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Title: America's Black and White Book - One Hundred Pictured Reasons Why We Are At War
Author: Rogers, W. A. (William Allen)
Language: English
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Copyright Status: Not copyrighted in the United States. If you live elsewhere check the laws of your country before downloading this ebook. See comments about copyright issues at end of book.

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 [A transcriber's note follows the text]



[Illustration: W. A. Rogers.]

  AMERICA'S
  _Black and White_
  BOOK

  _One Hundred Pictured Reasons
  WHY WE ARE AT WAR_

  By
  W. A. ROGERS

  CUPPLES & LEON COMPANY
  NEW YORK


  _Copyright, 1917, by_
  THE NEW YORK HERALD COMPANY
  _All Rights Reserved_



LIST OF CARTOONS

NUMBER


  1. Verdict--"Carelessness on the part of the deceased."

  2. The first great German "U" Boat Victory.

  3. Modern German Gothic Art.

  4. The Announcement.

  5. A SILENT COMPANY--Yet its voice is heard above the roar of Cannon.

  6. Those "cannon on the forward deck."

  7. Here are "the facts."

  8. He had expected to find the President alone.

  9. "We Germans love the Belgians, who were forced into the war."--Dr.
     Dernberg.

  10. The Crushing of Belgium.

  11. Invasion of Belgium by the "Uncultured."

  12. GERMAN RELIGIOUS ART--Intended for a Cathedral window.

  13. Christmas Night.

  14. A moving picture.

  15. There is no American blood on John Bull's hands.

  16. Going to "throw a scare" into Uncle Sam.

  17. "THOSE FLIPPANT AMERICANS, who were drowned on the
      Lusitania."--Cologne Gazette.

  18. "Gott Mit Uns"--and Allah too!

  19. Swarming.

  20. "Here's a present from the Kaiser, my pretty maid."

  21. "Seized for Military purposes."

  22. Those who are decorated.

  23. It was a glorious Victory.

  24. One of those touching pictures of a German soldier feeding little
      Belgium.

  25. "Don't you see the war is nearly over?--Forget the Lusitania!"

  26. Activities of a German diplomatist in America.

  27. Activities of an American diplomatist in Europe.

  28. A good deal like the "Goose-Step."

  29. The sad case of Mr. Dumba.

  30. Just whose pet snake is this?

  31. Is God still with us?

  32. Once more the Olive Branch.

  33. Assurances by the waste-basket full.

  34. "Yes, father, I remember you said the war would end in October."

  35. Spraddled.

  36. The Austrians did it.

  37. Recently on exhibition at Cooper Union.

  38. The New Intensive Kultur.

  39. "Watch your step!"

  40. Whether to get angry or to laugh!

  41. A message on preparedness--at the psychological moment.

  42. A little May party interferes with the Christmas spirit.

  43. The Ambulance Driver.

  44. "For ways that are dark."

  45. "It's got to be uprooted."

  46. The Persia Torpedoed.

  47. The Barbary Pirates: We cleaned them out 110 years ago, and we may
      have to do it again.

  48. Yes, of course, "Turkey did it."

  49. Washington's most industrious special correspondent.

  50. A Silent Protest.

  51. His Private graveyard.

  52. Safety first.

  53. Let the decoration fit the crime.

  54. Like sheep to the slaughter.

  55. Von Tirpitz.

  56. On the sinking of a hospital ship.

  57. "Pirates and Privateers no longer exist."--Von Jagow.

  58. "Well, Count, do you claim it?"

  59. The Kaiser's Colonial Secretary for North America.

  60. "Please observe, Mr. Ambassador, that you are pretty close to the
      edge yourself."

  61. "From now on we will make no forward movement."

  62. "Admiral of the Atlantic."

  63. Assorted cargo for the return trip of the Deutschland.

  64. Triumph of the Hohenzollerns at Verdun.

  65. Those disappointing German-Americans.

  66. Preparing a few more answers to our protests.

  67. Is anybody being fooled by this?

  68. A Prussian offer of Peace.

  69. No, this is not Eliza crossing on the ice!

  70. Maybe somebody wants to buy a little suckling pig, eh?

  71. Bringing the flag up to date!

  72. A survival of the dark ages.

  73. Germany.

  74. Under their true flag.

  75. Wrathful waiting.

  76. THE ONLY ANSWER: Kaiser: "One day in the week you may go to
      Falmouth." Uncle Sam: "Seven days in the week you may go to ----!"

  77. I'm here, Mr. President, close behind you.

  78. Another case of wiping hands on the American flag.

  79. For homeless Belgium.

  80. "Shame--only American sailors! Not a woman or child in the lot."

  81. Something to remember after the War.

  82. The new recruit.

  83. It is to laugh.

  84. Not all is dark.

  85. "We are now getting the enemy out of their trenches."--German
      report.

  86. "Papa, here comes the light that killed Uncle Nick."

  87. The Junker must go.

  88. "Come avay; our music iss not for Barbarians."

  89. The Piffle steams under orders from Wilhelmstrasse.

  90. THE HONEY-MOON IS OVER. "He gave me a black eye at Carnegie Hall."

  91. A good recruiting sergeant for Uncle Sam.

  92. Will it succeed?

  93. "Your mother, your wife, your child may be next!"

  94. Still "luring them on."

  95. Mobilized.

  96. The way to do it.

  97. Rehearsing their swan song.

  98. Hold Fast, Everybody!

  99. This is their emblem.

  100. To France!



[Illustration]

INTRODUCTION


Each government engaged in the European War has issued a White, Green,
Blue or Yellow Book, explaining the causes which led to its entry into
the great conflict.

These books are all interesting, and are full of valuable documentary
information; but, if the busy people of America are to understand the
reasons for their own participation in the war, some shorter cut to the
desired end must be devised.

We, therefore, offer a BLACK AND WHITE BOOK, in which our nation's
reasons for going to war are set forth in pictures, a universal
language which can be read at a glance by any one who has eyes to see.

On August 1st, 1914, we were at peace with all the world. We were bound
by ties of blood to every race on earth.

Particularly close and intimate were our relations with the German
people, whom we welcomed to our shores as among our most desirable
citizens.

Then, far away from us, apart from our interests or concerns--like a
tragedy being played on the other side of the footlights--broke the
frightful war of 1914. We looked on fascinated, but not convinced of
the reality of its cruelty.

For a little over eight months we watched it, when, on April 22nd,
1915, there appeared in the New York papers an advertisement stating
that the great passenger ship "LUSITANIA" would sail on the 7th of May
for Liverpool.

In the next column, in equally conspicuous type, appeared a sinister
warning to Americans, telling them to keep off the seas at peril of
their lives. This was signed, "IMPERIAL GERMAN EMBASSY, Washington,
D.C."

On May 7th came the fulfilment of the threat, and we awoke to the fact
that we were not an audience looking at a tragedy, but the victims of
the tragedy itself.

Not until then was it brought home to us that our good German friends,
whom we thought we knew so well, had been inoculated with the virus of
a Junker madness, and that we were dealing with a people who had cast
from them every restraint of fair fighting and had become the outlaw
nation of the world.

In the following pictures the Artist has attempted to show "Why we are
at war."

  --W. A. ROGERS.



With Junker thoroughness, Dr. Bernhard Dernberg had been sent here to
suggest excuses for the brutal assassination of Belgium.

[Illustration: Verdict--"Carelessness on the part of the deceased."]


The first woman to fall a victim to the "U" boat piracy was a
stewardess on an English merchant ship sunk without warning in 1914.

[Illustration: The first great German "U" boat Victory.]


The Rheims Cathedral belonged to the world. The product of hundreds
of years of consecrated labor, its destruction by a nation devoted to
"Kultur" is one of the primary reasons why we are at war.

[Illustration: Modern German Gothic Art.]


The blackest count in the indictment against Germany is foreshadowed
in the warning by the Imperial German Embassy at Washington to all
Americans, of the crime which was to follow on May 7th, 1915.

[Illustration: The Announcement.]


On May 7th, 1915, by order of the Imperial German Government, a "U"
boat torpedoed the great ship Lusitania without warning, drowning over
1,200 passengers. A sea crime unequaled by any pirate known to history.

[Illustration: A SILENT COMPANY--Yet its voice is heard above the roar
of Cannon.]


Immediately after the sinking of the Lusitania, hired perjurers swore
that the ship carried guns on her forward deck when she sailed from the
port of New York.

[Illustration: Those "cannon on the forward deck."]


Germany with brazen stupidity insisted on being told the facts--facts
which she knew in far greater detail than did the Government of the
United States.

[Illustration: Here are "the facts."]


A few days after the crime of May 7th, the Count Von Bernstorff
requested an audience with the President.

He understood he was to see the President alone.

[Illustration: He had expected to find the President alone.]


Dr. Bernhard Dernberg became exceedingly tiresome with his hypocritical
professions of affection for the Belgians. His propaganda was effective
but not in the way he intended.

[Illustration: "We Germans love the Belgians, who were forced into the
war." --Dr. Dernberg.]


If the Crown Prince Frederick Wilhelm really said what he is credited
with: "This is the most stupid, senseless and unnecessary war of modern
times," he accurately described his father's masterpiece.

[Illustration: The Crushing of Belgium.]


In the early months of the war the plain people of the United States
invaded Belgium. This lack of "Kultur" was not criticised by the
Belgians.

[Illustration: Invasion of Belgium by the "Uncultured."]


In the autumn of 1914 the German Government issued a poster
representing a 42 c. m. shell on which was piously inscribed, "Mit Gott
fur Konig und Vaterland."

[Illustration: GERMAN RELIGIOUS ART--Intended for a Cathedral window.]


It is a singular fact, attested by many photographs, that in the
battered interiors of a number of Cathedrals within the war zone,
figures of Christ, unharmed, still hold their places.

[Illustration: Christmas Night.]


Official Germany has reported that the busy "U" boat Commander
sometimes desists from firing on life boats long enough to reel off a
moving picture of his drowning victims.

[Illustration: A moving picture.]


A strong effort was being made in May, 1915, to persuade the United
States Government that England was equally guilty with Germany in
ignoring our rights at sea.

[Illustration: There is no American blood on John Bull's hands.]


The German dearly loves a masquerade. Mr. Bartholdt was parading the
"German Vote" in Congress in January, 1915, with the idea of "Throwing
a scare into Uncle Sam."

[Illustration: Going to "throw a scare" into Uncle Sam.]


The semi-official Cologne Gazette added insult to injury when it
characterized the one hundred and twenty-five American men, women and
children lost on the "Lusitania," as "Those Flippant Americans."

[Illustration: "THOSE FLIPPANT AMERICANS, who were drowned on the
Lusitania."--Cologne Gazette.]


The Kaiser invited the "unspeakable Turk" to help subjugate the
barbarians of England, France and Italy.

[Illustration: "Gott Mit Uns"--and Allah too!]


The United States was swarming with German spies and assassins whose
activities seemed to have a center in the German Embassy at Washington.

[Illustration: Swarming.]


Little children playing on the quiet greens of peaceful English
villages seemed to be the favorite targets of the Zeppelin fleet.

[Illustration: "Here's a present from the Kaiser, my pretty little
maid."]


The hosts of "Kultur" seemed to take particular delight in the
destruction of the monuments of Gothic grandeur in Belgium and France.

[Illustration: "Seized for Military purposes."]


As the war went on, the heroism and devotion of the Red Cross nurse
seemed to shine out with a lustre which quite eclipsed the glitter of
military decorations.

[Illustration: Those who are decorated.]


Heroic Belgium, crushed beneath the gross bulk of bloated Junkerdom,
still held his sword in hand, ready to strike again for freedom.

[Illustration: It was a glorious Victory.]


German soldiers whose hands were red with the blood of Belgian mothers,
posed for official photographs to be used for American propaganda,
showing them feeding little Belgian children.

[Illustration: One of those touching pictures of a German soldier
feeding little Belgium.]


After the campaigns of Lemberg and Przemysl, the Kaiser intimated to
Washington that the War was about over; and it would be well, in the
interests of peace, to FORGET THE "LUSITANIA."

[Illustration: "Don't you see the war is nearly over?--Forget the
Lusitania!"]


Count Von Bernstorff continued to "play horse" with Uncle Sam, while
Dumba, Von Papen and Boy-Ed looked on with ill-concealed contempt at
"the idiotic Yankees."

[Illustration: Activities of a German diplomatist in America.]


In contrast to the violation of our hospitality by Counts Von
Bernstorff and Dumba in America, Brand Whitlock, our ambassador in
Belgium, spent his time in relieving the distress in that distracted
country.

[Illustration: Activities of an American diplomatist in Europe.]


Mr. Bryan, in the disguise of a pacifist, was consciously or
unconsciously playing the role assigned him by the Imperial German
Embassy at Washington.

[Illustration: A good deal like the "Goose-Step."]


Ambassador Dumba, having accumulated sufficient rope, hanged himself
at last. His hat as well as his passports were handed him by the
President.

[Illustration: The sad case of Mr. Dumba.]


One bomb plot succeeded another; leaving a slimy trail that always led
back to the German Embassy at Washington.

[Illustration: Just whose pet snake is this?]


Before a wrecked Cathedral window in France, from which the Mother and
Child still looked down in silent protest, a young German recruit might
well ask, "Is God still with us?"

[Illustration: Is God still with us?]


In September, 1915, the Count Von Bernstorff extended the olive branch
to the Government of the United States, while Von Tirpitz backed him up
with a gun.

[Illustration: Once more the Olive Branch.]


Von Bethmann-Hollweg was urged by the German Embassy in Washington
to patch up any old assurances and send them over as Uncle Sam was
becoming extremely restless.

[Illustration: Assurances by the waste-basket full.]


Certain that Verdun would fall, the Kaiser had predicted that the war
would end in October, 1915. As September closed, the Crown Prince's
army was being shot to pieces.

[Illustration: "Yes, father, I remember you said the war would end in
October."]


It looked as though the German Army was spread over too much
territory--faced too many fronts to be effective!

[Illustration: Spraddled.]


The "Ancona" was sunk with great loss of life, and the German
Government immediately claimed that an Austrian "U" boat was
responsible, their attitude being that any story was good enough for
"those idiotic Yankees."

[Illustration: The Austrians did it.]


In the autumn of 1915, "The Friends of Peace" hung their white robes
over plots of assassination, arson, piracy and the destruction of ships
and munition plants.

[Illustration: Recently on exhibition at Cooper Union.]


Under our feet the Prussian spy system was working day and night. It
was hard to take a step in Washington without sticking your foot on a
spiked helmet.

[Illustration: The New Intensive Kultur.]


The people of the United States were beginning to think we had had
enough of German aggression, and it was felt that a strong stand must
be made for the national dignity and honor.

[Illustration: "Watch your step!"]


In November, 1915, Mr. Henry Ford had an idea "wished on him" by an
Austrian lady who was lecturing in this country. She succeeded in
making a spectacle of him, at which Uncle Sam was uncertain whether to
laugh or weep.

[Illustration: Whether to get angry or to laugh!]


When the country, in December, 1915, was at the height of distraction,
with plots against its peace and security being carried out in every
direction, President Wilson came out with a message on Preparedness for
War.

[Illustration: A message on preparedness--at the psychological moment.]


Immediately before Christmas the German Government once more sent us
assurances of her high regard and friendship, meanwhile blowing up a
few ships at sea and munition plants on land.

[Illustration: A little May party interferes with the Christmas
spirit.]


Many young Americans were at the front, driving their ambulances into
the line of fire. Even Christmas night found them abroad on their
errands of mercy.

[Illustration: The Ambulance Driver.]


With one hand passing out checks to Von Papen to pay for dynamite, and
the other carrying assurances to the White House of Germany's good
faith and friendship, Count Von Bernstorff was fairly busy.

[Illustration: "For ways that are dark."]


Treasonable plots were becoming more and more unbearable. It was
thought that the breaking point was very near.

[Illustration: "It's got to be uprooted."]


The U. S. Consul to Aden, travelling on the business of his government,
was the victim of a "U" boat attack in the Mediterranean. This occurred
very near the spot where we drove the Barbary pirates from the seas a
hundred and ten years ago.

[Illustration: The Persia Torpedoed.]


The expedition in which the U. S. Marines distinguished themselves one
hundred and ten years ago was brought to mind by the piracy of 1916.

[Illustration: The Barbary Pirates--We cleaned them out 110 years ago
and we may have to do it again.]


With characteristic effrontery Germany and Austria disclaimed
responsibility for the death of our consul to Aden, blaming it on the
Turks.

[Illustration: Yes, of course, "Turkey did it."]


In February, 1916, the newspaper offices were being bombarded with
stories from "a source near the German Embassy."--"What Mr. Lansing
thinks," "Washington agrees with Berlin," "What the President
believes," etc., etc.

[Illustration: Washington's most industrious special correspondent.]


In the Place d'Iéna in Paris stands a statue of Washington. Within
sight of this monument an old man and a little child were killed, the
only victims of an air raid by German "Taubes."

[Illustration: A Silent Protest.]


Von Bernstorff, hoping that the "Lusitania" was buried forever, was
busy with assurances of regret. His principal hope being that she might
"Rest in Peace."

[Illustration: His Private graveyard.]


Mr. Bryan, to the disgust of all decent Americans, made a plea to
his countrymen to bow to the will of Germany and keep off the seas
entirely.

[Illustration: Safety first.]


It was asserted and has never been denied, by the German Government,
that the Kaiser decorated the commander of the "U" boat which sank the
Lusitania.

[Illustration: Let the decoration fit the crime.]


Verdun had become a slaughter house. To save the tottering prestige
of the Crown Prince Frederick Wilhelm, whole German battalions were
sacrificed in vain efforts to break down the French defense.

[Illustration: Like sheep to the slaughter.]


Von Tirpitz was said to have expressed deep sorrow for the women and
children he had been compelled to kill. (As well, perhaps, as for those
whom he was to kill on the morrow.)

[Illustration: Von Tirpitz.]


The Junker Pirates, having filled the sea with little lost children,
torpedoed a hospital ship and sent down into the deep a score of Red
Cross nurses to keep them company.

[Illustration: On the sinking of a hospital ship.]


In the face of a sea campaign of "Frightfulness," Von Jagow came out
with a statement that "Piracy no longer exists." But something just as
good was "made in Germany."

[Illustration: "Pirates and Privateers no longer exist."--Von Jagow.]


In a safe of one Von Igel were found documents of the most
incriminating nature. Count Von Bernstorff was given opportunity to
claim them as official papers if he so desired.

[Illustration: "Well, Count, do you claim it?"]


Junker impudence in the German Embassy at Washington had reached its
highest point. Even Count Von Bernstorff realized that he had gone the
very limit with our State Department.

[Illustration: The Kaiser's Colonial Secretary for North America.]


When the German Ambassador protested against the deportation of his
chief lieutenants for their activities in plots against our peace and
safety, he was warned that his own position was none too secure.

[Illustration: "Please observe, Mr. Ambassador, that you are pretty
close to the edge yourself."]


Making a virtue, perhaps, of necessity, the German Government
announced, in February, 1916, that "from now on it would make no
forward movement." Events since have proved how well it realized its
true condition.

[Illustration: "From now on we will make no forward movement."]


In June, 1916, Wilhelm II, peering out from behind Heligoland, where
his ships had rusted for two years, declared himself "Admiral of the
Atlantic."

[Illustration: "Admiral of the Atlantic."]


The "Deutschland," a cargo submersible craft, sent over for reasons
best known to the German Admiralty, was extremely mysterious as to her
cargo for the return trip.

[Illustration: Assorted cargo for the return trip of the Deutschland.]


It was stated in a cable from Amsterdam, that, by the Kaiser's direct
personal order, issued about three weeks after the first attack on
Verdun, to the Court painter, a great historical painting was to be
made, called "The Triumph of the Hohenzollerns." Accordingly the
painter, with costumes, horses, models, and a corps of photographers
and assistants, mobilized his forces on an eminence overlooking Verdun.

[Illustration: Triumph of the Hohenzollerns at Verdun.]


Junkerdom could never understand why all German-born American citizens,
or American citizens of German blood did not immediately rally to the
flag of Germany against the forces fighting for the liberty of the
world.

[Illustration: Those disappointing German-Americans.]


Germany was ready to talk about restricting "U" boat activity as long
as we would listen to her; but the sound of riveting machines in her
shipyards was her real answer.

[Illustration: Preparing a few more answers to our protests.]


While Von Bethmann-Hollweg was talking of Germany's desire for peace
and a cessation of slaughter, Germany was making every preparation for
a renewal, more ruthless than ever, of undersea warfare.

[Illustration: Is anybody being fooled by this?]


While her soldiers were driving Belgian civilians into slavery in
Germany, Von Bethmann-Hollweg was issuing such beautiful sentiments as
the following: "Conscious of their responsibility before God, before
their own nations and before Humanity."

[Illustration: A Prussian offer of Peace.]


An American-German (not a German-American) said in an interview in
December, 1916, that Germany's Peace Proposals had broken the ice.

[Illustration: No, this is not Eliza crossing on the ice!]


Everybody in the world had heard of the German Peace Proposals,
supposed to have been sent out by the Kaiser, but nobody had been
allowed to see them.

[Illustration: Maybe somebody wants to buy a little suckling pig, eh?]


The Kaiser and Von Tirpitz were much happier in announcing a
new campaign of Intensive Frightfulness than when endorsing the
hypocritical peace proposals of Von Bethmann Hollweg.

[Illustration: Bringing the flag up to date!]


The retreat of the German Army in northeastern France will be
remembered as one of the blackest pages in Junker history.

It stirred the indignation of the whole world.

[Illustration: A survival of the dark ages.]


Blinded by the glitter of fifty years of militarism, the German peasant
now finds himself the bearer of a crushing burden.

His case is not helped by the diplomacy which guides him.

[Illustration: Germany.]


On February 1st the German Admiralty with the utmost deliberation
raised the black flag of piracy against the entire world, declaring
that all vessels of whatever description would be sunk on sight if they
approached European waters.

[Illustration: Under their true flag.]


By the end of February, 1917, the President and the people of the
United States were in a state of indignation that could not much longer
be controlled.

They had exchanged "watchful" for "wrathful" waiting.

[Illustration: Wrathful waiting.]


Junker impudence finally overreached itself. When the United States was
informed that it could send one ship striped like a zebra to Falmouth
each week, American patience suddenly came to an end.

[Illustration: THE ONLY ANSWER:

Kaiser: "One day in the week you may go to Falmouth."

Uncle Sam: "Seven days in the week you may go to ----!"]


The President addressed a request to Congress for power to arm merchant
vessels for protection against German piracy.

[Illustration: I'm here, Mr. President, close behind you.]


Two little children, born almost under the shadow of the Hall of
Independence in Philadelphia, were murdered at sea in the new campaign
of "Frightfulness."

[Illustration: Another case of wiping hands on the American flag.]


The feeling of America for devastated Belgium was shown in the action
of the Rocky Mountain Club, which gave the million dollars collected
for a club house in New York, to the Homeless Belgians.

[Illustration: For homeless Belgium.]


An American merchant ship was sunk, carrying down a score of American
sailors. Not a single child in the lot. The price of "Frightfulness"
seemed wasted.

[Illustration: "Shame--only American sailors! Not a woman or child in
the lot."]


Many things done by the Germans in the heat and frenzy of war will be
forgiven, but in the days and years to come the murder of the sick and
wounded and the devoted women of the Red Cross on Hospital ships will
be beyond human forgiveness.

[Illustration: Something to remember after the War.]


Mr. Carranza showed signs of having fallen under strong German
influence.

He seemed inclined to adopt the goose-step at Tampico.

[Illustration: The new recruit.]


The tension in public feeling was suddenly relieved by the revelations
of a plot in which Germany and Mexico were to offer a full partnership
to Japan in return for an attack on our southwestern border. It caused
a roar of laughter from Washington to Tokio and back.

[Illustration: It is to laugh.]


Through all the hideousness of war shone the light of the Red Cross. A
fund for this great enterprise of humanity of one hundred and fourteen
million dollars was raised in the United States in a week.

[Illustration: Not all is dark.]


The Kaiser's plan for "Getting the boys out of the Trenches" in Eastern
France was almost as naive as Mr. Henry Ford's plan of two years ago,
and much more effective.

[Illustration: "We are now getting the enemy out of their
trenches."--German report.]


The fate of the Romanoffs must have been most disturbing to the peace
of mind of the Hohenzollern family. The torch of Liberty arose "Like
Thunder" across the seas.

[Illustration: "Papa, here comes the light that killed Uncle Nick."]


England, France, Russia, Italy and the United States recognized that
the Junker menace to the world must be thoroughly crushed before Peace
could ever return to the world.

[Illustration: The Junker must go.]


Prussia at last realized that the United States could no longer be
cajoled. Austria was therefore advised to give up all pretense of
friendliness and come out into the open as a foe to America.

[Illustration: "Come avay; our music iss not for Barbarians."]


The "pacifists" were bending every endeavor to induce the American
Government to bow down in craven acquiescence to the restrictions of
Berlin on Ocean travel.

[Illustration: The Piffle steams under orders from Wilhelmstrasse.]


It was discovered that German money was paying a great part of the
expenses of the Pacifist Party.

The Pacifists were willing to take the money, but objected to being
found out.

[Illustration: THE HONEY-MOON IS OVER. "He gave me a black eye at
Carnegie Hall."]


A "U" boat was reported at work off the Port of New York. This proved
of considerable value to the recruiting sergeants.

[Illustration: A good recruiting sergeant for Uncle Sam.]


Germany set a trap beautifully baited with honeyed words for the
Russian bear.

It looked for a time as though the Bear would be caught.

[Illustration: Will it succeed?]


There seemed to be a lack of realization on the part of many Americans
that war was actually coming our way and that in the German programme,
"we were next."

[Illustration: "Your mother, your wife, your child may be next!"]


Perhaps Prussia builded better than she knew when she carved out a
heroic wooden figure to represent her hero, Von Hindenburg.

The Von Hindenburg Line was constantly nearing Berlin.

[Illustration: Still "luring them on."]


Uncle Sam took command of one of the most powerful branches of his
Industrial Army--the Railroads. They swore allegiance to the Flag.

[Illustration: Mobilized.]


Admiral Fiske advocated going after the submarines with
hydro-aeroplanes armed with torpedoes and guns.

Congress was urged to provide a great fleet of the aero craft.

[Illustration: The way to do it.]


The Hohenzollern family were beginning to realize that the day of
Divine Right was nearing its end. They were gathering at the feet of
"Old Fritz" for their swan song.

[Illustration: Rehearsing their swan song.]


When the Russian loosened his hold on the Junker Beast, a situation
loomed up that called for all the resolution and resourcefulness of the
remaining allies.

[Illustration: Hold Fast, Everybody!]


The United States Marine Corps, true to its traditions, was in the
forefront of Uncle Sam's entry into the arena of the World's War.

[Illustration: This is their emblem.]


When France presented the United States with the great Statue of
Liberty, which stands at our gates, she little thought how powerful
that symbol of her friendship would some day prove.

By its shining light we now march to her aid.

[Illustration: To France!]



  [Transcriber's note:
  Italics are rendered between underscores e.g. _italics_.
  Small caps are rendered with ALL CAPS.
  The following table lists changes made by the transcriber.]

  +---------------------------+
  |   Transcriber's changes   |
  |-------+--------+----------|
  |Cartoon|   As   |    As    |
  |Number |Printed |Corrected |
  |-------+--------+----------|
  |   49  |Feburary| February |
  |   79  |devasted|devastated|
  +-------+--------+----------+





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