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Title: Record of Medals of Honor issued to the officers and enlisted men of the United States Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard, 1862-1923
Author: Personnel, U.S. Bureau of Naval
Language: English
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RECORD OF MEDALS OF HONOR

ISSUED TO THE

OFFICERS AND ENLISTED MEN OF THE UNITED STATES
NAVY MARINE CORPS AND COAST GUARD

1862-1923


WASHINGTON
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
1924



ADDITIONAL COPIES OF THIS PUBLICATION MAY BE PROCURED FROM
THE SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASHINGTON, D.C. AT 20 CENTS PER COPY



ROLL OF HONOR


BEING A RECORD OF THE MEDALS OF HONOR ISSUED TO THE OFFICERS AND
ENLISTED MEN OF THE NAVY, MARINE CORPS, AND COAST GUARD, UNDER
AUTHORITY OF THE CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES, FOR DEEDS OF GALLANTRY
AND HEROISM IN TIMES OF WAR AND PEACE


¶ This record of the personnel who have shed luster upon the service by
upholding the honor of the flag in storm and battle, by their devotion
to the country and to each other, and by their unselfishness in risking
their own lives to save others, is especially commended to the rising
generation of American seamen, that they may emulate the deeds of their
heroic predecessors, and maintain that high standard of gallantry which
has always characterized the personnel of the United States naval
service.


PUBLISHED BY THE BUREAU OF NAVIGATION
NAVY DEPARTMENT
SEPTEMBER 1, 1924

W. R. SHOEMAKER
_Chief of Bureau_



MEDAL OF HONOR.


The original medal of honor was designed during the Civil War by A.
C. Paquet. The medal proper, a bronze five-pointed star bearing a
star-rimmed medallion of Minerva driving before her shield the figure
of Discord, was suspended by an anchor from the bottom buckle of a
ribbon having a blue band over thirteen vertical stripes of red and
white. This ribbon was attached at top and bottom to buckles of bronze,
the bottom buckle bearing a star.

Medal and ribbon were worn on the left breast until 1913. In that year
the medal was placed in its present distinctive position at the neck of
the wearer, being detached from its original ribbon and worn as a
pendant from a ribbon band woven through the anchor ring. The ribbon
band, which is of light blue with a cluster of thirteen small stars, is
worn around the neck.

The second medal of honor, added in 1919, is from the design of Tiffany
& Co., of New York. The medal, which is of gold, is in the form of a
cross superimposed upon a wreath of leaves. The center of the cross
bears the arms of the United States, framed by the inscription "United
States Navy, 1917-1918," and each arm of cross contains an anchor.

The new medal of honor is suspended from a ribbon consisting of a
triple chevron of thirteen white stars on a light blue field, the star
at point of chevron being uppermost. At the crest of this ribbon is a
bar which bears the single word "Valour." The new medal of honor is
also worn at the neck as a pendant, but in contrast to the old medal,
which is suspended direct from the ribbon band worn around the neck,
the new medal is suspended from the band by means of its ribbon.

The service ribbon bar worn in lieu of either medal of honor is light
blue and bears a cluster of white stars.

    [Illustration: CONGRESSIONAL MEDAL OF HONOR
    Awarded under Acts approved December 21, 1861, and March 3, 1915
    See page 7]


    [Illustration: CONGRESSIONAL MEDAL OF HONOR
    Awarded under Act approved February 4, 1919
    See page 9]



EXTRACTS FROM THE STATUTES AUTHORIZING THE ISSUE OF MEDALS OF HONOR


[Extract from the act to promote the efficiency of the Navy.]

SECTION 7. _And it is further enacted_, That the
Secretary of the Navy be, and is hereby, authorized to cause two
hundred medals of honor to be prepared with suitable emblematic
devices which shall be bestowed upon such petty officers, seamen,
landsmen, and marines as shall most distinguish themselves by their
gallantry in action and other seamanlike qualities during the present
war.

Approved December 21, 1861.


[Extract from the act to establish and equalize the grade of line
officers of the United States Navy.]

SECTION 10. _And be it further enacted_, That * * *
seamen distinguishing themselves in battle or by extraordinary heroism
in the line of their profession may be promoted to forward warrant
officers or acting master's mates, as they may best be qualified, upon
the recommendation of their commanding officer, approved by the flag
officer and the Department. Upon such promotion they shall receive a
gratuity of one hundred dollars and a medal of honor to be prepared by
the Navy Department.

Approved July 16, 1862.


[Extract from the act to appoint certain officers of the Navy.]

SECTION 3. _And be it further enacted_, That * * *
seamen distinguishing themselves in battle or by extraordinary heroism
in the line of their profession may be promoted to forward warrant
officers or acting master's mates, as they may be best qualified, upon
the recommendation of their commanding officer, approved by the flag
officer and the Department. Upon such promotion they shall receive a
gratuity of one hundred dollars and a medal of honor to be prepared by
the Navy Department.

Approved May 17, 1864.


AN ACT For the reward of enlisted men of the Navy or Marine Corps.

_Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the
United States of America in Congress assembled_, That any enlisted
man of the Navy or Marine Corps who shall have distinguished himself
in battle or displayed extraordinary heroism in the line of his
profession shall, upon recommendation of his commanding officer,
approved by the flag officer and the Secretary of the Navy, receive a
gratuity and medal of honor as provided for seamen in section fourteen
hundred and seven of the Revised Statutes.

Approved March 3, 1901.


[Public Resolution No. 23.]

JOINT RESOLUTION Authorizing the issue of duplicate medals where the
originals have been lost or destroyed.

_Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United
States of America in Congress assembled_, That in any case where
the President of the United States has heretofore, under any act or
resolution of Congress, caused any medal to be made and presented to
any officer or person in the United States on account of distinguished
or meritorious services, on a proper showing made by such person to
the satisfaction of the President that such medal has been lost or
destroyed through no fault of the beneficiary, and that diligent
search has been made therefor, the President is hereby authorized to
cause to be prepared and delivered to such person a duplicate of such
medal, the cost of which shall be paid out of any money in the
Treasury not otherwise appropriated.

Approved April 15, 1904.


[Extract from "An act making appropriations for the naval service for
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1916, and for other purposes."]

The President of the United States is hereby empowered to prepare a
suitable medal of honor to be awarded to any officer of the Navy,
Marine Corps, or Coast Guard who shall have distinguished himself
in battle or displayed extraordinary heroism in the line of his
profession.

Approved March 3, 1915.


    AN ACT To establish in the War Department and in the Navy
    Department, respectively, a roll designated as "the Army and Navy
    medal of honor roll," and for other purposes.

_Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United
States of America in Congress assembled_, That there is hereby
established in the War Department and Navy Department, respectively, a
roll designated as "the Army and Navy medal of honor roll." Upon
written application made to the Secretary of the proper department, and
subject to the conditions and requirements hereinafter contained, the
name of each surviving person who has served in the military or naval
service of the United States in any war, who has attained or shall
attain the age of sixty-five years, and who has been awarded a medal of
honor for having in action involving actual conflict with an enemy
distinguished himself conspicuously by gallantry or intrepidity, at the
risk of his life, above and beyond the call of duty, and who was
honorably discharged from service by muster out, resignation, or
otherwise, shall be, by the Secretary of the proper department, entered
and recorded on said roll. Applications for entry on said roll shall be
made in such form and under such regulations as shall be prescribed by
the War Department and Navy Department, respectively, and proper blanks
and instructions shall be, by the proper Secretary, furnished without
charge upon request made by any person claiming the benefits of this
act.

SEC. 2. That it shall be the duty of the Secretary of War and of the
Secretary of the Navy to carry this act into effect and to decide
whether each applicant, under this act, in his department is entitled
to the benefit of this act. If the official award of the medal of honor
to the applicant, or the official notice to him thereof, shall appear
to show that the medal of honor was awarded to the applicant for such
an act as is required by the provisions of this act, it shall be deemed
sufficient to entitle the applicant to such special pension without
further investigation. Otherwise all official correspondence, orders,
reports, recommendations, requests, and other evidence now on file in
any public office or department shall be considered. A certificate of
service and of the act of heroism, gallantry, bravery, or intrepidity
for which the medal of honor was awarded, and of enrollment under this
act, and of the right of the special pensioner to be entitled to and to
receive the special pension herein granted, shall be furnished each
person whose name shall be so entered on said roll. The Secretary of
War and the Secretary of the Navy shall deliver to the Commissioner of
Pensions a certified copy of each of such of said certificates as he
may issue, as aforesaid, and the same shall be full and sufficient
authority to the Commissioner of Pensions for the payment by him to the
beneficiary named in each such certificate the special pension herein
provided for.

SEC. 3. That each such surviving person whose name shall have been
entered on said roll in accordance with this act shall be entitled to
and shall receive and be paid by the Commissioner of Pensions, in the
Department of the Interior, out of any moneys in the Treasury of the
United States not otherwise appropriated, a special pension of $10 per
month for life, payable quarter yearly. The Commissioner of Pensions
shall make all necessary rules and regulations for making payment of
such special pensions to the beneficiaries thereof.

Such special pension shall begin on the day that such person shall file
his application for enrollment on said roll in the office of the
Secretary of War or of the Secretary of the Navy after the passage and
approval of this act, and shall continue during the life of the
beneficiary.

Such special pension shall not deprive any such special pensioner of
any other pension or of any benefit, right, or privilege to which he is
or may hereafter be entitled under any existing or subsequent law, but
shall be in addition thereto.

The special pension allowed under this act shall not be subject to any
attachment, execution, levy, tax, lien, or detention under any process
whatever.

SEC. 4. That in case any person has been awarded two or more medals of
honor, he shall not be entitled to and shall not receive more than one
such special pension.

Rank in the service shall not be considered in applications filed
hereunder.

Approved April 27, 1916.


[PUBLIC--NO. 253--65TH CONGRESS.]

[H. R. 12194.]

AN ACT To provide for the award of medals of honor,
distinguished-service medals, and Navy crosses, and for other purposes.

_Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United
States of America in Congress assembled_, That the President of the
United States be, and he is hereby, authorized to present, in the name
of Congress, a medal of honor to any person who, while in the naval
service of the United States, shall, in action involving actual
conflict with the enemy, distinguish himself conspicuously by gallantry
and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of
duty and without detriment to the mission of his command or the command
to which attached.

SEC. 2. That the President be, and he hereby is, further authorized to
present, but not in the name of Congress, a distinguished-service medal
of appropriate design and a ribbon, together with a rosette or other
device to be worn in lieu thereof, to any person who, while in the
naval service of the United States, since the sixth day of April,
nineteen hundred and seventeen, has distinguished, or who hereafter
shall distinguish, himself by exceptionally meritorious service to the
Government in a duty of great responsibility.

SEC. 3. That the President be, and he hereby is, further authorized to
present, but not in the name of Congress, a Navy cross of appropriate
design and a ribbon, together with a rosette or other device to be worn
in lieu thereof, to any person who, while in the naval service of the
United States, since the sixth day of April, nineteen hundred and
seventeen, has distinguished, or who shall hereafter distinguish,
himself by extraordinary heroism or distinguished service in the line
of his profession, such heroism or service not being sufficient to
justify the award of a medal of honor or a distinguished-service medal.

SEC. 4. That each enlisted or enrolled person of the naval service to
whom is awarded a medal of honor, distinguished-service medal, or a
Navy cross shall, for each such award, be entitled to additional pay at
the rate of $2 per month from the date of the distinguished act or
service on which the award is based, and each bar, or other suitable
emblem or insignia, in lieu of a medal of honor, distinguished-service
medal, or Navy cross, as hereinafter provided for, shall entitle him to
further additional pay at the rate of $2 per month from the date of the
distinguished act or service for which the bar is awarded, and such
additional pay shall continue throughout his active service, whether
such service shall or shall not be continuous.

SEC. 5. That no more than one medal of honor or one
distinguished-service medal or one Navy cross shall be issued to any
one person; but for each succeeding deed or service sufficient to
justify the award of a medal of honor or a distinguished-service medal
or Navy cross, respectively, the President may award a suitable bar, or
other suitable emblem or insignia, to be worn with the decoration, and
the corresponding rosette or other device.

SEC. 6. That the Secretary of the Navy is hereby authorized to expend
from the appropriation "Pay of the Navy" of the Navy Department so much
as may be necessary to defray the cost of the medals of honor,
distinguished-service medals, and Navy crosses, and bars, emblems, or
insignia herein provided for, and so much as may be necessary to
replace any medals, crosses, bars, emblems, or insignia as are herein
or may heretofore have been provided for: _Provided_, That such
replacement shall be made only in those cases where the medal of honor,
distinguished-service medal, or Navy cross, or bar, emblem, or insignia
presented under the provisions of this or any other act shall have been
lost, destroyed, or rendered unfit for use without fault or neglect on
the part of the person to whom it was awarded, and shall be made
without charge therefor.

SEC. 7. That, except as otherwise prescribed herein, no medal of honor,
distinguished-service medal, Navy cross, or bar or other suitable
emblem or insignia in lieu of either of said medals or of said cross,
shall be issued to any person after more than five years from the date
of the act or service justifying the award thereof, nor unless a
specific statement or report distinctly setting forth the act or
distinguished service and suggesting or recommending official
recognition thereof shall have been made by his naval superior through
official channels at the time of the act or service or within three
years thereafter.

SEC. 8. That in case an individual who shall distinguish himself dies
before the making of the award to which he may be entitled the award
may nevertheless be made and the medal or cross or the bar or other
emblem or insignia presented within five years from the date of the act
or service justifying the award thereof to such representative of the
deceased as the President may designate: _Provided_, That no medal or
cross or no bar or other emblem or insignia shall be awarded or
presented to any individual or to the representative of any individual
whose entire service subsequent to the time he distinguished himself
shall not have been honorable: _Provided further_, That in cases of
persons now in the naval service for whom the award of the medal of
honor has been recommended in full compliance with then existing
regulations, but on account of services which, though insufficient
fully to justify the award of the medal of honor, appears to have been
such as to justify the award of the distinguished-service medal or Navy
cross hereinbefore provided for, such cases may be considered and acted
upon under the provisions of this act authorizing the award of the
distinguished-service medal and Navy cross notwithstanding that said
services may have been rendered more than five years before said cases
shall have been considered as authorized by this proviso, but all
consideration or any action upon any of said cases shall be based
exclusively upon official records now on file in the Navy Department.

SEC. 9. That the President be, and he hereby is, authorized to
delegate, under such conditions, regulations, and limitations as he
shall prescribe, to flag officers who are commanders in chief or
commanding on important independent duty the power conferred upon him
by this act to award the Navy cross; and he is further authorized to
make from time to time any and all rules, regulations, and orders which
he shall deem necessary to carry into effect the provisions of this act
and to execute the full purpose and intention thereof.

Approved February 4, 1919.



ROLL OF HONOR.


JOHN M. ADAMS.

Sergeant, United States Marine Corps, for distinguished conduct in the
presence of the enemy in battle near Tientsin, China, July 13, 1900.
(G.O. 55, July 19, 1901.)


HARRY C. ADRIANCE.

Corporal, United States Marine Corps, for distinguished conduct in the
presence of the enemy in battle near Tientsin, China, July 13, 1900.
(G.O. 55, July 19, 1901.)


MICHAEL AHEAM.

Paymaster's steward on board of the U.S.S. _Kearsarge_, when she
destroyed the _Alabama_ off Cherbourg, France, June 19, 1864;
"exhibited marked coolness and good conduct, and is highly commended by
his divisional officer." (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


EDWARD ALLEN.

Boatswain's mate, first class, United States Navy, for distinguished
conduct in the presence of the enemy in battles on the 13th, 20th,
21st, and 22d of June, 1900, while with the relief expedition of the
allied forces in China. (G.O. 55, July 19, 1901.)


AARON ANDERSON.

Landsman (colored) on board of the U.S.S. _Wyandank_, during a boat
expedition up Mattox Creek, March 17, 1865; was reported by his
commanding officer as having rendered gallant assistance, loading the
howitzer while lying on his back, and then firing with such care and
precision as to kill and wound many of the rebel party. (G.O. 59, June
22, 1865.)


CAPT. EDWIN A. ANDERSON, UNITED STATES NAVY.

For extraordinary heroism in battle, engagement of Vera Cruz, April 22,
1914; commanded the Second Seaman Regiment, and in marching his
regiment across the open space in front of the Naval Academy and other
buildings he unexpectedly met a heavy fire from riflemen, machine guns,
and 1-pounders, which caused part of his command to break and fall
back, many casualties occurring amongst them at the time. His
indifference to the heavy fire, to which he himself was exposed at the
head of his regiment, showed him to be fearless and courageous in
battle. (G.O. 177, December 4, 1915.)


ROBERT ANDERSON.

Quartermaster on board of the U.S.S. _Crusader_ and _Keokuk_; exhibited
in the former vessel, on all occasions, in various skirmishes and
fights, the greatest intrepidity and devotion. In the latter vessel,
during the attack on Charleston, was stationed at the wheel, and when
the shot penetrated, scattering the iron, desired to cover his
commanding officer with his person. Promoted to acting master's mate.
(G.O. 17, July 10, 1863.)


WILLIAM ANDERSON.

Coxswain on the U.S.S. _Powhatan_; for rescuing from drowning W. H.
Moffatt, first class boy, on the 28th of June, 1878.


JOHN ANDREWS.

Ordinary seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Benicia_; was stationed at the
lead in passing the forts in Korea, June 9 and 10, 1871. Standing on
the gunwale of the _Benicia's_ launch, lashed to the ridgerope, he
remained unflinching in this dangerous position and gave his soundings
with coolness and accuracy under a heavy fire. (G.O. 176, July 9,
1872.)


JOHN ANGLING.

Boy on board of the U.S.S. _Pontoosuc_; commended for gallantry, skill,
and coolness in action during the operations in and about Cape Fear
River, which extended from December 24, 1864, to January 22, 1865, and
resulted in the capture of Fort Fisher and Wilmington. (G.O. 59, June
22, 1865.)


EDWIN N. APPLETON.

Corporal, United States Marine Corps, for bravery in crossing the river
at Tientsin June 20, 1900, in a small boat with three other men under a
heavy fire and assisting to destroy buildings occupied by the enemy.
(G.O. 84, March 22, 1902.)


MATTHEW ARTHUR.

Signal quartermaster on board of the U.S.S. _Carondelet_, at the
reduction of Forts Henry and Donelson, February 6 and 14, 1862, and
other actions, "most faithfully, effectively, and valiantly performed
all the duties of signal quartermaster and captain of rifled bow gun,
and was conspicuous for valor and devotion." (G.O. 17, July 10, 1863.)


CHARLES ASTEN.

Quarter gunner on board of the U.S.S. _Signal_, which vessel was
attacked by field batteries and sharpshooters and destroyed in Red
River May 5, 1864. "He was on the sick list, but did duty during the
whole of the engagement." (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


DANIEL ATKINS.

Ship's cook, first class (colored), serving on board the U.S.S.
_Cushing_, for gallant conduct in attempting to save the life of the
late Ensign Joseph C. Breckenridge, United States Navy, who fell
overboard at sea from that vessel on February 11, 1898. (G.O. 489, May
20, 1898.)


THOMAS ATKINSON.

Yeoman on board of the U.S.S. _Richmond_, Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864;
commended for coolness and energy in supplying the rifle ammunition,
which was under his sole charge, in the action in Mobile Bay on the
morning and forenoon of August 5, 1864. He was a petty officer on board
of the U.S. frigate _Congress_ in 1842-1846; was present and assisted
in capturing the whole of the Buenos Ayrean fleet by that vessel off
Montevideo; joined the _Richmond_ in September, 1860; was in the
actions with Fort McRee, the Head of the Passes of the Mississippi,
Forts Jackson and St. Philip, the Chalmettes, the rebel ironclads and
gunboats below New Orleans, Vicksburg, Port Hudson, and at the
surrender of New Orleans. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


J. F. AUER.

Ordinary seaman apprentice; for jumping overboard from the U.S.S.
_Lancaster_ November 20, 1883, at Marseille, France, and rescuing from
drowning a French lad who had fallen into the sea from a stone pier
astern of the ship.


JAMES AVERY.

Seaman on board the U.S.S. _Metacomet_; was one of the boat's crew
which, in charge of Acting Ensign H. C. Neilds, of the United States
Navy, went to the rescue of the officers and crew of the U.S. monitor
_Tecumseh_ when that vessel was sunk by a torpedo in passing the forts
in Mobile Bay August 5, 1864. This boat's crew, under their brave and
gallant leader, went within a few hundred yards of one of the forts
under a fire which Admiral Farragut expressed as "one of the most
galling" he ever saw and succeeded in rescuing from death 10 of the
crew of the _Tecumseh_. Their conduct elicited the admiration of both
friend and foe. (G.O. 71, January 15, 1866.)


ENSIGN OSCAR C. BADGER, UNITED STATES NAVY.

For distinguished conduct in battle, engagements of Vera Cruz, April 21
and 22, 1914. Was in both days' fighting at the head of his company,
and was eminent and conspicuous in his conduct, leading his men with
skill and courage. (G.O. 177, December 4, 1915.)


BENJAMIN F. BAKER.

Coxswain, serving on board the U.S.S. _Nashville_, for extraordinary
bravery and coolness while cutting the cable leading from Cienfuegos,
Cuba, May 11, 1898, under a heavy fire of the enemy. (G.O. 521, July 7,
1899.)


HENRY BAKER.

Quarter gunner on board the U.S.S. _Metacomet_; was one of the boat's
crew which, in charge of Acting Ensign H. C. Neilds, of the United
States Navy, went to the rescue of the officers and crew of the U.S.
monitor _Tecumseh_ when that vessel was sunk by a torpedo in passing
the forts in Mobile Bay August 5, 1864. This boat's crew, under their
brave and gallant leader, went within a few hundred yards of one of the
forts under a fire which Admiral Farragut expressed as "one of the most
galling" he ever saw, and succeeded in rescuing from death 10 of the
crew of the _Tecumseh_. Their conduct elicited the admiration of both
friend and foe. (G.O. 71, January 15, 1866.)


JOHN HENRY BALCH.

Pharmacist's mate, first class, United States Navy. "For gallantry and
intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty,
with the Sixth Regiment United States Marines, in action at Vierzy, on
July 19, 1918. Unhesitatingly and fearlessly exposed himself to
terrific machine and high-explosive fire to succor the wounded as they
fell in the attack, leaving his dressing station voluntarily and
keeping up the work all day and late into the night unceasingly for 16
hours on a field torn by shell and machine-gun fire. Also in the action
at Somme-Py on October 5, 1918, exhibited exceptional bravery in
establishing an advanced dressing station under heavy shell fire." (Act
of February 4, 1919.)


CHARLES BALDWIN.

Coal heaver on board of the U.S.S. _Wyalusing_; volunteered May 25,
1864, in a night attempt to destroy the rebel ram _Albemarle_, in
Roanoke River, and, although it was unsuccessful, he displayed courage,
zeal, and unwearied exertion on the occasion. Promoted to acting
master's mate. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


JAMES BARNUM.

Boatswain's mate on board of the U.S.S. _New Ironsides_; commended for
highly meritorious conduct during the several engagements with Fort
Fisher in December, 1864, and January, 1865. (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


EDWARD BARRETT.

Second-class fireman on board the U.S.S. _Alaska_; for hauling the
fires from under the boiler after the stop-valve chamber had been
ruptured at Callao Bay, Peru, September 14, 1881. (G.O. 326, October
18, 1884.)


DAVID D. BARROW.

Ordinary seaman, serving on board the U.S.S. _Nashville_, for
extraordinary bravery and coolness while cutting the cables leading
from Cienfuegos, Cuba, May 11, 1898, under a heavy fire of the enemy.
(G.O. 521, July 7, 1899.)


GURDON H. BARTER.

Landsman on board of the U.S.S. _Minnesota_; especially commended for
bravery in the assault on Fort Fisher January 15, 1865, remaining at
the front near the fort when the panic carried the mass away. (G.O. 59,
June 22, 1865.)


THOMAS C. BARTON.

Seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Hunchback_, in the attack upon Franklin,
Va., October 3, 1862; mentioned for heroic conduct. Promoted to acting
master's mate. (G.O. 11, April 3, 1863.)


DAVID L. BASS.

Seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Minnesota_; especially commended for
bravery in the assault on Fort Fisher January 15, 1865, remaining at
the front near the fort when the panic carried the mass away. (G.O. 59,
June 22, 1865.)


RICHARD BATES.

Seaman of the U.S.S. _De Soto_; for heroic conduct in rescuing from
drowning James Rose and John Russell, seamen of the U.S.S. _Winooski_,
off Eastport, Me., May 10, 1866. (G.O. 77, August 1, 1866.)


PHILIP BAZAAR.

Ordinary seaman on board the U.S.S. _Santiago de Cuba_; was one of the
boat's crew detailed for General Terry. The five men forming this
boat's crew were represented to have been the only men who entered Fort
Fisher in the assault from the fleet January 15, 1865. (G.O. 59, June
22, 1865.)


HARRY C. BEASLEY.

Seaman on board the U.S.S. _Florida_; for extraordinary heroism in the
line of his profession during the seizure of Vera Cruz, Mexico, April
21, 1914. (G.O. 101, June 15, 1914.)


FREDERICK BEHNE.

Fireman, first class, serving on board the U.S.S. _Iowa_, for
extraordinary heroism at the time of the blowing out of the manhole
plate of boiler D on board that vessel January 25, 1905. (G.O. 182,
March 20, 1905.)


HEINRICH BEHNKE.

Fireman, first class, serving on board the U.S.S. _Iowa_, for
extraordinary heroism at the time of the blowing out of the manhole
plate of boiler D on board that vessel January 25, 1905. (G.O. 182,
March 20, 1905.)


GEORGE BELL.

Captain of the afterguard on board of the U.S.S. _Santee_; was pilot of
the boat engaged in cutting out the rebel armed schooner _Royal Yacht_
from Galveston Bay November 7, 1861, and evinced more coolness, in
passing the four forts and the rebel steamer _General Rusk_, than was
ever before witnessed by his commanding officer. "Although severely
wounded in the encounter, he displayed extraordinary courage under the
most painful and trying circumstances." (G.O. 17, July 10, 1863.)


W. H. BELPITT.

Captain of afterguard on the U.S.S. _Monocacy_, for jumping overboard
from that vessel at Foochow, China, on the morning of October 7, 1884,
and sustaining, until picked up, a Chinaman who had been thrown into
the water by the capsizing of a canoe. (Letter No. 126, October 27,
1884, Lieutenant Commander Iverson, United States Navy.)


JAMES H. BENNETT.

Chief boatswain's mate, serving on board the U.S.S. _Marblehead_, for
extraordinary bravery and coolness while cutting the cables leading
from Cienfuegos, Cuba, May 11, 1898, under a heavy fire of the enemy.
(G.O. 521, July 7, 1899.)


JAMES BENSON.

Seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Ossipee_, June 20, 1872; at the imminent
risk of his life, jumped into the sea, when the ship was going at a
speed of 4 knots, and endeavored to save John K. Smith, landsman, of
the same vessel, from drowning. (G.O. 180, October 10, 1872.)


MAJ. RANDOLPH C. BERKELEY, UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS.

For distinguished conduct in battle, engagements of Vera Cruz, April 21
and 22, 1914; was eminent and conspicuous in command of his battalion;
was in the fighting of both days, and exhibited courage and skill in
leading his men through action. His cool judgment and courage and his
skill in handling his men in encountering and overcoming the
machine-gun and rifle fire down Cinco de Mayo and parallel streets
accounts for the small percentage of the losses of marines under his
command. (G.O. 177, December 4, 1915.)


ASA BETHAM.

Coxswain on board of the U.S.S. _Pontoosuc_; commended for gallantry,
skill, and coolness in action during the operations in and about Cape
Fear River, which extended from December 24, 1864, to January 22, 1865,
and resulted in the capture of Fort Fisher and Wilmington. (G.O. 59,
June 22, 1865.)


ALBERT BEYER.

Coxswain, serving on board the U.S.S. _Nashville_, for extraordinary
bravery and coolness while cutting the cables leading from Cienfuegos,
Cuba, May 11, 1898, under heavy fire of the enemy. (G.O. 521, July 7,
1899.)


CHARLES J. BIBBER.

Gunner's mate on board of the U.S.S. _Agawam_; one of the crew of the
powder boat which was exploded near Fort Fisher December 23, 1864, for
which service he volunteered. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


JOHN F. BICKFORD.

Captain of top on board of the U.S.S. _Kearsarge_ when she destroyed
the _Alabama_ off Cherbourg, France, June 19, 1864; "exhibited marked
coolness and good conduct, and is highly commended by his divisional
officer." Promoted to acting master's mate. (G.O. 45, December 31,
1864.)


RICHARD BINDER.

Sergeant, United States Marine Corps, U.S.S. _Ticonderoga_, for
personal valor as captain of a gun at Fort Fisher, 1864 to 1865.


CHARLES F. BISHOP.

Quartermaster, second class, on board of the U.S.S. _Florida_, for
extraordinary heroism in the line of his profession during the seizure
of Vera Cruz, Mexico, April 21, 1914. (G.O. 101, June 15, 1914.)


ERNEST H. BJORKMAN.

Ordinary seaman, serving on board the U.S.S. _Leyden_, for heroism at
the time of the wreck of that vessel January 21, 1903. (G.O. 145,
December 26, 1903.)


WILLIAM BLAGEEN.

Ship's cook on board of the U.S.S. _Brooklyn_ in the engagement in
Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864; conspicuous for bravery, performing his
duty in the powder division, at a point where the ship was riddled very
much, and in the immediate vicinity of the shell whips, which were
twice cleared of men by bursting shells. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


ROBERT M. BLAIR.

Boatswain's mate on board of the U.S.S. _Pontoosuc_; commended for
gallantry, skill, and coolness in action during the operations in and
about Cape Fear River, which extended from December 24, 1864, to
January 22, 1865, and resulted in the capture of Fort Fisher and
Wilmington. (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


ROBERT BLAKE.

Contraband (colored) on board of the U.S.S. _Marblehead_ in the
engagement with the rebel batteries on Stono River December 25, 1863;
serving as a powder boy, displayed extraordinary courage, alacrity, and
intelligence in the discharge of his duties under trying circumstances,
and merited the admiration of all. (G.O. 32, April 16, 1864.)


ROBERT BLUME.

Seaman, serving on board the U.S.S. _Nashville_, for extraordinary
bravery and coolness while cutting the cables leading from Cienfuegos,
Cuba, May 11, 1898, under a heavy fire of the enemy. (G.O. 521, July 7,
1899.)


EDWARD BOERS.

Seaman, serving on board the U.S.S. _Bennington_, for extraordinary
heroism displayed at the time of the explosion of a boiler of that
vessel at San Diego, Calif., July 21, 1905. (G.O. 13, January 5, 1906.)


FRANK BOIS.

Quartermaster on board of the U.S.S. _Cincinnati_ in an attack on the
Vicksburg batteries May 27, 1863; coolness in making signals and in
nailing the flag to the stump of the forestaff under a heavy fire.
(G.O. 17, July 10, 1863.)


WILLIAM BOND.

Boatswain's mate on board of the U.S.S. _Kearsarge_ when she destroyed
the _Alabama_ off Cherbourg, France, June 19, 1864; "exhibited marked
coolness and good conduct, and is highly commended by his divisional
officer." (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


ROBERT E. BONNEY.

Chief water tender, serving on board the U.S.S. _Hopkins_; for
extraordinary heroism in the line of his profession on the occasion of
the accident to one of the boilers of that vessel February 14, 1910.
(G.O. 59, March 23, 1910.)


LIEUT. JOEL T. BOONE (M.C.), UNITED STATES NAVY.

"For extraordinary heroism, conspicuous gallantry, and intrepidity in
actual conflict with the enemy at and in the vicinity of Vierzy,
France, July 19, 1918. With absolute disregard for personal safety,
ever conscious and mindful of the suffering fallen, Surgeon Boone,
leaving the shelter of a ravine, went forward onto the open field where
there was no protection and, despite the extreme enemy fire of all
calibers, through a heavy mist of gas, applied dressings and first aid
to wounded marines. This occurred southeast of Vierzy, near the
cemetery, and on the road south from that town. When the dressings and
supplies had been exhausted, he went through a heavy barrage of
large-caliber shell, both high-explosive and gas, to replenish these
supplies, returning quickly with a side-car load, and administered them
in saving the lives of the wounded. A second trip, under the same
conditions and for the same purpose, was made by Surgeon Boone later
that day. He served with the Sixth Regiment United States Marines."
(Act of February 4, 1919.)


THOMAS BOURNE.

Seaman and gun captain on board of the U.S.S. _Varuna_ in the attacks
upon Forts Jackson and St. Philip April 24, 1862; mentioned as having
done his "duty through the thickest of the fight with great coolness
and danger to the enemy." (G.O. 11, April 3, 1863.)


EDWARD R. BOWMAN.

Quartermaster on board of the U.S.S. _Ticonderoga_ in the attacks on
Fort Fisher January 13 to 15, 1865; "commended for good conduct
throughout the action, in which he was badly wounded, and bore his
sufferings with great fortitude." (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


ERWIN J. BOYDSTON.

Private, United States Marine Corps, for distinguished conduct in the
presence of the enemy at Peking, China, July 21 to August 17, 1900.
Boydston assisted to erect barricades under a heavy fire. (G.O. 55,
July 19, 1901.)


ALEXANDER BRADLEY.

Landsman on board of the U.S.S. _Wachusett_; jumped overboard off Cowes
August 7, 1872, in a strong tideway, to save Philip Cassidy, landsman,
of the U.S.S. _Wabash_, from drowning. (G.O. 180, October 10, 1872.)


AMOS BRADLEY.

Landsman on board of the U.S.S. _Varuna_ in the attack upon Forts
Jackson and St. Philip April 24, 1862; "stood at the wheel the whole
time, although guns were raking the deck from behind him. His position
was one of the most responsible on the ship, and he did his duty to the
utmost." (G.O. 11, April 3, 1863.)


CHARLES BRADLEY.

Boatswain's mate; first captain of 9-inch gun on board of the U.S.S.
_Louisville_; especially commended for his attention to duty, bravery,
and coolness in action. (G.O. 11, April 3, 1863.)


CHIEF GUNNER GEORGE BRADLEY, UNITED STATES NAVY.

For meritorious service under fire on the occasion of the landing of
the American naval forces at Vera Cruz in 1914. Chief Gunner Bradley
was then attached to the U.S.S. _Utah_, as a chief gunner's mate, and
was in charge of the ammunition party and special details at Vera Cruz.
(Medal presented by President Coolidge at the White House on October 4,
1923.) (G.O. 117, September 13, 1923.)


GEORGE F. BRADY.

Chief gunner's mate, serving on board the torpedo boat _Winslow_, for
gallant and conspicuous conduct in the action at Cardenas, Cuba, May
11, 1898. Brady's energy in assisting to sustain fire, his efforts to
repair the steering gear under fire, his promptness in maintaining
closed water-tight doors and hatches, was largely instrumental in
saving the vessel. (G.O. 497, September 3, 1898.)


JOHN BRAZELL.

Quartermaster on the U.S.S. _Richmond_; recommended for coolness and
good conduct in the action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of
August 5, 1864. He was on the _Brooklyn_ in the actions with Forts
Jackson and St. Philip, the Chalmettes, batteries below Vicksburg, and
present at the surrender of New Orleans. Joined the _Richmond_ in 1863.
(G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


HENRY BREAULT.

Torpedoman, second class, serving on the U.S. submarine _O-5_, for
heroism and devotion to duty at the time of the sinking of that vessel.
On the morning of October 28, 1923, the _O-5_ collided with the
steamship _Abangarez_ and sank in less than a minute. When the
collision occurred Breault was in the torpedo room. Upon reaching the
hatch he saw that the boat was rapidly sinking. Instead of jumping
overboard to save his own life, he returned to the torpedo room to the
rescue of a shipmate whom he knew was trapped in the boat, closing the
torpedo-room hatch on himself. Breault and Brown remained trapped in
this compartment until rescued by the salvage party 31 hours later.
(Medal presented by President Coolidge at the White House on March 8,
1924.) (G.O. 125, February 20, 1924.)


GEORGE BREEMAN.

Seaman, serving on board the U.S.S. _Kearsarge_, for extraordinary
heroism in the line of his profession at the time of the accidental
ignition of powder charges in the forward 13-inch turret on board that
vessel April 13, 1906. (G.O. 21, May 5, 1906.)


JOHN BREEN.

Boatswain's mate on board of the U.S.S. _Commodore Perry_ in the attack
upon Franklin, Va., October 3, 1862; distinguished for his gallant
conduct. (G.O. 11, April 3, 1863.)


CHRISTOPHER BRENNAN.

Seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Mississippi_ (but belonging to the
_Colorado_) in the capture of Forts St. Philip and Jackson and New
Orleans, April 24 and 25, 1862; attracted the particular attention of
his commanding officer by his "courageous example to those around him.
Was the life and soul of the gun's crew." (G.O. 17, July 10, 1863.)


PATRICK F. BRESNAHAN.

Water tender, serving on board the U.S.S. _Iowa_, for extraordinary
heroism at the time of the blowing out of the manhole plate of boiler D
on board that vessel January 25, 1905. (G.O. 182, March 20, 1905.)


GEORGE W. BRIGHT.

Coal passer, serving on board the U.S.S. _Nashville_, for extraordinary
bravery and coolness while cutting the cables leading from Cienfuegos,
Cuba, May 11, 1898, under a heavy fire of the enemy. (G.O. 521, July 7,
1899.)


ANDREW BRINN.

Seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Mississippi_ in the attack on the Port
Hudson batteries night of March 14, 1863; commended for zeal and
courage displayed in the performance of unusual and trying service
while the vessel was aground and exposed to a heavy fire. (G.O. 17,
July 10, 1863.)


GEORGE F. BROCK.

Carpenter's mate, second class, serving on board the U.S.S.
_Bennington_, for extraordinary heroism displayed at the time of the
explosion of a boiler of that vessel at San Diego, Calif., July 21,
1905. (G.O. 13, January 5, 1906.)


CHARLES BROWN.

Corporal, United States Marine Corps, U.S.S. _Colorado_, assisted in
capturing the Korean standard in the center of the citadel of the
Korean Fort June 11, 1871. (G.O. 169, February 8, 1872.)


JAMES BROWN.

Quartermaster on board of the U.S.S. _Albatross_ in the action with
Fort De Russy May 4, 1863. After the steering wheel and wheel ropes had
been shot away, he stood on the gun platform of the quarter-deck,
exposing his person to a close fire of musketry from the shore, and
rendered invaluable assistance by his expert management of the
relieving tackles in extricating the vessel from a perilous position.
(G.O. 32, April 16, 1864.)


JOHN BROWN.

Captain of afterguard on board of the U.S.S. _De Soto_; heroic conduct,
with two comrades, in rescuing from drowning James Rose and John
Russell, seamen, of the U.S.S. _Winooski_, off Eastport, Me., May 10,
1866. (G.O. 77, August 1, 1866.)


JOHN BROWN.

Captain of forecastle on board of the U.S.S. _Brooklyn_, in the
engagement in Mobile Bay August 5, 1864; very conspicuous for bravery,
skill, coolness, and activity at his gun. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


ROBERT BROWN.

Captain of top on board the U.S.S. _Richmond_, Mobile Bay, August 5,
1864; commended for coolness and good conduct in the action in Mobile
Bay on the morning and forenoon of August 5, 1864. He was on board the
_Westfield_ in the actions with Forts Jackson and St. Philip, the
Chalmettes, and present at the surrender of New Orleans; also with the
batteries at Vicksburg. Joined the _Richmond_ in September, 1863. (G.O.
45, December 31, 1864.)


WILSON BROWN.

Landsman on board of the U.S.S. _Hartford_ in the engagement in Mobile
Bay August 5, 1864; "was stationed at the shell whip on the berth deck.
A man was killed on the ladder above him and thrown with such violence
against Brown as to knock him into the hold, where he lay for a short
time senseless, but on recovering he immediately returned to his
station, though, besides himself, only one of the original six
belonging there had escaped." (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


WILLIAM H. BROWN.

Landsman on board of the U.S.S. _Brooklyn_ in the engagement in Mobile
Bay August 5, 1864; conspicuous for bravery, performing his duty in the
powder division, at a point where the ship was riddled very much, and
in the immediate vicinity of the shell whips, which were twice cleared
of men by bursting shells. Was also wounded. (G.O. 45, December 31,
1864.)


WILLIAM P. BROWNELL.

Coxswain on board of the U.S.S. _Benton_; conspicuous for skill and
courage as captain of 9-inch gun in the attacks on Great Gulf, May 3,
1863, and Vicksburg, May 22, 1863, also in serving at Battery Benton
before Vicksburg. (G.O. 32, April 16, 1864.)


HENRY BRUTSCHE.

Landsman on board of the U.S.S. _Tacony_. At the capture of Plymouth
October 31, 1864, he landed and spiked a loaded 9-inch gun under a
sharp fire of musketry. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


LIEUT. COMMANDER ALLEN BUCHANAN, UNITED STATES NAVY.

For distinguished conduct in battle, engagements of Vera Cruz, April 21
and 22, 1914; commanded First Seaman Regiment; was in both days'
fighting and almost continually under fire from soon after landing,
about noon of the 21st, until we were in possession of the city, about
noon of the 22d. His duties required him to be at points of great
danger in directing his officers and men, and he exhibited conspicuous
courage, coolness, and skill in his conduct of the fighting. Upon his
courage and skill depended, in great measure, success or failure. His
responsibilities were great, and he met them in a manner worthy of
commendation. (G.O. 177, December 4, 1915.)


DAVID M. BUCHANAN.

Apprentice serving on board of the U.S.S. _Saratoga_. On the morning of
July 15, 1879, while that vessel was anchored off the Battery, New York
Harbor, Robert Lee Robey, apprentice, fell overboard from the afterpart
of the ship. The tide was running strong ebb at the time, and Robey,
not being an expert swimmer, was in danger of drowning. Buchanan
instantly sprang over the rail after him, without hesitating an instant
to remove even a portion of his clothing. They were later picked up by
the ship's boat. (G.O. 246, July 22, 1879.)


JAMES BUCK.

Quartermaster on board of the U.S.S. _Brooklyn_ in the attack upon
Forts Jackson and St. Philip and at the taking of New Orleans April 24
and 25, 1862. "Stationed at the wheel. Early in the fight was painfully
wounded by a heavy splinter, but for seven hours stood bravely at his
post, refusing to go below until positively ordered to do so. Next
morning stole to his station and steered the ship over eight hours."
Promoted to acting master's mate. (G.O. 11, April 3, 1863.)


HOWARD M. BUCKLEY.

Private, United States Marine Corps, for distinguished conduct in the
presence of the enemy in battles while with the Eighth Army Corps on
the 25th, 27th, 29th of March, and the 4th of April, 1899. (G.O. 55,
July 19, 1901.)


THOMAS BURKE.

Seaman on board of the U.S.S. _De Soto_; heroic conduct, with two
comrades, in rescuing from drowning James Rose and John Russell,
seamen, of the U.S.S. _Winooski_, off Eastport, Me., May 10, 1866.
(G.O. 77, August 1, 1866.)


JAMES BURNES.

Private, United States Marine Corps, for bravery in crossing the river
at Tientsin, June 20, 1900, in a small boat with three other men under
a heavy fire and assisting to destroy building occupied by the enemy.
(G.O. 84, March 22, 1902.)


JOHN M. BURNS.

Seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Lackawanna_ in the engagement in Mobile
Bay, August 5, 1864; severely wounded and sent below under the
surgeon's charge; would not remain unemployed, but assisted the powder
division until the action was over. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


ALBERT BURTON.

Seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Wabash_; mentioned for gallant conduct
in the assault on Fort Fisher January 15, 1865, and as having entered
the stockade. (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


MAJ. SMEDLEY D. BUTLER, UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS.

For distinguished conduct in battle, engagement of Vera Cruz, April 22,
1914; was eminent and conspicuous in command of his battalion. He
exhibited courage and skill in leading his men through the action of
the 22d and in the final occupation of the city. (G.O. 177, December 4,
1915.)

SECOND MEDAL.

"On November 17, 1915, it was planned to attack Fort Riviere, Haiti,
with a force made up of detachments from the Fifth, Thirteenth,
Twenty-third Companies, and the marine detachment and sailors from the
_Connecticut_. Fort Riviere was an old French bastion fort, about 200
feet on the side, with thick walls of brick and stone, the walls being
loopholed. The original entrance had been on the northern side, but had
been blocked, a small breach in the southern wall being used in its
stead. As this breach in the wall was the only entrance to the fort, it
was naturally covered by the defenders on the inside, making passage
through it into the fort a most hazardous undertaking for the leading
men. Notwithstanding the fact that the fire of the Cacos was constantly
passing through this hole in the wall, Sergt. Ross L. Iams, Fifth
Company, unhesitatingly jumped through, closely followed by Pvt. Samuel
Gross of the Twenty-third company. A mêlée then ensued inside of the
fort for about 10 minutes, the Cacos fighting desperately with rifles,
clubs, stones, etc., during which several jumped from the walls in an
effort to escape, but were shot by the automatic guns of the Fifth
Company and by the Thirteenth Company advancing to the attack."

It is urged that Maj. Smedley D. Butler be given a medal of honor for
his conspicuous bravery during the assault on Fort Riviere. Two men
entered ahead of him, doing so to prevent him from being the first.
Theirs was devotion to him, while his action was devotion to duty. The
assault inside the fort was made by 23 men with the knowledge that no
quarter would be given them.


WILLIAM ROBERT BUTTON.

Corporal, United States Marine Corps. "For extraordinary heroism and
conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in actual conflict with the enemy
near Grande Riviere, Republic of Haiti, on the night of October
31-November 1, 1919, resulting in the death of Charlemange Peralte, the
supreme bandit chief in the Republic of Haiti, and the killing and
capture and dispersal of about 1,200 of his outlaw followers. Corpl.
William R. Button not only distinguished himself by his excellent
judgment and leadership but unhesitatingly exposed himself to great
personal danger; and the slightest error would have forfeited not only
his life but the lives of the detachments of gendarmerie under his
command. The successful termination of his mission will undoubtedly
prove of untold value to the Republic of Haiti." (G.O. 536, June 10,
1920.)


GEORGE BUTTS.

Gunner's mate on board of the U.S.S. _Signal_, which vessel was
attacked by field batteries and sharpshooters and destroyed in Red
River May 5, 1864. "He was on the sick list, but did duty during the
whole of the engagement." (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


JAMES BYRNES.

Boatswain's mate; first captain of 9-inch gun on board of the U.S.S.
_Louisville_; "especially commended for his attention to duty, bravery,
and coolness in action." Promoted to acting master's mate. (G.O. 11,
April 3, 1863.)


THOMAS CAHEY.

Seaman, serving on board the U.S.S. _Petrel_, for heroism and
gallantry, fearlessly exposing his own life to danger for the saving of
others on the occasion of the fire on board said vessel March 31, 1901.
(G.O. 85, March 22, 1902.)


ALBERT R. CAMPBELL.

Private, United States Marine Corps, for distinguished conduct in the
presence of the enemy in the advance on Tientsin June 21, 1900. (G.O.
55, July 19, 1901.)


DANIEL CAMPBELL.

Private, United States Marine Corps, serving on board the U.S.S.
_Marblehead_, for extraordinary bravery and coolness while cutting the
cables leading from Cienfuegos, Cuba, May 11, 1898, under a heavy fire
of the enemy. (G.O. 521, July 7, 1899.)


WILLIAM CAMPBELL.

Boatswain's mate on board of the U.S.S. _Ticonderoga_, in the attacks
on Fort Fisher December 24 and 25, 1864, and January 13, 14, and 15,
1865. "Commended for coolness and good conduct as captain of a gun."
(G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


TEDFORD H. CANN.

Seaman, United States Naval Reserve Force, serving on board the U.S.S.
_May_, for courageous conduct on November 5, 1917, for finding leak in
flooded compartment, closing same at peril of his life, and thereby
unquestionably saving the ship. (G.O. 366, February 11, 1918.)


JAMES CAREY.

Seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Huron_; saving three shipmates from
drowning.


WILLIAM I. CARR.

Private, United States Marine Corps, for distinguished conduct in the
presence of the enemy at Peking, China, July 21 to August 17, 1900.
(G.O. 55, July 19, 1901.)


WILLIAM M. CARR.

Master-at-arms on board of the U.S.S. _Richmond_, Mobile Bay, August 5,
1864; commended for coolness, energy, and zeal in the action of Mobile
Bay on the morning and forenoon of August 5, 1864. Volunteered to
direct, under the orders of the commander of the division, the passing
of shells from the shell rooms in addition to his duties connected with
the care of lights, which he performed most satisfactorily; has been
master-at-arms on board the _Richmond_ since September, 1860; was in
the actions with Fort McRee; at the Head of the Passes of the
Mississippi; Forts Jackson and St. Philip; the Chalmettes; the rebel
ironclads and gunboats below New Orleans; Vicksburg; Port Hudson; and
present at the surrender of New Orleans. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


JOSEPH E. CARTER.

Blacksmith, serving on board the U.S.S. _Marblehead_, for extraordinary
bravery and coolness while cutting the cables leading from Cienfuegos,
Cuba, May 11, 1898, under heavy fire of the enemy. (G.O. 521, July 7,
1899.)


MICHAEL CASSIDY.

Landsman on board the U.S.S. _Lackawanna_ in the engagement in Mobile
Bay August 5, 1864; first sponger of a gun. Displayed great coolness
and exemplary behavior, eliciting the applause of his officers and the
gun's crew. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


LIEUT. GUY W. S. CASTLE, UNITED STATES NAVY.

For distinguished conduct in battle, engagements of Vera Cruz, April 21
and 22, 1914. Was eminent and conspicuous in command of his battalion.
Was in the fighting of both days, and exhibited courage and skill in
leading his men through action. In seizing the customhouse he
encountered for many hours the heaviest and most pernicious concealed
fire of the entire day, but his courage and coolness under trying
conditions was marked. (G.O. 177, December 4, 1915.)


JOHN H. CATHERWOOD.

Ordinary seaman, United States Navy, for extraordinary heroism in the
line of his profession while operating against outlaws on the island of
Basilan, P.I., September 24, 1911. (G.O. 138, December 13, 1911.)


MAJ. ALBERTUS W. CATLIN, UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS.

For distinguished conduct in battle, engagement of Vera Cruz, April 22,
1914. Was eminent and conspicuous in command of his battalion. He
exhibited courage and skill in leading his men through the action of
the 22d and in the final occupation of the city. (G.O. 177, December 4,
1915.)


THOMAS CAVANAUGH.

Fireman, first class, serving on board the U.S.S. _Potomac_, for
extraordinary heroism in line of duty, volunteering to enter the
fireroom filled with live steam and open the auxiliary valve at the
time of the accident to the forward boiler of that vessel, en route
from Cat Island to Nassau, on the night of November 14, 1898. After
repeated attempts, enveloped from head to feet in wet blankets and wet
towels over his face, he succeeded in getting the valve open and thus
relieving the vessel from further danger. (G.O. 503, December 13,
1898.)


LEONARD CHADWICK.

Apprentice, first class, serving on board the U.S.S. _Marblehead_, for
extraordinary bravery and coolness while cutting the cables leading
from Cienfuegos, Cuba, May 11, 1898, under a heavy fire of the enemy.
(G.O. 521, July 7, 1899.)


JAMES B. CHANDLER.

Coxswain on board of the U.S.S. _Richmond_, Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864;
commended for coolness and good conduct in the action in Mobile Bay, on
the morning and forenoon of August 5, 1864. He deserves especial notice
for having come off the sick list and going to and remaining at his
quarters during the entire action. Joined the _Brooklyn_ in November,
1861; was in the actions with Forts Jackson and St. Philip; the
Chalmettes; batteries below Vicksburg; and present at the surrender of
New Orleans. Joined the _Richmond_ in September, 1863. (G.O. 45,
December 31, 1864.)


AUGUST CHANDRON.

Seaman apprentice, second class, of the U.S.S. _Quinnebaug_; for
jumping overboard from that vessel at Alexandria, Egypt, on the morning
of November 21, 1885, and, with the aid of Hugh Miller, boatswain's
mate, rescuing from drowning William Evans, ordinary seaman. (Letter,
Capt. N. Ludlow, U.S.N., No. 8326/B, November 21, 1885.)


LOUIS G. CHAPUT.

Landsman on board of the U.S.S. _Lackawanna_ in the engagement in
Mobile Bay August 5, 1864; remained at his gun after he was severely
wounded until relieved by another person; was then taken below, and
after reporting to the surgeon, returned to his station at the gun and
resumed his duties till the action was over, and was then carried
below. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


GEORGE CHARETTE.

Gunner's mate, first class, United States Navy, for extraordinary
heroism in connection with the sinking of the U.S.S. _Merrimac_, at the
entrance to the harbor of Santiago de Cuba, on the night of June 2,
1898, under heavy fire from the Spanish batteries. (G.O. 529, November
2, 1899.)


JOHN P. CHATHAM.

Gunner's mate, second class, United States Navy, for distinguished
conduct in the presence of the enemy, in battles on the 13th, 20th,
21st, and 22d of June, 1900, while with the relief expedition of the
allied forces in China. (G.O. 55, July 19, 1901.)


EDWARD A. CLARY.

Water tender, serving on board the U.S.S. _Hopkins_, for extraordinary
heroism in the line of his profession on the occasion of the accident
to one of the boilers of that vessel February 14, 1910. (G.O. 59, March
23, 1910.)


JOSEPH CLANCY.

Chief boatswain's mate, United States Navy, for distinguished conduct
in the presence of the enemy in battles on the 13th, 20th, 21st, and
22d of June, 1900, while with the relief expedition of the allied
forces in China. (G.O. 55, July 19, 1901.)


CLAUS K. R. CLAUSEN.

Coxswain, United States Navy, for extraordinary heroism in connection
with the sinking of the U.S.S. _Merrimac_, at the entrance to the
harbor of Santiago de Cuba on the night of June 2, 1898, under heavy
fire from the Spanish batteries. (G.O. 529, November 2, 1899.)


JOHN J. CLAUSEY.

Chief gunner's mate, serving on board the U.S.S. _Bennington_, for
extraordinary heroism displayed at the time of the explosion of a
boiler of that vessel at San Diego, Calif., July 21, 1905. (G.O. 13,
January 5, 1906.)


ROBERT T. CLIFFORD.

Master-at-arms on board of the U.S.S. _Monticello_; volunteered for
duty on four occasions of danger, and was particularly conspicuous in
charging a rebel force near New Topsail Inlet, N.C., August 22, 1863,
and in destroying a rebel schooner. Promoted to acting master's mate.
(G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


PATRICK COLBERT.

Coxswain on board of the U.S.S. _Commodore Hull_. At the capture of
Plymouth, October 31, 1864, was captain of the forward pivot gun.
Although painfully wounded by a shell, which killed a comrade at his
side, he remained at his post until the close of the action, and
appeared as cool during the engagement as if at target practice. (G.O.
45, December 31, 1864.)


JOHN COLEMAN.

Private, United States Marine Corps, on board of the U.S.S. _Colorado_,
fighting hand to hand with the enemy and saving the life of Alexander
McKenzie, Korea, June 11, 1871. (G.O. 169, February 8, 1872.)


DENNIS CONLAN.

Seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Agawam_; one of the crew of the powder
boat which was exploded near Fort Fisher December 23, 1864, for which
service he volunteered. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


MICHAEL CONNOLLY.

Ordinary seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Plymouth_; gallantry in
rescuing a citizen from drowning in the harbor of Halifax, Nova Scotia,
on the 7th of August, 1876. (G.O. 218, August 24, 1876.)


THOMAS CONNOR.

Ordinary seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Minnesota_. In the assault on
Fort Fisher, January 15, 1865, charged up the palisades and remained
there when others were seized with a panic. He, with others, brought
off a wounded officer from the field. (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


WILLIAM C. CONNOR.

Boatswain's mate on board of the U.S.S. _Howquah_ on the occasion of
the destruction of the blockade runner _Lynx_, off Wilmington,
September 25, 1864, at night. Performed his duty faithfully under the
most trying circumstances, standing firmly at his post in the midst of
a cross fire from the rebel shore batteries and our own vessels. (G.O.
45, December 31, 1864.)


JAMES COONEY.

Private, United States Marine Corps, for distinguished conduct in the
Battle of Tientsin, July 13, 1900. (G.O. 55, July 19, 1901.)


THOMAS C. COONEY.

Chief machinist, serving on board the U.S. torpedo boat _Winslow_, for
gallant and conspicuous conduct in the action at Cardenas, Cuba, May
11, 1898. Cooney's promptness in extinguishing fires in boiler pierced
by shell saved boiler tubes from burning out. (G.O. 497, September 3,
1898.)


JOHN COOPER.

Coxswain on board of the U.S.S. _Brooklyn_, in the engagement in Mobile
Bay, August 5, 1864. Very conspicuous for bravery, skill, coolness, and
activity at his gun. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)

SECOND MEDAL.

Quartermaster on Acting Rear Admiral Thatcher's staff. During the
terrific fire at Mobile, on the 26th of April, 1865, at the risk of
being blown to pieces by exploding shells, he advanced through the
burning locality, rescued a wounded man from certain death, and bore
him on his back to a place of safety. Entitled to wear a bar attached
to the ribbon of the medal he had already received at Mobile Bay,
August 5, 1864. (G.O. 62, June 29, 1865.)


DEMETRI CORAHORGI.

Fireman, first class, serving on board the U.S.S. _Iowa_, for
extraordinary heroism at the time of the blowing out of the manhole
plate of boiler D on board that vessel, January 25, 1905. (G.O. 182,
March 20, 1905.)


THOMAS E. CORCORAN.

Landsman on board of the U.S.S. _Cincinnati_, in an attack on the
Vicksburg batteries, May 27, 1863; conspicuous for coolness and bravery
under a severely accurate fire. "This is no ordinary case of
performance of duty." (G.O. 17, July 10, 1863.)


WILLIAM COREY.

Landsman on board of the U.S.S. _Plymouth_; heroic conduct in
endeavoring to save the life of one of the crew of the _Plymouth_, who
had fallen overboard from aloft, at the navy yard, New York, July 26,
1876. (G.O. 215, August 9, 1876.)


LIEUT. COMMANDER WILLIAM M. CORRY, UNITED STATES NAVY.

For heroic service in attempting to rescue a brother officer from a
flame-enveloped airplane. On October 2, 1920, an airplane in which
Lieut. Commander Corry was a passenger crashed and burst into flames.
He was thrown 30 feet clear of the plane and though injured rushed back
to the burning machine and endeavored to release the pilot. In so doing
he sustained serious burns, from which he died four days later.


JOHN COSTELLO.

Ordinary seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Hartford_; gallantry in
rescuing from drowning a landsman of that vessel, at Philadelphia, on
the 16th of July, 1876. (G.O. 214, July 27, 1876.)


PETER COTTON.

Coxswain on board of the U.S.S. _Baron DeKalk_; mentioned by his
commanding officer for having "distinguished himself in various
actions." (G.O. 11, April 3, 1863.)


H. C. COURTNEY.

Seaman on board the U.S. training ship _Portsmouth_; for jumping
overboard from that vessel at the Washington Navy Yard, February 7,
1882, and rescuing from drowning Charles Taliaferro, jack-of-the-dust.
(G.O. 326, October 18, 1884.)


LIEUT. (JUNIOR GRADE) GEORGE M. COURTS, UNITED STATES NAVY.

For distinguished conduct in battle, engagements of Vera Cruz, April
21 and 22, 1914; was under fire, eminent and conspicuous in the
performance of his duties; had well qualified himself by thorough study
during his years of duty in Mexico to deal with the conditions of this
engagement, and his services were of great value. He twice volunteered
and passed in an open boat through the zone of fire to convey important
orders to the _Chester_, then under a severe fire. (G.O. 177, December
4, 1915.)


JESSIE W. COVINGTON.

Ship's cook, third class, United States Navy, for extraordinary heroism
following internal explosion of the _Florence H._, on April 17, 1918.
The sea in the vicinity of wreckage was covered by a mass of boxes of
smokeless powder, which were repeatedly exploding. Jessie W. Covington,
of the U.S.S. _Stewart_, plunged overboard to rescue a survivor who was
surrounded by powder boxes and too exhausted to help himself, fully
realizing that similar powder boxes in the vicinity were continually
exploding and that he was thereby risking his life in saving the life
of this man. (G.O. 403, June 8, 1918.)


CHIEF GUNNER ROBERT EDWARD COX, UNITED STATES NAVY.

For extraordinary heroism on U.S.S. _Missouri_, April 13, 1904. While
at target practice off Pensacola, Fla., an accident occurred in the
after turret of the _Missouri_ whereby the lives of 5 officers and 28
men were lost. The ship was in imminent danger of destruction by
explosion, and the prompt action of Cox and two gunners' mates caused
the fire to be brought under control, and the loss of the _Missouri_,
together with her crew, was averted. (G.O. 43, April 14, 1921.) (Medal
presented by President Harding.)


T. CRAMEN.

Boatswain's mate of the U.S. training ship _Portsmouth_; for jumping
overboard from that vessel at the Washington Navy Yard, February 7,
1882, and rescuing from drowning Charles Taliaferro, jack-of-the-dust.
(G.O. 326, October 18, 1884.)


ALEXANDER CRAWFORD.

Fireman on board of the U.S.S. _Wyalusing_; volunteered May 25, 1864,
in a night attempt to destroy the rebel ram _Albemarle_, in Roanoke
River, and, although it was unsuccessful, he displayed courage, zeal,
and unwearied exertion on the occasion. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


WILLIAM J. CREELMAN.

Landsman, United States Navy, attached to the U.S.S. _Maine_;
distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in the line of his
profession in an attempt to save life at sea, February, 1897.


GEORGE CREGAN.

Coxswain on board of the U.S.S. _Florida_; for extraordinary heroism in
the line of his profession during the seizure of Vera Cruz, Mexico,
April 21, 1914. (G.O. 101, June 15, 1914.)


THOMAS CRIPPS.

Quartermaster on board of the U.S.S. _Richmond_, Mobile Bay, August 5,
1864; commended for coolness and good conduct as captain of a gun in
the action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of August 5, 1864.
He was on the _Brooklyn_ in the actions with Forts Jackson and St.
Philip; the Chalmette batteries; batteries below Vicksburg; and present
at the surrender of New Orleans. Joined the _Richmond_ in September,
1863. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


WILLIE CRONAN.

Boatswain's mate, second class, serving on board the U.S.S.
_Bennington_, for extraordinary heroism displayed at the time of the
explosion of a boiler of that vessel at San Diego, Calif., July 21,
1905. (G.O. 13, January 5, 1906.)


CORNELIUS CRONIN.

Chief quartermaster on board of the U.S.S. _Richmond_, Mobile Bay,
August 5, 1864; commended for coolness and close attention to duty in
looking out for signals and steering the ship in the action in Mobile
Bay on the morning and forenoon of August 5, 1864. He has been in the
naval service eight years. Joined the _Brooklyn_ in December, 1861; was
in the actions with Forts Jackson and St. Philip and with the rebel
ironclads and gunboats below New Orleans; was in the action with the
Chalmette batteries; present at the surrender of New Orleans; and in
the attack on the batteries below Vicksburg, in 1862. Joined the
_Richmond_ in September, 1863. Afterwards appointed a gunner in the
Navy. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


WILLIAM A. CROUSE.

Water tender, serving on board the U.S.S. _Concord_, for especially
brave and praiseworthy conduct in line of duty, hauling fires at the
time of the blowing out of a lower manhole plate joint on boiler B on
board of that vessel off Cavite, Manila Bay, P.I., May 21, 1898. The
atmosphere in which Crouse was obliged to work was very hot and filled
with vapor, necessitating the playing of water into the fireroom from a
hose. (G.O. 502, December 14, 1898.)


LOUIS CUKELA.

Sergeant, United States Marine Corps. "For extraordinary heroism in
action in the Forest de Retz, near Viller Cottertes, France, July 18,
1918. Sergeant Cukela advanced alone against an enemy's strong point
that was holding up his line, worked his way to its rear, and by the
use of German hand grenades attacked and captured two machine guns and
four men." (Act of February 4, 1919.)


GEORGE W. CUTTER.

Landsman on board of the U.S.S. _Powhatan_; jumped overboard at
Norfolk, May 27, 1872, and aided in saving one of the crew of that
vessel from drowning. (G.O. 176, July 9, 1872.)


JOHN O. DAHLGREN.

Corporal, United States Marine Corps, for distinguished conduct in the
presence of the enemy at the Battle of Peking, China, June 20 to July
16, 1900. (G.O. 55, July 19, 1901.)


DANIEL DALY.

Private, United States Marine Corps, for distinguished and gallant
conduct in the presence of the enemy in the Battle of Peking, China,
August 14, 1900. (G.O. 55, July 19, 1901.)

SECOND MEDAL.

Gunnery sergeant, United States Marine Corps. "On October 22, 1915,
Captain Upshur, First Lieutenant Ostermann, First Lieutenant Miller,
Assistant Surgeon Borden, and 35 enlisted men of the Fifteenth Company
of Marines, all mounted, left Fort Liberte, Haiti, for a six-day
reconnaissance. After dark on the evening of October 24, while crossing
river in deep ravine, the detachment was suddenly fired upon from three
sides by about 400 Cacos concealed in bushes about 100 yards from fort.
The marine detachment fought its way forward to a good position, which
it maintained during the night, although subjected to a continuous fire
from the Cacos. At daybreak the marines, in three squads, commanded by
Captain Upshur, Lieutenant Ostermann, and Gunnery Sergeant Daly,
advanced in three different directions, surprising and scattering the
Cacos in all directions. The expeditionary commander commented on the
gallantry displayed by the officers and men of this detachment in the
following language:

    "The action of 35 men in the attack made upon them during the night
    of October 24 can not be commended too highly. It is true that
    these men were in pitch darkness, surrounded by ten times their
    number and fighting for their lives, but the manner in which they
    fought during that long night, the steady, cool discipline that
    prevented demoralization, is remarkable. Had one squad failed, not
    one man of the party would have lived to tell the story. The actual
    assault upon the enemy, made in three different directions and
    beginning as soon as the light permitted them to see, was splendid.
    It meant success or utter annihilation. It succeeded, thanks to
    the splendid examples given by the officers and noncommissioned
    officers, supported by the men. Upshur and Ostermann advancing from
    two directions captured Fort Dipitie with a total of 13 marines,
    putting garrison to flight. Demolished and burned fort. All three
    squads burned all houses from which fire had been coming. I
    believe, therefore, that Capt. William P. Upshur, First Lieut.
    Edward A. Ostermann, and Gunnery Sergt. Daniel Daly should be given
    medals of honor for this particular engagement and the work of the
    following day.

    "On November 17, 1915, it was planned to attack Fort Riviere,
    Haiti, with a force made up of detachments from the Fifth,
    Thirteenth, Twenty-third Companies, and the marine detachment and
    sailors from the _Connecticut_. Fort Riviere was an old French
    bastion fort, about 200 feet on the side, with thick walls of brick
    and stone, the walls being loopholed. The original entrance had
    been on the northern side, but had been blocked, a small breach in
    the southern wall being used in its stead. As this breach in the
    wall was the only entrance to the fort, it was naturally covered by
    the defenders on the inside, making passage through it into the
    fort a most hazardous undertaking for the leading men.
    Notwithstanding the fact that the fire of the Cacos was constantly
    passing through this hole in the wall, Sergt. Ross L. Iams, Fifth
    Company, unhesitatingly jumped through, closely followed by Pvt.
    Samuel Gross, of the Twenty-third Company. A mêlée then ensued
    inside of the fort for about 10 minutes, the Cacos fighting
    desperately with rifles, clubs, stones, etc., during which several
    jumped from the walls in an effort to escape, but were shot by the
    automatic guns of the Fifth Company and by the Thirteenth Company
    advancing to the attack."

Gunnery Sergt. Daniel Daly, Fifteenth Company, during the operations
was the most conspicuous figure among the enlisted personnel.


HENRY W. DAVIS.

Private, United States Marine Corps, for distinguished conduct in the
presence of the enemy at Peking, China, July 21 to August 17, 1900.
(G.O. 55, July 19, 1901.)


JOHN DAVIS.

Ordinary seaman; for jumping overboard from the U.S.S. _Trenton_, at
Toulon, France, February, 1881, and rescuing from drowning Augustus
Ohlensen, coxswain. (G.O. 326, October 18, 1884.)


JOHN DAVIS.

Quarter gunner on board of the U.S.S. _Valley City_, in the attack on
the enemy's vessels and a fort near Elizabeth City, N.C., February 10,
1862. When the vessel was on fire near the magazine, he seated himself
on an open barrel of powder as the only means to keep the fire out.
(G.O. 11, April 3, 1863.)


JOHN DAVIS.

Gunner's mate, third class, serving on board the U.S.S. _Marblehead_,
for extraordinary bravery and coolness while cutting the cables leading
from Cienfuegos, Cuba, May 11, 1898, under a heavy fire of the enemy.
(G.O. 521, July 7, 1899.)


JOSEPH H. DAVIS.

Landsman on the U.S. receiving ship _Dale_, for jumping from the
ferryboat while off the wharf at Norfolk, Va., and rescuing from
drowning John Norman, seaman, January 22, 1886. (See letter Mate J. W.
Baxter, United States Navy, No. 8985, January 25, 1886.)


RAYMOND E. DAVIS.

Quartermaster, third class, serving on board the U.S.S. _Bennington_,
for extraordinary heroism displayed at the time of the explosion of a
boiler of that vessel at San Diego, Calif., July 21, 1905. (G.O. 13,
January 5, 1906.)


SAMUEL W. DAVIS.

Ordinary seaman, on board of the U.S.S. _Brooklyn_, in the engagement
in Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864; displayed much courage, bravery, and
coolness in acting as a lookout for torpedoes and other obstructions.
(G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


CHARLES DEAKIN.

Boatswain's mate on board of the U.S.S. _Richmond_, Mobile Bay, August
5, 1864; commended for coolness and good conduct as captain of a gun in
the action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of August 5, 1864.
He deserves special notice for his good example and zeal in going to
and remaining at his quarters during the whole action, although quite
sick. He has been in the naval service six years; was on board the
_Brooklyn_ in the actions with Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and with
the rebel ironclads and gunboats below New Orleans; was in the action
with the Chalmette batteries; present at the surrender of New Orleans;
and on board the _Brooklyn_ in the attack upon the batteries below
Vicksburg in 1862. Joined the _Richmond_ in September, 1863. (G.O. 45,
December 31, 1864.)


PERCY A. DECKER.

Boatswain's mate, second class, on board of the U.S.S. _Florida_; for
extraordinary heroism in the line of his profession during the seizure
of Vera Cruz, Mexico, April 21, 1914. (G.O. 101, June 15, 1914.)


OSBORN DEIGNAN.

Coxswain, United States Navy, for extraordinary heroism in connection
with the sinking of the U.S.S. _Merrimac_, at the entrance to the
harbor of Santiago de Cuba, on the night of June 2, 1898, under heavy
fire from the Spanish batteries. (G.O. 529, November 2, 1899.)


LORENZO DEMMING.

Landsman on board of the U.S. picket boat _No. 1_, which destroyed the
rebel ram _Albemarle_ at Plymouth, N.C., October 27, 1864. (G. O. 45,
December 31, 1864.)


JOHN DEMPSEY.

Seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Kearsarge_; gallant conduct in jumping
overboard from the _Kearsarge_, at Shanghai, China, on the 23d of
January, 1875, and rescuing from drowning one of the crew of that
vessel.


JOHN DEMPSTER.

Coxswain on board of the U.S.S. _New Ironsides_; commended for highly
meritorious conduct during the several engagements with Fort Fisher in
December, 1864, and January, 1865. (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


MICHAEL DENEEF.

Captain of top on board of the U.S.S. _Swatara_; gallant conduct in
jumping overboard at Para, Brazil, December 1, 1875, and rescuing one
of the crew of that vessel from drowning. (G.O. 201, January 18, 1876.)


AUSTIN DENHAM.

Seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Kansas_; displayed great coolness and
self-possession at the time Commander A. F. Crosman and others were
drowned near Greytown, Nicaragua, April 12, 1872, and by extraordinary
heroism and personal exertion prevented greater loss of life. (G.O.
176, July 9, 1872.)


J. HENRY DENIG.

Sergeant, United States Marine Corps, on board of the U.S.S.
_Brooklyn_, in the engagement in Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864.
Conspicuous good conduct at his gun. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


RICHARD DENNIS.

Boatswain's mate on board of the U.S.S. _Brooklyn_, in the engagement
in Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864. Displayed much courage, bravery, and
coolness in operating the torpedo catcher and assisting in working the
bow chaser. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


WILLIAM DENSMORE.

Chief boatswain's mate on board of the U.S.S. _Richmond_, Mobile Bay,
August 5, 1864; commended for coolness and good conduct as captain of a
gun in the action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of August
5, 1864. He has been in the naval service 12 years; was on board the
ship _St. Louis_, blockading off Pensacola and Head of the Passes of
the Mississippi, until the expiration of his service in 1861; reshipped
the same year and joined the _Brooklyn_; was in the actions with Forts
Jackson and St. Philip and with the rebel ironclads and gunboats below
New Orleans; was in the action with the Chalmette batteries; present at
the surrender of New Orleans; and on board the _Brooklyn_ in the attack
upon the batteries below Vicksburg in 1862. Joined the _Richmond_ in
September, 1863. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


ABRAHAM DE SOMERS.

Chief turret captain on board of the U.S.S. _Utah_, for extraordinary
heroism in the line of his profession during the seizure of Vera Cruz,
Mexico, April 21 and 22, 1914. (G.O. 101, June 15, 1914.)


BARTHOLOMEW DIGGINS.

Ordinary seaman, serving on board the U.S.S. _Hartford_, for gallant
conduct in the presence of the enemy during the action against Fort
Morgan and the enemy's vessels in Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864. (G.O.
391, November 12, 1891.)


JOHN DITZENBACK.

Quartermaster on board the U.S. monitor _Neosho_. During the engagement
at Bells Mills, on the Cumberland River, near Nashville, Tenn.,
December 6, 1864, the flag and signal staffs of the _Neosho_ were shot
away and the flag lay drooping over the wheelhouse. Under the fire of
the enemy's artillery and musketry, this man went out of the pilot
house, recovered the flag, and tied it to the stump of the main signal
staff, the highest mast remaining, being assisted by Pilot John H.
Ferrell. (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


JOHN DONNELLY.

Ordinary seaman on board the U.S.S. _Metacomet_; was one of the boat's
crew which, in charge of Acting Ensign H. C. Neilds, United States
Navy, went to the rescue of the officers and crew of the U.S. monitor
_Tecumseh_ when that vessel was sunk by a torpedo in passing the forts
in Mobile Bay August 5, 1864. This boat's crew, under their brave and
gallant leader, went within a few hundred yards of one of the forts,
under a fire which Admiral Farragut expressed as "one of the most
galling" he ever saw, and succeeded in rescuing from death 10 of the
crew of the _Tecumseh_. Their conduct elicited the admiration of both
friend and foe. (G.O. 71, January 15, 1866.)


WILLIAM DOOLEN.

Coal heaver on board the U.S.S. _Richmond_, Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864;
commended for coolness and good conduct and for refusing to leave his
station as shot and shell passer after having been knocked down and
badly wounded in the head by splinters; and upon going to quarters the
second time he was found at his station nobly doing his duty in the
action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of August 5, 1864. He
was in Fort Pickens when it was bombarded by the rebels; was on board
the _Brooklyn_ in the actions with Forts Jackson and St. Philip; the
Chalmettes; the rebel ironclad and gunboats below New Orleans; the
batteries below Vicksburg; and present at the surrender of New Orleans.
(G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


JOHN J. DORAN.

Boatswain's mate, second class, serving on board the U.S.S.
_Marblehead_, for extraordinary bravery and coolness while cutting the
cables leading from Cienfuegos, Cuba, May 11, 1898, under heavy fire of
the enemy. (G.O. 521, July 7, 1899.)


JOHN DORMAN.

Seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Carondelet_; although several times
wounded in various actions, has invariably returned to duty, presenting
an example of constancy and devotion to the flag. (G.O. 32, April 18,
1864.)


JAMES DOUGHERTY.

Private, United States Marine Corps, on board of the U.S.S. _Benicia_;
attack on and capture of the Korean forts June 11, 1871, for seeking
out and killing the commanding officer of the Korean forces. (G.O. 169,
February 8, 1872.)


PATRICK DOUGHERTY.

Landsman on board of the U.S.S. _Lackawanna_; in the engagement in
Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864, took the place of the powder boy at his
gun, without orders, when the powder boy was disabled; kept up a
supply, and showed much zeal in his new capacity. (G.O. 45, December
31, 1864.)


HENRY DOW.

Boatswain's mate on board of the U.S.S. _Cincinnati_, in an attack on
the Vicksburg batteries, May 27, 1863; conspicuous for coolness and
bravery under a severely accurate fire. "This was no ordinary case of
performance of duty." (G.O. 17, July 10, 1863.)


LIEUT. NIELS DRUSTRUP, UNITED STATES NAVY.

For meritorious service under fire on the occasion of the landing of
the naval forces at Vera Cruz, Mexico, on April 21, 1914. For several
hours Drustrup was in charge of an advanced barricade under a heavy
fire, and not only displayed utmost ability as a leader of men but
exerted a great steadying influence on the men around him. Lieutenant
Drustrup was then attached to the U.S.S. _Utah_ as a chief turret
captain. (G.O. 131, July 17, 1924.)


FRANK DU MOULIN.

Apprentice on board of the U.S.S. _Sabine_. On the 5th of September,
1867, he jumped overboard and saved from drowning Apprentice D'Orsay,
who had fallen from the mizzen topmast rigging of the _Sabine_, in New
London Harbor, and was rendered helpless by striking the mizzen rigging
and boat davit in the fall. (G.O. 84, October --, 1867.)


ADAM DUNCAN.

Boatswain's mate on board of the U.S.S. _Richmond_, Mobile Bay, August
5, 1864; commended for coolness and good conduct as captain of a gun in
the action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of August 5, 1864.
He has been six years in the naval service; was on board the _Brooklyn_
in the actions with Forts Jackson and St. Philip and with the rebel
ironclads and gunboats below New Orleans; was in the action with the
Chalmette batteries; present at the surrender of New Orleans; and on
board the _Brooklyn_ in the attack upon the batteries below Vicksburg
in 1862. Joined the _Richmond_ in September, 1863. (G.O. 45, December
31, 1864.)


JAMES K. L. DUNCAN.

Ordinary seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Fort Hindman_. During the
engagement near Harrisonburg, La., March 2, 1864, a shell burst in the
muzzle of one of the guns of the vessel, setting fire to the tie of a
cartridge which had just been put in the gun. Duncan immediately seized
the burning cartridge, removed it from the gun, and threw it overboard.
(G.O. 32, April 16, 1864.)


WILLIAM DUNN.

Quartermaster on board of the U.S.S. _Monadnock_. In the several
attacks upon Fort Fisher, December 24 and 25, 1864, and January 13, 14,
and 15, 1865, he was stationed at the lead. His attention to duty was
constant, and his cheerfulness, coolness, and disdain of shelter
attracted the notice of all on deck. (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


RICHARD D. DUNPHY.

Coal heaver on board of the U.S.S. _Hartford_; lost both arms during
the engagement in Mobile Bay August 5, 1864.


AUSTIN J. DURNEY.

Blacksmith, serving on board the U.S.S. _Nashville_, for extraordinary
bravery and coolness while cutting the cables leading from Cienfuegos,
Cuba, May 11, 1898, under a heavy fire of the enemy. (G.O. 521, July 7,
1899.)


CAPT. JESSE F. DYER, UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS.

For distinguished conduct in battle, engagements of Vera Cruz, April 21
and 22, 1914; was in both days' fighting, at the head of his company,
and was eminent and conspicuous in his conduct, leading his men with
skill and courage. (G.O. 177, December 4, 1915.)


JOHN EDWARDS.

Captain of top on board of the U.S.S. _Lackawanna_; in the engagement
in Mobile Bay August 5, 1864; second captain of a gun; although
wounded, would not, when ordered, go below to the surgeon, but took the
place of the first captain during the remainder of the battle. (G.O.
45, December 31, 1864.)


LIEUT. COMMANDER WALTER ATLEE EDWARDS, UNITED STATES NAVY.

For heroism in rescuing 482 men, women, and children from the French
military transport _Vinh-Long_, destroyed by fire in the Sea of
Marmora, Turkey, on December 16, 1922. Lieut. Commander Edwards,
commanding the U.S.S. _Bainbridge_, placed his vessel alongside the bow
of the transport and, in spite of several violent explosions which
occurred on the burning vessel, maintained his ship in that position
until all who were alive were taken on board. Of a total of 495 on
board, 482 were rescued by his coolness, judgment, and professional
skill, which were combined with a degree of heroism that must reflect
new glory on the United States Navy. (Medal presented by President
Coolidge at the White House on February 2, 1924.) (G.O. No. 123,
February 4, 1924.)


JOHN EGLIT.

Seaman, serving on board the U.S.S. _Nashville_, for extraordinary
bravery and coolness while cutting the cables leading from Cienfuegos,
Cuba, May 11, 1898, under a heavy fire of the enemy. (G.O. 521, July 7,
1899.)


JOHN W. EHLE.

Fireman, first class, serving on board the U.S.S. _Concord_, for
especially brave and praiseworthy conduct in line of duty, assisting to
haul fires at the time of the blowing out of a lower manhole-plate
joint on boiler B on board that vessel off Cavite, Manila Bay, P.I.,
May 21, 1898. The atmosphere in which Ehle was obliged to work was very
hot and filled with vapor, necessitating the playing of water into the
fireroom from a hose. (G.O. 502, December 14, 1898.)


HENRY A. EILERS.

Gunner's mate, serving on board the U.S.S. _Philadelphia_; for
extraordinary heroism in the line of his profession on the occasion of
the sham attack on Fort McHenry, Baltimore, Md., September 17, 1892, in
remaining at his post in the magazine and stamping out the burning
particles of a prematurely exploded cartridge, which were blown down
the chute. (G.O. 404, November 22, 1892.)


SURG. MIDDLETON S. ELLIOTT, UNITED STATES NAVY.

For distinguished conduct in battle, engagements of Vera Cruz, April
21 and 22, 1914; was eminent and conspicuous in the efficient
establishment and operation of the base hospital and in his cool
judgment and courage in supervising first-aid stations on the firing
line and removing the wounded. (G.O. 177, December 4, 1915.)


WALTER ELMORE.

Landsman on board the U.S.S. _Gettysburg_; for jumping overboard and
saving from drowning Wallace Febrey, landsman, while that vessel was
under way at sea in latitude 36° 58´ N., longitude 3° 44´ E., on
October 1, 1878.


THOMAS ENGLISH.

Signal quartermaster on board of the U.S.S. _New Ironsides_; commended
for highly meritorious conduct during the several engagements with Fort
Fisher in December, 1864, and January, 1865. (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


JOHN ENRIGHT.

Landsman of the U.S.S. _Ranger_; for jumping overboard from that vessel
and rescuing from drowning John Bell, ordinary seaman, and George
Svensson, ordinary seaman, off Ensenada, Mexico, January 18, 1886.


JOHN P. ERICKSON.

Captain of forecastle on board of the U.S.S. _Pontoosuc_; commended for
gallantry, skill, and coolness in action during the operations in and
about Cape Fear River, which extended from December 24, 1864, to
January 22, 1865, and resulted in the capture of Fort Fisher and
Wilmington. Was severely wounded in the naval assault upon Fort Fisher.
(G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


NICK ERICKSON.

Coxswain, serving on board the U.S.S. _Marblehead_, for extraordinary
bravery and coolness while cutting the cables leading from Cienfuegos,
Cuba, May 11, 1898, under a heavy fire of the enemy. (G.O. 521, July 7,
1899.)


JOHN EVERETTS.

Gunner's mate, first class, serving on board the U.S.S. _Cushing_; for
gallant conduct in attempting to save the life of the late Ensign
Joseph C. Breckinridge, United States Navy, who fell overboard at sea
from that vessel on February 11, 1898. (G.O. 489, May 20, 1898.)


HARRY D. FADEN.

Coxswain, serving on board the U.S.S. _Adams_, for gallantry, rescuing
O. C. Hawthorne, landsman for training, from drowning at sea, June 30,
1903. (G.O. 138, July 31, 1903.)


WILLIAM FARLEY.

Boatswain's mate on board of the U.S.S. _Marblehead_, in the engagement
with the rebel batteries on Stono River, December 25, 1863;
distinguished for extraordinary energy and heroism in discharging his
duties as first captain of 9-inch gun, setting a noble example of
courage and devotion. (G.O. 32, April 16, 1864.)


EDWARD FARRELL.

Quartermaster on board of the U.S.S. _Owasco_, in the attack upon Forts
Jackson and St. Philip, April 24, 1862. "His intelligence, coolness,
and capacity were conspicuous." (G.O. 11, April 3, 1863.)


ISAAC L. FASSEUR.

Ordinary seaman of the U.S.S. _Lackawanna_; for rescuing from drowning
William Cruise, who had fallen overboard, June 13, 1884, at Callao,
Peru.


JOHN H. FERRELL.

Pilot on board the U.S. monitor _Neosho_. During the engagement at
Bells Mills, on the Cumberland River, near Nashville, Tenn., December
6, 1864, the flag and signal staffs of the _Neosho_ were shot away and
the flag lay drooping over the wheelhouse. Under the fire of the
enemy's artillery and musketry he went out on the pilot house,
recovered the flag, and tied it to the stump of the main signal staff,
the highest mast remaining. (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


OSCAR W. FIELD.

Private, United States Marine Corps, serving on board the U.S.S.
_Nashville_, for extraordinary bravery and coolness while cutting the
cables leading from Cienfuegos, Cuba, May 11, 1898, under a heavy fire
of the enemy. (G.O. 521, July 7, 1899.)


FREDERICK T. FISHER.

Gunner's mate, first class, serving on board the U.S.S. _Philadelphia_,
for distinguished conduct in the presence of the enemy at Samoa, April
1, 1899. (G.O. 55, July 19, 1901.)


HARRY FISHER.

Private, United States Marine Corps, for distinguished conduct in the
presence of the enemy at the Battle of Peking, China, June 20 to July
16, 1900. Fisher was killed while assisting to erect barricades under a
heavy fire. (G.O. 55, July 19, 1901.)


JOSEPH FITZ.

Ordinary seaman, serving on board the U.S.S. _Pampanga_, for bravery
and extraordinary heroism in the time of battle, Mount Dajo Jolo, P.I.,
March 8, 1906. (G.O. 19, May 1, 1906.)


JOHN FITZGERALD.

Private, United States Marine Corps, for heroism and gallantry in
action at Cuzco, Cuba, June 14, 1898. (G.O. 92, December 8, 1910.)


THOMAS FITZPATRICK.

Coxswain on board of the U.S.S. _Hartford_; in the engagement in Mobile
Bay, August 5, 1864. "His gun was almost disabled by the bursting of a
shell, which destroyed much of the material and killed seven men,
besides wounding several others, and among them himself.
Notwithstanding this, he had the killed and wounded quietly removed;
replaced the breeching, side tackle, and truck, etc. (which had been
cut to pieces), got a crew, and in a little while was firing the gun
again as usual." (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


JOHN FLANNAGAN.

Boatswain's mate on board the U.S.S. _Supply_; for rescuing from
drowning David Walsh, seaman, of Havre, France, October 26, 1878.


REAR ADMIRAL FRANK F. FLETCHER, UNITED STATES NAVY.

For distinguished conduct in battle, engagements of Vera Cruz, April 21
and 22, 1914; was under fire, eminent and conspicuous in the
performance of his duties; was senior officer present at Vera Cruz,
directing the landing and the operations of the landing force were
carried out under his orders and directions. In connection with these
operations he was at times on shore and under fire. (G.O. 177, December
4, 1915.)


LIEUT. FRANK J. FLETCHER, UNITED STATES NAVY.

For distinguished conduct in battle, engagements of Vera Cruz, April 21
and 22, 1914: was under fire, eminent and conspicuous in the
performance of his duties. He was in charge of the _Esperanza_ and
succeeded in getting on board over 350 refugees, many of them after the
conflict had commenced. This ship was under fire, being struck more
than 30 times, but he succeeded in getting all the refugees placed in
safety. Later he was placed in charge of the train conveying refugees
under a flag of truce. This was hazardous duty, as it was believed that
the track was mined, and a small error in dealing with the Mexican
guard of soldiers might readily have caused a conflict, such a conflict
at one time being narrowly averted. It was greatly due to his efforts
in establishing friendly relations with the Mexican soldiers that so
many refugees succeeded in reaching Vera Cruz from the interior. (G.O.
177, December 4, 1915.)


THOMAS FLOOD.

Boy on board of the U.S.S. _Pensacola_, in the attack upon Forts
Jackson and St. Philip, and at the taking of New Orleans, April 24 and
25, 1862. "Assisted very materially by taking the duties of the signal
quartermaster, who was shot down, which duties he performed with the
coolness, exactitude, and fidelity of a veteran seaman." "Can not speak
too warmly of Flood." "Intelligence and character of high order." (G.O.
11, April 3, 1863.)


EDWARD FLOYD.

Boilermaker, serving on board the U.S.S. _Iowa_, for extraordinary
heroism at the time of the blowing out of the manhole plate of boiler D
on board that vessel, January 25, 1905. (G.O. 182, March 20, 1905.)


ALEXANDER J. FOLEY.

Sergeant, United States Marine Corps, for distinguished conduct in the
presence of the enemy in battle near Tientsin, China, July 13, 1900.
(G.O. 55, July 19, 1901.)


ANDREW P. FORBECK.

Seaman, United States Navy, for distinguished conduct in the presence
of the enemy in battle, Katbalogan, Samar, P.I., July 16, 1900. (G.O.
55, July 19, 1901.)


PATRICK F. FORD, Jr.

(See James Meredith.)


BRUNO A. FORSTERER.

Sergeant, United States Marine Corps, for distinguished conduct in the
presence of the enemy at Samoa, April 1, 1899. (G.O. 55, July 19,
1901.)


ENSIGN PAUL F. FOSTER, UNITED STATES NAVY.

For distinguished conduct in battle, engagements of Vera Cruz, April 21
and 22, 1914; was in both days' fighting at the head of his company,
and was eminent and conspicuous in his conduct, leading his men with
skill and courage. (G.O. 177, December 4, 1915.)


CHRISTOPHER FOWLER.

Quartermaster on board of the U.S.S. _Fortune_; gallant conduct off
Point Zapotitlan, Mexico, May 11, 1874, on the occasion of the
capsizing of one of the boats of the _Fortune_ and the drowning of a
portion of the boat's crew.


CHARLES H. FOY.

Signal quartermaster on board of the U.S.S. _Rhode Island_; commended
for valuable services during the actions with Fort Fisher January 13 to
15, 1865, and for commendable qualities. (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


HERBERT L. FOSS.

Seaman, serving on board the U.S.S. _Marblehead_, for bravery and
coolness while cutting the cables leading from Cienfuegos, Cuba, May
11, 1898, under a heavy fire of the enemy. (G.O. 521, July 7, 1899.)


CHARLES R. FRANCIS.

Private, United States Marine Corps, for distinguished conduct in the
presence of the enemy in the advance on Tientsin, China, June 21, 1900.
(G.O. 55, July 19, 1901.)


FREDERICK FRANKLIN.

Quartermaster on board of the U.S.S. _Colorado_; assumed command of
Company D, after Lieutenant McKee was wounded, and handled it with
great credit until relieved during the attack and capture of the Korean
forts June 11, 1871. (G.O. 169, February 8, 1872.)


JOSEPH J. FRANKLIN.

Private, United States Marine Corps, serving on board the U.S.S.
_Nashville_, for extraordinary bravery and coolness while cutting the
cables leading from Cienfuegos, Cuba, May 11, 1898, under a heavy fire
of the enemy. (G.O. 521, July 7, 1899.)


WILLIAM J. FRANKS.

Seaman serving on board the U.S.S. _Marmora_; was sent on shore with a
crew to man a rifle howitzer which had been mounted on a field carriage
and posted in the streets of Yazoo City during the rebel attack on that
place, March 5, 1864. His defense of the gun against superior forces is
mentioned as most gallant, having nobly stood his ground through the
whole action, fighting hand to hand to save the gun and the reputation
of the Navy. Promoted to acting master's mate. (G.O. 32, April 16,
1864.)


ENSIGN HUGH C. FRAZER, UNITED STATES NAVY.

For extraordinary heroism in battle, engagement of Vera Cruz, April 22,
1914. Ran forward to rescue a wounded man, in which act he was so
exposed that the fire of his own men was temporarily suspended for fear
of hitting him. He returned at once to his position in line. (G.O. 177,
December 4, 1915.)


EMIL FREDERICKSEN.

Water tender, serving on board the U.S.S. _Bennington_, for
extraordinary heroism displayed at the time of the explosion of a
boiler of that vessel at San Diego, Calif., July 21, 1905. (G.O. 13,
January 5, 1906.)


MARTIN FREEMAN.

Pilot on board of the U.S.S. _Hartford_ in the engagement in Mobile Bay
August 5, 1864; was the great reliance of the commanding officer of the
_Hartford_ in all difficulties in his line of duty. During the action
he was in the maintop piloting the ships into the bay. Especially
commended to the department. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


J. B. FRISBEE.

Gunner's mate on board of the U.S.S. _Pinola_ in the attack upon Forts
Jackson and St. Philip April 24, 1862, and the taking of New Orleans.
"Berth deck being on fire, he instantly closed the magazine and
remained inside." (G.O. 11, April 3, 1863.)


ISAAC N. FRY.

Orderly sergeant, United States Marine Corps, U.S.S. _Ticonderoga_, in
the attacks on Fort Fisher January 13 to 15, 1865. "Commended for
coolness, good conduct, and skill as captain of a gun." (G.O. 59, June
22, 1865.)


CAPT. ELI T. FRYER, UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS.

For distinguished conduct in battle, engagements of Vera Cruz, April 21
and 22, 1914; was in both days' fighting at the head of his company and
was eminent and conspicuous in his conduct, leading his men with skill
and courage. (G.O. 177, December 4, 1915.)


LOUIS R. GAIENNIE.

Private, United States Marine Corps, for distinguished conduct in the
presence of the enemy at Peking, China, July 21 to August 17, 1900.
(G.O. 55, July 19, 1901.)


ROBERT GALBERT.

Apprentice, first class, United States Navy, for extraordinary heroism
and gallantry, while under fire of the enemy at El Pardo, Cebu, P.I.,
September 12 and 13, 1899. (G.O. 531, November 21, 1899.)


FRANK GALLAGHER.

(See Francis T. Ryan.)


WILLIAM GARDNER.

Seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Oneida_; in the engagement in Mobile
Bay, August 5, 1864, behaved so coolly under fire as to draw the
particular attention of the executive officer of the vessel. (G.O. 45,
December 31, 1864.)


JAMES R. GARRISON.

Coal heaver on board of the U.S.S. _Hartford_ in the engagement in
Mobile Bay August 5, 1864. Had one of his great toes shot off, but
without leaving his station at the shell whip bound up the wound and
remained at work until again severely wounded. (G.O. 45, December 31,
1864.)


WILLIAM GARVIN.

Captain of forecastle on board of the U.S.S. _Agawam_; one of the crew
of the powder boat which was exploded near Fort Fisher December 23,
1864, for which service he volunteered. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


PHILIP GAUGHAN.

Sergeant, United States Marine Corps, serving on board the U.S.S.
_Nashville_, for extraordinary bravery and coolness while cutting the
cables leading from Cienfuegos, Cuba, May 11, 1898, under a heavy fire
of the enemy. (G.O. 521, July 7, 1899.)


DANIEL G. GEORGE.

(See William Smith.)


MICHAEL GIBBONS.

Oiler, serving on board the U.S.S. _Nashville_, for extraordinary
bravery and coolness while cutting the cables leading from Cienfuegos,
Cuba, May 11, 1898, under a heavy fire of the enemy. (G.O. 521, July 7,
1899.)


CHARLES GIDDINGS.

Seaman of the U.S.S. _Plymouth_; for heroic conduct in trying to save
the life of one of the crew of that ship, who had fallen overboard from
aloft at the navy yard, New York, July 26, 1876. (G.O. 215, August 9,
1876.)


FRANK S. GILE.

Landsman on board the U.S.S. _Lehigh_, Charleston Harbor, November 16,
1863; for gallant behavior in passing lines between the _Lehigh_ and
_Nahant_ in an open boat while exposed to a heavy fire from the forts
in Charleston Harbor. Advanced in his rating. (G.O. 32, April 16,
1864.)


FREEMAN GILL.

Gunner's mate, first class, serving on board the U.S.S. _Marblehead_;
for extraordinary bravery and coolness while cutting the cables leading
from Cienfuegos, Cuba, May 11, 1898, under a heavy fire of the enemy.
(G.O. 55, July 19, 1901.)


MATTHEW GILLICK.

Boatswain's mate; for jumping overboard from the U.S.S. _Lancaster_
November 20, 1883, at Marseille, France, and rescuing from drowning a
French lad who had fallen into the sea from a stone pier astern of the
ship. (G.O. 326, October 18, 1884.)


ALPHONSE GIRANDY.

Seaman, serving on board the U.S.S. _Petrel_; for heroism and
gallantry, fearlessly exposing his own life to danger for the saving of
others, on the occasion of the fire on board said vessel March 31,
1901. (G.O. 85, March 22, 1902.)


EDWARD A. GISBURNE.

Electrician, third class, on board the U.S.S. _Florida_; for
extraordinary heroism in the line of his profession during the seizure
of Vera Cruz, Mexico, April 21 and 22, 1914. (G.O. 101, June 15, 1914.)


JOSEPH A. GLOWIN.

Corporal, United States Marine Corps; for extraordinary heroism in the
line of his profession and for eminent and conspicuous courage in the
presence of the enemy at the action at Guayacanes, Dominican Republic,
July 3, 1916. (G.O. 244, October 30, 1916.)


WILLIAM H. GOWAN.

Boatswain's mate, second class, United States Navy, for bravery and
extraordinary heroism displayed by him during a conflagration in
Coquimbo, Chile, January 20, 1909. (G.O. 18, March 19, 1909.)


H. P. GRACE.

Chief quartermaster on board of the U.S.S. _Benicia_; gallant and
meritorious conduct in the attack on the Korean forts June 10 and 11,
1871.


LIEUT. JOHN GRADY, UNITED STATES NAVY.

For distinguished conduct in battle, engagement of Vera Cruz, April 22,
1914; during the second day's fighting the service performed by him was
eminent and conspicuous. He was in command of the Second Regiment,
Artillery; from necessarily exposed positions shelled the enemy from
their strongest position. (G.O. 177, December 4, 1915.)


ROBERT GRAHAM.

Landsman on board of the U.S.S. _Tacony_. At the capture of Plymouth,
October 31, 1864, he landed and spiked a loaded 9-inch gun under a
sharp fire of musketry. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


ORA GRAVES.

Seaman, United States Navy; displayed extraordinary heroism on July 23,
1917, while the U.S.S. _Pittsburgh_ was proceeding to Buenos Aires,
Argentine. A 3-inch saluting charge exploded, causing the death of C.
T. Lyles, seaman. Upon the explosion Graves was blown to the deck, but
soon recovered and discovered burning waste on the deck. He put out the
burning waste while the casemate was filled with clouds of smoke,
knowing that there was more powder there which might explode. (G.O. No.
366, February 11, 1918.)


RADE GRBITCH.

Seaman, serving on board the U.S.S. _Bennington_, for extraordinary
heroism displayed at the time of the explosion of a boiler of that
vessel at San Diego, Calif., July 21, 1905. (G.O. 13, January 5, 1906.)


JOHN GREENE.

Captain of forecastle; captain of gun on board of the U.S.S. _Varuna_
in the attack upon Forts Jackson and St. Philip April 24, 1862;
mentioned as having done his "duty through the thickest of the fight
with great coolness and danger to the enemy." (G.O. 11, April 3, 1863.)


JOHN GRIFFITHS.

Captain of forecastle, belonging to the U.S.S. _Santiago de Cuba_; was
one of the boat's crew detailed for General Terry. This boat's crew
were represented to have been the only men who entered Fort Fisher in
the assault from the fleet January 15, 1865. (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


LUKE M. GRISWOLD.

Ordinary seaman; was one of the crew of the first cutter of the U.S.S.
_Rhode Island_ on the night of December 30, 1862, which was engaged in
saving the lives of the officers and crew of the _Monitor_. The crew
had saved quite a number, and, owing to their gallantry and zeal in the
desire to save others, they became separated from the _Rhode Island_
and were adrift for several hours. (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


SAMUEL GROSS.

Private, United States Marine Corps. "On November 17, 1915, it was
planned to attack Fort Riviere, Haiti, with a force made up of
detachments from the Fifth, Thirteenth, Twenty-third Companies, and the
marine detachment and sailors from the _Connecticut_. Fort Riviere was
an old French bastion fort, about 200 feet on the side, with thick
walls of brick and stone, the walls being loopholed. The original
entrance had been on the northern side, but had been blocked, a small
breach in the southern wall being used in its stead. As this breach in
the wall was the only entrance to the fort, it was naturally covered by
the defenders on the inside, making passage through it into the fort a
most hazardous undertaking for the leading men. Notwithstanding the
fact that the fire of the Cacos was constantly passing through this
hole in the wall, Sergt. Ross L. Iams, Fifth Company, unhesitatingly
jumped through, closely followed by Pvt. Samuel Gross, of the
Twenty-third Company. A mêlée then ensued inside of the fort for about
10 minutes, the Cacos fighting desperately with rifles, clubs, stones,
etc., during which several jumped from the walls in an effort to
escape, but were shot by the automatic guns of the Fifth Company and by
the Thirteenth Company advancing to the attack."


EDMUND HAFFEE.

Quarter gunner on board of the U.S.S. _New Ironsides_; commended for
highly meritorious conduct during the several engagements with Fort
Fisher in December, 1864, and January, 1865. (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


JAMES HALEY.

Captain of forecastle on board of the U.S.S. _Kearsarge_ when she
destroyed the _Alabama_ off Cherbourg, France, June 19, 1864;
"exhibited marked coolness and good conduct, and is highly commended by
the divisional officer." (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


WILLIAM HALFORD.

Coxswain on board of the U.S.S. _Saginaw_; sole survivor of the boat's
crew sent to the Sandwich Islands for assistance after the wreck of the
_Saginaw_, October, 1870. Promoted to acting gunner. (G.O. 169,
February 8, 1872.)


LUOVI HALLING.

Boatswain's mate, first class, serving on board the U.S.S. _Missouri_;
for heroism in attempting to rescue from drowning Cecil C. Young,
ordinary seaman, September 15, 1904. (G.O. 172, October 4, 1904.)


WILLIAM HALSTEAD.

Coxswain on board of the U.S.S. _Brooklyn_ in the engagement in Mobile
Bay August 5, 1864; "coolness, bravery, and skill in the working of his
gun. His conduct was particularly meritorious." (G.O. 45, December 31,
1864.)


MARK G. HAM.

Carpenter's mate on board of the U.S.S. _Kearsarge_ when she destroyed
the _Alabama_ off Cherbourg, France, June 19, 1864; "exhibited marked
coolness and good conduct, and is highly commended by his divisional
officer." (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


WILLIAM F. HAMBERGER.

Chief carpenter's mate, United States Navy, for distinguished conduct
in the presence of the enemy in battles on the 13th, 20th, 21st, and
22d of June, 1900, while with the relief expedition of the allied
forces in China. (G.O. 55, July 19, 1901.)


HUGH HAMILTON.

Coxswain on board of the U.S.S. _Richmond_, Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864;
commended for coolness and good conduct in the action in Mobile Bay on
the morning and forenoon of August 5, 1864. Was in the actions with
Forts Jackson and St. Philip, the Chalmettes, the rebel ironclads and
gunboats below New Orleans, the batteries below Vicksburg; present at
the surrender of New Orleans. Joined the _Richmond_ in October, 1863.
(G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


RICHARD HAMILTON.

Coal heaver on board of the U.S. picket boat _No. 1_, which destroyed
the rebel ram _Albemarle_ at Plymouth, N.C., October 27, 1864. (G.O.
45, December 31, 1864.)


THOMAS W. HAMILTON.

Quartermaster on board of the U.S.S. _Cincinnati_ in the attack on the
Vicksburg batteries May 27, 1863; "was severely wounded at the wheel,
but afterwards returned to lend a hand, and had to be sent below."
(G.O. 17, July 10, 1863.)


ENSIGN CHARLES H. HAMMANN, UNITED STATES NAVAL RESERVE FORCE.

"For extraordinary heroism as a pilot of a seaplane on August 21, 1919,
when with three other planes he took part in a patrol for dropping
propaganda on Pola. They encountered and attacked a superior force of
enemy land planes, and in the course of the engagement which followed
the plane of Ensign George M. Ludlow was shot down and fell in the
water 5 miles off Pola. Ensign Hammann immediately dived down and
landed on the water close alongside the disabled machine, where he took
Ludlow on board and, although his machine was not designed for the
double load to which it was subjected, and although there was danger of
attack by Austrian planes, made his way to Porto Corsini." (Act of
February 4, 1919.)


ALEXANDER HAND.

Quartermaster on board of the U.S.S. _Ceres_ in the fight near
Hamilton, up the Roanoke River, July 9, 1862; spoken of for "good
conduct and soul bravery." (G.O. 11, April 3, 1863.)


JOHN HANDRAN.

Seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Franklin_; gallant conduct in jumping
overboard from the _Franklin_ at Lisbon, Portugal, and rescuing from
drowning one of the crew of that vessel on the 9th of January, 1876.
(G.O. 206, February 15, 1876.)


BURKE HANFORD.

Machinist, first class, United States Navy, for distinguished conduct
in the presence of the enemy in battles on the 13th, 20th, 21st, and
22d of June, 1900, while with the relief expedition of the allied
forces in China. (G.O. 55, July 19, 1901.)


SECOND LIEUT. HERMAN HENRY HANNEKEN, UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS.

"For extraordinary heroism and conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in
actual conflict with the enemy near Grande Riviere, Republic of Haiti,
on the night of October 31-November 1, 1919, resulting in the death of
Charlemagne Peralte, the supreme bandit chief in the Republic of Haiti,
and the killing and capture and dispersal of about 1,200 of his outlaw
followers. Second Lieut. Hanneken not only distinguished himself by his
excellent judgment and leadership but unhesitatingly exposed himself to
great personal danger, and the slightest error would have forfeited not
only his life but the lives of the detachments of gendarmerie under his
command. The successful termination of his mission will undoubtedly
prove of untold value to the Republic of Haiti." (G.O. No. 536, June
10, 1920.)


HANS A. HANSEN.

Seaman, United States Navy, for distinguished conduct in the presence
of the enemy in battles on the 13th, 20th, 21st, and 22d of June, 1900,
while with the relief expedition of the allied forces in China. (G.O.
55, June 19, 1901.)


THOMAS HARCOURT.

Ordinary seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Minnesota_; especially
commended for bravery in the assault on Fort Fisher January 15, 1865,
remaining at the front near the fort when the panic carried the mass
away. (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


THOMAS HARDING.

Captain of forecastle, on board of the U.S.S. _Dacotah_, on the
occasion of the destruction of the blockade runner _Pevensey_, near
Beaufort, N.C., June 9, 1864. "Learning that one of the officers in the
boat, which was in danger of being and subsequently was swamped, could
not swim, Harding remarked to him: 'If we are swamped, sir, I shall
carry you to the beach or I will never go there myself.' He did not
succeed in carrying out his promise, but made desperate efforts to do
so, while others thought of themselves only. Such conduct is worthy of
appreciation and admiration--a sailor risking his own life to save that
of an officer." Promoted to acting master's mate. (G.O. 45, December
31, 1864.)


BERNARD HARLEY.

Ordinary seaman on board of the U.S. picket boat _No. 1_, which
destroyed the rebel ram _Albemarle_ at Plymouth, N.C., October 27,
1864. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


JOSEPH G. HARNER.

Boatswain's mate, second class, on board of the U.S.S. _Florida_; for
extraordinary heroism in the line of his profession during the seizure
of Vera Cruz, Mexico, April 21, 1914. (G.O. 101, June 15, 1914.)


DANIEL HARRINGTON.

Landsman on board of the U.S.S. _Pocahontas_; landing in a boat near
Brunswick, Ga., March 11, 1862, and when fired upon by the enemy,
concealed, exhibited great coolness and bravery. Promoted to acting
master's mate. (G.O. 11, April 3, 1863.)


DAVID HARRINGTON.

First-class fireman on board the U.S.S. _Tallapoosa_; at the time of
the sinking of that vessel, on the night of August 21, 1884, remained
at his post of duty in the fireroom until the fires were put out by the
rising waters, and opened the safety valves when the water was up to
his waist. (G.O. 326, October 18, 1884.)


JOHN HARRIS.

Captain of forecastle on board the U.S.S. _Metacomet_; was one of the
boat's crew which, in charge of Acting Ensign H. C. Neilds, United
States Navy, went to the rescue of the officers and crew of the U.S.
monitor _Tecumseh_ when that vessel was sunk by a torpedo in passing
the forts in Mobile Bay August 5, 1864. This boat's crew, under their
brave and gallant leader, went within a few hundred yards of the forts
under a fire which Admiral Farragut expressed as "one of the most
galling" he ever saw, and succeeded in rescuing from death 10 of the
crew of the _Tecumseh_. Their conduct elicited the admiration of both
friend and foe. (G.O. 71, January 15, 1866.)


BOLDON R. HARRISON.

Seaman, United States Navy, for extraordinary heroism in the line of
his profession while operating against outlaws on the island of
Basilan, P.I., September 24, 1911. (G.O. 138, December 13, 1911.)


GEORGE H. HARRISON.

Seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Kearsarge_ when she destroyed the
_Alabama_ off Cherbourg, France, June 19, 1864; "exhibited marked
coolness and good conduct, and is highly commended by his divisional
officer." (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


COMMANDER WILLIAM K. HARRISON, UNITED STATES NAVY.

For distinguished conduct in battle, engagements of Vera Cruz, April 21
and 22, 1914: Brought his ship into the inner harbor during the nights
of the 21st and 22d without the assistance of a pilot or navigational
lights, and was in a position on the morning of the 22d to use his guns
with telling effect at a critical time. (G.O. 177, December 4, 1915.)


WILLIAM HART.

Machinist, first class, serving on board the U.S.S. _Marblehead_, for
extraordinary bravery and coolness while cutting the cables leading
from Cienfuegos, Cuba, May 11, 1898, under a heavy fire of the enemy.
(G.O. 521, July 7, 1899.)


LIEUT. CHARLES C. HARTIGAN, UNITED STATES NAVY.

For distinguished conduct in battle, engagement of Vera Cruz, April 22,
1914: During the second day's fighting the service performed by him was
eminent and conspicuous. He was conspicuous for the skillful handling
of his company under heavy rifle and machine-gun fire, for which
conduct he was commended by his battalion commander. (G.O. 177,
December 4, 1915.)


HARRY HARVEY.

Sergeant, United States Marine Corps, for distinguished conduct in the
presence of the enemy in battle, Benictican, February 16, 1900. (G.O.
55, July 19, 1901.)


EDWARD W. HATHAWAY.

Seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Sciota_; lost an arm before Vicksburg
February 28, 1862.


CHARLES HAWKINS.

Seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Agawam_; one of the crew of the powder
boat which was exploded near Fort Fisher December 23, 1864, for which
service he volunteered. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


CYRUS HAYDEN.

Carpenter on board of the U.S.S. _Colorado_, color bearer of the
battalion; for planting his flag on the ramparts of the citadel and
protecting it under a heavy fire from the enemy during the attack and
capture of the Korean forts June 11, 1871. (G.O. 169, February 8,
1872.)


DAVID E. HAYDEN.

Hospital apprentice, first class, United States Navy. "For gallantry
and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of
duty in action at Thiaucourt, September 15, 1918, with the Second
Battalion, Sixth Regiment United States Marines. During the advance,
when Corporal Creed was mortally wounded, while crossing an open field
swept by machine-gun fire, without hesitating, Hayden ran to his
assistance and, finding him so severely wounded as to require immediate
attention and disregarding personal safety, dressed the wound under
intense machine-gun fire and then carried the wounded man back to a
place of safety." (Act of February 4, 1919.)


JOHN HAYDEN.

Apprentice on board the U.S. training ship _Saratoga_. On the morning
of July 15, 1879, while the _Saratoga_ was anchored off the Battery, in
New York Harbor, R. L. Robey, apprentice, fell overboard. As the tide
was running strong ebb and not being an expert swimmer, he was in
danger of drowning. David M. Buchanan, apprentice, instantly, without
removing any of his clothing, jumped after him. John Hayden stripped
himself and stood coolly watching the two in the water, and when he
thought his services were required made a dive from the rail and came
up alongside of them and rendered assistance until all three were
picked up by a boat from the ship. (G.O. 246, July 22, 1879.)


JOSEPH B. HAYDEN.

Quartermaster on board of the U.S.S. _Ticonderoga_ in the attacks on
Fort Fisher January 13 to 15, 1865; commended for coolness and close
attention to duty in steering the ship into action. (G.O. 59, June 22,
1865.)


JOHN HAYES.

Coxswain on board the U.S.S. _Kearsarge_ when she destroyed the
_Alabama_ off Cherbourg, France, June 19, 1864; "exhibited marked
coolness and good conduct, and is highly commended by his divisional
officer." (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


THOMAS HAYES.

Coxswain on board the U.S.S. _Richmond_, Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864;
commended for coolness and good conduct as captain of No. 1 gun in the
action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of August 5, 1864. He
was on board the _Brooklyn_ in the actions with Forts Jackson and St.
Philip and the ironclads and gunboats below New Orleans, with the
Chalmette batteries, batteries below Vicksburg, and was present at the
surrender of New Orleans. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


WILLIAM HEISCH.

Private, United States Marine Corps, for bravery in crossing the river
at Tientsin June 20, 1900, in a small boat with three other men under a
heavy fire and assisting to destroy buildings occupied by the enemy.
(G.O. 84, March 22, 1902.)


J. H. HELMS.

Sergeant, United States Marine Corps, serving on board the U.S.S.
_Chicago_, for heroism rescuing Ishi Tomizi, ship's cook, from drowning
at Montevideo, Uruguay, January 10, 1901. (G.O. 35, March 23, 1901.)


GEORGE F. HENRECHON.

Machinist's mate, second class, United States Navy, for extraordinary
heroism in the line of his profession while operating against outlaws
on the island of Basilan, P.I., September 24, 1911. (G.O. 138, December
13, 1911.)


HENRY HENRICKSON.

Seaman, serving on board the U.S.S. _Marblehead_, for extraordinary
bravery and coolness while cutting the cables leading from Cienfuegos,
Cuba, May 11, 1898, under a heavy fire of the enemy. (G.O. 521, July 7,
1899.)


JOHN HICKMAN.

Second-class fireman on board the U.S.S. _Richmond_ in the attack on
the Port Hudson batteries March 14, 1863. "When the fireroom and other
parts of the ship were filled with hot steam from injury to the boiler
by a shot, he from the first moment of the casualty stood firmly at his
post, and was conspicuous in his exertions to remedy the evil by
hauling the fires from the injured boiler, the heat being so great from
the combined effects of fire and steam that he was compelled from mere
exhaustion to be relieved every few minutes until the work was
accomplished." (G.O. 17, July 10, 1863.)


FRANK HILL.

Private, United States Marine Corps, serving on board the U.S.S.
_Nashville_, for extraordinary bravery and coolness while cutting the
cables leading from Cienfuegos, Cuba, May 11, 1898, under a heavy fire
of the enemy. (G.O. 521, July 7, 1899.)


FRANK E. HILL.

Ship's cook, first class, serving on board the U.S.S. _Bennington_, for
extraordinary heroism displayed at the time of the explosion of a
boiler of that vessel at San Diego, Calif., July 21, 1905. (G.O. 13,
January 5, 1906.)


JOHN HILL.

Chief quarter gunner on board of the U.S.S. _Kansas_; displayed great
coolness and self-possession at the time Commander A. F. Crosman and
others were drowned, near Greytown, Nicaragua, April 12, 1872, and by
extraordinary heroism and personal exertion prevented greater loss of
life. (G.O. 176, July 9, 1872.)


CAPT. WALTER N. HILL, UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS.

For distinguished conduct in battle, engagements of Vera Cruz, April 21
and 22, 1914; was in both days' fighting at the head of his company,
and was eminent and conspicuous in his conduct, leading his men with
skill and courage. (G.O. 177, December 4, 1915.)


WILLIAM L. HILL.

Captain of top; for jumping overboard from the U.S. training ship
_Minnesota_ at Newport, R.I., June 22, 1881, and sustaining, until
picked up by a steam launch, William Mulcahy, third-class boy, who had
fallen overboard. (G.O. 326, October 18, 1884.)


WILLIAM HINNEGAN.

Second-class fireman on board the U.S.S. _Agawam_; one of the crew of
the powder boat which was exploded near Fort Fisher December 23, 1864,
for which service he volunteered. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


GEORGE HOLLAT.

Third-class boy on board of the U.S.S. _Varuna_ in the attack upon
Forts Jackson and St. Philip April 24, 1862; mentioned as deserving
"great praise." (G.O. 11, April 8, 1863.)


GEORGE HOLT.

Quarter gunner on board of the U.S.S. _Plymouth_, who, at the imminent
risk of his life, jumped overboard in the harbor of Hamburg July 3,
1871, when a 4-knot tide was running, and, with a comrade, saved from
drowning one of a party who was thrown out of a shore boat coming
alongside the ship. (G.O. 180, October 10, 1872.)


AUGUST HOLTZ.

Chief water tender on board the U.S.S. _North Dakota_; for
extraordinary heroism in the line of his profession during the fire on
board of that vessel September 8, 1910. (G.O. 83, October 4, 1910.)


WILLIAM E. HOLYOKE.

Boatswain's mate, first class, United Slates Navy, for distinguished
conduct in the presence of the enemy in battles on the 13th, 20th,
21st, and 22d of June, 1900, while with the relief expedition of the
allied forces in China. (G.O. 55, July 19, 1901.)


THOMAS HOBAN.

Coxswain, serving on board the U.S.S. _Nashville_, for extraordinary
bravery and coolness while cutting the cables leading from Cienfuegos,
Cuba, May 11, 1898, under a heavy fire of the enemy. (G.O. 521, July 7,
1899.)


JAMES HORTON.

Gunner's mate on board the U.S.S. _Montauk_. During the night of
September 21, 1864, fire was discovered in the magazine lightroom of
that vessel. The alarm created a panic and demoralized the crew, with
the exception of Horton and a first-class fireman named John Rountry.
Horton rushed into the cabin, obtained the magazine keys, sprang into
the lightroom, and began passing out combustibles, including the box of
signals in which the fire originated. Rountry, with hose in hand,
notwithstanding the cry of "Fire in the magazine!" forced his way
through the frightened crowd to the lightroom and put out the flames.
(G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


JAMES HORTON.

Captain of top; for courageous conduct in going over the stern of the
U.S.S. _Constitution_, at sea, February 13, 1879, during a heavy gale
and cutting the fastenings of the ship's rudder chains. (G.O. 326,
October 18, 1884.)


LEWIS A. HORTON.

Seaman; was one of the crew of the first cutter of the U.S.S. _Rhode
Island_, on the night of December 30, 1862, which was engaged in saving
the lives of the officers and crew of the _Monitor_. They had saved a
number, and it was owing to their gallantry and zeal in the desire to
save others that they became separated from the _Rhode Island_ and were
adrift for some hours. (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


WILLIAM C. HORTON.

Private, United States Marine Corps, for distinguished conduct in the
presence of the enemy at Peking, China, July 21 to August 17, 1900.
Horton assisted to erect barricades under a heavy fire. (G.O. 55, July
19, 1901.)


EDWARD J. HOUGHTON.

Ordinary seaman on board of the U.S. picket boat _No. 1_, which
destroyed the rebel ram _Albemarle_ at Plymouth, N.C., October 27,
1864. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


MARTIN HOWARD.

Landsman on board of the U.S.S. _Tacony_. At the capture of Plymouth,
October 31, 1864, he landed and spiked a loaded 9-inch gun under a
sharp fire of musketry. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


PETER HOWARD.

Boatswain's mate on board of the U.S.S. _Mississippi_, in the attack on
the Port Hudson batteries, night of March 14, 1863; commended for zeal
and courage displayed in the performance of unusual and trying service
while the vessel was aground and exposed to a heavy fire. Promoted to
acting master's mate. (G.O. 17, July 19, 1863.)


MICHAEL HUDSON.

Sergeant, United States Marine Corps, on board of the U.S.S.
_Brooklyn_, in the engagement in Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864;
conspicuous good conduct at his gun. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


CAPT. JOHN A. HUGHES, UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS.

For distinguished conduct in battle, engagements of Vera Cruz, April 21
and 22, 1914; was in both days' fighting at the head of his company,
and was eminent and conspicuous in his conduct, leading his men with
skill and courage. (G.O. 177, December 4, 1915.)


HENRY L. HURLBERT.

Private, United States Marine Corps, for distinguished conduct in the
presence of the enemy at Samoa, April 1, 1899. (G.O. 55, July 19,
1901.)


JAMES L. HULL.

Fireman, first class, serving on board the U.S.S. _Concord_, for
especially brave and praiseworthy conduct in line of duty, assisting to
haul fires at the time of the blowing out of a lower manhole plate
joint on boiler B on board that vessel off Cavite, Manila Bay, P.I.,
May 21, 1898. The atmosphere in which Hull was obliged to work was very
hot and filled with vapor, necessitating the playing of water into the
fireroom from a hose. (G.O. 502, December 14, 1898.)


MARTIN HUNT.

Private, United States Marine Corps, for distinguished conduct in the
presence of the enemy at the battle of Peking, China, June 20 to July
16, 1900. (G.O. 55, July 19, 1901.)


CAPT. HARRY McL. P. HUSE, UNITED STATES NAVY.

For distinguished conduct in battle, engagements of Vera Cruz, April 21
and 22, 1914; was under fire, eminent and conspicuous in the
performance of his duties; was indefatigable in his labors of a most
important character, both with the division commander in directing
affairs and in his efforts on shore to get in communication with the
Mexican authorities to avoid needlessly prolonging the conflict. (G.O.
177, December 4, 1915.)


MICHAEL HUSKEY.

Fireman on board of the U.S.S. _Carondelet_, Deer Creek expedition,
March, 1863; gallantry in volunteering to aid in the rescue of the tug
_Ivy_, under fire of the enemy, and for general meritorious conduct.
(G.O. 32, April 16, 1864.)


JOHN HYLAND.

Seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Signal_, which vessel was attacked by
field batteries and sharpshooters, and destroyed in Red River, May 5,
1864. He displayed great bravery in assisting the officers to slip the
cable, in full view and range of several hundred sharpshooters, on
which occasion he was disabled by a second wound. (G.O. 45, December
31, 1864.)


ROSS L. IAMS.

Sergeant, United States Marine Corps. "On November 17, 1915, it was
planned to attack Fort Riviere, Haiti, with a force made up of
detachments from the Fifth, Thirteenth, Twenty-third Companies, and the
marine detachment and sailors from the _Connecticut_. Fort Riviere was
an old French bastion fort, about 200 feet on the side, with thick
walls of brick and stone, the walls being loopholed. The original
entrance had been on the northern side, but had been blocked, a small
breach in the southern wall being used in its stead. As this breach in
the wall was the only entrance to the fort it was naturally covered by
the defenders on the inside, making passage through it into the fort a
most hazardous undertaking for the leading men. Notwithstanding the
fact that the fire of the Cacos was constantly passing through this
hole in the wall, Sergt. Ross L. Iams, Fifth Company, unhesitatingly
jumped through, closely followed by Pvt. Samuel Gross of the
Twenty-third Company. A mêlée then ensued inside of the fort for about
10 minutes, the Cacos fighting desperately with rifles, clubs, stones,
etc., during which several jumped from the walls in an effort to
escape, but were shot by the automatic guns of the Fifth Company and by
the Thirteenth Company advancing to the attack."


LIEUT. (JUNIOR GRADE) JONAS H. INGRAM, UNITED STATES NAVY.

For distinguished conduct in battle, engagement of Vera Cruz, April 22,
1914. During the second day's fighting the service performed by him was
eminent and conspicuous. He was conspicuous for skillful and efficient
handling of the artillery and machine guns of the _Arkansas_ Battalion,
for which he was specially commended in reports. (G.O. 177, December 4,
1915.)


OSMOND K. INGRAM.

Gunner's mate, first class, United States Navy. "For extraordinary
heroism in the presence of the enemy on the occasion of the torpedoing
of the _Cassin_, on October 15, 1917. While the _Cassin_ was searching
for the submarine, Ingram sighted the torpedo coming, and realizing
that it might strike the ship aft in the vicinity of the depth charges,
he ran aft with the intention of releasing the depth charges before the
torpedo could reach the _Cassin_. The torpedo struck the ship before he
could accomplish his purpose and Ingram was killed by the explosion.
The depth charges exploded immediately afterward. His life was
sacrificed in an attempt to save the ship and his shipmates, as the
damage to the ship would have been much less if he had been able to
release the depth charges." (Act of February 4, 1919.)


JOSEPH IRLAM.

Seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Brooklyn_, in the engagement in Mobile
Bay, August 5, 1864; stationed at the wheel; behaved with great
coolness and bravery, sending the other two men who were stationed with
him to replace men disabled at the guns. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


JOHN IRVING.

Coxswain on board of the U.S.S. _Brooklyn_, in the engagement in Mobile
Bay, August 5, 1864; very conspicuous for bravery, skill, coolness, and
activity at his gun. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


THOMAS IRVING.

Coxswain belonging to the U.S.S. _Lehigh_, Charleston Harbor, November
16, 1863, distinguished for promptness in manning and rowing an open
boat engaged in carrying lines between the _Lehigh_ and _Nahant_, while
the shot and shell from cannon and mortars were flying and breaking all
around. Promoted to acting master's mate. (G.O. 32, April 16, 1864.)


NICHOLAS IRWIN.

Seaman on board the U.S.S. _Brooklyn_ in the engagement in Mobile Bay,
August 5, 1864; very conspicuous for bravery, skill, coolness, and
activity at his gun. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


LIEUT. EDOUARD V. M. ISAACS, UNITED STATES NAVY.

"When the U.S.S. _President Lincoln_ was attacked and sunk by the
German submarine _U-90_, on May 21, 1918, Lieutenant Isaacs was
captured and held as a prisoner on board the _U-90_ until the return of
the submarine to Germany, when he was confined in the prison camp.
During his stay on the _U-90_ he obtained information of the movements
of German submarines which was so important that he determined to
escape, with a view to making this information available to the United
States and allied naval authorities. In attempting to carry out this
plan he jumped through the window of a rapidly moving train, at the
imminent risk of death, not only from the nature of the act itself but
from the fire of the armed German soldiers who were guarding him.
Having been recaptured and reconfined, he made a second and successful
attempt to escape, breaking his way through barbed-wire fences and
deliberately drawing the fire of the armed guards in the hope of
permitting others to escape during the confusion. He made his way
through the mountains of southwestern Germany, having only raw
vegetables for food, and at the end swam the River Rhine during the
night in the immediate vicinity of German sentries." (Act of February
4, 1919.)


FRANZ ANTON ITRICH.

Chief carpenter's mate, serving on board the U.S.S. _Petrel_, for
heroism in the presence of the enemy, Manila, P.I., May 1, 1898. (G.O.
13, December 5, 1900.)


JOHN JACKSON.

Ordinary seaman on board the U.S.S. _C. P. Williams_, Stono Inlet,
August 16, 1863; was stationed on the forecastle lookout, and
discovered two torpedoes floating down so as to cross the bow of the
vessel; seized a boat hook, jumped on the bobstays, and carefully
guided the torpedoes down with the tide. Subsequently he volunteered to
remove the caps, which he did with skill and courage. (G.O. 32, April
16, 1864.)


WILLIAM H. JAEGER.

Apprentice, first class, United States Navy, for distinguished conduct
in the presence of the enemy, Katbalogan, Samar, P.I., July 16, 1900.
(G.O. 55, July 19, 1901.)


JOHN H. JAMES.

Captain of top on board of the U.S.S. _Richmond_, Mobile Bay, August 5,
1864, commended for coolness and good conduct as captain of a gun in
the action in Mobile Bay, on the morning and forenoon of August 5,
1864. He came off the sick list at the commencement of the action, went
to his quarters, and fought his gun well during the entire action. He
was in the actions with Forts Jackson and St. Philip, the rebel
ironclads and gunboats below New Orleans, the Chalmettes, the batteries
below Vicksburg, and present at the surrender of New Orleans. Joined
the _Richmond_ September, 1863. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


ERNEST AUGUST JANSON.

Gunnery sergeant, United States Marine Corps. "For conspicuous
gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty in action
with the enemy near Chateau-Thierry, France, June 6, 1918. Immediately
after the company to which he belonged had reached its objective on
Hill 142, several hostile counterattacks were launched against the line
before the new position had been consolidated. Gunnery Sergeant Janson
was attempting to organize a position on the north slope of the hill
when he saw 12 of the enemy, armed with five light machine guns,
crawling toward his group. Giving the alarm, he rushed the hostile
detachment, bayonetted the two leaders, and forced the others to flee,
abandoning their guns. His quick action, initiative, and courage drove
the enemy from a position from which they could have swept the hill
with machine-gun fire and forced the withdrawal of our troops." (Act of
February 4, 1919.)


ALEXANDER JARDINE.

Fireman, first class, serving on board the U.S.S. _Potomac_, for
extraordinary bravery in line of duty, volunteering to enter the
fireroom filled with live steam and open the auxiliary valve at the
time of the accident to the forward boiler of that vessel en route from
Cat Island to Nassau on the night of November 14, 1898. After repeated
attempts, enveloped from head to feet in wet blankets and wet towels
over his face, he succeeded in getting the valve open and thus
relieving the vessel of all further danger. (G.O. 503, December 13,
1898.)


BERRIE H. JARRETT.

Seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Florida_; for extraordinary heroism in
the line of his profession during the seizure of Vera Cruz, Mexico,
April 21, 1914. (G.O. 116, August 19, 1914.)


THOMAS JENKINS.

Seaman on board the U.S.S. _Cincinnati_, in an attack on the Vicksburg
batteries May 27, 1863, conspicuous for coolness and bravery under a
severely accurate fire. "This was no ordinary case of performance of
duty." (G.O. 17, July 10, 1863.)


JOHN P. JOHANSON.

Seaman, serving on board the U.S.S. _Marblehead_, for heroism and
gallantry under fire of the enemy, while cutting cables at Cienfuegos,
Cuba, May 11, 1898. (G.O. 529, November 2, 1899.)


JOHAN J. JOHANSSON.

Ordinary seaman, serving on board the U.S.S. _Nashville_, for
extraordinary bravery and coolness while cutting the cables leading
from Cienfuegos, Cuba, May 11, 1898, under a heavy fire of the enemy.
(G.O. 521, July 7, 1899.)


JOHANNES J. JOHANNESSEN.

Chief water tender, serving on board the U.S.S. _Iowa_, for
extraordinary heroism at the time of the blowing out of the manhole
plate of boiler D on board that vessel January 25, 1905. (G.O. 182,
March 20, 1905.)


HANS JOHNSEN.

Chief machinist, serving on board the torpedo boat _Winslow_, for
gallant and conspicuous conduct in the action at Cardenas, Cuba, May
11, 1898. Johnsen was specially commended for presence of mind in
turning off steam from the engine wrecked by shell bursting in
cylinder. (G.O. 497, September 3, 1898.)


HENRY JOHNSON.

Seaman belonging to the U.S.S. _Metacomet_; was one of the boat's crew
which, in charge of Acting Ensign H. C. Neilds, of the United States
Navy, went to the rescue of the officers and crew of the U.S. monitor
_Tecumseh_ when that vessel was sunk by a torpedo in passing the forts
in Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864. This boat's crew, under their brave and
gallant leader, went within a few hundred yards of one of the forts
under a fire, which Admiral Farragut expressed as "one of the most
galling" he ever saw, and succeeded in rescuing from death 10 of the
crew of the _Tecumseh_. Their conduct elicited the admiration of both
friend and foe. (G.O. 82, February 23, 1867.)


JOHN JOHNSON.

Seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Kansas_; displayed great coolness and
self-possession at the time Commander A. F. Crosman and others were
drowned, near Greytown, Nicaragua, April 12, 1872, and by extraordinary
heroism and personal exertion prevented greater loss of life. (G.O.
176, July 9, 1872.)


PETER JOHNSON.

Fireman, first class, serving on board the U.S.S. _Vixen_, for coolness
and heroism in entering the fireroom on the night of May 28, 1898, when
the lower front manhole gasket of boiler A blew out. (G.O. 167, August
27, 1904.)


WILLIAM JOHNSON.

Cooper of the U.S.S. _Adams_, for rescuing from drowning Daniel W.
Kloppen, a workman, at the navy yard, Mare Island, Calif., November 14,
1879. (G.O. 326, October 18, 1884.)


WILLIAM P. JOHNSON.

Landsman on board of the U.S.S. _Fort Hindman_, in the engagement near
Harrisonburg, La., March 2, 1864. "Although badly wounded in the hand,
he took the place of a wounded man, and sponged and loaded the gun
throughout the entire action." (G.O. 32, April 16, 1864.)


LIEUT. COMMANDER RUFUS Z. JOHNSTON, UNITED STATES NAVY.

For distinguished conduct in battle, engagement of Vera Cruz, April 22,
1914; was regimental adjutant, and eminent and conspicuous in his
conduct. He exhibited courage and skill in leading his men through the
action of the 22d and in the final occupation of the city. (G.O. 177,
December 4, 1915.)


ANDREW JONES.

Chief boatswain's mate on board of the U.S.S. _Chickasaw_. Although his
enlistment had expired, he volunteered from the _Vincennes_ for the
battle in Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864, and was honorably mentioned by
the commanding officer of the _Chickasaw_. (G.O. 45, December 31,
1864.)


JOHN JONES.

Landsman; was one of the crew of the first cutter of the U.S.S. _Rhode
Island_, on the night of December 30, 1862, which was engaged in saving
the lives of the officers and crew of the _Monitor_. They had saved a
number, and it was owing to their gallantry and zeal and desire to save
others that they became separated from the _Rhode Island_, and were
adrift for some hours. (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


JOHN E. JONES.

Quartermaster on board of the U.S.S. _Oneida_; in the engagement in
Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864; stationed at the wheel, was wounded. After
the wheel ropes were shot away he went on the poop to assist at the
signals, and remained there until ordered to reeve new wheel ropes.
(G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


THOMAS JONES.

Coxswain on board of the U.S.S. _Ticonderoga_, in the attacks on Fort
Fisher, December 24 and 25, 1864, and January 13, 14, and 15, 1865;
"commended for coolness and good conduct as captain of a gun." (G.O.
59, June 22, 1865.)


WILLIAM JONES.

Captain of top on board of the U.S.S. _Richmond_, Mobile Bay, August 5,
1864; commended for coolness and good conduct as captain of a gun in
the action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of the 5th of
August, 1864. Joined the _Dacotah_ in September, 1861, and was on board
the _Cumberland_ when sunk by the _Merrimac_, at Newport News. Joined
the _Richmond_ in September, 1863. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


THOMAS JORDAN.

Quartermaster on board of the U.S.S. _Galena_. During the action in
Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864, he was stationed on the poop, attending
signals, under a heavy fire from Fort Morgan, and displayed gallantry
and great coolness. (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


ROBERT JORDAN.

Coxswain U.S.S. _Minnesota_; temporarily on board the U.S.S. _Mount
Washington_, Nansemond River, April 14, 1863. "Performed every duty
with the utmost coolness and courage, and showed an unsurpassed
devotion to the service." (G.O. 17, July 10, 1863.)


THOMAS KANE.

Captain of the hold on board of the U.S.S. _Nereus_; on the occasion of
the assault on Fort Fisher, January 15, 1865, behaved with conspicuous
gallantry, having, under a heavy fire of musketry, carried on his back
a wounded messmate to a place of safety, and fearlessly exposed himself
in assisting other wounded comrades whose lives were endangered. (G.O.
84, October 3, 1867.)


THOMAS W. KATES.

Private, United States Marine Corps, for distinguished conduct in the
presence of the enemy in the advance on Tientsin, June 21, 1900. (G.O.
55, July 19, 1901.)


PHILIP B. KEEFER.

Coppersmith, serving on board the U.S.S. _Iowa_, for courageous and
zealous conduct in hauling fires from two furnaces of boiler B when
fireroom was completely filled with live steam from a blown-out manhole
gasket, and fireroom floor plates were covered with boiling water, on
board of that vessel off Santiago de Cuba, July 20, 1898. (G.O. 501,
December 14, 1898.)


MICHAEL KEARNEY.

Private, United States Marine Corps, serving on board the U.S.S.
_Nashville_, for extraordinary bravery and coolness while cutting the
cables leading from Cienfuegos, Cuba, May 11, 1898, under a heavy fire
of the enemy. (G.O. 521, July 7, 1899.)


JOHN KELLEY.

Second-class fireman on board of the U.S.S. _Ceres_, in the fight near
Hamilton, up the Roanoke River, July 9, 1862; spoken of for "good
conduct and soul bravery." (G.O. 11, April 3, 1863.)


FRANCIS KELLY.

Water tender, United States Navy, for extraordinary heroism in
connection with the sinking of the U.S.S. _Merrimac_, at the entrance
to the harbor of Santiago de Cuba, on the night of June 2, 1898, under
heavy fire from the Spanish batteries. (G.O. 529, November 2, 1899.)


JOHN JOSEPH KELLY.

Private, United States Marine Corps. "For conspicuous gallantry and
intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty in action with the enemy
at Blanc Mont Ridge, France, October 3, 1918. Private Kelley ran
through our own barrage a hundred yards in advance of the front line
and attacked an enemy machine-gun nest, killing the gunner with a
grenade, shooting another member of the crew with his pistol, and
returned through the barrage with eight prisoners." (Act of February 4,
1919.)


THOMAS KENDRICK.

Coxswain on board of the U.S.S. _Oneida_, in the engagement in Mobile
Bay, August 5, 1864, a volunteer from the _Bienville_; attracted the
particular attention of the executive officer of the _Oneida_ by his
excellent conduct. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


BARNETT KENNA.

Quartermaster on board of the U.S.S. _Brooklyn_, in the engagement in
Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864; coolness, bravery, and skill in the working
of his gun. His conduct was particularly meritorious. (G.O. 45,
December 31, 1864.)


CHARLES KENYON.

Fireman on board of the U.S.S. _Galena_, in the attack upon Drurys
Bluff, May 15, 1862; "conspicuous for persistent courage." Promoted to
acting third assistant engineer. (G.O. 11, April 3, 1863.)


THOMAS KERSEY.

Ordinary seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Plymouth_; bravery and presence
of mind in rescuing from drowning one of the crew of the _Plymouth_, at
the navy yard, New York, on the 26th of July, 1876. (G.O. 215, August
9, 1876.)


JOSEPH KILLACKEY.

Landsman, United States Navy, for distinguished conduct in the presence
of the enemy, in battles on the 13th, 20th, 21st, and 22d of June,
1900, while with the relief expedition of the allied forces in China.
(G.O. 55, July 19, 1901.)


HUGH KING.

Ordinary seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Iroquois_; jumped overboard in
the Delaware River, September 7, 1871, and saved one of the crew of
that vessel from drowning. (G.O. 176, July 9, 1872.)


JOHN KING.

Water tender, serving on board the U.S.S. _Vicksburg_, for heroism in
the line of his profession at the time of the accident to the boilers
May 29, 1901. (G.O. 72, December 6, 1901.)

SECOND MEDAL.

Water tender, serving on board the U.S.S. _Salem_, for extraordinary
heroism in the line of his profession on the occasion of the accident
to one of the boilers of that vessel September 13, 1909. (G.O. 40,
October 19, 1909.)


R. H. KING.

Landsman on board of the U.S. picket boat _No. 1_, which destroyed the
rebel ram _Albemarle_, at Plymouth, N.C., October 27, 1864. (G.O. 45,
December 31, 1864.)


SAMUEL W. KINNAIRD.

Landsman on board of the U.S.S. _Lackawanna_; in the engagement in
Mobile Bay August 5, 1864, set an example to the crew by his presence
of mind and cheerfulness, that had beneficial effect. (G.O. 45,
December 31, 1864.)


ROBERT KLEIN.

Chief carpenter's mate, serving on board the U.S.S. _Raleigh_, for
heroism in rescuing shipmates overcome in double bottoms by fumes of
turpentine January 25, 1904. (G.O. 173, October 6, 1904.)


MATEJ KOCAK.

Sergeant, United States Marine Corps. "For extraordinary heroism in
action in the Villers Cotteretes, south of Soissons, France, July 18,
1918. He advanced ahead of the American line and captured a machine gun
and its crew. Later the same day he took command of several squads of
allied troops and led them forward in the advance." (Act of February 4,
1919.)


FRANZ KRAMER.

Seaman, serving on board the U.S.S. _Marblehead_, for extraordinary
bravery and coolness while cutting the cables leading from Cienfuegos,
Cuba, May 11, 1898, under a heavy fire of the enemy. (G.O. 521, July 7,
1899.)


ERNEST KRAUSE.

Coxswain, serving on board the U.S.S. _Nashville_, for extraordinary
bravery and coolness while cutting the cables leading from Cienfuegos,
Cuba, May 11, 1898, under a heavy fire of the enemy. (G.O. 521, July 7,
1899.)


HERMANN W. KUCHNEISTER.

Private, United States Marine Corps, serving on board the U.S.S.
_Marblehead_, for extraordinary bravery and coolness while cutting the
cables leading from Cienfuegos, Cuba, May 11, 1898, under a heavy fire
of the enemy. (G.O. 521, July 7, 1899.)


P. J. KYLE.

Landsman; for rescuing from drowning a shipmate from the U.S.S.
_Quinnebaug_, at Port Mahon, Minorca, March 13, 1879.


BARTLETT LAFFEY.

Seaman, serving on board the U.S.S. _Petrel_; was sent on shore with
others to man a rifle howitzer which had been mounted on a field
carriage and posted in the streets of Yazoo City during the rebel
attack on that place, March 5, 1864. Their defense of the gun against
superior forces is mentioned as most gallant, having nobly stood their
ground through the whole action, fighting hand to hand to save the gun
and the reputation of the Navy. Promoted to acting master's mate. (G.O.
32, April 16, 1864.)


DANIEL LAKIN.

Seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Commodore Perry_, in the attack upon
Franklin, Va., October 3, 1862; distinguished for his gallant conduct.
Promoted to acting master's mate. (G.O. 11, April 3, 1863.)


THOMAS LAKIN.

Seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Narragansett_; gallant conduct in
jumping overboard from the _Narragansett_ at the navy yard, Mare
Island, Calif., on the 24th of November, 1874, and rescuing two men of
that ship from drowning.


SURG. CARY D. LANGHORNE, UNITED STATES NAVY.

For extraordinary heroism in battle, engagement of Vera Cruz, April 22,
1914. Carried a wounded man from the front of the Naval Academy while
under a heavy fire. (G.O. 177, December 4, 1915.)


JOHN S. LANN.

Landsman on board the U.S.S. _Magnolia_; was one of the howitzer corps,
cooperating with the Army in the military and naval expedition to St.
Marks, Fla., March 5 and 6, 1865, and was commended for coolness and
determination under fire, his remarkable efforts in assisting to
transport gun, and for remaining by his gun throughout a severe
engagement in a manner highly creditable to the service. (G.O. 59, June
22, 1865.)


LIEUT. JAMES P. LANNON, UNITED STATES NAVY.

For extraordinary heroism in battle, engagement of Vera Cruz, April 22,
1914. Assisted a wounded man under heavy fire, and after returning to
his battalion was himself desperately wounded. (G.O. 177, December 4,
1915.)


JOHN LAVERTY.

Fireman on board of the U.S.S. _Wyalusing_; volunteered May 25, 1864,
in a night attempt to destroy the rebel ram _Albemarle_, in Roanoke
River, and although it was unsuccessful, he displayed courage, zeal,
and unwearied exertion on the occasion. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


JOHN LAVERTY.

First-class fireman; for hauling the fires from under the boiler, the
stop-valve chamber having been ruptured, of the U.S.S. _Alaska_, at
Callao Bay, Peru, September 14, 1881. (G.O. 326, October 18, 1884.)


JOHN LAWSON.

Landsman on board of the U.S.S. _Hartford_, in the engagement in Mobile
Bay, August 5, 1864. "Was one of the six men stationed at the
shell-whip on the berth deck. A shell killed or wounded the whole
number. Lawson was wounded in the leg and thrown with great violence
against the side of the ship; but as soon as he recovered himself,
although begged to go below, he refused and went back to the
shell-whip, where he remained during the action." (G.O. 45, December
31, 1864.)


NICHOLAS LEAR.

Quartermaster on board of the U.S.S. _New Ironsides_; commended for
highly meritorious conduct during the several engagements with Fort
Fisher in December, 1864, and January, 1865. (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


JAMES H. LEE.

Seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Kearsarge_ when she destroyed the
_Alabama_ off Cherbourg, France, June 19, 1864; "exhibited marked
coolness and good conduct and is highly commended by his divisional
officer." (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


EMILE LEJEUNE.

Seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Plymouth_; gallant conduct in rescuing a
citizen from drowning at Port Royal, S.C., June 6, 1876. (G.O. 212,
June 9, 1876.)


GEORGE W. LELAND.

Gunner's mate belonging to the U.S.S. _Lehigh_, Charleston Harbor,
November 16, 1863; distinguished for promptness in manning and rowing
an open boat engaged in carrying lines between the _Lehigh_ and
_Nahant_, while the shot and shell from cannon and mortars were flying
and breaking all around. Promoted to acting master's mate. (G.O. 32,
April 16, 1864.)


PIERRE LEON.

Captain of forecastle on board the U.S.S. _Baron DeKalb_, Yazoo River
expedition, December 23 to 27, 1862; mentioned by his commanding
officer for having "distinguished himself in various actions." (G.O.
11, April 3, 1863.)


JOSEPH LEONARD.

(See Joseph Melvin.)


WILLIAM LEVERY.

Apprentice, first class, serving on board the U.S.S. _Marblehead_; for
extraordinary bravery and coolness while cutting the cables leading
from Cienfuegos, Cuba, May 11, 1898, under a heavy fire of the enemy.
(G.O. 521, July 7, 1899.)


HARRY LIPSCOMB.

Water tender on board the U.S.S. _North Dakota_; for extraordinary
heroism in the line of his profession during the fire on board of that
vessel September 8, 1910. (G.O. 83, October 4, 1910.)


BENJAMIN LLOYD.

Coal heaver on board of the U.S.S. _Wyalusing_; volunteered May 25,
1864, in a night attempt to destroy the rebel ram _Albemarle_, in
Roanoke River, and although it was unsuccessful, he displayed courage,
zeal, and unwearied exertion on the occasion. (G.O. 45, December 31,
1864.)


JOHN W. LLOYD.

Coxswain on board of the U.S.S. _Wyalusing_; volunteered May 25, 1864,
in a night attempt to destroy the rebel ram _Albemarle_, in Roanoke
River, and although it was unsuccessful, he displayed courage, zeal,
and unwearied exertion on the occasion. Promoted to acting master's
mate. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


HUGH LOGAN.

Captain of the afterguard; was one of the crew of the U.S.S. _Rhode
Island_ on the night of December 30, 1862, which was engaged in saving
the lives of the officers and crew of the _Monitor_. They had saved a
number, and it was owing to their gallantry and zeal in the desire to
save others that they became separated from the _Rhode Island_ and were
adrift for some hours. (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


GEORGE LOW.

Seaman; for jumping overboard from the U.S.S. _Tennessee_ at New
Orleans, La., February 15, 1881, and sustaining, until picked up by a
boat's crew, N. P. Petersen, gunner's mate, who had fallen overboard.
(G.O. 326, October 18, 1884.)


ENSIGN GEORGE M. LOWRY, UNITED STATES NAVY.

For distinguished conduct in battle, engagements of Vera Cruz, April 21
and 22, 1914; was in both days' fighting at the head of his company,
and was eminent and conspicuous in his conduct, leading his men with
skill and courage. (G.O. 177, December 4, 1915.)


JOHN LUCY.

Second-class boy on board of the U.S. training ship _Minnesota_; heroic
conduct on the occasion of the burning of Castle Garden, at New York,
on the 9th of July, 1876. (G.O. 214, July 27, 1876.)


WILLIAM F. LUKES.

Landsman, United States Navy, and a member of Company D; capture of the
Korean forts, June 9 and 10, 1871; received a severe cut over the head
while fighting inside the fort. (G.O. 180, October 10, 1872.)


LIEUT. COMMANDER ALEXANDER G. LYLE, DENTAL CORPS, UNITED STATES NAVY.

"For extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty while serving with the
Fifth Regiment United States Marines. Under heavy shell fire, on April
23, 1918, he rushed to the assistance of Corpl. Thomas Regan, who was
seriously wounded, and administered such effective surgical aid while
bombardment was still continuing, as to save the life of Corporal
Regan. (Act of February 4, 1919.)


THOMAS LYONS.

Seaman, serving on board the U.S.S. _Pensacola_; in the attack on Forts
Jackson and St. Philip, April 24, 1862, was lashed outside of that
vessel, on the port-sheet chain, with lead in hand, to lead the ship
past the forts, and never flinched, although under a heavy fire from
the forts and rebel gunboats. (G.O. 169, February 8, 1872.)


JAMES MACHON.

Boy, U.S.S. _Brooklyn_; in the engagement in Mobile Bay, August 5,
1864; conspicuous for bravery, performing his duty in the powder
division, at a point where the ship was riddled very much, and in the
immediate vicinity of the shell whips, which were twice cleared of men
by bursting shells. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


ALEXANDER MACK.

Captain of top on board of the U.S.S. _Brooklyn_; in the engagement in
Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864; activity, zeal, and skill displayed in
handling his gun, as well as great courage. He was severely wounded.
(G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


JOHN MACK.

Seaman on board the U.S.S. _Hendrick Hudson_; was one of the men of a
howitzer's crew cooperating with the Army in the military and naval
expedition to St. Marks, Fla., March 5 and 6, 1865, and was commended
for coolness and determination under fire, remarkable efforts in
assisting to transport gun, and for remaining by gun throughout a
severe engagement in a manner highly creditable to himself and to the
service. (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


JOHN MACKENZIE.

Chief boatswain's mate, United States Naval Reserve Force, on board the
U.S.S. _Remlik_. On the morning of December 17, 1917, the _Remlik_
encountered a heavy gale. During this gale there was a heavy sea
running. The depth-charge box on the taff rail aft, containing a Sperry
depth charge, was washed overboard, the depth charge itself falling
inboard and remaining on deck. Mackenzie, on his own initiative, went
aft and sat down on the depth charge, as it was impracticable to carry
it to safety until the ship was headed up into the sea. In acting as he
did Mackenzie exposed his life and prevented a serious accident to the
ship and probable loss of the ship and entire crew. (G.O. 391, May 8,
1918.)


JOHN MACKIE.

Corporal, United States Marine Corps, on board of the U.S.S. _Galena_,
in the attack on Fort Darling, at Drurys Bluff, James River, May 15,
1862; particularly mentioned for his "gallant conduct and services and
signal acts of devotion to duty." (G.O. 17, July 10, 1862.)


HARRY LEWIS MacNEAL.

Private, United States Marine Corps, serving on board the U.S.S.
_Brooklyn_, for heroism and gallantry in action at the Battle of
Santiago de Cuba, July 3, 1898. (G.O. 526, August 9, 1899.)


WILLIAM MADDEN.

Coal heaver on board the U.S.S. _Brooklyn_, in the engagement in Mobile
Bay, August 5, 1864; conspicuous for bravery, performing his duty in
the powder division, at a point where the ship was riddled very much,
and in the immediate vicinity of the shell whips, which were twice
cleared of men by bursting shells. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


EDWARD MADDIN.

Ordinary seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Franklin_; gallant conduct in
jumping overboard from the _Franklin_, at Lisbon, Portugal, and
rescuing from drowning one of the crew of that vessel, on the 9th of
January, 1876. (G.O. 206, February 15, 1876.)


LIEUT. COMMANDER JAMES J. MADISON, UNITED STATES NAVAL RESERVE FORCE.

"For exceptionally heroic service in a position of great responsibility
as commanding officer of the U.S.S. _Ticonderoga_, when, on October 4,
1918, that vessel was attacked by an enemy submarine and sunk after a
prolonged and gallant resistance. The submarine opened fire at a range
of 500 yards, the first shots taking effect on the bridge and
forecastle, one of the two forward guns of the _Ticonderoga_ being
disabled by the second shot. The fire was returned and the fight
continued for nearly two hours. Lieutenant Commander Madison was
severely wounded early in the fight, but caused himself to be placed in
a chair on the bridge and continued to direct the fire and to maneuver
the ship. When the order was finally given to abandon the sinking ship,
he became unconscious from loss of blood, but was lowered into a
lifeboat and was saved, with 31 others, out of a total number of 236 on
board." (Act of February 4, 1919.)


JOHN W. MAGEE.

Second-class fireman on board the U.S.S. _Tallapoosa_, when that vessel
sunk, on the night of August 21, 1884; remained at his post of duty in
the fireroom until the fires were put out by the rising waters. (G.O.
326, October 18, 1884.)


GEORGE F. MAGER.

Apprentice, first class, serving on board the U.S.S. _Marblehead_; for
gallantry under fire of the enemy while cutting cables at Cienfuegos,
Cuba, May 11, 1898. (G.O. 529, November 2, 1899.)


GEORGE MAHONEY.

Fireman, first class, serving on board the U.S.S. _Vixen_; for coolness
and heroism in entering the fireroom on the night of May 28, 1898, when
the lower front manhole of boiler A blew out. (G.O. 167, August 27,
1904.)


HENRY J. MANNING.

Quartermaster; for jumping overboard from the U.S. training ship _New
Hampshire_, off Newport, R.I., January 4, 1882, and endeavoring to
rescue Jabez Smith, second-class musician, from drowning. (G.O. 326,
October 18, 1884.)


EDWARD MARTIN.

Quartermaster on board of the U.S.S. _Galena_. During the action in
Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864, he was stationed at the wheel while towing
the U.S.S. _Oneida_ by Forts Morgan and Gaines, which vessel had become
disabled by a shell that exploded her starboard boiler. He displayed
coolness and great courage on that trying occasion. (G.O. 59, June 22,
1865.)


JAMES MARTIN.

Sergeant, United States Marine Corps, on board of the U.S.S.
_Richmond_, Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864; commended for coolness and good
conduct as captain of a gun in the action in Mobile Bay, on the morning
and forenoon of August 5, 1864; was in the actions with Forts Jackson
and St. Philip, the Chalmettes, the rebel ironclads and gunboats below
New Orleans, Vicksburg, Port Hudson, and present at the surrender of
New Orleans, on board of the _Richmond_. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


WILLIAM MARTIN.

Boatswain's mate on board of the U.S.S. _Benton_, Yazoo River
expedition, December 23 to 27, 1862; mentioned by his commanding
officer for having "distinguished himself in various actions." Promoted
to acting master's mate. (G.O. 11, April 3, 1863.)


WILLIAM MARTIN.

Seaman; captain of gun on board of the U.S.S. _Varuna_, in the attack
upon Forts Jackson and St. Philip, April 24, 1862; mentioned as having
done his "duty through the thickest of the fight, with great coolness
and danger to the enemy." (G.O. 11, April 3, 1863.)


JOSEPH MATTHEWS.

Captain of top; for courageous conduct in going over the stern of the
U.S.S. _Constitution_ at sea, February 13, 1879, during a heavy gale,
and cutting the fastenings of the ship's rudder chains. (G.O. 326,
October 18, 1884.)


CLARENCE E. MATHIAS.

Private, United States Marine Corps; for distinguished conduct in the
presence of the enemy in the advance on Tientsin, June 21, 1900. (G.O.
55, July 19, 1901.)


JOHN MAXWELL.

Fireman, second class, serving on board the U.S.S. _Marblehead_, for
extraordinary bravery and coolness while cutting the cables leading
from Cienfuegos, Cuba, May 11, 1898, under a heavy fire of the enemy.
(G.O. 521, July 7, 1899.)


CHARLES MELVILLE.

Ordinary seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Hartford_, in the engagement in
Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864. "This man (a loader of a gun) was severely
wounded by a piece of a shell. He was taken below, but would not remain
there; and although scarcely able to stand, performed his duty until
the end of the action. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


JOSEPH MELVIN.

(Name changed to Joseph Leonard.)

Private, United States Marine Corps; for distinguished conduct in the
presence of the enemy in battles, while with the Eighth Army Corps, on
the 25th, 27th, and 29th of March, and the 4th of April, 1899. (G.O.
55, July 19, 1901.)


JAMES MEREDITH.

(Name changed to Patrick F. Ford, Jr.)

Private, United States Marine Corps, serving on board the U.S.S.
_Marblehead_, for extraordinary bravery and coolness while cutting the
cables leading from Cienfuegos, Cuba, May 11, 1898, under a heavy fire
of the enemy. (G.O. 521, July 7, 1899.)


JAMES F. MERTON.

Landsman, United States Navy, and a member of Company D; capture of the
Korean forts, June 9 and 10, 1871; was severely wounded in the arm
while trying to force his way into the fort. (G.O. 180, October 10,
1872.)


WILLIAM MEYER.

Carpenter's mate, third class, serving on board the U.S.S. _Nashville_,
for extraordinary bravery and coolness while cutting the cables leading
from Cienfuegos, Cuba, May 11, 1898, under a heavy fire of the enemy.
(G.O. 521, July 7, 1899.)


JAMES MIFFLIN.

Engineer's cook on board of the U.S.S. _Brooklyn_, in the engagement in
Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864; conspicuous for bravery, performing his
duty in the powder division, at a point where the ship was riddled very
much, and in the immediate vicinity of the shell whips, which were
twice cleared of men by bursting shells. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


ANDREW MILLER.

Sergeant, United States Marine Corps, on board of the U.S.S.
_Richmond_, Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864; commended for coolness and good
conduct as captain of a gun in the action in Mobile Bay, on the morning
and forenoon of August 5, 1864; was on board the _Brooklyn_ in the
actions with Forts Jackson and St. Philip, the Chalmettes, the rebel
ironclads and gunboats below New Orleans, batteries below Vicksburg,
and present at the surrender of New Orleans. (G.O. 45, December 31,
1864.)


HARRY H. MILLER.

Seaman, serving on board the U.S.S. _Nashville_, for extraordinary
bravery and coolness while cutting the cables leading from Cienfuegos,
Cuba, May 11, 1898, under a heavy fire of the enemy. (G.O. 521, July 7,
1899.)


HUGH MILLER.

Boatswain's mate; for jumping overboard from the U.S.S. _Quinnebaug_,
at Alexandria, Egypt, on the morning of November 21, 1885, and
assisting in saving a shipmate from drowning. (Letter Capt. N. Ludlow,
United States Navy, No. 8326/B, November 21, 1885.)


JAMES MILLER.

Quartermaster on board of the U.S.S. _Marblehead_, in the engagement
with the rebel batteries on Stone River, December 25, 1863; noted for
bravery and coolness in casting the lead and giving the soundings while
exposed to a dangerous fire, and only retired, reluctantly, when
ordered to do so; also commended for admirable management at the wheel.
Promoted to acting master's mate. (G.O. 32, April 16, 1864.)


WILLARD MILLER.

Seaman, serving on board the U.S.S. _Nashville_, for extraordinary
bravery and coolness while cutting the cables leading from Cienfuegos,
Cuba, May 11, 1898, under a heavy fire of the enemy. (G.O. 521, July 7,
1899.)


DANIEL S. MILLIKEN.

Quarter gunner on board the U.S.S. _New Ironsides_; commended for
highly meritorious conduct during the several engagements with Fort
Fisher, in December, 1864, and January, 1865. (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


JOHN MILLMORE.

Ordinary seaman, serving on board the U.S.S. _Essex_, for rescuing from
drowning John W. Powers, ordinary seaman, serving on the same vessel
with him, at Monrovia, Liberia, October 31, 1877. (G.O. 326, October
18, 1884.)


CHARLES MILLS.

Seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Minnesota_; in the assault on Fort
Fisher, January 15, 1865, charged up to the palisades; remained there
when the panic seized the men, and, at the risk of his life, remained
with and assisted a wounded officer from the field after dark. (G.O.
59, June 22, 1865.)


JOSEPH MITCHELL.

Gunners mate, first class, United States Navy; for distinguished
conduct in the presence of the enemy in the battle of Peking, China,
July 12, 1900. (G.O. 55, July 19, 1901.)


THOMAS MITCHELL.

Landsman, serving on board U.S.S. _Richmond_; for rescuing from
drowning M. F. Caulan, first-class boy, serving with him on the same
vessel, at Shanghai, China, November 17, 1879. (G.O. 326, October 18,
1884.)


COMMANDER WILLIAM A. MOFFETT, UNITED STATES NAVY.

For distinguished conduct in battle, engagements of Vera Cruz, April 21
and 22, 1914; brought his ship into the inner harbor during the nights
of the 21st and 22d without the assistance of a pilot or navigational
lights, and was in a position on the morning of the 22d to use his guns
at a critical time with telling effect. His skill in mooring his ship
at night was especially noticeable. He placed her nearest to the enemy
and did most of the firing and received most of the hits. (G.O. 177,
December 4, 1915.)


HUGH MOLLOY.

Ordinary seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Fort Hindman_. During the
engagement near Harrisonburg, La., March 2, 1864, a shell pierced the
bow casement on the right of gun No. 1, mortally wounding the first
sponger, who dropped his sponge out of the port on the forecastle.
Molloy instantly jumped from the port to the forecastle, recovered the
sponge, and sponged and loaded the gun while outside, exposed to a
heavy fire of musketry. (G.O. 32, April 16, 1864.)


MONS MONSSON.

Chief gunner's mate, serving on board the U.S.S. _Missouri_, for
extraordinary heroism in entering a burning magazine through the
scuttle and endeavoring to extinguish the fire by throwing water with
his hands until a hose was passed to him, April 13, 1904. (G.O. 160,
May 26, 1904.)


DANIEL MONTAGUE.

Chief master-at-arms, United States Navy, for extraordinary heroism in
connection with the sinking of the U.S.S. _Merrimac_, at the entrance
to the harbor of Santiago de Cuba, on the night of June 2, 1898, under
heavy fire from the Spanish batteries. (G.O. 529, November 2, 1899.)


ROBERT MONTGOMERY.

Captain of afterguard on board of the U.S.S. _Agawam_; one of the crew
of the powder boat which was exploded near Fort Fisher, December 23,
1864, for which service he volunteered. (G.O. 45, December 21, 1864.)


ALBERT MOORE.

Private, United States Marine Corps, for distinguished conduct in the
presence of the enemy at Peking, China, July 21 to August 17, 1900.
Moore assisted to erect barricades under a heavy fire. (G.O. 55, July
19, 1901.)


CHARLES MOORE.

Seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Kearsarge_ when she destroyed the
_Alabama_, off Cherbourg, France, June 19, 1864; "exhibited marked
coolness and good conduct, and is highly commended by his divisional
officer." (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


CHARLES MOORE.

Landsman on board of the U.S.S. _Marblehead_, in the engagement with
the rebel batteries on Stone River, December 25, 1863; although
painfully wounded by a piece of shell and sent below, returned to his
quarters in a few moments and insisted upon resuming his duties, and
actually remained until he became so faint from loss of blood that he
had to be sent below. (G.O. 32, April 16, 1864.)


FRANCIS MOORE.

Boatswain's mate, for jumping overboard from the U.S. training ship
_Portsmouth_, at the Washington Navy Yard, January 23, 1882, and
endeavoring to rescue Thomas Duncan, carpenter and calker, who had
fallen overboard. (G.O. 326, October 18, 1884.)


GEORGE MOORE.

Seaman; was one of the crew of the first cutter of the U.S.S. _Rhode
Island_, on the night of December 30, 1862, which was engaged in saving
the lives of the officers and crew of the _Monitor_. They had saved a
number, and it was owing to their gallantry and zeal and desire to save
others that they became separated from the _Rhode Island_ and were
adrift for some hours. (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


PHILIP MOORE.

Seaman; for jumping overboard from the U.S.S. _Trenton_, at Genoa,
Italy, September 21, 1880, and rescuing from drowning Hans Paulsen,
ordinary seaman. (G.O. 326, October 18, 1884.)


WILLIAM MOORE.

Boatswain's mate on board the U.S.S. _Benton_; conspicuous for bravery
in the attack on Haines Bluff, December 27, 1862, being engaged in
carrying out lines to the shore amidst a heavy fire; also for marked
coolness and ability as captain of a 9-inch gun in Battery Benton in
the attack upon Vicksburg, May 22, 1863. (G.O. 32, April 16, 1864.)


JAMES H. MORGAN.

Captain of top on board of the U.S.S. _Richmond_, Mobile Bay, August 5,
1864; commended for coolness and good conduct as captain of a gun in
the action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of August 5, 1864.
He joined the _Colorado_ in May, 1861; volunteered for the U.S.S.
_Mississippi_; was in the action with Forts Jackson and St. Philip, the
Chalmettes, Vicksburg, Port Hudson, and present at the surrender of New
Orleans; was on board the _New Ironsides_ at Charleston. Joined the
_Richmond_ in October, 1863. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


WILLIAM H. MORIN.

Boatswain's mate, second class, serving on board the U.S.S.
_Marblehead_; for heroism while engaged in the perilous work of
sweeping for and disabling 27 contact mines in the approaches to
Caimanera, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, July 26 and 27, 1898. (G.O. 500,
December 14, 1898.)


JOHN MORRIS.

Corporal, United States Marine Corps, for leaping overboard from the
U.S. flagship _Lancaster_, at Villefranche, France, December 25, 1881,
and rescuing from drowning Robert Blizzard, ordinary seaman, a
prisoner, who had jumped overboard. (G.O. 326, October 18, 1884.)


JOHN G. MORRISON.

Coxswain on board of the U.S.S. _Carondelet_; commended for meritorious
conduct in general, and especially for heroic conduct and inspiring
example to the crew in the engagement with the rebel ram _Arkansas_, in
Yazoo River, July 15, 1862. When the _Carondelet_ was badly cut up,
several of her crew killed, many wounded, and others almost suffocated
from the effects of escaped steam, Morrison was the leader when
boarders were called on deck, and the first to return to the guns and
give the ram a broadside as she passed. His presence of mind in time of
battle or trial is reported as always conspicuous and encouraging.
(G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


WILLIAM MORSE.

Seaman; for jumping overboard from the U.S.S. _Shenandoah_ at Rio de
Janeiro, Brazil, September 19, 1880, and rescuing from drowning James
Grady, first-class fireman. (G.O. 326, October 18, 1884.)


CHARLES W. MORTON.

Boatswain's mate on board of the U.S.S. _Benton_, Yazoo River
expedition, December 23 to 27, 1862; mentioned by his commanding
officer for having "distinguished himself in various actions." (G.O.
11, April 3, 1863.)


PATRICK MULLEN.

Boatswain's mate on board of the U.S.S. _Wyandank_. During a boat
expedition up Mattox Creek, March 17, 1865, was reported by his
commanding officer as having rendered gallant assistance. (G.O. 59,
June 22, 1865.)

SECOND MEDAL.

Boatswain's mate on board of the U.S.S. _Don_. While the boats of this
vessel were engaged, May 1, 1865, in picking up the crew of picket
launch _No. 6_, which had swamped, an officer was seen in the water who
was no longer able to keep up and was at the time below the surface.
Patrick Mullen jumped overboard and brought the officer safely to the
boat, thereby rescuing him from drowning. Entitled to wear a bar on the
medal he already had received at Mattox Creek March 17, 1865. (G.O. 62,
June 29, 1865.)


FREDERICK MULLER.

Mate, United States Navy, attached to the U.S.S. _Wompatuck_, for
heroism and gallantry under fire of the enemy at Manzanillo, Cuba, June
30, 1898. (G.O. 45, April 30, 1901.)


HUGH P. MULLIN.

Seaman, serving on board the U.S.S. _Texas_; for rescuing Alfred
Kosminski, apprentice, second class, who fell overboard while that
vessel was coaling at Hampton Roads, Va., November 11, 1899. Mullin,
though wearing heavy rubber boots at the time, jumped overboard and at
great risk to himself supported Kosminski until the latter was safely
hauled out of the water. (G.O. 537, January 8, 1900.)


J. E. MURPHY.

Coxswain, United States Navy, for extraordinary heroism in connection
with the sinking of the U.S.S. _Merrimac_ at the entrance to the harbor
of Santiago de Cuba on the night of June 2, 1898, under heavy fire from
the Spanish batteries. (G.O. 529, November 2, 1899.)


JOHN A. MURPHY.

Drummer, United States Marine Corps, for distinguished conduct in the
presence of the enemy at Peking, China, July 21 to August 17, 1900.
(G.O. 55, July 19, 1901.)


PATRICK MURPHY.

Boatswain's mate on board of the U.S.S. _Metacomet_; Mobile Bay, August
5, 1864, and other occasions.


SAMUEL McALLISTER.

Ordinary seaman, United States Navy, for bravery in crossing the river
at Tientsin, China, June 20, 1900, in a small boat with three other men
under a heavy fire and assisting to destroy buildings occupied by the
enemy. (G.O. 84, March 22, 1902.)


JOHN McCARTON.

Ship's printer, for jumping overboard from the U.S. training ship _New
Hampshire_, off Coasters Harbor Island, near Newport, R.I., January 4,
1882, and endeavoring to rescue Jabez Smith, second-class musician,
from drowning. (G.O. 326, October 18, 1884.)


MATTHEW McCLELLAND.

First-class fireman on board of the U.S.S. _Richmond_, in the attack on
Port Hudson batteries, March 14, 1863. "When the fireroom and other
parts of the ship were filled with hot steam from injury to the boiler
by a shot, he, from the first moment of the casualty, stood firmly at
his post and was conspicuous in his exertions to remedy the evil by
hauling the fires from the injured boiler, the heat being so great from
the combined effects of fire and steam that he was compelled, from
sheer exhaustion, to be relieved every few minutes until the work was
accomplished." (G.O. 17, July 10, 1863.)


CHIEF BOATSWAIN JOHN McCLOY, UNITED STATES NAVY.

While coxswain, United States Navy, for distinguished conduct in the
presence of the enemy in battles on the 13th, 20th, 21st, and 22d of
June, 1900, while with the relief expedition of the allied forces in
China. (G.O. 55, July 19, 1901.)

SECOND MEDAL.

For distinguished conduct in battle and extraordinary heroism,
engagement of Vera Cruz, April 22, 1914. Led a flotilla of three picket
launches, mounting 1-pounders along the sea front of Vera Cruz in front
of the naval school and customhouse. The launches drew the combined
fire of the Mexicans in that vicinity and thus enabled the cruisers to
shell them out temporarily and save our men on shore. His conduct was
eminent and conspicuous, and, although shot through the thigh during
this fire, he remained at his post as beachmaster for 48 hours until
sent to a hospital ship by the brigade surgeon. (G.O. 177, December 4,
1915.)


MICHAEL McCORMICK.

Boatswain's mate on board of the U.S.S. _Signal_, which vessel was
attacked by field batteries and sharpshooters and destroyed, in Red
River, May 5, 1864. He was wounded early in the day, but stood to his
gun until ordered to leave it. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


ADAM McCULLOCK.

Seaman on board the U.S.S. _Lackawanna_ in the engagement in Mobile
Bay, August 5, 1864, being wounded, would not leave his quarters,
although ordered to do so, but remained until the action was over.
(G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


ENSIGN EDWARD O. McDONNELL, UNITED STATES NAVY.

For extraordinary heroism in battle, engagements of Vera Cruz, April 21
and 22, 1914; posted on the roof of the Terminal Hotel and landing;
established a signal station there and day and night maintained
communication between the troops and the ships. At this exposed post he
was continually under fire. One man was killed and three wounded at his
side during the two days' fighting. He showed extraordinary heroism and
striking courage and maintained his station in the highest degree of
efficiency. All signals got through, largely due to his heroic devotion
to duty. (G.O. 177, December 4, 1915.)


JOHN McDONALD.

Boatswain's mate on board of the U.S.S. _Baron De Kalb_, Yazoo River
expedition, December 23 to 27, 1862, mentioned by his commanding
officer for having "distinguished himself in various actions." (G.O.
11, April 3, 1863.)


JOHN McFARLAND.

Captain of forecastle on board of the U.S.S. _Hartford_ in the
engagement in Mobile May, August 5, 1864. "Was at the wheel, which has
been his station in all the previous fights of this ship. As on every
other occasion, he displayed the utmost coolness and intelligence
throughout the action. When the _Lackawanna_ ran into the _Hartford_,
and for a moment there was every appearance of the man at the wheel
being crushed, he never left his station nor ceased for an instant to
attend strictly to his duties." This evidence of coolness and
self-possession, together with his good conduct in the other battles of
the _Hartford_, entitle him to the medal. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


JOHN McGOWAN.

Quartermaster on board of the U.S.S. _Varuna_ in the attack upon Forts
Jackson and St. Philip, April 24, 1862; "stood at the wheel the whole
time, although guns were raking the decks from behind him. His position
was one of the most responsible on the ship, and he did his duty to the
utmost. (G.O. 11, April 3, 1863.)


FRED HENRY McGUIRE.

Hospital apprentice, United States Navy, for extraordinary heroism in
the line of his profession while operating against outlaws on the
island of Basilan, P.I., September 24, 1911. (G.O. 138, December 13,
1911.)


PATRICK McGUNIGAL.

Ship's fitter, first class, United States Navy, attached to the
_Huntington_. On the morning of September 17, 1917, while the U.S.S.
_Huntington_ was passing through the war zone, a kite balloon was sent
up with Lieut. (junior grade) H. W. Hoyt, United States Navy, as
observer. When the balloon was about 400 feet in the air the
temperature suddenly dropped, causing the balloon to descend about 200
feet, when it was struck by a squall. The balloon started to roll over.
The pilot was inside the basket and could not get out, due to the
tangle of ropes overhead. The balloon was hauled to the ship's side,
but the basket trailed in the water and the pilot was submerged.
McGunigal, with great daring, climbed down the side of the ship, jumped
to the ropes leading to the basket, and cleared the tangle enough to
get the pilot out of them, helped the pilot to get clear, put a bowline
around him, and he was hauled to the deck. A bowline was lowered to
McGunigal and he was taken safely aboard. (G.O. 341, November 7, 1917.)


MARTIN McHUGH.

Seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Cincinnati_ in an attack on the
Vicksburg batteries May 27, 1863; conspicuous for coolness and bravery
under a severely accurate fire. "This was no ordinary case of
performance of duty." (G.O. 17, July 10, 1863.)


JAMES McINTOSH.

Captain of top on board of the U.S.S. _Richmond_, Mobile Bay, August 5,
1864; commended for coolness and good conduct in the action in Mobile
Bay on the morning and forenoon of August 5, 1864. He was present and
assisted in the capture of the batteries at Hatteras Inlet and on board
the _Cumberland_ when she was sunk by the _Merrimac_ at Newport News.
Joined the _Richmond_ in September, 1863. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


ALEXANDER McKENZIE.

Boatswain's mate on board of the U.S.S. _Colorado_; received a sword
cut in the head while fighting at the side of Lieutenant McKee at the
capture of the Korean forts June 11, 1871. (G.O. 169, February 8,
1872.)


WILLIAM McKNIGHT.

Coxswain; captain of gun on board of the U.S.S. _Varuna_ in the attack
upon Forts Jackson and St. Philip April 24, 1862; mentioned as having
done his "duty through the thickest of the fight with great coolness
and danger to the enemy." (G.O. 11, April 3, 1863.)


JAMES McLEOD.

Captain of foretop; a volunteer from the U.S.S. _Colorado_, on board of
the _Pensacola_ in the attack upon Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and at
the taking of New Orleans April 24, and 25, 1862. "Especially
commended." (G.O. 11, April 3, 1863.)


LIEUT. FREDERICK V. McNAIR, UNITED STATES NAVY.

For distinguished conduct in battle, engagement of Vera Cruz, April 22,
1914. Was eminent and conspicuous in command of his battalion. He
exhibited courage and skill in leading his men through the action of
the 22d and in the final occupation of the city. (G.O. 177, December 4,
1915.)


MICHAEL J. McNALLY.

Sergeant, United States Marine Corps, for distinguished conduct in the
presence of the enemy at Samoa April 1, 1899. (G.O. 55, July 19, 1901.)


MICHAEL McNAMARA.

Private, United States Marine Corps, on board of the U.S.S. _Benicia_;
for gallantry in advancing to the parapet, wrenching the match-lock
from the hands of an enemy and killing him, at the capture of the
Korean forts June 11, 1871. (G.O. 169, February 8, 1872.)


GEORGE W. McWILLIAMS.

Landsman on board of the U.S.S. _Pontoosuc_; commended for gallantry,
skill, and coolness in action during the operations in and about Cape
Fear River, which extended from December 24, 1864, to January 22, 1865,
and resulted in the capture of Fort Fisher and Wilmington; was severely
wounded in the naval assault upon Fort Fisher. (G.O. 59, June 22,
1865.)


DAVID NAYLOR.

Landsman on board of the U.S.S. _Oneida_, in the engagement in Mobile
Bay, August 5, 1864; powder boy at the 30-pounder Parrott rifle. His
passing box, having been knocked out of his hand, fell overboard into a
boat alongside. He immediately jumped overboard, recovered it, and
returned to his station. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


JOHN NEIL.

Quarter gunner on board of the U.S.S. _Agawam_; one of the crew of the
powder boat which was exploded near Fort Fisher, December 23, 1864, for
which service he volunteered. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


LAURITZ NELSON.

Sailmaker's mate, serving on board the U.S.S. _Nashville_; for
extraordinary bravery and coolness while cutting the cables leading
from Cienfuegos, Cuba, May 11, 1898, under a heavy fire of the enemy.
(G.O. 521, July 7, 1899.)


OSCAR F. NELSON.

Machinist's mate, first class, serving on board the U.S.S.
_Bennington_; for extraordinary heroism displayed at the time of the
explosion of a boiler of that vessel at San Diego, Calif., July 21,
1905. (G.O. 13, January 5, 1906.)


LIEUT. COL. WENDELL C. NEVILLE, UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS.

For distinguished conduct in battle engagements of Vera Cruz, April 21
and 22, 1914; commanded Second Regiment Marines. Was in both days'
fighting and almost continually under fire from soon after landing,
about noon on the 21st, until we were in possession of the city, about
noon of the 22d. His duties required him to be at points of great
danger in directing his officers and men, and he exhibited conspicuous
courage, coolness, and skill in his conduct of the fighting. Upon his
courage and skill depended, in great measure, success or failure. His
responsibilities were great and he met them in a manner worthy of
commendation. (G.O. 177, December 4, 1915.)


WILLIAM NEWLAND.

Ordinary seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Oneida_, in the engagement in
Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864; first loader of the after 9-inch gun;
mentioned as having behaved splendidly, and as being distinguished on
board for good conduct and faithful discharge of all duties. (G.O. 45,
December 31, 1864.)


JOHN H. NIBBE.

Quartermaster on board of the U.S.S. _Petrel_, captured in Yazoo River,
April 22, 1864. "A shot came through the stem of the vessel raking the
gun deck and exploding the boilers. Quartermaster Nibbe stood his
ground on this occasion and aided the wounded, when officers and others
around him deserted their posts." (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


WILLIAM NICHOLS.

Quartermaster on board of the U.S.S. _Brooklyn_ in the engagement in
Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864; perfect coolness and dexterity in handling
his gun; always sure of his aim before he would consent to fire. (G.O.
45, December 31, 1864.)


HENRY N. NICKERSON.

Boatswain's mate, second class, on board of the U.S.S. _Utah_; for
extraordinary heroism in the line of his profession during the seizure
of Vera Cruz, Mexico, April 21, 1914. (G.O. 101, June 15, 1914.)


JOHN NOBLE.

Landsman belonging to the U.S.S. _Metacomet_; constituted one of boat's
crew which, in charge of Acting Ensign H. C. Neilds, of the United
States Navy, went to the rescue of the officers and crew of the U.S.
monitor _Tecumseh_, when that vessel was sunk by a torpedo in passing
the forts in Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864. This boat's crew, under their
brave leader, went within a few hundred yards of one of the forts,
under a fire which Admiral Farragut expressed as "one of the most
galling" he ever saw, and succeeded in rescuing from death 10 of the
crew of the _Tecumseh_. Their conduct elicited the admiration of both
friend and foe. (G.O. 71, January 15, 1866.)


JOSEPH B. NOIL.

Seaman (colored) on board of the U.S.S. _Powhatan_; saved Boatswain J.
C. Walton from drowning at Norfolk, December 26, 1872. (See Report
Capt. P. Crosby, United States Navy.)


CHARLES L. NORDSICK.

Ordinary seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Florida_; for extraordinary
heroism in the line of his profession during the seizure of Vera Cruz,
Mexico, April 21 and 22, 1914. (G.O. 101, June 15, 1914.)


J. A. NORRIS.

Landsman on board the U.S.S. _Jamestown_, December 20, 1883; for
rescuing from drowning A. A. George, who had fallen overboard at the
New York Navy Yard. (G.O. 326, October 18, 1884.)


CHRISTOPHER NUGENT.

Orderly sergeant, United States Marine Corps, on board of the U.S.S.
_Fort Henry_; was in charge of a reconnoitering party sent into Crystal
River, Fla., June 15, 1863, and displayed extraordinary zeal, skill,
and discretion in driving a guard of rebel soldiers into a swamp,
capturing their arms and destroying their camp equipage. (G.O. 32,
April 16, 1864.)


OLIVER O'BRIEN.

Coxswain on board of the U.S.S. _Canandaigua_; meritorious conduct in
boarding the blockade runner _Beatrice_, while aground, under lire from
Fort Moultrie, on the night of November 28, 1864. Promoted to acting
master's mate. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


THOMAS O'CONNELL.

Coal heaver on board of the U.S.S. _Hartford_ in the engagement in
Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864. "Although on the sick list and quite
unwell, he went to his station at the shell whip, where he remained
until his right hand was shot away." (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


JAMES O'CONNER.

Landsman, engineer's force; for jumping overboard from the U.S.S. _Jean
Sands_, opposite the Norfolk Navy Yard, on the night of June 15, 1880,
and rescuing from drowning a young girl who had fallen overboard. (G.O.
326, October 18, 1884.)


TIMOTHY O'DONOGHUE.

Seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Signal_, which vessel was attacked by
field batteries and sharpshooters and destroyed, in Red River, May 5,
1864. "He was wounded early in the day, but stood to his gun until
ordered to leave it." [Duplicate issued to supply the place of the
original, which was lost in saving a young lady from drowning.] (G.O.
45, December 31, 1864.)


WILLIAM O'HEARN.

Water tender, serving on board the U.S.S. _Puritan_; for gallant
conduct at the time of the collapse of one of the crown sheets of
boiler E of the vessel, July 1, 1897. O'Hearn wrapped wet cloths about
his face and arms and, entering the fireroom, crawled over the tops of
the boilers and closed the auxiliary stop valve, disconnecting boiler E
and removing the danger of disabling other boilers. (G.O. 482, November
1, 1897.)


JOHN O'NEAL.

Boatswain's mate on board of the U.S.S. _Kansas_; displayed great
coolness and self-possession at the time Commander A. F. Crosman and
others were drowned near Greytown, Nicaragua, April 12, 1872, and by
extraordinary heroism and personal exertion prevented greater loss of
life. (G.O. 176, July 9, 1872.)


WILLIAM OAKLEY.

Gunner's mate, second class, serving on board the U.S.S. _Marblehead_;
for extraordinary bravery and coolness while cutting the cables leading
from Cienfuegos, Cuba, May 11, 1898, under a heavy fire of the enemy.
(G.O. 521, July 7, 1899.)


AUGUST OHMSEN.

Master-at-arms of the U.S.S. _Tallapoosa_, at the time of the sinking
of that vessel, on the night of August 21, 1884; for clearing the berth
deck, remaining there until the water was waist deep, wading about with
outstretched arms, rousing the men out of their hammocks, then, going
on deck, assisting to lower the first cutter and then the dingy, which
he took charge of. (G.O. 326, October 18, 1884.)


ANTON OLSEN.

Ordinary seaman, serving on board the U.S.S. _Marblehead_; for
gallantry under fire of the enemy while cutting cables at Cienfuegos,
Cuba, May 11, 1898. (G.O. 529, November 2, 1899.)


FRANCIS EDWARD ORMSBEE, Jr.

Chief machinist's mate, United States Navy, who, while attached to the
naval air station, Pensacola, Fla., on September 25, 1918, while flying
with Ensign J. A. Jova, saw a plane go into a tail spin and crash about
three-quarters of a mile to the right. Having landed near by, Ormsbee
lost no time in going overboard, and made for the wreck, which was all
under water except the two wing tips. He succeeded in partially
extricating the gunner, so that his head was out of water, and held him
in this position until the speed boat arrived. Ormsbee then made a
number of desperate attempts to rescue the pilot, diving into the midst
of the tangled wreckage, although cut about the hands, but was too late
to save his life. (G.O. 436, December 9, 1918.)


HARRY WESTLEY ORNDOFF.

Private, United States Marine Corps; for distinguished conduct in the
presence of the enemy in battles on the 13th, 20th, 21st, and 22d of
June, 1900, while with the relief expedition of the allied forces in
China. (G.O. 55, July 19, 1901.)


JOHN ORTEGA.

Seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Saratoga_; meritorious conduct in action
on two occasions. Promoted to acting master's mate. (G.O. 45, December
31, 1864.)


JOHN OSBORNE.

Seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Juniata_; gallant conduct in rescuing
from drowning an enlisted boy of that vessel, at Philadelphia, Pa.,
August 21, 1876. (G.O. 218, August 24, 1876.)


LIEUT. (JUNIOR GRADE) WEEDON E. OSBORNE (D. C.), UNITED STATES NAVY.

"For extraordinary heroism in actual conflict with the enemy and under
fire during the advance on Bouresche, France, on June 6, 1918, in
helping to carry the wounded to a place of safety. While engaged in
this heroic duty he was killed. He was at the time attached to the
Fifth Regiment, United States Marines." (Act of February 4, 1919.)


CHRISTIAN OSEPINS.

Seaman; for jumping overboard from the U.S. tug _Fortune_, May 7, 1882,
at Hampton Roads, Va., and rescuing from drowning James Walters,
gunner's mate. (G.O. 326, October 18, 1884.)


FIRST LIEUT. EDWARD A. OSTERMANN, UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS.

"On October 22, 1915, Captain Upshur, First Lieutenant Ostermann, First
Lieutenant Miller, Assistant Surgeon Borden, and 35 enlisted men of the
Fifteenth Company of Marines, all mounted, left Fort Liberte, Haiti,
for a six-day reconnaissance. After dark on the evening of October 24,
while crossing river in deep ravine, the detachment was suddenly fired
upon from three sides by about 400 Cacos concealed in bushes about 100
yards from fort. The marine detachment fought its way forward to a good
position, which it maintained during the night, although subjected to a
continuous fire from the Cacos. At daybreak the marines, in three
squads, commanded by Captain Upshur, Lieutenant Ostermann, and Gunnery
Sergeant Daly, advanced in three different directions, surprising and
scattering the Cacos in all directions. The expeditionary commander
commented on the gallantry displayed by the officers and men of this
detachment in the following language:

"The action of the 35 men in the attack made upon them during the night
of October 24 can not be commended too highly. It is true that these
men were in pitch darkness, surrounded by ten times their number, and
fighting for their lives, but the manner in which they fought during
that long night, the steady, cool discipline that prevented
demoralization is remarkable. Had one squad failed, not one man of the
party would have lived to tell the story. The actual assault upon the
enemy, made in three different directions and beginning as soon as the
light permitted them to see, was splendid. It meant success or utter
annihilation. It succeeded, thanks to the splendid examples given by
the officers and noncommissioned officers, supported by the men. Upshur
and Ostermann advancing from two directions captured Fort Dipitie, with
a total of 13 Marines, putting garrison to flight. Demolished and
burned fort. All three squads burned all houses from which fire had
been coming. I believe, therefore, that Capt. William P. Upshur, First
Lieut. Edward A. Ostermann, and Gunnery Sergt. Daniel Daly should be
given medals of honor for this particular engagement and the work of
the following day."


MILES M. OVIATT.

Corporal, United States Marine Corps, on board of the U.S.S. _Brooklyn_
in the engagement in Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864; conspicuous for good
conduct at his gun. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


MICHAEL OWENS.

Private, United States Marine Corps, on board of the U.S.S. _Colorado_;
capture of Korean forts, June 11, 1871; fighting hand to hand with the
enemy and badly wounded. (G.O. 169, February 8, 1872.)


ALEXANDER PARKER.

Boatswain's mate, United States Navy; gallant conduct in attempting to
save a shipmate from drowning at the navy yard, Mare Island, Calif., on
the 25th of July, 1876. (G.O. 215, August 9, 1876.)


POMEROY PARKER.

Private, United States Marine Corps, serving on board the U.S.S.
_Nashville_, for extraordinary bravery and coolness while cutting the
cables leading from Cienfuegos, Cuba, May 11, 1898, under heavy fire of
the enemy. (G.O. 521, July 7, 1899.)


WILLIAM PARKER.

Captain of the afterguard on board of the U.S.S. _Cayuga_ in the attack
upon Forts Jackson and St. Philip and the taking of New Orleans, April
24 and 25, 1862; mentioned with "praise for his conduct." (G.O. 11,
April 3, 1863.)


GEORGE PARKS.

Captain of forecastle on board of the U.S.S. _Richmond_, Mobile Bay,
August 5, 1864; commended for coolness and good conduct in the action
in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of August 5, 1864. He joined
the _Richmond_ in September, 1860; reshipped October, 1863; was in the
actions with Fort McRee; with the rebel vessels at the Head of the
Passes of the Mississippi; in passing Forts Jackson and St. Philip; the
Chalmettes; twice before Vicksburg batteries; at Port Hudson; was
captain of a gun in the naval 9-inch gun battery at the siege of Port
Hudson; and present at the surrender of New Orleans. (G.O. 45, December
31, 1864.)


JOACHIM PEASE.

Seaman (colored) on board of the U.S.S. _Kearsarge_ when she destroyed
the _Alabama_ off Cherbourg, France, June 19, 1864; "exhibited marked
coolness and good conduct and is highly commended by his divisional
officer." (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


OSCAR E. PECK.

Second-class boy on board of the U.S.S. _Varuna_ in the attack upon
Forts Jackson and St. Philip April 24, 1862. "His coolness and
intrepidity attracted the attention of all hands." "Deserving of great
praise." (G.O. 11, April 3, 1863.)


WILLIAM PELHAM.

Landsman on board of the U.S.S. _Hartford_ in the engagement in Mobile
Bay August 5, 1864. "When the crew of the gun to which he belonged was
entirely broken up, owing to the number of its killed and wounded, he
assisted in removing the latter below and then immediately returned and
without any direction to do so took his place at the adjoining gun,
where a vacancy existed, and continued to perform his duties there most
faithfully for the remainder of the action." (G.O. 45, December 31,
1864.)


ROBERT PENN.

Fireman, first class (colored), serving on board the U.S.S. _Iowa_, for
extraordinary zeal and readiness to perform duty at the risk of serious
scalding at the time of the blowing out of the manhole gasket of boiler
B on board that vessel off Santiago de Cuba July 20, 1898. Penn hauled
the fire standing on a board thrown across a coal bucket, above a foot
of boiling water, while the water was still blowing from the boiler.
(G.O. 501, December 14, 1898.)


THOMAS PERRY.

Boatswain's mate on board of the U.S.S. _Kearsarge_ when she destroyed
the _Alabama_ off Cherbourg, France, June 19, 1864; "exhibited marked
coolness and good conduct and is highly commended by his divisional
officer." (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


ALEXANDER PETERS.

Boatswain's mate, first class, serving on board the U.S.S. _Missouri_,
for heroism in attempting to rescue from drowning Cecil C. Young,
ordinary seaman, September 15, 1904. (G.O. 172, October 4, 1904.)


CARL E. PETERSEN.

Chief machinist, United States Navy, for distinguished conduct in the
presence of the enemy at Peking, China, June 28 to August 17, 1900.
(G.O. 55, July 19, 1901.)


ALFRED PETERSON.

Seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Commodore Perry_ in the attack upon
Franklin, Va., October 3, 1862; distinguished for his gallant conduct.
(G.O. 11, April 3, 1863.)


LIEUT. ORLANDO H. PETTY (M.C.), UNITED STATES NAVAL RESERVE FORCE.

"For extraordinary heroism while serving with the Fifth Regiment,
United States Marines, in France during the attack on the Bois de
Belleau, June 11, 1918. While under heavy fire of high-explosive and
gas shells in the town of Lucy, where his dressing station was located,
he attended to and evacuated the wounded under most trying conditions.
Having been knocked to the ground by an exploding gas shell which tore
his mask, he discarded the mask and courageously continued his work.
His dressing station being hit and demolished, he personally helped
carry Captain Williams, wounded, through the shell fire to a place of
safety." (Act of February 4, 1919.)


GEORGE F. PHILLIPS.

Machinist, first class, United States Navy, for extraordinary heroism
in connection with the sinking of the U.S.S. _Merrimac_ at the entrance
to the harbor of Santiago de Cuba, on the night of June 2, 1898, under
heavy fire from the Spanish batteries. (G.O. 529, November 2, 1899.)


REUBEN J. PHILLIPS.

Corporal, United States Marine Corps, for distinguished conduct in the
presence of the enemy in the battles on the 13th, 20th, 21st, and 22d
of June, 1900, while with the relief expedition of the allied forces in
China. (G.O. 55, July 19, 1901.)


WILLIAM PHINNEY.

Boatswain's mate on board of the U.S.S. _Lackawanna_; in the engagement
in Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864, as captain of a gun showed much presence
of mind and coolness in managing it, and the great encouragement he
gave the crew. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


RICHARD PILE.

Ordinary seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Kansas_; displayed great
coolness and self-possession at the time Commander A. F. Crosman and
others were drowned, near Greytown, Nicaragua, April 12, 1872, and by
extraordinary heroism and personal exertion prevented greater loss of
life. (G.O. 176, July 9, 1872.)


WILLIAM B. POOLE.

Quartermaster on board of the U.S.S. _Kearsarge_ when she destroyed the
_Alabama_ off Cherbourg, France, June 19, 1864; "exhibited marked
coolness and good conduct and is highly commended by his divisional
officer." (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


GEORGE PRANCE.

Captain of the maintop on board of the U.S.S. _Ticonderoga_ in the
attacks on Fort Fisher December 24 and 25, 1864, and January 13, 14,
and 15, 1865; commended for coolness and good conduct as captain of a
gun. (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


THOMAS F. PRENDERGAST.

Corporal, United States Marine Corps, for distinguished conduct in the
presence of the enemy in battles while with the Eighth Army Corps on
March 25, 27, and 29, and April 4, 1899. (G.O. 55, July 19, 1901.)


HERBERT IRVING PRESTON.

Private, United States Marine Corps, for distinguished conduct in the
presence of the enemy at Peking, China, July 21 to August 17, 1900.
Preston assisted to erect barricades under a heavy fire. (G.O. 55, July
19, 1901.)


JOHN PRESTON.

Landsman on board of the U.S.S. _Oneida_ in the engagement in Mobile
Bay August 5, 1864. Although severely wounded, he remained at his gun
until obliged to go to the surgeon, to whom he reported himself as
slightly hurt. He assisted in taking care of the wounded below and
wanted to return to his station, but on examining him it was found that
he was wounded quite severely in both eyes. (G.O. 45, December 31,
1864.)


EDWARD PRICE.

Coxswain on board of the U.S.S. _Brooklyn_, in the engagement in Mobile
Bay, August 5, 1864; great coolness and bravery under fire. His gun
becoming disabled by the sponge breaking, leaving the head in the gun,
he proceeded to clear it by pouring powder into the vent and blowing
the sponge head out. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


GEORGE PROVINCE.

Ordinary seaman belonging to the U.S.S. _Santiago de Cuba_; was one of
the boat's crew detailed for General Terry. This boat's crew was
represented to have been the only men who entered Fort Fisher in the
assault from the fleet, January 15, 1865. (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


JOHN HENRY PRUITT.

Corporal, United States Marine Corps. "For extraordinary gallantry and
intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty in action with the enemy
at Blanc Mont Ridge, France, October 3, 1918. Corporal Pruitt, single
handed, attacked two machine guns, capturing them and killing two of
the enemy. He then captured 40 prisoners in a dug-out near by. This
gallant soldier was killed soon afterwards by shell fire while he was
sniping the enemy." (Act of February 4, 1919.)


HUGH PURVIS.

Private, United States Marine Corps, on board of the U.S.S. _Alaska_,
during the attack on and capture of the Korean forts, June 11, 1871;
was the first to scale the walls of the fort, and capture the flag of
the Korean forces. Promoted to corporal. (G.O. 169, February 8, 1872.)


GEORGE PYNE.

Seaman on board the U.S.S. _Magnolia_; was one of a howitzer's crew
that cooperated with the Army in the military and naval expedition to
St. Marks, Fla., March 5 and 6, 1865, and was commended for coolness
and determination under fire, remarkable efforts in assisting to
transport the gun, and for remaining by his gun throughout a severe
engagement in a manner highly creditable to himself and to the service.
(G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


JOHN H. QUICK.

Sergeant, United States Marine Corps, for distinguished and gallant
conduct in battle at Cuzco, Cuba, on June 14, 1898, signaling to the
U.S.S. _Dolphin_ on three different occasions while exposed to a heavy
fire from the enemy. (G.O. 504, December 13, 1898.)


JOSEPH QUICK.

Coxswain, serving on the U.S.S. _Yorktown_; for heroism rescuing
Walenty Wisnieroski, machinist, second class, from drowning at
Yokohama, Japan, April 27, 1902. (G.O. 93, July 7, 1902.)


JOHN RANNAHAN.

Corporal, United States Marine Corps, on board of the U.S.S.
_Minnesota_; especially commended for bravery in the assault on Fort
Fisher, January 15, 1865, remaining at the front near the fort when the
panic carried the mass away. (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


CHARLES READ.

Ordinary seaman on board the U.S.S. _Magnolia_; was one of a howitzer's
crew that cooperated with the Army in the military and naval expedition
to St. Marks, Fla., March 5 and 6, 1865, and was commended for coolness
and determination under fire, remarkable efforts in assisting to
transport the gun, and for remaining by his gun in a manner highly
creditable to himself and the service. (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


CHARLES A. READ.

Coxswain on board of the U.S.S. _Kearsarge_ when she destroyed the
_Alabama_, off Cherbourg, France, June 19, 1864; "exhibited marked
coolness and good conduct and is highly commended by his divisional
officer." (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


GEORGE E. READ.

Seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Kearsarge_ when she destroyed the
_Alabama_, off Cherbourg, France, June 19, 1864; "exhibited marked
coolness and good conduct and is highly commended by his divisional
officer." (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


JEREMIAH REGAN.

Quartermaster on board of the U.S.S. _Galena_ in the attack upon Drurys
Bluff May 15, 1862. His good conduct "attracted the particular
attention of his commanding officer." (G.O. 11, April 3, 1863.)


PATRICK REGAN.

Ordinary seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Pensacola_; gallant conduct
while serving on the _Pensacola_ in the harbor of Coquimbo, Chile, July
30, 1873.


MAJ. GEORGE C. REID, UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS.

For distinguished conduct in battle, engagements of Vera Cruz, April 21
and 22, 1914; was eminent and conspicuous in command of his battalion;
was in the fighting of both days and exhibited courage and skill in
leading his men through action. His cool judgment and courage and his
skill in handling his men in encountering and overcoming the machine
gun and rifle fire down Cinco de Mayo and parallel streets accounts for
the small percentage of the losses of marines under his command. (G.O.
177, December 4, 1915.)


PATRICK REID.

Chief water tender on board of the U.S.S. _North Dakota_; for
extraordinary heroism in the line of his profession during the fire on
board of that vessel September 8, 1910. (G.O. 83, October 4, 1910.)


CHARLES RICE.

Coal heaver on board of the U.S.S. _Agawam_; one of the crew of the
powder boat which was exploded near Fort Fisher December 23, 1864, for
which service he volunteered. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


LOUIS RICHARDS.

Quartermaster on board of the U.S.S. _Pensacola_ in the attack upon
Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and at the taking of New Orleans, April
24 and 25, 1862. "Fine conduct;" "through din and roar of battle
steered the ship through barricade, and his watchful devotion to orders
contributed greatly to successful passage." "Coolness perfectly
heroic." Promoted to acting master's mate. (G.O. 11, April 3, 1863.)


JOHN P. RILEY.

(Name changed to Rilley.)

Landsman, serving on board the U.S.S. _Nashville_, for extraordinary
bravery and coolness while cutting the cables leading from Cienfuegos,
Cuba, May 11, 1898, under a heavy fire of the enemy. (G.O. 521, July 7,
1899.)


EDWARD RINGOLD.

Coxswain on board of the U.S.S. _Wabash_, in the engagement at
Pocataligo October 22, 1862, "solicited permission to accompany the
howitzer corps, and performed his duty with such gallantry and presence
of mind as to attract the attention of all around him. Knowing there
was a scarcity of ammunition, he came up through the whole line of
fire, with his 'shirt slung over his shoulders, filled with fixed
ammunition, which he brought 2 miles from the rear.'" (G.O. 17, July
10, 1863.)


JAMES S. ROANTREE.

Sergeant, United States Marine Corps, on board of the U.S.S. _Oneida_;
in the engagement in Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864, conducted himself with
distinguished gallantry, and is mentioned as particularly deserving of
notice. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


CHARLES C. ROBERTS.

Machinist's mate, first class, on board of the U.S.S. _North Dakota_;
for extraordinary heroism in the line of his profession during the fire
on board of that vessel, September 8, 1910. (G.O. 83, October 4, 1910.)


JAMES ROBERTS.

Seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Agawam_; one of the crew of the powder
boat which was exploded near Fort Fisher, December 23, 1864, for which
service he volunteered. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


ALEXANDER ROBINSON.

Boatswain's mate on board of the U.S.S. _Howquah_ on the occasion of
the destruction of the blockade runner _Lynx_, off Wilmington,
September 25, 1864, at night. Performed his duty faithfully under the
most trying circumstances, standing firmly at his post in the midst of
a cross fire from the rebel shore batteries and our own vessels. (G.O.
45, December 31, 1864.)


CHARLES ROBINSON.

Boatswain's mate on board of the U.S.S. _Baron De Kalb_, Yazoo River
expedition, December 23 to 27, 1862; mentioned by his commanding
officer for having "distinguished himself in various actions." (G.O.
11, April 3, 1863.)


JOHN ROBINSON.

Captain of the hold on board of the U.S.S. _Yucca_, who, with Acting
Ensign James H. Bunting, during the heavy gale which occurred in
Pensacola Bay on the night of January 19, 1867, swam ashore with a line
for the purpose of sending off a blowcock, which would facilitate
getting up steam and prevent the vessel from stranding, thus
voluntarily periling his life to save the vessel and the lives of
others. (G.O. 82, February 23, 1867.)


ROBERT GUY ROBINSON.

Gunnery sergeant, United States Marine Corps. "For extraordinary
heroism as observer in the First Marine Aviation Force at the front in
France. He not only participated successfully in numerous raids into
the enemy territory, but on October 8, 1918, while conducting an air
raid in company with planes from Squadron 218, Royal Air Force, he was
attacked by nine enemy scouts and in the fight which followed he shot
down one of the enemy planes. Also, on October 14, 1918, while on an
air raid over Pittham, Belgium, his plane and one other became
separated from their formation on account of motor trouble and were
attacked by 12 enemy scouts. In the fight which ensued he behaved with
conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity. After shooting down one of the
enemy planes he was struck by a bullet which carried away most of his
elbow, and his gun jammed at the same time. He cleared the jam with one
hand and while his pilot maneuvered for position, with the gun cleared,
he returned to the fight though his left arm was useless and fought off
the enemy scouts until he collapsed after receiving two more bullet
wounds, one in the stomach and one in the thigh. (Act of February 4,
1919.)


THOMAS ROBINSON.

Captain of afterguard on the U.S.S. _Tallapoosa_; heroic efforts to
save from drowning Wellington Brocar, landsman, of the _Tallapoosa_,
off New Orleans July 15, 1866. (G.O. 77, August 1, 1866.)


SAMUEL F. ROGERS.

Quartermaster on board of the U.S.S. _Colorado_; wounded while fighting
at the side of Lieutenant McKee at the capture of the Korean forts June
11, 1871. (G.O. 169, February 8, 1872.)


GEORGE ROSE.

Seaman, United States Navy, for distinguished conduct in the presence
of the enemy, in battles on the 13th, 20th, 21st, and 22d of June,
1900, while with the relief expedition of the allied forces in China.
(G.O. 55, July 19, 1901.)


JOHANNES ROUNING.

Ordinary seaman, United States Navy; for jumping overboard from the
U.S. tug _Fortune_ May 7, 1882, at Hampton Roads, Va., and rescuing
from drowning James Walters, gunner's mate. (G.O. 326, October 18,
1884.)


JOHN ROUNTRY.

First-class fireman on board of the U.S.S. _Montauk_. During the night
of September 21, 1864, fire was discovered in the lightroom of the
_Montauk_. The alarm created a panic and demoralized the crew. Rountry,
with hose in hand, notwithstanding the cry of "fire in the magazine,"
forced his way through the frightened crowd to the lightroom, and, with
the aid of James Horton, gunner's mate, put out the fire. (G.O. 59,
June 22, 1865.)


JOHN RUSH.

First-class fireman on board of the U.S.S. _Richmond_, in the attack on
the Port Hudson batteries, March 14, 1863. "When the fireroom and other
parts of the ship were filled with hot steam from injury to the boiler
by a shot, he, from the first moment of the casualty, stood firmly at
his post, and was conspicuous in his exertions to remedy the evil by
hauling the fires from the injured boiler, the heat being so great from
the combined effects of fire and steam that he was compelled, from mere
exhaustion, to be relieved every few minutes until the work was
accomplished." (G.O. 17, July 10, 1863.)


CAPT. WILLIAM R. RUSH, UNITED STATES NAVY.

For distinguished conduct in battle, engagements of Vera Cruz, April 21
and 22, 1914; commanded naval brigade; was in both days' fighting and
almost continually under fire from soon after landing, about noon on
the 21st, until we were in possession of the city, about noon of the
22d. His duties required him to be at points of great danger in
directing his officers and men, and he exhibited conspicuous courage,
coolness, and skill in his conduct of the fighting. Upon his courage
and skill depended in great measure success or failure. His
responsibilities were great, and he met them in a manner worthy of
commendation. (G.O. 177, December 4, 1915.)


HENRY P. RUSSELL.

Landsman, serving on board the U.S.S. _Marblehead_, for extraordinary
bravery and coolness while cutting the cables leading from Cienfuegos,
Cuba, May 11, 1898, under a heavy fire of the enemy. (G.O. 521, July 7,
1899.)


JOHN RUSSELL.

Seaman, for jumping overboard from the U.S.S. _Trenton_, at Genoa,
Italy, September 21, 1880, and rescuing from drowning Hans Paulsen,
ordinary seaman. (G.O. 326, October 18, 1884.)


FRANCIS T. RYAN.

(Alias Frank Gallagher.)

Coxswain, United States Navy, for distinguished conduct in the presence
of the enemy in the battles on the 13th, 20th, 21st and 22d of June,
1900, while with the relief expedition of the allied forces in China.
(G.O. 55, July 19, 1901.)


RICHARD RYAN.

Ordinary seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Hartford_; gallant conduct in
jumping overboard at Norfolk, Va., and rescuing from drowning one of
the crew of that vessel, March 4, 1876. (G.O. 207, March 23, 1876.)


ENSIGN THOMAS J. RYAN, UNITED STATES NAVY.

For heroism in effecting the rescue of a woman from the burning Grand
Hotel, Yokohama, Japan, on September 1, 1923. Following the earthquake
and fire which occurred in Yokohama on September 1, Ensign Ryan, with
complete disregard for his own life, extricated a woman from the Grand
Hotel, thus saving her life. His heroic conduct upon this occasion
reflects the greatest credit on himself and on the United States Navy,
of which he is a part. (Medal presented by President Coolidge at the
White House on March 15, 1924.) (G.O. 124, February 4, 1924.)


WILLIAM SADLER.

Captain of top; for jumping overboard from the U.S.S. _Saratoga_, off
Coasters Harbor Island, R.I., June 25, 1881, and sustaining, until
picked up by a boat from the ship, Frank Gallagher, second-class boy,
who had fallen overboard. (G.O. 326, October 18, 1884.)


ISAAC SAPP.

Seaman, engineers' force, on board of the U.S.S. _Shenandoah_; for
jumping overboard and assisting Midshipman Miller in saving Charles
Prince, seaman, from drowning at Villefranche, December 15, 1871. (G.O.
169, February 8, 1872.)


JAMES SAUNDERS.

Quartermaster on board of the U.S.S. _Kearsarge_ when she destroyed the
_Alabama_ off Cherbourg, France, June 19, 1864. His conduct is
testified to by Commodore Winslow as deserving of all commendation,
both for gallantry and encouragement of others in his division. (G.O.
59, June 22, 1865.)


AUZELLA SAVAGE.

Ordinary seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Santiago de Cuba_; "commended
for gallant behavior in the assault on Fort Fisher, January 15, 1865.
Had a flagstaff shot away above his hand, but seized the remainder off
the staff and brought the colors safely off." (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


DAVID J. SCANNELL.

Private, United States Marine Corps, for distinguished conduct in the
presence of the enemy at Peking, China, July 21 to August 17, 1900.
Scannell assisted to erect barricades under a heavy fire. (G. O. 55,
July 19, 1901.)


CHARLES S. SCHEPKE.

Gunner's mate, first class, serving on board the U.S.S. _Missouri_, for
extraordinary heroism in remaining by a burning magazine and assisting
to extinguish the fire, April 13, 1904. (G.O. 160, May 26, 1904.)


OSCAR SCHMIDT, Jr.

Chief gunner's mate, United States Navy, U.S.S. _Chestnut Hill_, for
gallant conduct and extraordinary heroism on the occasion of the
explosion and subsequent fire on board the U.S. submarine chaser _219_,
October 9, 1918. Schmidt seeing a man hanging on a line from the bow of
the _219_, whose legs were partly blown off, jumped overboard, swam to
the subchaser, and carried him from the bow to the stern, where a
member of the subchaser's crew helped him land the man on the afterdeck
of the subchaser. Schmidt then endeavored to pass through the flames
amidships to get another man who was seriously burned. This he was
unable to do, but the injured man fell overboard and drifted to the
stern of the chaser, where Schmidt helped him aboard. (G.O. 450,
January 25, 1919.)


OTTO D. SCHMIDT.

Seaman, serving on board the U.S.S. _Bennington_, for extraordinary
heroism displayed at the time of the explosion of a boiler of that
vessel at San Diego, Calif., July 21, 1905. (G.O. 13, January 5, 1906.)


FRED J. SCHNEPEL.

Ordinary seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Florida_; for extraordinary
heroism in the line of his profession during the seizure of Vera Cruz,
Mexico, April 21 and 22, 1914. (G.O. 101, June 15, 1914.)


GEORGE SCHUTT.

Coxswain belonging to the U.S.S. _Hendrick Hudson_; was one of the
howitzer's crew cooperating with the Army in the military and naval
expedition to St. Marks, Fla., March 5 and 6, 1865, and was commended
for coolness and determination under fire, remarkable efforts in
assisting to transport gun, and for remaining by his gun throughout a
severe engagement in a manner highly creditable to himself and to the
service. (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


JOSEPH F. SCOTT.

Private, United States Marine Corps, serving on board the U.S.S.
_Nashville_, for extraordinary bravery and coolness while cutting the
cables leading from Cienfuegos, Cuba, May 11, 1898, under a heavy fire
of the enemy. (G.O. 521, July 7, 1899.)


WILLIAM SEACH.

Ordinary seaman, United States Navy, for distinguished conduct in the
presence of the enemy in battles on the 13th, 20th, 21st, and 22d of
June, 1900, while with the relief expedition of the allied forces in
China. (G.O. 55, July 19, 1901.)


JAMES SEANOR.

Master-at-arms of the U.S. ironclad _Chickasaw_; in the engagement in
Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864, although his time was out, volunteered from
the _Vincennes_ for the battle of Mobile Bay, and was honorably
mentioned by his commanding officer on the _Chickasaw_. (G.O. 45,
December 31, 1864.)


CHIEF GUNNER ROBERT SEMPLE, UNITED STATES NAVY.

For meritorious service under fire on the occasion of the landing of
the American naval forces at Vera Cruz on April 21, 1914. Chief Gunner
Semple was then attached to the U.S.S. _Florida_ as a chief turret
captain. (G.O. 120, January 10, 1924.)


BENJAMIN SEVEARER.

Seaman, who raised the flag on Fort Clark at the Hatteras expedition.
"Deed of noble daring." (G.O. 11, April 3, 1863.)


RICHARD SEWARD.

Paymaster's steward on board of the U.S.S. _Commodore_, November, 1863;
"volunteered to go on the field amidst a heavy fire to recover the
bodies of two soldiers, which he brought off with the aid of others; a
second instance of personal valor within a fortnight." Promoted to
acting master's mate. (G.O. 32, April 16, 1864.)


WILLIAM S. SHACKLETTE.

Hospital steward, serving on board the U.S.S. _Bennington_, for
extraordinary heroism displayed at the time of the explosion of a
boiler of that vessel at San Diego, Calif., July 21, 1905. (G.O. 13,
January 5, 1906.)


PATRICK SHANAHAN.

Chief boatswain's mate, serving on board the U.S.S. _Alliance_, for
heroism, rescuing William Stevens, quartermaster, first class, from
drowning, May 28, 1899. (G.O. 534, November 29, 1899.)


HENDRICK SHARP.

Seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Richmond_, Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864;
commended for coolness and courage as captain of 100-pounder rifle gun
on top-gallant forecastle, in the action in Mobile Bay on the morning
and forenoon of August 5,1864. He fought his gun when under the hottest
fire from the enemy's batteries, at short range, with a coolness and
effectiveness that won not only the admiration of the commanding
officer of the division but of all others who had an opportunity to
observe him. He has been in the naval service 32 years; joined the
_Richmond_ at Norfolk when first put in commission, September 27, 1860.
At the expiration of his term of service, in 1863, reshipped for the
period of three years. He was in action on board of the _Richmond_ with
the rebels at the Head of the Passes of the Mississippi; at the
bombardment of Fort McRee, at Pensacola, which lasted an entire day,
when he received a severe splinter wound in the left hand, which
permanently disabled two of his fingers; and notwithstanding the
severity of the wound, as soon as it was dressed by the surgeon he
returned to his gun without the permission of the surgeon and persisted
in remaining at his quarters, using his right hand until the action
ceased. He was in the actions with Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and
with the rebel ironclads and gunboats below New Orleans; in action with
the Chalmette batteries; present at the surrender of New Orleans;
fought the batteries of Vicksburg twice; was in the memorable attack on
Port Hudson on the 14th of March, 1863; was captain of a 9-inch gun in
the naval 9-inch gun battery commanded by Lieut. Commander Edward
Terry, placed in the rear of Port Hudson during the siege. He was also
captain of a gun in the naval battery established at Baton Rouge, and
commanded by Lieut. Commander Edward Terry after the repulse of the
Army and death of General Williams at that place. (G.O. 45, December
31, 1864.)


LOUIS C. SHEPARD.

Ordinary seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Wabash_; mentioned for gallant
conduct in the assault on Fort Fisher, January 15, 1865, and as having
entered the stockade. (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


JAMES SHERIDAN.

Quartermaster on board of the U.S.S. _Oneida_; in the engagement in
Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864, captain of the after 9-inch gun; was
wounded in several places, but remained at his gun until the firing
ceased, and then supplied the place of the signal quartermaster, who
had been injured by a fall. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


WILLIAM SHIPMAN.

Coxswain on board of the U.S.S. _Ticonderoga_ in the attacks on Fort
Fisher, January 15, 1865; "especially commended for his conduct at the
time of the explosion of the 100-pounder Parrott gun." Being captain of
a gun near the bursted one, and seeing the effect of the explosion on
those around him, he at once encouraged them by exclaiming: "Go ahead,
boys; this is only the fortunes of war!" (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


JOHN SHIVERS.

Private, United States Marine Corps, on board of the U.S.S.
_Minnesota_; especially commended for bravery in the assault on Fort
Fisher January 15, 1865, remaining at the front near the fort when the
panic carried the mass away. (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


HENRY SHUTES.

Captain of forecastle on board of the U.S.S. _Wissahickon_; for
distinguished service in the battle below New Orleans, April 24 and 25,
1862, and in the engagement at Fort McAllister, February 27, 1863, and
seamanlike qualities while gunner's mate of the U.S.S. _Don_. A shot
from Fort McAllister penetrated the _Wissahickon_ below the water line
and entered the magazine, on which occasion Shutes, by his presence of
mind and prompt action, contributed to the preservation of the powder
and safety of the ship. (G.O. 71, January 15, 1866.)


JOHN OTTO SIEGEL.

Boatswain's mate, second class, United States Navy, for extraordinary
heroism on November 1, 1918, when he went aboard the schooner
_Hjeltenaes_, which was in a mass of flames, and after rescuing two men
from crew's quarters, went back the third time. Immediately after he
had entered the crew's quarters a steam pipe over the door carried
away, making it impossible for him to escape. Siegel became overcome
with smoke and fell to the deck, being finally rescued by some of the
crew of the _Mohawk_, of which he was a member, who carried him out and
rendered first aid. (G.O. 445, January 7, 1919.)


FRANCE SILVA.

Private, United States Marine Corps, for distinguished conduct in the
presence of the enemy at Peking, China, June 28 to August 17, 1900.
(G.O. 55, July 19, 1901.)


LEBBEUS SIMKINS.

Coxswain on board of the U.S.S. _Richmond_, Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864;
commended for coolness and courage in the action in Mobile Bay on the
morning and forenoon of August 5, 1864. He joined the _Brooklyn_ in
January, 1861; was in the actions with Forts Jackson and St. Philip,
and the rebel ironclads and gunboats below New Orleans, Chalmette
batteries, batteries below Vicksburg, and present at the surrender of
New Orleans. Joined the _Richmond_ October, 1863. (G.O. 45, December
31, 1864.)


HENRY SIMPSON.

First-class fireman; for rescuing from drowning John W. Powers,
ordinary seaman on board the U.S.S. _Essex_, at Monrovia, Liberia,
October 31, 1877. (G.O. 326, October 18, 1884.)


LAWRENCE C. SINNETT.

Seaman on board the U.S.S. _Florida_; for extraordinary heroism in the
line of his profession during the seizure of Vera Cruz, Mexico, April
21, 1914. (G.O. 101, June 15, 1914.)


ALBERT JOSEPH SMITH.

Private, United States Marine Corps. "At about 7.30 a.m. on the morning
of February 11, 1921, Private Smith while on duty as a sentry rescued
Plen M. Phelps, late machinist's mate, second class, United States
Navy, from a burning seaplane, which had fallen near his post, gate No.
1, marine barracks, naval air station, Pensacola, Fla. Despite the
explosion of the gravity gasoline tank, with total disregard of
personal safety, he pushed himself to a position where he could reach
Phelps, who was pinned beneath the burning wreckage, and rescued him
from the burning plane, in the performance of which he sustained
painful burns about the head, neck, and both hands." (G.O. 72,
September 29, 1921.)


CHARLES H. SMITH.

Coxswain, was one of the crew of the first cutter of the U.S.S. _Rhode
Island_, on the night of December 30, 1862, which was engaged in saving
the lives of the officers and crew of the _Monitor_. They had saved a
number, and it was owing to their gallantry and zeal and desire to save
others that they became separated from the _Rhode Island_, and were
adrift for some hours. Promoted to acting master's mate. (G.O. 59, June
22, 1865.)


EDWIN SMITH.

Ordinary seaman on board the U.S.S. _Whitehead_ in the attack upon
Franklin, N.C., October 3, 1862; swam ashore under the fire of the
enemy with a line and thus rendered important service. Mentioned for
gallantry.


EUGENE P. SMITH.

Chief water tender, U.S.S. _Decatur_; for several times entering
compartments on board of _Decatur_ immediately following an explosion
on board that vessel, September 9, 1915, and locating and rescuing
injured shipmates. (G.O. 189, February 8, 1916.)


FRANK E. SMITH.

Oiler, United States Navy, for distinguished conduct in the presence of
the enemy, in battles on the 13th, 20th, 21st, and 22d of June, 1900,
while with the relief expedition of the allied forces in China. (G.O.
55, July 19, 1901.)


JAMES SMITH.

Captain of forecastle on board of the U.S.S. _Richmond_, Mobile Bay,
August 5, 1864; commended for coolness and good conduct as captain of a
gun in the action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of August
5, 1864. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


JAMES SMITH.

Landsman, United States Navy, for distinguished conduct in the presence
of the enemy in battles on the 13th, 20th, 21st, and 22d of June, 1900,
while with the relief expedition of the allied forces in China. (G.O.
55, July 19, 1901.)


JAMES SMITH.

Seaman on board the U.S.S. _Kansas_; displayed great coolness and
self-possession at the time Commander A. F. Crosman and others were
drowned near Greytown, Nicaragua, April 12, 1872, and by extraordinary
heroism and personal exertion prevented greater loss of life. (G.O.
176, July 9, 1872.)


JOHN SMITH.

Captain of forecastle on board of the U.S.S. _Lackawanna_ in the
engagement in Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864; was first captain of a gun,
and finding that he could not sufficiently depress his gun when
alongside of the rebel ironclad _Tennessee_, threw a hand holystone
into one of the ports at a rebel using abusive language against the
crew of the ship. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


JOHN SMITH.

Seaman, for jumping overboard from the U.S.S. _Shenandoah_, at Rio de
Janeiro, Brazil, September 19, 1880, and rescuing from drowning James
Grady, first-class fireman. (G.O. 326, October 18, 1884.)


JOHN SMITH.

Second captain of top on board of the U.S.S. _Richmond_, Mobile Bay,
August 5, 1864. Commended for coolness and good conduct as captain of a
gun in the action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of August
5, 1864. He was on board the _Varuna_ when she was sunk by the rebel
vessels after having passed Forts Jackson and St. Philip; was
transferred to the _Brooklyn_, and was in the action with the batteries
below Vicksburg. Joined the _Richmond_ in September, 1863. (G.O. 45,
December 31, 1864.)


OLOFF SMITH.

Coxswain on board of the U.S.S. _Richmond_, Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864;
commended for coolness and good conduct in the action in Mobile Bay on
the morning and forenoon of August 5, 1864. He was on board the
_Richmond_ in the actions with Fort McRee, at the Head of the Passes of
the Mississippi; with the Forts Jackson and St. Philip; the rebel
ironclads and gunboats below New Orleans; the Chalmette batteries;
twice with the batteries of Vicksburg in attempting to pass and at the
siege of Port Hudson; and present at the surrender of New Orleans. He
has been coxswain on board the _Richmond_ for twenty consecutive
months. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


THOMAS SMITH.

Seaman, for rescuing from drowning William Kent, coxswain of the U.S.S.
_Enterprise_, of Para, Brazil, October 1, 1878.


THOMAS SMITH.

Seaman on board the U.S.S. _Magnolia_. Was one of a howitzer's crew
cooperating with the Army in the military and naval expedition to St.
Marks, Fla., March 5 and 6, 1865, and was commended for coolness and
determination under fire, remarkable efforts in assisting to transport
gun, and for remaining by his gun throughout a severe engagement in a
manner highly creditable to himself and to the service. (G.O. 59, June
22, 1865.)


WALTER B. SMITH.

Ordinary seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Richmond_, Mobile Bay, August
5, 1864; commended for coolness and good conduct at the 100-pounder
rifle gun on the topgallant forecastle, and for musket firing into the
gun ports of the rebel ironclad _Tennessee_ in the action in Mobile Bay
on the morning and forenoon of August 5, 1864. He was on board the
U.S.S. _Hatteras_ when that vessel was sunk by the piratical vessel
commanded by the notorious Semmes, off Galveston; joined the _Richmond_
after having been exchanged, September, 1863, and his conduct on board
of the ship has been of the most exemplary kind. (G.O. 45, December 31,
1864.)


WILHELM SMITH.

Gunner's mate, first class, on board the U.S.S. _New York_; for
entering a compartment filled with gases and rescuing a shipmate, P. J.
Walsh, ordinary seaman, January 24, 1916. (G.O. 202, April 6, 1916.)


WILLIAM SMITH.

Quartermaster on board the U.S.S. _Kearsarge_ when she destroyed the
_Alabama_, off Cherbourg, France, June 19, 1864; "exhibited marked
coolness and good conduct, and is highly commended by his divisional
officer." (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


WILLIAM SMITH.

(Name changed to Daniel G. George.)

Ordinary seaman on board of the U.S. picket boat _No. 1_, which
destroyed the rebel ram _Albemarle_ at Plymouth, N.C., October 27,
1864. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


WILLARD M. SMITH.

Corporal, United States Marine Corps, on board of the U.S.S.
_Brooklyn_, in the engagement in Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864;
conspicuous for good conduct at his gun. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


WILLIAM E. SNYDER.

Chief electrician, serving on board the U.S.S. _Birmingham_, for
extraordinary heroism, rescuing G. H. Kephart, seaman, from drowning at
Hampton Roads, Va., January 4, 1910. (G.O. 58, March 2, 1910.)


WILLIAM SPICER.

Gunner's mate, first class, serving on board the U.S.S. _Marblehead_,
for heroism while engaged in the perilous work of sweeping for and
disabling 27 contact mines in the approaches to Caimanera, Guantanamo
Bay, Cuba, July 26 and 27, 1898. (G.O. 500, December 14, 1898.)


DAVID SPROWLE.

Orderly sergeant, United States Marine Corps, on board of the U.S.S.
_Richmond_, Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864; commended for coolness and for
setting a good example to the marine guard working a division of great
guns in the action of Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of August
5, 1864. Joined the _Richmond_ September 27, 1860; was in the actions
with Fort McRee, the Head of the Passes of the Mississippi, Forts
Jackson and St. Philip, the Chalmettes, the rebel ironclads and
gunboats below New Orleans, Vicksburg, Port Hudson, and present at the
surrender of New Orleans. He has been in the service 28 years. (G.O.
45, December 31, 1864.)


WILLIAM B. STACY.

Seaman on board the U.S.S. _Rhode Island_. While coaling ship in the
harbor of Cape Haitien one of the crew of the _Rhode Island_ fell
overboard, and, notwithstanding he succeeded in catching a rope, had,
from exhaustion, to relinquish his hold. Although the sea was running
high at the time, Stacy, at the peril of his life, jumped overboard,
secured the rope around his shipmate, and thus saved him from drowning.
(G.O. 71, January 15, 1866.)


ROBERT STANLEY.

Hospital apprentice, United States Navy, for distinguished conduct in
the presence of the enemy in the battle of Peking, China, July 12,
1900. Stanley volunteered and carried messages under fire. (G.O. 55,
July 19, 1901.)


WILLIAM A. STANLEY.

Shell man at No. 8 gun on board of the U.S.S. _Hartford_ in the
engagement in Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864; "was severely wounded but
refused to go below, and continued to perform his duties until at
length he became so weak from loss of blood as to be unable to stand."
(G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


THOMAS STANTON.

Chief machinist's mate on board of the U.S.S. _North Dakota_; for
extraordinary heroism in the line of his profession during the fire on
board that vessel September 8, 1910. (G.O. 83, October 4, 1910.)


LIEUT. ADOLPHUS STATON, UNITED STATES NAVY.

For distinguished conduct in battle, engagement of Vera Cruz, April 22,
1914; was eminent and conspicuous in command of his battalion. He
exhibited courage and skill in leading his men through the action of
the 22d and in the final occupation of the city. (G.O. 177, December 4,
1915.)


JAMES E. STERLING.

Coal heaver on board of the U.S.S. _Brooklyn_ in the engagement in
Mobile Bay August 5, 1864; bravery in remaining at his post when
wounded, and passing shell until struck down a second time and
completely disabled. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


DANIEL D. STEVENS.

Quartermaster on the U.S.S. _Canonicus_, for bravery before Fort
Fisher, 1865. (Letter July 15, 1870, Secretary of the Navy to Hon. S.
Hooper.)


JAMES A. STEWART.

Corporal, United States Marine Corps, on board of the U.S.S.
_Plymouth_; jumped overboard in the harbor of Villefranche, France,
February 1, 1872, and saved Midshipman Osterhaus from drowning. (G.O.
180, October 10, 1872.)


PETER STEWART.

Gunnery sergeant, United States Marine Corps, for distinguished conduct
in the presence of the enemy in battles on the 13th, 20th, 21st, and
22d of June, 1900, while with the relief expedition of the allied
forces in China. (G.O. 55, July 19, 1901.)


COMMANDER HERMAN O. STICKNEY, UNITED STATES NAVY.

For distinguished conduct in battle, engagements of Vera Cruz, April 21
and 22, 1914; covered the landing of the 21st with the guns of the
_Prairie_, and throughout the attack and occupation rendered important
assistance to our forces on shore with his 3-inch battery. (G.O. 177,
December 4, 1915.)


JAMES STODDARD.

Seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Marmora_. This man was sent on shore
with others, to man a rifle howitzer, which had been mounted on a field
carriage and posted in the streets of Yazoo City during the rebel
attack on that place March 5, 1864. Their defense of the gun against
superior forces is mentioned as most gallant, having nobly stood their
ground through the whole action, fighting hand to hand to save the gun
and the reputation of the Navy. Promoted to acting master's mate. (G.O.
32, April 16, 1864.)


JOHN STOKES.

Chief master-at-arms, serving on board the U.S.S. _New York_, for
gallant conduct in jumping overboard and assisting in the rescue of
Peter Mahoney, water tender, United States Navy, off the coast of
Jamaica, March 31, 1899. (G.O. 525, July 29, 1899.)


ANDREW V. STOLTENBERG.

Gunner's mate, second class, United States Navy, for distinguished
conduct in the presence of the enemy in battle at Katbalogan, Samar,
P.I., July 16, 1900. (G.O. 55, July 19, 1901.)


RICHARD STOUT.

Landsman on board of the U.S.S. _Isaac Smith_, Stone River, January 30,
1863; distinguished for gallantry and meritorious conduct in the action
with the rebel batteries, in which he lost his right arm. (G.O. 32,
April 16, 1864.)


ROBERT STRAHAN.

Captain of the top on board of the U.S.S. _Kearsarge_ when she
destroyed the _Alabama_, off Cherbourg, France, June 19, 1864;
"exhibited marked coolness and good conduct, and is highly commended by
his divisional officer." (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


LODDIE STUPKA.

Fireman, first class, serving on board the U.S.S. _Leyden_, for heroism
at the time of the wreck of that vessel, January 21, 1903. (G.O. 145,
December 26, 1903.)


EDWARD SULLIVAN.

Private, United States Marine Corps, serving on board the U.S.S.
_Marblehead_, for extraordinary bravery and coolness while cutting the
cables leading from Cienfuegos, Cuba, May 11, 1898, under a heavy fire
of the enemy. (G.O. 521, July 7, 1899.)


JAMES SULLIVAN.

Ordinary seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Agawam_; one of the crew of the
powder boat which was exploded near Fort Fisher December 23, 1864, for
which service he volunteered. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


JAMES F. SULLIVAN.

Boatswain's mate; for jumping overboard from the U.S. training ship
_New Hampshire_, at Newport, R.I., April 21, 1882, and rescuing from
drowning Francis T. Price, third-class boy. (G.O. 326, October 18,
1884.)


JOHN SULLIVAN.

Seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Monticello_; courage and commendable
conduct during a reconnaissance of the harbor and water defenses of
Wilmington, June 23 to 25, 1864. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


TIMOTHY SULLIVAN.

Coxswain; first captain of 9-inch gun on board the U.S.S. _Louisville_;
"especially commended for his attention to duty, bravery, and coolness
in action." (G.O. 11, April 3, 1863.)


ROBERT SUMMERS.

Chief quartermaster on board of the U.S.S. _Ticonderoga_, in the
attacks on Fort Fisher January 13 to 15, 1865; commended for great
coolness and intelligence in looking out for and making signals. Served
also on the _Paul Jones_, in the actions with the batteries on St.
Johns River and with Fort McAllister on the Ogeechee River. (G.O. 59,
June 22, 1865.)


GUSTAV A. SUNDQUIST.

Ordinary seaman, serving on board the U.S.S. _Nashville_, for heroism
and gallantry under fire of the enemy, while cutting cables at
Cienfuegos, Cuba, May 11, 1898. (G.O. 529, November 2, 1899.)


AXEL SUNDQUIST.

Chief carpenter's mate, serving on board the U.S.S. _Marblehead_, for
heroism while engaged in the perilous work of sweeping for and
disabling 27 contact mines in the approaches to Caimanera, Guantanamo,
Cuba, July 26 and 27, 1898. (G.O. 500, December 14, 1898.)


CLARENCE E. SUTTON.

Sergeant, United States Marine Corps, for distinguished conduct in the
presence of the enemy at the battle of Tientsin, China, July 13, 1900.
Sutton assisted to carry a wounded officer from the field under a heavy
fire. (G.O. 55, July 19, 1901.)


JOHN SWANSON.

Seaman of the U.S.S. _Santiago de Cuba_; was one of the boat's crew
detailed for General Terry. The men of this boat's crew were
represented to have been the only men who entered Fort Fisher in the
assault from the fleet, January 15, 1865. (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


EDWARD SWATTON.

Seaman of the U.S.S. _Santiago de Cuba_; was one of the boat's crew
detailed for General Terry. The men of this boat's crew were
represented to have been the only men who entered Fort Fisher in the
assault from the fleet, January 15, 1865. (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


ROBERT SWEENEY.

Ordinary seaman, U.S.S. _Kearsarge_; October 26, 1881, jumped overboard
and assisted in saving from drowning a shipmate who had fallen
overboard at Hampton Roads. A strong tide was running at the time.


ROBERT SWEENEY.

Ordinary seaman of the U.S.S. _Jamestown_, December 20, 1883; for
rescuing from drowning A. A. George, who had fallen overboard at the
navy yard, New York. (G.O. 326, October 18, 1884.)


WILLIAM SWEENEY.

Landsman, engineer's force; for jumping overboard from the U.S.S. _Jean
Sands_, opposite the navy yard, Norfolk, on the night of June 15, 1880,
and rescuing from drowning a young girl who had fallen overboard. (G.O.
326, October 18, 1884.)


SECOND LIEUT. RALPH TALBOT, UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS.

"For exceptional meritorious service and extraordinary heroism while
attached to Squadron C, First Marine Aviation Force, in France. He
participated in numerous air raids into enemy territory, and on October
8, 1918, while on such a raid, he was attacked by 9 enemy scouts, and
in the fight that followed shot down an enemy plane. Also, on October
14, 1918, while on a raid over Pittham, Belgium, Lieutenant Talbot and
another plane became detached from the formation on account of motor
trouble, and were attacked by 12 enemy scouts. During the severe fight
that followed, his plane shot down one of the enemy scouts. His
observer was shot through the elbow and his gun jammed. He cleared the
jam with one hand while Talbot maneuvered to gain time, and then
returned to the fight. The observer fought until shot twice, once in
the stomach and once in the hip. When he collapsed Lieutenant Talbot
attacked the nearest enemy scout with his front guns and shot him down.
With his observer unconscious and his motor failing, he dived to escape
the balance of the enemy and crossed the German trenches at an altitude
of 50 feet, landing at the nearest hospital and left his observer, and
returned to his aerodrome." (Act of February 4, 1919.)


WILLIAM TALBOTT.

Captain of forecastle, on board of the U.S.S. _Louisville_ at the
capture of Arkansas Post, January 10 and 11, 1863; was conspicuous for
ability and bravery as captain of 9-inch gun. (G.O. 32, April 16,
1864.)


JAMES TALLENTINE.

Quarter gunner on board of the U.S.S. _Tacony_. At the capture of
Plymouth, October 31, 1864, he landed and spiked a loaded 9-inch gun
under a sharp fire of musketry. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


GEORGE TAYLOR.

Armorer on board of the U.S.S. _Lackawanna_; in the engagement in
Mobile Bay August 5, 1864, although wounded, went into the shell room
and with his hands extinguished the fire from a shell exploded over it
by the enemy. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


JOHN TAYLOR.

Seaman in charge of the picket boat attached to the navy yard, New
York; for coolness, promptness, and good judgment on the 9th of
September, 1865, in rescuing from drowning Commander S. D. Trenchard,
of the United States Navy, who fell overboard in attempting to get on a
ferryboat which had collided with an English steamer and needed
immediate assistance. (G.O. 71, January 15, 1866.)


RICHARD H. TAYLOR.

Quartermaster, serving on board the U.S.S. _Nipsic_; for gallantry
during the hurricane at Apia, Samoa, March 16, 1889. (G.O. 157, April
20, 1904.)


THOMAS TAYLOR.

Coxswain on board of the U.S.S. _Metacomet_. During the passage of the
forts at the entrance of Mobile Bay, and in the action with the rebel
gunboats, August 5, 1864, cowardice was exhibited by the officer in
command of the forward pivot gun, but Thomas Taylor, by encouraging
example and words and effective handling of the gun, did honor to the
occasion. (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


WILLIAM G. TAYLOR.

Captain of forecastle on board of the U.S.S. _Ticonderoga_, in the
attacks on Fort Fisher, December 24 and 25, 1864, and January 13, 14,
and 15, 1865; "commended for coolness and good conduct as captain of a
gun." (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


AUGUST P. TEYTAND.

Quartermaster, third class, serving on board the U.S.S. _Leyden_; for
heroism at the time of the wreck of that vessel, January 21, 1903.
(G.O. 145, December 26, 1903.)


JAMES THAYER.

Ship's corporal; for rescuing from drowning a boy serving with him on
the U.S.S. _Constitution_, at navy yard, Norfolk, Va., November 16,
1879. (G.O. 326, October 18, 1884.)


HENRY THIELBERG.

Seaman, U.S.S. _Minnesota_, but temporarily on board of the U.S.S.
_Mount Washington_, Nansemond River, April 14, 1863; "conducted himself
with the highest coolness and courage, and volunteered to go upon the
pilot house to watch the movements of the enemy, which position he did
not leave until ordered down, although the balls flew thick around him,
and three struck within a few inches of his head." (G.O. 17, July 10,
1863.)


LOUIS F. THIES.

Private, United States Marine Corps, serving on board the U.S.S.
_Petrel_; for heroism and gallantry, fearlessly exposing his own life
to danger for the saving of the others on the occasion of the fire on
board said vessel March 31, 1901. (G.O. 85, March 22, 1902.)


KARL THOMASS.

Coxswain, United States Navy; for distinguished conduct in the presence
of the enemy, in battles on the 13th, 20th, 21st, and 22d of June,
1900, while with the relief expedition of the allied forces in China.
(G.O. 55, July 19, 1901.)


HENRY THOMPSON.

Seaman, United States Navy; for rescuing a man from drowning at Mare
Island, Calif., on the 27th of June, 1878.


HENRY THOMPSON.

Private, United States Marine Corps, on board of the U.S.S.
_Minnesota_; especially commended for bravery in the assault on Fort
Fisher, January 15, 1865, remaining at the front near the fort when the
panic carried the mass away. (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


WILLIAM THOMPSON.

Signal quartermaster on board the U.S.S. _Mohican_ in the action at
Hilton Head, November 7, 1861; "steered the ship with a steady hand and
bold heart under the batteries; was wounded by a piece of shell, but
remained at his station until he fell from loss of blood;" "leg since
amputated." (G.O. 17, July 10, 1863.)


WILLIAM G. THORDSEN.

Coxswain, serving on the U.S.S. _Pampanga_; for heroism and gallantry
under fire of the enemy at Hilongas, P.I., May 6, 1900. (G.O. 6, August
15, 1900.)


MICHAEL THORNTON.

Seaman; for jumping overboard from the U.S. tug _Leyden_, near Boston,
Mass., August 25, 1881, and sustaining, until picked up, Michael
Drennan, landsman, who had jumped overboard while temporarily insane.
(G.O. 326, October 18, 1884.)


PAUL TOBIN.

Landsman on board the U.S.S. _Plymouth_; at the imminent risk of his
life he jumped overboard in the harbor of Hamburg, July 3, 1871, when a
4-knot tide was running, and with a comrade saved from drowning one of
a party who was thrown out of a shore boat coming alongside the ship.
(G.O. 180, October 10, 1872.)


SAMUEL TODD.

Quartermaster on board of the U.S.S. _Brooklyn_, in the engagement in
Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864; conspicuous coolness at the commencement
and during the action. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


A. J. TOMLIN.

Corporal, United States Marine Corps, on board of the U.S.S. _Wabash_.
During the assault on Fort Fisher, January 15, 1865, he advanced under
a heavy fire from the enemy's sharpshooters into an open space close to
the fort and assisted a wounded comrade to a place of safety. (G.O. 59,
June 22, 1865.)


MARTIN T. TORGERSON.

Gunner's mate, third class, United States Navy; for distinguished
conduct in the presence of the enemy in battles on the 13th, 20th,
21st, and 22d of June, 1900, while with the relief expedition of the
allied forces in China. (G.O. 55, July 19, 1901.)


LIEUT. JULIUS C. TOWNSEND, UNITED STATES NAVY.

For distinguished conduct in battle, engagement of Vera Cruz, April 22,
1914. Was eminent and conspicuous in command of his battalion. He
exhibited courage and skill in leading his men through the action of
the 22d and in the final occupation of the city. (G.O. 177, December 4,
1915.)


SAMUEL TRIPLETT.

Ordinary seaman, serving on board the U.S.S. _Marblehead_; for heroism
while engaged in the perilous work of sweeping for and disabling 27
contact mines in the approaches of Caimanera, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba,
July 26 and 27, 1898. (G.O. 500, December 14, 1898.)


OTHNIEL TRIPP.

Chief boatswain's mate on board of the U.S.S. _Seneca_ in the assault
on Fort Fisher, January 15, 1865; "exhibited great gallantry in
charging through the gap in the stockade." (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


J. M. TROUT.

Second-class fireman on board of the U.S.S. _Frolic_; gallant conduct
in endeavoring to save the life of one of the crew of the _Frolic_ who
had fallen overboard at Montevideo, April 20, 1877.


JEREMIAH TROY.

Chief boatswain's mate; for jumping overboard from the U.S. training
ship _New Hampshire_ at Newport, R.I., April 21, 1882, and rescuing
from drowning Francis T. Price, third-class boy. (G.O. 326, October 18,
1884.)


WILLIAM TROY.

Ordinary seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Colorado_; fighting at the side
of Lieutenant McKee, and especially commended by the latter after being
wounded at the capture of the Korean Forts, June 11, 1871. (G.O. 169,
February 8, 1872.)


ALEXANDER H. TRUETT.

Coxswain on board of the U.S.S. _Richmond_, Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864;
commended for coolness and good conduct in the action in Mobile Bay on
the morning and forenoon of August 5, 1864. He was in the actions with
Forts Jackson and St. Philip, the Chalmette batteries, the rebel
ironclads and gunboats below New Orleans, the batteries below
Vicksburg, and was present at the surrender of New Orleans. He was
present at and assisted in the capture of the piratical steamers
_Miramon_ and _Marquis de la Habana_ in March, 1860, near Vera Cruz.
(G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


ALEXANDER TURVELIN.

Seaman; for jumping overboard from the U.S.S. _Trenton_, at Toulon,
France, February, 1881, and rescuing from drowning Augustus Ohlensen,
coxswain. (G.O. 326, October 18, 1884.)


OSCAR J. UPHAM.

Private, United States Marine Corps; for distinguished conduct in the
presence of the enemy at Peking, China, July 21 to August 17, 1900.
Upham assisted to erect barricades under a heavy fire. (G.O. 55, July
19, 1901.)


CAPT. WILLIAM P. UPSHUR, UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS.

"On October 22, 1915, Captain Upshur, First Lieutenant Ostermann, First
Lieutenant Miller, Assistant Surgeon Borden, and 35 enlisted men of the
Fifteenth Company of Marines, all mounted, left Fort Liberte, Haiti,
for a six-day reconnaissance. After dark on the evening of October 24,
while crossing river in deep ravine, the detachment was suddenly fired
upon from three sides by about 400 Cacos concealed in bushes about 100
yards from fort. The marine detachment fought its way forward to a good
position, which it maintained during the night, although subjected to a
continuous fire from the Cacos. At daybreak the marines, in three
squads, commanded by Captain Upshur, Lieutenant Ostermann, and Gunnery
Sergeant Daly, advanced in three different directions, surprising and
scattering the Cacos in all directions. The expeditionary commander
commented on the gallantry displayed by the officers and men of this
detachment in the following language:

    "The action of the 35 men in the attack made upon them during the
    night of October 24 can not be commended too highly. It is true
    that these men were in pitch darkness, surrounded by ten times
    their number, and fighting for their lives, but the manner in which
    they fought during that long night, the steady, cool discipline
    that prevented demoralization is remarkable. Had one squad failed,
    not one man of the party would have lived to tell the story. The
    actual assault upon the enemy, made in three different directions
    and beginning as soon as the light permitted them to see, was
    splendid. It meant success or utter annihilation. It succeeded,
    thanks to the splendid examples given by the officers and
    noncommissioned officers, supported by the men. Upshur and
    Ostermann, advancing from two directions, captured Fort Dipitie
    with a total of 13 marines, putting garrison to flight. Demolished
    and burned fort. All three squads burned all houses from which fire
    had been coming. I believe, therefore, that Capt. William P.
    Upshur, First Lieut. Edward A. Ostermann, and Gunnery Sergt. Daniel
    Daly should be given medals of honor for this particular engagement
    and the work of the following day."


FRANK MONROE UPTON.

Quartermaster, third class, United States Navy, for extraordinary
heroism following internal explosion of the _Florence H_, on April 17,
1918. The sea in the vicinity of wreckage was covered by a mass of
boxes of smokeless powder, which were repeatedly exploding. Frank M.
Upton, of the U.S.S. _Stewart_, plunged overboard to rescue a survivor,
who was surrounded by powder boxes and too exhausted to help himself,
fully realizing that similar powder boxes in the vicinity were
continually exploding and that he was thereby risking his life in
saving the life of this man. (G.O. 403, June 8, 1918.)


ALBERT VADAS.

Seaman, serving on board the U.S.S. _Marblehead_; for extraordinary
bravery and coolness while cutting the cables leading from Cienfuegos,
Cuba, May 11, 1898, under a heavy fire of the enemy. (G.O. 521, July 7,
1899.)


JOSEPH E. VANTINE.

First-class fireman on board of the U.S.S. _Richmond_, in the attack on
the Port Hudson batteries, March 14, 1863. "When the fireroom and other
parts of the ship were filled with hot steam from injury to the boiler
by a shot, he, from the first moment of the casualty, stood firmly at
his post and was conspicuous in his exertions to remedy the evil by
hauling the fires from the injured boiler, the heat being so great from
the combined effects of fire and steam that he was compelled, from mere
exhaustion, to be relieved every few minutes until the work was
accomplished." (G.O. 17, July 10, 1863.)


HUDSON VAN ETTEN.

Seaman, serving on board U.S.S. _Nashville_; for extraordinary bravery
and coolness while cutting the cables leading from Cienfuegos, Cuba,
May 11, 1898, under a heavy fire of the enemy. (G.O. 521, July 7,
1899.)


PINKERTON R. VAUGHN.

Sergeant, United States Marine Corps, on board of the U.S.S.
_Mississippi_, in the attack on the Port Hudson batteries, night of
March 14, 1863; commended for zeal and courage displayed in the
performance of unusual and trying service while the vessel was aground
and exposed to a heavy fire. (G.O. 17, July 10, 1863.)


JAMES W. VERNEY.

Chief quartermaster on board of the U.S.S. _Pontoosuc_; commended for
gallantry, skill, and coolness in action during the operations in and
about Cape Fear River, which extended from December 24, 1864, to
January 22, 1865, and resulted in the capture of Fort Fisher and
Wilmington. (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


JACOB VOLZ.

Carpenter's mate, third class, United States Navy; for extraordinary
heroism in the line of his profession while operating against outlaws
on the island of Basilan, P.I., September 24, 1911. (G.O. 138, December
13, 1911.)


ROBERT VOLZ.

Seaman, serving on board the U.S.S. _Nashville_; for extraordinary
bravery and coolness while cutting the cables leading from Cienfuegos,
Cuba, May 11, 1898, under a heavy fire of the enemy. (G.O. 521, July 7,
1899.)


MAURICE WAGG.

Coxswain on board of the U.S.S. _Rhode Island_; distinguished and
meritorious conduct during the night of the foundering of the _Monitor_
off Hatteras, December 31, 1864. Promoted to acting master's mate.
(G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


LIEUT. RICHARD WAINWRIGHT, UNITED STATES NAVY.

For distinguished conduct in battle, engagements of Vera Cruz, April 21
and 22, 1914; was eminent and conspicuous in command of his battalion;
was in the fighting of both days, and exhibited courage and skill in
leading his men through action. In seizing the customhouse he
encountered for many hours the heaviest and most pernicious concealed
fire of the entire day, but his courage and coolness under trying
conditions was marked. (G.O. 177, December 4, 1915.)


E. A. WALKER.

Sergeant, United States Marine Corps, for distinguished conduct in the
presence of the enemy at the battle of Peking, China, June 20, to July
16, 1900. (G.O. 55, July 19, 1901.)


JAMES A. WALSH.

Seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Florida_; for extraordinary heroism in
the line of his profession during the seizure of Vera Cruz, Mexico,
April 21 and 22, 1914. (G.O. 101, June 15, 1914.)


MICHAEL WALSH.

Chief machinist, serving on board the U.S.S. _Leyden_, for heroism at
the time of the wreck of that vessel, January 21, 1903. (G.O. 145,
December 26, 1903.)


JAMES WARD.

Quarter-gunner on board of the U.S.S. _Lackawanna_, in the engagement
in Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864; being wounded and ordered below, would
not go, but rendered much aid at one of the guns when the crew was
disabled, and subsequently remained in the chains, heaving the lead
until nearly in collision with the rebel ironclad _Tennessee_. (G.O.
45, December 31, 1864.)


DAVID WARREN.

Coxswain on board of the U.S.S. _Monticello_; courage and commendable
conduct during a reconnaissance of the harbor and water defense of
Wilmington, June 23 to 25, 1864. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


HENRY S. WEBSTER.

Landsman on board of the U.S.S. _Susquehanna_; during the assault on
Fort Fisher, January 15, 1865, remained on the field under fire with a
wounded officer until aid could be obtained to bring him to the rear.
(G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


CHARLES H. WEEKS.

Captain of the foretop on board of the U.S.S. _Susquehanna_. On the
21st of September, 1864, the U.S.S. _Montauk_, then off Charleston, was
discovered to be on fire in the magazine lightroom; on which occasion
Charles H. Weeks, who was master-at-arms of the vessel, displayed great
presence of mind and rendered valuable services in extinguishing the
fire. (G.O. 84, October 3, 1867.)


ALBERT WEISBOGEL.

Captain of the mizzen top; gallant conduct in jumping overboard from
the U.S.S. _Benicia_, at sea, and rescuing from drowning one of the
crew of that vessel on the 11th of January, 1874. (G.O. 207, March 23,
1876.)

SECOND MEDAL.

Captain of the mizzen top; gallant conduct in jumping overboard from
the U.S.S. _Plymouth_, at sea, and rescuing from drowning one of the
crew of that vessel, on the 27th of April, 1876. (G.O. 212, June 9,
1876.)


ADAM WEISSEL.

Ship's cook; for jumping overboard from the U.S. training ship
_Minnesota_, at Newport, R.I., August 26, 1881, and sustaining, until
picked up by a boat from the ship, C. Lorenze, captain of the
forecastle, who had fallen overboard. (G.O. 326, October 18, 1884.)


WILLIAM WELLS.

Quartermaster on board of the U.S.S. _Richmond_, Mobile Bay, August 5,
1864; commended for coolness and close attention to duty as leadsman
and lookout in the action in Mobile Bay, on the morning and forenoon of
August 5, 1864. Joined the _Brooklyn_ in September, 1861; was in the
actions with Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and with the rebel ironclads
and gunboats below New Orleans, and on board of the _Brooklyn_ in the
attack upon the batteries below Vicksburg in 1862. He received two
wounds in the left leg and a severe one in the head in the engagements
with Forts Jackson and St. Philip, April 24, 1862, the latter causing
"opacity of the cornea and loss of vision of the right eye," as
certified by the surgeon of the _Brooklyn_. Joined the _Richmond_ in
September, 1863. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


WALTER S. WEST.

Private, United States Marine Corps, serving on board the U.S.S.
_Marblehead_, for extraordinary bravery and coolness while cutting the
cables leading from Cienfuegos, Cuba, May 11, 1898, under a heavy fire
of the enemy. (G.O. 521, July 7, 1899.)


KARL WESTA.

Chief machinist's mate on board of the U.S.S. _North Dakota_; for
extraordinary heroism in the line of his profession during the fire on
board of that vessel September 8, 1910. (G.O. 83, October 4, 1910.)


AXEL WESTERMARK.

Seaman, United States Navy, for distinguished conduct in the presence
of the enemy at Peking, China, June 28 to August 17, 1900. (G.O. 55,
July 19, 1901.)


GEORGE H. WHEELER.

Ship fitter, first class, United States Navy, for bravery and
extraordinary heroism displayed by him during a conflagration in
Coquimbo, Chile, January 20, 1909. (G.O. 18, March 19, 1909.)


JOSEPH WHITE.

Coxswain on board of the U.S.S. _New Ironsides_; commended for highly
meritorious conduct during the several engagements with Fort Fisher in
December, 1864, and January, 1865. (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


DANIEL WHITFIELD.

Quartermaster on board of the U.S.S. _Lackawanna_ in the engagement in
Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864; remarkable coolness as captain of a gun in
holding on to the lockstring and waiting for some time whilst alongside
of the rebel ironclad _Tennessee_, and firing that the shot might enter
her port. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


FRANKLIN L. WILCOX.

Ordinary seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Minnesota_; especially
commended for bravery in the assault on Fort Fisher, January 15, 1865,
remaining at the front near the fort when the panic carried the mass
away. (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


JULIUS A. R. WILKE.

Boatswain's mate, first class, serving on board the U.S.S.
_Marblehead_, for extraordinary bravery and coolness while cutting the
cables leading from Cienfuegos, Cuba, May 11, 1898, under a heavy fire
of the enemy. (G.O. 521, July 7, 1899.)


HENRY WILKES.

Landsman on board of the U.S. picket boat _No. 1_, which destroyed the
rebel ram _Albemarle_ at Plymouth, N.C., October 27, 1864. (G.O. 45,
December 31, 1864.)


PERRY WILKES.

Pilot on board of the U.S.S. _Signal_, which vessel was attacked by
field batteries and sharpshooters and destroyed in Red River, May 5,
1864. He remained steadfast at the wheel until it was disabled by the
bursting of a shell. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


ENSIGN THEODORE S. WILKINSON, Jr., UNITED STATES NAVY.

For distinguished conduct in battle, engagements of Vera Cruz, April 21
and 22, 1914; was in both days' fighting at the head of his company and
was eminent and conspicuous in his conduct, leading his men with skill
and courage. (G.O. 177, December 4, 1915.)


ANTONIO WILLIAMS.

Seaman; for courage and fidelity displayed in the loss of the U.S.S.
_Huron_, November 24, 1877.


ANTHONY WILLIAMS.

Sailmaker's mate on board of the U.S.S. _Pontoosuc_; commended for
gallantry, skill, and coolness in action during the operations in and
about Cape Fear River, which extended from December 24, 1864, to
January 25, 1865, and resulted in the capture of Fort Fisher and
Wilmington. (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


AUGUSTUS WILLIAMS.

Seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Santiago de Cuba_; "commended for
gallant behavior in the assault on Fort Fisher, January 15, 1865."
(G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


FIRST LIEUT. ERNEST C. WILLIAMS, UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS.

For extraordinary heroism in the line of his profession in the face of
the enemy at San Francisco de Macoris, Dominican Republic, November 29,
1916. (G.O. 289, April 27, 1917.)


FRANK WILLIAMS.

Seaman, serving on board the U.S.S. _Marblehead_, for extraordinary
bravery and coolness while cutting the cables leading from Cienfuegos,
Cuba, May 11, 1898, under a heavy fire of the enemy. (G.O. 521, July 7,
1899.)


HENRY WILLIAMS.

Carpenter's mate; for going over the stern of the U.S.S.
_Constitution_, at sea, February 13, 1879, during a heavy gale, and
performing important carpenter's work upon her rudder. (G.O. 326,
October 18, 1884.)


JAY WILLIAMS.

Coxswain, United States Navy, for distinguished conduct in the presence
of the enemy in battles on the 13th, 20th, 21st, and 22d of June, 1900,
while with the relief expedition of the allied forces in China. (G.O.
55, July 19, 1901.)


JOHN WILLIAMS.

Seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Commodore Perry_, in the attack upon
Franklin, Va., October 3, 1862; distinguished for his gallant conduct.
(G.O. 11, April 3, 1863.)


JOHN WILLIAMS.

Captain of maintop on board of the U.S.S. _Pawnee_, in the attack upon
Mathias Point, June 26, 1861; "gallantry can not be spoken of in too
high terms; though wounded by a musket ball in the thigh, he retained
the charge of his boat; and when the staff was shot away held the stump
in his hand, with the flag, until we got alongside the _Freeborn_."
(G.O. 11, April 3, 1863.)


JOHN WILLIAMS.

Boatswain's mate on board of the U.S.S. _Mohican_, in the action at
Hilton Head, November 7, 1861; captain of 11-inch gun; was conspicuous
for his cool courage and pleasant, cheerful way of fighting, losing few
shots and inspiring his gun's crew with his manner. Promoted to acting
master's mate. (G.O. 17, July 10, 1863.)


LOUIS WILLIAMS.

Captain of top; for jumping overboard from the U.S.S. _Lackawanna_,
March 16, 1883, at Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands, and rescuing from
drowning Thomas Moran, landsman. (G.O. 326, October 18, 1884.)


LOUIS WILLIAMS.

Captain of hold of the U.S.S. _Lackawanna_; for rescuing from drowning
William Cruise, who had fallen overboard at Callao, Peru, June 13,
1884. (G.O. 326, October 18, 1884.)


PETER WILLIAMS.

Seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Monitor_ in the fight with the
_Merrimac_, March 19, 1862; promoted to acting master's mate and
subsequently to acting ensign. (G.O. 11, April 3, 1863.)


ROBERT WILLIAMS.

Signal quartermaster on board of the U.S.S. _Benton_; Yazoo River
expedition December 23 to 27, 1862, mentioned by his commanding officer
as having "distinguished himself in various actions." (G.O. 11, April
3, 1863.)


WILLIAM WILLIAMS.

Landsman belonging to the U.S.S. _Lehigh_, Charleston Harbor, November
16, 1863; gallant behavior in passing lines between the _Lehigh_ and
_Nahant_ in an open boat with two others, being at the time exposed to
a heavy fire from the forts in Charleston Harbor; advanced in his rate.
(G.O. 32, April 16, 1864.)


GEORGE WILLIS.

Coxswain on board of the U.S.S. _Tigress_; gallant and meritorious
conduct, while serving on the _Tigress_, on the night of September 22,
1873, off the coast of Greenland.


RICHARD WILLIS.

Coxswain on board of the U.S.S. _New Ironsides_; commended for highly
meritorious conduct during the several engagements with Fort Fisher in
December, 1864, and January, 1865. (G.O. 59, June 22, 1865.)


AUGUST WILSON.

Boilermaker, serving on board the U.S.S. _Puritan_, for gallant conduct
at the time of the collapse of one of the crown sheets of boiler E of
that vessel July 1, 1897. Wilson wrapped wet cloths about his face and
arms and entering the fireroom opened the safety valve, thus removing
the danger of disabling the other boilers. (G.O. 482, November 1,
1897.)


ROSWELL WINANS.

First sergeant, United States Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism
in the line of his profession and for eminent and conspicuous courage
in the presence of the enemy at the action at Guayacanes, Dominican
Republic, July 3, 1916. (G.O. 244, October 30, 1916.)


ROBERT B. WOOD.

Coxswain, U.S.S. _Minnesota_, temporarily on board of the U.S.S. _Mount
Washington_, Nansemond River, April 14, 1863; "behaved with a courage
and coolness that could not be surpassed; did not leave his post,
although he had received a severe contusion on the head from a
partially spent ball, and ventured in an open boat to carry a hawser
under a heavy fire." (G.O. 17, July 10, 1863.)


SAMUEL WOODS.

Seaman, U.S.S. _Minnesota_, temporarily on board of the U.S.S. _Mount
Washington_, Nansemond River, April 14, 1863; fought his gun with the
most determined courage; plunged into the stream and endeavored to save
a shipmate who had been knocked overboard by a shell, and was
conspicuous for his tender care of the wounded. (G.O. 17, July 10,
1863.)


JOHN WOON.

Boatswain's mate on board of the U.S.S. _Pittsburgh_, in an engagement
with the batteries at Grand Gulf, April 29, 1863; "had been confined to
his hammock several days from sickness, yet insisted on and took
command of the gun of which he was captain; fought it for over two
hours, and only left it when no longer able to stand; conduct uniformly
good." (G.O. 17, July 10, 1863.)


CHARLES B. WORAM.

Seaman on board of the U.S.S. _Oneida_, acting as aid to the executive
officer in the engagement in Mobile Bay August 5, 1864. Distinguished
himself for his cool courage and carried his orders intelligently and
correctly. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


EDWARD WRIGHT.

Quartermaster on board of the U.S.S. _Cayuga_ in the attack upon Forts
Jackson and St. Philip, and the taking of New Orleans, April 24 and 25,
1862. Mentioned with "praise for his conduct." (G.O. 11, April 3,
1863.)


WILLIAM WRIGHT.

Yeoman on board of the U.S.S. _Monticello_; courage and commendable
conduct during a reconnaissance of the harbor and water defenses of
Wilmington, June 23 to 25, 1864. (G.O. 45, December 31, 1864.)


EDWARD B. YOUNG.

Coxswain on board of the U.S.S. _Galena_; during the action in Mobile
Bay, August 5, 1864, he was captain of No. 3 gun and displayed great
bravery and coolness throughout the engagement. (G.O. 59, June 22,
1865.)


FRANK A. YOUNG.

Private, United States Marine Corps, for distinguished conduct in the
presence of the enemy at the battle of Peking, China, June 20 to July
16, 1900. (G.O. 55, July 19, 1901.)


HORATIO N. YOUNG.

Seaman on the U.S.S. _Lehigh_, Charleston Harbor, November 16, 1863;
gallant behavior in passing lines between the _Lehigh_ and _Nahant_ in
an open boat, being at the time exposed to a heavy fire from the forts
in Charleston Harbor. Advanced in his rating. (G.O. 32, April 16,
1864.)


WILLIAM YOUNG.

Boatswain's mate on board of the U.S.S. _Cayuga_, in the attack upon
Forts Jackson and St. Philip and the taking of New Orleans, April 24
and 25, 1862; mentioned with "praise for his conduct." (G.O. 11, April
3, 1863.)


WILLIAM ZION.

Private, United States Marine Corps, for distinguished conduct in the
presence of the enemy at Peking, China, July 21 to August 17, 1900.
(G.O. 55, July 19, 1901.)


WILLIAM ZUIDERVELD.

Hospital apprentice, first class, on board of the U.S.S. _Florida_; for
extraordinary heroism in the line of his profession during the seizure
of Vera Cruz, Mexico, April 21, 1914. (G.O. 116, August 19, 1914.)





*** End of this Doctrine Publishing Corporation Digital Book "Record of Medals of Honor issued to the officers and enlisted men of the United States Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard, 1862-1923" ***

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