips, a
bunch of celery, and two leeks. Boil them in water for a few moments,
drain, put them in cold water for a moment, after which put them into
three quarts of water, adding two cloves, and boil gently three hours.
Add a little salt, put through a sieve, heat again on the fire, and
serve.

4. =Bouillon Maigre of Fish.= Put into three quarts of water two pounds
of black bass, two pounds of pike, and one pound of eels. Add to these
two onions, two carrots, one head of celery, two cloves, and a little
salt. Simmer gently for two hours, and strain. This bouillon is used as
a foundation for all soups and sauces composed of fish.

5. =Pot-au-Feu.= Put into a saucepan three quarts of water, two pounds
of beef cut in slices, a fowl partially roasted, a knuckle of veal,
and a little salt. Simmer gently, and as soon as boiling begins, skim
carefully. Add two carrots, two turnips, two leeks, a few branches of
celery, an onion stuck with two cloves, and boil four hours. Drain your
vegetables carefully, remove every particle of grease from your soup,
strain, pour it over your vegetables, and serve.

6. =Soup à la Julienne= (Vegetable Soup). Divide two medium-sized
carrots in two, then cut into very thin slices of about an inch long;
take the same quantity of turnips, leeks, onions, and a few pieces
of celery, all cut into thin slices, and put them into a saucepan,
with a piece of good butter, on a gentle fire, stir softly until the
vegetables begin to color slightly, add three pints of consommé (or
stock, Art. 1), and boil gently one hour. Ten minutes before serving
put in three or four leaves of lettuce, the same of sorrel, and a
little chervil chopped up, boil a little longer, adding a pinch of
sugar, and a tablespoonful of green peas previously boiled.

7. =Soup à la Printanière.= This soup is made exactly as the foregoing,
except with the addition of asparagus-tops to the other vegetables,
which, instead of being in slices, are cut out in fancy shapes with a
vegetable-cutter, which may be procured at any hardware-shop.

8. =Soup à la Brunoise.= Cut into square pieces, as small as possible,
a carrot, a turnip, an onion, a leek, and a few pieces of celery. Stew
gently in a saucepan with a little butter, stir softly until beginning
to color lightly, drain, and put into three pints of consommé (see Art.
1), which boil gently for an hour, skim off the grease carefully, and
serve.

9. =Soup à la Paysanne.= Take two tablespoonfuls of white beans, the
same of green peas. Cut in slices a carrot, a little celery, a turnip,
a leek, a cucumber, and a few string-beans; add a dozen little onions
and a pinch of sugar. Put these into three pints of consommé (or
stock), which boil gently an hour. Before serving you may add a few
pieces of bread cut in small squares and fried in butter.

10. =Soup with (farcied) Lettuce.= Boil ten moderate-sized lettuce,
then dip them in cold water, drain and press the water from them.
Separate them in two, season with a little pepper and salt, then lay a
tablespoonful of farce on the half of one lettuce, and cover with the
other half. Wrap up each lettuce with a piece of _very thin_ larding
pork, place them carefully in a saucepan containing half a pint of
consommé (or stock, Art. 1), and a few branches of parsley, inclosing
a clove of garlic, three pepper-corns, three cloves, and tie all
together. After boiling gently an hour, drain the lettuce, remove the
larding pork, the parsley, and its seasoning. Have boiling three pints
of consommé (Art. 1), into which place your lettuce, and serve. It
would be well to tie the larding pork around the lettuce, so that the
farce should not escape.

11. =Farce.= Place in a saucepan four ounces of very fresh bread-crumbs
and a cup of consommé (or stock, Art. 1). Simmer gently for ten
minutes, at the end of which time stir constantly with a wooden spoon,
and boil for ten minutes longer, so as to form a soft paste. This done,
put it on a plate to cool. Take four ounces of the breast of a chicken,
from which remove the skin and sinews, and pound extremely fine. Add
to this your bread-crumbs, in quantity about three quarters as much as
you have of chicken, and pound together until well mixed; season with
a little salt and white pepper, a very little nutmeg, and a piece of
butter. Then pound again, adding by degrees two eggs, until you have
obtained a fine, smooth paste. This mixture is used for all farces of
chicken. Veal, fish, and game are treated in the same manner. Quenelles
are also made of this mixture, by forming it into small balls, and
poaching them in boiling water for two minutes.

12. =Sorrel Soup= (clear). Wash a good handful of sorrel, which chop
up together with a lettuce and a teaspoonful of chopped chervil, and
put in a saucepan with half an ounce of butter. When beginning to
color lightly, add three pints of consommé (or stock, Art. 1), and
boil gently twenty minutes. Add a pinch of sugar, and skim the grease
carefully from your soup. Serve with small squares of bread fried in
butter a light brown.

13. =Cucumber Soup with Green Peas.= Cut two cucumbers in small pieces,
and, adding a pinch of sugar, cook in a little stock for about half an
hour, then add a pint of green peas, previously boiled, and serve in
three pints of consommé (or stock, Art. 1).

14. =Soup à la Pluche de Cerfeuil= (Chervil Soup). Fry in butter pieces
of bread cut in small squares, after which drain them. Pick and clean
a handful of chervil, and, taking only the ends of the leaves, serve,
together with bread, in three pints of consommé.

15. =Potage aux Pointes d'Asperges= (Asparagus Soup). Take from two
bunches of asparagus only the small green ends, wash them, and then
put them in a saucepan in boiling water with a little salt, and a very
little soda, so as to make them very green. Then, having thoroughly
boiled them, put them for a moment in cold water, drain, and serve them
in three pints of consommé (Art. 1), and add small squares of bread
fried in butter.

16. =Croûtes au Pot.= Cut a carrot, a turnip, and a few pieces of
celery in small pieces, blanch them in hot water, drain them, and boil
with three pints of consommé (or stock, Art. 1); take four French
rolls, which divide in two, taking out all the soft part, and butter
the inside. Put them in the oven, and, as soon as they become browned,
serve them in your consommé, with the addition of a tablespoonful of
green peas previously boiled.

17. =Consommé with Poached Eggs.= Put in a saucepan with some boiling
water a tablespoonful of vinegar and a pinch of salt, in which poach
eight eggs. Then take them out and put them in cold water, so as to
pare the whites perfectly round, lay them again in hot water for a
moment, and serve in three pints consommé (Art. 1).

18. =Consommé Royal.= Break into a bowl two eggs, with which mix
thoroughly half a glass of milk. Butter a little saucepan, into which
strain your eggs and milk. Then put your saucepan into a flat pan,
which you have half filled with boiling water, and place in a moderate
oven for about thirty minutes. Take it out to cool, and when cold, cut
in little squares, and serve in three pints of consommé (see Art. 1).
If desired, add a handful of green peas, a few thin slices of carrots,
a few string-beans cut in diamond-shapes, or a few green ends of
asparagus, all previously boiled.

19. =Soup à la Princesse.= Boil a fowl in a little stock for two hours.
Take it out and let it become cold. Boil two tablespoonfuls of barley,
which afterward put in cold water for a moment. Also boil about a
handful of green peas. Cut the chicken into small pieces, after having
carefully removed all skin, and put into three pints of consommé (see
Art. 1), together with the barley and peas, boil for five minutes and
serve.

20. =Beef Soup.= Boil two ounces of barley with a little salt for ten
minutes, then put in cold water for a moment, cut into small squares
four ounces of cold beef, which, with the barley, and about an eighth
of a can of tomatoes, boil for ten minutes in three pints of consommé
(or stock, Art. 1), and serve.

21. =Vermicelli Soup.= Take four ounces of vermicelli, which boil in
hot water for twenty minutes, then put in cold water for a moment and
drain. Put three pints of consommé (Art. 1) in a saucepan, and, as soon
as it begins to boil, pour in the vermicelli; boil for ten minutes, and
serve.

22. =Vermicelli Soup with Green Peas.= Prepare as the foregoing, and
just before serving add eight tablespoonfuls of green peas previously
boiled.

23. =Farina Soup.= Add to three pints of boiling consommé (or stock,
Art. 1) two ounces of farina by degrees, stirring constantly with a
wooden spoon, so as to prevent thickening into lumps, and, after
boiling gently twenty minutes, serve.

24. =Arrowroot Soup.= Put in a saucepan four teaspoonfuls of arrowroot,
which moisten with a little cold stock, so as to form a smooth paste;
then add to it three pints of hot stock, taking care to stir with a
spoon from time to time, so as not to stick to the saucepan, and, after
boiling gently twenty minutes, serve.

25. =Soup with Italian Paste.= Take four ounces of Italian paste and
blanch in boiling water with a little salt for twenty minutes. Drain,
and put in three pints of consommé (see Art. 1), boil for ten minutes,
and serve.

26. =Sago Soup.= Take two ounces of sago, which boil gently in three
pints of consommé (see Art. 1) for thirty minutes, taking care to stir
constantly with a spoon; serve.

27. =Tapioca Soup.= Put in three pints of consommé (Art. 1) four ounces
of tapioca, which stir constantly; boil for forty minutes, and serve.

28. =Potage de Nouilles= (Noodle Soup). Take four ounces of flour, very
little salt, and two yolks of eggs, with which make a tolerably firm
paste. Roll it out very thin, taking care to sprinkle some flour on the
table, so that the paste does not stick. Fold it in two; cut it in very
thin slices of about an inch long, and blanch them in boiling water ten
minutes; after which put in cold water for a moment, drain, and serve
in three pints of boiling consommé (see Art. 1).

29. =Soup with Rice.= Take four ounces of rice, which wash well, then
boil for ten minutes, and put in cold water for a moment. Boil the rice
in three pints of consommé (see Art. 1) for forty minutes; skim and
serve.

30. =Rice Soup à la Créole.= Take six ounces of rice, which prepare as
the foregoing, and ten minutes before serving add about an eighth of a
can of tomatoes, and a little cayenne pepper; boil for a moment, and
serve.

31. =Chicken Consommé.= Take a chicken, cut it in pieces and put in a
saucepan with two quarts of water, and let it simmer gently until the
scum begins to rise, skim until every particle is removed; then add
salt, a carrot, an onion, a turnip, and a little celery. Boil gently
for two hours, strain, and serve.

32. =Chicken Giblet.= Cut a chicken, an onion, and a little ham, each
in small pieces. Put all together, in a saucepan, on the fire, and
add half an ounce of butter. When beginning to color slightly, add
three points of consommé (see Art. 1), and a pinch of rice; and, after
boiling three quarters of an hour, add two tablespoonfuls of tomatoes,
boil five minutes longer, and serve.

33. =Chicken Gumbo.= Cut in very small squares one ounce of raw ham
and an onion, which put in a saucepan, with a piece of butter, and
the wings of a chicken cut in small pieces. When beginning to color
slightly, add three pints of consommé (or stock, Art. 1) and a pinch
of barley. Boil an hour. Half an hour before serving, put in ten
okra-pods cut in slices, five tablespoonfuls of tomatoes, and a little
red pepper.

34. =Chicken Okra, with Oysters.= Prepare as the foregoing, without the
barley. Blanch two dozen oysters, which drain, and add to your soup
just before serving.

35. =English Mutton Broth.= Take half a pound of cold mutton and an
onion, cut each in very small pieces, and put in a saucepan with half
an ounce of butter. When beginning to color slightly, add three pints
of consommé (or stock, Art. 1), a carrot, and a turnip, cut in small
even pieces. Boil an hour, skim off the grease, and just before serving
add two ounces of barley previously boiled.

36. =Mullagatawny Soup.= Cut into small pieces an onion, a carrot, a
few pieces of celery, and a slice of ham, which put in a saucepan on a
moderate fire, with half an ounce of butter, until they begin to color
slightly. Add one quart of consommé (or stock, Art. 1) and boil for an
hour; add a pinch of curry, a little mullagatawny paste, which moisten
with a little cold stock, and, after adding a pint of stock, boil for
five minutes, and serve. Cold mutton, veal, or chicken, cut in small
pieces, may be added to this if desired.

37. =French Ox-tail Soup.= Cut an ox-tail in small pieces, also an
onion, and put in a saucepan with a little butter. When they begin to
color slightly, add three pints of consommé (or stock) and boil gently
for two hours. Skim off the grease, add one ounce of barley which you
have previously boiled, and about an eighth of a can of tomatoes; boil
ten minutes, and serve.

38. =English Ox-tail Soup.= Proceed as for the foregoing, except
instead of consommé add three pints of Spanish sauce (see Art. 80),
with very little thickening. Boil for two hours, and add a little
barley, a little salt, a carrot, previously boiled and cut in slices,
and four tablespoonfuls of tomatoes. Twenty minutes before serving add
a good glass of sherry, boil for a moment, and serve.

39. =Mock-Turtle Soup.= Take a scalded calf's head, boil it in hot
water for twenty minutes, drain, and put it in cold water. Then place
it in a saucepan with three quarts of water, a carrot, an onion,
four cloves, three cloves of garlic, a few branches of parsley,
a tablespoonful of vinegar, and a little salt. Mix well three
tablespoonfuls of flour in a little water, which add to the other
ingredients and boil gently for an hour and a half. Drain, and when
cold cut the calf's head into small pieces. Then add three pints
Spanish sauce (see Art. 80), boil gently twenty minutes, and, just
before serving, also add one good glass of sherry, a little red pepper,
and two hard-boiled eggs chopped up, the yolks and whites separately,
and the peel of a lemon cut in small pieces.

40. =Calf's-feet Soup.= Blanch two calf's feet for ten minutes,
then put them in cold water for a moment. Afterward place them in a
saucepan, with an onion, a carrot, a pinch of thyme, a bay-leaf, a
clove of garlic, a little parsley, the juice of a lemon, and a little
salt. Boil about an hour, or until very tender, and let them cool.
Then cut the calf's feet in small pieces, which put in three pints of
boiling consommé (or stock), with the addition of two wineglasses of
sherry, and serve.

41. =American Green-Turtle Soup.= Take a turtle, and let it bleed for
six hours, taking care that the head hangs downward. Then divide the
two shells, pressing your knife on the lower one so as not to disturb
the intestines, which take entire and throw immediately away. Detach
the fins and fleshy parts, putting aside any not needed for the soup,
and which may be put to use afterward in an entrée, or broiled. After
having cleaned them put them in a saucepan, with a sufficient quantity
of water to cover them. Boil them, taking care to see from time to time
that the shells of the fins detach themselves. Put them in cold water
for a moment, drain, and cut them in small pieces, which place in a
saucepan, with three pints of consommé (or stock, Art. 1). Boil gently
for three hours, add four glasses of sherry and some Spanish sauce (see
Art. 80). Boil hard four eggs, pound the yolks, adding a little salt
and pepper, and the yolk of a raw egg. Form this mixture into little
balls, putting a little flour on your hands to roll them. Poach them
in boiling water, throw them into your soup, and, after boiling an
instant, serve.

42. =Green-Turtle Soup à la Londonderry.= Proceed as for the foregoing,
but instead of Spanish sauce add three pints of consommé (or stock,
Art. 1) and a glass of sherry. Boil gently half an hour, and serve.

43. =Terrapin Soup.= Take a live terrapin, and, removing the claws,
soak in boiling water for about three minutes. With a cloth remove
the shells, and, proceeding as for the green turtle, cut it in small
pieces and boil it in consommé (stock, Art. 1). When the terrapin is
cooked, add some Spanish sauce (Art. 80), with two glasses of sherry,
boil gently for twenty minutes, make some little balls prepared in the
manner described in green-turtle soup (Art. 41), and serve in your soup.

44. =Soup à la d'Orsay.= Wash the ends of a bunch of asparagus, which
boil with a little salt and a very little soda, drain them and put them
into cold water. Press them through a sieve, add two yolks of raw eggs
and three pints of consommé (stock), and, when boiling, a pinch of
sugar and an ounce of butter. Take the breasts of two roast pigeons,
then add to your soup when serving, and eight small eggs, which boil
soft (but sufficiently hard to remove the shells), and serve in your
soup.

45. =Soup aux Quenelles de Volaille.= Prepare some quenelles (see Art.
11) and serve them in three pints of consommé (Art. 1).

46. =Consommé Rachel.= Spread on a sheet of tin half a pound of farce
(Art. 11) of chicken (Art. 11) and put in the oven for three or four
minutes. Put it aside to cool, and then with a cutter for the purpose
form into round flat shapes. Place in a saucepan four ounces of flour,
which mix in three pints of cold consommé (Art. 1), boil gently for
half an hour, stirring with a spoon from time to time, so that it does
not stick to the saucepan. Strain, remove from the fire, and add three
yolks of eggs which you have mixed in a little water, a tablespoonful
of green peas previously boiled, the small rounds of chicken farce, and
serve.

47. =Rye Soup à l'Allemande.= Wash well half a pound of rye, and add
three pints of consommé (stock, Art. 1), a few pieces of celery, three
leeks, a little salt and pepper, and boil gently three hours. Remove
the leeks and celery, and cut in very thin slices as for Julienne soup.
Mix two ounces of flour in a little cold consommé, which pour into your
soup with your vegetables, taking care to stir well with a spoon. Add a
pinch of sugar, boil an hour, skim, and serve.

48. =Giblet Soup of Goose.= Take the giblets of a goose, which cut in
small pieces. Singe and remove the skin from the feet, and cut them in
small pieces, as also four ounces of larding pork. Put all together
in a saucepan, with one ounce of butter, and, when beginning to color
brown, add two ounces of flour, and boil for five minutes. Then add
three pints of consommé (stock), two green onions, a very little thyme,
a clove of garlic, two cloves, a bay-leaf, and a little mace, around
which put a few branches of parsley, and tie all together. Carefully
remove all grease from your soup, add a wineglass of sherry, and serve.

49. =Soup à la Bohemienne.= Cut a carrot in very small pieces, which
put in a saucepan with an ounce of butter. When beginning to color
lightly, add three pints of consommé (stock, Art. 1), boil for half an
hour, skim, add a pint of peas, a pinch of sugar, pepper, and nutmeg.
When your peas are cooked, make a paste with three ounces of flour, two
yolks of eggs, one whole egg, a glass of cream, and a little salt and
nutmeg. Put through a sieve into your soup, which must be boiling on
the fire, stir with a spoon, boil for ten minutes, add a tablespoonful
of chopped parsley, and serve.

50. =Soup with Poached Eggs à la Styrie.= Take three pints of consommé
(stock, Art. 1), which boil, and add thereto, by degrees, two ounces
of semolina, stirring constantly with a spoon. Poach in boiling water
with a little salt, and a tablespoonful of vinegar, six eggs, which put
into cold water. Blanch a tablespoonful of chopped parsley, which add
to your soup, with three quarters of a pint of green peas, and, lastly,
your poached eggs, which, just before serving in your soup, place in
hot water for an instant.

51. =English Hare Soup.= Cut a young hare in small pieces, which put in
a saucepan with four ounces of lard, cut in small squares, two ounces
of butter, and, when beginning to color brown, add one ounce of flour,
half a bottle of claret, and a quart of consommé (stock, Art. 1).
Season with a little thyme, a bay-leaf, two onions, a dozen mushrooms,
two cloves, a little salt, pepper, mace, and a very little cayenne.
Boil, and then remove your saucepan to the back of the range to simmer
gently. Take off all grease most carefully, and, when your hare is
thoroughly done, strain your consommé and serve with the hare.

52. =Soup of Sturgeon à la Pierre Legrand.= Take one pound of pike,
one of perch, and the same of eels, which put into a saucepan, with an
onion cut in slices, a carrot, a clove of garlic, a very little thyme,
and a bay-leaf. Cut up your fish, add four wineglasses of sherry, boil
until all moisture is absorbed, add three pints of consommé (stock,
Art. 1), boil for one hour, and press through a sieve. Take two pounds
of sturgeon, and boil gently with a carrot, an onion, a slice of ham,
salt, pepper, a small garlic, a pint of consommé, and a glass of
sherry. Make a farce of quenelles (see Art. 11), form in small balls,
which poach in hot water. Add them to the slices of sturgeon, also the
ends of a bunch of asparagus, previously boiled, and two tablespoonfuls
of chervil, chopped very fine. Strain the liquid in which your sturgeon
was boiled, add to the essence of fish prepared above, boil for a few
moments, and serve.

53. =Clam Chowder à la Thayer.= Put half a pound of fat salt pork in
a saucepan, let it fry slowly, and then remove it from the fire and
put it aside to cool. Chop up fine fifty large hard-clams, also half a
can of tomatoes, a handful of celery, the same of parsley, a quart of
onions, half a dozen pilot-biscuit, a little thyme, and two quarts of
potatoes cut up in pieces about as large as a five-cent piece. Put the
saucepan in which you have your pork again on the fire, add first the
onions, and then the other ingredients, with the juice of the clams,
and enough water to cover. Add black pepper, a little salt, and an
eighth of a pint of Worcestershire sauce. Stir from the bottom so as
to avoid burning, and simmer gently until the potatoes are thoroughly
done. When the chowder begins to boil, you may add boiling water if you
find it too thick. Five minutes before serving, add half a lemon sliced
thin.

54. =Olla Podrida= (Spanish Soup). Put in a saucepan two pounds of
beef, a pint of dwarf or chick peas, which you have previously soaked
in water for six hours. Then blanch in boiling water for twenty minutes
half a pound of bacon and half a pound of raw ham, which add to the
other ingredients, with enough water to cover them. Skim carefully,
and, after boiling gently two hours, add a fowl, a carrot, an onion, a
clove of garlic, two cloves, and two bay-leaves, which inclose in some
branches of parsley, tying all together. Boil again for an hour, adding
two smoked sausages (choricos), which may be found at any Italian
grocery, and a cabbage previously blanched. Continue boiling gently
for two hours; soak a pinch of saffron in water, strain it into your
soup on the fire, and boil thirty minutes longer, until the ingredients
become yellow. Strain your soup, remove the meats, drain, arrange as
neatly as possible on a dish, and serve with the soup.

55. =Bouillabaisse à la Marseillaise.= Put into a saucepan an onion
chopped very fine, with a tablespoonful of oil. When beginning to
color slightly, cut in slices half a pound of pike, the same of perch,
flounder, eel, and lobster, which wash and clean well. Place them in
a saucepan with parsley, two chopped cloves of garlic, some pepper
and salt, a little nutmeg, and a pinch of saffron, which mix in two
tablespoonfuls of water, and strain into your saucepan. Moisten with
three pints of fish-broth (see Art. 4), two tablespoonfuls of oil, and
a wineglass of sherry. Boil on a quick fire for twenty minutes. Take
some rather thick pieces of bread, over which pour the liquid in which
your fish was boiled, and serve the fish on a separate dish.


PURÉES.

56. =Purée of Sorrel.= Proceed as for clear sorrel soup (Art. 12),
except with the addition of four yolks of eggs, mixed in a little
water, just before serving the soup and when it has entirely ceased
boiling. Serve with it some square pieces of bread fried in butter.

57. =Cream of Sorrel.= Boil one quart of sorrel, drain it, put it in
cold water, and press it through a sieve. Put it in a saucepan with not
quite a quart of consommé (stock), and the same of cream; salt, pepper,
and an ounce of butter. Boil for a few moments, and then remove the
saucepan to the back of the range. When it has ceased boiling, take the
yolks of four eggs, which mix in a little water; add to your soup, and
serve.

58. =Purée of Green Peas.= Take a quart of green peas and put them in
a saucepan with boiling water, adding some parsley and a little salt.
Boil rapidly, until the peas are thoroughly done, then drain them and
remove the parsley. Pound them, and press them through a sieve, and
return them to the fire, in a saucepan, with a pint and a half of
consommé and the same of cream. When boiling, add an ounce of butter,
a little salt, a pinch of sugar, and serve with small squares of bread
fried in butter.

59. =Purée of Peas à la Princesse.= Boil a chicken in a little more
than three pints of consommé (stock, Art. 1). If an ordinary chicken,
it will take forty minutes; if an old one, two hours. After it is done,
let it become cold, and cut it in pieces to serve in your soup. Make
the purée of peas like the preceding; add to it the consommé in which
the chicken was cooked, and serve with small squares of bread fried in
butter.

60. =Split-Pea Soup.= Take a pint of split peas, which, having washed
well, place in a saucepan with an onion, a clove, half an ounce of ham,
and two quarts of cold water. Boil until the peas are very soft, press
them through a sieve, put them again on the fire, with the addition of
an ounce of butter, three pints of consommé (stock, Art. 1), and serve
with some small pieces of bread fried in butter.

61. =Purée of Lentils.= Take a quart of lentils, wash them well, and
put them in a saucepan with a slice of lean ham, the carcass of a
partridge, a carrot, an onion, a few branches of parsley, a few pieces
of celery, and add three pints of consommé (stock). Boil until the
lentils are thoroughly cooked, drain, remove the ham, partridge, and
parsley, press through a sieve, place on the fire again, adding one
ounce of butter, boil for a moment, and serve with small squares of
bread fried in butter.

62. =Purée of White Beans.= Take one pint of white beans, which wash
well, and boil thoroughly in three pints of consommé (stock, Art. 1).
When the beans are done, press them through a sieve, put them again
on the fire, adding one ounce of butter, a pinch of sugar, boil for
a moment, and serve with small squares of bread fried in butter.
This soup can be varied by adding a plateful of string-beans boiled
separately with a little salt and a very little soda, after which
put in cold water for a moment, and then cut in diamonds. Chop a
teaspoonful of parsley, and serve with the string-beans in your soup.

63. =Purée of Asparagus.= Take a bunch of asparagus, separate the heads
from the stalks, wash them, and then boil them with a little salt and
a very little soda, after which put them in cold water for a moment.
Put into a saucepan one ounce of butter, two ounces of flour, a little
salt, a pinch of sugar, and add the heads of asparagus, a pint and a
half of cream, the same of consommé (stock, Art. 1). Stir all together
until boiling, strain, put back on the fire for a few moments, and,
adding an ounce of butter, serve.

64. =Purée of Rice.= Take half a pound of rice, which wash well in
several waters, boil for a few moments, then put in cold water, drain,
and place in a saucepan with one quart of consommé (stock), and boil
for about an hour. Press through a sieve, and put back on the fire
until it begins to boil, then add one pint of cream and an ounce of
butter; serve.

65. =Rice Soup à la Crécy.= Take two very red carrots, a turnip, and
an onion, which cut in slices, and a clove. Boil these in not quite a
quart of consommé (stock, Art. 1) for about an hour. Press through a
sieve. Then boil four ounces of rice, after which drain and put it in
cold water for a moment; drain again, and boil for three quarters of an
hour in nearly a quart of consommé. Add the purée of vegetables, and,
when beginning to boil up again, add one ounce of butter, and serve.

66. =Purée of Barley.= Take half a pound of barley, which boil for
about five minutes, then put in cold water. Drain, and add it to three
pints of consommé (stock, Art. 1), boil about two hours, press through
a sieve and put back on the fire until it begins to boil, adding one
ounce of butter and two tablespoonfuls of green peas, previously
boiled; serve.

67. =Purée of Celery.= Take a bunch of celery, and wash it well; cut
it in pieces and place it in a saucepan with water, a little salt, and
boil thoroughly, drain, and put it in cold water. In another saucepan
put an ounce of butter (which melt), one ounce of flour, salt, pepper,
and a very little nutmeg; mix all together, adding the celery, not
quite a quart of consommé (stock), and the same of cream. Put it on
the fire, taking care to stir until it boils, press through a sieve and
again put it on the fire for a moment; serve.

68. =Purée Soubise à la Princesse.= Blanch six onions in boiling water,
with a little salt, until they become soft. Drain and dry them in a
napkin. Then put them in a saucepan with an ounce of butter, on a very
gentle fire, so that they may only color slightly; add two ounces of
flour, a little salt, pepper, and a very little nutmeg; moisten with
a pint and a half of consommé (stock, Art. 1), and the same of cream.
When beginning to boil, press through a sieve, heat again on the fire,
adding half an ounce of butter, and serve.

69. =Purée of Potatoes à la Jackson.= Bake in the oven half a dozen
potatoes. Take out the inside, which put in a saucepan with an ounce of
butter. Mix thoroughly together with a spoon, and season with a little
salt, pepper, a pinch of sugar, and a very little nutmeg. Moisten with
a pint and a half of consommé (stock), press through a sieve, put back
on the fire, and as soon as beginning to boil add a pint and a half of
cream; heat without boiling, then add four yolks of eggs well mixed in
a little water, and serve.

70. =Purée of Jerusalem Artichokes.= Clean a dozen Jerusalem
artichokes, cut them in pieces, and put them in a saucepan with a
little butter, salt, and a pinch of sugar. As soon as they begin to
color slightly, add a pint and a half of consommé (stock, Art. 1), boil
a little longer, and press through a sieve. Put back on the fire until
beginning to boil, add an ounce of butter, a pint and a half of cream,
and when very hot, without boiling, add the yolks of four eggs, which
you have previously mixed well in a little water. You may serve with
small squares of bread fried in butter if desired.

71. =Purée of Fowl à la Reine.= Clean a chicken, and put it in a
saucepan with a quart of consommé (stock, Art. 1), a carrot, an onion,
and a clove. Simmer very gently for three hours; take out the fowl, cut
off the white meat, and pound very fine. Remove the grease carefully
from your soup in which the fowl has been cooked, then add the pounded
chicken, and put through a sieve. Heat it up again on the fire, add a
pint and a half of cream, taking care that it does not boil, add very
little nutmeg, pepper, salt, a very little sugar, an ounce of butter,
and the yolks of four eggs, well mixed in a little water. Serve.

72. =Purée of Partridge.= Remove the shells of two dozen French
chestnuts, which boil five minutes, remove the skins, and put the
chestnuts in a saucepan with a little salt and water, and boil for
about five minutes. Cut off all the meat from a cold partridge,
which pound in a mortar, together with the chestnuts, and then press
through a sieve. Boil the bones of your partridge for about half an
hour in three pints of consommé (stock, Art. 1), adding a wineglass
of sherry, strain, and add it to your chestnuts and partridge. Put in
a saucepan two tablespoonfuls of flour, with an ounce of butter, a
little pepper, and salt. Mix all well together, and add them to your
purée, which should be very hot. When economy is no object, you may
add two partridges instead of one, which will give a better flavor to
your purée, to which, if you find too thick, you may add a little more
consommé.

73. =Purée of Rabbit.= Remove the fillets from an uncooked rabbit, and
place them in a saucepan on a moderate fire, with half an ounce of
butter, and simmer very gently. In another saucepan put the remainder
of the rabbit with an onion, a clove, and a little nutmeg, and three
pints of consommé (stock, Art. 1). Simmer gently three quarters of an
hour, remove the meat from the thighs and shoulders, pound it together
with two ounces of rice well boiled, moisten with the consommé in which
your rabbit was cooked, and put through a sieve. Cut your fillets of
rabbit, which you cooked in butter, into small pieces, and serve in
your soup.

74. =Tomato Soup.= Cut a carrot and an onion in slices, add a slice
of raw ham and a clove, and put into a saucepan with half an ounce of
butter. As soon as your vegetables begin to color slightly, mix well
with them an ounce of flour, add a quart of tomatoes, and boil for
thirty minutes. Strain, then season with salt and pepper, put again on
the fire, add a pint of consommé (stock), and boil for five minutes,
and add an ounce of butter. Remove the grease from your soup, and serve
with small squares of bread fried in butter.

75. =Purée of Vegetables aux Croûtons.= Clean and cut in slices a
medium-sized carrot, a turnip, an onion, a leek, some pieces of celery,
and add two cloves. Boil them for a few moments, and afterward put them
into cold water for a moment. Then place your vegetables in a saucepan,
with four ounces of dried peas, moisten with three pints consommé (or
stock, Art. 1), boil for two hours, season with a little pepper, salt,
and a pinch of sugar. Press through a sieve, put again on the fire with
an ounce of butter, and serve in your soup, with small squares of bread
fried in butter.

76. =Rice Soup au Lait d'Amandes.= Wash in cold water four ounces of
rice, which boil for ten minutes, afterward put it in cold water,
drain, then place it in a saucepan with three pints of milk, and boil
very gently for forty-five minutes. Take four ounces of bitter-almonds
with one of sweet, blanch them and pound them well, adding by degrees,
as you pound, a glass of cold milk. Put through a sieve, add a pinch of
salt and about a coffee-spoonful of sugar, and then with the rice and
milk boil for a moment, and serve.

77. =Bisque of Crawfish.= Wash four dozen crawfish and put them in
sufficient water to cover them, cut a carrot, an onion, and three
cloves of garlic in slices, add two cloves, a few branches of parsley,
a little salt, and a tablespoonful of vinegar, and boil for fifteen
minutes. Drain them, and then pound them to a paste. Melt one ounce of
butter in a saucepan, add two ounces of flour, which mix well with the
butter. Then add the paste of crawfish, not quite a quart of cream,
the same of consommé (stock), three quarters of a cupful of tomatoes,
salt and pepper, and a little cayenne. Boil, and stir with a spoon,
press through a sieve, and put back on the fire, with one ounce of
butter; as soon as it boils up again, serve.

78. =Bisque of Lobster.= Take half a pound of boiled lobster from which
you have removed the shell, and proceed as for the foregoing, adding
half instead of three quarters of a cupful of tomatoes.

79. =Bisque of Clams.= Boil fifty clams in their juice for about five
minutes, drain them, chop them fine, then pound them. Put in a saucepan
on the fire four ounces of butter, with two ounces of flour, add your
clams with their juice, two pinches of salt, one of pepper, one of
cayenne, and two and a half pints of milk, stir constantly, and, just
before beginning to boil, remove from the fire, strain, heat again over
the fire, and serve.

Bisque of oysters is prepared in the same manner.



CHAPTER II.

_SAUCES._


80. =Spanish Sauce.= Melt two ounces of butter in a saucepan, to
which add two ounces of flour, and put on a gentle fire, stirring
until colored a nice brown; then mix with the flour and butter a pint
of consommé (stock, Art. 1), an ounce and a half of lean raw ham, a
carrot, an onion, a piece of celery, two cloves, a pinch of salt and
pepper, and stir until beginning to boil. Remove the saucepan to the
back of the range, so as to simmer gently for an hour; skim off the
grease carefully and strain.

81. =Sauce Allemande.= Melt two ounces of butter and mix thoroughly
with it two ounces of flour on a gentle fire. Add immediately a pint
of consommé (stock, Art. 1), a little salt and pepper, and stir until
boiling. After boiling fifteen minutes, remove from the fire and skim
the grease off carefully. When your sauce has ceased boiling, add the
yolks of three eggs, well mixed in a little water, and stirred in
quickly with an egg-beater, so as to make your sauce light.

82. =Sauce Veloutée.= Put in a saucepan two pounds of veal, the thighs
of a chicken, two carrots, two onions, a few branches of parsley,
inclosing two cloves, two bay-leaves, a clove of garlic; tie all
together, adding a little salt and pepper, and one quart of consommé
(stock, Art. 1). When beginning to boil, skim constantly, so as to
clear the sauce well. Remove the saucepan to the back of the range and
simmer gently two hours. Melt two ounces of butter in a saucepan on
the fire, with which mix thoroughly an ounce of flour. When beginning
to color slightly, add a pint of the liquid in which your meats were
boiled, strain half a wineglass of the juice of canned mushrooms, add
it to your sauce, which boil forty-five minutes; strain, and serve.

83. =Béchamel Sauce.= Melt an ounce of butter in a saucepan, add an
ounce of flour, and mix well together. Then add an onion cut in slices,
half an ounce of lean raw ham, and a little salt and pepper. When
beginning to color slightly, moisten with a pint of milk, stir well
until boiling, after which boil ten minutes longer; strain, and serve.

84. =White Sauce, or Butter-Sauce.= Put in a saucepan on the fire
an ounce of butter, which melt, and add to it one tablespoonful of
flour, a little salt, white pepper, a little nutmeg, and mix all well
together, adding a glass of water; stir until boiling, add an ounce of
butter and the juice of a lemon; strain, and serve.

85. =Sauce Hollandaise.= Put two ounces of butter in a saucepan, with
a little salt, nutmeg, a glass and a quarter of water, and mix all
together on the fire. Put into another saucepan two tablespoonfuls of
vinegar, which reduce one half; add it to your other ingredients, with
a tablespoonful of Béchamel sauce (Art. 83), and an ounce of butter,
mixing all well together. Take the yolks of four eggs, which mix in
a little water, and, removing your sauce from the fire, when it has
ceased boiling, add the eggs, the juice of a lemon, strain, and serve.

86. =Sauce Piquante.= Chop four shallots very fine, put them in a
saucepan with four tablespoonfuls of sweet-oil. When beginning to color
slightly, add half a pint of Spanish sauce (Art. 80), boil slowly for a
few minutes, then add two ounces of pickles, and serve.

87. =Bread-Sauce.= Chop an onion very fine, put it in a saucepan, with
four ounces of bread-crumbs, which you have put through a sieve, add a
little salt, pepper, and a glass of milk. Boil ten minutes, add a glass
of cream, and serve.

88. =Sauce Béarnaise.= Chop up three shallots and put them in a
saucepan with a pinch of chervil, a branch of tarragon, a green onion,
and two tablespoonfuls of vinegar. Reduce one half, and let cool; then
add four ounces of butter, eight yolks of eggs, a sherry-glass of
water, salt, pepper, and a very little nutmeg. Put your saucepan again
on a gentle fire, stir well until the sauce thickens; strain, and serve.

89. =Parisian Sauce.= Put into a saucepan half an ounce of chopped
truffles, a wineglass of sherry, some branches of parsley, inclosing a
clove, a little thyme, a bay-leaf, and tie all together. Reduce one
half on the fire, put through a sieve, add half a pint of Allemande
sauce (Art. 81); heat again on the fire, and serve.

90. =Tomato Sauce.= Put in a saucepan an ounce of raw ham, a carrot, an
onion, very little thyme, a bay-leaf, two cloves, a clove of garlic,
and half an ounce of butter. Simmer for ten minutes, add an ounce of
flour well mixed in half a pint of tomatoes and a glass of consommé
(stock, Art. 1). Boil for half an hour, season with a little salt,
pepper, a very little nutmeg, strain, and serve.

91. =Sauce Périgueux.= Chop an ounce of truffles, put them in a
saucepan on the fire, with a glass of sherry and a glass of white wine.
Reduce one half, then add half a pint of Spanish sauce (Art. 80), boil
five minutes, and serve.

92. =Sauce Robert.= Cut an onion in small pieces, and put it in a
saucepan with half an ounce of butter. When it begins to color, drain
off the butter, and moisten with half a glass of consommé (stock,
Art. 1). Boil gently for thirty minutes, add half a pint of Spanish
sauce (Art. 80), a wineglass of sherry, and a tablespoonful of English
mustard mixed in a little water.

93. =Italian Sauce.= Peel and chop two shallots, which, with a little
butter, put in a saucepan on the fire. When beginning to color
slightly, moisten with half a pint of Spanish sauce (Art. 80) and a
wineglass of sherry. Boil for twenty minutes. Chop half an ounce of
lean, cooked ham, half a dozen mushrooms chopped fine, and a little
chopped parsley. After skimming the grease from your sauce, add these
ingredients, boil five minutes, and serve.

94. =Sauce Soubise.= Peel and chop three onions, which put in a
saucepan on the fire with an ounce of butter. Simmer very gently, so
as not to color too much, and, after three quarters of an hour, add
a tablespoonful of flour, salt, pepper, a little nutmeg, and mix all
together. Moisten with a gill of consommé (stock, Art. 1), the same of
cream, boil for five minutes, strain, heat again on the fire, and serve.

95. =Sauce Poivrade.= Put into a saucepan a chopped onion, three
branches of thyme, three bay-leaves, a clove of garlic, three cloves,
six pepper-corns, half an ounce of raw ham cut in small pieces, four
tablespoonfuls of vinegar, a little pepper, a very little cayenne;
reduce until almost dry, moisten with a claret-glass of red wine and
half a pint of Spanish sauce (Art. 80), boil fifteen minutes, strain,
and serve.

96. =Sauce Hachée.= Peel and chop an onion, a pickle, a shallot,
a tablespoonful of capers, and moisten with two tablespoonfuls of
vinegar. Put them in a saucepan on the fire, reduce one half, add half
a pint of Spanish sauce (Art. 80), a little cayenne pepper, a pinch of
parsley chopped fine, half an ounce of capers, and two tablespoonfuls
of wine-vinegar, boil five minutes, and serve.

97. =Hunter Sauce.= Put the remains of a roast partridge in a saucepan
with half an ounce of raw ham, a carrot, an onion, a clove of garlic,
a little thyme, three bay-leaves, and three cloves. Moisten with a
glass of white wine, reduce one half, add half a pint of Spanish sauce
(Art. 80), boil half an hour, strain, and serve.

98. =Sauce Colbert.= Put an ounce of glaze (Art. 179) in a saucepan
on the fire with a tablespoonful of consommé (stock, Art. 1). Mix
well together, and add half a pint of consommé (stock, Art. 1), half
an ounce of butter in small pieces, and by degrees, stirring all the
time. When all well mixed together, strain, add the juice of a lemon, a
tablespoonful of chopped parsley, and serve.

99. =Sauce Suprême.= Cut up the remains of two roast chickens,
which put into a saucepan with a pint of consommé (stock, Art. 1),
some branches of parsley, inclosing a clove, a clove of garlic, two
bay-leaves, salt, and white pepper, a very little thyme, and tie
all together. Boil one hour, and strain. Put two ounces of butter
in another saucepan, a tablespoonful of flour, a teaspoonful of
corn-starch, mix thoroughly together, and add the liquid in which the
remains of the chicken were broiled. Stir with a spoon until boiling,
reduce one quarter, pour in two wineglasses of cream and one wineglass
of sherry. Boil fifteen minutes longer, add the juice of a lemon,
strain, and serve.

100. =Sauce Venétienne.= Put two tablespoonfuls of vinegar in a
saucepan on the fire, with some parsley, a little tarragon, two cloves,
a very little thyme, half an ounce of raw ham chopped up. Reduce one
half, and add half a pint sauce veloutée (Art. 82). Boil five minutes
and strain. Chop fine a tablespoonful of chervil, the same of tarragon,
boil them in hot water five minutes, dry with a napkin, and add to your
sauce just before serving.

101. =Sauce Bordelaise.= Peel two cloves of garlic, and put them
in a saucepan, with a pinch of chervil, a few tarragon-leaves, two
bay-leaves, a lemon, from which you have removed the peel and the
seeds, two cloves, two tablespoonfuls of oil, and two claret-glasses
of white wine. Reduce one half on a very gentle fire, add half a pint
of Spanish sauce (Art. 80), boil half an hour, carefully remove all
grease, and pour in another glass of white wine. Boil ten minutes, add
the juice of a lemon, strain, put back your sauce on the fire, cut a
dozen mushrooms in very small pieces, add them to your sauce, and serve.

102. =Another way of making Sauce Bordelaise.= Peel and chop very
fine four cloves of garlic, which put into a saucepan with three
tablespoonfuls of oil. When beginning to color lightly, add a
tablespoonful of chopped parsley. This sauce should never be made until
ready to serve on the instant.

103. =Sauce à la Poulette.= Put in a saucepan three sherry-glasses of
water, three ounces of butter, the juice of half a lemon, and a pinch
of salt and white pepper. As soon as beginning to boil, take off the
fire, and, when boiling ceases, add the yolks of four eggs which you
have previously mixed well, in about a sherry-glass of water. Stir
constantly so that the sauce does not break, strain it, and add to it
a little parsley chopped fine.

104. =Sauce Fleurette.= Proceed as for the foregoing, except, instead
of the parsley, add only the ends of some chervil-leaves, not chopped.

105. =Sauce à la Marinière.= Cut a small eel and a pike in small
pieces, put them in a saucepan, with an onion, a carrot, three branches
of parsley, half a dozen mushrooms, a little thyme, two bay-leaves, and
a pinch of allspice; moisten with half a bottle of red wine, and boil
forty minutes. Add half a pint of Spanish sauce (Art. 80), and simmer
at the back of the range for half an hour. Take out your pieces of fish
and strain the liquid in which they were boiled. Peel twenty small
white onions, which put in a saucepan with half an ounce of butter.
When they begin to color slightly, add to them a very little of the
sauce until they are cooked, then add to them the whole of the sauce,
and serve.

106. =Lobster Sauce.= Take a boiled lobster, separate it in two, remove
the coral, which wash well in cold water; lay it on a table, with half
an ounce of butter, mix well together with the blade of a knife, and
press through a sieve. Pound to a paste quarter of a pound of the meat
of the lobster. Put half a pint of white sauce (Art. 84) in a saucepan,
and, when boiling, add the above ingredients, which stir well, so as
to mix thoroughly; strain, and serve. As there is not always coral in
every lobster, it is well to preserve it in a little vinegar, and put
it by until needed.

107. =Shrimp Sauce.= Take half a pint of white sauce (Art. 84), which
should be boiling; add a little lobster-coral and butter, as described
in lobster sauce (Art. 106), or half a tablespoonful of anchovy sauce.
Remove the shells from four dozen shrimps, and serve in your sauce.

108. =Sauce Génevoise.= Cut a medium-sized pike in pieces, which put
in a saucepan with half an ounce of raw ham cut in small pieces, two
cloves, two bay-leaves, a clove of garlic, a little thyme, a pinch of
salt and pepper, a few mushrooms chopped up, and two claret-glasses
of red wine. Reduce one half, add half a pint of Spanish sauce (Art.
80), boil thirty minutes; then add a wineglass of madeira (or sherry);
strain, and stir thoroughly into your sauce a teaspoonful of anchovy
sauce.

109. =Sauce Remoulade (cold).= Put in a bowl two yolks of eggs, a
tablespoonful of mustard, salt, and pepper. Mix well with the foregoing
two tablespoonfuls of vinegar, and then, stirring constantly, eight
tablespoonfuls of oil; and, lastly, another tablespoonful of vinegar;
then chop a shallot, some chervil, some tarragon-leaves, and mix them
with your sauce.

110. =Sauce Remoulade (hot).= Peel and chop very fine six shallots and
a clove of garlic; put them into a saucepan with five tablespoonfuls
of vinegar, and reduce on the fire one half. Pound the yolks of four
hard-boiled eggs, which mix well with a teaspoonful of anchovy sauce;
add to them half a pint of sauce Allemande (Art. 81) and a quarter
of a tablespoonful of sweet-oil, and then the shallots, garlic, and
vinegar; heat without boiling, and add a pinch of tarragon, the same of
chervil and of parsley all chopped fine, a little salt and pepper, and,
just before serving, two tablespoonfuls of vinegar.

111. =Sauce Ravigote (hot).= Put into a saucepan half a pint of
consommé (stock, Art. 1), half a teaspoonful of vinegar, a _very
little_ green garlic, and the same of tarragon-leaves and chervil.
Boil ten minutes, drain your herbs, press all moisture from them with
a cloth, and then chop them very fine. Put on a table half an ounce of
flour, and the same of butter, which mix well together and add them to
your consommé and vinegar, which you have put back on the fire; stir
well with a spoon until boiling, then skim the sauce, add your chopped
herbs, and serve.

112. =Sauce Ravigote (cold).= Take half a pint of sauce Mayonnaise
(Art. 113), to which add a little chervil, parsley, tarragon, all
mashed and chopped fine, and mix well with your Mayonnaise; also a
tablespoonful of mustard, and a tablespoonful of capers.

113. =Sauce Mayonnaise.= Put the yolks of two eggs in a bowl with
salt, pepper, the juice of a lemon, and half a teaspoonful of dry
mustard. Stir with a wooden spoon, and add by degrees, in _very_ small
quantities, and stirring continuously, a tablespoonful of vinegar;
then, a few drops at a time, some good oil, stirring rapidly all the
time, until your sauce thickens, and half a pint of oil has been
absorbed.

114. =Sauce Tartare.= Proceed as for the foregoing, except that,
instead of half a teaspoonful of mustard, add three. Chop a pickle and
a tablespoonful of capers, which dry in a napkin. Also chop a green
onion, some chervil, a few tarragon-leaves, and mix with your sauce.



CHAPTER III.

_FISH._


115. =Boiled Striped Bass à la Venétienne.= Clean a striped bass of
about four pounds. Cut off the fins with a scissors. Then wash your
fish well, put it in a fish-kettle with four ounces of salt, and enough
water to cover the fish. Simmer gently, and when beginning to boil
remove it to the back of the range, to simmer for half an hour. Then
serve with a sauce Venétienne (Art. 100).

116. =Boiled Red Snapper with Butter Sauce.= Proceed as for the
foregoing, and serve with a white sauce (Art. 84).

117. =Boiled Salmon, Madeira Sauce.= Boil four pounds of salmon as in
Art. 115, adding half a bottle of white wine, then serve with Spanish
sauce (Art. 80), adding a glass of madeira or sherry. Salmon may also
be served with the following sauces: Italian sauce (Art. 93), sauce
Hollandaise (Art. 85), sauce Génevoise (Art. 108), or cold with sauce
Tartare (Art. 114), sauce ravigote (Art. 112), or sauce remoulade (Art.
109).

118. =Halibut, Lobster Sauce.= Boil four pounds of halibut, and serve
with a lobster sauce (Art. 106).

119. =Boiled Codfish, Oyster Sauce.= Boil a codfish. Stew two dozen
oysters, which drain, and add to a white sauce (Art. 84). Boiled
codfish may also be served with caper sauce, sauce Hollandaise (Art.
85), and other white sauces.

120. =Sheep's Head, Shrimp Sauce.= Boil a sheep's head, and serve with
a shrimp sauce (Art. 107).

121. =Salmon-Trout, Sauce Hollandaise.= Boil a salmon-trout, and serve
with sauce Hollandaise (Art. 85).

122. =Pickerel, Anchovy Sauce.= Clean a pickerel of four pounds and
put it in a fish-kettle with enough water to cover it; add four ounces
of salt, a carrot cut in slices, an onion, six branches of thyme, six
cloves, six pepper-corns, some parsley-roots, and a tablespoonful of
vinegar. When beginning to boil remove the fish-kettle to the back of
the range for about half an hour. Take half a pint of Spanish sauce
(Art. 80), into which mix two teaspoonfuls of anchovy sauce, and, when
boiling, serve with your fish.

123. =Black Bass, Burgundy Sauce.= Clean a black bass of four pounds,
put it in the fish-kettle to boil, adding half a bottle of claret.
Then let it simmer for half an hour at the back of the range. Take
half a pint of Spanish sauce (Art. 80), put it in a saucepan with two
wineglasses of red wine, reduce one quarter, and serve with your fish.

124. =Baked Blue-Fish, Tomato Sauce.= Clean a blue-fish of four pounds
and place it in a buttered pan. Cover the fish with tomato sauce (Art.
90), on top of which put some bread-crumbs and a few little pieces of
butter. Place in the oven for about forty minutes, or until you see
that the flesh is detached from the backbone, and serve with tomato
sauce around it.

125. =Baked Fillet of Sole (or Flounder).= Cut a flounder of four
pounds into fillets, that is, in pieces of about five inches long and
four in width, tapering to a point at each end. Each piece should be
not quite an inch thick. Put them in a buttered pan, cover with sauce
Allemande (Art. 81), on top of which sprinkle some bread-crumbs and a
few small pieces of butter. Put into the oven until well browned. Place
half a pint of sauce Allemande in a saucepan, with the addition of a
wineglass of sherry, boil ten minutes, pour it around your fish, and
serve.

126. =Weak-Fish, Italian Sauce.= Cut a weak-fish of four pounds in
fillets, as described in the foregoing, and place them in a saucepan
with a little melted butter, salt, pepper, a little nutmeg, and two
tablespoonfuls of madeira (or sherry). Simmer gently for twenty
minutes, arrange your fish neatly on a dish, one piece overlapping the
other, and serve with an Italian sauce (Art. 93).

127. =Chicken Halibut aux Fines Herbes.= Chop a little parsley, six
mushrooms, and a shallot; add to them a little salt, pepper, and
nutmeg, and place all together in a saucepan on the fire for five
minutes, with half a pint of white wine. Then put these ingredients
on a dish, and place on top of them four pounds of chicken halibut.
Send to a moderate oven for about thirty minutes, taking care from time
to time to pour with a spoon some of the liquid in the dish over your
fish. Put half a pint of Spanish sauce (Art. 80) in another saucepan on
the fire, reduce your sauce for about seven or eight minutes, adding
the juice of a lemon, and serve it around your fish.

128. =Eels à la Tartare.= Broil your eels on a gridiron. When the skin
detaches itself on one side, turn them on the other. When done, with
a napkin take off all the skin, cut the eels in pieces three inches
long, remove the insides, and put the eels in a saucepan with a little
salt, pepper, six cloves, six pepper-corns, two parsley-roots, a little
thyme, four bay-leaves, and two tablespoonfuls of vinegar. Add enough
water to cover your eels, and, after boiling fifteen minutes, take them
off the fire, let them cool in the liquid in which they were cooked,
and then wipe them dry with a cloth. Break in a bowl two eggs, which
mix thoroughly with half an ounce of melted butter; pour this over
your fish, and sprinkle lightly with bread-crumbs. Broil them on a
very gentle fire. When they are a nice brown, serve them with a sauce
Tartare (Art. 114).

129. =King-Fish, Sherry Sauce.= Clean four medium-sized king-fish,
split them in two, and broil them on a gentle fire. Put half a pint of
Spanish sauce (Art. 80) in a saucepan, add a wineglass of sherry, boil
fifteen minutes, pour it around your fish, and serve.

130. =Fillet of Shad, with Purée of Sorrel.= After cleaning your shad,
cut it in equal pieces, leaving the skin underneath. Put them on a
plate, and sprinkle a little salt on them, add the juice of a lemon,
and a few branches of parsley. A few moments before they are required
to be served put them in a saucepan on a gentle fire for fifteen
minutes, with a glass of white wine and an ounce of butter. Pick and
clean a quart of sorrel, which blanch in boiling water, drain, and
press it through a sieve. Put an ounce of butter in a saucepan with
half an ounce of flour, a little salt, pepper, and nutmeg, and, when
beginning to color slightly, add your purée of sorrel and half a glass
of cream. Simmer gently ten minutes, when add the yolks of two eggs
which you have mixed in a little milk. Boil five minutes longer, pour
over your fish, and serve.

131. =Broiled Shad à la Maître d'Hôtel.= Clean a shad, without removing
the skin, split it in two, and put the roes on a buttered pan, which
send to the oven until brown. Then broil the shad, and when done put
it on a dish together with the roes. Melt an ounce of butter, in which
put a little salt and pepper, a little chopped parsley, and the juice
of a lemon. Mix well together, pour over your shad, and serve. Porgies,
mackerel, and other broiling fish, may be served in the same manner.

132. =Long Island Brook-Trout.= Clean and wash a trout of about four
pounds, and put it in a fish-kettle with four ounces of salt. When
beginning to boil remove your fish-kettle to the back of the range for
twenty-five minutes. Blanch four roes of shad in a little boiling water
and a little salt, drain, and cut them in small pieces, as also a dozen
mushrooms. Add these, with the juice of a lemon, to a pint of sauce
Allemande (Art. 81), and boil ten minutes. Serve the fish garnished
with sprigs of parsley, and the sauce in a separate dish.

133. =Trout à la Génevoise.= Clean four little trout, cut off the
gills, and put your fish in an earthen pot for four hours, with a
little thyme, four bay-leaves, two shallots cut in pieces, five
branches of parsley, a little pepper and salt, and the juice of two
lemons, after which drain, and place them in a saucepan on the fire,
with a chopped onion, a clove of garlic, and a little nutmeg. Add
enough red wine to cover your fish, and boil gently for twenty minutes.
Take half a pint of Spanish sauce (Art. 80), boil for about an hour
with one half of the liquid in which the foregoing ingredients were
boiled. Chop four mushrooms and truffles, a little parsley, and add to
your sauce. Put your fish on a dish, garnish with parsley, and serve
with your sauce on a separate dish.

134. =Scallops of Trout.= Prepare as the foregoing a medium-sized
trout, which cut in round pieces, or in the shape of an egg, and
about three inches in length, and put into a saucepan in which you
have previously melted two ounces of butter; add a little salt, white
pepper, the juice of a lemon; and when they are done on one side, turn
them on the other; mash some potatoes, and with them form a border on
a plate, which may go to the oven. Moisten your potatoes lightly with
some melted butter, and send them to the oven to brown. When done,
arrange your scallops of fish in the middle of the potatoes, and pour
over all a sauce béchamel (Art. 83).

135. =Halibut, Sauce Suprême.= Take four pounds of halibut, which cut
in square pieces; soak them for an hour in four wineglasses of madeira
(or sherry); turn them over from time to time, first on one side and
then on the other. Just before serving, put them into a saucepan, in
which you have melted two ounces of butter; add a little salt and
pepper, put them on the fire for a few moments, and then send to the
oven for twenty minutes. Arrange your fish on a dish, and pour over
them a sauce suprême (Art. 99).

136. =Scallops of White-Fish à la Provençale.= Cut a white-fish of
four pounds into round pieces, or in the shape of an egg, and about
three inches in length; put them in a dish with a clove of garlic, a
little thyme, three bay-leaves, two roots of parsley, an onion cut in
thin slices, salt and pepper, and moisten them with a sherry-glass
of oil: then peel three white onions, which cut in slices, blanch
them in boiling water, with a little salt; drain them and put them
in a frying-pan on the fire, with a wineglass of oil, which heat
thoroughly, and, when beginning to color slightly, drain off the oil,
and moisten with half a bottle of white wine. Then drain your fish,
which put in the saucepan with your onions. Simmer gently for thirty
minutes, drain, and in the liquor in which your fish was cooked put a
tablespoonful of tomato sauce, reduce gently about one third, pour over
your fish, and serve.

137. =Eels en Matelote.= Clean an eel, a pike, and a perch; cut them
in slices; place them in a saucepan with a clove of garlic, two
bay-leaves, two branches of thyme, three cloves, a little basil, and
a few branches of parsley; add enough red wine to cover your fish.
Put them on a very gentle fire, and, when beginning to boil, add a
wineglass of brandy. Shake gently, so as not to break your fish, and,
after boiling fifteen minutes, drain off your fish, and keep them hot.
Put on a table half an ounce of flour and an ounce of butter; mix well
together with the blade of a knife, and add to the liquid in which your
fish was boiled. Peel and press through a sieve twenty small white
onions, which put in a frying-pan, with a little butter, on a very
gentle fire; add them, with a dozen mushrooms, to your fish, which heat
up again. Take the ingredients in which your fish was first cooked,
and place them in a dish, your fish on top. Garnish with some boiled
crawfish, and some pieces of bread cut in triangles, and fried in
butter.

138. =Red Snapper à la Chambord.= Take a red snapper, about four pounds
in weight. Remove the scales, and on one side of the fish cut a square
in the skin, which take out, and in the flesh insert two dozen pieces
of truffles, cut in squares, and pointed at one end. Over this tie a
thin piece of larding pork. Put your fish in a fish-kettle, surround
it with a sliced carrot and onion, three cloves of garlic, six
bay-leaves, six cloves, six branches of thyme, four parsley-roots, and
cover the fish with half a bottle of white wine and a quart of consommé
(stock, Art. 1); put it on the fire until boiling, and then send it to
a gentle oven to cook slowly for an hour, basting it often with its own
liquor, on the side studded with truffles. Take half a pint of Spanish
sauce (Art. 80), to which add two wineglasses of the liquid in which
your fish was cooked, put your sauce on the fire to boil, skim off
the grease, and strain; then put it back again on the fire for a few
moments, adding a dozen mushrooms, a dozen quenelles (Art. 11), as many
truffles cut in quarters, a dozen crawfish, and the same of chicken's
kidneys which you have previously blanched in hot water, with a little
salt, for ten minutes. Lay your fish on a dish, pour your sauce around
it, and serve.

139. =Ray, with Caper Sauce.= Cook your fish as the foregoing, with the
exception of the truffles, and serve with it a white sauce (Art. 84),
to which add some capers.

140. =Ray, au Beurre Noir.= Cut in moderate-sized pieces four pounds
of ray-fish, which put in a saucepan with an onion cut in slices,
three parsley-roots, four cloves, six pepper-corns, half an ounce of
salt, and four tablespoonfuls of vinegar. When beginning to boil, put
your saucepan at the back of the range for thirty minutes, so as not
to boil. Then take off the skin from both sides of your fish, which
put in the saucepan with your other ingredients to keep hot. Put in a
frying-pan four ounces of butter, and, when colored black, fry a dozen
sprigs of parsley for a moment, remove them, and add to your butter two
tablespoonfuls of vinegar. Strain your fish, which arrange on a dish,
garnish with the fried parsley, pour the black butter over the fish,
and serve.

141. =Fried Smelts.= Clean about two dozen smelts, cut off the gills,
wash them well in cold water, and dry them thoroughly. Put a pinch
of salt and pepper in a little milk, into which dip your smelts, and
then roll them in flour. Put in a frying-pan about a pound and a half
of lard, in which, when very hot, fry your smelts a light brown. Also
fry some parsley, which place around your fish, and serve with a sauce
Tartare (Art. 112).

142. =Farcied Smelts.= Prepare your smelts as the foregoing. Split them
in two, taking care to make the opening in the under part of the fish,
and, beginning at the tail, make the incision the length of the fish,
without disturbing the head. Then take some chicken farce (Art. 11),
and add to it half a dozen very finely chopped mushrooms, and a very
little chopped parsley. Lay this on one side of your smelts, and cover
with the other half. Place them in a buttered pan, cover each one with
a very little melted butter, sprinkle some bread-crumbs lightly over
them, and send them to the oven for about fifteen minutes. Take half a
pint of Spanish sauce (Art. 80), add a sherry-glass of white wine, boil
for fifteen minutes, add a little chopped parsley to your sauce, which
pour over your fish, and serve.

143. =Oysters à la Poulette.= Take fifty oysters, which blanch in
boiling water, then drain them, preserving part of the liquid in which
they were boiled. Take half a pint of béchamel sauce (Art. 83), add a
little of the liquid in which your oysters were boiled, a little salt
and pepper, a little chopped parsley, and, when your sauce has ceased
boiling, the yolks of three eggs well mixed in a little water. Serve
your oysters hot in the sauce.

144. =Farcied Oysters à l'Africaine.= Take twenty very large oysters,
which blanch and then drain. Also take some chicken farce (Art. 11),
chopping three truffles very fine, and mix with your farce, with which
cover your oysters on both sides, and dip in bread-crumbs. Then beat up
four eggs, the yolks and whites together, with a little salt, pepper,
and very little nutmeg added, and spread over your oysters, which dip
again into bread-crumbs. Put the oysters in a buttered pan, and send to
the oven for about fifteen minutes, a very little melted butter on each
oyster. Take half a pint of Spanish sauce (Art. 80), add to it a glass
of sherry, and, after boiling twenty minutes, chop up two truffles, put
them in your sauce, and serve with your oysters.

145. =Fried Oysters.= Take fifty large oysters, dip them in beaten
eggs, in which you have put a little salt and pepper; then roll them in
bread-crumbs, and, if your oysters should not be very large, dip them
again in beaten eggs, and again roll them in bread-crumbs. Fry them in
very hot lard, drain off the grease, and serve very hot. Garnish with
slices of lemon.

146. =Broiled Oysters.= Take fifty large oysters, which drain and dip
in four beaten eggs, to which you have added a little salt and pepper.
Roll them in bread-crumbs, dip them again in eggs, and again roll them
in bread-crumbs. Put a few drops of melted butter on each, broil them
on a gridiron a light brown, and serve very hot.

147. =Cromesqui of Oysters.= Boil fifty oysters for about five minutes,
drain them, and chop them fine. Put in a saucepan on the fire an ounce
of butter, the same of flour, a pinch of salt, the same of pepper and
nutmeg, and mix all well together. Add the juice of your oysters, and
half a glass of milk, and stir with a wooden spoon until just before
beginning to boil, then remove it from the fire; add two yolks of eggs
mixed in about a tablespoonful of water, and then your oysters. Put
this mixture on ice until cold, form it into balls about the size of
a small egg, and wrap up each one in a very thin piece of pork. Break
three eggs in a bowl, add six ounces of flour, and a little water, so
as to make a smooth and very soft paste, but sufficiently solid to
adhere to your cromesqui. Then mix a teaspoonful of soda with your
paste, with which cover each one, and fry in very hot lard. When a
bright yellow, drain, and serve hot.

148. =Oysters on Toast.= Put fifty oysters in a frying-pan with their
liquor, toss them on the fire for about ten minutes, and sprinkle with
chopped parsley. Put the oysters on eight pieces of toast, the juice
poured over them. Serve very hot.

149. =Oysters a la Mosely.= Take fifty oysters, the third of which put
in a deep dish with a little pepper, salt, a little melted butter, and
cover with bread-crumbs. Then put half of the remaining oysters on top.
Proceed as above, add a third layer, pour in enough sherry to reach
the top of your oysters, cover with bread-crumbs, and a little melted
butter, and send to a moderate oven until colored a light brown. Serve
very hot.

150. =Oysters au Gratin.= Take three dozen rather small oysters,
blanch them, and drain them. Make a rather thick béchamel sauce (Art.
83), to which add two yolks of eggs well mixed in a little water.
When beginning to boil, add your oysters, a little salt, pepper, and
a little nutmeg. Mix all well together, and then put them, with your
sauce, in the shells. Cover them lightly with bread-crumbs, and a few
drops of melted butter on top. Send them to the oven, and serve when
nicely browned.

151. =Lobster au Naturel.= Put in a saucepan two sliced onions, a few
green onions, some parsley, four cloves, four branches of thyme, one of
sage, a pinch of mace, a little piece of green pepper, two ounces of
salt, and enough water to cover them. Boil them for twenty minutes, and
then allow them to cool, after which add four medium-sized lobsters,
boil for half an hour; take them off the fire, and let them become
cold in their liquor. Then drain them, split them in two, break their
claws, and serve them garnished with parsley.

152. =Lobster à la Havraise.= Take three small live lobsters, cut off
the claws, break them, and separate your lobsters in two, cutting
each lobster in eight pieces. Put into a frying-pan three very finely
chopped shallots, with a tablespoonful of oil. When beginning to
color lightly, add your pieces of lobster, and, after cooking fifteen
minutes, add half a pint of Spanish sauce (Art. 80), a glass of sherry,
about ten mushrooms, a little chopped parsley, a little salt, pepper,
and a very little nutmeg. Mix well together, boil five minutes longer,
and serve.

153. =Croquettes of Lobster.= Chop fine the meat of two boiled lobsters
and add half a pint of béchamel sauce (Art. 83), to which you have
added the yolks of two eggs well mixed in a little water. Then add
two tablespoonfuls of tomato sauce, a little pepper, salt, and a very
little nutmeg, and _put on the ice until perfectly cold_--this is of
the utmost importance. When thoroughly cold, form them into croquettes
and roll them in bread-crumbs; beat three eggs (the yolks and whites
together), into which dip your croquettes and roll them again in
bread-crumbs. Put about two pounds of lard in a frying-pan, and, when
very hot, fry your croquettes, which, when a light brown, drain, and
serve.

154. =Broiled Lobster.= Take four chicken lobsters (uncooked and
perfectly fresh), separate them in two, lengthwise, put a little melted
butter upon them, salt, pepper, and some bread-crumbs. Broil them on a
gentle fire, and, just before serving, sprinkle over them some chopped
parsley. You may serve with them, if desired, a sauce Tartare (Art.
112) or a sauce remoulade (Art. 109).

155. =Deviled Lobster.= Prepare the mixture as described in Art. 153
for lobster croquettes, and mix with it a teaspoonful of mustard. Clean
the shells of your lobsters, fill them with the above mixture, which
cover lightly with mustard, on top of which sprinkle some bread-crumbs
and a very little melted butter. Put them in the oven, and, when
colored a light brown, serve.

156. =Lobster à la Bordelaise.= Take the meat of three boiled lobsters,
which cut in medium-sized pieces, and put them in a saucepan on the
fire for about five minutes, with half a pint of sauce Bordelaise (Art.
101), and serve.

157. =Crawfish à la Bordelaise.= Boil four dozen crawfish as directed
in Art. 77, drain, and put them in a saucepan on the fire for about
five minutes, with half a pint of sauce Bordelaise (Art. 101), and
serve.

158. =Farcied Lobster.= Prepare the mixture as for lobster croquettes
(Art. 153), adding a little chopped parsley, and with it fill the
shells of two or three lobsters which you have previously washed.
Sprinkle some bread-crumbs on top, and a very small quantity of melted
butter. Send to the oven, and, when colored a light brown, serve.

159. =Lobster à l'Indienne.= Take two boiled lobsters, divide them in
two, and remove the meat from the shells and claws. Wash half a pound
of rice, boil it five minutes in boiling water, then put it in cold
water for a moment. Drain, and place it in a saucepan with three pints
of water, and boil forty minutes. Take half a pint of sauce Veloutée
(Art. 82), add your lobsters, place your saucepan at the side of the
range so as not to boil, and mix with your sauce a teaspoonful of
curry. Drain off your rice, form it in a border on a dish, and place
your lobster and sauce in the center.

160. =Fried Frogs' Legs.= Put three dozen frogs' legs in an earthen
jar, with salt, thyme, six bay-leaves, three branches of parsley, an
onion cut in thin slices, the juice of a lemon, and three or four
tablespoonfuls of oil; turn them over on one side, then on the other,
several times during an hour; then drain them, dip them in milk, in
which you have put a little salt and pepper, roll them in flour, and
fry them a light brown, in very hot lard. Serve them with some fried
parsley.

161. =Frogs' Legs à la Poulette.= Put three dozen frogs' legs in a
saucepan, with an ounce of butter, a claret-glass of white wine, and
half a cupful of consommé (stock, Art. 1), an onion sliced thin,
a little thyme, bay-leaf, parsley, a pinch of salt, pepper, and a
very little nutmeg. Boil for ten minutes, and then drain. Put a
tablespoonful of flour in a saucepan, with an ounce of butter, and mix
well together. Strain the liquid in which your frogs' legs were cooked,
add to it two yolks of eggs well mixed in about a tablespoonful of
water, a tablespoonful of chopped parsley; boil three or four minutes,
and serve.

162. =Frogs' Legs à la Marinière.= Put three dozen frogs' legs in a
saucepan, with a dozen chopped mushrooms, four shallots also chopped,
and two ounces of butter, and toss them on the fire for five or six
minutes; then add a tablespoonful of flour, a little salt, pepper, a
nutmeg, and moisten with a claret-glass of white wine and a glass of
consommé (Art. 1); boil ten minutes. Mix the yolks of four eggs with
two tablespoonfuls of cream, remove your frogs' legs from the fire,
and, when boiling has ceased, add your eggs, stirring continually until
thoroughly mixed, and serve.

163. =Frogs' Legs à la Maître d'Hôtel.= Boil in water two dozen frogs'
legs for about twelve minutes, with a pinch of salt, pepper, and the
juice of a lemon. Drain them, and pour over them some melted butter
to which you have added the juice of a lemon and a tablespoonful of
chopped parsley; serve very hot.

164. =Soft-Shell Crabs.= Take eight soft-shell crabs, remove the
gills and the sand. Wash them, then dry them with a cloth, dip them
in a little milk, and roll them in flour. Put plenty of lard in a
frying-pan, in which, when very hot, fry your crabs. Five minutes will
suffice. Serve with them some fried parsley. You may also dip the crabs
in beaten eggs, and sprinkle with bread-crumbs before frying.

165. =Farcied Crabs.= Remove the meat from four dozen boiled
hard-shelled crabs and chop up fine. Put in a saucepan an onion cut
in pieces, and an ounce of butter. When beginning to color slightly,
add a dozen chopped mushrooms, a tablespoonful of chopped parsley,
and four ounces of bread-crumbs, which you have previously soaked in
consommé, and then pressed almost dry; a pinch of salt and pepper, a
little cayenne, and half a gill of tomato sauce (Art. 90). Mix all well
together on the fire, and cook for five minutes. Wash your shells and
fill them with the foregoing, cover them with bread-crumbs, and a _very
little_ melted butter on top; send to the oven and color a light brown.

166. =Deviled Crabs.= Proceed as for the foregoing, putting a
tablespoonful of mustard in the above mixture, and a layer of mustard
on top of each crab before covering with bread-crumbs.

167. =Clam Fritters.= Take fifteen clams, which chop very fine, and
put in a bowl with two ounces of flour, two eggs, a pinch of salt
and pepper, and a tablespoonful of parsley, which chop fine. Mix all
thoroughly together. Put some lard in a frying-pan, into which, when
very hot, throw a tablespoonful of your mixture at a time, until you
have used the entire quantity; fry on both sides, and serve.

168. =Oyster Fritters.= Prepare as the foregoing.

169. =Fish-Balls.= Wash and peel six potatoes, boil them in a pint of
water, with salt, drain them, mash them thoroughly; add an ounce of
butter, a pinch of salt and pepper, and an egg; mix all well together,
adding six ounces of boiled codfish from which you have removed the
bones; mix your fish well with your other ingredients, form into balls
about the size of a very small apple, roll them lightly and evenly in
flour; fry them on both sides in about half their height of very hot
lard, drain off the grease, and serve them very hot.

170. =Codfish au Gratin.= Take two pounds of boiled codfish, from which
you have removed the bones, put in a dish with half a pint of béchamel
sauce (Art. 83), in which you have mixed four ounces of American
cheese. Sprinkle it on top with bread-crumbs and a little melted
butter, and send to the oven until colored a bright yellow. Serve. You
may, instead of the cheese, mix some chopped mushrooms with your fish.
Other boiled fish may be prepared in the same manner.

171. =Snails à la Provençale.= Take four ounces of wood-ashes, which
put in a cloth, and tie securely. Then place in a saucepan with about a
quart of water, and boil fifteen minutes. Wash well four dozen snails,
and put them in your saucepan, and boil them about fifteen minutes.
Then take one out, and try with a larding-needle if you can remove it
easily from its shell, and, if so, drain the snails, and take them
out of their shells. Put into a saucepan on the fire a tablespoonful
of oil, half a dozen mushrooms chopped very fine, some parsley, a
clove of garlic, three shallots, all chopped fine, salt, a little
red pepper, and a very little nutmeg. Add a tablespoonful of flour,
and moisten with three sherry-glasses of white wine, and, as soon
as your sauce begins to boil, add your snails, and boil gently for
thirty minutes. Your sauce must be thick. Mix the yolks of three eggs
in a tablespoonful of milk, and add to your sauce when it has ceased
boiling. Put a snail in each shell, and enough sauce to fill each one.
Sprinkle bread-crumbs on top, send to the oven for about ten minutes,
and serve.

172. =Clams on Toast.= Take fifty clams and roast them very slightly,
after which take them out of their shells, chop them fine, and, with
all their juice, which you have carefully preserved, put them into a
saucepan with a little butter, and stew for a few moments. Just before
serving, season them with a little red pepper and a very little Tobasco
pepper. First serve to each person a piece of toast, and then the clams
to be poured over the toast.

173. =Soft Clams steamed.= Put some boiling water in a saucepan, in the
bottom of which lay a brick. Put fifty soft clams in a pan, or in some
utensil which may be placed inside your saucepan, and on top of the
brick, so that the water shall not touch the clams. Boil quickly about
five minutes, covering the saucepan with a lid. Then, if your clams are
done, serve them in their shells, with a sauce separately, composed of
a little chopped shallot, a little melted butter, salt, pepper, and a
little vinegar or the juice of a lemon.

174. =Clams au Gratin.= Prepare exactly as for oysters au gratin (Art.
150).

175. =Mussels à la Marinière.= Take fifty mussels in their shells,
remove the black, stringy species of moss attached to them, put them
in a covered saucepan on the fire, with about a quarter of a glass of
water; toss them for three or four minutes in the saucepan, or until
the shells are opened, then drain them, remove one shell of each,
leaving the mussel in the other half, and serve them in the following
sauce: Chop fine two shallots, which put in a saucepan on the fire,
with a tablespoonful of vinegar, reduce one half, and add a teaspoonful
of chervil and tarragon chopped fine; boil for a moment, then add half
a pint of sauce Allemande (Art. 81), and a sherry-glass of sherry.

176. =Stewed Terrapin à la Lucie.= Drop three live terrapins into
boiling water, and, if large, boil them three hours, or, if moderate
sized, two hours and a half. Then pick them, throwing away all of the
intestines, heart, head, and most of the feet; also be very particular
to cut out the gall, which will be found in the middle of the liver,
and throw it away. Scrape out all the fat and meat sticking to the
shells, and put into a saucepan with half a pound of _very good_
butter, a good deal of salt, and cayenne pepper. Simmer over a slow
fire for about two hours. Wine may be added, according to taste, after
the terrapin is served.

177. =Stewed Terrapin à la Maryland.= Pick and clean, as the foregoing,
two terrapins weighing about six to seven pounds. Boil them in some
water with a little salt for about twenty minutes. Drain them, cut
them in moderate-sized pieces, and put them in a saucepan with enough
cream to cover them, a pinch of salt, pepper, nutmeg, and three
wineglasses of sherry. Simmer gently for three quarters of an hour. Mix
four yolks of eggs with two tablespoonfuls of cream, add them to your
terrapins, and serve very hot.

178. =Stewed Terrapin= (another manner). Prepare your terrapins as the
foregoing, add to them half a pint of brandy, touch it with a lighted
match, let it burn, and serve.

179. =Glaze.= Put two quarts of consommé (Art. 1) in a saucepan on the
fire. Reduce it by _very_ gentle boiling until it becomes the color of
chocolate. Put it in a bowl on the ice, and keep it until needed.



CHAPTER IV.

_ENTRÉES._


BEEF.

180. =Beef Tongue, Sauce Piquante.= Wash carefully a beef's tongue,
boil it an hour, put it in cold water, then remove the skin. Take some
strips of larding pork about two inches long, roll them in some parsley
chopped very fine, a little pepper and nutmeg, and lard your tongue,
which having done, place in a saucepan with a carrot, two onions, six
cloves, six pepper-corns, four bay-leaves, and four branches of thyme.
Add enough consommé (or stock) to cover the tongue, simmer very gently
for four hours, and serve with a sauce piquante (Art. 86).

181. =Beef's Tongue à la Jardinière.= Proceed exactly as for the
foregoing, and serve on a macédoine of vegetables (Art. 416).

182. =Smoked Beef's Tongue, Wine Sauce with Mushrooms.= Soak a smoked
tongue in water the night before it is needed. Then put it in about
four quarts of cold water, and boil it slowly about five hours; drain,
place it in cold water a moment, remove the skin, trim the thicker end
of the tongue neatly, and put it again in hot water for a moment,
drain, put it on a dish, pour around it half a pint of Spanish sauce
(Art. 80), to which you have added, while on the fire, ten chopped
mushrooms and a sherry-glass of sherry.

183. =Hashed Beef.= Take two pounds of cold beef, free from sinew and
bone, and chop it up well. Peel and cut in pieces two onions, and put
them in a frying-pan with two ounces of butter. When beginning to color
very lightly, add your beef, a little salt, pepper, and nutmeg, and a
pinch of thyme. Toss all together on the fire ten minutes. Just before
serving, sprinkle a tablespoonful of chopped parsley over your hash.

184. =Beef's Brains au Beurre Noir.= Put into cold water three brains,
clean them thoroughly, removing all blood, fibers, and pieces of
skin, after which change the water, and let them soak for two hours,
being careful to change the water every half-hour. Then put them in a
saucepan with six parsley-roots, four cloves, four pepper-corns, an
onion cut in pieces, also a carrot, four bay-leaves, four branches
of thyme, a teaspoonful of salt, and moisten with a pint of consommé
(stock, Art. I) and a claret-glass of white wine. Boil for half an
hour, drain, carefully remove all herbs from the brains, and serve with
a black-butter sauce.

_Black-Butter Sauce._ Put in a frying-pan four ounces of butter, and
when colored black add two tablespoonfuls of vinegar; boil for a
moment, add some branches of fried parsley, and serve.

185. =Beef's Brains à la Poulette.= Prepare the brains as the
foregoing, and serve with a sauce poulette (Art. 103).

186. =Palates of Beef, Sauce Robert.= Boil four beef's palates in
enough water to cover them, and a little salt, for an hour. Then
put them in cold water, and clean them well. Put them in a saucepan
with four bay-leaves, four branches of thyme, four cloves, four
pepper-corns, four parsley-roots, and half a teaspoonful of salt.
Moisten with a pint of consommé (stock, Art. 1), and simmer them gently
for two hours. Then take them from your saucepan, drain them, cut them
in squares, and serve them with a sauce Robert (Art. 92). Other sauces,
according to your taste, may be served with this dish.

187. =Ox-Tails braised.= Cut two ox-tails into joints, boil them for
half an hour in two quarts of water, and half an ounce of salt; then
put them in cold water, drain and place them in a saucepan with a
carrot, two onions, six cloves, six pepper-corns, four bay-leaves, four
branches of thyme, three branches of parsley, and a little salt; add a
quart of consommé (stock, Art. 1), and simmer gently for five hours;
serve with an Italian sauce (Art. 93).

188. =Beef-Kidneys, Sautés au Vin Blanc.= Cut two beef's kidneys in
thin slices; then put in a frying-pan an ounce of butter, into which,
when melted, put the kidneys, adding a pinch of salt, the same of
pepper, and a very little nutmeg; toss the kidneys in the butter for
about five minutes on a good fire; moisten them with one gill of
Spanish sauce (Art. 80), and a sherry-glass of white wine; boil five
minutes on the fire, and serve.

189. =Sirloin Steak broiled, with Anchovy Sauce.= Take two and a half
pounds of sirloin steak, and put it on a gridiron on a moderate fire,
with salt and pepper. Turn the steak often, so that both sides may
be equally done; ten minutes should be sufficient to broil it; serve
with a white or butter sauce (Art. 14), to which add a teaspoonful of
anchovy sauce.

190. =Rump Steak broiled à la Maître d'Hôtel.= Broil as the foregoing;
then put two ounces of butter on a very hot plate, so as to melt
it completely; add to it a teaspoonful of parsley, which you have
previously washed and chopped fine, a pinch of salt and pepper, the
juice of a lemon; mix all together, and serve your steak on top.

191. =Porter-house Steak à la Bordelaise.= Broil a porter-house steak
as the foregoing, on top of which place small pieces of marrow, cut
round, about the size of a fifty-cent piece, and previously boiled;
pour around your steak half a pint of sauce Bordelaise (Art. 101).
Steak may also be served with a sauce Béarnaise (Art. 88), sauce Hachée
(Art. 96), tomato sauce (Art. 90), and others. Potatoes should also
be served in whatever manner appropriate to the sauce. Onions cut in
slices, rolled in flour and fried in butter a light brown, may also be
served on top of a broiled steak.

192. =Tenderloins of Beef, with Potatoes à la Parisienne.= Take three
and a half pounds of the fillet of beef, and with a knife remove the
skin on top; cut some larding pork into strips, with which lard your
beef on the surface. Then in a frying-pan put an onion sliced thin, a
branch of thyme, three cloves, three pepper-corns, three bay-leaves,
three parsley-roots, and a pinch of salt; moisten with a sherry-glass
of white wine and the same of consommé (stock, Art. 1), and place your
fillet on top, on which put a few little pieces of butter; simmer
gently for about forty minutes, strain the liquid in which your fillet
was cooked, pour it over the fillet and serve on a separate dish some
potatoes à la Parisienne (Art. 438).

193. =Fillet of Beef Sauté, Madeira Sauce.= Cut eight pieces from a
fillet of beef about half an inch thick; put into a saucepan an ounce
of butter, a pinch of salt and pepper, a very little nutmeg, and place
your pieces of beef on top; toss them for about five minutes on a quick
fire, and, when done on both sides, serve them (one piece overlying
the other) with half a pint of Spanish sauce (Art. 80), to which add a
wineglass of madeira (or sherry); also serve with this dish some potato
croquettes (Art. 423).

194. =Braised Beef, Tomato Sauce.= Take three pounds of rump steak;
put in a saucepan four ounces of salt pork, which cut in small pieces,
place your beef on top, and simmer gently for half an hour, turning it
over from time to time; then add as much consommé (stock, Art. 1) as
will entirely cover your beef, and two sherry-glasses of white wine,
a carrot, an onion, three branches of thyme, three bay-leaves, three
cloves, three pepper-corns, three parsley-roots, a pinch of salt and
pepper, and a little nutmeg; simmer gently for four hours, drain, and
serve with a tomato sauce (Art. 90); or you can serve your beef with
the liquid in which it was cooked, after having removed all the grease,
and strained carefully.

195. =Beef à la Mode.= Take a round of beef of about four pounds, cut
half a pound of larding pork in strips about two inches long, which
roll in a tablespoonful of chopped parsley. Make incisions in your
beef, and introduce your strips of pork therein. Cut a carrot and an
onion in slices, and put them in a saucepan with several branches of
parsley, inclosing three cloves, six bay-leaves, three branches of
thyme, and tie all together, then add your beef, two claret-glasses
of white wine, and a quart of consommé (stock). Simmer gently for
three hours, drain off your beef, and strain the liquid in which it
was cooked. Then put the beef with its liquid in a saucepan with two
carrots and two turnips, which you have previously blanched and cut in
slices, and twenty small onions. Simmer gently for an hour and a half,
skim off the grease from the liquid, and serve.

196. =Boiled Marrow-Bones.= Tie up in a cloth eight marrow-bones,
neatly trimmed, and of about four inches in length, boil an hour,
remove the cloth, and serve them on toast, a small napkin neatly
arranged around each bone.

197. =Beefsteak Pie.= Take two pounds of cold beef, cut it in small
pieces. Put two dozen small white onions, with some butter, in a
frying-pan on the fire, and cook gently until browned. Fry half a
pound of bacon cut in small pieces, drain, moisten with a pint of
Spanish sauce (Art. 80), add your onions, boil for a few moments, add
your beef, and put all together in a deep dish, which you have lined
with paste, moistening the edges of your dish so that the paste shall
adhere. Cut out some paste the size of your dish and lay it on top. Dip
a small brush in beaten egg, with which brush the entire top of your
pie, which send to the oven until well colored, and serve. You may mix
in your pie, if desired, about twenty-five oysters.

_Paste for the Pie._ Put on a table six ounces of flour, make a hole
in the middle, in which place three ounces of butter, and add a
claret-glass of water. Mix all well together, and roll it out to the
proper thickness.

198. =Broiled Tripe.= Cut some tripe into long pieces, season with
pepper and salt. Broil them a nice brown, and serve them on the same
plate with an ounce of melted butter, the juice of a lemon well mixed
with it, and some chopped parsley. Honeycomb tripe is more delicate
than the ordinary tripe.

199. =Tripe à la Lyonnaise.= Cut two pounds of tripe in thin strips, as
for Julienne soup, put a sliced onion, with two ounces of butter, in
a frying-pan; when well colored, add your tripe, a pinch of salt and
pepper, and very little nutmeg. Toss all together until all moisture
is absorbed, then add about a quarter of a can of tomatoes, cook for
a moment longer, or until very hot, and serve with a little chopped
parsley on top.

200. =Fried Tripe.= Cut some tripe in squares. Break two eggs, to which
add a little salt and pepper, and beat up your eggs well. Then dip your
tripe in the eggs, roll them in flour, fry them in very hot lard, and
when they are a light brown drain them, and serve with fried parsley on
top.

201. =Tripe à la Mode de Caen.= Put in an earthen pot an onion cut in
slices, a carrot in quarters, and four slices of bacon; cover these
with a layer of tripe, then a calf's foot cut in four, a pinch of salt
and pepper, four cloves, four bay-leaves, three branches of thyme,
six pepper-corns, and six parsley-roots. On top of these put a layer
of bacon, another of tripe, another calf's foot, cut in pieces, and
another layer of tripe, with some bacon on top. Fill your jar three
quarters of its height with white wine. Put on the cover, and paste
it all around the edge with some flour mixed in a little water, so as
to render the jar air-tight. Place it in the oven, and cook for five
hours. Instead of white wine, you may substitute cider if you wish.


VEAL.

202. =Calf's Head en Tortue.= Take a scalded calf's head, put it in
a saucepan with enough water to cover it, boil for half an hour,
and then plunge it in cold water; mix four tablespoonfuls of flour
with a little cold water; cut an onion and a carrot in slices, and
put in a saucepan, together with six cloves, six pepper-corns, six
parsley-roots, four branches of thyme, six cloves of garlic, six
bay-leaves, an ounce of butter, two tablespoonfuls of vinegar, and
lastly your calf's head; add enough water to cover it, and boil for two
hours. Take half a pint of Spanish sauce (Art. 80), put it on the fire
in a saucepan with a wineglass of sherry, about ten mushrooms cut in
pieces, and four chickens' livers which you have previously blanched;
drain your calf's head and put it on a dish with your sauce; you may
also serve with it the brains, from which you have removed all the
fibers and loose skin, and also the tongue cut down the middle and the
skin taken off.

203. =Calf's Head à la Vinaigrette.= Proceed as for the foregoing, and,
just before serving, chop a little parsley, a little chervil, a small
onion; add a pinch of salt and pepper, four tablespoonfuls of vinegar
and eight tablespoonfuls of oil, and serve with your calf's head.

204. =Baked Calf's Head à l'Italienne.= Boil a calf's head as the
preceding, cut it in pieces, which put in a pan, and cover with an
Italian sauce (Art. 93); sprinkle some bread-crumbs on top, and a very
little melted butter; send to the oven, and, when colored a light
brown, put it on a dish, and serve with an Italian sauce surrounding
it. You may also serve with other sauces, according to your taste.

205. =Calves' Tongues.= Take four calves' tongues, which prepare as
beef's tongue (Art. 180), and, after cooking two hours, take them
off the fire, remove all skin, and cut them through the middle of
the tongue. Put them on a dish, and serve with them an Italian sauce
(Art. 93), sauce poivrade (Art. 95), tomato sauce (Art. 90), or with a
macédoine of vegetables (Art. 416).

206. =Calves' Brains au Gratin.= Put into cold water four calves'
brains, clean them thoroughly, removing all blood, fibers, and pieces
of skin, after which change the water and let them soak for two hours,
being careful to change the water every half-hour, then drain them;
put for a moment in a saucepan on the fire, four ounces of butter and
a large sliced onion; add the brains, season with pepper and salt, and
let them simmer gently, turning them over so that both sides may be
done, and drain off the grease; butter a deep dish, which sprinkle all
over with bread-crumbs; add a _very_ thick béchamel sauce (Art. 83) to
the brains, which put in the dish, let them cool, sprinkle bread-crumbs
and some melted butter on top; send to a moderate oven for half an
hour, and serve.

207. =Calves' Brains à la Poulette.= Proceed as for beef's brain,
allowing only half the time to boil; put four brains on a dish, and
pour over them a sauce à la poulette (Art. 103).

208. =Fried Calves' Brains, Tomato Sauce.= Boil four calves' brains as
the preceding, drain them, and cut them into medium-sized pieces; beat
up two eggs, to which add a little salt and pepper; dip the brains in
the eggs and then sprinkle them with bread-crumbs; put plenty of lard
in a frying-pan, and, when very hot, fry the brains, and also some
parsley; drain, and serve with a tomato sauce in a separate dish.

209. =Calves' Ears farcied.= Take four well-scalded calves' ears; put
them in two quarts of boiling water on the fire for half an hour, after
which put in cold water; then clean the inside of the ears well, and
place in a saucepan with a quart of consommé (Art. 1), a claret-glass
of white wine, the juice of a lemon, four cloves, four branches of
thyme, three bay-leaves, one clove of garlic, and a dozen branches of
parsley tied together; boil gently for two hours, drain them, and fill
the inside of the ears with a chicken farce (Art. 11), to which add a
tablespoonful of parsley chopped fine; sprinkle with bread-crumbs and
a few drops of melted butter; send them to the oven, and, when a nice
light brown, serve with a tomato sauce (Art. 90) surrounding them, or a
sauce piquante (Art. 86).

210. =Calves' Liver Sauté, Sauce Poivrade.= Cut two pounds of calf's
liver in equal pieces, put two ounces of melted butter in a frying-pan
with your calf's liver, fry on both sides, and serve with a sauce
poivrade (Art. 95).

211. =Broiled Calf's Liver.= Cut thin two pounds of calf's liver in
equal pieces, roll in flour, and broil on a gridiron; a little melted
butter on each piece; broil on both sides and put them on a dish, with
a little melted butter, a little chopped parsley, the juice of a lemon,
salt, and pepper, well mixed together.

212. =Calf's Liver with Bacon.= Fry two pounds of calf's liver, cut
in pieces, and serve with very thin slices of bacon, or with half
a pint of Spanish sauce (Art. 80), to which add a claret-glass of
port or claret, and three tablespoonfuls of currant jelly mixed in a
tablespoonful of water. Boil gently for three or four minutes, and
serve.

213. =Braised Calf's Liver à la Bourgignone.= Take an entire calf's
liver, lard it thickly with larding pork, and put it in a saucepan
with an ounce of butter, four bay-leaves, three branches of thyme,
three cloves, a sliced onion and carrot; cook for ten minutes, moisten
with a pint of Spanish sauce (Art. 80) and a claret-glass of red wine.
Simmer gently for an hour and a half, and take out your calf's liver,
which keep very hot. Remove all grease from the liquid in which it was
cooked, strain it, pour it over the liver, which should be left whole,
and serve.

214. =Calf's Heart aux Fines Herbes.= Cut three calves' hearts in round
or oval pieces, put them in a frying-pan in which you have melted an
ounce and a half of butter, and, adding a little salt and pepper, cook
gently, taking care to turn over until they are a good color on both
sides, then drain them, leaving the butter in your pan, into which
throw three chopped shallots. Toss them for half a minute in your
butter, which pour over your calf's heart, and, when serving, put a
tablespoonful of chopped parsley on top.

215. =Calf's Feet à la Poulette.= Prepare four calf's feet as the
foregoing, cooking half an hour longer; drain them, cut them in pieces,
and serve with a sauce à la poulette (Art. 103).

216. =Veal Pot-Pie.= Cut two pounds of a shoulder of veal in
medium-sized pieces, which boil in a quart of water ten minutes, then
put them for a moment in cold water, drain them, and place them in a
saucepan on the fire with a quart of water, some salt, white pepper,
a little nutmeg, and several branches of parsley, inclosing three
bay-leaves, three branches of thyme, four pepper-corns, tied all
together. Boil an hour. Mix in a bowl three tablespoonfuls of flour
with half a glass of water, which add to your veal and boil ten minutes
longer. Put in a bowl four ounces of flour with a teaspoonful of Royal
Baking Powder, and mix well with a little water, so as to form a soft
paste, with which make little round balls, poach them in boiling water,
add them to your veal in the saucepan, having removed the parsley with
its seasoning, and serve.

217. =Sweetbreads aux Fines Herbes.= Take some sweetbreads (in quantity
according to their size), put them in a saucepan with some water, and
simmer them gently for about ten minutes. Drain them, remove from
them all skin and fat, shape them in round pieces, and put them in a
frying-pan in which you have melted an ounce of butter and added a
little salt and pepper. Let them simmer gently, turning them over now
and then, and when they are a good color take them out. Chop three
shallots and six mushrooms, put them in the butter in which your
sweetbreads were cooked, let them remain on the fire for about two
minutes, adding a little chopped parsley and the juice of a lemon,
which pour over your sweetbreads, and serve. You can also prepare
sweetbreads in the same manner, and serve with a tomato sauce (Art.
90), Spanish sauce (Art. 80), or stewed with sauce à la poulette (Art.
103), with a tablespoonful of chopped parsley added, or sauce Béarnaise
(Art. 88).

218. =Sweetbreads larded with Peas.= Blanch some sweetbreads as the
foregoing, pare them neatly, and lard them thickly with larding pork.
Put in a pan very thin slices of ham, a carrot, an onion cut in thin
slices, two cloves, two bay-leaves, a clove of garlic, two branches
of thyme, and place the sweetbreads on top. Cover them about three
quarters with consommé (stock, Art. 1), put them in the oven, and baste
them from time to time with the liquid in the pan, and, when well
colored, take them from the oven and serve them on top of about a quart
of peas, previously boiled, a little butter, salt, pepper, and a little
sugar added to them.

219. =Sweetbread Croquettes.= Boil four sweetbreads, and let them
become cold; then chop them very fine, add about ten mushrooms and some
truffles also chopped fine. Take about half a pint of Allemande sauce
(Art. 81), mix well with your sweetbreads, which put on the ice to
become thoroughly cold; form the mixture into croquettes, dip them in
two beaten eggs, roll them in bread-crumbs; fry them a bright yellow in
very hot lard, drain them, and serve them with fried parsley or with
green peas.

220. =Veal Cutlets à l'Allemande.= Take three pounds of veal cutlets,
which cut in round pieces; break two eggs in a bowl, adding some salt
and pepper and an ounce of melted butter; beat all well together, and
dip into it your veal cutlets, after which sprinkle some bread-crumbs
over them. Then put them on a moderate fire, in a frying-pan, in which
you have melted two ounces of butter, and, when they are fried a light
brown on both sides, serve with half a pint of tomato sauce (Art. 90).

221. =Veal Chops à la Mayonnaise.= Put eight veal chops in a flat
saucepan, moisten them with their height of consommé (Art. 1), add
a little salt, pepper, nutmeg, and simmer gently for an hour, after
which take them out and put them on the ice until very cold; serve them
in a circle with whatever jelly remains, and in the center a sauce
Mayonnaise (Art. 113), or a sauce ravigote cold (Art. 112).

222. =Veal Chops Piqués.= Take eight veal chops, make six incisions in
each, in which insert three pieces of truffles cut square at one end
and pointed at the other, and three small pieces of boiled ham cut in
the same manner; put in a flat saucepan an onion and a carrot cut in
slices, a thin slice of ham, three cloves, three pepper-corns, three
bay-leaves, three branches of parsley, the same of thyme, two cloves
of garlic, and a pinch of salt and pepper. Place your chops on top and
moisten them with three quarters of their height of consommé (Art. 1)
and a claret-glass of white wine. Send them to the oven for an hour,
baste them every ten minutes with their liquor, and serve them with a
sauce financière, made in the following manner: Put in a saucepan half
a pint of Spanish sauce (Art. 80), to which add a wineglass of sherry,
a few truffles cut in quarters, also olives from which you have removed
the stones, a few pieces of sweet-bread blanched and boiled, and a few
chickens' livers blanched, boiled, and cut in quarters.

223. =Braised Tendons of Veal a la Macédoine.= Cut your tendons of veal
three inches in length and one inch thick, put them in a pan with two
slices of ham, a carrot and an onion cut in thin slices, two cloves,
two bay-leaves, two branches of thyme, and a clove of garlic; cover
them about three quarters with consommé (stock, Art. 1), and put them
in the oven, basting them from time to time with the liquid in the pan.
Take half a pint of Spanish sauce (Art. 80), to which add a pinch of
sugar, and, when your sauce is boiling, add a quart of macédoine (Art.
416), which put on a dish, your tendons of veal on top, and serve.

224. =Braised Tendons of Veal with Purée of Celery.= Braise your
tendons as the foregoing; then put them on a dish and cover them with
a _very thick_ sauce Allemande (Art. 81); let them become cold, and,
when the sauce is firmly set, beat up two eggs, adding a little salt
and pepper, in which dip your tendons, and then sprinkle them with
bread-crumbs. Put in a frying-pan about two pounds of lard, in which,
when very hot, fry your tendons. Serve them in the form of a circle,
one piece overlapping the other, and a purée of celery (Art. 392) in
the center. You may also serve with a sauce suprême (Art. 99) around
the tendons.

225. =Fricandeau of Veal.= Take three pounds from the tenderest part of
the thigh, about two inches in thickness; lard it well on the surface,
put it in a saucepan with same ingredients as for braised tendons of
veal (Art. 223), moisten with enough consommé (stock, Art. 1) to reach
the surface of your veal. Put on the fire until boiling, then send to
the oven, basting it frequently with its liquor. Let it remain in the
oven three hours, and serve it with either the liquid in which it was
cooked, after having strained it and removed all grease, or on a purée
of peas (Art. 446), or a purée of sorrel (469).

226. =Blanquette of Veal.= Take three pounds of a shoulder of veal,
cut it in pieces, which put in a saucepan with three pints of water,
a pinch of salt, several branches of parsley, inclosing three cloves,
three pepper-corns, three bay-leaves, three branches of thyme, two
cloves of garlic, and tie all together. When commencing to boil, skim
thoroughly, and then boil an hour and a half. Put half a pint of sauce
Allemande (Art. 80) on the fire, but do not allow it to boil; chop a
dozen mushrooms, add them to your sauce, drain off your veal, and serve
together with your sauce.

227. =Minced Veal, with Poached Eggs on Top.= Chop fine two pounds of
cold veal, from which you have removed the sinews, and add a little
more than half a pint of sauce béchamel (Art. 83), a little salt,
pepper, and nutmeg, and an ounce of butter; put all together in a
saucepan on the fire for a few moments, remove it from the fire, and
place it on a dish with ten poached eggs on top. Minced chicken is
prepared in exactly the same manner.

228. =Veal Kidneys Sautés.= Take three veal kidneys, which cut very
thin, and proceed as for beef kidneys (Art. 188).

229. =Deviled Veal Kidneys.= Take three veal kidneys, which separate in
two, lengthwise; then from the flat side remove all fibrous particles
from the inside; cover them on both sides with mustard, and add a
little red pepper; roll them well in bread-crumbs, put a little melted
butter on both sides; broil on a gentle fire. Mutton, beef, and pork
kidneys are treated in the same manner, except that they are cut in
quarters instead of in halves.


MUTTON.

230. =Sheep's Brains.= Prepare and cook the brains as for calf's brains
(Art. 208).

231. =Sheep's Kidneys en Brochette.= Take ten sheep's kidneys, remove
all the skin which covers them, split them without cutting the sinew,
pass a skewer through them, sprinkle a pinch of salt and pepper over
them, and broil them on a good fire, taking care to turn them so as to
broil on both sides; after which remove the skewer. Put two ounces of
melted butter on a dish, a tablespoonful of chopped parsley, the juice
of a lemon, mix all well together, and serve.

232. =Mutton Chops à la Soubise.= Take ten rib chops, season with
pepper and salt, dip them in two ounces of melted butter, and cover
them thickly with bread-crumbs; broil them, and, when they are well
colored, serve them on a dish, with a sauce soubise (Art. 94). You may
also serve them with a sauce Robert (Art. 92), or a tomato sauce (Art.
90), or with a macédoine (Art. 416) in the center.

233. =Mutton Chops Sautés.= Take ten mutton chops, which put in a
frying-pan in which you have melted two ounces of butter; sprinkle them
with a little salt and pepper, and cook them on a quick fire; four or
five minutes will be sufficient. Serve with purée of turnips (Art. 398).

234. =Mutton Chops à la Pompadour.= Take ten mutton chops, which cook
as described in mutton chops sautés (Art. 233); then let them become
cold; peel and chop ten onions, which put in a saucepan with two ounces
of butter. When colored lightly, add two tablespoonfuls of flour,
a pinch of salt and pepper, and a very little nutmeg. Mix all well
together and add about two sherry-glasses of cream. Reduce for about
fifteen minutes, and then allow your mixture to become cold, then cover
each chop with it on both sides; beat up four eggs, into which dip the
chops and cover with bread-crumbs; again dip them in egg, and again
cover with bread-crumbs and a few drops of melted butter. Send them to
the oven, and, when a bright yellow color, serve them with a purée of
French chestnuts (Art. 442) in the center.

235. =Mutton Chops en Crépinette.= Put eight mutton chops in a
frying-pan in which you have melted an ounce of butter, adding a pinch
of salt, pepper, and nutmeg; when the chops are colored on both sides,
take them out and let them become cold. Chop fine three quarters of a
pound of sausage-meat, add eight mushrooms, a little parsley and sage,
all chopped fine; mix all together, and cover your chops on both sides
with the farce, and wrap up each chop with the caul of pork. Send them
to a gentle oven on a buttered pan, and, when well colored, serve with
a tomato sauce (Art. 90), sauce piquante (Art. 86), or sauce ravigote
hot (Art. 111).

236. =Breast of Mutton.= Take two breasts of mutton, which put in a
saucepan with a quart of consommé (stock, Art. 1) and a quart of water,
an onion and a carrot cut in slices, three bay-leaves, four cloves,
three branches of thyme, two cloves of garlic, and four parsley-roots,
and boil gently for two hours; then drain them and put them between two
dishes, with a weight on top to flatten them; when cold, cut them oval,
dip them in two beaten eggs to which you have added an ounce of melted
butter and a pinch of salt and pepper. Sprinkle them thickly with
bread-crumbs and a few drops of melted butter, and send to the oven;
when well colored, serve with a sauce piquante (Art. 86).

237. =Sheep's Feet à la Poulette.= Split in halves a dozen scalded
sheep's feet, and proceed as for calf's feet à la poulette (Art. 215);
serve very hot.

238. =Roast Leg of Mutton à la Bretonne.= Take a leg of mutton of about
six or seven pounds; put it to roast, taking care to baste it from time
to time; an hour and a quarter is sufficient to roast it. Put in the
oven six onions without being peeled, and, as soon as they are done,
peel them and put them in a saucepan, with a pinch of salt, pepper,
and nutmeg; add to them half a pint of Spanish sauce (Art. 80), which
reduce fifteen minutes, strain, and serve with your mutton.

239. =Boiled Leg of Mutton.= Take a leg of mutton of about six
pounds and place in a saucepan with a sliced onion, a carrot, three
bay-leaves, three cloves of garlic, three branches of thyme, four
cloves, six parsley-roots, an ounce of salt, and enough water to cover
them. Boil for an hour and a half, and serve with a sauce béchamel
(Art. 83), to which add some chopped parsley or capers.

240. =Roast Saddle of Mutton.= Take a medium-sized saddle of mutton,
cut the flaps square and roll them up, tie some twine around the
saddle, so as to give it a neat shape, season with salt and pepper, and
roast it for three quarters of an hour; remove your twine, and serve
with some currant jelly.

241. =Leg of Mutton en Venaison.= Take a medium-sized leg of mutton,
from which cut the knuckle-bone at the second joint and put it in an
earthen jar with two sliced onions, a carrot, six bay-leaves, six
cloves of garlic, ten cloves, ten pepper-corns, six branches of thyme,
six parsley-roots, a teaspoonful of pepper, and a pint of vinegar. Let
your mutton remain in these ingredients three days, and stir every six
hours; then take it out of the earthen jar, roast it, and serve with a
sauce poivrade (Art. 95).

242. =Irish Stew.= Take four pounds from a breast of mutton, take off
the skin and the fat, cut it in medium-sized pieces, which put in a
saucepan with three pints of water, half an ounce of salt, a pinch
of pepper, and a very little nutmeg. When beginning to boil, skim
all the grease off carefully, add two carrots and two turnips cut in
slices, six medium-sized onions peeled, and some branches of parsley,
inclosing three cloves, one clove of garlic, six pepper-corns, two
bay-leaves, two branches of thyme, and tie all together. Boil an hour
and a half. Peel and cut in pieces eight potatoes, boil them, and add
them to your stew. Mix two ounces of flour in a little water, making a
smooth, soft paste, and pour it over your stew, stirring constantly.
Boil ten minutes, remove the bunch of parsley, and serve. You may put a
tablespoonful of chopped parsley over your stew if desired.

243. =Shoulder of Mutton farcied.= Bone a shoulder of mutton, take out
a portion of the meat without breaking the skin, remove the sinews and
chop the meat with half of its weight of fat salt pork, and an ounce
of ham; when chopped very fine, add a medium-sized onion also chopped
fine, and four ounces of bread-crumbs which you have soaked in consommé
(Art. 1) and then pressed almost dry, an egg, and a pinch of salt,
pepper, and a very little nutmeg. Mix all well together, and place this
farce in the inside of your shoulder. Roll up and sew together with
a larding-needle; then put it in a saucepan with a sliced onion and
carrot, two bay-leaves, two branches of thyme, one clove of garlic,
three cloves, and three pepper-corns. Moisten three quarters of its
height with consommé (stock, Art. 1) and a claret-glass of white wine.
Put it in the oven for two hours, basting it from time to time with
its liquor. Drain your shoulder of mutton, reduce its liquor one half,
skim off the grease, and serve it on the same dish with the mutton. You
may serve with this a purée of turnips (Art. 398), purée of peas (Art.
446), or various other vegetables.

244. =Epigramme of Lamb.= Put a breast of spring lamb in a saucepan
with enough consommé (Art. 1) to cover it. Boil gently for an hour and
a half; place it between two dishes, with a weight on top; when cold,
cut it in the shape of chops and dip in two beaten eggs, to which you
have added a little salt and pepper; then roll them in bread-crumbs and
send them to the oven in a pan, with a little melted butter on top. Put
eight lamb chops in a saucepan with half an ounce of butter, a little
salt and pepper; color them on both sides. Remove your breast of lamb
from the oven, and serve together with the chops, in a circle, first a
breast of lamb and then a chop, and some asparagus ends or macédoine
(Art. 416) in the center.

245. =Breast of Lamb, with Asparagus.= Prepare two breasts of spring
lamb as the foregoing, serve them in a circle on a dish, with a garnish
of green asparagus ends in the center; then take the green ends of
about two bunches of asparagus, boil them very tender, adding a little
salt; drain them, and add them to half a pint of very hot Allemande
sauce (Art. 81), a pinch of sugar, and nutmeg, which pour around your
breasts of lamb, and serve.


PORK.

246. =Pig's Tongue.= Prepare and cook as for calf's tongue (Art. 205),
and serve with a sauce piquante (Art. 86), or sauce ravigote (Art.
110), or sauce tartare (Art. 112).

247. =Fillet of Pork à la Fermière.= Take five small fillets of pork,
divide them in two, shaping them alike, and put them in an earthen jar;
peel and slice a carrot and an onion, put them in a frying-pan with
a claret-glass of white wine, a clove of garlic, two bay-leaves, two
branches of thyme, two cloves, four parsley-roots, a little mace, and a
pinch of pepper. Boil them for five minutes, let them become cold, pour
over your fillets of pork, and allow them to soak twelve hours; then
drain off your fillets and put them in a saucepan with three quarters
of their height of consommé (stock, Art. 1) and three tablespoonfuls of
the liquid in which your fillets were soaked. Boil on a good fire for
half an hour, drain them, keep them hot, reduce the liquid one half in
which they were cooked, drain it, and serve with your fillets.

248. =Boiled Pigs' Feet.= Take eight pigs' feet, and, if raw, tie
them securely in a cloth so as to preserve their shape, put them in a
saucepan with half an ounce of salt, three cloves, three pepper-corns,
three branches of thyme, three bay-leaves, a little mace, two
parsley-roots, a sliced carrot, a wineglass of vinegar, and moisten
liberally with water. Simmer gently for six hours, let them become cold
in their liquor; remove the cloths in which they were tied, dip them in
beaten egg, roll them thickly in bread-crumbs, broil them, and, when
a deep yellow color, serve very hot. You may serve with them a sauce
piquante (Art. 86).

249. =Pigs' Kidneys Sautés.= Chop two shallots and a small onion very
fine, put them in a frying-pan with an ounce of butter, color them
very gently, and add four pigs' kidneys cut in thin slices, a pinch
of salt and pepper, and a little nutmeg; toss them for a few minutes
without stopping, and, when they are almost done, add a teaspoonful of
flour, which mix well with the kidneys, a sherry-glass of white wine,
a tablespoonful of chopped parsley; mix all well together, and serve,
without having allowed them to boil.

250. =Sausage of Fresh Pork.= Take a pound of lean pork and the same of
fat pork; chop them very fine, adding half an ounce of salt, a pinch of
pepper, a little nutmeg, a pinch of sage, a shallot and a teaspoonful
of parsley, both chopped fine; mix all well together, and put this
farce in the thin skin used for enveloping sausages, by means of a
funnel; tie all together securely in several places, and broil them a
fine light color, and serve. Flat sausages are prepared in the same
manner.

251. =Spare-Ribs, Apple Sauce.= Take eight ribs of fresh pork, put
them in a pan, with a pinch of salt sprinkled on top, and some melted
butter; send to the oven for an hour, or until well colored. Pare a
dozen apples, put them in a saucepan with two ounces of sugar, a little
nutmeg, a _very_ little cinnamon, the juice of a lemon, and a little
water. Put your apples through a sieve, and serve, when very cold, with
your roast.

252. =Pork Chops, Sauce Robert.= Take eight pork chops, put them in
a frying-pan in which you have melted an ounce of butter, sprinkle
them with a little salt and pepper, a very little nutmeg, a pinch of
allspice, and color them on both sides on a quick fire; serve them on
a dish with a sauce Robert (Art. 92), Italian sauce (Art. 93), sauce
ravigote hot (Art. 110), sauce piquante (Art. 86), or tomato sauce
(Art. 90).

253. =Broiled Pork Chops.= Proceed as for broiled mutton chops (Art.
232), and serve with any of the above sauces.

254. =Pork Chops à l'Indienne.= Fry as for pork chops, sauce Robert
(Art. 252), and drain off the grease. In a saucepan put half a pint of
Spanish sauce (Art. 80) and a teaspoonful of curry; add your chops,
simmer gently for about ten minutes, and serve them with the sauce
around them, and boiled rice in the center.

255. =Pig's Head, Sauce Poivrade.= Cut the meat from a pig's head,
divide in pieces of about two inches long, put them in an earthen jar
with an onion cut in slices, three bay-leaves, three branches of thyme,
three cloves, three pepper-corns, a pinch of pepper, two parsley-roots,
two claret-glasses of vinegar, and soak twenty-four hours; then put
them in a saucepan with enough water to cover them, a carrot and an
onion cut in slices. Boil gently two hours, drain your pork, and serve
with a sauce poivrade (Art. 95).

256. =Frankfort Sausages, with Sourcrout.= Take ten Frankfort sausages,
boil them five minutes in boiling water, and serve them with a garnish
of sourcrout (Art. 417).

257. =Roast Sucking Pig farcied.= Take a sucking pig, make an incision
in the top of the thighs and shoulders; remove all sinews from the
intestines, which chop fine with a pound of bread-crumbs which you have
soaked in water and then pressed almost dry. Put two sliced onions in
a saucepan on the fire, with an ounce of butter, for five minutes;
then add your mixture, half an ounce of salt, a good pinch of pepper,
a little nutmeg, a pinch of allspice, three times as much of sage; mix
all well together, and with this mixture stuff the inside of the pig
and sew up the paunch. Put it on a pan to roast for four hours, with a
claret-glass of white wine. Baste it several times just before serving,
remove the string with which it was sewed, strain, remove all grease
from its liquor, and serve with the pig.

258. =Glazed Ham.= Trim a ham of about five pounds, cut the thigh-bone,
and put it in cold water to soak, if old, twenty-four hours, during
which time change the water twice; if new, twelve hours will suffice.
After soaking, wrap it up in a cloth and put it in a large pot, with
enough water to cover it; add a carrot, an onion, three bay-leaves,
three cloves, one clove of garlic, six pepper-corns, and simmer very
gently five hours; after which remove the pot from the fire, and a
moment afterward take out your ham; unfasten the cloth, remove the
thigh-bone, leaving the knuckle-bone. Drain your ham, put it back again
in the cloth in a deep, round bowl, with a weight on top, until the
next day, then take off the cloth, trim the ham carefully, and remove
the rind within five inches of the knuckle-bone; cut it in points,
brush the ham over with glaze (Art. 179). Decorate with aspic jelly
(Art. 278 or 279); garnish the knuckle-bone with a ruffle of paper, and
serve.

259. =Glazed Ham with Champagne Sauce.= Proceed as for the foregoing,
put half a pint of Spanish sauce (Art. 80) in a saucepan on the fire,
add a glass of champagne or champagne cider, boil for a moment, and
serve in a sauce-boat with your ham.

260. =Glazed Ham with Truffles.= Proceed as for glazed ham (Art. 258),
except that instead of boiling five hours, boil four hours. Then take
out a quart of its liquid and substitute a bottle of white wine.
Simmer slowly for an hour, drain, then remove the napkin, take out the
thigh-bone, leaving the knuckle-bone joint. Cover the back of the ham
with incisions, in which insert large slices of truffles, which you
have previously cooked in a little of the ham's liquor, some of which
now pour over the ham. Wrap it up again very tight in the napkin, and
finish as for glazed ham.

261. =Ham à l'Américaine.= Take a ham of about five pounds, prepare
as for glazed ham, put it in a pot with a quart of claret, and enough
water to cover it. Simmer very gently five hours. Then take it out,
sprinkle lightly with sugar, send to the oven, and, when well-colored,
serve with a garnish of spinach, Brussels sprouts, green peas, or other
green vegetables, according to taste.

262. =Ham à la Zingara.= Cut ten slices of raw ham rather thick, put
them in a frying-pan, in which you have melted a little lard. Color
them on both sides, take them out of your frying-pan and keep them hot.
Mix with your lard two ounces of bread-crumbs, press through a sieve,
and put them on the fire five minutes, stirring constantly; moisten
with a sherry-glass of white wine; add a little salt, pepper, and
nutmeg, and a little chopped parsley. Mix all well together, and serve
with your slices of ham on top.

263. =Roast Ham.= Trim and pare a ham, of about five pounds, soak it
for two days, changing the water about every eight hours, after which
let it soak for about half a day in two bottles of white wine; then
put it to roast by a slow fire, for about four hours, covering it
underneath with thin pieces of larding pork, and basting it often with
hot water, which you have put in your pan. When your ham is nearly
done, take off the rind within six inches of the knuckle-bone, cut it
in long points; sprinkle the ham on top with bread-crumbs, and serve
with a hunter sauce (Art. 97).

264. =Ham Toast.= Cut the crust from eight slices of bread of medium
thickness, spread some butter thickly on top, and a little mustard,
then some grated cheese and ham, very little chopped shallot, and some
cayenne pepper. Send to the oven for a few moments, or until the cheese
is dissolved, and serve immediately.


POULTRY AND GAME, WITH ROASTS OF SAME.

265. =Broiled Chicken.= Take four spring chickens, put some alcohol on
a plate, light it, and pass your chickens over the flame, to singe off
any hair which may remain. Split them in two, clean them, wash them
well, and dry with a cloth, flatten them with a cleaver; broil them
on a moderate fire, and, when well colored on both sides, serve them
on a very hot dish, on which you have put an ounce of butter, a pinch
of salt and pepper, the juice of a lemon, a tablespoonful of chopped
parsley, and mix all well together. Serve some water-cresses around
them.

266. =Broiled Chickens (Deviled).= Take three medium-sized spring
chickens, prepare them as the foregoing, spread them lightly with a
layer of mustard, sprinkle them with bread-crumbs, and broil them on a
very gentle fire. To be certain that they are thoroughly done, lift up
the thigh, and if not red underneath, they are sufficiently cooked.
Serve very hot.

267. =Roast Spring Chickens.= Clean three or four spring chickens,
truss them, put them to roast, sprinkle them with a pinch of salt, and
a very little melted butter, with which baste them from time to time.
From thirty to thirty-five minutes should be sufficient to roast them.
When they are a fine color, remove your skewers, and take a gill of
consommé (Art. 1), reduce it on the fire one half, mix it with the
drippings of your chicken, strain, pour it over them, and serve with
water-cresses around them.

268. =Fricassée of Chicken.= Clean and wash two chickens, cut off the
thighs, legs, wings, and breasts, which put in a saucepan with a quart
of water, and blanch them ten minutes; then put them in cold water for
a moment; after which place them in a saucepan with a pint of consommé
(Art. 1), a pint of water, several branches of parsley, inclosing four
cloves, four pepper-corns, three branches of thyme, three bay-leaves,
and tie all together, add one half ounce of salt, two pinches of
pepper, and a little nutmeg. Simmer gently forty minutes. Put in
another saucepan two ounces of butter, and the same of flour, mix well
together, then add little by little three quarters of a pint of the
liquid in which your chickens were cooked, and which you have strained.
Boil gently. Take the yolks of four eggs, the juice of a lemon, and a
tablespoonful of water. Remove your sauce from the fire, and, when it
has ceased boiling, add your eggs, stirring until well mixed. Put your
chickens on a dish, pour the sauce over them, and serve. You may add
mushrooms to your sauce, green peas, or the green ends of asparagus.

269. =Chicken à la Marengo.= Prepare and cut up two chickens as the
foregoing, put them in a frying-pan with two tablespoonfuls of oil,
color your chickens a light brown, then remove them from the frying-pan
and put them in a saucepan with a half pint of Spanish sauce (Art. 80),
six tablespoonfuls of tomatoes, a claret-glass of white wine, a pinch
of salt and pepper, a little nutmeg, and boil for thirty minutes on a
good fire; add a dozen mushrooms, the same of truffles cut in quarters,
and serve. You may also serve, around your chicken, eggs fried in oil
and small pieces of bread fried in butter.

270. =Chicken Sauté à la Hongroise.= Clean and cut up two chickens as
for fricassée, and put them in a saucepan with two ounces of butter and
two onions cut in small pieces. When beginning to color, add two ounces
of flour, which mix well with your other ingredients; moisten with a
pint of milk, add a little salt, pepper, and nutmeg, several branches
of parsley, inclosing two cloves, two pepper-corns, two bay-leaves, two
branches of thyme, and tie all together. Boil very gently, skim off the
grease, remove your parsley with its spices, and serve.

271. =Chicken Sauté aux Fines Herbes.= Clean and cut in pieces two
young chickens, and put them in a saucepan, with four chopped shallots
and two ounces of butter. Turn your chicken continually, so as not to
stick to the pan, add a little salt, pepper, and nutmeg, and half a
pint of Spanish sauce (Art. 80). Chop a dozen mushrooms very fine, boil
five minutes longer, and, just before serving, add a tablespoonful of
chopped parsley, which mix with your sauce, and serve very hot.

272. =Chicken à la Financière.= Prepare two young chickens as for a
fricassée, put them in a frying-pan with an ounce of butter. When
beginning to color, remove them from the frying-pan and place them in a
saucepan with half a pint of Spanish sauce (Art. 80), two wineglasses
of sherry, a pinch of pepper, salt, and nutmeg, several branches of
parsley, inclosing two cloves, a little thyme, and two bay-leaves, and
tie all together. Boil for about thirty-five minutes. Cut in pieces six
truffles, six mushrooms, a sweet-bread tossed in a little butter, a
dozen chickens' kidneys, let the sauce boil up again, and serve.

273. =Suprême de Volaille.= Take four very tender chickens, cut the
skin which covers the breast, so as to remove the fillets. Pass the
point of a knife between the breast-bone and the fillet as far as the
wish-bone, then remove the fillet entire, without tearing it, and
proceed the same with the other fillets. Place them on a table, and
open them carefully, dividing the large fillets from the small ones
(those underneath), but not separating them, and introduce between each
fillet a tablespoonful of chicken farce (Art. 11), with which you have
mixed three truffles chopped very fine; make three or four incisions
on the top of each fillet, moisten lightly with a little white of
egg, decorate the top with thin slices of truffles cut in the form of
small cockscombs; again moisten lightly with white of egg, place the
fillets in a saucepan, adding a wineglass of sherry, half an ounce of
butter, three sherry-glasses of consommé (Art. 1), put the lid on your
saucepan, and boil gently ten minutes. Serve them in half a pint of
sauce suprême (Art. 99), to which you have added about eight chopped
truffles.

274. =Chicken à la Toulouse.= Take the eight thighs of the foregoing,
and put them in a saucepan with some consommé (Art. 1), several
branches of parsley, inclosing two bay-leaves, two branches of thyme,
two cloves, two pepper-corns, and tie all together; also, add an onion
and a carrot, cut in slices; boil gently for about forty minutes, and,
if sufficiently done, drain them, place them in a circle on a dish, and
serve them with a sauce Allemande (Art. 81) in the center, to which you
have added a dozen chopped mushrooms.

275. =Chicken with Rice.= Clean and prepare two chickens, put them in
a saucepan with enough consommé (Art. 1) to cover them. After boiling
forty minutes, drain them. Wash half a pound of rice and boil it
for ten minutes, put it in cold water, drain it and moisten with a
quarter of the liquid in which the chickens were cooked and which you
have strained, add a pinch of salt, pepper, and nutmeg. Simmer gently
for forty minutes, add an ounce of butter to your rice, mix all well
together, place on a dish, and serve your chickens cut up in pieces on
top.

276. =Chicken Sauté au Chasseur.= Clean and prepare two chickens, cut
up in pieces. Cut half a pound of bacon in small pieces, and put on the
fire, in a saucepan, for about five minutes; add your chicken, and,
when colored on one side, turn over on the other. When done, pour off
all the grease in your saucepan, moisten your chicken with half a pint
of Spanish sauce (Art. 80) and a claret-glass of white wine. Peel two
dozen little onions, put them in a frying-pan with a little lard, and,
when colored, add them to your chicken a moment before serving, with a
pinch of pepper, salt, nutmeg, and a dozen mushrooms cut in quarters.
Remove all grease from your sauce, and serve.

277. =Boiled Fowl, Caper Sauce.= Prepare and clean a fowl, pass a
wooden skewer through the thighs, put it in a saucepan with half a
pound of salt pork, and enough water to cover the chicken. Boil for an
hour and a half, drain, put it on a dish, and pour over it half a pint
of white sauce (Art. 84), to which you have added a handful of capers.
Instead of capers you may add a tablespoonful of chopped parsley, or
two dozen oysters, blanched and drained.

278. =Aspic de Foie Gras.= Heat three pints of consommé (Art. 1),
to which add three ounces of gelatine, a branch of tarragon, a
tablespoonful of tarragon vinegar, and two wineglasses of madeira (or
sherry). Simmer gently, and, when your gelatine is dissolved, remove
your saucepan to the side of the range. Mix the whites of four eggs
with a glass of cold water, and add them to your jelly, also the juice
of a lemon; stir until thoroughly mixed. Simmer gently at the side
of the range for half an hour, then strain through a flannel several
times, or until perfectly clear. Take a round mold with a hole in the
middle, place it on the top of some cracked ice, and pour in the bottom
a few tablespoonfuls of jelly. When stiff, decorate it with truffles
and the whites of hard-boiled eggs, cut in any fancy form which pleases
you, then put on top another layer of jelly, let it stiffen, then add a
layer of pâté de foie gras cut in pieces, then another layer of jelly,
and so on, in the same manner, until your mold is filled, then put it
on the ice for an hour. Then turn out your jelly on a dish, and put
in the middle a sauce remoulade (cold, Art. 109), or sauce ravigote
(cold, Art. 112), or sauce tartare (114). Instead of pâté de foie gras,
slices of cold chicken, turkey, sweetbreads, or lobster may be used.
The receipt for this jelly is given as it is generally made in this
country, where gelatine is much used.

279. =Aspic= (another manner of making it). Cut in slices two onions
and a carrot, put them in a saucepan on the fire, with two cloves, two
pepper-corns, two bay-leaves, a branch of thyme, a few very thin slices
of ham on top, four pounds of a knuckle of veal, two pounds of the lean
part of a shin of beef, half a glass of water, and the remains of cold
chicken or turkey. When beginning to color, moisten with three quarts
of consommé (Art. 1), add two calf's feet, which you have boiled ten
minutes in boiling water. Simmer very gently for four hours, remove
all grease, and strain it through a flannel. Put it back again on the
fire, mix the whites of four eggs with a glass of water, add it to your
stock, also adding three wineglasses of sherry. Simmer gently at the
back of the range for half an hour, strain it through a flannel until
perfectly clear, and put it on the ice. This receipt is given in the
manner in which aspic is made in France.

280. =Boned Chicken.= Boned chicken is prepared exactly in the same
manner as boned turkey (Art. 292).

281. =Larded Chicken.= Prepare a chicken as for roasting, lard the
breasts with pieces of larding pork, about an eighth of an inch wide
and an inch and a half long. Put it in a saucepan with a sliced
onion and carrot, six parsley-roots, two cloves, a clove of garlic,
two pepper-corns, a branch of thyme, a bay-leaf, a pinch of salt,
and enough consommé (stock, Art. 1) to cover three quarters of your
chicken. When beginning to boil, send it to the oven for about an hour
with all its liquid, with which baste it from time to time. Serve with
a purée of artichokes (Art. 443), purée of celery (Art. 392), purée of
French chestnuts (Art. 442), sauce Allemande (Art. 81), or other sauces
preferred. You may also serve the chicken with a clear gravy. Grouse,
partridges, and quail may be larded in the same manner.

282. =Chicken Pie à la Christine.= Clean two chickens, cut them in
pieces, and put them in a saucepan with quarter of a pound of salt
pork, an onion, and a little celery, all cut in small pieces, some
salt, a pinch of pepper, a very little nutmeg, several branches of
parsley, inclosing two bay-leaves, two branches of thyme, three cloves,
and a clove of garlic, all tied together. Boil an hour, and skim off
the grease carefully whenever necessary. Add two tablespoonfuls of
flour with which you have thoroughly mixed half a glass of water, boil
ten minutes longer, make a paste as for beefsteak pie (Art. 197), line
a deep dish with it, in which put your chicken, covering it on top with
a round of paste the size of your dish, brush over it some beaten egg,
and send to the oven, until well colored. Instead of celery, you may
add some chopped mushrooms and truffles, and, instead of the pork, some
small pieces of cooked ham, and hard-boiled eggs cut in slices.

283. =Chicken Croquettes.= Chop and pound fine in a mortar a pound of
chicken from which you have removed all skin and sinews; also chop fine
about ten mushrooms, which mix with your chicken, and add half a pint
of Allemande sauce (Art. 81) rather thick, to which you have added the
yolks of three eggs, mixed in two tablespoonfuls of water or milk.
Put your mixture on the ice until perfectly cold, then form it into
croquettes, which roll in bread-crumbs. Beat up three eggs, with which
cover your croquettes; again roll in bread-crumbs. Put some lard in a
frying-pan in which, when very hot, fry your croquettes, and, when a
bright yellow color, drain, and serve with fried parsley on top. You
may add to your mixture, before forming into croquettes, some chopped
truffles or chopped parsley.

284. =Puff Paste.= Put a pound of flour on a table, make a hole in
the center of the flour, in which by degrees pour half a pint of cold
water. The water should always be added in very small quantities at a
time, and thoroughly worked into the flour until perfectly absorbed
before adding more. When all the water has been thoroughly mixed
with the flour, work your paste out with the hands until round. Take
a pound of butter, which has been on the ice, and which you have
carefully washed. If very hard, knead it a little with your hands,
then place it in the middle of your paste, flatten it, fold your paste
over the butter so that it forms a square, and put it on the ice ten
minutes. Then with a rolling-pin roll out your paste (having previously
sprinkled the table with flour) about two feet long, then fold it one
third of its length, roll it once with the rolling-pin, then take the
remainder of the paste and fold it over the two other layers, and roll
the paste two or three times, fold the paste again as before, and put
it on the ice fifteen minutes. Then proceed as before, and put it again
on the ice. Repeat the same operation once again.

285. =Pâté Brisée.= Put a pound of flour on a table, make a hollow in
the middle of the flour, in which put eight ounces of butter and not
quite half a pint of water. Work this paste well, so as to be quite
smooth.

286. =Bouchées de Salpicon.= Take half a pound of puff paste, and,
after having given it six turns, roll it out half an inch thick, cut
it out in ten rounds, with a muffin-ring or a mold for the purpose.
Mark lightly in the center of each, with the point of a knife, a very
small round. Brush them (with a camel's-hair brush) in beaten egg, put
them on a pan, send them to a very hot oven, and watch them carefully
so that they do not color too much on the outside before the inside is
done. This paste should rise at least two inches. When the bouchées
are thoroughly done inside, and colored bright yellow on the outside,
take them out of the oven, remove the small rounds in the center which
you have marked out, and also enough paste from the inside to make
space for the following mixture: Put half a pint of Spanish sauce (Art.
80), with a glass of sherry, in a saucepan on the fire, boil it ten
minutes, then add eight mushrooms, four chickens' livers, which you
have previously blanched in boiling water ten minutes, the breast of
a cold chicken, some cold smoked tongue, and two truffles, all cut in
small pieces. When hot, fill your bouchées, place the small covers on
top of each, and serve. Instead of Spanish sauce, Allemande sauce (Art.
81) is often preferred. You may also add four ounces of chicken farce
(Art. 11), which form into small balls, and poach in boiling water.
Instead of chicken, you may substitute sweetbreads; or you may fill the
bouchées with oysters, to which you have added an Allemande sauce and
some mushrooms cut in small pieces.

287. =Croüstades de Salpicon.= Take some pâté brisée (Art. 285), roll
it out very thin, butter ten little tin molds, which line with your
paste, prick a few holes in the bottom and fill the insides, and send
them to a hot oven until done, take them out of the molds, brush the
outsides with beaten egg, put them back in the oven for five minutes,
remove the flour from the insides, using a small, dry brush, so that
none shall remain, and fill them with the mixture described in the
foregoing article.

288. =Cromesqui of Chicken.= Make a mixture as for chicken croquettes
(Art. 283), adding a little red pepper. When cold, form it into balls,
about the size of a small egg, and wrap up each one in a very thin
piece of pork. Break three eggs in a bowl, add six ounces of flour, mix
well together, and then add a little water, so as to make a smooth and
very soft paste, but sufficiently solid to adhere to your cromesqui.
Then mix thoroughly a teaspoonful of soda with your paste, with which
cover each cromesqui, and fry in very hot lard. When a bright yellow,
drain, and serve plain, or with a tomato sauce (Art. 90).

289. =Timbale of Chicken.= Chop fine, and then pound in a mortar half
a pound of the white meat of chicken, from which you have removed the
skin and sinews; add to the chicken, little by little, while pounding,
three sherry-glasses of _very_ cold cream, a little salt, white pepper,
and the whites of five eggs. When you have obtained a very fine, smooth
paste, press it through a sieve, and then fill with it ten little tin
molds, which you have buttered. Place them in a saucepan, in which you
have put the depth of an inch of water, cover your saucepan, and send
to the oven for about ten minutes, or until the mixture is firm enough
to turn out of the molds. Then serve with a sauce périgueux (Art. 91),
or a sauce suprême (Art. 99), or a sauce Allemande (Art. 81).

290. =Roast Turkey stuffed.= Clean and prepare a medium-sized turkey
for roasting. Cut two onions in pieces, and put them in a saucepan with
two ounces of lard, and color them lightly. Soak a pound of bread in
water, from which press the water, add the bread to your onions, with
the turkey's liver and heart chopped very fine, a little salt, two
pinches of pepper, the same of sage, a pinch of thyme, and mix all well
together. Stuff the inside of the turkey with this mixture, sew up the
opening through which you have introduced the stuffing, and put it to
roast, with a little butter on top, and a wineglass of water. Roast for
three quarters of an hour, strain the liquid in your pan, pour it over
your turkey, and serve.

291. =Turkey with Truffles.= Clean and prepare a young medium-sized
turkey as the foregoing. Melt four ounces of the fat of your turkey in
a frying pan with a shallot and a few truffles chopped fine, a pinch of
thyme, salt, pepper, and nutmeg, a pound of sausage-meat, and a can of
truffles cut in quarters. Mix all well together, and with this mixture
stuff your turkey; sew up the opening through which you have put your
farce. Roast the turkey for three quarters of an hour, putting a little
butter on the breast and a glass of white wine in the pan, and baste
it often. Serve your turkey on a dish, and pour over it the liquid
in your pan, which you have strained. Proceed in the same manner for
chickens, capons, partridges, etc.--the quantity of each ingredient in
proportion to the size of the piece roasted.

292. =Boned Turkey.= Take a hen-turkey of seven pounds, singe off the
hair, by passing it over some lighted alcohol, cut off the head and
neck, make an incision through the back its entire length, cut off the
wings, and remove all the bones of the turkey. Take three pounds of
chopped sausage-meat, the half of which place in the interior of your
turkey, cover the farce with alternate strips of larding pork, half an
inch wide, strips of cold ham, tongue, and some truffles cut in pieces
intermixed. Season with pepper. Place on top of these the other half of
your sausage-meat, which cover with another layer of larding pork, ham,
and truffles. Then draw the meat at the sides to the center of the back
of your turkey, and sew them together with a larding-needle threaded
with fine twine. Place on top several slices of lemon, from which you
have removed the peel and seeds, and wrap up your turkey very tight
in a cloth, which tie firmly with a string, and put in a saucepan,
in which you have put the bones of your turkey, a carrot, an onion,
a little thyme, two bay-leaves, two cloves, one clove of garlic, and
enough consommé (stock, Art. 1) to cover the turkey. Simmer gently for
three hours, then remove the cloth, which wash clean, and again wrap
the turkey in it, tying it as tight as possible. Place it in a pan,
put another pan on top, in which put a weight, so as to render the top
of the turkey perfectly flat, and put on ice for a day. Skim off the
grease from the liquid in which your turkey was cooked, strain, take
of it three pints, which put on the fire with three ounces of gelatine
and the juice of two lemons. Mix four whites of eggs with a glass of
water, pour into your saucepan with the stock and gelatine, stir all
well together, and when beginning to boil remove to the back of the
range to simmer gently for half an hour, strain through a flannel until
perfectly clear, add a wineglass of sherry, put on the ice until cold,
cut in pieces, which place on top and around your turkey.

293. =Tame Ducks roasted.= Clean and prepare two ducks for roasting.
Put them in a pan with a little salt, a little butter, a wineglass of
water, and roast them by a good fire for about twenty-five or thirty
minutes. When well colored, serve them, surrounded with water-cresses.
Strain the liquor in your pan, and serve in a sauce-boat with your
ducks.

294. =Ducks with Olives.= Prepare and cook your ducks as the foregoing.
Put half a pint of Spanish sauce (Art. 80) in a saucepan, let it boil,
and add three dozen olives from which you have removed the stones, and
a glass of sherry; boil gently ten minutes, pour your sauce around your
ducks, and serve.

295. =Duck with Turnips.= Prepare two ducks as the foregoing. Put
in a saucepan a sliced onion and carrot, two pieces of larding pork,
three bay-leaves, three branches of thyme, two cloves of garlic, four
parsley-roots, three cloves, three pepper-corns, and a pinch of salt.
Place your ducks on top, moisten them with sufficient consommé (Art.
1) to barely cover them, and a claret-glass of white wine. Boil very
gently for an hour. Pare some turnips, cut them round and small, in
sufficient quantity for eight people. Put them in a saucepan on the
fire, with an ounce of lard; when equally colored, drain them, and
place them in a saucepan with half a pint of Spanish sauce (Art. 80),
a pinch of sugar, a pinch of pepper; boil until the turnips are done.
Place your ducks on a dish, and your sauce, with the turnips, around
them.

296. =Ducks with Purée of Peas.= Clean, prepare, and cook two ducks as
the foregoing. Boil a quart of peas, put them through a sieve, then
heat them in a saucepan with a little butter, salt, and a pinch of
sugar, and serve, with your ducks, on a separate dish.

297. =Roast Goose.= Clean and prepare a young goose for roasting. Put
a little butter on top, a little salt, and a claret-glass of water
in your pan, and roast for an hour. Put half a pint of Spanish sauce
in a saucepan on the fire, mix with it a tablespoonful of mustard, a
teaspoonful of vinegar, a pinch of pepper, and nutmeg. Let it boil a
moment, and serve, with your goose, in a sauce-boat.

298. =Braised Goose, Celery Sauce.= Prepare a goose as for duck with
turnips (Art. 295). Cut a bunch of celery in small pieces, wash them
well, and boil in water, with a little salt; when done, drain them. Put
in a saucepan half a pint of white sauce (Art. 84), add your celery,
boil five minutes, drain off your goose, pour your celery sauce on a
dish, place your goose on top, and serve.

299. =Roast Squabs.= Clean and wash eight squabs, put a little butter
and salt on top, and roast them thirty minutes. Reduce half a pint of
consommé (Art. 1) on the fire, one half pour over your squabs, and
serve some water-cresses around them.

300. =Broiled Squabs.= Clean and wash eight squabs, split them in two,
flatten them with a cleaver, beat up two eggs, add an ounce of melted
butter, a pinch of salt and pepper, mix all well together, spread over
your squabs, and sprinkle them with bread-crumbs. Broil them on a
gentle fire, and, when well colored, serve.

301. =Squabs en Compote.= Clean eight squabs, split them in two, put
them in a saucepan with four ounces of butter, in small pieces. Color
them slightly on the fire, and, when a good color, drain off the
grease. Moisten your squabs with half a pint of Spanish sauce (Art.
80), add a pinch of pepper, nutmeg, and thyme, a glass of sherry, and
boil thirty minutes. Peel two dozen little onions, toss them in a
frying-pan with half an ounce of lard, and, when well colored, add them
to your squabs. Cut a dozen mushrooms in quarters, boil ten minutes,
and serve very hot.

302. =Broiled Squabs (Deviled).= Prepare exactly as for deviled chicken
(Art. 266).

303. =Squabs with Green Peas.= Clean eight squabs, separate them in
two, put them in a saucepan on the fire, with an ounce of butter. When
a nice color, add half a glass of water, two bay-leaves, two branches
of thyme, two cloves, two pepper-corns, a clove of garlic, and a pinch
of salt and pepper. Cook thirty minutes, drain and strain the liquid in
which your squabs were cooked, add to it a quart of boiled peas, and
serve with your squabs.

304. =Broiled Partridge.= Clean and divide in two, for broiling, three
partridges, break the thigh-bone, and broil them on a gentle fire. When
well colored on both sides, serve them on a dish on which you have
put two ounces of melted butter, a tablespoonful of chopped parsley,
a pinch of pepper and salt, and the juice of a lemon, all well mixed
together. Garnish with water-cresses or slices of lemon.

305. =Deviled Partridge.= Broil three partridges as the foregoing, and
proceed as for deviled chicken (Art. 266).

306. =Partridge aux Choux.= Clean three partridges, and put them in a
saucepan with half a pound of bacon, two smoked sausages, a carrot cut
in two, and a whole onion, several branches of parsley, inclosing four
cloves, three branches of thyme, and a clove of garlic. Tie all well
together, and cover your partridges with pieces of larding pork. Blanch
a cabbage in boiling water on the fire for fifteen minutes, then put it
for a moment in cold water, drain it, and press from it all moisture.
Lay it on top of your partridges, and cover with strips of larding
pork. Moisten with sufficient consommé (Art. 1) to cover them. Simmer
gently for two hours. Drain off your partridges, bacon, sausages, and
cabbage, from which again press the moisture. Remove your carrot,
onion, and herbs, boil, and serve your partridges on a dish, with your
cabbage underneath, and your bacon and sausage, cut in pieces, around
them.

307. =Roast Partridge.= Clean three partridges, pass a wooden skewer
through the thighs, tie on top of each a thin slice of pork, and roast
them forty minutes. Put a claret-glass of white wine in the pan, and
baste them from time to time. Remove your skewers, and the strings with
which you have tied on your pork, and put your partridges on a dish.
Add two wineglasses of consommé (Art. 1) to the liquid in the pan, boil
for a moment, strain and pour in the dish with your partridges, which
serve, garnished with water-cresses, or with bread sauce (Art. 87).

308. =Salmi of Partridge.= Cut up in pieces three cold roast
partridges, which put in a saucepan with an onion cut in slices,
two cloves, a bay-leaf, a branch of thyme, a clove of garlic, two
parsley-roots, and six chopped mushrooms. Moisten with a claret-glass
of white wine, and half a pint of Spanish sauce (Art. 80). Boil very
gently for half an hour, carefully removing all grease, and strain.
Then put your sauce again in the saucepan with your partridges, add
two dozen mushrooms, and keep them hot. Fry a bright yellow, in butter,
eight pieces of bread, cut round at one end and pointed at the other;
drain them. Serve your partridges, the sauce poured over them, and
garnish with your fried pieces of bread.

309. =Truffled Partridge.= Prepare three partridges as for roasting,
make an incision in the skin of the neck. Pound together two chickens'
livers and the same in quantity of fresh fat pork, adding a pinch of
salt and pepper and a little nutmeg. Mix all together, with half a
pound of truffles, cut in quarters, and put the third of your farce
in each partridge. Sew up the opening through which you have inserted
the farce, and also the skin of the neck. Then put a little butter on
them, and roast them for thirty-five to forty minutes, according to the
size of your partridges. Serve around them a sauce périgueux (Art. 91).
Grouse are prepared in each manner described for partridges.

310. =Broiled Quail.= Prepare and broil eight quails as for broiled
partridge. You may also devil them, as described in deviled chicken
(Art. 266).

311. =Roast Quail.= Prepare eight quails for roasting, with a piece of
thin pork on top and a claret-glass of consommé (Art. 1) in the pan.
Fifteen minutes on a good fire will be sufficient to roast them. Boil
the liquid in your pan for a moment, strain it, put it in a dish with
your quails, under each of which you have placed a piece of toast, and
serve garnished with water-cresses.

312. =Quail en Caisse.= Split eight quails through the back, without
injuring the fillets, and remove the bones. Take half a dozen chickens'
livers with as much fat pork, and pound together to a paste, then mix
with this four truffles chopped very fine, salt, pepper, and nutmeg,
and fill the inside of your quail with this mixture, then wrap them
up in thin strips of pork, and tie a string around each, so as to
preserve their shape. Put them in a pan and send them to the oven for
fifteen minutes. Then take eight paper cases, as wide and as high as
your quail, put a little oil on the inside of the cases, and half fill
them with a farce of sausage, with which you have mixed four chopped
truffles, as many mushrooms, a little salt, pepper, and nutmeg. Put
your quail on top, and send them to the oven for twenty minutes. Put a
tablespoonful of Spanish sauce (Art. 80) on top of each quail.

313. =Quail with Truffles.= Clean eight quails, split them through the
back and remove the bones. Put in a saucepan on the fire for a moment
the livers of your quails, five chickens' livers, and the same quantity
of fresh fat pork. Take them out of your saucepan and pound them
together, adding two truffles chopped fine, a pinch of salt, pepper,
and nutmeg, fill your quails with the mixture and sew up the opening.
Tie on top of each a thin piece of pork, place them in a saucepan with
slices of ham, and moisten half their height with an equal quantity
of consommé (Art. 1) and white wine. Send them to the oven for about
thirty minutes, remove the strings used for tying on the pork, and
place your quails on a dish. Skim off all grease from their liquid,
strain it, put it in a saucepan on the fire for a moment, add to it a
dozen truffles cut in slices, pour it over your quails, and serve.

314. =Pigeons Poêlés.= Clean eight pigeons, and put them in a saucepan
with a clove of garlic, two cloves, two pepper-corns, two bay-leaves, a
branch of thyme, an onion cut in slices, a little salt and pepper, and
moisten with quarter of a pint of consommé and the same of white wine.
Simmer gently, and, when they are cooked, drain off the liquid, remove
all the grease, strain it, reduce it on the fire one half, add a dozen
mushrooms, and serve with the pigeons.

315. =Pigeons en Compote.= Prepare and cook eight pigeons in the
same manner as described for squabs en compote (Art. 301), with the
exception of cooking them an hour longer.

316. =Fillets of Hare Sautés.= Take the fillets of two hares, and cut
them in medium-sized pieces. Put them in a saucepan with two ounces
of butter, an onion cut in slices, a clove of garlic chopped, two
bay-leaves, two cloves, and two branches of thyme. After having been
on a good fire ten minutes, add a tablespoonful of flour and your
fillets; moisten with quarter of a pint of consommé (Art. 1), and the
same of red wine, a pinch of salt and pepper, and boil on a good fire
forty minutes. Remove your fillets, strain the liquid, put it back on
the fire with your fillets, add a tablespoonful of vinegar, boil five
minutes, and serve.

317. =Roast Hare.= Clean and uncase a hare, then take off the skin on
top of the thighs and fillet, lard them, and put them in a pan with a
little salt and pepper on top and a little melted butter. Baste them
from time to time, and roast them an hour. Serve with a sauce poivrade
(Art. 95).

318. =Hare à la Bourgeoise.= When your hare is uncased and cleaned,
cut it in pieces and put it in a saucepan, with a quarter of a pound
of bacon cut in small pieces, several branches of parsley, inclosing
three cloves, three pepper-corns, two branches of thyme, two cloves of
garlic, and tie all well together. Moisten with half a pint of consommé
(Art. 1), the same of white wine, and about thirty pieces of turnips
cut in small quarters; reduce on the fire until nearly all the liquid
has evaporated, and serve.

319. =Ragoût of Hare.= Skin and clean a hare, cut it in pieces and
prepare it in the same manner as for ragoût of venison (Art. 331).

320. =Rabbit Sauté à la Minute.= Cut in pieces two rabbits, which you
have skinned and cleaned, put them in a saucepan with two ounces of
butter, salt, pepper, a little allspice, and nutmeg. Put on the fire
for about twenty minutes, then add four chopped shallots, a wineglass
of white wine, boil ten minutes, add a tablespoonful of chopped
parsley, and serve.

321. =Ragoût of Rabbit.= After having cleaned and skinned two rabbits,
cut them in pieces and cook exactly as for ragoût of venison (Art.
331).

322. =Roast Rabbit.= Take two rabbits and proceed exactly as for roast
hare, except that instead of cooking an hour, cook them three quarters
of an hour, and serve with a sauce ravigote hot (Art. 111).

323. =Hash of Rabbit.= Take the remains of two rabbits, or one whole
rabbit, and the same quantity of a cold leg of mutton, and chop very
fine. Break the bones of your rabbit and put them in a saucepan, with
two chopped cloves of garlic, two cloves, two bay-leaves, a branch
of thyme, a little mace, and a pinch of sage. Put them on the fire
ten minutes, moisten with two claret-glasses of red wine and one of
consommé (Art. 1). Boil three quarters of an hour, strain, then add
them to your hash in a frying-pan, with a little salt, pepper, and
nutmeg. Heat without boiling, and serve very hot; garnish with pieces
of bread fried in butter.

324. =Rabbit à l'Espagnole.= After having skinned and cleaned two
rabbits, cut them in pieces and put them in a saucepan on the fire for
fifteen minutes with some butter. Moisten them with a claret-glass of
consommé (Art. 1), a pinch of salt, pepper, and nutmeg, and a little
thyme. Reduce on the fire until almost all moisture is evaporated, add
half a pint of Spanish sauce (Art. 80), and three tablespoonfuls of
tomatoes. Boil ten minutes, and just before serving sprinkle a little
chopped parsley on top.

325. =Suprême of Partridge.= Take the breasts of four partridges and
separate the upper from the lower fillet, so as to make an opening
for stuffing; chop up the white and dark meat fine, which put in a
saucepan with a little butter, and toss on the fire until done; then
mix thoroughly with quarter of a pint of béchamel sauce (Art. 83), and
a few truffles and mushrooms chopped fine. When this mixture is cold,
stuff with it the under fillet of partridge and cover with the upper.
Put them in a pan, cover with buttered paper, and send to a moderate
oven for about half an hour, or a little more. Dust over with hashed
truffles, and serve with purée of celery (Art. 392).

326. =Timbale of Partridge.= Proceed exactly as for timbale of chicken
(Art. 289). Timbale of grouse may be made in the same manner.

327. =Venison Chops, with Currant Jelly Sauce.= Broil eight venison
chops for about six to seven minutes. Put in a saucepan nearly half a
pint of Spanish sauce (Art. 80) and the eighth of a pint of currant
jelly; let them boil a moment, or until the currant jelly is dissolved;
then serve your chops with the sauce around them.

328. =Saddle of Venison.= Take seven pounds of a saddle of venison,
roast it about thirty-five minutes, and serve with currant jelly.

329. =Leg of Venison.= Take seven pounds of a leg of venison, which
roast forty-five minutes, and serve with currant jelly.

330. =Venison Chops.= Put eight venison chops in an earthen jar with
four bay-leaves, three branches of thyme, six cloves, six pepper-corns,
four branches of parsley, a clove of garlic, a sliced onion and
carrot, and a pint of vinegar; let them soak twenty-four hours; drain
them, and put them in a frying-pan with an ounce of butter; shake them
in the pan until done. Put four tablespoonfuls of vinegar, with a pinch
of pepper, in a saucepan on the fire, reduce two thirds, add half a
pint of Spanish sauce (Art. 80), boil five minutes, and serve with your
chops on a very hot dish.

331. =Ragoût of Venison.= Cut into pieces three pounds of a breast of
venison, which put on the fire in a saucepan, with half a pound of
bacon cut in small pieces, and a little salt, pepper, and nutmeg, for
fifteen minutes; mix well with your ingredients two tablespoonfuls
of flour, add half a pint of consommé (stock), and the same of red
wine; also several branches of parsley, inclosing three cloves, three
pepper-corns, two branches of thyme, two bay-leaves, a clove of garlic,
and tie all together. Boil three quarters of an hour. Peel two dozen
white onions, color them in a frying-pan on the fire, with a little
butter, and then add them to your stew; boil fifteen minutes longer,
add a dozen mushrooms cut in quarters, and serve.

332. =Braised Fillets of Venison.= Put four fillets of venison in
an earthen jar, with half a pint of oil, a little salt, pepper, and
nutmeg, for four hours; drain them and put them in a saucepan on the
fire, with two cloves, two pepper-corns, two bay-leaves, two branches
of thyme, a pinch of salt and pepper, and a sliced onion. Moisten with
an equal quantity of consommé (stock, Art. 1) and white wine, so as to
almost cover your fillets. Simmer gently for an hour and a half; drain
them, and serve with a sauce piquante (Art. 86).

333. =Broiled Plover.= Clean eight plovers, split them down the back
without separating the two parts; chop the livers very fine, add half
of their quantity of butter, as much bread-crumbs which you have
pressed through a sieve, a little salt, pepper, nutmeg, a pinch of
thyme, either powdered or chopped very fine, the white of an egg,
and a tablespoonful of parsley chopped very fine. Mix all thoroughly
together, toast eight pieces of bread without the crust, spread your
mixture upon them; broil the plovers, place them on top of your toast,
and serve garnished with water-cresses.

334. =Roast Plover.= Prepare and clean eight plovers for roasting; tie
on top of each a thin piece of pork; and roast them twenty minutes.
Remove the strings and place the plovers on a dish; take the liquid
from the pan in which the birds were roasted, add a wineglass of
consommé (Art. 1), boil for a moment, strain, and pour it on the dish
with the plovers; serve garnished with water-cresses.

335. =Broiled Woodcock.= Prepare eight woodcocks for broiling; preserve
the insides, except the gizzard, chop them, finish as for the toast
described in broiled plover (Art. 333), and serve garnished with slices
of lemon.

336. =Roast Woodcock.= Prepare as for roast plover. Roast them twelve
to fifteen minutes.

337. =Snipe.= Snipe are prepared as woodcocks, robins, and other small
birds.

338. =Reed-Birds.= Take two dozen reed-birds and put them in a
saucepan, with two ounces of butter, a pinch of salt and pepper, toss
them in the pan, on a quick fire, for about three minutes. Put them
on a dish on which you have placed pieces of toast; add a wineglass
of consommé (Art. 1) to the butter in your saucepan. Boil a moment,
strain, add the juice of a lemon, and pour over the reed-birds.
Reed-birds are also roasted, served on toast, with sometimes a silver
skewer passed through them. Four to five minutes, on a good fire, will
be sufficient to roast them.

339. =Roast Canvas-Back Ducks.= Prepare and clean four canvas-back
ducks, pass them over some lighted alcohol to singe the hair; wash them
well, and do not cut off the heads. Pass a skewer through the thighs
and under the wings, and put them before the fire for fifteen minutes
to roast. Take out the skewers, garnish with water-cresses, and serve
some currant jelly separately.

340. =Red-Head Ducks.= Prepare and cook as the foregoing.

341. =Broiled Red-Head Ducks.= After having cleaned and washed three
red-head ducks, split them in two for broiling, and, when well-colored
on both sides, serve them with a sauce poivrade (Art. 95), sauce
piquante (Art. 86), or other sharp, highly-seasoned sauces.

342. =Salmi of Red-Head Ducks.= Take the remains of three red-head
ducks, or two whole red-head, cold, cut up in pieces, and finish as
for salmi of partridge (Art. 308). Mallard, teal, and other wild ducks
are prepared as described in the foregoing articles on ducks; the time
necessary to roast them depending on their size.



CHAPTER V.

_VEGETABLES._


343. =Green Peas à l'Anglaise.= Put a quart of water in a saucepan
with a pinch of salt; when boiling, add three pints of green peas, and
boil them for twenty-five minutes; take one out and see if thoroughly
done, if so, drain them, and put them in a saucepan with two ounces of
butter, a pinch of salt and sugar, and serve them very hot.

344. =Green Peas à la Française.= Put three pints of green peas in a
saucepan, with ten branches of parsley tied together, a whole onion
peeled, a pinch of salt and sugar, and a pint of water. Boil for
twenty-five minutes, and, if sufficiently done, take out the onion and
parsley. Mix on a table an ounce of butter with a teaspoonful of flour,
which add to your peas on the fire, stir gently with a spoon, and, when
thoroughly mixed and the butter dissolved, serve very hot.

345. =Green Peas with Bacon.= Cut the rind from a quarter of a pound of
bacon, which cut in small pieces and place in a saucepan on the fire,
when beginning to color add a tablespoonful of flour, a little pepper
and nutmeg, and ten branches of parsley tied together; moisten with a
glass of water; add three pints of green peas, and boil about thirty
minutes; if sufficiently done, remove the bunch of parsley, and serve.
Peas cooked in this way are often used as a garnish for different kinds
of meat.

346. =Green Peas à la Paysanne.= Put three pints of green peas in
a saucepan, with an ounce of butter, ten branches of parsley tied
together, a whole onion peeled, a pinch of sugar, a little salt, half a
glass of water, a lettuce cut in pieces (as for Julienne soup). Simmer
very gently, and, when the peas are sufficiently done, mix three yolks
of eggs with three tablespoonfuls of cream, and, having removed your
parsley and onion, add the eggs to your peas; mix all well together,
and serve.

347. =String-Beans à l'Anglaise.= Take three pints of string-beans,
string them, and put them in nearly two quarts of boiling water, in
which you have put a little salt; when the beans are sufficiently
cooked, drain them and put them in a saucepan with two ounces of
butter, a pinch of salt, a very little chopped parsley, the juice of a
lemon, and serve them very hot.

348. =String-Beans Sautés.= Prepare and cook your beans as the
foregoing. Put in a saucepan three ounces of butter, a pinch of salt,
the juice of a lemon, a tablespoonful of chopped parsley, and six
tablespoonfuls of sauce Allemande (Art. 81); mix all well together,
pour over your beans, and serve hot.

349. =Beans Panachés.= Prepare a pint and a half of string-beans, as
the preceding; put in a saucepan two quarts of water, a good pinch of
salt, and boil them until tender. Take the same of white beans, which
boil; drain them both and put them in a saucepan together, adding a
pinch of salt, three ounces of butter, the juice of a lemon, and a
tablespoonful of chopped parsley; when very hot, serve.

350. =White Beans Sautés.= Boil three pints of beans as the foregoing,
and, when they are thoroughly done, drain them and put them in a
saucepan with three ounces of butter, a pinch of salt and pepper, a
tablespoonful of chopped parsley, and the juice of half a lemon; serve
very hot. You may also add, after removing your saucepan from the fire,
the yolks of two eggs well mixed in two tablespoonfuls of milk or cream.

351. =Dried Beans.= Soak, the night before they are required to use,
three pints of dried beans, and proceed as for the preceding. The time
required to cook them depends on the quality of your beans.

352. =Purée of Dried Beans.= Soak in water for twelve hours a quart of
dried beans, drain them, and put them in a saucepan with boiling water
and a little salt. When thoroughly cooked, press them through a sieve,
and then put them in a saucepan with three ounces of butter; when very
hot, serve.

353. =Red Beans.= Soak in water for twelve hours three pints of red
beans; then boil them in two quarts of water, with an onion, a carrot,
a pinch of sugar and pepper, several branches of parsley, inclosing
two cloves, two branches of thyme, tied all together, half a pound of
bacon, and half a pint of red wine; when your beans have absorbed all
moisture, remove your carrot, onion, and branch of parsley, add two
ounces of butter, and serve, with the bacon cut in slices, around your
beans.

354. =Windsor Beans.= Put three pints of very small Windsor beans in
two quarts of boiling water, a good pinch of salt, and a branch of
savory herb. When your beans are thoroughly cooked, drain them and put
them in a saucepan, with a pinch of salt, pepper, sugar, nutmeg, and
a tablespoonful of savory herb chopped very fine. Mix two eggs in two
tablespoonfuls of milk or cream, and add them to your beans, after
having taken them off the fire. If, instead of small beans, you have
large ones, the skin or peel must be removed.

355. =Windsor Beans à l'Anglaise.= Prepare and cook your beans as
the foregoing, and, just before serving, add a tablespoonful of mint
chopped very fine.

356. =Purée of Windsor Beans.= Boil three quarts of Windsor beans in
consommé (Art. 1), with a bunch of savory herb, and a little salt; when
thoroughly done, press them through a sieve, and then put them in a
saucepan on the fire with three ounces of butter, a pinch of sugar, and
two wineglasses of good cream. Serve very hot, garnished with pieces of
bread fried in butter.

357. =Asparagus with French Rolls.= Cut off the tops of eight oval,
soft, French rolls, remove the inside, in which put a little butter,
and send to the oven for three or four minutes to color lightly. Fill
them with the green ends of about three bunches of asparagus, which
you have previously boiled, and about half a pint of sauce Allemande
(Art. 81), well mixed with the asparagus ends. Serve very hot.

358. =Asparagus with Butter Sauce.= Scrape and wash two bunches of
asparagus, cut them in equal lengths, and put them in two quarts of
boiling water, with a little salt. Boil them until perfectly tender,
drain and serve them very hot, with a white sauce (Art. 84), or with
melted butter.

359. =Pointes d'Asperges au Veloutée.= Cut the green ends, about an
inch in length, of three bunches of asparagus, and put them in three
pints of boiling water, with two pinches of salt. Boil rapidly for
about ten minutes, and, when thoroughly done, drain them, and put them
in a saucepan with two ounces of butter, a pinch of salt, pepper,
nutmeg, two pinches of sugar, and about six tablespoonfuls of sauce
veloutée (Art. 82). Mix all well together, and serve very hot.

360. =Asperges en Petits Pois.= Cut off in pieces about the size of
a pea the green ends of four bunches of asparagus, which put in two
quarts of boiling water, and half an ounce of salt. Boil them rapidly,
and, when thoroughly cooked, drain them, and put them in a saucepan
with two ounces of butter, a little nutmeg, two pinches of sugar, and
six tablespoonfuls of béchamel sauce (Art. 83). Mix all well together,
and serve garnished with pieces of bread fried in butter.

361. =Lentils.= Clean and wash two quarts of lentils, and boil them
in two quarts of boiling water, and a little salt. When thoroughly
cooked, drain them, and finish as for white beans (Art. 350).

362. =Cauliflower with Butter Sauce.= Take some cauliflowers, in
quantity according to size, wash them, trim off the leaves, and put
them in two quarts of boiling water on the fire, adding half an ounce
of salt, half an ounce of butter, and the juice of a lemon. Boil
rapidly until quite tender, drain, and serve them with a white sauce
(Art. 84).

363. =Cauliflower au Gratin.= Boil your cauliflowers as the foregoing,
then put them in a deep dish, add half a pint of sauce Allemande (Art.
81), in which you have mixed four ounces of grated cheese. Sprinkle
thickly with bread-crumbs, and a little melted butter, and send to the
oven until colored a light brown.

364. =Cauliflower au Veloutée.= Prepare as for cauliflowers with butter
sauce (Art. 362), and serve with a sauce veloutée (Art. 82).

365. =Artichokes with Butter Sauce.= Take eight artichokes, cut off the
stalks, and also about half an inch off the leaves; then place them in
three quarts of boiling water and half an ounce of salt, and boil about
half an hour; pass the point of a knife through the bottom of one, and,
if soft, the artichoke is sufficiently done. Drain, and serve with a
white or butter sauce (Art. 84).

366. =Fonds d'Artichauts à l'Italienne.= Cut off the stalks, remove the
leaves and the furze in the inside of eight artichokes, boil them as
the foregoing, and serve with an Italian sauce (Art. 93).

367. =Fonds d'Artichauts à la Macédoine.= Cut off the stalks, remove
all the leaves from eight artichokes, and also the furze which adheres
to the bottom. Trim them perfectly round, and put them in three pints
of boiling water, with a little salt, and, when thoroughly done, drain
them, fill them with a macédoine of vegetables (Art. 416), and serve
them very hot.

368. =Fried Artichokes.= Take eight artichokes, cut off the stalks and
the ends of the leaves, and put them in a bowl for an hour, with half
a glass of vinegar, and a little salt and pepper. Break three eggs in
a bowl, to which add two ounces of flour, a pinch of pepper and salt;
drain off your artichokes, dip them in your eggs and flour, and fry
them one by one in hot lard; drain them, and serve very hot.

369. =Artichokes à la Barrigoule.= Prepare and boil eight artichokes;
when done, drain them and remove the leaves in the middle, also the
furze which adheres to the bottom of the artichokes; let them dry
thoroughly; cover a frying-pan about half an inch deep with oil;
when very hot, add your artichokes, the tips of the leaves touching
the oil; when a fine color, drain them. Chop fine four ounces of fat
fresh pork, two shallots, a tablespoonful of parsley, and a dozen
mushrooms; add a pinch of salt, pepper, and nutmeg, and a wineglass of
sherry; mix all well together, and with this mixture fill the center
of your artichokes. Tie a strip of thin pork on each and put them in
a saucepan, on top of an onion and a carrot sliced extremely fine;
moisten with a glass of consommé (Art. 1) and a claret-glass of white
wine, heat them for a moment on the fire, send them to the oven for
three quarters of an hour, remove the strips of pork, and fill the
artichokes up to the top with Italian sauce (Art. 93).

370. =Raw Artichokes à la Vinaigrette.= Cut eight artichokes in
thin slices; mix well together eight tablespoonfuls of oil, three
tablespoonfuls of vinegar, a pinch of salt and pepper, and serve with
your artichokes. Artichokes to be eaten raw must be very fresh.

371. =Jerusalem Artichokes.= Peel two dozen Jerusalem artichokes, boil
them in two or three quarts of boiling water, with a pinch of salt;
when thoroughly done, pour over them a sauce béchamel (Art. 83).

372. =Spinach à l'Anglaise.= Pick three quarts of spinach, wash it very
carefully, changing the water several times; then put it in four quarts
of boiling water, adding half an ounce of salt. Boil your spinach on a
very hot fire, taking care to press it down into the saucepan from time
to time; boil it for about ten minutes, then put it in cold water for
a moment, and press the water from it; chop it rather fine and put it
in a saucepan with six ounces of butter, a pinch of salt, a nutmeg, and
serve very hot.

373. =Spinach à l'Espagnole.= Boil your spinach as the foregoing,
and, after chopping it extremely fine, put it in a saucepan with four
ounces of butter, a little salt and nutmeg, and an eighth of a pint of
Spanish sauce (Art. 80); serve it very hot, garnished with pieces of
bread fried in butter.

374. =Spinach with Cream.= Boil your spinach as the foregoing, chop it
extremely fine. Put in a saucepan on the fire four ounces of butter, a
tablespoonful of flour, a little salt, nutmeg, half a teaspoonful of
sugar, and half a pint of cream. Stir all well together until boiling,
add your spinach, and, when hot, serve, garnished with pieces of bread
fried in butter.

375. =Salsify with Butter Sauce.= Scrape three bunches of salsify,
dip them in three quarts of water and two tablespoonfuls of vinegar,
to prevent their turning black, then cut them three inches in length.
Put two tablespoonfuls of flour in a saucepan, add, by degrees, some
water, stirring constantly, until two quarts have been added, then a
tablespoonful of vinegar, a little salt, and your salsify. Boil about
an hour, or until it is perfectly tender; drain, and serve with a white
or butter sauce (Art. 84). Instead of butter sauce, you may serve with
them a Spanish sauce (Art. 80), veloutée (Art. 82), or béchamel sauce
(Art. 83).

376. =Fried Salsify.= Prepare and boil your salsify as above, cut them
two inches in length, and when very tender drain them. Put in a bowl
half a pound of flour, two eggs, and some water. Mix well together
until you have a soft, smooth paste, thin enough to pour from a spoon.
Cover each piece of salsify with the paste, and fry one by one in very
hot lard, drain them, and serve them on a dish, piled one on top of the
other.

377. =Stewed Tomatoes.= Put a can of tomatoes in a saucepan, with four
ounces of butter, a little salt and pepper, a pinch of sugar, and two
tablespoonfuls of bread-crumbs. Boil five minutes, and serve.

378. =Broiled Tomatoes.= Slice eight tomatoes, sprinkle them thickly
with bread-crumbs and a little butter, broil them on a moderate fire,
and, when a bright yellow color on top, serve them on a dish in a
circle, one on top of the other.

379. =Farcied Tomatoes.= Take eight medium-sized, firm tomatoes, cut a
hole on top of each, and scoop out the inside of the tomato, chop an
onion, put it in a saucepan on the fire, with an ounce of butter, to
simmer gently. When slightly colored, add six ounces of bread-crumbs,
which you have soaked in water, and then pressed out nearly all the
moisture, a dozen chopped mushrooms, a tablespoonful of chopped
parsley, a pinch of salt, pepper, and thyme chopped fine, a little red
pepper, and four tablespoonfuls of tomato sauce (Art. 90); mix all well
together, and then fill the inside of your tomatoes. Sprinkle the tops
of each with bread-crumbs and a little melted butter. Send them to the
oven, and, when colored a light brown on top, serve, with a tomato
sauce around them.

380. =Boiled Onions.= Peel a dozen medium-sized white onions, boil them
in a quart of water with a little salt. When very tender, drain them,
and serve with a butter sauce (Art. 84), or a sauce béchamel (Art. 83).

381. =Fried Onions.= Peel eight medium-sized onions, cut them in slices
across the top, roll them in flour, fry them in hot lard, drain, and
serve.

382. =Onions Glacés.= Peel a dozen small onions, color them lightly
in a frying-pan on the fire with a little lard. Then put them in a
saucepan with half a pint of consommé (stock, Art. 1), a pinch of salt,
pepper, and nutmeg. Simmer very gently until the consommé is reduced
three quarters, then pour it on a dish, your onions placed on top, and
serve.

383. =Fried Egg-Plant.= Peel an egg-plant, cut it in slices about a
third of an inch thick, dip them in three beaten eggs, to which you
have added a pinch of salt and pepper. Sprinkle them with bread-crumbs,
and fry them in very hot lard, drain, and serve them.

384. =Egg-Plant farcied.= Take four small egg-plants, peel them and
separate them in two, scoop out the inside, which fill with a chicken
farce (Art. 11), and sprinkle a few bread-crumbs on top. Cut an onion
and a carrot in slices, and put them in a saucepan, with a branch
of thyme, a bay-leaf, two cloves, and a clove of garlic. Place your
egg-plants on top. Moisten within three quarters of their height with
consommé (stock, Art. 1), and a claret-glass of white wine. Put them in
the oven for an hour, pouring over them, from time to time, some of the
liquid in the pan. Pour over them half a pint of Spanish sauce (Art.
80), to which you have added a wineglass of sherry, and serve.

385. =Cucumbers farcied.= Divide four medium-sized cucumbers in two,
after having pared them. Scoop out the inside and fill with a chicken
farce (Art. 11). Put a sliced onion in a saucepan on the fire, with
three slices of ham cut thin, place your cucumbers on top, moisten with
a claret-glass of white wine, and the same of Spanish sauce (Art. 80).
Then send them to the oven, pouring over them, from time to time, the
liquid in the pan, which, when the cucumbers are sufficiently done,
strain, pour over your cucumbers on a dish, and serve.

386. =Cucumbers with Cream.= Peel half a dozen cucumbers, cut them in
medium-sized square pieces, soak them for two hours in some vinegar,
and a pinch of salt. Turn them over from time to time, drain them, and
dry them on a cloth, pressing the moisture from them. Put them in a
saucepan on the fire, with an ounce of butter, half a pint of consommé
(stock, Art. 1), several branches of parsley, inclosing two cloves, two
branches of thyme, a clove of garlic, and tie all together, add a pinch
of salt. When they are cooked, drain them, add them to half a pint of
béchamel sauce (Art. 83), the juice of half a lemon, a tablespoonful of
chopped parsley, and serve very hot.

387. =Lentils à la Maître d'Hôtel.= Wash three pints of lentils, put
them in a saucepan with two quarts of water and a pinch of salt. Boil
them very slowly for an hour, or until perfectly tender, then drain
them, put them in a saucepan on the fire for a moment, with four
ounces of butter, a little salt, a pinch of pepper, nutmeg, and a
tablespoonful of chopped parsley. Remove your saucepan from the fire,
mix the yolks of two eggs in two tablespoonfuls of water, add them to
your lentils, mixing all well together, and serve.

388. =Purée of Lentils.= Prepare and boil as the foregoing, press them
through a sieve, add about three ounces of butter, salt, pepper, and a
very little nutmeg. Heat them on the fire for a few moments, and serve.

389. =Celery with Marrow.= Remove the green leaves from a bunch of
celery, scrape the roots, cut the celery in pieces of about five
inches long, wash them well, and put them in a saucepan, with plenty
of water, and a little salt, and boil them ten minutes. Then put them
in cold water for a moment. Cover the bottom of a saucepan with thin
pieces of pork, a sliced onion and carrot, and several branches of
parsley, inclosing three cloves, three pepper-corns, two bay-leaves,
two branches of thyme, a clove of garlic, and tie all together, and
then put your celery on top, nearly cover with consommé (stock, Art.
1), add the juice of a lemon, and place a buttered paper on top. Simmer
gently for an hour and a half. Heat half a pint of Spanish sauce (Art.
80), with a glass of sherry, pour over your celery, and place on top
some beef marrow, which you have previously soaked in water for four
hours, then boiled ten minutes, and cut in round pieces the size of a
fifty-cent piece.

390. =Celery with White Sauce.= Clean and wash a bunch of celery, which
boil until tender, in plenty of water and a little salt, drain, and
serve with a white or butter sauce (Art. 84), or a sauce Allemande
(Art. 81).

391. =Fried Celery, Tomato Sauce.= Prepare and boil a bunch of celery
as the foregoing; then drain it. Put in a bowl half a pound of flour,
two eggs, and a little water. Mix well together until you have a soft,
smooth paste, thin enough to pour from a spoon. Cut your celery into
pieces about five inches long, cover them with your paste, fry them
in hot lard until a light brown; drain, and serve with a tomato sauce
(Art. 90).

392. =Purée of Celery.= Wash and clean two bunches of celery, cut them
in pieces, and boil them in three quarts of water, with a little salt;
when boiled thoroughly tender, drain, and add them to half a pint of
béchamel sauce (Art. 83), a pinch of salt, pepper, and nutmeg. Boil ten
minutes, press through a sieve, put back in the saucepan to heat again,
and serve.

393. =Horse-Radish Sauce (cold).= Grate four ounces of horse-radish, to
which add four ounces of bread-crumbs, and press through a sieve; add
a glass of cream, a pinch of salt, and a tablespoonful of vinegar; mix
all well together, and serve.

394. =Horse-Radish Sauce (hot).= Prepare the same as the above, adding
two ounces of bread-crumbs, instead of four; heat all together in a
saucepan, and serve.

395. =Braised Lettuce, Madeira Sauce.= Wash eight lettuce, blanch them
ten minutes in boiling water, then put them for a moment in cold
water, and press out all the moisture. Spread thin pieces of pork on
the bottom of a saucepan, a sliced carrot and onion, several branches
of parsley, a little pepper, salt, and nutmeg, and the lettuce on top.
Moisten three quarters of their height with consommé (stock, Art. 1),
cover with a buttered paper, simmer gently two hours, drain them well,
and serve them with half a pint of very hot Spanish sauce (Art. 80), to
which you have added a wineglass of sherry or madeira.

396. =Farcied Lettuce.= Boil eight lettuce as the foregoing, and, after
you have put them in cold water for a moment, dry them with a cloth and
press out all the moisture; divide them partly in two, without allowing
them to fall apart; place in each lettuce about two ounces of chicken
farce (Art. 11), which cover with the leaves of your lettuce; shape
them neatly, wrap them and tie them up in thin pieces of pork, and
finish cooking as the foregoing; remove the pieces of pork, and serve
with a Spanish sauce (Art. 80).

397. =Turnips with Cream.= Peel and boil in plenty of water and a
little salt, ten white turnips; when very tender, drain them and pour
over them half a pint of béchamel sauce (Art. 83), to which you have
added two tablespoonfuls of cream.

398. =Purée of Turnips.= Peel and wash about fifteen white turnips,
boil them in plenty of water and a little salt until perfectly tender;
drain them, put them through a sieve, add two ounces of butter, a
little salt, pepper, and nutmeg; and serve very hot.

399. =Turnips Glacés au Jus.= Peel and wash about ten white turnips,
cut them perfectly round, boil them ten minutes, put them in cold water
for a moment, then place them in a saucepan with a pinch of pepper,
nutmeg, and sugar, and half a pint of consommé (stock, Art. 1). Simmer
gently until perfectly tender; mix with the blade of a knife, on a
table, half an ounce of butter and a teaspoonful of flour, which add to
your turnips; boil for a few minutes, so as to mix thoroughly with your
sauce, and serve.

400. =Beets with Butter.= Peel and wash a dozen small beets, boil them
in three quarts of water, and, when perfectly tender, put them in cold
water for a moment, cut them in thin slices, put them in a saucepan
with two ounces of butter and a pinch of salt; serve very hot. You may
also boil them and serve them with a sauce béchamel (Art. 83), to which
you have added two tablespoonfuls of cream.

401. =Pickled Beets.= Boil ten medium-sized beets, cut them in
slices, and put them in a bowl with six cloves, six pepper-corns, six
bay-leaves, three cloves of garlic peeled, and half an ounce of salt;
almost cover them with vinegar and water in equal quantity; serve very
cold.

402. =Broiled Mushrooms.= Take some mushrooms, in quantity according to
their size, peel them, wash, and then dry them on a cloth. Broil them
on a gentle fire, a little butter on top, and, when colored on both
sides, put an ounce of melted butter on a dish, the juice of lemon, a
tablespoonful of chopped parsley, mix all well together, and serve
your mushrooms on top; or serve the mushrooms singly on very hot toast,
on which you have put a little butter.

403. =Stewed Mushrooms, Spanish Sauce.= Put half a pint of Spanish
sauce (Art. 80) in a saucepan, with a sherry-glass of sherry, add your
mushrooms, stew about five minutes, and serve.

404. =Stewed Mushrooms à la Princesse.= Put into a saucepan a gill of
sauce Allemande (Art. 81), a glass of cream, a pinch of pepper, nutmeg,
an ounce of butter, and the juice of a lemon, add some mushrooms, which
you have peeled and washed, and a tablespoonful of chopped parsley.
Boil for a few moments, and serve very hot.

405. =Mushrooms au Gratin.= Reduce on the fire ten minutes a cup of
Allemande sauce (Art. 81), pour it over some mushrooms, in a deep dish,
sprinkle with bread-crumbs, and pour a little melted butter on top,
send to the oven, and, when colored a light brown, serve.

406. =Mushrooms au Gratin= (another way). Wash and cut off the stalks
of about a dozen as large mushrooms as possible. Peel and chop fine an
onion, which put in a saucepan on the fire, with an ounce of butter.
Simmer very gently, and, when the onion is colored slightly, add the
stalks of your mushrooms, which you have chopped fine, six ounces of
bread-crumbs, which you have soaked in consommé (Art. 1) and then
pressed until nearly dry, a pinch of salt, pepper, and nutmeg, and four
tablespoonfuls of tomato sauce. Mix all well together, and boil ten
minutes. Then fill your mushrooms with the above mixture, sprinkle some
bread-crumbs, and put a little melted butter on top. Send them to a
gentle oven, until colored a light brown, and serve on toast, or with
a Spanish sauce (Art. 80), to which add a glass of sherry, or with an
Italian sauce (Art. 93), or a tomato sauce (Art. 90).

407. =Squash.= Peel and wash a squash, open it and take out the seeds,
put it in a saucepan, with two quarts of water and a pinch of salt.
When boiled tender, allow it to drain fifteen minutes, press it through
a sieve, put it in a saucepan with four ounces of butter, a pinch of
salt, and a little nutmeg, and serve very hot.

408. =Carrots Sautés au Beurre.= Scrape and wash some very young
carrots, and boil them with a little salt, either whole or cut in
pieces. When very tender, drain them, and put them in a saucepan, with
some butter, a pinch of salt, and a tablespoonful of chopped parsley.
Serve very hot. You may also serve them boiled, with a sauce béchamel
(Art. 83).

409. =Chiccory with Cream.= Wash some chiccory, and boil for thirty
minutes in three quarts of water, with a little salt. Then put in cold
water for a moment, drain, and press the moisture from it. Chop it very
fine. Put in a saucepan two ounces of butter, a tablespoonful of flour,
a pinch of salt, pepper, and nutmeg; mix all well together, and add a
glass of cream, and the same of consommé (Art. 1). Stir with a spoon
on the fire until beginning to boil, then add your chiccory, and boil
ten minutes. Mix with the yolks of three eggs a tablespoonful of cream,
remove your saucepan from the fire, stir in your eggs, and serve. Place
on top of the chiccory two hard-boiled eggs cut in quarters.

410. =Cabbage Sauté au Beurre.= Wash a cabbage, of about two pounds,
boil it in two quarts of water, with a little salt, for about an
hour. Put it for a moment in cold water, drain it, press out all the
moisture, chop it, not too fine, and put it in a saucepan, with four
ounces of butter, a pinch of salt and pepper, and serve very hot.

411. =Cabbage au Gratin.= Wash a cabbage, of about three pounds, boil
it in boiling water about twenty minutes, then put it in cold water for
a moment. Drain it, carefully press out all moisture, and place it in
a saucepan, with half a pint of consommé (stock, Art. 1), four ounces
of butter, a little salt, pepper, and nutmeg. Boil two hours. Place it
in a deep dish, cover it with a sauce Allemande (Art. 81). Sprinkle
bread-crumbs and grated cheese on top, and send to the oven until
colored a nice brown.

412. =Cabbage farcied.= Wash a cabbage, of about three pounds, put it
in boiling water and boil for half an hour, then plunge it in cold
water for a moment. Chop fine a pound and a half of fresh pork, season
with salt, pepper, nutmeg, and a little thyme. Remove the leaves from
the center of your cabbage, and fill it with the above ingredients. Tie
a buttered paper around the cabbage, and place a slice of thin pork on
top. Then put your cabbage in a saucepan, filling it half the height
of the cabbage with consommé (stock, Art. 1). Send it to the oven for
about two hours, basting frequently with the consommé. Remove this
buttered paper and pork, and serve around it a Spanish sauce (Art. 80),
to which you have added the juice of a lemon.

413. =Brussels Sprouts.= Scrape and wash well two quarts of Brussels
sprouts, put them in three quarts of boiling water, with half an ounce
of salt. Boil rapidly until perfectly tender, drain them, and put them
in a saucepan, with four ounces of butter. Mix well together, and, when
very hot, serve instantly.

414. =Stewed Corn with Cream.= Boil ten ears of corn, then cut the corn
from the cob, and put it in a saucepan, with two ounces of butter, a
pinch of salt, and two glasses of cream. Boil gently ten minutes, and
serve.

415. =New Orleans Corn Pudding.= Grate six ears of raw corn, which mix
with a pint of milk and four eggs well beaten, add a little salt and
white pepper, and send to the oven until colored a light brown on top.

416. =Macédoine of Vegetables.= Cut two ounces of carrots (with a
vegetable-cutter or with a knife) in small pieces, and two ounces of
turnips cut in the same manner, boil them until tender, and drain them.
Also boil the same quantity of string-beans, cut in small pieces, and
an equal portion of asparagus ends, and the tops of cauliflowers and
green peas, which, when boiled very tender, drain. Take half a pint
of Spanish sauce, boil it a few minutes, with a pinch of sugar and
nutmeg, add your vegetables, boil five minutes, and serve. Instead of
Spanish sauce, you may also add your vegetables to a sauce Allemande
(Art. 81), with a pinch of sugar and nutmeg. Heat your sauce until very
hot, but do not allow it to boil. The vegetables for the above must all
be boiled separately, as, in the same length of time, all will not be
equally cooked. If you desire to avoid the trouble of preparing these
vegetables yourself, they may be procured at any grocer's, canned or in
bottles.

417. =Sourcrout.= Wash a quart of sourcrout, which drain, and put in
a saucepan, with half a pound of bacon, a good pinch of pepper, and
moisten with sufficient stock (from which the grease has not been
removed) to cover it. Boil gently an hour and a half, add eight small
sausages, which place in the middle of your sourcrout, boil thirty
minutes, remove your bacon and sausages, drain the sourcrout, which
arrange on a dish, placing the sausages around it, and also the bacon,
cut in small pieces. You may serve with this dish, if desired, a dish
of mashed potatoes.

418. =Lima Beans.= Boil three pints of Lima beans in plenty of water,
and a little salt, until quite tender. Drain them and put them in a
saucepan on the fire, with two ounces of butter, a pinch of salt,
pepper, and nutmeg. Mix two yolks of eggs in a tablespoonful of water
and the juice of a lemon, add them to your beans, with a tablespoonful
of chopped parsley, and serve.

419. =Succotash.= Take a pint and a half of boiled Lima beans, and the
same of boiled corn, cut from the cob. Mix them together in a saucepan
on the fire, with six ounces of butter, half a glass of milk, a pinch
of salt, pepper, and nutmeg, and serve very hot.

420. =Dried Lima Beans.= Soak three pints of Lima beans in water for
twelve hours, and proceed as for fresh Lima beans (Art. 418).

421. =Mashed Potatoes.= Peel and wash eight medium-sized potatoes, cut
them in pieces, and put them in a saucepan with a quart of cold water
and a little salt. Boil until perfectly tender, drain, press through a
sieve, and put them in a saucepan, with a pinch of salt and a glass of
milk, and serve hot.

422. =Baked Mashed Potatoes.= Prepare your potatoes as the above, with
the exception of the milk, place them in a pan in the oven, with some
melted butter on top, and, when well browned, serve.

423. =Potato Croquettes.= Boil four potatoes, drain them, press them
through a sieve, and then put them in a saucepan with an ounce of
butter, a pinch of salt, pepper, nutmeg, and sugar. Heat them well, and
add an egg. Let your mixture become very cold, form it into croquettes.
Beat up three eggs, into which dip each croquette, and cover entirely
with egg, then roll them in bread-crumbs, and fry in hot lard. When
colored a light brown, drain them, and serve very hot.

424. =Mashed Potatoes with Bacon.= Cut a quarter of a pound of bacon in
small pieces, also an onion, put them in a saucepan on the fire, and,
when the onion begins to color, add a pint of water, several branches
of parsley, inclosing two cloves, a branch of thyme, two bay-leaves,
and tie all together; add eight potatoes, which you have washed,
peeled, and cut in quarters, a pinch of pepper and nutmeg. When the
potatoes are thoroughly cooked, remove your parsley with its seasoning,
mash the potatoes well in the saucepan, and serve.

425. =Potatoes à l'Anglaise.= Wash eight potatoes, and boil them in
cold water, with a pinch of salt. When thoroughly done, peel them, cut
them in thin round slices, put them, with three ounces of butter, a
pinch of salt, pepper, and nutmeg, in a saucepan on the fire, and, when
very hot, serve.

426. =Potatoes à la Maître d'Hôtel.= Prepare your potatoes as the
above. Just before serving add the juice of a lemon and a tablespoonful
of chopped parsley. Another manner of preparing them: Proceed as for
the foregoing, with the addition of half a glass of cream.

427. =Potatoes Sautés.= Prepare as the foregoing; then put them in a
saucepan on the fire, with four ounces of melted butter and a pinch of
salt; toss them in the pan until they are a good color, and serve them
with a little chopped parsley on top.

428. =Potatoes à la Lyonnaise.= Boil your potatoes, and, when cold, cut
them in round slices of medium thickness; cut two onions in slices,
and put them with four ounces of butter in a frying-pan; when your
onions are colored very slightly, add your potatoes, toss them in
the pan until they are a good color, drain them, and serve them with
chopped parsley sprinkled over them.

429. =Potatoes à la Provençale.= Boil your potatoes, and, when cold,
cut them in quarters; put in a saucepan on the fire for five minutes
four tablespoonfuls of oil, a pinch of green onion, and quarter of
the rind of a lemon chopped fine; then mix with your ingredients a
tablespoonful of flour; add your potatoes, a little salt, pepper,
nutmeg, and two ounces of butter; serve very hot, with some chopped
parsley sprinkled on top.

430. =Hashed Potatoes with Cream.= Boil your potatoes, and, when cold,
hash them fine, and put them in a saucepan with half a pint of cream,
salt, pepper, a little nutmeg, and four ounces of butter; serve when
very hot.

431. =Baked Hashed Potatoes.= Prepare as the foregoing; then put them
in a dish about an inch and a half deep, level the potatoes on top with
the blade of a knife, put a little melted butter on top, and send to
the oven until nicely browned.

432. =Potatoes à l'Anna.= Cut up some raw potatoes very fine, put
them in cold water for six hours, then drain them, season with salt
and plenty of pepper; put them in a well-buttered pan, sprinkle
bread-crumbs on top, and enough melted butter to cover them; send them
to a very hot oven for about thirty-five minutes, or until they are
well browned. Just before serving, drain off the butter, and put them
on a dish.

433. =Fried Potatoes.= Peel eight medium-sized potatoes, cut them in
slices, not too thick; wash them, then dry them on a napkin, fry them
in plenty of hot lard on a quick fire, and, when a light brown, drain
them, sprinkle them with salt, and serve.

434. =Fried Potatoes en Julienne.= Prepare and cook them as the above,
and cut them in long, thin strips.

435. =Saratoga Potatoes.= Peel a pint of rather small potatoes, wash
them in cold water, dry them on a napkin, and cut them in as thin
slices as possible; then put half of your potatoes in a liberal
quantity of very hot lard, taking care that they do not stick to each
other. Fry them on a very quick fire, and, when a light brown and very
crisp, drain them, and fry the remaining half. Sprinkle a little salt
on top, and serve them on a very hot dish.

436. =Potatoes à la Hollandaise.= Peel and wash fifteen medium-sized
long potatoes, put them in cold water with a little salt, boil them,
and, when well done, put them in a saucepan on the fire with two ounces
of melted butter, remove them to the back of the range so as not to
boil, shake them in the saucepan from time to time, and, when they have
absorbed the butter, serve them in a very hot dish, and pour over them
a sauce Hollandaise (Art. 85).

437. =Potatoes farcied.= Wash ten medium-sized potatoes--long
potatoes, if you have them. Bake them, and cut the tops off with a
sharp knife, and with a teaspoon scoop out the inside of each potato,
which put in a bowl with two ounces of butter and the yolks of two
eggs, a pinch of salt, pepper, and sugar. Fill the skins of your
potatoes with this mixture, cover them with their tops, heat them well
in the oven, and serve them very hot on a napkin. You may also prepare
them with half potato and the other half chopped meat; finish the same,
taking care to serve very hot.

438. =Potatoes à la Parisienne.= Peel and wash ten potatoes, scoop
them out in little round balls with a potato-cutter for the purpose,
which may be procured at any hardware-shop. Boil them five minutes,
then put them in a frying-pan on the fire, with four ounces of melted
butter, stir them in the pan, so that every potato shall be covered
with butter, and send them to the oven to color. Sprinkle some salt and
a little chopped parsley over them, and serve.

439. =Potatoes à la Duchesse.= Peel eight potatoes, cut them in pieces,
wash them, and put them in a saucepan, with a quart of water and a
pinch of salt. When they are thoroughly boiled, drain them, and put the
saucepan at the side of the fire for ten minutes. Then add to them two
ounces of butter, two eggs, a pinch of salt, the same of sugar, and
press through a sieve. Form this mixture into little oval loaves, flat
on top, on which, with the point of a knife, make designs, according to
your taste. Put a little melted butter on top, send to the oven, and,
when colored a nice brown, serve.

440. =Potatoes à la Parmentière.= Peel some potatoes, and cut them in
form of a cork about three inches long, put them in a saucepan on the
fire, with enough Spanish sauce (Art. 80) to cover them, a pinch of
salt, pepper, and sugar, and a glass of sherry. Simmer gently until the
potatoes are perfectly tender, strain your sauce, pour it over your
potatoes, and serve.

441. =Ragoût of Potatoes à la Paysanne.= Cut a bunch of chiccory in two
through the middle, which boil fifteen minutes, put in cold water for
a moment, drain, and press out all moisture. Peel ten potatoes, place
them in a saucepan, with enough consommé (stock, Art. 1) to cover them,
add your chiccory, three leeks cut in slices, a little salt, and season
highly with pepper. Boil gently until your potatoes are nearly done,
then add a little chopped chervil, and boil ten minutes longer. Your
potatoes should be soft, without breaking. Serve very hot.

442. =Purée of French Chestnuts.= Remove the shells from two pounds of
French chestnuts, put them in a frying-pan on the fire, with an ounce
and a half of lard. Turn them over in the pan every now and then, and
when you see that the species of skin which covers them is softened,
and may be removed without difficulty, take them off the fire, for
the purpose of doing so. Then put them in a saucepan, with a quart of
consommé (stock, Art. 1), and, when the chestnuts are perfectly soft,
drain them, press them through a sieve, heat them again with four
ounces of butter, a pinch of salt and sugar, and serve.

443. =Purée of Artichokes.= Take the under part of ten artichokes, from
which all leaves have been removed. Boil them in water and a little
salt, drain them, and put them in a saucepan with a tablespoonful of
flour, a pinch of salt, pepper, and nutmeg, and a glass and a half of
consommé (stock, Art. 1). Boil twenty minutes, press through a sieve.
Heat again on the fire, and serve as a vegetable, or garnish to meat or
poultry.

444. =Purée of Jerusalem Artichokes.= Scrape and wash fifteen Jerusalem
artichokes, boil them until tender in a pint of consommé (stock, Art.
1). Drain them, press them through a sieve, put them in a saucepan,
with two ounces of butter, a pinch of salt and pepper, and, when hot,
serve.

445. =Jerusalem Artichokes au Gratin.= Prepare and cook some artichokes
exactly as for cauliflower au gratin (Art. 363).

446. =Purée of Green Peas.= Wash a quart of green peas, which put in a
saucepan on the fire, with three pints of water, very little salt and
pepper, half an ounce of ham, an onion cut in slices, and boil until
soft. Then press them through a sieve, heat them again on the fire,
adding four ounces of butter, a pinch of sugar, and serve.



CHAPTER VI.

_EGGS, MACARONI, SALADS, ETC._


EGGS.

447. =Poached Eggs.= Put in a flat saucepan three pints of water, a
tablespoonful of vinegar, and two pinches of salt. When the water
boils, break your eggs into it, and let them poach two or three
minutes; lift them out with a skimmer, and serve each egg on toast.

448. =Fried Eggs.= Heat an ounce of butter in a frying-pan, break into
it eight eggs, fry three or four minutes, lift them out with a skimmer;
serve plain, or with broiled ham or bacon cut in very thin slices.

449. =Eggs sur le Plat.= Butter well the bottom of a dish, in which
break eight eggs; put them in a hot oven for four or five minutes, and
serve.

450. =Scrambled Eggs.= Break a dozen eggs into a moderate-sized flat
saucepan into which you have put two ounces of butter, a pinch of salt
and white pepper, and half a glass of milk, stirring all together with
a wooden spoon. When the eggs are thickened to a proper consistency,
serve very hot.

451. =Scrambled Eggs with Peas.= Same as foregoing, adding half a pint
of boiled peas.

452. =Scrambled Eggs with Asparagus.= Proceed as for the foregoing,
and, instead of peas, add the green ends of a bunch of asparagus.

453. =Scrambled Eggs with Tomatoes.= Proceed as for scrambled eggs
(Art. 450), adding a quarter of a can of tomatoes, from which you have
drained the liquid.

454. =Scrambled Eggs with Truffles.= Proceed as for scrambled eggs,
adding a small box of chopped truffles.

455. =Scrambled Eggs with Ham.= Proceed as for scrambled eggs, adding
an ounce of lean cooked ham chopped fine.

456. =Eggs à la Tripe.= Peel and chop six onions, put them in a
saucepan on the fire, with two ounces of butter, a pinch of salt,
pepper, and nutmeg; simmer them gently about an hour, and then add to
them a tablespoonful of flour, which mix well with your onions; moisten
with half a pint of milk; simmer gently, stirring every now and then
to prevent your sauce sticking to the saucepan; then put it through a
sieve and heat again on the fire, adding a dozen hard-boiled eggs cut
in round slices.

457. =Eggs au Beurre Noir.= Fry eight eggs; then in a frying-pan put
two ounces of butter, a pinch of salt and pepper; heat on the fire
until it becomes black, then add two tablespoonfuls of vinegar; let it
boil up again, and pour it over your eggs.

458. =Eggs à l'Aurore.= Take a dozen hard-boiled eggs, to which add
half a pint of béchamel sauce (Art. 83), and put them on a dish;
sprinkle them on top with three yolks of hard-boiled eggs which you
have previously pounded fine, and mixed with an equal quantity of
bread-crumbs. Add a little melted butter on top, garnish with pieces
of bread dipped in melted butter, and send to the oven; when colored a
light brown, serve.

459. =Eggs with Cream.= Boil three sherry-glasses of cream, which put
in a large dish, break into it a dozen eggs, send to a moderate oven
for about twelve minutes, and serve.

460. =Eggs with Cucumbers.= Pare and cut in slices six cucumbers;
put them in a frying-pan with two ounces of butter, a tablespoonful
of chopped shallots, the same of chopped parsley, six tablespoonfuls
of consommé (stock, Art. 1), and mix all well together with a
tablespoonful of flour, a little salt, pepper, and nutmeg; when the
cucumbers are thoroughly done, add a dozen hard-boiled eggs and a glass
of cream; boil five minutes, and serve very hot.

461. =Poached Eggs au Jus.= Put a pint of consommé (stock, Art. 1) in a
saucepan and reduce it one half; poach eight eggs, put them on a dish,
pour your consommé over them, and serve.

462. =Poached Eggs with Asparagus.= Cut off the green ends, about half
an inch in length, of two bunches of asparagus; wash them, then boil
them about fifteen minutes in two quarts of boiling water and a pinch
of salt; if perfectly tender, drain them and mix them with a gill of
sauce Allemande (Art. 81) and a pinch of sugar. Poach eight eggs, place
them on top of your asparagus, and serve.

463. =Poached Eggs with Wine Sauce.= Poach ten eggs, which place on
toast and cover with a sauce Allemande (Art. 81) to which you have
added a wineglass of sherry.

464. =Eggs à la Marseillaise.= Chop fine a clove of garlic, to which
add eight tablespoonfuls of sweet oil, three tablespoonfuls of vinegar,
and a tablespoonful of anchovy sauce; season highly with salt and
pepper, mix all well together, add a tablespoonful of capers, and place
on top a dozen cold hard-boiled eggs cut in two.

465. =Eggs with Sauce Mayonnaise.= Cut a dozen cold hard-boiled eggs in
two, which place on slices of toast, and cover with a sauce Mayonnaise
(Art. 113).

466. =Eggs à la Huguenot.= Put a glass of consommé (stock, Art. 1) in
a saucepan on the fire; reduce three quarters, pour it on a dish, into
which break a dozen eggs, sprinkle them with salt and pepper, send them
to a moderate oven for about six or seven minutes, and serve; your eggs
must be soft.

467. =Eggs en Timbale.= Break a dozen eggs in a bowl, add a little
salt, pepper, and a glass of cream; beat them well, strain them, and
put them in eight little tin molds which you have buttered; then place
these in a pan containing water; send to the oven, and, when the eggs
are sufficiently consistent to turn out of the molds, serve very hot.
You may serve with this dish, if desired, a sauce béchamel (Art. 83).

468. =Eggs à la Jardinière.= Peel and cut in small pieces two onions,
which put in a saucepan on a gentle fire, with two ounces of butter, a
little salt and pepper; when beginning to color, mix well with them a
glass of cream, which boil for a few moments and allow to become half
cold; then beat up well with the foregoing ingredient six eggs. Pour
all together on a dish, and send to a moderate oven for about six or
seven minutes, and, when well colored on top, serve.

469. =Poached Eggs with Purée of Sorrel.= Clean and wash well two
quarts of sorrel, put it in a saucepan with a pint of water and
a pinch of salt; after boiling a few moments, drain it and press
through a sieve; then put it again in a saucepan with two ounces of
butter, a tablespoonful of flour, a pinch of salt, pepper, and nutmeg;
when beginning to color slightly, mix well with your sorrel two
sherry-glasses of consommé (stock, Art. 1) and a glass of cream. Boil
ten minutes, remove your saucepan from the fire, and, when boiling
ceases, add the yolks of two eggs well mixed in two tablespoonfuls of
water or milk; poach eight eggs, place them on top of your purée of
sorrel, and serve.

470. =Aspic with Eggs.= Prepare some aspic (Art. 278), pour a small
quantity in a mold, let it become perfectly cold, then cover entirely
with thin slices of cold ham; put another layer of jelly on top, and
allow it to become cold, as the first, then place on top of this cold
poached eggs, which cover with a layer of jelly, and, when cold,
continue with alternate slices of ham, jelly, and eggs, until your mold
is filled, which, if hollow in the center, fill with either some of
the jelly cut in small pieces, or a cold sauce remoulade (Art. 109).

471. =Eggs au Gratin.= Take two ounces of bread-crumbs, the same of
grated Parmesan cheese, an ounce of butter, a pinch of pepper, salt,
and nutmeg, and the yolks of three eggs; mix all well together and send
to the oven; when beginning to color, break on top of this mixture
eight eggs, sprinkle some grated Parmesan cheese on top, and, when the
eggs are done, serve immediately.

472. =Eggs à la Lyonnaise.= Cut two onions in small pieces, put them in
a saucepan on a very gentle fire, with two ounces of butter, a pinch of
salt, pepper, and nutmeg; when colored, add to them a gill of béchamel
sauce (Art. 83) and twelve hard-boiled eggs cut in round slices; pour
all together in a dish, cover with bread-crumbs and a very little
melted butter; send to the oven, and, when colored a light brown, serve.

473. =Eggs à la Portugaise.= Divide five hard-boiled eggs in two,
cutting them through their length; pound the yolks in a mortar, with an
equal quantity of butter, and fresh bread-crumbs which you have soaked
in milk, and then press from them nearly all moisture; add a little
salt, pepper, and nutmeg, pound all well together, and then thoroughly
mix with these ingredients a raw egg; fill each half of your white of
egg with the foregoing paste, giving to it the form of a whole egg; dip
each egg in beaten eggs, cover with bread-crumbs, fry in hot lard, and
serve plain or with a tomato sauce (Art. 90).

474. =Eggs en Turban.= Cut ten hard-boiled eggs in two around the
middle; make a farce as in the preceding article; take the end, about
five inches in length, of a round loaf, which place in a buttered pan,
with half of your farce arranged in a circle around it; place your
eggs on top of this, one quite close to the other, cover them all but
the ends with your farce; butter a paper, which should be the height
of your eggs, tie it around them, put a little melted butter on top of
the eggs, and send to the oven for about thirty-five minutes. See if
your farce is firm, remove the round of bread in the middle, also the
buttered paper; pour in the middle a sauce béchamel (Art. 83), to which
you have added a teaspoonful of chopped parsley, and serve.

475. =Poached Eggs with Anchovy Sauce.= Take half a pint of white or
butter sauce (Art. 84), to which add a teaspoonful of anchovy sauce and
the juice of a lemon; poach eight eggs, pour the sauce over them, and
serve.

476. =Poached Eggs with Anchovy Toast.= Spread eight pieces of toast
with anchovy paste, on which put a little glaze (Art. 179); poach eight
eggs, place each egg on a piece of toast, and serve very hot.

477. =Curried Eggs with Rice.= Cut in two, lengthwise, ten hard-boiled
eggs, add them to half a pint of very hot Allemande sauce (Art. 81),
to which add a teaspoonful of curry paste; serve them with a border of
boiled rice, or the rice in the center and the eggs and sauce around
it.

478. =Omelette (plain).= Take twelve eggs, beat them up with a fork for
a moment only, so as to mix the yolks and the whites well together,
adding a little pepper and salt. Put in an omelette-pan or frying-pan
two ounces of butter, to which, when melted, add your eggs, stir them
with a fork, and, when beginning to thicken, fold in two, and serve
immediately.

479. =Omelette aux Fines Herbes.= Prepare as the foregoing, mixing with
the eggs, before putting them in the pan, a tablespoonful of chopped
parsley.

480. =Omelette with Cheese.= Prepare as for plain omelette (Art. 478),
adding to the eggs, before putting them in the pan, two ounces of
grated American cheese, or equal parts of American and Parmesan cheese.

481. =Omelette with Onions.= Peel and cut in small pieces two
medium-sized onions, and put them in a frying-pan on a gentle fire with
two ounces of butter. When very slightly colored, add to them twelve
eggs, which you have beaten for a moment with a fork, and seasoned with
a little pepper and salt. Finish as for plain omelette (Art. 478).

482. =Omelette with Peas.= Beat up twelve eggs with a fork, add a pinch
of salt, pepper, and sugar, a gill of boiled green peas, from which you
have drained all moisture, and finish as for plain omelette (Art. 478).

483. =Omelette with Asparagus Tops.= Cut off the green ends, about
an inch in length, of a bunch of asparagus, boil them in a quart of
water, with a little salt, drain off all moisture from them. Mix them
with a dozen beaten eggs, and finish as for plain omelette (Art. 478).

484. =Omelette with Sorrel.= Clean and wash well two handfuls of
sorrel, press out all the moisture, chop it very fine, and put it in
a frying-pan on the fire, with two ounces of butter, for about five
minutes. Beat up twelve eggs with a little salt and pepper, add them to
your sorrel in the pan, and finish as for plain omelette (Art. 478).

485. =Omelette with Tomatoes.= Beat up twelve eggs for a moment, with a
little pepper and salt, add to them about four ounces of tomatoes--if
canned tomatoes, _drain off the liquid from them_. Put two ounces of
butter in an omelette-pan (or frying-pan), add your eggs, and finish as
for plain omelette. You may pour a little tomato sauce (Art. 91) around
your omelette.

486. =Omelette with Mushrooms.= Put half a pint of Spanish sauce
(Art. 80) and a wineglass of sherry in a saucepan on the fire. Reduce
one half, and add half a box of mushrooms cut in quarters. Beat up
twelve eggs (for a moment only, so as to mix the whites and yolks)
with a little salt, pepper, and nutmeg. Put two ounces of butter in an
omelette-pan (or frying-pan), and, when melted, add your eggs. When
beginning to thicken, take out the mushrooms with a spoon from your
sauce and place them on your omelette, which fold in two, and serve,
with your sauce poured around it.

487. =Omelette with Kidneys.= Cut in pieces six sheep's kidneys, from
which you have removed the skin, and put them in a frying-pan on the
fire, with half an ounce of butter, a little salt, pepper, and nutmeg.
Toss them in the pan until they are quite firm, then add a teaspoonful
of flour, a wineglass of sherry, and three times as much consommé
(stock). Boil ten minutes, and finish as for plain omelette (Art. 478).

488. =Omelette with Chickens' Livers.= Cook six chickens' livers, as
the kidneys in the foregoing, and finish as for plain omelette (Art.
478).

489. =Omelette with Smoked Beef.= Chop fine four ounces of smoked beef,
to which add twelve beaten eggs, and finish as for plain omelette (Art.
478).

490. =Omelette with Ham.= Chop fine four ounces of lean ham, to which
add twelve beaten eggs, and finish as for plain omelette (Art. 478).

491. =Spanish Omelette.= Peel and chop fine two cloves of garlic,
which put in a frying-pan on the fire with two tablespoonfuls of oil,
let them color slightly. Break in a bowl a dozen eggs, which beat up
with a fork, add four ounces of canned tomatoes (from which you have
_drained as much moisture as possible_), a pinch of salt and pepper,
and a tablespoonful of chopped parsley; add an ounce of butter to your
garlics and oil, beat all together, and add your eggs with the above
ingredients. Allow them to remain a few seconds in the pan, fold the
omelette in two, and serve plain, or with a tomato sauce (Art. 90)
around it. You may also add to the omelette a little green pepper and a
few mushrooms cut in slices.


MACARONI.

492. =Macaroni with Cream.= Put a pound of macaroni in a saucepan on
the fire, with three quarts of boiling water and half an ounce of salt.
Boil it about twelve minutes, or until very tender, then drain it. Put
four ounces of butter in a saucepan, with a tablespoonful of flour, a
pinch of salt, pepper, and nutmeg. Mix all well together, then add two
ounces of grated Parmesan cheese and four ounces of Gruyère cheese.
Moisten with a glass of milk and a glass of cream; stir all together,
boil for a moment, add your macaroni, and serve.

493. =Macaroni à l'Italienne.= Boil a pound of macaroni as the
foregoing, and drain it. Peel and cut an onion in small pieces, which
put into a saucepan, with four ounces of butter. When very slightly
colored, add a teaspoonful of flour, a little salt, pepper, nutmeg, and
about four wineglasses of the juice of tomatoes; boil gently; add two
ounces of grated Parmesan cheese and the same of Gruyère cheese. Mix
all thoroughly together, add your macaroni, and, when very hot, serve.

494. =Macaroni à la Milanaise=. Boil a pound of macaroni as the
foregoing. Put it in a saucepan, with a pint of tomato sauce (Art.
90), two ounces of Gruyère cheese, and the same of Parmesan, an ounce
of smoked tongue cut in thin strips, and the same of ham also cut in
strips, and the same of truffles and mushrooms chopped fine. Mix all
well together, and serve very hot.

495. =Macaroni à la Napolitaine.= Put two pounds of a leg of veal, with
an ounce of butter, in a saucepan on the fire. When well colored on
both sides, moisten with a quart of consommé (Art. I), and boil gently
about three hours, or until your consommé is reduced two thirds, then
strain it, and put it in a saucepan, with a pint of tomato sauce, two
ounces of Parmesan and four ounces of Gruyère cheese, grated, a pinch
of salt, pepper, and nutmeg, and boil gently. Boil a pound of macaroni
in water, with a little salt, add it to your sauce, simmer at the side
of the range for half an hour, and serve. The veal is sometimes served
on a dish, the macaroni on top.

496. =Baked Macaroni.= Prepare the macaroni as for macaroni with cream
(Art. 492), put it on a dish and sprinkle some bread-crumbs on top, to
which add a few pieces of butter. Send to a moderate oven, and, when
colored a light brown, serve.

497. =Spaghetti.= Boil a pound of spaghetti in three quarts of water
and a little salt. Boil gently until quite tender. Peel and chop fine
two cloves of garlic, put them in a saucepan with four tablespoonfuls
of oil; when very lightly colored, moisten with a quart of tomato
sauce (Art. 90), two pinches of salt, the same of pepper, and a little
nutmeg; then add your spaghetti. Put it at the side of the range to
simmer gently for half an hour, and serve very hot.

498. =Risotto Napolitaine.= Cut a medium-sized onion in small pieces,
which put in a saucepan, with an ounce of butter, on a moderate fire,
for about fifteen minutes, or until colored lightly. Wash a pound
of rice, blanch it for ten minutes in boiling water, then put it in
cold water for a moment, drain, put it in a saucepan at the side of
the range, with your onions, and a quart of consommé (stock, Art. 1),
simmer gently about fifty minutes, add three ounces of butter, the
same of Parmesan cheese, a pinch of pepper, salt, nutmeg, and a little
cayenne. Stir all well together, boil for a few moments, and serve very
hot.

499. =Risotto Hongroise.= (Hungarian dish.) Cut half a pound of lean
bacon into slices, which put in a deep saucepan, and let them fry
slowly to a golden yellow, then remove the pan from the fire, and place
on top of the bacon two large sliced onions, two large sliced knobs
of German celery, a small sliced carrot, the tops of a small head of
cauliflower, half a pound of blanched, well-drained rice, a can of
drained French peas, and four ounces of truffles. Sprinkle some salt
and a little red pepper over them, and on top of all put two small
spring chickens, which you have cut in quarters and seasoned with salt.
Put the cover on the saucepan, and stew very slowly for an hour. Do not
stir with a spoon, but shake the pan from time to time. Serve with this
dish some grated Parmesan cheese.

500. =Risotto à la Finne.= Fry half a pound of bacon as above, to
which add a sliced carrot, two sliced onions, a bay-leaf, half a pound
of blanched rice, and a quart of clams with their juice. Season with
pepper. Cover the saucepan, and stew very slowly three quarters of an
hour. Do not stir with a spoon, but shake the saucepan at intervals.
Serve with grated Parmesan cheese.


SALADS.

501. =Salad of Beans.= Put in a bowl three pints of cold boiled
string-beans (which cut in pieces about an inch long) and an onion cut
in very thin slices; add two tablespoonfuls of chopped parsley, six
tablespoonfuls of oil, two of vinegar, and a pinch of salt and pepper.
Mix all well together, and serve. You may also make a salad of white
beans in the same manner, except that the onion must be cut in very
small squares. White beans and green beans may also be mixed together
in a salad.

502. =Salad of Lentils.= Proceed exactly as for the foregoing.

503. =Salad of Cauliflower.= Prepare exactly as for salad of beans
(Art. 501).

504. =Salad of Celery-Roots.= Boil about a dozen celery-roots in water,
and a little salt; when tender, drain, and let them become cold. Cut
them in pieces, mix well together six tablespoonfuls of oil, two of
vinegar, some pepper and salt, which add to your celery, stirring
all well together, and serve. You may also make a salad of equal
proportions of celery, cold boiled potatoes, cut in slices, and cold
beets, also cut in slices.

505. =Potato Salad.= Chop fine a dozen cold boiled potatoes, also a
medium-sized onion, and a teaspoonful of chervil. Put in a bowl ten
tablespoonfuls of oil and two of vinegar; season with pepper and salt,
mix all well together, add your potatoes, chervil, and onion, stirring
all thoroughly together, and serve.

506. =Salad à la Macédoine.= Cut two carrots with a vegetable-cutter,
or in small pieces with a knife, the same quantity of potato, cut in
the same manner, an equal proportion of green peas, string-beans,
a beet cut in pieces, and small ends of cauliflowers. Boil each
separately in water, with a little salt added. When perfectly cold,
add an equal proportion of celery cut in small pieces. Make a dressing
composed of six tablespoonfuls of oil, two of vinegar, pepper and salt,
and serve with your vegetables, all well mixed together. You may,
instead of the above, serve the vegetables with a sauce Mayonnaise.

507. =Salad of Herring à l'Allemande.= Take four cold boiled potatoes,
two cold beets, two raw apples, three pickles, all cut in very small
pieces of equal size, also three herrings, which you have previously
soaked in water for twelve hours, changing the water several times,
add a tablespoonful of chopped parsley, and mix all together, with
eight tablespoonfuls of oil, one tablespoonful of vinegar, season with
pepper, salt, and a little nutmeg, and serve.

508. =Parisian Salad.= Cut in small pieces six cold boiled potatoes,
the same quantity of beets, and also of boiled celery, both cold, and
cut in small pieces. Mix the yolks of four hard-boiled eggs with two
tablespoonfuls of anchovy sauce, press through a sieve, add, little
by little, four tablespoonfuls of oil, one tablespoonful of mustard,
two tablespoonfuls of vinegar, a few tarragon leaves chopped fine, two
pinches of salt, two of pepper, and the whites of your eggs cut in
pieces. Stir all well together, and serve.

509. =Italian Salad.= Take four cold boiled potatoes, the same of
cold beets, six pickles, four anchovies, and the cold boiled fillets
of two flounders, all cut in small pieces; add a little salt to your
vegetables. Mix together three tablespoonfuls of oil, one and a half
of vinegar, season with pepper, add them to the foregoing ingredients,
with an ounce of capers. Put a Charlotte-Russe mold in a bowl
surrounded by cracked ice, fill the bottom of your mold with the whites
of hard-boiled eggs cut in pieces, some capers, or truffles, dipping
them in some meat jelly (Art. 278) before it has quite stiffened. Then
pour into your mold some liquid jelly, about half an inch in depth;
add to your vegetables about half a pint of liquid jelly, and, when
beginning to stiffen, put them in your mold, which put on the ice for
an hour. Dip your mold in a little warm water, turn out your salad, and
serve, garnished with hard-boiled eggs cut in two.

510. =Russian Salad of Truffles.= Chop four dozen truffles, which
put in a saucepan on the fire, with a wineglass of sherry, for five
minutes. When cold, put them in a bowl, with a tablespoonful of oil, a
pinch of pepper and salt, a teaspoonful of chopped tarragon, and the
same of parsley. Mix all well together, and cover them with a sauce
Mayonnaise (Art. 113).

511. =Salad à la Toulouse.= Chop ten truffles very fine, and the
bottoms of four cold boiled artichokes, from which you have removed the
furze attached to them, also the leaves, and chop them rather fine. Mix
with two teaspoonfuls of mustard, eight tablespoonfuls of oil, two of
vinegar, and the yolks of ten hard-boiled eggs. Arrange your chopped
truffles and artichokes in layers in a salad bowl, mixing with each
layer some of the hard-boiled eggs with their dressing. Then stir all
thoroughly together, and serve.

512. =Chicken Salad.= Cut in small pieces a pound of the white meat of
chicken, from which you have removed the skin and sinews. Put it in a
bowl. Mix with it thoroughly two tablespoonfuls of oil, with one of
vinegar, and season with pepper and salt. Take four heads of lettuce,
wash them, remove some of the leaves around the heart of the lettuce,
chop them fine, and mix them with your chicken, which put on a dish,
and cover entirely with a sauce Mayonnaise (Art. 113), spreading it
over smoothly with the blade of a knife. Cut three hard-boiled eggs in
quarters, place them with the hearts of the lettuce around your salad.
Decorate the top with thin long strips of cold boiled beets, and a few
capers, or olives, from which you have removed the pits.

513. =Lobster Salad.= Take about a pound of the meat of cold boiled
lobster, chop it fine, and finish as for chicken salad (Art. 512). If
there is coral in your lobster, wash it, dry it on a cloth, chop it
rather fine, and with it sprinkle the top of your salad.

514. =Cold Slaw.= Cut two pounds of raw cabbage in long thin strips,
and serve with a sauce Mayonnaise (Art. 113).


CHEESE.

515. =Cheese Biscuits.= Take a quarter of a pound of flour, the same of
butter, and also of grated Parmesan cheese, add a little cayenne pepper
and salt. Work all well together with the hand, roll the paste thin,
cut it into biscuits, and bake in the oven.

516. =Ramequins.= Put in a saucepan on the fire two ounces and a half
of butter, with half a glass of water. When boiling, add three ounces
of flour, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon, until the paste
becomes firm; remove it from the fire, and, when it has ceased boiling,
stir into it, as rapidly as possible, three eggs, one by one, then add
an ounce of grated Parmesan cheese, mixing it well with your other
ingredients. Lift out some of your mixture with a spoon, drop it on a
pan, forming it into small balls about the size of a nut, and brush
them with beaten egg. Cut an ounce of Gruyère cheese into as small
pieces as possible, sprinkle them on top of your balls, which send to a
gentle oven, and, when firm and well colored, serve.

517. =Cheese Straws.= Take half a pound of flour and make a hollow in
the center, in which put four ounces of butter, two ounces of Parmesan
cheese, an egg, a pinch of red pepper, and a gill of milk, which you
have added little by little. Mix all well together, roll the paste out
about an eighth of an inch thick, cut it in strips a quarter of an inch
wide and six inches long, and send to a moderate oven until colored a
light brown. Divide them in bundles of ten pieces each, around which
tie very narrow ribbons of different colors. Serve very hot.

518. =Cheese Soufflés.= Put in a bowl two ounces of grated American and
the same of Gruyère cheese. Mix well with them the yolks of five eggs.
Beat the whites of your eggs until very stiff, mix an ounce of butter
with your eggs and cheese, then stir in lightly the whites of your
eggs. Pour your mixture into small paper cases, send them to a gentle
oven for about ten minutes, and serve instantly.



CHAPTER VII.

_DESSERTS AND CAKES._


519. =Sweet Omelette.= Beat up twelve eggs with an ounce of sugar, and
finish as for plain omelette (Art. 478), sprinkle some sugar on top,
and serve.

520. =Omelette with Rum.= Make a plain omelette (Art. 478), sprinkle
some sugar on top, pour over it six wineglasses of rum, to which touch
a lighted match, and serve while burning.

521. =Omelette with Jam.= Make a plain omelette, and, just before
folding it in two, place upon it some strawberry, raspberry, or any
other sort of jam, according to your taste. Fold your omelette in two,
and serve.

522. =Omelette à la Celéstine.= Boil a glass of milk, with which
mix thoroughly two tablespoonfuls of rice flour, add four ounces of
powdered sugar, and a teaspoonful of extract of vanilla. Simmer gently
for ten minutes, stirring constantly, add the yolks of three eggs,
mixed in a little water or milk, and half an ounce of butter; stir all
together until quite smooth, and keep hot. Beat up ten eggs, with which
make ten little omelettes of about four inches in length. Fill each
one with a tablespoonful of the above mixture. Heat three quarters of
a pound of peach marmalade, to which add a little water. Place your
omelette in a circle on a dish, pouring your marmalade in the center,
and serve very hot.

523. =Omelette Soufflé.= Separate the yolks of twelve eggs from the
whites. Put the yolks of five in a deep dish, with half a pound of
sugar, a teaspoonful of extract of vanilla, and beat all together for
ten minutes with a wooden spoon. Put the whites of your eggs in a large
bowl, and with an egg-beater beat them very stiff, then mix them with
your yolks and sugar. Butter a dish, into which pour the above, send to
a moderate oven for about twelve minutes, sprinkle some sugar on top,
and serve instantly.

524. =Fried Bananas.= Cut eight bananas in two, through their length,
dip them in a paste composed of three eggs, six ounces of flour, well
mixed together, and a little water, so as to make a smooth, soft, and
rather liquid paste, but sufficiently solid to adhere to your bananas.
Add a teaspoonful of soda, and mix thoroughly with your paste, then
fry your bananas in hot lard, and, when colored a bright yellow, drain
them, sprinkle them with powdered sugar, and serve.

525. =Rice Croquettes.= Wash four ounces of rice in cold water, which
put in a saucepan on the fire, with a pint of water, and boil ten
minutes, then put in cold water for a moment. Put your rice back again
on the fire, with a pint of milk, a little grated orange and lemon
peel, and two ounces of sugar. Boil gently forty minutes. Let it
become perfectly cold, then form it into croquettes, beat up two eggs,
in which dip your croquettes. Roll them in bread-crumbs, fry them in
very hot lard, and, when your croquettes are a bright yellow, drain
them, sprinkle them with sugar, and serve. You may also serve them
with an apricot sauce made in the following manner: Put four ounces of
sugar and two wineglasses of water in a saucepan on the fire; when the
sugar is melted, add half a pound of apricots, boil for a moment, press
through a sieve, heat again on the fire, and serve. You may flavor with
vanilla, maraschino, kirsch, or any liqueur you wish.

526. =French Pancakes.= Put in a bowl six ounces of flour, with three
eggs, and a pinch of salt. Stir well together with a wooden spoon
until your paste is smooth, adding a gill of milk. Put a small piece
of butter in a frying-pan, and, when melted, put into it about two
tablespoonfuls of your paste; when colored on one side, turn it on the
other, and continue in the same manner until your paste is all used.
Put them on a dish, fill them with currant jelly, or jam, roll them
up, and powder them with sugar. Heat a poker or slender piece of iron
red hot, lay it lightly for a second on each pancake, making several
stripes across the pancake, and serve hot.

527. =Cabinet Pudding.= Soak in milk half a pound of baba (Art. 545),
brioche (Art. 594), or sponge cake (Art. 567). Remove the stems and the
seeds of two ounces of raisins, chop half an ounce of citron, blanch
and chop two ounces of almonds, and add six ounces of sugar. Mix all
together and place in a buttered mold. Stir ten eggs into half a pint
of milk, which pour into your mold. Put into a saucepan on the fire
some water, about two inches deep, place in it your mold, which cover,
and send to the oven for about an hour, or until firm enough to turn
out of the mold. Serve with the following sauce: Put in a saucepan on
the fire half a pint of milk, the yolks of six eggs, four ounces of
sugar, and a teaspoonful of extract of vanilla. Stir it well until it
begins to thicken. Pour it over your pudding, and serve.

528. =Bread Pudding.= Soak a pound of bread-crumbs in cold milk,
divide it in small pieces, so as not to form a solid lump, and add
three ounces of currants, and the same of raisins, from which you
have removed the seeds, the grated peel of an orange, an ounce of
citron cut in very small pieces, six ounces of powdered sugar, eight
well-beaten eggs, and half a pint of milk. Mix all well together.
Pour into a buttered mold, which place in a saucepan, which you have
filled with water the height of your mold. Boil about two hours, or
until thoroughly done, of which you may judge by slipping the point
of a knife in your pudding, and, if it comes out dry, the pudding
is sufficiently cooked. Turn it out of the mold, and serve with the
following sauce: Put a spoonful of corn starch in a saucepan on the
fire, mix with it half a glass of water, four ounces of sugar, and
the thin outside peel of a lemon, stir until boiling, then add three
wineglasses of sherry, brandy, or rum.

529. =English Plum-Pudding.= Remove the skin and the sinews from half
a pound of beef suet; chop it very fine, adding half a pound of flour,
and continue to chop until the flour is thoroughly mixed with the suet;
then add eight ounces of raisins from which you have removed the seeds,
and the same of currants, two ounces of citron cut in small pieces,
a little nutmeg, two apples which you have pared and chopped fine, a
wineglass of rum, and six eggs. Mix all well together, and then put
into a buttered mold, which place in a saucepan which you have filled
with water the height of your mold, and simmer gently six hours, then
turn your pudding out of the mold, and serve. Instead of boiling your
pudding in a mold, you may tie it securely in a buttered cloth, place
it in a saucepan with some boiling water, and boil it six hours; remove
the cloth, and serve with a sauce, with rum, of the preceding articles,
or sprinkle powdered sugar on top; pour some rum over the pudding,
light it, and serve burning.

530. =Pudding au Marasquin.= Take an ounce of raisins, from which you
have removed the seeds, and two ounces of currants; soak them in a
wineglass of sherry; then beat up slightly the yolks of six eggs, with
half a pound of powdered sugar; add your raisins and currants, a pint
of milk, half an ounce of gelatine, a teaspoonful of vanilla extract,
and put all together in a saucepan on the fire; stir until the gelatine
is dissolved, but do not allow your milk to boil; then strain. Put a
mold on ice, pour into it, about the depth of two inches, a part of
your mixture; when it has stiffened, cover entirely with Savoy cake an
inch thick and soaked in maraschino; then pour on top some more of your
mixture, about the depth of an inch high, and continue with alternate
layers of cake and your mixture until the mold is filled. Put it on the
ice until needed, then turn it out of the mold, and serve.

531. =Rice Pudding.= Wash well, rubbing it between the hands, half a
pound of rice; change the water several times. Boil it ten minutes in
boiling water; then put it in cold water for a moment, drain it, and
put it in a saucepan on the fire with three pints of milk, half a pound
of sugar, and the peel of a lemon cut extremely thin and grated; simmer
gently for an hour, take it off the fire, add four eggs, stirring until
well mixed, two ounces of raisins from which you have removed the
seeds, two ounces of currants, and half an ounce of citron cut in small
pieces. Butter a tin mold, sprinkle a few bread-crumbs on the bottom
and the sides, pour in your rice, and send it to a gentle oven for an
hour and a half; turn it out of your mold, and serve with the following
sauce: Put in a saucepan on the fire a tablespoonful of corn starch,
four yolks of eggs, half a pint of milk, four ounces of sugar, the
grated rind of an orange (or a teaspoonful of extract of vanilla); stir
until beginning to boil, strain, and serve.

532. =Rice Pudding= (another way). Wash six ounces of rice, changing
the water several times; boil it in boiling water for ten minutes, then
put it in cold water for a moment, drain it, and put it in a saucepan
on the fire with three pints of milk, six ounces of sugar, a little
grated lemon-peel, a pinch of allspice, and very little nutmeg. Simmer
gently for an hour, add, one by one, four eggs, and stir until well
mixed; pour your rice into a deep dish which you have buttered, send it
to the oven until well colored, then remove it from the oven, put it on
ice, and serve it extremely cold.

533. =Apple Charlotte.= Pare three dozen apples, put them in a saucepan
on the fire with half a glass of water and half of the peel of a lemon;
when your apples are soft, remove the lemon-peel, add six ounces of
sugar, four ounces of peach marmalade, and reduce one half, stirring
constantly, so that the apples do not stick to the saucepan. Butter a
tin mold, cut a piece of bread a quarter of an inch thick, the size and
shape of the bottom of your mold, dip it in melted butter, and place
it in your mold; then cut some pieces of bread, the same thickness as
above, the height of your mold and about two and a half inches wide.
Place them around the sides (having dipped them in melted butter), one
piece slightly overlapping the other. Pour the apples in the center,
cover with a piece of bread dipped in melted butter, and send to the
oven for about an hour; drain off the butter, turn your charlotte out
of the mold, and serve with the following sauce: Put in a saucepan half
a pound of peach marmalade with half a glass of water, two ounces of
sugar, and stir all well together until boiling, press through a sieve,
heat again on the fire, adding two liqueur-glasses of rum.

534. =Apples à la Condé.= Pare eight apples, in which cut a hole in the
center; put them in a saucepan on the fire with four ounces of sugar,
enough water to cover them, and half of the peel of a lemon. When the
apples are soft, remove the lemon-peel, drain them, and strain the
juice, which reduce on the fire two thirds. Boil half a pound of rice
(which you have previously washed) in boiling water ten minutes; then
put it in cold water for a moment, drain, and put it in a saucepan on
the fire with a pint and a half of milk, six ounces of sugar, and a
teaspoonful of extract of vanilla; boil gently three quarters of an
hour; put your rice, about an inch in depth, on a dish, arrange your
apples on top, fill the center with currant jelly, or any jam you wish;
pour over them the juice which you have reduced, decorate them with
blanched almonds cut in small pieces, citron, or angelica cut in small
pieces, and then put them on the ice, and, when very cold, serve.

535. =Compote of Apples.= Pare ten apples, in which cut a hole in the
center, put them in a saucepan with enough water to cover them, six
ounces of sugar, and the rind of a lemon; simmer very gently until
quite soft, without breaking; drain them, and reduce the juice three
quarters on the fire, strain, pour it over your apples, which you have
placed on a dish, and serve.

536. =Pommes Meringues.= Pare and cut in quarters two dozen apples,
removing the core and pips. Put them in a saucepan on the fire with
half a glass of water, six ounces of sugar, and the peel of an orange,
grated. Reduce one half, stirring constantly; then put them on the
ice; beat six whites of eggs very stiff, add to them four ounces of
sugar, stir them lightly together, cover your apples with the meringue,
sprinkle with powdered sugar, and send to a gentle oven until lightly
colored, then remove them, put them again on ice, and serve very cold.

537. =Beignets of Apples.= Pare, cut in round quarters, and remove the
core and pips of ten apples. Put half a pound of flour in a bowl, in
which break three eggs; mix them well with the flour, and add a little
water, so as to make rather a liquid paste, but sufficiently solid to
adhere to the apples, which dip into the paste, covering them entirely.
Put some lard in a frying-pan, in which, when very hot, fry your
apples. When a bright yellow, drain them, sprinkle them with sugar, and
serve hot. Beignets of peaches are prepared in the same manner.

538. =Beignets de Crême à la Vanille.= Put in a saucepan four eggs,
two ounces of corn starch, four ounces of sugar, and stir all well
together; add a pint of milk, a teaspoonful of vanilla, place on the
fire, stirring with a wooden spoon until boiling, and pour into a pan
which you have buttered. Let it become cold, then cut it into pieces
an inch wide and three inches long. Make a paste as for the foregoing
article, in which dip your mixture (which you have cut in pieces),
and fry in very hot lard. When colored a bright yellow, drain them,
sprinkle them with sugar, and serve.

539. =Beignets Soufflés.= Make a paste as for éclairs (Art. 547),
adding a teaspoonful of extract of vanilla. Put some lard in a
frying-pan, which, when melted, should be about two and a half inches
high in your pan, and, when very hot, take with a spoon some pieces of
your paste about the size of a nut, drop them in your lard, and fry
them a bright yellow; drain them, roll them in powdered sugar, and
serve.

540. =Almond Puddings.= Blanch and chop fine a quarter of a pound of
almonds, which mix thoroughly together with two ounces of flour, four
ounces of powdered sugar, and two ounces of corn starch. Separate the
whites and yolks of eight eggs. Beat the yolks well, flavor them with
vanilla, and mix together with the above ingredients. Then beat the
whites very stiff, and stir them in thoroughly with the rest. Butter
some little tin timbale-molds, which nearly fill with the mixture,
cover with buttered paper, and place them in a pan in which you have
put enough water to reach about three quarters of the height of the
timbale-molds, and send to a moderate oven for about three quarters of
an hour, or until done, of which you may judge by inserting a straw in
the cake, and, if it comes out clean, it is sufficiently done. Remove
the cake from the molds. Serve with the following sauce: With a small
coffee-cup full of currant jelly, to which add about the same quantity
of claret, add a little sugar, a very little stick cinnamon, and a
little nutmeg. Strain, and serve hot. OBS.--This pudding, instead of
the almonds, may be made with macaroons (about twelve), which should
be well browned in the oven, and then crushed fine with a rolling-pin,
and mixed with the flour, etc., in the same order as described for the
almonds.

541. =Baked Custard.= Break eight eggs in a bowl, to which add half a
pound of sugar, a quart of milk, two tablespoonfuls of vanilla, and a
sherry-glass of brandy. Mix all well together, strain, put in a deep
dish, and send to a gentle oven for about forty minutes, or until well
colored on top. Serve very cold.

542. =Boiled Custard.= Put in a saucepan twelve eggs, to which mix
gradually a pint and a half of milk; add half a pound of sugar, a
tablespoonful of vanilla, and a sherry-glass of rum. Put on the fire,
stirring with an egg-beater until beginning to thicken, then remove the
custard from the fire, not having allowed it to boil. Strain, and stir
until nearly cold. Serve very cold.

543. =Trifles.= Soak some sponge cake in sherry, put it on a dish,
place a layer of raspberry jam on top, which cover entirely with
whipped cream, to which add some powdered sugar, and flavor with
vanilla.

544. =Brioche.= Take a quarter of a pound of flour, make a hollow in
the center, in which put half of a cake of yeast, and moisten with a
little tepid water (about two ounces) until the paste is soft, then put
it in a saucepan, and leave it in rather a warm place. Then put three
quarters of a pound of flour on a table, make a hollow in the center
of the flour, in which put a pinch of sugar, seven eggs, one by one,
mixing each thoroughly with the flour before adding another, and three
quarters of a pound of butter, little by little, mixing it thoroughly
with the flour and eggs. Then see if your yeast has risen twice its
height; and if so, add it to your paste, which put in a warm place
eight hours; after which sprinkle a little flour on a table, form your
paste into balls of about two ounces each, brush them over with beaten
egg, send them to a hot oven, and, when well colored, remove from the
oven.

545. =Pâté à Brioche Panachée.= Take half the quantity of the foregoing
paste, roll it out half an inch thick, on top of which place a layer
of peach marmalade, and send to the oven for about ten minutes; then
sprinkle on top of the marmalade an ounce of currants, previously
washed and dried, about twenty blanched almonds cut in small pieces,
and a little citron, also cut in small pieces. Then divide your brioche
in pieces three inches long and an inch wide. Serve cold.

546. =Baba.= Put four ounces of flour on a table, make a hollow in the
center, in which put half a cake of yeast, and moisten with a little
milk, so as to form a soft paste, which put in a saucepan, and leave in
a warm place. Then put six ounces of flour on a table, make a hollow
in the center, in which put ten ounces of flour, two ounces of sugar,
six ounces of butter, and three eggs. Mix all well together, working
it with the hands, and adding, one by one, three eggs and a wineglass
of rum. Then mix together an ounce of currants, with three ounces of
raisins, from which you have removed the seeds, and half an ounce of
citron, cut in small pieces, and add them to your paste, also the rest
of your paste, with the yeast. Fill a buttered mold a third of its
height with your paste, and send to a moderate oven for about three
quarters of an hour. Pass the point of a knife into the baba, and if
sufficiently done it will come out dry. Then turn it out of your mold,
pour over it two liqueur-glasses of rum, sprinkle a little sugar on
top, and serve. Instead of putting the baba in a large mold, you may
put it in several very small ones if preferred.

547. =Éclairs.= Put an ounce of butter in a saucepan on the fire, with
about six tablespoonfuls of water. When beginning to boil, add about
two and a half ounces of flour, stirring with a wooden spoon about five
minutes, then remove from the fire, and add, one by one, four eggs,
stirring rapidly, until each is well mixed. Then put your mixture in
a cornucopia of stiff paper, with a hole in the point, through which
press it on a pan, forming little shapes similar to lady fingers. Send
them to a gentle oven for about twenty minutes, or until firm; let them
become cold, then make an incision in them, the length of each, through
the middle, in which place some whipped cream, to which you have added
sugar and a little essence of coffee. Then put in a copper saucepan, or
one which is well enameled and thoroughly clean, half a pound of sugar,
with a glass of water. After remaining on the fire a few moments, lift
out a little of the sugar with a wooden spoon, and drop it in a cup of
cold water. Take the sugar between the thumb and third finger, separate
them, and, if you may draw the sugar out in a fine thread without
breaking, you have reached the desired result. Put it in a bowl, and
add a tablespoonful of the extract of coffee, stir until beginning to
thicken, cover with it the top of each éclair, and, when cold, serve.

548. =Chocolate Éclairs.= Make a paste as for the foregoing, which form
into éclairs, and bake as the above. Put in a saucepan two eggs, two
tablespoonfuls of corn starch, two ounces of sugar, a glass of milk, a
teaspoonful of vanilla, and stir all together on the fire. Just before
beginning to boil, remove from the fire and let it become cold. Then
fill the inside of your éclairs with your cream. Melt an ounce of
chocolate in a tablespoonful of water, boil half a pound of sugar as
the foregoing, mix thoroughly with your chocolate, with which cover
your éclairs.

549. =Duchess Cakes with Peach Marmalade.= Make a paste as for éclairs
(Art. 547), of which take about half a tablespoonful at a time, and
place on a pan in oval form, as for meringues, only smaller, and about
three inches apart. Brush them with beaten egg, send them to a gentle
oven, and, when they are done, make an incision in each one through
the middle, and fill the inside with peach marmalade, or any other
preferred. Then put in a copper saucepan, or one which is well enameled
and thoroughly clean, half a pound of sugar, with a glass of water.
After remaining on the fire a few moments, lift out a little of the
sugar with a wooden spoon, and drop it in a cup of cold water. Take
the sugar between the thumb and third finger, separate them, and, if
you may draw the sugar out in a fine thread without breaking, you have
reached the desired result. Then cover the top of each cake with the
sugar, and, when cold, serve.

550. =Gâteau St. Honoré.= Take some pâté brisée (Art. 285), roll it out
thin, and with it line a round tin pie-dish, which you have buttered.
Then take some paste, as for éclairs (Art. 547), and form a border of
about an inch thick on top of your other paste in the pan, brush it
over with beaten eggs, and send it to a moderate oven until thoroughly
done, then remove it. Make a cornucopia of stiff paper, with a hole cut
in the end, fill it with éclair paste, press it out through the hole
on a pan, forming the paste into about a dozen and a half small balls
the size of a French chestnut, prick a hole in the bottom of each, and
send them to the oven until done. When cold, dip them in melted sugar,
as described in the foregoing article, place them all around the top of
your paste in the pie-dish. Whip a pint of cream, let it remain fifteen
minutes on the ice, drain off all the moisture, mix well with your
cream three ounces of sugar and half a teaspoonful of vanilla, and fill
the inside of your pastry. You may, instead of vanilla, flavor your
cream with rum, chocolate, or raspberry, and decorate the pastry with
candied oranges, cherries, and other candied fruits.

551. =Apple Tart.= Peel two dozen apples, which put in a saucepan with
two tablespoonfuls of water and a little grated lemon-peel; stew them
until soft, then add three ounces of sugar, and stir with a wooden
spoon five minutes; then let them become cold. Take some pâté brisée
(Art. 285), roll it out thin, and with it line a pie-dish large enough
to contain your apples, which place in the dish. Roll out some more
paste very thin, sprinkle it with flour, double it, cut it in strips a
quarter of an inch wide, moisten the edges of your tart, and place the
strips on top of your apples, a small space between each, fasten the
ends to the edge of your dish, and brush the strips lightly with water;
place an equal quantity of strips across and on top of the others,
making a sort of lattice-work; brush them over with beaten egg, and
send the tart to a hot oven; when three quarters done, remove it, brush
it over with a little melted currant jelly; return it to the oven until
thoroughly done both underneath and on top.

552. =Apple Tart à la Portugaise.= Line a pie-dish with some pâté
brisée (Art. 285), then place on top a layer, about half an inch thick,
of peach marmalade, and send to the oven until the paste is done. Peel
eight apples, cut them in two, remove the core and the pips, put them
in a saucepan with a pint of water, six ounces of sugar, and the rind
of a lemon; stew them until soft, without breaking; then drain them and
place them on top of the peach marmalade in your tart, strain the juice
of your apples, reduce it two thirds on the fire, and, just before
serving, pour it over your tart.

553. =Apricot Tart.= Line a pie-dish with some pâté brisée (Art. 285)
rolled thin, sprinkle the bottom with powdered sugar, fill the dish
with canned apricots, send it to a hot oven, and, when thoroughly done,
sprinkle the top with powdered sugar, and serve. Proceed in the same
manner for tart of peaches, and currants (to which add more sugar), and
cherries (first removing the stones).

554. =Gâteau d'Artois.= Peel a dozen apples, remove the core and pips,
and stew them with a tablespoonful of water in a saucepan. When soft,
add two ounces of sugar and a little cinnamon, and stew ten minutes
longer. Take some puff paste (Art. 284), roll it out thin, divide it
in two equal parts, spread your apples on one part, covering them with
the other; moisten the edges of your paste, which fasten together by
pressing upon the top layer with the thumb. Then mark out lightly, with
a knife, ten equal pieces, about four inches long and an inch and a
half wide. Brush the top with beaten egg, and send to a hot oven until
well colored and thoroughly done underneath. Cut the pieces through,
which you have marked out, and serve.

555. =Mince Pie.= Chop very fine half a pound of beef suet, three
quarters of a pound of cold beef, three apples which you have peeled,
two ounces of citron, and a little lemon-peel; add a pound of powdered
sugar, half a pound of currants, the same of raisins, a teaspoonful of
ginger, the same of nutmeg, half a pint of sherry, and a quarter of a
pint of brandy. Mix all well together in a jar, which cover, and let
it remain for eight days. Take some puff paste (Art. 284), roll it out
thin, and with it line a flat pie-dish, into which place your mince
meat, and cover with another layer of paste, which moisten and press
all around the edge so as to fasten it securely. Brush the top with
beaten egg, and send to a moderate oven for about forty minutes, and,
if sufficiently done, serve very hot.

556. =Pastries à la Condé.= Put four ounces of almonds in boiling
water, remove the skins, wash the almonds, dry them, and chop them
fine. Mix with them thoroughly two ounces of powdered sugar and half
the white of an egg; roll out some puff paste (Art. 284) half an inch
thick, five inches wide, and fourteen inches long. Spread the almonds
entirely over your paste, sprinkle lightly with sugar, and cut the
paste in ten equal strips across the length. Send them to rather a hot
oven, and, when well colored, serve.

557. =Gâteau Fourré aux Amandes.= Put four ounces of almonds in boiling
water, and remove the skins. Pound the almonds to a paste, with which
mix thoroughly four ounces of sugar, an ounce of butter, the yolks of
two eggs, and half a sherry-glass of rum. Take half a pound of puff
paste (Art. 284), roll it a quarter of an inch thick, and, with a
sufficient quantity, line a shallow pie-dish. Moisten the edge of your
paste, fill the pie-dish with your mixture of almonds, make a border
with the rest of your paste around the edge of your dish, then, with
the point of a knife, trace some fanciful design on the top, brush it
over with beaten egg, send to a hot oven for about forty-five minutes,
and, if well done underneath, sprinkle some powdered sugar on top, and,
when melted, remove from the oven and serve. You may also serve this
cold.

558. =Gâteau Fourré aux Pommes.= Peel and cut in quarters a dozen
apples, from which remove the core and pips. Put them in a saucepan on
the fire with a sherry-glass of water, the peel of half a lemon, and
four ounces of sugar. Stew them for about seven or eight minutes, stir
them for a few moments with a wooden spoon, let them become cold, and
finish as described in the preceding article.

559. =Gâteau Fourré à la Crême.= Mix thoroughly together in a saucepan
two ounces of flour with two eggs, add a glass of milk, stirring well,
so as to make a smooth paste, then a glass of cream and half an ounce
of butter. Continue to stir with a wooden spoon until boiling, then let
it simmer gently at the side of the range for fifteen minutes, stirring
it from time to time. Let it become cold, and add to it three ounces
of sugar, two pounded macaroons, a teaspoonful of vanilla, and mix
all well together. Take some puff paste (Art. 284), and finish as for
gâteau fourré aux amandes (Art. 557).

560. =Mars.= Take some brioche paste (Art. 544), roll it out a quarter
of an inch thick, six inches wide, and sixteen inches long. Cover it
with apple marmalade, and send it to a very gentle oven for about ten
minutes. Then let it become cold, and cut it into strips an inch wide,
across the length of the paste. Beat six whites of eggs very stiff,
mix with them half a pound of powdered sugar, with which cover each
strip of pastry on top, about three quarters of an inch thick. Blanch
twenty almonds, cut them in long, thin strips, place them two by two
on top of your pastries, the two points meeting in the center (six or
eight pieces of almonds on each will be sufficient), sprinkle them with
powdered sugar, and send them to the oven about twelve minutes, or
until colored lightly.

561. =Fanchonettes.= Roll out thin some pâté brisée (Art. 285), with
which line some little molds. Fill them two thirds with apple, peach,
or any other marmalade preferred, and send them to a hot oven twelve
minutes. Then let them become cold. Beat six whites of eggs very stiff,
and mix well with them half a pound of powdered sugar; cover your
little tarts with it half an inch thick, and smooth it on top with the
blade of a knife. Make a cornucopia of stiff paper, cut a hole in the
end of it, put in it some of the white of egg and sugar, and press it
through the hole, forming on top of each tart, in a circle, six very
small balls, and one in the center. Sprinkle over them some powdered
sugar, and send them to a very gentle oven. They should not be allowed
to color. When they are firm, remove them from the oven, place on top
of each little ball a very small piece of currant jelly, and serve.

562. =Cream Pastries with Almonds.= Take some puff paste (Art. 284),
roll it out very thin, and cut it in ten pieces, each about three
inches wide and four inches long. Send them to the oven, and, when
done, take them out; then cut ten other pieces of the same size as the
above, and brush them with beaten egg; blanch two ounces of almonds,
chop them fine, mix with them a very little powdered sugar, a _very_
little white of egg, and sprinkle them on top of your ten pieces of
paste, which send to the oven until well colored, and let them become
cold. Beat up half a pint of cream, put it on the ice about fifteen
minutes, drain it on a sieve, mix with it, in a bowl, an ounce of sugar
and a little extract of vanilla. Place your cream on the plain pieces
of pastry, and cover with those on which you have sprinkled the almonds.

563. =Gâteau Madeleine à l'Orange.= Put in a bowl half a pound of
powdered sugar, the same of flour, four eggs, the grated peel of an
orange, and mix all well together. Put half a pound of butter near the
fire, so as to make it soft without melting it quite liquid, and add
it to your other ingredients. Butter ten little tin molds, which fill
three quarters with your mixture, and send them to a gentle oven for
about twenty minutes, or until thoroughly done, of which you may judge
by passing the point of a knife through one, and, if it comes out dry,
your cake is sufficiently baked. Instead of the orange-peel, you may
flavor, if you wish, with vanilla, adding some currants and citron cut
in very small pieces.

564. =Gâteau Genoise.= Put in a bowl half a pound of sugar with half
a pound of butter, heated, so as to be a little soft. Beat up both
together quickly with a wooden spoon for three or four minutes, then
add three eggs, one by one, mixing each thoroughly before adding
another. Then add the yolks of three eggs, the grated peel of half a
lemon; stir all well together, adding half a pound of flour; beat the
three whites of your eggs, and add them to the foregoing. Butter a pan,
into which pour your mixture about three quarters of an inch thick;
send it to a gentle oven for about thirty minutes, cut it in small
pieces, and ice it as for coffee éclairs (Art. 547).

565. =Gâteau Savarin.= Put three ounces of flour in a bowl, with half
a cake of yeast, adding about two sherry-glasses of lukewarm milk,
so as to form a soft paste, to which, when risen double its height,
add twelve ounces of flour, seven ounces of butter (a little warm), a
pinch of salt, an ounce of sugar, and seven eggs. Beat up your mixture
well with a wooden spoon, and, while beating, add, one by one, four
eggs. When the mixture no longer sticks to the bowl, you have beaten
it enough; then add to it half an ounce of citron cut in very small
pieces, and put it in rather a warm place for about two hours. Butter a
tin mold, which sprinkle with a few chopped almonds, fill the mold one
half with your mixture, and let it rise half as much again; then send
to a moderate oven, slip the point of a knife into the cake, and, if it
comes out dry, it is sufficiently done. Turn it out of your mold; put
four ounces of sugar, with a glass of water, in a saucepan on the fire,
boil five minutes, add a tablespoonful of anisette, two tablespoonfuls
of rum, and one of curaçoa, which pour gradually over your cake until
absorbed, and serve.

566. =Manquet.= Put the yolks of eight eggs in a bowl with half a pound
of sugar, and stir with a wooden spoon three or four minutes; then add
the grated peel of a lemon. Whip the three whites of your eggs until
very stiff, add them gradually to the above ingredients, also an ounce
of melted butter, and stir all together lightly. Butter a tin mold,
dust it with flour, pour into it your mixture, and send it to a gentle
oven for about half an hour. Slip the point of a knife into your cake,
and, if it comes out dry, it is sufficiently done.

567. =Sponge Cake.= Put in a bowl a pound of flour, three quarters of a
pound of powdered sugar, two eggs, two glasses of milk, and the grated
rind of a lemon. Mix all well together, and then add six ounces of
melted butter, and a teaspoonful of Royal Baking Powder. Butter a tin
mold, in which pour your mixture; send it to a gentle oven, and, when
sufficiently colored, slip the point of a knife into it, and, if it
comes out dry, your cake is done. Turn it out of the mold, and serve.

568. =Lady Fingers.= Put four ounces of powdered sugar in a bowl, with
the yolks of four eggs, and stir them well together with a wooden
spoon, until they become white and slightly consistent; then add three
ounces of flour and a little grated lemon-peel. Beat up the whites of
your eggs until very stiff, then mix them lightly, in small quantities
at a time, with your other ingredients. Pour your mixture into a
cornucopia made of stiff paper, with a hole in the end, through which
press it on a pan (on which you have spread a sheet of white paper),
forming it into lady fingers, about five inches long and not quite an
inch wide, sprinkle each with powdered sugar, and send them to a very
gentle oven, watching them, so that they do not color too much. When
they are firm, slip the blade of a knife underneath them, so as to
remove them from the pan, and serve.

569. =Savoy Cake.= Put the yolks of three eggs in a bowl, with four
ounces of powdered sugar, beat them well until slightly consistent, and
add to them an ounce and a half of flour, an ounce of corn starch, a
few drops of extract of vanilla, and mix all well together. Beat up the
whites of your eggs very stiff, and stir them lightly with your other
ingredients. Butter a mold, which sprinkle with sugar, and into which
pour your mixture. Send it to a gentle oven, and, when it is done (of
which you may judge by slipping the point of a knife into it, and, if
it comes out dry, your cake is sufficiently baked), turn it out of the
mold, let it become cold, and serve.

570. =Macaroons.= Put half a pound of almonds in boiling water, remove
the skins, then put the almonds in cold water, which drain off, and put
them in the oven to dry. Pound them to a paste, adding, by degrees, the
white of an egg; then add a pound and a half of powdered sugar, again
pound well, adding, little by little, the whites of two eggs. Spread
on a pan a sheet of white paper, form your mixture in little rounds,
somewhat smaller than a twenty-five cent piece, place them on top of
the paper in your pan, each about an inch and a half apart from the
other. Send them to a gentle oven for about twelve minutes, the door of
the oven shut, and, at the end of that time, if they are well colored,
remove them from the oven, let them become cold, turn the paper upside
down, moisten it with a little water underneath, and remove the
macaroons.

571. =Tea Cakes.= Put on a table a pound of flour, which you have
previously sifted, make a hole in the middle, in which place half a
pound of butter, six ounces of powdered sugar, a pinch of ginger, and
four eggs. Mix all well together, and roll out your paste extremely
thin, cut it out in rounds or squares, which put on a pan, which you
have buttered lightly, brush your cakes with beaten egg, sprinkle them
on top with half a pound of currants. Send them to the oven, and, when
colored a bright yellow, remove them, and serve when needed.

572. =Chocolate Cakes.= Make the same mixture as for Savoy cake (Art.
569), put it in a cornucopia made of stiff paper, with a hole in the
end, through which press it on a pan (on which you have spread a sheet
of white paper), and form it into small rounds about the size of a
fifty-cent piece. Send them to a gentle oven until they are quite firm,
then let them become cold, and cut them all the same size with a small
round cutter. Spread a layer of peach or other marmalade on the half of
your cakes, which cover with the other half. Melt about two ounces of
chocolate in about two tablespoonfuls of water. Put in a saucepan on
the fire half a pound of sugar, with half a glass of water, boil for
about eight to ten minutes, lift out some of the sugar with a spoon,
drop it into cold water, place it between the thumb and third finger,
and, if you may draw the sugar out into a long fine thread without
breaking, you have reached the desired result. Then put your chocolate
in a bowl, add your sugar, stirring until beginning to thicken. Take as
many little wooden skewers as you have cakes, sharpen them to a fine
point, stick one into each cake, which dip into your chocolate and
sugar, covering it entirely. Put a colander upside down on a table, and
in the holes place the ends of your sticks, thereby allowing the cakes
on the opposite end to dry, after which remove your cakes from the
sticks, and serve when needed.

573. =Angel Cake.= Beat the whites of eleven eggs very stiff. Mix with
half a pound of sifted flour, half a pound of sugar, and a teaspoonful
of cream of tartar. Flavor with extract of almond or extract of
pineapple. Then mix all together with the whites of eggs, and bake in
a moderate oven for about forty minutes, or until thoroughly done, of
which you may judge by passing the point of a knife into your cake,
and, if it comes out dry, it is sufficiently done. Do not butter the
pan for this cake.

574. =Pound Cake.= Put in a bowl half a pound of butter, which you have
put in rather a warm place, so as to be a little soft. Add two eggs,
which beat well together with the butter for four or five minutes. Add
another egg, which also beat five minutes, and then another, and beat
all together the same length of time, and mix with the foregoing half a
pound of flour, four ounces of currants, and the same of raisins, which
you have stoned. Butter a mold, put a piece of paper in the bottom, and
also around the sides, pour your mixture into the mold, and send it to
a moderate oven for about an hour. Pass the point of a knife into your
cake, and, if it comes out dry, it is sufficiently done.

575. =Charlotte-Russe.= Butter a tin mold, the bottom and sides of
which line with lady fingers. Whip a pint of cream until quite firm,
and put it on the ice. Dissolve half an ounce of gelatine in about
a sherry-glass of hot water, then add four ounces of sugar. Boil a
sherry-glass of milk, remove it from the fire, and mix with it four
eggs, stirring rapidly. Strain your gelatine and sugar, and add them,
with a teaspoonful of vanilla, to your other ingredients, and mix all
well together. When beginning to stiffen, add your whipped cream, which
remove from the bowl with a skimmer, so as to drain off all moisture.
Fill your mold with the cream, put it on ice for an hour, take it out
of the mold, and serve.

576. =Bavarian Strawberry Cream.= Dissolve a quarter of an ounce of
gelatine in three or four tablespoonfuls of hot water, then add to it
four ounces of powdered sugar, and put it through a sieve. Whip a pint
of cream, and, when firm, put it on ice for a quarter of an hour. Press
four ounces of strawberries through a sieve, which put in a bowl with
your gelatine and sugar. When beginning to stiffen slightly, add your
whipped cream, which remove from the bowl with a skimmer, so as to
drain off all moisture. Mix all well together, and pour into a mold,
which put on ice for about an hour. Then turn your cream out of the
mold, and serve.

577. =Bavarian Chocolate Cream.= Prepare exactly as for the foregoing,
adding two ounces of chocolate which you have previously melted.

578. =Bavarian Vanilla Cream.= Proceed as for Bavarian strawberry cream
(Art. 576), except that instead of adding strawberries, flavor with a
teaspoonful of vanilla.

579. =Bavarian Coffee Cream.= Proceed as for Bavarian strawberry cream
(Art. 576), but, instead of strawberries, flavor with a tablespoonful
of essence of coffee.

580. =Jelly of Rum.= Dissolve two ounces of gelatine in a pint and a
half of very hot water on the fire, and, when melted, add ten ounces
of sugar. Beat three whites of eggs with half a glass of water, which
mix with your gelatine, stirring quickly with an egg-beater. Then put
all on the fire until boiling, then remove to the back of the range to
simmer gently for half an hour. Strain your jelly through a flannel
until perfectly clear, and add three sherry-glasses of rum. Pour it
into a mold, which put on the ice until sufficiently stiff to turn out.

581. =Wine Jelly.= Proceed as for the foregoing, adding a pint and
a quarter of water (instead of a pint and a half), the juice of a
lemon, a very small piece of cinnamon stick, a gill of sherry, and a
sherry-glass of brandy. Finish as the preceding.

582. =Meringues.= Beat the whites of eight eggs as stiff as possible,
then mix with them lightly three quarters of a pound of sugar; but
do not beat them after adding the sugar. Fill a tablespoon with your
beaten eggs, which place in oval form on a board slightly moistened
and covered with a sheet of white paper; continue until your eggs are
all used, and place each spoonful about an inch apart from the other.
Send to a very gentle oven, with the door shut, for about ten minutes,
and, if sufficiently firm, remove them, turn them over on a pan, which
put in a _very_ gentle oven for about three quarters of an hour; take
them out, press them in the middle with your thumb, so as to render
them hollow, and, when cold, fill them with whipped cream to which you
have added two ounces of sugar and a teaspoonful of vanilla. When the
weather is very hot, and it is sometimes difficult to whip cream, put
it in a bowl, which place in a larger one, and surround the smaller
with cracked ice, mixed with a little rock salt.

583. =Jelly of Mixed Fruits.= Dissolve on the fire two ounces of
gelatine in three or four tablespoonfuls of water, add ten ounces of
sugar, and, when melted, remove from the fire. Mix the whites of three
eggs in half a glass of water, add to your gelatine, stirring quickly
with an egg-beater. Then put all on the fire until boiling, then remove
to the back of the range to simmer gently for half an hour. Strain
your jelly through a flannel until perfectly clear; pour a little of
it into a mold, and, when the jelly is sufficiently stiff, place on
top of it two dozen very red cherries from which you have removed the
stones, an ounce of white currants, the same of red, two ounces of
pineapple, and the same of raspberries, or strawberries if in season.
Pour the rest of your jelly into the mold, which put on the ice until
sufficiently stiff to turn out of the mold.

584. =French Chestnuts with Coffee Sauce.= Remove the shells from three
dozen French chestnuts, boil the chestnuts five minutes in water, then
peel off the skin which covers them, put them in a saucepan on the
fire, with enough water to cover them, and two ounces of sugar; boil
them until soft, without breaking, and drain them. Put in a saucepan
on the fire four yolks of eggs, three ounces of sugar, a teacupful
of black coffee, and half a glass of cream. Stir until just before
boiling, then strain it, allow it to become cold, pour it over your
marrons, and serve.

585. =Nougat.= Put half a pound of almonds in boiling water for two or
three minutes, remove the skins, wash the almonds, and cut them each in
seven or eight long strips, then put them in the oven to dry. Put in a
copper or well-enameled saucepan, on the fire, five ounces of powdered
sugar, which be careful to stir very gently until colored brown, then
add your almonds, which should be slightly browned and very hot. Mix
all together, rub a little oil lightly over a pan, into which pour your
nougat, cut it immediately into pieces about four inches long and an
inch and a half wide, and let them become cold.

586. =Vanilla Ice Cream.= Put in a saucepan on the fire a quart
of milk, three quarters of a pound of sugar, three tablespoonfuls
of extract of vanilla, and eight yolks of eggs. Stir well with an
egg-beater, and, when beginning to thicken without boiling, strain your
mixture and allow it to become cold. Place the tin freezer into the
pail belonging to it, surround it with chopped ice mixed with about
half a pound of rock salt, pour your cream into the tin can, which
cover, and then turn the handle at the side of the pail rapidly around
for a few moments, take off the cover from the can, and with a spoon
detach any of the cream which may have frozen to the sides. Again put
on the cover, continue to turn the handle, repeating from time to time
the operation just described, and pressing the cream down with the
spoon, so as to make it smooth. When the cream is thoroughly frozen,
put it into a mold, place a piece of thick paper on top, over which
shut down the cover securely. Place your mold in a bowl, surround it
with chopped ice, with which mix two handfuls of rock salt. Just before
serving, turn your ice cream out of the mold by dipping it for a few
seconds in warm water. Instead of extract of vanilla, the vanilla-bean
will give a much better flavor.

587. =Coffee Ice Cream.= Put in a saucepan on the fire a pint and a
half of milk, the yolks of eight eggs, fourteen ounces of sugar, and
half a pint of very strong black coffee. Stir well with an egg-beater,
and, when beginning to thicken without boiling, strain your mixture,
allow it to become cold, and freeze as the foregoing.

588. =Chocolate Ice Cream.= Prepare a mixture as for vanilla ice cream
(Art. 586). Melt four ounces of chocolate in half a glass of water, on
the fire, add it to your mixture, strain it through a sieve, and freeze
as described in Art. 586.

589. =Strawberry Ice Cream.= Press through a sieve a sufficient
quantity of strawberries to obtain half a pint of juice, which put into
a tin freezing-can with three quarters of a pound of sugar and a quart
of cream, and freeze as vanilla ice cream (Art. 586).

590. =Strawberry Mousse.= Proceed as for strawberry ice cream, and,
when half frozen, stir into it quickly a pint of whipped cream, put it
in a mold for two hours, surrounded by cracked ice and a little rock
salt, then turn it out, and serve. Whipped cream may be added to all
kinds of plain ice creams.

591. =Neapolitan Ice Cream.= Prepare a mixture as for vanilla ice cream
(Art. 586). Let it become cold, put it in the freezer, and, when not
quite frozen, take out one third of it, stirring into it rapidly about
an ounce and a half of chocolate, which you have previously melted. Put
it into a mold, which place in a large bowl, and surround the mold with
cracked ice, and about two handfuls of rock salt. When the ice cream is
sufficiently stiff to support another layer on top, take out the half
of that which is in the freezer, place it in your mold on top of the
chocolate ice cream. Then mix with the remaining portion of ice cream
not quite a gill of strawberry juice, and place in your mold, which
leave two hours in the ice, turn the ice cream out, and serve.

592. =Nesselrode Pudding.= Remove the shells from two dozen French
chestnuts, which put in a saucepan, with a little water, then peel off
the skin which covers them, and put the chestnuts in a saucepan on
the fire, with a pint of water and a pound of sugar. Boil them until
very soft, then press them through a sieve, and put them again in a
saucepan with a pint of cream, in which you mixed the yolks of four
eggs. Just before beginning to boil, put your mixture through a sieve,
add an ounce of raisins, which you have stoned, an ounce of currants,
two sherry-glasses of yellow chartreuse, and freeze it, as described
in Art. 586. When frozen, cut four candied apricots, also four candied
green gages, and half an ounce of citron all in small pieces, add
three ounces of candied cherries; mix them thoroughly in your ice
cream, which put in a mold, a thick piece of paper on top, and the
cover securely shut down upon it. Put some cracked ice, mixed with two
handfuls of rock salt, in a bowl, in the middle of which place your
mold, covering it entirely with the ice and salt, where let it remain
two hours, then turn the ice cream out of the mold, first dipping it
for a few seconds in warm water.

593. =Frozen Apple Pudding à la Marie Héloise.= Cut four ounces of
almonds, and the same of citron, into long thin strips, and boil them
in a thick sugar sirup, with four ounces of large raisins, and the
same of candied cherries; when boiled, let them become cold. Pare
twenty-four large apples, which cut in quarters, remove the core, and
stew them in a little water, then press them through a sieve, add half
a pound of powdered sugar and a glass of orange marmalade or quince
jelly. When cold, add the almonds, citron, cherries, and raisins, a
sherry-glass of brandy, the same of maraschino, and put the whole into
a freezer and freeze from ten to fifteen minutes. Then stir into it
rapidly a pint of stiff whipped cream, and put into a mold, which place
in a large bowl, and surround the mold with cracked ice mixed with
about two handfuls of rock salt. Leave it for two hours, then turn it
out of the mold on a dish, surround it with whipped cream, to which you
have added about two ounces of sugar, and flavored with vanilla.

594. =Orange Ice.= Put a quart of water in a saucepan on the fire, with
three quarters of a pound of sugar, which boil ten minutes, remove
from the fire and allow it to become cold. Take the juice of a dozen
oranges and four lemons, strain, rasp a lump of sugar with the rind of
an orange, which add to the juice, mix all together with the water and
sugar, and freeze, as described in Art. 586. Strawberry and raspberry
ice are prepared in the same manner, except that they are pressed
through a sieve.

595. =Pineapple Ice.= For this, take a pint and a half of water,
four lemons, three quarters of a pound of sugar, a pound and a half
of pineapple, which chop fine and pound in a mortar, press through a
sieve, and finish as the above.

596. =Orange Baskets.= Take ten oranges, as large as possible; with
a penknife, or the point of a small, sharp knife, form the handle
of the basket, by beginning at the side of the orange and cutting a
line across the top, stopping just opposite where you have begun. Cut
another line exactly as the first, half an inch apart from it, then cut
around the orange in the middle, stopping at where the handle is marked
out. Remove the two quarters of peel, pass the knife under the handle,
so as to loosen the orange, which remove as carefully as possible, and
proceed in the same manner, so as to remove most of the orange from the
basket, and the remainder scoop out with a teaspoon. Dry the baskets
with a cloth, tie the handles with bows of narrow ribbons of all
colors, fill them with orange ice as the foregoing, and serve.

597. =Roman Punch.= Put in a saucepan on the fire three quarters of a
pound of sugar, with three pints of water, boil ten minutes, then put
aside to become cold. Then put in a freezer, and, when nearly frozen,
stir into it rapidly a gill of rum and the juice of four lemons.



APPENDIX.

_A FEW AMERICAN RECEIPTS FOR BUCKWHEAT CAKES, WAFFLES, ETC._


598. =Buckwheat Cakes.= Mix a cupful of buckwheat meal in a bowl with
enough water to make the consistency of cream; add a pinch of salt and
a wineglass of yeast, and allow it to remain over night; then bake on a
very dry griddle till the cakes are of a light brown.

599. =Wheat Flannel Cakes.= Mix together eight tablespoonfuls of wheat
flour with a gill of yeast, the same of fresh milk, and a little salt;
put in a covered bowl over night to rise, and in the morning bake on a
griddle, and turn the cakes on one side and then on the other, until
both are browned. If the above mixture should become acid, add half a
teaspoonful of soda well mixed in a little water.

600. =Indian Meal Griddle Cakes.= Mix well together with a pint of
Indian meal a quart of milk, a tablespoonful of butter, a little salt,
and two eggs; beat all well together and bake on a griddle.

601. =Corn Bread.= With two teacupfuls of hot hominy mix a liberal
tablespoonful of butter; beat four eggs very light, and stir them into
the hominy and butter; then add gradually a pint of milk, stirring
constantly, and, when thoroughly mixed, half a pint of Indian meal. If
thicker than the consistency of rich boiled custard, add a little more
milk. Bake in a deep pan (so as to allow the mixture to rise), in an
oven which is quite hot at the bottom and not too much so at the top.

602. =Fairies.= With a pint of flour mix a scant tablespoonful of
butter, some salt, and enough water to make a dough which may be
kneaded. When kneaded sufficiently, roll the dough out as thin as a
sheet of paper; cut it in rounds with a muffin-ring, prick them with a
fork, and bake them for an instant in a moderately hot oven.

603. =Waffles.= Dissolve half a pound of fresh butter in a quart
of new milk; then thoroughly mix with the above a quart of flour;
add six fresh eggs which you have previously beaten very light, and
a little salt. Bake in waffle-irons, which should be greased with
good butter after the baking of each waffle. Butter the waffles
while very hot, before serving, and serve with them one and a half
tablespoonfuls of powdered cinnamon, well mixed with six tablespoonfuls
of powdered sugar. When very rich cream may be procured, three or four
tablespoonfuls may be added to the milk in the above receipt.

604. =Gingerbread.= Mix well with a pint of molasses half a pound of
sugar, half a pound of butter, and three eggs. Dissolve an ounce of
baking soda in a pint of water, which add to the above ingredients,
with also an ounce of ground ginger; then add two pounds of flour; mix
all well together, and bake in a moderately hot oven.

605. =Ginger Snaps.= Sift half an ounce of baking soda through a pound
and three quarters of flour; also sift half a pound of sugar through
the flour, which then mix well with half a pound of butter; add half an
ounce of ginger, the same of ground allspice; mix together a pint of
molasses with half a gill of water, which add to the other ingredients,
mixing all thoroughly together; roll out very thin and bake until very
crisp. When ginger snaps are liked very hot, sometimes red pepper is
added.

606. =Cookies.= Take four ounces of butter, three ounces of pulverized
sugar, and six ounces of flour; rub all together until in crumbs;
add two yolks of eggs, which mix thoroughly together with the above
ingredients until quite smooth. Put this mixture on a plate, which
cover with another plate, and let it rest in a cool place for half
an hour; roll it out an eighth of an inch thick, cut it out in small
rounds a little larger than a silver dollar, and bake in a moderate
oven until colored a _very_ light brown; spread some raspberry jam on
half of the rounds, and cover with the other half.

607. =Boiled Potatoes.= Take about twelve potatoes, which wash well in
cold water; peel them, cutting out the eyes or any black specks which
the potatoes may have; then put them in a saucepan in which there
is enough cold water to cover them, sprinkle them over with about a
teaspoonful of salt, and put them on the fire for about half an hour,
then pierce them with a fork, to see if they are thoroughly done; if
so, drain them, place a cloth on top of them, cover the saucepan with
its lid, and put it at the side of the range, to steam the potatoes
until quite dry, and serve them very hot. Some persons prefer them
boiled and served with the skins on, or boiled in their skins and
peeled before serving.

608. =Boiled Rice.= Take three quarters of a pound of rice, which wash
well in cold water, drain and rub the rice with your hands; pick out
the yellow grains and specks of black; then wash the rice again three
or four times, changing the water, and rubbing it with the hands. After
the last time, pour some cold water over it, and put it in a saucepan
on the fire in which there are about five quarts of _boiling_ water.
Stir with a wooden spoon, and add half a teaspoonful of salt. Boil the
rice rapidly for about twenty minutes, skimming off at intervals the
scum which rises. When the rice is soft, drain it, and then pour a
little cold water over it, which also drain instantly. Put the rice,
without any water, into a saucepan, which half cover, and put at the
side of the range. Stir every now and then, and, when the rice is
perfectly dry, serve.



INDEX.


CHAPTER I.


SOUPS.

    ART.                               PAGE
    41. American green-turtle soup                                    20
    24. Arrowroot soup                                                16
    2. Bouillon, or beef broth                                         9
    3. Bouillon maigre                                                10
    4. Bouillon maigre of fish                                        10
    20. Beef soup                                                     15
    55. Bouillabaisse à la Marseillaise                               25
    1. Consommé, or stock                                              9
    17. Consommé with poached eggs                                    14
    18. Consommé royal                                                14
    46. Consommé Rachel                                               21
    31. Chicken consommé                                              17
    32. Chicken giblet                                                17
    33. Chicken gumbo                                                 17
    34. Chicken okra, with oysters                                    18
    40. Calf's-feet soup                                              19
    53. Clam chowder à la Thayer                                      24
    35. English mutton broth                                          18
    38. English ox-tail soup                                          19
    51. English hare soup                                             23
    23. Farina soup                                                   15
    37. French ox-tail soup                                           18
    11. Farce                                                         12
    42. Green-turtle soup à la Londonderry                            20
    48. Giblet soup of goose                                          22
    36. Mullagatawny soup                                             18
    39. Mock-turtle soup                                              19
    54. Olla podrida                                                  25
    5. Pot-au-feu                                                     10
    15. Potage aux pointes d'asperges                                 13
    28. Potage de nouilles                                            16
    30. Rice soup à la Créole                                         17
    47. Rye soup à l'Allemande                                        22
    12. Sorrel soup                                                   13
    26. Sago soup                                                     16
    8. Soup à la Brunoise                                             11
    49. Soup à la Bohemienne                                          23
    44. Soup à la d'Orsay                                             21
    6. Soup à la Julienne                                             10
    9. Soup à la Paysanne                                             11
    14. Soup à la pluche de cerfeuil                                  13
    19. Soup à la Princesse                                           15
    45. Soup aux quenelles de volaille                                21
    52. Soup of sturgeon à la Pierre Legrand                          24
    25. Soup with Italian paste                                       16
    50. Soup with poached eggs à la Styrie                            23
    29. Soup with rice                                                17
    27. Tapioca soup                                                  16
    43. Terrapin soup                                                 21
    21. Vermicelli soup                                               15
    22. Vermicelli soup with green peas                               15


PURÉES.

    79. Bisque of clams                                               34
    77. Bisque of crawfish                                            33
    78. Bisque of lobster                                             34
    57. Cream of sorrel                                               26
    63. Purée of asparagus                                            28
    66. Purée of barley                                               29
    67. Purée of celery                                               29
    71. Purée of fowl à la Reine                                      31
    58. Purée of green peas                                           27
    70. Purée of Jerusalem artichokes                                 30
    61. Purée of lentils                                              27
    59. Purée of peas à la Princesse                                  27
    69. Purée of potatoes à la Jackson                                30
    72. Purée of partridge                                            31
    64. Purée of rice                                                 28
    73. Purée of rabbit                                               32
    56. Purée of sorrel                                               26
    68. Purée soubise à la Princesse                                  30
    75. Purée of vegetables aux croûtons                              32
    62. Purée of white beans                                          28
    65. Rice soup à la Crécy                                          29
    76. Rice soup au lait d'amandes                                   33
    60. Split-pea soup                                                27
    74. Tomato soup                                                   32


CHAPTER II.


SAUCES.

    81. Sauce Allemande                                               35
    103. Sauce à la poulette                                          41
    105. Sauce à la Marinière                                         42
    88. Sauce Béarnaise                                               37
    101. Sauce Bordelaise                                             41
    102. Another way of making sauce Bordelaise                       41
    98. Sauce Colbert                                                 40
    104. Sauce fleurette                                              42
    108. Sauce Génevoise                                              43
    85. Sauce Hollandaise                                             36
    96. Sauce hachée                                                  39
    113. Sauce Mayonnaise                                             44
    91. Sauce Périgueux                                               38
    86. Sauce piquante                                                37
    95. Sauce poivrade                                                39
    111. Sauce ravigote (hot)                                         44
    112. Sauce ravigote (cold)                                        44
    109. Sauce remoulade (cold)                                       43
    110. Sauce remoulade (hot)                                        43
    92. Sauce Robert                                                  38
    94. Sauce soubise                                                 39
    99. Sauce suprême                                                 40
    114. Sauce Tartare                                                45
    82. Sauce veloutée                                                35
    100. Sauce Venétienne                                             40
    83. Béchamel sauce                                                36
    87. Bread sauce                                                   37
    97. Hunter sauce                                                  39
    93. Italian sauce                                                 38
    106. Lobster sauce                                                42
    89. Parisian sauce                                                37
    107. Shrimp sauce                                                 43
    80. Spanish sauce                                                 35
    90. Tomato sauce                                                  38
    84. White sauce or butter sauce                                   36


CHAPTER III.


FISH.

    115. Boiled striped bass à la Venétienne                          46
    123. Black bass, Burgundy sauce                                   47
    124. Baked blue-fish, tomato sauce                                47
    119. Boiled codfish, oyster sauce                                 47
    170. Codfish au gratin                                            64
    137. Eels en matelote                                             53
    128. Eels à la Tartare                                            49
    125. Baked fillet of sole (or flounder)                           48
    169. Fish-balls                                                   63
    118. Halibut, lobster sauce                                       46
    135. Halibut, sauce suprême                                       52
    127. Chicken halibut aux fines herbes                             48
    129. King-fish, sherry sauce                                      49
    122. Pickerel, anchovy sauce                                      47
    116. Boiled red snapper with butter sauce                         46
    138. Red snapper à la Chambord                                    53
    139. Ray, with caper sauce                                        54
    140. Ray, au beurre noir                                          54
    117. Boiled salmon, madeira sauce                                 46
    136. Scallops of white-fish à la Provençale                       52
    120. Sheep's head, shrimp sauce                                   47
    130. Fillet of shad with purée of sorrel                          50
    131. Broiled shad à la maître d'hôtel                             50
    141. Fried smelts                                                 55
    142. Farcied smelts                                               55
    133. Trout à la Génevoise                                         51
    132. Long Island brook trout                                      50
    121. Salmon trout, sauce Hollandaise                              47
    134. Scallops of trout                                            51
    126. Weak-fish, Italian sauce                                     48


CLAMS, OYSTERS, LOBSTERS, ETC.

    167. Clam fritters                                                63
    172. Clams on toast                                               65
    174. Clams au gratin                                              65
    173. Soft clams steamed                                           65
    157. Crawfish à la Bordelaise                                     60
    164. Soft-shell crabs                                             62
    165. Farcied crabs                                                62
    166. Deviled crabs                                                63
    160. Fried frogs' legs                                            61
    161. Frogs' legs à la poulette                                    61
    162. Frogs' legs à la Marinière                                   62
    163. Frogs' legs à la maître d'hôtel                              62
    151. Lobster au naturel                                           58
    152. Lobsters à la Havraise                                       59
    154. Broiled lobster                                              59
    156. Lobster à la Bordelaise                                      60
    159. Lobster à l'Indienne                                         60
    155. Deviled lobster                                              60
    158. Farcied lobster                                              60
    153. Croquettes of lobster                                        59
    175. Mussels à la Marinière                                       66
    143. Oysters à la poulette                                        56
    149. Oysters à la Mosely                                          58
    150. Oysters au gratin                                            58
    148. Oysters on toast                                             57
    144. Farcied oysters à l'Africaine                                56
    145. Fried oysters                                                56
    146. Broiled oysters                                              57
    147. Cromesqui of oysters                                         57
    168. Oyster fritters                                              63
    176. Stewed terrapin à la Lucie                                   66
    177. Stewed terrapin à la Maryland                                66
    178. Stewed terrapin (another manner)                             67


CHAPTER IV.

_ENTRÉES._


BEEF.

    195. Beef à la mode                                               73
    184. Beef's brains au beurre noir                                 69
    185. Beef's brains à la poulette                                  70
    188. Beef-kidneys, sautés au vin blanc                            70
    183. Hashed beef                                                  69
    194. Braised beef, tomato sauce                                   72
    193. Fillet of beef sauté, madeira sauce                          72
    192. Tenderloins of beef, with potatoes à la Parisienne           71
    180. Beef tongue, sauce piquante                                  68
    181. Beef's tongue à la jardinière                                68
    182. Smoked beef's tongue, wine sauce with mushrooms              68
    191. Porter-house steak à la Bordelaise                           71
    190. Rump steak broiled à la maître d'hôtel                       71
    189. Sirloin steak broiled, with anchovy sauce                    71
    197. Beefsteak pie                                                74
    179. Glaze                                                        67
    196. Boiled marrow-bones                                          73
    187. Ox-tails braised                                             70
    199. Tripe à la Lyonnaise                                         74
    201. Tripe à la mode de Caen                                      75
    198. Broiled tripe                                                74
    200. Fried tripe                                                  75


VEAL.

    226. Blanquette of veal                                           84
    206. Calves' brains au gratin                                     77
    207. Calves' brains à la poulette                                 77
    208. Fried calves' brains, tomato sauce                           77
    209. Calves' ears farcied                                         78
    215. Calf's feet à la poulette                                    79
    214. Calf's heart aux fines herbes                                79
    203. Calf's head à la vinaigrette                                 76
    204. Baked calf's head à l'Italienne                              76
    202. Calf's head en tortue                                        75
    213. Braised calf's liver à la Bourgignone                        79
    211. Broiled calf's liver                                         78
    210. Calves' liver sauté, sauce poivrade                          78
    217. Calf's liver with bacon                                      79
    205. Calves' tongues                                              76
    225. Fricandeau of veal                                           84
    217. Sweetbreads aux fines herbes                                 80
    218. Sweetbreads larded with peas                                 81
    219. Sweetbread croquettes                                        81
    221. Veal chops à la Mayonnaise                                   82
    222. Veal chops piqués                                            82
    220. Veal cutlets à l'Allemande                                   82
    223. Braised tendons of veal à la macédoine                       83
    224. Braised tendons of veal with purée of celery                 83
    227. Minced veal, with poached eggs on top                        84
    216. Veal pot-pie                                                 80
    228. Veal kidneys sautés                                          85
    229. Deviled veal kidneys                                         85


MUTTON.

    245. Breast of lamb, with asparagus                               90
    244. Epigramme of lamb                                            90
    242. Irish stew                                                   89
    234. Mutton chops à la Pompadour                                  86
    232. Mutton chops à la soubise                                    86
    235. Mutton chops en crépinette                                   87
    233. Mutton chops sautés                                          86
    236. Breast of mutton                                             87
    238. Roast leg of mutton à la Bretonne                            88
    239. Boiled leg of mutton                                         88
    241. Leg of mutton en venaison                                    88
    240. Roast saddle of mutton                                       88
    243. Shoulder of mutton farcied                                   89
    237. Sheep's feet à la poulette                                   87
    230. Sheep's brains                                               85
    231. Sheep's kidneys en brochette                                 85


PORK.

    258. Glazed ham                                                   95
    259. Glazed ham with champagne sauce                              95
    260. Glazed ham with truffles                                     95
    261. Ham à l'Américaine                                           96
    262. Ham à la Zingara                                             96
    264. Ham toast                                                    97
    263. Roast ham                                                    96
    248. Broiled pig's feet                                           92
    255. Pig's head, sauce poivrade                                   94
    249. Pig's kidneys sautés                                         92
    246. Pig's tongue                                                 91
    253. Broiled pork chops                                           93
    254. Pork chops à l'Indienne                                      93
    252. Pork chops, sauce Robert                                     93
    247. Fillet of pork à la fermière                                 91
    250. Sausage of fresh pork                                        92
    256. Frankfort sausages, with sourcrout                           94
    251. Spare-ribs, apple sauce                                      93
    257. Roast sucking pig farcied                                    94


POULTRY AND GAME, WITH ROASTS OF SAME.

    284. Puff paste                                                  106
    285. Pâté brisée                                                 106
    278. Aspic de foie gras                                          102
    279. Aspic (another manner of making it)                         103
    277. Boiled fowl, caper sauce                                    102
    286. Bouchées de salpicon                                        106
    287. Croüstades de salpicon                                      107
    272. Chicken à la financière                                     100
    269. Chicken à la Marengo                                         99
    274. Chicken à la Toulouse                                       101
    271. Chicken sauté aux fines herbes                               99
    270. Chicken sauté à la Hongroise                                 99
    276. Chicken sauté au chasseur                                   102
    280. Boned chicken                                               104
    265. Broiled chicken                                              97
    266. Broiled chickens (deviled)                                   97
    283. Chicken croquettes                                          105
    288. Cromesqui of chicken                                        108
    268. Fricassée of chicken                                         98
    281. Larded chicken                                              104
    282. Chicken pie à la Christine                                  104
    267. Roast spring chicken                                         98
    275. Chicken with rice                                           101
    289. Timbale of chicken                                          108
    273. Suprême de volaille                                         100
    294. Ducks with olives                                           111
    296. Ducks with purée of peas                                    112
    295. Duck with turnip                                            111
    293. Tame duck roasted                                           111
    298. Braised goose, celery sauce                                 112
    297. Roast goose                                                 112
    315. Pigeons en compote                                          118
    314. Pigeons poêlés                                              118
    292. Boned turkey                                                110
    290. Roast turkey stuffed                                        109
    291. Turkey with truffles                                        109
    339. Roast canvas-back ducks                                     124
    340. Red-head ducks                                              124
    341. Broiled red-head ducks                                      124
    342. Salmi of red-head ducks                                     124
    318. Hare à la bourgeoise                                        119
    319. Ragoût of hare                                              119
    316. Fillets of hare sautés                                      118
    317. Roast hare                                                  119
    306. Partridge aux choux                                         114
    304. Broiled partridge                                           114
    305. Deviled partridge                                           114
    307. Roast partridge                                             115
    308. Salmi of partridge                                          115
    325. Suprême of partridge                                        120
    326. Timbale of partridge                                        121
    309. Truffled partridge                                          116
    333. Broiled plover                                              123
    310. Broiled quail                                               116
    312. Quail en caisse                                             116
    311. Roast quail                                                 116
    313. Quail with truffles                                         117
    324. Rabbit à l'Espagnole                                        120
    323. Hash of rabbit                                              120
    322. Roast rabbit                                                120
    321. Ragoût of rabbit                                            119
    320. Rabbit sauté à la minute                                    119
    338. Reed birds                                                  124
    337. Snipe                                                       124
    300. Broiled squabs                                              113
    302. Broiled squabs (deviled)                                    114
    301. Squabs en compote                                           113
    299. Roast squab                                                 113
    303. Squabs with green peas                                      114
    332. Braised fillets of venison                                  122
    330. Venison chops                                               121
    327. Venison chops, with currant jelly sauce                     121
    329. Leg of venison                                              121
    331. Ragoût of venison                                           122
    328. Saddle of venison                                           121
    335. Broiled woodcock                                            123
    336. Roast woodcock                                              123


CHAPTER V.


VEGETABLES.

    369. Artichokes à la Barrigoule                                  132
    368. Fried artichokes                                            132
    366. Fonds d'artichauts a l'Italienne                            131
    367. Fonds d'artichauts à la macédoine                           132
    443. Purée of artichokes                                         153
    370. Raw artichokes à la vinaigrette                             133
    365. Artichokes with butter sauce                                131
    371. Jerusalem artichokes                                        133
    444. Purée of Jerusalem artichokes                               153
    445. Jerusalem artichokes au gratin                              153
    358. Asparagus with butter sauce                                 130
    357. Asparagus with French rolls                                 129
    359. Pointes d'asperges au veloutée                              130
    360. Asperges en petits pois                                     130
    351. Dried beans                                                 128
    420. Dried Lima beans                                            147
    418. Lima beans                                                  146
    349. Beans panachés                                              127
    352. Purée of dried beans                                        128
    353. Red beans                                                   128
    350. White beans sautés                                          128
    354. Windsor beans                                               129
    355. Windsor beans à l'Anglaise                                  129
    356. Purée of Windsor beans                                      129
    347. String-beans à l'Anglaise                                   127
    348. String-beans sautés                                         127
    401. Pickled beets                                               141
    400. Beets with butter                                           141
    411. Cabbage au gratin                                           144
    412. Cabbage farcied                                             144
    410. Cabbage sauté au beurre                                     144
    408. Carrots sautés au beurre                                    143
    363. Cauliflower au gratin                                       131
    364. Cauliflower au veloutée                                     131
    362. Cauliflower with butter sauce                               131
    391. Fried celery, tomato sauce                                  139
    392. Purée of celery                                             139
    389. Celery with marrow                                          138
    390. Celery with white sauce                                     138
    442. Purée of French chestnuts                                   152
    409. Chiccory with cream                                         143
    414. Stewed corn with cream                                      145
    415. New Orleans corn pudding                                    145
    385. Cucumbers farcied                                           136
    386. Cucumbers with cream                                        137
    334. Egg-plant farcied                                           136
    383. Egg-plant fried                                             136
    393. Horse-radish sauce (cold)                                   139
    394. Horse-radish sauce (hot)                                    139
    361. Lentils                                                     130
    387. Lentils à la maître d'Hôtel                                 137
    388. Purée of lentils                                            138
    395. Braised lettuce, madeira sauce                              139
    396. Farcied lettuce                                             140
    416. Macédoine of vegetables                                     145
    404. Stewed mushrooms à la Princesse                             142
    405. Mushrooms au gratin                                         142
    406. Mushrooms au gratin (another way)                           142
    402. Broiled mushrooms                                           141
    403. Stewed mushrooms, Spanish sauce                             142
    380. Boiled onions                                               135
    381. Fried onions                                                136
    382. Onions glacés                                               136
    343. Green peas à l'Anglaise                                     126
    344. Green peas à la Française                                   126
    346. Green peas à la Paysanne                                    127
    446. Purée of green peas                                         153
    345. Green peas with bacon                                       126
    425. Potatoes à l'Anglaise                                       148
    432. Potatoes à l'Anna                                           149
    439. Potatoes à la Duchesse                                      151
    436. Potatoes à la Hollandaise                                   150
    428. Potatoes à la Lyonnaise                                     148
    426. Potatoes à la maître d'hôtel                                148
    438. Potatoes à la Parisienne                                    151
    440. Potatoes à la parmentière                                   152
    429. Potatoes à la Provençale                                    149
    431. Baked hashed potatoes                                       149
    422. Baked mashed potatoes                                       147
    607. Boiled potatoes                                             210
    423. Potato croquettes                                           147
    434. Fried potatoes en Julienne                                  150
    437. Potatoes farcied                                            150
    433. Fried potatoes                                              150
    430. Hashed potatoes with cream                                  149
    421. Mashed potatoes                                             147
    424. Mashed potatoes with bacon                                  148
    441. Ragoût of potatoes à la paysanne                            152
    435. Saratoga potatoes                                           150
    427. Potatoes sautés                                             148
    376. Fried salsify                                               134
    375. Salsify with butter sauce                                   134
    417. Sourcrout                                                   146
    372. Spinach à l'Anglaise                                        133
    373. Spinach à l'Espagnole                                       133
    374. Spinach with cream                                          134
    413. Brussels sprouts                                            145
    407. Squash                                                      143
    419. Succotash                                                   147
    378. Broiled tomatoes                                            135
    379. Farcied tomatoes                                            135
    377. Stewed tomatoes                                             135
    399. Turnips glacés au jus                                       141
    398. Purée of turnips                                            140
    397. Turnips with cream                                          140


CHAPTER VI.

_Eggs, Macaroni, Salads, etc._


EGGS.

    470. Aspic with eggs                                             158
    458. Eggs à l'aurore                                             155
    466. Eggs à la Huguenot                                          157
    468. Eggs à la jardinière                                        157
    472. Eggs à la Lyonnaise                                         159
    464. Eggs à la Marseillaise                                      157
    473. Eggs à la Portugaise                                        159
    456. Eggs à la tripe                                             155
    457. Eggs au beurre noir                                         155
    471. Eggs au gratin                                              159
    477. Curried eggs with rice                                      160
    467. Eggs en timbale                                             157
    474. Eggs en turban                                              160
    448. Fried eggs                                                  154
    449. Eggs sur le plat                                            154
    459. Eggs with cream                                             156
    460. Eggs with cucumbers                                         156
    465. Eggs with sauce Mayonnaise                                  157
    461. Poached eggs au jus                                         156
    476. Poached eggs with anchovy toast                             160
    475. Poached eggs with anchovy sauce                             160
    462. Poached eggs with asparagus                                 156
    469. Poached eggs with purée of sorrel                           158
    463. Poached eggs with wine sauce                                157
    450. Scrambled eggs                                              154
    452. Scrambled eggs with asparagus                               155
    455. Scrambled eggs with ham                                     155
    451. Scrambled eggs with peas                                    154
    453. Scrambled eggs with tomatoes                                155
    454. Scrambled eggs with truffles                                155
    479. Omelette aux fines herbes                                   161
    478. Omelette (plain)                                            161
    483. Omelette with asparagus tops                                161
    480. Omelette with cheese                                        161
    488. Omelette with chickens' livers                              163
    490. Omelette with ham                                           163
    487. Omelette with kidneys                                       162
    486. Omelette with mushrooms                                     162
    481. Omelette with onions                                        161
    482. Omelette with peas                                          161
    489. Omelette with smoked beef                                   163
    491. Spanish omelette                                            163
    484. Omelette with sorrel                                        162
    485. Omelette with tomatoes                                      162


MACARONI.

    496. Baked macaroni                                              165
    493. Macaroni à l'Italienne                                      164
    494. Macaroni à la Milanaise                                     164
    495. Macaroni à la Napolitaine                                   165
    492. Macaroni with cream                                         164
    500. Risotto à la Finne                                          166
    499. Risotto Hongroise                                           166
    498. Risotto Napolitaine                                         165
    497. Spaghetti                                                   165


SALADS.

    506. Salad à la Macédoine                                        168
    511. Salad à la Toulouse                                         170
    501. Salad of beans                                              167
    503. Salad of cauliflower                                        167
    504. Salad of celery-roots                                       167
    512. Chicken salad                                               170
    507. Salad of herring à l'Allemande                              168
    509. Italian salad                                               169
    502. Salad of lentils                                            167
    513. Lobster salad                                               170
    508. Parisian salad                                              168
    505. Potato salad                                                167
    510. Russian salad of truffles                                   169
    514. Cold slaw                                                   171


CHEESE.

    515. Cheese biscuits                                             171
    518. Cheese soufflés                                             172
    517. Cheese straws                                               171
    516. Ramequins                                                   171


CHAPTER VII.


DESSERTS AND CAKES.

    533. Apple Charlottes                                            179
    534. Apples à la Condé                                           180
    537. Beignets of apples                                          181
    535. Compote of apples                                           180
    536. Pommes meringues                                            180
    551. Apple tart                                                  187
    552. Apple tart à la Portugaise                                  188
    553. Apricot tart                                                189
    546. Baba                                                        184
    524. Fried bananas                                               174
    577. Bavarian chocolate cream                                    200
    579. Bavarian coffee cream                                       200
    576. Bavarian strawberry cream                                   199
    578. Bavarian vanilla cream                                      200
    538. Beignets de crême à la vanille                              181
    539. Beignets soufflés                                           182
    544. Brioche                                                     183
    545. Pâté à brioche panachée                                     184
    575. Charlotte-Russe                                             199
    584. French chestnuts with coffee sauce                          202
    562. Cream pastries with almonds                                 192
    525. Rice croquettes                                             174
    541. Baked custard                                               183
    542. Boiled custard                                              183
    549. Duchess cakes with peach marmalade                          186
    548. Chocolate éclairs                                           186
    547. Éclairs                                                     185
    561. Fanchonettes                                                192
    526. French pancakes                                             175
    554. Gâteau d'Artois                                             189
    559. Gâteau fourré à la crême                                    191
    557. Gâteau fourré aux amandes                                   191
    558. Gâteau fourré aux pommes                                    191
    550. Gâteau St. Honoré                                           187
    583. Jelly of mixed fruits                                       201
    580. Jelly of rum                                                200
    581. Wine jelly                                                  200
    560. Mars                                                        191
    582. Meringues                                                   201
    555. Mince pie                                                   189
    585. Nougat                                                      202
    522. Omelette à la Celéstine                                     173
    523. Omelette soufflé                                            174
    519. Sweet omelette                                              173
    521. Omelette with jam                                           173
    520. Omelette with rum                                           173
    556. Pastries à la Condé                                         190
    540. Almond puddings                                             182
    530. Pudding au Marasquin                                        177
    528. Bread pudding                                               176
    527. Cabinet pudding                                             175
    529. English plum pudding                                        177
    531. Rice pudding                                                178
    532. Rice pudding (another way)                                  178
    543. Trifles                                                     183
    573. Angel cake                                                  198
    572. Chocolate cakes                                             197
    574. Pound cake                                                  198
    569. Savoy cake                                                  196
    567. Sponge cake                                                 195
    571. Tea cakes                                                   197
    564. Gâteau Genoise                                              193
    563. Gâteau Madeleine à l'Orange                                 193
    565. Gâteau Savarin                                              194
    568. Lady fingers                                                195
    570. Macaroons                                                   196
    566. Manquet                                                     195
    588. Chocolate ice cream                                         204
    587. Coffee ice cream                                            203
    591. Neapolitan ice cream                                        204
    589. Strawberry ice cream                                        204
    590. Strawberry mousse                                           204
    586. Vanilla ice cream                                           203
    594. Orange ice                                                  206
    595. Pineapple ice                                               207
    596. Orange baskets                                              207
    593. Frozen apple pudding à la Marie Héloise                     206
    592. Nesselrode pudding                                          205
    597. Roman punch                                                 207


APPENDIX.

A FEW AMERICAN RECEIPTS FOR BUCKWHEAT CAKES, CORN BREAD, WAFFLES,
GINGERBREAD, ETC.

    598. Buckwheat cakes                                             208
    600. Indian meal griddle cakes                                   208
    599. Wheat flannel cakes                                         208
    601. Corn bread                                                  209
    602. Fairies                                                     209
    606. Cookies                                                     210
    604. Gingerbread                                                 209
    605. Ginger snaps                                                210
    603. Waffles                                                     209
    607. Boiled potatoes                                             210
    608. Boiled rice                                                 211


THE END.

       *       *       *       *       *

Transcriber's Notes:

Items in the index are only in a vague alphabetical order. Obvious
punctuation errors repaired.

Page 175, "kirch" changed to "kirsch" (maraschino, kirsch, or any)

Page 183, "Pâte" to "Pâté" (545. =Pâté à Brioche Panachée.=)

Page 187, "pâte" changed to "pâté" (Take some pâté)

Page 188, "pâte" changed to "pâté" (Take some pâté)

Page 188, "pâte" changed to "pâté" (with some pâté)

Page 189, "pâte" changed to "pâté" (with some pâté)

Page 192, "pâte" changed to "pâté" (thin some pâté)

Page 218, heading "IV.", "ENTREES" changed to "ENTRÉES".

Page 220, "l'Americaine" changed to "l'Américaine" (261. Ham à
l'Américaine)

Page 221, "Pâte" changed to "Pâté" (285. Pâté brisée)

Page 221, "financere" changed to "financière" (272. Chicken à la
financière)

Page 223, "vension" changed to "venison" (328. Saddle of venison)

Page 225, "Madédoine" changed to "Macédoine" (Macédoine of vegetables)

Page 229, "Célestine" changed to "Celéstine" (522. Omelette à la
Celéstine)

Page 229, "Pâté" to "Pâté" (545. Pâté à brioche)

Page 230, word "à" added to text (Pastries à la Condé)

Page 230, "G noise" changed to "Genoise" (564. Gâteau Genoise)





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