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Title: Rustic Chivalry (Cavalleria Rusticana) - Melodrama in One Act
Author: Mascagni, Pietro
Language: English
As this book started as an ASCII text book there are no pictures available.
Copyright Status: Not copyrighted in the United States. If you live elsewhere check the laws of your country before downloading this ebook. See comments about copyright issues at end of book.

*** Start of this Doctrine Publishing Corporation Digital Book "Rustic Chivalry (Cavalleria Rusticana) - Melodrama in One Act" ***

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             GRAND OPERA
              LIBRETTOS

               ITALIAN
           AND ENGLISH TEXT
    AND MUSIC OF THE PRINCIPAL AIRS


              CAVALLERIA
               RUSTICANA

           (RUSTIC CHIVALRY)


                 BY
              MASCAGNI


         OLIVER DITSON COMPANY
                BOSTON

          CHAS. H. DITSON & Co.
               _New York_

              LYON & HEALY
                _Chicago_



OPERA SCORES

All the vocal scores have English text together with the foreign text
mentioned below. Unless otherwise specified, these books are bound in
paper.


                      GRAND OPERAS

 =AÏDA=                           =Giuseppe Verdi=    =2.50=
    In four acts. Italian text

 =BOHEMIAN GIRL=                =Michael W. Balfe=    =2.00=
    In three acts

 =CARMEN=                          =Georges Bizet=    =2.50=
    In four acts. French text

 =CAVALLERIA RUSTICANA=          =Pietro Mascagni=    =2.00=
    In one act. Italian text

 =FAUST=                          =Charles Gounod=    =2.00=
    In five acts. French text

 =LAKMÉ=                             =Léo Delibes=    =3.00=
    In three acts

 =MARITANA=              =William Vincent Wallace=    =2.50=
    In three acts

 =MIGNON=                        =Ambroise Thomas=    =2.50=
    In three acts. Italian text

 =SAMSON AND DELILAH=        =Camille Saint-Saëns=    =2.50=
    In three acts

 =TROVATORE, IL=                  =Giuseppe Verdi=    =2.00=
    In four acts. Italian text


                  LIGHT OPERAS

 =BELLS OF CORNEVILLE, THE;
    or, THE CHIMES OF NORMANDY=
     In three acts             =Robert Planquette=    =2.50=

 =BILLEE TAYLOR; or, THE REWARD OF VIRTUE=
     In two acts                  =Edward Solomon=    =1.50=

 =BOCCACCIO; or, THE PRINCE OF PALERMO=
     In three acts               =Franz von Suppé=    =2.50=

 =DOCTOR OF ALCANTARA, THE=
     In two acts                 =Julius Eichberg=    =1.50=

 =FATINITZA=                     =Franz von Suppé=    =2.50=
     In three acts. German and Italian text

 =MARTHA=                   =Friedrich von Flotow=    =2.50=
     In four acts. German and Italian text

 =MASCOT, THE=                     =Edmond Audran=    =2.50=
     In three acts

 =OLIVETTE=                        =Edmond Audran=    =2.00=
     In three acts

 =PINAFORE, H. M. S.; or, THE LASS THAT
    LOVED A SAILOR=
     In two acts             =Sir Arthur Sullivan=    =1.50=

 =SORCERER, THE=             =Sir Arthur Sullivan=    =1.75=
     In two acts

 =STRADELLA=                =Friedrich von Flotow=    =2.00=
     In three acts

Send for Descriptive Circular P--Oratorios, Cantatas, Operas and
Operettas.


  OLIVER DITSON COMPANY



                           RUSTIC CHIVALRY

                        (CAVALLERIA RUSTICANA),

                         MELODRAMA IN ONE ACT.

                                  BY
                            PIETRO MASCAGNI.

                     ENGLISH VERSION BY J. C. MACY.

                                   30

                                 BOSTON
                          OLIVER DITSON COMPANY

                            NEW YORK CHICAGO
                   CHAS. H. DITSON & CO. LYON & HEALY

                 Copyright, MCMXIX, by MARY EMMA S. MACY.



                          DRAMATIS PERSONÆ.

                             CHARACTERS.

         SANTUZZA, a village girl            _Soprano_.
         LOLA, wife of Alfio           _Mezzo Soprano_.
         TURIDDU, a young soldier              _Tenor_.
         ALFIO, a teamster                  _Baritone_.
         LUCIA, mother of Turiddu          _Contralto_.

  CHORUS OF PEASANTS AND VILLAGERS.--CHORUS BEHIND THE SCENES.


PLOT OF THE OPERA.

TURIDDU, a young villager, is the son of LUCIA, and the lover of LOLA,
(who is the wife of ALFIO; having married the latter during TURIDDU'S
prolonged absence in military service). TURIDDU wins the affections
of SANTUZZA, whom he wrongs; while, in the meantime, he is intimate
with LOLA. On Easter morning, (the opening of the opera), ALFIO is
incidentally informed, by SANTUZZA, of his wife's unfaithful actions. He
challenges TURIDDU (biting the ear, as was the rustic Sicilian custom).
TURIDDU, though regretting his past evil course, accepts the challenge
and is killed by ALFIO


[**                    Transcriber Notes:
                       ------------------
     The original text is dual column, with English on the left and
       Italian on the right, with musical scores interspersed throughout.
     In this version, the complete English text for a scene is shown
       first, followed by the complete Italian text for the scene.
     The musical scores are placed as near as possible to the original
       version.                                                      **]



      RUSTIC CHIVALRY.


  TURIDDU. (Behind the scenes.)
    O Lo-la, fair as flow'rs in beau-ty smil-ing, ...
    Love from thy soul-lit eyes
    Soft-ly is glow-ing; ...
    He who would kiss thy lips, red and be-guil-ing ...
    Bliss-ful and fa-vor'd were he,
    Such heav-en know-ing!...
    Tho' thy thresh-old blood, crim-son, is stain-ing, ...
    Car-ing for naught, I seek thee, scorning to hide me; ...
    What tho' I for-feit life, thy pres-ence gain-ing?
    What were the joy of heav'n, wert thou de-nied me!
    What tho' I for-feit life, thy pres-ence gain-ing,
    What were the joy of heav'n wert thou de-nied me.
    Ah! ... Ah! ... Ah! ... Ah! ...

    O Lo-la, bian-ca co-me fior di spi-no, ...
        quan-do t'af-fac-ci te s'affac-(cia il) so-le; ...
    Chi t'ha ba-cia-(to il) lab-bro por-po-ri-no ...
    Gra-zia più bel-la a Di-o chie-der non vô-le....
    C'e scrit-to san-gue so-pra la tua por-ta; ...
    Ma di re-star-(ci a) me non me n'in-por-ta; ...
    Se per te mo-(jo e) va-(do in) pa-ra-di-so,
    Non c'en-tro se ... non ve-do il tuo bel vi-so,
    Se per te mo-(jo e) va (do in) pa-ra-di-so
    Non c'en-tro se ... non ve-do il tuo bel vi-so.
    Ah! ... Ah! ... Ah! ... Ah! ...

                  (Curtain rises.)


SCENE I.

A public place or square in a Sicilian village. At right, in background,
a church. At left, the inn and dwelling of Mamma Lucia.

Time, Easter morning.

(Peasants, countrymen, country-women, and children, cross the stage.)

(The church doors open and the throng enters.)

(The movement continues until the following:)

INTRODUCTORY CHORUS.

 _Chorus of women._

              (Behind scenes.)

         Ah! Ah!

 _Chorus of men._

              (Behind scenes.)

         Ah! Ah!

 _Chorus of women._

              (Behind scenes.)

 Sweet is the air with the blossoms of oranges;
   Sings now the lark from the myrtles in flow'r;
 Murmurs of tender song tell of a joyful world,
   And of thankful hearts. Ah! gladsome hour!

              (The women enter.)

 _Chorus of men._

              (Behind scenes.)

 Your spinning wheels now busily are humming,
 O'er fields of golden corn the sound is coming;
 We linger where the leafy shade is restful;
 Of you we think, and every heart is zestful.
 Oh lovely women! Allured by you and enraptured,
 Like the bird by the lure held, now are we captured!

              (The men enter.)

_Women._
       Work in the field now is ended;--
       The Holy Mother mild
       In ecstasy fondles the Child.

 _All._

              (Withdrawing from stage.)

 Murmurs of tender song tell of a joyful world,
 And of thankful hearts.
 Ah! gladsome hour!

          (Enter, Santuzza, approaching Lucia's dwelling.)


SCENA I.

La scena rappresenta una piazza in un paese della Sicilia. Nel fondo, a
destra, Chiesa con porta practicabile. A sinistra l'osteria e la casa di
Mamma Lucia.

E il giorno Pasqua.

CORO D'INTRODUZIONE.

(Campane interne dalla Chiesa. Si alza la tela. La scena sul principio è
vuota. Albeggia. Paesani, contadini, contadine e ragazzi traversano la
scena. Si apre la chiesa e la folla vi entra. Il movimento del popolo
continua fino al Coro punto in cui rimane la scena vuota.)

 _Coro._

              (Donne di dentro.)

         Ah!

              (Uomini di dentro.)

         Ah!

              (Donne di dentro.)

 Gli aranci olezzano sui verdi margini,
 Cantan le allodole tra i mirti in fior;
 Tempo è si mormori da ognuno il tenero canto che i palpiti--
 Raddoppia al cor.

           (Le donne entrano in iscena.)

              (Uomini di dentro.)

 _Coro_.
      In mezzo al campo tra le spiche d'oro
      Giunge il rumore delle vostre spole,
      Noi stanchi riposando dal lavoro
      A voi pensiamo, o belle occhidisole.
      O belle occhidisole, a voi corriamo,
       Come vola l'augelo--al suo richiamo.

             (Gli uomini entrano in iscena.)

 _Donne._ Cessin le rustiche opre:
             La Virgine serena allietasi del Salvator;
             Tempo è si mormori da ognuno il
                     tenero canto che i palpiti--
             Raddoppia al cor.

 _Uomini._

              (Allontanandosi.)

         In mezzo al campo, etc.

 _Donne._

              (Allontanandosi.)

         Gli aranci olezzano, etc.


SCENE II.

              (Santuzza, Lucia, Alfio, and chorus.)

 _Santuzza._ Tell me, mother Lucia--

 _Lucia._

                   (Coming from house.)

     It is thou? What wilt thou?

 _Sant._ Where is Turiddu?

 _Lucia._ For him you ask? For him, my son Turiddu!

 _Sant._ Only for him I ask you. Pardon, but answer!
              Where is Turiddu?

 _Lucia._ Ask me not! I know not; I want no trouble.

 _Sant._ Mamma Lucia, with weeping do I pray you!
            Even as spake the Saviour to the Magdalen,
            Say, in pity say, where is Turiddu!

 _Lucia._ He's gone to bring some wine from Francofonte.

 _Sant._ No! Last night some within the village saw him.

 _Lucia._ What says't thou? Who told it?
             Nay, he hath not yet returned.
             Enter!

 _Sant._  I may not step across your threshold,
             I cannot pass it, I, most unhappy outcast!
             Excommunicated!

 _Lucia._ What of my son? What hast thou to tell me?

 _Sant._ Ah! the torture, the heart-pain.

  (Cracking of whips and jingling of bells behind scenes.)

            (Chorus enters, followed soon by Alfio.)


SCENA II.

Sortita di Alfio.

 _Santuzza._

          (Entra e si dirige alla casa di Lucia.)

               Dite, Mamma Lucia--

 _Lucia._

                    (Sortendo.)

            Sei tu? che vuoi?

 _Santuzza._ Turiddu ov'è?

 _Lucia._ Fin qui vieni a cercare il figlio mio?

 _Santuzza._ Voglio saper soltanto,
                 Perdonatemi voi, dove trovarlo.

 _Lucia._ Non lo so, non lo so, non voglio brighe!

 _Santuzza._ Mamma Lucia, vi supplico piangendo,
                  Fate come il Signore a Maddalena,
                  Ditemi per pietà, dov'è Turiddu.

 _Lucia._ E andato per il vino a Francofonte.

 _Santuzza._ No! l'han visto in paese ad alta notte.

 _Lucia._ Che dici? che dici? se non è tornato a casa!
               Entra!

 _Santuzza._ Non posso entrare in casa vostra.
                  Sono scomunicata!

 _Lucia._ E che ne sai del mio figliuolo?

 _Santuzza._ Quale spina ho in core!

(Dall'interno schiocchi di frusta e tintinnio di sonagli.
Entrano in iscena i coristi indi Alfio.)


  ALFIO.
    Gay-ly moves the tramp-ing horse,
    Joy-ful sound the ring-ing bells;
    Snap, now, the lash goes, A-hi!...
    Cold may blow the wind to-day,
    Rain or snow do what it may,
    Naught do I care, not I!...
    Gay-ly moves the tramp-ing horse,
    Joy-ful sound the ring-ing bells;
    Snap, now, the lash goes,
    Snap, now, the lash goes! A-hi!...
    Snap, now, the lash goes,
    Snap, now, the lash goes, A-hi! A-hi!
    Snap, now, the lash goes,
    Snap, now the lash goes,

  CHORUS. TENORS.
    Who hath call-ing mer-rier than the life of car-rier?
    Where is a jol-lier man?...
    Who hath call-ing mer-rier than the life of car-rier?
    Where is a jol-lier man? Where is a jol-lier man?
    Where is a jol-lier man? Where is a jol-lier man?
    Where is a jol-lier man, a jol-lier man than he?
    Where is a jol-lier man, a jol-lier man?...

  ALFIO.
    Il ca-val-lo scal-pi-ta, i so-na-gli squil-la-no,
        schioc-chi la fru-sta, Ehi là!...
    Sof-(fi il) ven-to ge-li-do, ca-da l'ac(qua o) ne-vi-chi,
        a me che co-sa fa?...
    Il ca-val-lo scal-pi-ta, i so-na-gli squil-la-no,
        schioc-chi la fru-sta, schioc-chi la fru-sta, Ehi-là!...
    schioc-chi la fru-sta, schioc-chi la fru-sta, Ehi-là! Ehi-là!
    schioc-cha la fru-sta, an-dar di (qua e) di là!
    schioc-ca la fru-sta, an-dar di (quà e) di là!

  CHORUS. TENORS.
    O che bel me-stie-re fa-(re il) car-ret-tie-re an-dar
         di (qua e) di là!...
    Oh che bel me-stie-re fa-(re il) car-ret-tie-re an-dar
         di (quà e) di là! an-dar di (qua e) di là!
         an-dar di (quà e) di là!
         di (quà e) di là, an-dar di (quà e) di là!
         di (quà e) di là....


  ALFIO.
    My lov-ing Lo-la calls me!
    Her gen-tle grace en-thralls me,
    Ah! ... faith-ful-ly she calls....
    My lov-ing Lo-la calls me,
    Her gen-tle grace en-thralls me,
    Ah! fond-ly I re-ply....
    Gay-ly moves the tramping horse,
    Joy-ful sound the ring-ing bells;
              (Women of the chorus enter the scene.)
    'Tis Eas-ter and home come I!...
    'Tis Eas-ter and home come I!... come I!...

    A-hi! A-hi! Snap, now, the lash goes, a-hi!
    Snap, now, the lash goes,
    Snap, now, the lash goes
    Who hath call-ing mer-rier,
    Than the life of car-rier,
    Where is a jol-lier man?
    Where is a jol-lier man?
    Where is a jol-lier man?

    Snap, now, the lash goes,
    I come! I'm the mer-ry car-rier! I'm the mer-ry car-rier,
    Who hath call-ing mer-rier than the life, the life of car-rier,
          than the life, this life of mine,
    A hap-pier man than I?... Where is a jol-lier man,
          where is a jol-lier man?
    'Tis Eas-ter, home come I, ... come I!..


  ALFIO.
    M'a spet-(ta a) ca-sa Lo-la che m'a ma e mi con-so-la,
          ch'è ... tut-ta fe-del-tà....
    M'a spet-(ta a) ca-sa Lo-la! che m'ama e mi con-so-la,
          ch'è tut-ta fe-del-tà....
    Il ca-val-lo scal-pi-ti, i so-na-gli squil-li-no,
          è Pas-qua, ed io son quà, ...
          è Pas-qua ed io son quà ... son quà! ...
               (Women of the chorus enter the scene.)
    Ehi-là! Ehi-là! schioc-chi la fru-sta,
    Ehi-là! schioc-chi la fru-sta, schioc-chi la fru-sta,
         schioc-chi la fru-sta,
    O che bel me-stie-re fa-(re il) car-ret-tie-re an-dar di
          (quà e) di là, an-dar di (quà e) di là! an-dar
          schioc-chi la fru-sta,
    Son quà! Oh che bel me-stie-re fa-(re il) car-ret-tie-re,
          oh che bel me-stier, an-dar di quà, an-dar di là,
          an-dar di quà, an-dar di là!
    E Pa (squa ed) io son quà, ... an-dar di (quà e) di là,
          an-dar di (quà e) di là,
    E Pas-(qua ed) io son qua, ... son qua!...

(Chorus withdraws into the church; others separate in various
directions.)


SCENE III.

SCENE AND PRAYER.

 _Lucia._ Blest are you, friendly Alfio!
               So favored, ever thus to be gay!

 _Alfio._ Mamma Lucia, have you that rare old wine,
               The same as ever?

 _Lucia._ Not now; Turiddu has gone to buy a plenty.

 _Alfio._ No; he is here! I saw him here this morning;
                He lingered near my cottage.

 _Lucia._

               (Surprised.)

              What now!

 _Santuzza._

           (Rapidly, to Lucia.)

              Be silent!

 _Alfio._ I will not tarry,
              _You_ will to church devotedly?

                   (Exit.)

 _Chorus._

                 (In church.)

   Queen of the Heavens, sorrow flieth!

 _People._

             (External chorus.)

             Hallelujah!

 _Chorus._

                 (In church.)

              Thy holy Son lives, nor dieth!

 _People._ Hallelujah!

 _Chorus._

                   (within.)

          From the dead He now hath risen,
          Truly hath He risen.

 _People._ Hallelujah.

 _Chorus._

     (External. Grouping in devotional attitudes.)

 We will sing of the Lord now victorious!
   All the terrors of death were in vain!
 Let us sing of the Christ ever glorious;
   He is risen, in glory to reign!

 _Santuzza._    We will sing of the Lord now victorious;
                     We will sing of the Christ ever glorious;
                   Pow'r of death was in vain.
                 Unto heaven the Lord now riseth,
                   Now riseth in glory to reign.

 _Chorus._ We will sing, of the Lord now victorious!
                  All the terrors of death were in vain!
                Let us sing of the Christ ever glorious;
                  He is risen, in glory to reign.
                      Praise the Lord.

   (All enter the church, except Santuzza and Lucia.)

(Il Coro esce, alcuni entrano in chiesa, altri prendone direzioni
diverse.)


SCENA III.

 _Lucia._ Beato voi, compar Alfio,
               Che siete sempre allegro così!

 _Alfio._

               (Spigliato.)

       Mamma Lucia,
 N'avete ancora di quel vecchio vino?


 _Lucia._ Non so; Turiddu è andato a prov vederne.

 _Alfio._ Se è sempre qui!
               L'ho visto stamattina vicino a casa mia.

 _Lucia._

                    (Sorpresa.)

           Come?

 _Santuzza._

               (A Lucia rapidamente.)

                 Tacete.

 _Alfio._ Io me ne vado, ite voi altre in chiesa.

                    (Esce.)

 _Coro._

                    (Interno.)

                 Regina Cœli, lætare--

                     Alleluja!

                 Quia, quem meruisti potare--

                     Alleluja!

                 Resusrexit sicut dixit--

                     Alleluja!

 _Coro._

                    (Esterno.)

(Uomini e donne entrano e si schierano innanzi alla
Chiesa in atteggiamento devoto.)

  Inneggiamo, il Signor non è morto!
  Ei fulgente ha dischiuso l'avel,
  Inneggiamo al Signore risorto
  Oggi asceso alla gloria del ciel!

  (Tutti entrano in chiesa tranne Santuzza e Lucia.)


SCENE IV.

ROMANZA.

 _Lucia._

                (To Santuzza.)

          And why with signals would you gain my silence?

 _Santuzza._ Now shall you know, kind mother:
                 Ere he went forth as a soldier,
                 Turiddu pledged his love to Lola,
                     All his faithfulness renewing
                 But; ah! homeward returning,
                 Married he found his Lola!
                 And, her falsity shaming--
                     All the old love subduing--
                       Loved _me_!
                 And I  loved _him_!
                 With jealousy, hatefully, and with madness,
                 Scorning wifely duty, envious of my gladness,
                 Lola, in malice shameful, regains Turiddu!
                 Fate disgraceful o'ertakes me,
                 My own Turiddu forsakes me!
                 Lola and he in joy remain,
                 Having each other's love again!
                 Ah me! alone I weep, I weep!

 _Lucia._ Grief is upon us!
              Such dire and woeful tidings to hear this holy morning.

 _Santuzza._ I am accursed! I am accursed!
                 Good mother, go pray for me unto the Saviour!
                 Thou'lt beseech Him for me!
                 I'll seek Turiddu, and pray to him
                 That he again may love me!

 _Lucia._ Holy Mary be with thee--the blessed Mary!

      (Lucia enters the church)


SCENA IV.

 _Lucia._ Perchè m'hai fatto segno di tacere?

 _Santuzza._ Voi lo sapete, o mamma, prima d'andar soldato
                 Turiddu aveva a Lola eterna fè giurato.
                 Tornò, la seppe sposa; e con un nuovo amore
                 Volle spegner la fiamma che gli bruciava il core
                 M'amò, l'amai, l'amai, ah!
                 Quell' invida d'ogni delizia mia,
                 Del suo sposo dimentica, arse di gelosia.
                 Me l'ha rapito. Priva dell' onor mio,
                 Dell' onor mio rimango:
                 Lola e Turiddu s'amano, io piango!

 _Lucia._ Miseri noi, che cosa vieni a dirmi
              In questo santo giorno?

 _Santuzza._ Io son dannata.
                 Andate, o mamma, ad implorare Iddio,
                 E pregate per me. Verrà Turiddu,
                 Vo' supplicarlo un' altra voltra ancora!

 _Lucia._ Ajutatela voi, Santa Maria!

       (Lucia entra in chiesa.)


SCENE V.

DUET. SANTUZZA AND TURIDDU.

 _Turiddu._

        (Entering.)

 Thou here, Santuzza!

 _Santuzza._ Here I await thee.

 _Turiddu._ Attending not the service of Easter?

 _Santuzza._ Not now! Thee would I speak with.

 _Turiddu._ I seek my mother.

 _Santuzza._ Thee would I speak with!

 _Turiddu._ Not here, not here!

 _Santuzza._ From whence dost thou come?

 _Turiddu._ Why dost thou ask me?--
                     From Francofonte.

 _Santuzza._ Ah, that is false!

 _Turiddu._ Santuzza, believe me!

 _Santuzza._ No! thou art lying!
                 Over yon path I beheld thee approach:
                 And thou wert seen to-day returning homeward
                 From the dwelling of Lola!

 _Turiddu._  Ah! thou wert spying!

 _Santuzza._ No, I do swear it!
                 Her husband, Alfio, saw thee
                 Here within the town, and told it me!

 _Turiddu._ So thou rewardest the love I gave thee,
                What though he slay me!

 _Santuzza._ Ah! Tell me not of murder!

 _Turiddu._ Leave me, I tell thee! leave me!
                The rage within me burning--
                My righteous wrath, thou canst not assuage!

 _Santuzza._ Then, thou oost love her!
                 More fair than I is Lola!
                 False friend! Oh, curses on her!

 _Turiddu._ Santuzza!

 _Santuzza._ She--vilest woman, steals the love that should be mine!

 _Turiddu._ Heed thou!
                I am no slave to thy envy
                Scornfully showing, jealously showing.

 _Santuzza._ Insult and punishment I am unheeding!
                 Yet do I love thee,
                 Even though anguish my heart is rending,
                 E'en though in sorrow my life is ending.


SCENA V.

 _Turiddu._

          (Entrando.)

   Tu qui Santuzza?

 _Santuzza._ Qui t'aspettavo.

 _Turiddu._ È Pasqua in chiesa non vai?

 _Santuzza._ Non vo. Debbo parlarti.

 _Turiddu._ Mamma cercavo.

 _Santuzza._ Debbo parlarti.

 _Turiddu._ Qui no! qui no!

 _Santuzza._

          (Parlato.)

      Dove sei stato?

 _Turiddu._

          (Parlato.)

 Che vuoi tu dire? A Francofonte.

 _Santuzza._ No, non è ver.

 _Turiddu._ Santuzza credimi.

 _Santuzza._ No, non mentire
                 Ti vidi volgere giù dal sentir.
                 E stamattina all' alba t'hanno
                 Scorto presso l'uscio di Lola.

 _Turiddu._ Ah! mi hai spiato!

 _Santuzza._ No! te lo giuro, a noi l'ha raccontato
                 Campar Alfio il marito poco fa.

 _Turiddu._ Così ricambi l'amor che ti porto?
                Vuoi che m'uccida?

 _Santuzza._ Oh! questo non lo dire.

 _Turiddu._ Lasciami dunque, lasciami invantenti sopire
                Il giusto sdegno colla tua pietà.
 _Santuzza._ Tu l'ami dunque?

 _Turiddu._  No!

 _Santuzza._ Assai più bella è Lola!

 _Turiddu._  Taci, non l'amo.

 _Santuzza._ L'ami, l'ami, Oh! maledetto!

 _Turiddu._  Santuzza!

 _Santuzza._ Quella cattiva femmina ti tolse a me!

 _Turiddu._  Bada, Santuzza, schiavo non sono
                 Di questa vana tua gelosia.

 _Santuzza._

              (Con angoscia.)

          Battimi, insultami, t'amo e perdono
          Ma è troppo forte l'angoscia mia.

         (Troncando nel sentire avvicinarsi Lola.)


SCENE VI.

LOLA'S DITTY.

 _Lola._

         (Behind scenes.)

       Bright flower, so radiant!
       Angelic thousands stand arrayed in heaven,
       Yet none so fair as thou hath yet been given!

         (Enters. Pauses suddenly.)

       Oh! Turiddu, hast thou seen Alfio?

 _Turiddu._ I came but this moment: I have not.

 _Lola._ Then at the forge perchance he awaiteth.
             Here I must not linger.
                      And thou?
             Is't here in public thou art praying?

 _Turiddu._

          (Confusedly.)

             Santuzza here was telling--

 _Santuzza._
             I was saying this is Easter!

                       (Meaningly.)

             And the Lord all things beholdeth!

 _Lola._

          (To Santuzza.)

             Thou wilt not go to the service?

 _Santuzza._
            No, no! None shall attend but those
            Who know they are not guilty!

 _Lola._

                (Vehemently.)

        In the grace of the Saviour
        I bow before thee!

 _Santuzza._

                (Bitterly.)

         O, well thou speakest!--
         Lola!

 _Turiddu._

                (Embarrassed.)
                  (To Lola.)

          Away then! Come, Lola;
          Here there is naught to hold us.

 _Lola._

                 (Ironically.)

         Oh, stay thou with _her_!

 _Santuzza._

                (To Turiddu.)

         Yes, stay thou!

                   (Firmly.)

         I have something yet to tell thee:

 _Lola._

                (Mockingly.)

         May the Saviour assist thee!

                  (Going.)

         So, I will leave thee.

               (Enters the church.)


SCENA VI.

 _Lola._

           (Dentra alla scena.)

          Fior di giaggiolo
            Gli angeli belli stano
          A mille in cielo
            Ma belli come lui
              Ce n'è uno solo.

       (Entra in iscena e s'interrompe.)

     Oh! Turiddu, e passato Alfio?

 _Turiddu._ Son giunto ora in piazza non so.

 _Lola._ Forse è rimasto dal maniscalco ma non può tardare!
             E voi sentite le funzioni in piazza?

 _Turiddu._

              (Confuso affret.)

           Santuzza mi narrava--

 _Santuzza._ Gli dicevo che oggi è Pasqua
                 E il Signor vede ogni cosa.

 _Lola._ Non venite alla messa?

 _Santuzza._

                 (Subito.)

          Io no, ci deve andar chi sa

              (Con intenzione.)

          Di non aver peccato!

 _Lola._

                 (Con forza.)

       Io ringrazio il Signore, e bacio in terra!

 _Santuzza._

                 (Esprimendosi.)

          Oh! fate bene, fate bene,

                 (Con amarezza.)

              Lola!

 _Turiddu._

                 (A Lola.)
               (Impacciato.)

          Andiamo, andiamo, Oni non abbiani che fare.

 _Lola._

                 (A Turiddu.)

             Oh!

                 (Con ironia.)

             Rimanete.

 _Santuzza._

                  (A Turiddu con fermezza.)

           Sì, resta, resta,
             Ho da parlarti ancora.

 _Lola._

                 (Sempre ironica.)

          E v'assista il Signore,

                 (Con caricatura.)

          Io me ne vado.

                (Entra in chiesa.)


SCENE VII.

CONTINUATION OF THE DUET.

 _Turiddu._

                (To Sant.)

         Ah! how foolish! naught availing!

 _Santuzza._

                (Coldly.)

      I have spoken; 'tis well--'tis the truth.

 _Turiddu._

                (Threateningly.)

         Ah! by heaven!

 _Santuzza._ My heart is breaking!

 _Turiddu._

                (Approaching her.)

            No!

 _Santuzza._

                (Warding him away.)

          Turiddu, ah! hear me!

 _Turiddu._

            Go!

                (Turns from her.)

 _Santuzza._

          (Threateningly.)

      False! False!

 _Turiddu._

        (With increased rage.)

      Thus I reward thee in my anger.

   (Throws her down, and hastens into the church.)

 _Santuzza._

          (In the height of fury.)

       Accurs'd! accurs'd at Easter, thou false one.

          (Falls, despairingly.)


SCENA VII.

 _Turiddu._

                (Con ironia.)

         Ah! lo vedi, che hai tu detto?

 _Santuzza._

                  (Fredda.)

         L'hai voluto e ben ti sta!


 _Turiddu._

                (S'avventa.)

            Ah! Per Dio!

 _Santuzza._ Squarciami il petto.

 _Turiddu._

                (S'avvia.)

            No!

 _Santuzza._

                (Trattenendolo.)

            Turiddu, ascolta!

 _Turiddu._ Va!

 _Santuzza._

            (Minacciosa.)

          Bada!

 _Turiddu._

        (Con moltissima forza.)

      Dell'ira tua non mi curo!

  (La getta a terra e fugge in chiesa.)

 _Santuzza._

          (Nel colmo dell'ira.)

      A te la mala Pasqua, spergiuro!

      (Cade affranta ed angosciata.)


  SANTUZZA.
    No, no. Tu-rid-du, re-main with me yet, and for-ev-er!
    Love me a-gain!
    How canst thou for-sake me!
    No, no, Tu-rid-du! In-to thine arms ... lov-ing a-gain,
    Say thou wilt take ... me!
    No, no, Tu-rid-du! Re-main with me yet and for ev-er!
    No Tu-rid-du, Tu-rid-du re-main with me ev-er!



  TURIDDU.
    Why dost thou fol-low me?
    Why dost thou watch me?
    Why dost thou spy e-ven at the church-door?
    Why dost thou fol-low, Why watch me ev-er?

  SANTUZZA.
    Lo! here thy San-tuz-za now doth im-plore ... thee; ...
    Ah! canst thou leave me weep-ing be-fore thee!
    Love thy San-tuz-za! No, Tu-rid-du! Stay, I im-plore thee!
    Oh! Tu-rid-du! No, Tu-rid-du, re-main, re-main!
    No! Tu-rid-du! Ah! ... No, Tu-rid-du,

  TURIDDU.
    Go! I re-peat it! Go! thou dost weary me!
    Vain were all re-pent-ance for such of-fend-ing!
    Thou shalt leave me!

    Go! Go! Go! Go! ... I ... re-peat-it;

  SANTUZZA.
    re-main, re-main, I im-plore thee, a-gain!

  TURIDDU.
    Go, I tell thee; vain were re-pent-ing, vain were re-pent-ing,
        for all thy of-fend-ing, all thy of-fend-ing! Go! go! go!

  SANTUZZA.
    No, no, no! See, thy San-tuz-za
    Now doth im-plore thee, Ah! canst thou leave me,
        thus weep-ing be-fore thee!
    Lo! thy San-tuz-za now doth im-plore thee!
    Ah! canst thou leave me? Ah! canst thou leave me?

  TURIDDU.
    Go! I re-peat it! Go!
    Vain were re-pen-tance for such of-fend-ing.
    Go! Go!

  SANTUZZA.
    Wilt thou leave me thus? Ah! ... Then dost thou leave me,
    Then dost thou leave ... me?
    Ah! No! Tu-rid-du! Re-main with me yet and for-ev-er!
    I im-plore thee, do not for-sake me, Tu-rid-du!

  TURIDDU.
    I re-peat it, Go! Ah! ... Go! I re-peat it, Go! I re-peat ... it!
    Go! ... Go! Vain were re-pent-ance for thine of-fend-ing!
    Once more do I tell thee, go! And, for-ev-er!



  SANTUZZA.
    No, no, Tu-rid-du, ri-ma-ni, ri-ma-ni an-co-ra
          ab-ban-do-nar-mi dun-que tu vuo-i?
    No, no, Tu-rid-du! ri-ma-(ni an)-co-ra,
          dun-que tu vuo-i ab-ban-do-nar-mi?
    No, no, Tu-rid-du, ri-ma-ni, ri-ma-ni an-co-ra,
          no, Tu-rid-du, Tu-rid-du ri-ma-ni an-co-ra.

  TURIDDU.
    Per-chè se-guir-mi, per-chè spi-ar-mi sul-li-mi-ta-re
          fin del-la chie-sa?
    Per-chè se-guir-mi per-chè spi-ar-mi?

  SANTUZZA.
    La! tu-a San-tuz-za pian (ge e) t'im-plo-ra ...
        co-me cac-ciar-la co-sì tu puo-i, la tua San-tuz-za! no,
    Tu-rid-du! ri-ma-(ni an) co-ra!
    Oh! Tu-rid-du! no, Tu-rid-du, ri-ma-(ni an)-cor. no!
    Tu-rid-du! Ah! ... no,

  TURIDDU.
    va ti ri-pe-to, va non te-diar-mi, pen-tir-(si è)
        va-no do-po l'of-fe-sa.
    non te-diar-mi
    va! va! va! va ... ti ...

  SANTUZZA.
    Tu-rid-du, ri-ma-ni, ri-ma-(ni an)-co-ra, an-cor.
        no! no! no! la tua San-tuz-za va-no, do-po - l'of-fe-sa.
    pian(ge e) t'im-plo-ra, co-me cac-ciar-la,
        co-me cac-ciar-la tu puo-i?
    La tua San-tuz-za piange (e e) t'im-plo-ra
        co-me cac-ciar-la? co-sì tu puo-i

  TURIDDU.
    ri-pe-to non te-diar-mi, pen-tir-(si è) va-no,
    do-po l'of-fe-sa pen-tir-si è va-no do-po l'of-fe-sa.
    va! va! va! va, ti ri-pe-to, va, va! va!

  SANTUZZA.
    tu puo-i co-sì Ah! ... dun-que tu vuo-i ab-ban-do-nar-mi?
    ah! no! Tu-rid-du! ri-ma-ni, ri-ma-ni an-co-ra,
    dun-que vuo-i ab-ban-do-nar-mi. Tu-rid-du!

  TURIDDU.
    ti ri-pe-to va! ah! ... va ti ri-pe-to, va, non te-diar-mi va! ...
    Pen-tir-si è va-no do-po l'of-fe-sa,
       pen-tir-si è va-no do-po l'of-fe-sa.


SCENE VIII.

DUET, SANTUZZA AND ALFIO.

           (Enter, Alfio.)

 _Santuzza._

         (Calming herself.)

      Oh! doth the Saviour send thee, neighbor Alfio?

 _Alfio._  At what point is the service?

 _Santuzza._ 'T is now at closing.
                 But I tell thee Lola has gone with Turiddu!

_Alfio._

         (Surprised.)

       What are you saying?

 _Santuzza._ While thou dost labor to earn an honest living,
                  Lola unfaithfully her love is giving.

 _Alfio._ Ah! in the name of heaven, Santuzza, what sayest thou?

 _Santuzza._ The truth!
                  Turiddu forsakes me--and he hath betrayed me!
                  'T was your wife who enticed him away from me!

 _Alfio._

          (Threateningly.)

       And if thou art lying
       I'll have thy heart's blood!

 _Santuzza._ Lies, as yet, my lips have never uttered.
                  Prone to be truthful am I.

 _Alfio._

          (After a pause.)

        Santuzza, I am thankful that you have spoken.

 _Santuzza._ But ah! what shame!
                  And I have told it thee!

_Alfio._

           (Suddenly, in fury.)

       T'is they who are shameful!
       Revenge I'll have upon them!
       This day and hour my wrath
       Shall fall upon them!


SCENA VIII.

        (Sorte Alfio e s'incontra con Santuzza.)

 _Santuzza._

          (Ad Alfio rianimandosi.)
          Oh! Il Signore vi manda, compar Alfio.

 _Alfio._

          (Tranquillo.)

      A che punto è la messa?

 _Santuzza._

                È tardi ormai, ma per voi
                     (Con intenzione.)
                Lola è andata con Turiddu!

 _Alfio._

                (Sorpreso.)

      Che avete detto?

 _Santuzza._ Che mentre correte
                 All'acqua e al vento a guadagnarvi il pane,
                 Lola v'adorna il tetto in malo modo!

 _Alfio._  Ah! nel nome di Dio, Santa che dite?

 _Santuzza._ Il ver. Turiddu mi tolse, mi tolse l'onore,
                E vostra moglie lui rapiva a me!

 _Alfio._

                (Minaccioso.)

      Se voi mentite, vo' schiantarvi il core.

 _Santuzza._ Uso a mentire il labbro mio, il labbro mio non è!
                 Per la vergogna mia, pel mio dolore
                 La trista verità--vi dissi, ahimè!

 _Alfio._

               (Dopo un poco di pausa.)

      Comare Santa, allor grato vi sono.

 _Santuzza._ Infame io son che vi partai così!

 _Alfio._ Infami loro, ad essi non perdono
               Vendetta avrò pria che tramonti il dì!
               Io sangue voglio, all'ira m'abbandono,
               In odio tutto l'amor mio finì!

                       (Escono.)


INTERMEZZO 1.


INTERMEZZO 2.


SCENE IX.

CHORUS AND BRINDISI.

(The people enter from the church. Lucia crosses and enters the inn.)

 _Chorus of men._

                (sotto voce.)

       Now homeward, now homeward ye neighbors,
         Good cheer is awaiting there;
         And wives our joy will share,
       Now Easter day shall be for all a time of rest,
         Without sorrow or care.

 _Chorus of women._

            (Lola and Turiddu come from the church.)

 _Turiddu._ My pretty Lola! Have you not a greeting,
                 When honest people we are meeting?

 _Lola._ I must leave thee.
              I must go and welcome Alfio!

 _Turiddu._ Here he will seek thee.
                 Do not hasten!
                      (To the people.)
           Meanwhile, good friends, come hither.
                      (All come forward.)
           We'll try the merry wine!

     (All take cups from the bar of the inn.)

 _Chorus._  Welcome!

 _Turiddu._

               (To Lola.)

      To those who love you!

               (Drinks.)

 _Chorus._  Drink it!

 _Lola._

             (To Turiddu.)

      May fortune give you favor!

               (Drinks.)

 _Chorus._  Drink it!

 _Turiddu._ We will!

 _Chorus._  Welcome! and drink!

                     (All drink.)

                Come, let us drink another!

 _All._ Come, drink; yes, let us drink another!
             Hail! the ruby wine now flowing, etc.


  TURIDDU.
    Hail! the ru-by wine now flow-ing,
    Bright-ly in the cup now show-ing,
    Mer-ry spell up-on you throw-ing,
    Like a smile from hap-py love
    Hail! the ru-by wine now flow-ing,
    Bright-ly in the cup now show-ing,
    Mer-ry spell around you throw-ing,
    Like the smile of hap-py love!
    Hail! ah, wine so rich-ly gleam-ing!
    In thy crim-son joy is beam-ing!
    All thy com-fort lend us,
    With thy cheer at-tend us--Hope and love! ...
    Hail! ah, wine so rich-ly gleam-ing!
    In thy crim-son joy is beam-ing!
    All thy com-fort lend us,
    With thy cheer at-tend us--Hope and love!


SCENA IX.

(Tutti escono di chiesa. Lucia attraversa la scena ed entra in casa. A
gruppi sotto voce fra loro.)

 _Coro._

                (Uomini.)

       A casa, a casa, amici, ove ci aspettano
       Le nostre donne, andiam,
       Or che letizia rasserena gli animi.

 _Coro._

                (Donne.)

       A casa, a casa, amiche, ecc.

           [Lola e Turiddu escono dalla chiesa.]

 _Turiddu._ Comare Lola, ve ne andante via
                 Senza nemmeno salutare?

 _Lola._ Vado a casa; Non ho visto compar Alfio!

 _Turiddu._ Non ci pensate, verrà in piazza.

           (Rivolgendosi al Coro che s'avvia.)

                 Intanto, amici, qua,
                 Beviamone un bicchiere.

(Tutti si avvicinano alla tavola dell' osteria
e prendono in mano i bicchieri.)

 _Coro._ Viva, beviam! Rinnovisi la giostra!

 _Turiddu._

                  (A Lola.)

             Ai vostri amori!

                   (Beve.)

 _Lola._

                 (A Turiddu.)

          Alla fortuna vostra!

                   (Beve.)

 _Turiddu._ Beviam!

 _Lola, Turiddu e Coro._
            Beviam, beviam! rinnovisi la giostra!


  TURIDDU.
    Vi-(va il) vi-no spu-meg-gian-te,
        nel bic-chie-re scin-til-lan-te
    Come il ri-so dell' A-man-te;
        mi-(te in)-fon-(de il) giu-bi-lo.
    vi-va il vi-no spu-meg-gian-te,
        nel bic-chie-re -scin-til-lan-te
    co(me-il) ri-so dell' a-man-te, mi-(te in)-fon-(de il) giu-bi-lo!
    Vi-(va il) vi-no ch'è sin-ce-ro che (ci al)-lie-ta o-gni
        pen-sie-ro, e (che af)
        fo-ga l'u-mor ne-ro nell' eb-brez-za ten-e-ra....
    Vi(va il) vi-no ch'è sin-ce-ro che (ci al)-lie-ta o-gni
        pen-sie-ro, e (che af)
        fo-ga l'u-mor ne-ro nell' eb-brez-za ten-e-ra.


FINALE.

 _Alfio._ Unto all of you, greeting!

 _Chorus._ Neighbor Alfio, greeting!

 _Turiddu._

                   (To Alfio.)

           Hearty welcome!
           Now join with us in revel.

                 (Fills a glass for him.)

           Look you! drink you this measure!

 _Alfio._ Thank you! but I must refuse the offer!
               A cup of deadly poison perhaps you proffer!

 _Turiddu._ Then suit your pleasure!

                  (Throws away the wine.)

 _Lola._ Ah me! what now befalls!

(Some of the women consult together, and then approach Lola, saying:)

              Neighbor Lola, come, haste away from here!

          (Exit, all the women, with LOLA.)

 _Turiddu._

                    (To Alfio.)

           Perhaps you have something to tell me!

 _Alfio._ I? nothing!

 _Turiddu._ Then hear me!
                 You will find me at your service!

 _Alfio._ This moment?

 _Turiddu._ This moment!

     (They embrace, Turiddu bites Alfio's ear, viciously.)

 _Alfio._ Neighbor Turiddu, you give a ready challenge!
               And I accept it! you understand me!

 _Turiddu._ Neighbor Alfio!
                I own thou shouldst have vengeance,
                And I admit, in the name that is holy,
                That I should be dealt with as a dog, by thee!
                But, shouldst thou kill me--if I perish
                By thine arm--yes, if I perish,--
                Unhappy Santa, she whom I have cherished--
                Lone, unhappy Santa, my dagger
                Will embed within thy heart!

 _Alfio._ Good neighbor, act upon it as may suit you!
                  You will find me yonder in the orchard.

                         (Exit.)

 _Turiddu._

                        (Calling.)

             My mother!

                     (Enter LUCIA.)

             Mother! the wine-cup too freely passes!
             Exciting, crazing!
             Too many cups I have been drinking!
             ----I must leave you, good mother!

             But first let me ask for a kindly blessing,
             As on that day when I became a soldier.
             And, mother, hear me--and heed it:
             If I return not, thou unto my Santa
             Must be a kindly mother!
             Santa, whom I promised I would lead to the altar!
             --If I return--

 _Lucia._ Why say you this to me?
               What is it? tell me!

 _Turiddu._ Ha--nothing!
                'Tis wine--that I have drunk so freely.
            --For me oh! pray to heaven,
              That I may be forgiven!
            One kiss, one kiss, my mother!
            And yet--and yet another!
              Farewell!

                    (Rushes off, desperately.)

 _Lucia._ Turiddu! Ah!

               (Retires to back of stage, crying.)
                     (Enter, Santuzza.)

            Santuzza!

 _Santuzza._ Ah! good mother!

        (Throws her arms around Lucia's neck.)

            (People crowd upon the stage.)

              (Excitement and agitation.)

(Enter a woman in the distance crying, "Neighbor Turiddu is murdered.")

  (Several women hastily enter, terrified. One of them shrieks--)

           "Neighbor Turiddu is murdered."

               (All rush upon the stage.)

 _All._ Ah!

(Santuzza falls; swooning. Lucia faints,
and is supported by some of the women.)

       THE CURTAIN FALLS RAPIDLY.


FINALE.

               (Entra Alfio.)

 _Alfio._ A voi tutti salute.

 _Coro._ Compar Alfio, salute.

 _Turiddu._ Benvenuto! con noi dovete bere,

                   (Empie un bicchiere.)

                Ecco pieno è il bicchiere.

                       (Troncando.)

 _Alfio._ Grazie, ma il vostro vino io non l'accetto,
               Diverrebbe veleno entro il mio petto!

 _Turiddu._

                      (Parlato.)

            A piacer vostro.

                    (Getto il vino.)

 _Lola._ Ahimè che mai sarà?

(Alcune donne nel Coro si consigliano fra loro poi si av
vicinano a Lola dicendole sotto voce.)

 _Coro._ Comare Lola, andiamo via di qua.

           (Tutte le donne escono conducendo Lola.)

 _Turiddu._ Avete altro a dirmi?

 _Alfio._ Io nulla.

 _Turiddu._ Allota sono agli ordini vostri--

 _Alfio._ Or ora?

 _Turiddu._ Or ora!

    (Si abbracciano. Turiddu morde l'orecchio destro di Alfio.)

 _Alfio._ Compar Turiddu, a vete morso, a buono!

                (Con intenzione.)

              Cintenderemo bene a quel che pare!

 _Turiddu._ Compar Alfio.
                Lo so che il torto è mio;
                E ve lo giuro nel nome di Dio
                Che al par d'un cane mi farei sgozzar--
                    Ma s'io non vivo,

                     (Dolorosamente.)


                Resta abbandonata povera Santa!
                Lei che mi s'è data!

                     (Con impeto.)

                Vi saprò in core il ferro mio piantar!

 _Alfio._

                  (Freddamente.)

          Compare fate come più vi piace,
          Io v'aspetto qui fuori dietro l'orto.

                       (Esce.)

 _Turiddu._

                     (Chiamando.)

                Mamma--

                    (Entra Lucia.)

                Mamma--quel vino è generoso,
                E certo oggi troppi bicchier
                Ne ho traccannati--
                Vado fuori all' aperto--
                Ma prima voglio che mi benedite--
                Come quel giorno che partii soldato:
                E poi mamma,
                Sentite, s'io non tornassi--
                Voi dovrete fare da madre a Santa,
                Ch'io le avea giurato di condurla all' altare.

 _Lucia._   Perchè parli cosi, figliolo mio?

 _Turiddu._

                   (Con disinvoltura.)

                Oh! nulla, è il vino che m'ha suggerito!
                M'ha suggerito il vino--
                Per me pregate Iddio,
                Un bacio mamma! un altro bacio
                Addio!

                  (Fugge disperatamente.)

 _Lucia._ Turiddu! che vuoi dire!

     (Va in fondo alla scena a disperatamente chiama.)

              Turiddu! Turiddu! ah!

                    (Entra Santuzza.)

                  Santuzza.

 _Santuzza._ Oh! madre mia!

(Le getta le braccia al colla. La scena si popolo. L'agitazione si
scorge sul volto di tutti. Che scambievolmente s'interrogano con
terrore. Si ode un mormorio confuso da lontano. Una donna sola,
assai lontano, gridando.)

                  Hanno ammazzato compare Turiddu!

(Si sentono delle voci confuse più vicine. Alcune donne entrano
atterrite correndo, ed una di esse grida disperatamente.)

            Hanno ammazzato compare Turiddu!

         (Tutti si precipitano sulla scena.)

 _Santuzza, Lucia e Coro._

                   (Gridando.)

            Ah!

(Santuzza cade priva di sensi, Lucia sviene ed è sorretta
dalle donne del Coro. Tutti restano atterriti.)

       CALA RAPIDAMENTE LA TELA.



THE A CAPPELLA CHORUS BOOK

_Edited by_ DR. F. MELIUS CHRISTIANSEN AND NOBLE CAIN

FOR MIXED VOICES _Price, in Boards_, $1.00

Outstanding choral compositions of Bach, Brahms, Gibbons, Kopolyoff,
Lassus, Morley, Palestrina, Pearsall, Praetorius, Purcell, Rachmaninoff,
Rimsky-Korsakoff, Sibelius, Tchaikovsky, Vittoria, Wilbye, and
Zolotarieff; a few folk melodies, and a negro spiritual.

This notable collection of twenty-seven choruses, one hundred and
twenty-eight music pages, contains sixteen secular numbers and eleven
sacred. The names of the distinguished editors are a guarantee of the
high quality of the book. Care has been taken to avoid music of more
than average difficulty, or of extreme vocal range.

Every number was chosen because of its intrinsic beauty as well as
singableness. The interesting _Foreword_ by the managing editor records
the development of _a cappella_ music in this country.

Unparalleled in both quality and price.

_Each number is also issued separately_



THE JUNIOR A CAPPELLA CHORUS BOOK

_Edited by_ OLAF C. CHRISTIANSEN AND CAROL M. PITTS

FOR MIXED VOICES _Price, in Boards_, $1.00

Contains one hundred and twenty-eight pages of music, an elaborate and
helpful Foreword, and _Hints for the Singers_ by Dr. Hollis Dann.

Of the fifty-one musical numbers, forty-two are secular and nine are
sacred. More than half are made available in _a cappella_ form for the
first time.

As the best possible preparation for acquiring independent movement
of voices accustomed only to part-songs that move solidly together,
the book opens with fifteen canons, rounds, and catches by Byrd,
Hayes, Haydn, Hilton, Purcell, and others. These are followed by two
canzonets of Morley (two-part) and three-part (S. A. B.) choruses by
Shield and Ford and arrangements of folksongs. The body of the book
consists of four-part madrigals, folksongs, two Negro spirituals, and
other choruses. Several five-part songs are included. Morley, Weelkes,
Pilkington, Bennet, Gevaert, Lully, Praetorius, Mozart, Bortniansky,
Archangelsky, Sibelius, and others are represented.

While the musical standard of the editors is high, pains have been taken
to selectmusic that not only is suitable in range and text for junior
choruses, but is hearty, joyous, and singable.

This truly significant volume will fill a great need, and be the
happiest possible introduction to the art of unaccompanied chorus
singing.

_Each number is also issued separately_



NEW CHORAL WORKS

WRITTEN FOR SCHOOLS


=BIZET, GEORGES=

 =Choral Fantasia from Carmen= (Arranged by N. Clifford Page)       .50

No opera has more numbers that are known and loved for their piquant
rhythms and exquisite melodies than Bizet's masterpiece. It teems with
color and life. The editor has introduced all the best of these and in
the logical order in which they appear in the score. Solos, trios and
choruses are all present in an easy choral arrangement, which closes
brilliantly with the famous Toreador March.


=GOUNOD, CHARLES=

 =Choral Fantasia from Faust= (Arranged by N. Clifford Page)        .50

The arranger has cleverly contrived that all the best known solos,
concerted numbers and chorus are included in this fantasia, in the
order in which they appear in the opera. All are treated chorally, and
difficulties are so treated that high schools and popular choruses may
perform the work.


=COERNE, LOUIS ADOLPHE=

 =Skipper Ireson's Ride= (Cantata for Mixed Voices)                 .30

To Whittier's stirring ballad, based on a quaint incident in an old New
England past, the composer has made attractive and ingenious music,
especially adapted for performance by schools and amateur societies.


=HOSMER, E. S.=

 =Columbus= (Cantata for Mixed Voices)
                (Also issued for Men's Voices)                     .40

A short and easy work, the music melodious though not without dramatic
touches. It calls for a solo baritone. The part writing makes large use
of unisons, and awkward progressions have been avoided.

(Also issued for men's voices)

_Send for Descriptive Circular "P"--Cantatas, Oratorios, etc._

The Ditson Novelty List is well worth while.

Ask to have your name added to our mailing list.

BOSTON: OLIVER DITSON COMPANY

NEW YORK: CHAS. H. DITSON & CO. CHICAGO: LYON & HEALY

ORDER OF YOUR LOCAL DEALER



The Clippinger Class-Method of Voice Culture

_by_ D. A. CLIPPINGER

An altogether sane, balanced and practical text book by one of America's
eminent authorities on the voice. It contains 132 pages of instructive
text, technical exercises, melodic studies, and carefully chosen songs
and duets.

The author's deep study of the voice together with his long experience
in solving difficult vocal problems in the studio has enabled him to
rid the subject of vagary, mystery, and uncertainty, and state the
principles of voice-training so clearly and simply that they may be
understood by anyone.


A FEW BASIC PRINCIPLES

A tone is _something to hear_. Therefore, to be right it must satisfy
the trained ear.

A good tone is _easily produced_. It is the bad tone that is difficult.

A considerable part of voice-training must be devoted to _getting rid of
resistance_, that is, effort at the wrong point.

Good voice-production is based on the _right idea_ of tone and right
conditions of the instrument.

The study of singing should be _an invigorating and inspiring form_ of
exercise.

To sing _well_ is an accomplishment _well_ worth the time and effort
involved.


AIM OF THE BOOK

An adequate treatment of breath-control, vowel-formation, vowel-color,
tone-quality, resonance, consonants, phonetic spelling, diction, the
head voice.

Ample exercises for flexibility.

An illuminating discussion of interpretation, and how to study a song.

An outline of the principles of interpretation as a basis of criticism.

Purchase of outside material unnecessary.

The book is COMPLETE in itself, with ample text, nearly 150 exercises
and studies, 25 songs and 7 duets.

 PRICE, $1.25


For Additional Teaching Material

_Art Songs for School and Studio_ (FIRST YEAR)

EDITED BY MABELLE GLENN and ALFRED SPOUSE

 Issued in Two Editions--Medium High--Medium Low--$1.00 each


_Art Songs for School and Studio_ (SECOND YEAR)

_Edited by_ MABELLE GLENN and ALFRED SPOUSE

 Issued in two editions--Medium High--Medium Low--$1.00 _each_

Because of the success of the _First Year_ book and the demand for a
second book, a step in advance, this collection has been issued. It
contains twenty-three second-year songs, including two duets, from the
works of Brahms, Densmore, Franz, Fisher, Grieg, Henschel, Jensen,
Manney, Schubert, Schumann, Sinding, Strickland, Tchaikovsky and Watts.

The editors have added helpful notes to each of the songs and the volume
includes hints on Teaching Procedure, Diction, and the Principles of
Singing.



MUSIC APPRECIATION

Based on Methods of Literary Criticism

By CLARENCE G. HAMILTON, A. M.

Music Students Library, with 263 illustrations, diagrams and music cuts.
396 pages, cloth Price, $2.50

The illustrative examples of piano pieces and songs that appear in this
book are issued in a separate volume entitled:

TYPICAL PIANO PIECES AND SONGS

 Size, 9½ × 12½; 144 pages; paper Price, $1.50

A thorough and unique textbook for individual use, music clubs, classes,
and educational institutions. Invaluable for those who wish to listen to
music with quickened hearing and real understanding. With twenty-four
portraits, twenty-eight diagrams and over two hundred music cuts.

What Educators have said regarding Professor Hamilton's

MUSIC APPRECIATION

=Sumner Salter=, _Director of Music_, Williams College:

"I am convinced of the skill and thoroughness of treatment and of the
far reaching practical value of the work."

=Walter H. Aiken=, _Director of Music_, Cincinnati, Ohio:

"One of the best, in my opinion, of anything thus far in print leading
to music appreciation through music analysis: telling the pupil what to
study and how."

=Arthur Foote=, Boston, Mass.

"The scheme is a new one and seems to me of much practical value. The
analyses are lucid and just the thing to teach the pupil how to think
and work out such matters for himself."

=H. D. Sleeper=, _Professor of Music_, Smith College:

"Capitally planned and carried out to meet a very definite need--the
awakening of intelligence regarding good music in the minds of young
people of high school and college age."

=Joseph N. Ashton=, _Director of Music_, Abbott Academy, Andover, Mass.,
formerly Professor of Music, Brown University:

"An admirable book. The music selected as a basis of study is such as
the student would be expected to be acquainted with. The scheme avoids
on the one side mechanical dryness and on the other vague and valueless
rhapsody. With this book sterile study is well-nigh impossible."

=Mrs. Frank A. Seiberling=, _President_ National Federation of Music
Clubs:

"The book will be invaluable to use in music clubs as a means of getting
a fundamental understanding of the history of music and the various
forms of compositions. When our next pamphlet goes out to the clubs of
our national federation I shall list the book for use as a reference
manual for the entire season for club study."

=Dr. Percy Goetschius=, Institute of Musical Art, New York City:

"I am _thoroughly delighted_ with the book. It is an original, very
sensible and practical method of approaching this important subject;
it is admirably planned and its comprehensive contents admirably
systematized; and it is written with a delightful mixture of simplicity
and erudition that makes it both easy to use and appealing to the
student."

A List of Victor Record Illustrations to accompany Music Appreciation,
by Clarence C. Hamilton, A. M., Professor of Music at Wellesley College,
has been prepared by the Educational Department of the Victor Talking
Machine Company, and will be sent free to any address, on request, by
Oliver Ditson Company.

BOSTON: OLIVER DITSON COMPANY

NEW YORK: CHAS. H. DITSON & CO. CHICAGO: LYON & HEALY

MADE IN U. S. A.



WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE

The Art of Singing

NEW AND REVISED EDITION, COMPLETE IN ONE BOOK

THE TEXT HAS BEEN ENTIRELY REWRITTEN

 Price, $2.25

Postage extra, except in first and second zones from Boston and New York

¶ This work is based upon the principles of the Old Italian
Singing-masters, and deals with Breath Control, Production of Voice, and
Register. The Management of the Breath, the Vocal Organ, the Jaw, Soft
Palate, Lips and Face, Eyes, Attack and Legato Tone, the Three Registers
of the Voice, Force, Intensity, and Expression are illustrated by many
cuts and exercises.


COMMENTS OF THE PRESS

¶ We find a logical, clear, precise, and well ordered system in the work
which must commend it to all who study it.--_Musical Courier_.

¶ This book will be made one of the useful "tools of the trade" by many
intelligent and progressive teachers.--_Philadelphia Public Ledger_.

¶ A careful examination of contents will tend to give any earnest
student an even higher estimate of the worth of Shakespeare and his
famous method.--_Music News_.

¶ Mr. Shakespeare has for so long been regarded as one of the most
capable singing teachers in England that his latest work is entitled to
respect.--_New Music Review_.

¶ William Shakespeare has long been one of the most distinguished
English teachers of singing; and this book in which he has embodied his
method of teaching is highly regarded by singers.--_New York Times_.

¶ It is based on the principles of the old Italian singing-masters and
deals with breath control and production of the voice together with
exercise. A fine book for vocalists.--_The Advance_.

¶ In the midst of so much mystic and cryptic writing about the voice it
is pleasant to come upon a book like this, which treats the topic from
the practical teacher's standpoint.--Louis C. Elson in the _Boston Daily
Advertiser_.

¶ Text-book on the vocal art by a well-known teacher of the old Italian
method. Breath control, voice production, and other technical matters
are lucidly set forth. This is the entirely rewritten edition of a
popular manual.--_St. Louis Globe-Democrat_.

¶ The work in its present form has been entirely rewritten and is a
clear and complete statement of the subject, from both the theoretical
and the practical standpoint.--_New Orleans Daily Picayune_.

¶ The author's aim to make an intelligible and useful record of the old
truths and conditions concerning his art has been ably carried out and
the book will be of great assistance to singers.--_Chicago Daily News_.

The Ditson Novelty List is well worth while.

Ask to have your name added to our mailing list.

BOSTON: OLIVER DITSON COMPANY

ORDER OF YOUR LOCAL DEALER



THE ART OF A CAPPELLA SINGING

_By_ JOHN SMALLMAN AND E. H. WILCOX

_VALUABLE FEATURES_

1. _Advice for organizing_ and conducting groups.

2. _Instruction for the singers_, to promote an artistic ensemble.

3. _Sixteen representative works_ by Bach, Bortniansky, Byrd, Farmer,
Ford, Gascongne, Gibbons, Jannequin, Lassus, Morley, Palestrina,
Praetorius, Purcell, and Tchaikovsky.

4. _Vocal phonetics of the text_ printed with the regular text in
the music. With the right vocal effect in the mind's eye, good voice
production comes naturally, and an artistic choral effect results.

5. _No extremes in vocal range_ are demanded of any voice, careful
provision being made for average young voices.

6. _A special chapter on each of the choruses_ for analysis, technique,
interpretation, and appreciation.

7. _A complete year's course_ in group-singing, plus a repertoire of
outstanding works.

8. _For mixed choruses and classroom use_ in school, college, or
university; or mixed vocal ensembles and choral societies, amateur and
professional.

 _Price, in cloth_, $2.00

OLIVER DITSON COMPANY, INC.



Standard Opera Librettos

All librettos have English text. Additional texts are indicated by
Italic letters, as follows: _I_, Italian; _G_, German; _F_, French.
Those marked with (*) contain no music. All the others have the music of
the principal airs.

                  PRICE, 30 CENTS EACH, NET.

                          A-G

 Title                     Text          Composer

 Africaine, L'              _I._     _Giacomo Meyerbeer_
 Aïda                       _I._     _Giuseppe Verdi_
 Armide                     _F._     _C. W. von Gluck_
 Ballo in Maschera, Un
   (The Masked Ball)        _I._     _Giuseppe Verdi_
 Barbe-Bleue
   (Blue Beard)             _F._     _Jacques Offenbach_
 Barbiere di Siviglia, Il
   (Barber of Seville)      _I._     _Gioacchino A. Rossini_
 Bartered Bride             _G._     _Frederich Smetana_
 Belle Hélèna, La           _F._     _Jacques Offenbach_
 Bells of Corneville
   (Chimes of Normandy)              _Robert Planquette_
 *Billee Taylor                      _Edward Solomon_
 *Boccaccio                          _Franz von Suppé_
 Bohemian Girl, The                  _Michael Wm. Balfe_
    do.                     _I._           do.
 Carmen                     _F._     _Georges Bizet_
    do.                     _I._           do.
 Cavalleria Rusticana       _I._     _Pietro Mascagni_
 Chimes of Normandy
   (Bells of Corneville)             _Robert Planquette_
 Cleopatra's Night                   _Henry Hadley_
 Contes d'Hoffmann, Les
   (Tales of Hoffmann)      _F._     _Jacques Offenbach_
 Crispino e la Comare
 (The Cobbler and the Fairy)_I._     _Luigi and F. Ricci_
 Crown Diamonds, The        _F._     _D. F. E. Auber_
 Dame Blanche, La                         _F. A. Boieldieu_
 Damnation of Faust, The    _F._     _Hector Berlioz_
 Dinorah                    _I._     _Giacomo Meyerbeer_
 *Doctor of Alcantara, The                _Julius Eichberg_
 Don Giovanni               _I._     _W. A. Mozart_
 Don Pasquale               _I._     _Gaetano Donizetti_
 *Dorothy                                 _Alfred Cellier_
 Dumb Girl of Portici,
   The (Masaniello)         _I._     _D. F. E. Auber_
 Elisire d'amore, L'        _I._     _Gaetano Donizetti_
 *Erminie                   _I._     _Edward Jakobowski_
 Ernani                     _I._     _Giuseppe Verdi_
 Etoile du Nord, L' (The
   Star of the North)       _I._     _Giacomo Meyerbeer_
 Fatinitza                                _Franz von Suppé_
 Faust                      _F._     _Charles Gounod_
    do.                     _I._           do.
 Favorita, La               _I._     _Gaetano Donizetti_
 Fidelio                    _G._     _L. van Beethoven_
 Figlia del Reggimento, La
  (Daughter of the Regiment)_I._     _Gaetano Donizetti_
 Fille de Madame Angot, La  _F._     _Charles Lecocq_
 Flauto Magico, Il
   (The Magic Flute)        _I._     _W. A. Mozart_
      do.                   _G._           do.
 Fledermaus, Die (The Bat)  _G._     _Johann Strauss_
 Flying Dutchman, The                _Richard Wagner_
    do.                     _G._           do.
 Fra Diavolo.               _I._     _D. F. E. Auber_
 Freischütz, Der            _G._     _Carl Maria von Weber_
    do.                     _I._           do.
 *Gillette (_La Belle
   Coquette_)                          _Edmond Audran_
 Gioconda, La               _I._     _Amilcare Ponchielli_
 Giroflé-Girofla            _F._     _Charles Lecocq_
 Götterdämmerung, Die       _G._     _Richard Wagner_

          BOSTON: OLIVER DITSON COMPANY

   New York: Chas. H. Ditson & Co. Chicago: Lyon & Healy, Inc.

Order of your local dealer

Made in U. S. A.



Standard Opera Librettos

All librettos have English text. Additional texts are indicated by
Italic letters, as follows: _I_, Italian; _G_, German; _F_, French.
Those marked with (*) contain no music. All the others have the music of
the principal airs.

PRICE, 30 CENTS, EACH

PRICES ARE

Postage extra, except in first and second zones from Boston and New York

                           G-Z

 Title                     Text          Composer

 Grand Duchess of
   Gerolstein, The          _F._     _Jacques Offenbach_
 *Hamlet                             _Ambroise Thomas_
 Jewess, The                _I._     _Jacques F. Halévy_
 Königin von Saba
   (Queen of Sheba)         _G._     _Karl Goldmark_
 Lakmé                      _I._     _Léo Delibes_
 Lily of Killarney, The                   _Sir Jules Benedict_
 Linda di Chamounix         _I._     _Gaetano Donizetti_
 Lohengrin                  _G._     _Richard Wagner_
    do.                     _I._            do.
 *Lovely Galatea, The                     _Franz von Suppé_
 Lucia di Lammermoor        _I._     _Gaetano Donizetti_
 Lucrezia Borgia            _I._            do.
 *Madame Favart                           _Jacques Offenbach_
 Manon                      _F._     _Jules Massenet_
 Maritana                                 _Wm. Vincent Wallace_
 Marriage of Figaro         _I._     _W. A. Mozart_
 Martha                     _I._     _Friedrich von Flotow_
 Masaniello (Dumb
   Girl of Portici)         _I._     _D. F. E. Auber_
 *Mascot, The                        _Edmond Audran_
 Masked Ball                _I._     _Giuseppe Verdi_
 Meistersinger, Die
   (The Mastersingers)      _G._     _Richard Wagner_
 Mefistofele                _I._     _Arrigo Boito_
 Merry Wives of
     Windsor, The                       _Otto Nicolai_
 Mignon                     _I._     _Ambroise Thomas_
 Mikado, The                         _Sir Arthur S. Sullivan_
 *Nanon                              _Richard Genée_
 Norma                      _I._     _Vincenzo Bellini_
 *Olivette                           _Edmond Audran_
 Orpheus                             _C. W. von Gluck_
 Otello                     _I._     _Giuseppe Verdi_
 Pagliacci, I               _I._     _R. Leoncavallo_
 Parsifal                   _G._     _Richard Wagner_
 Pinafore (H. M. S.)                 _Sir Arthur S. Sullivan_
 Prophète, Le               _I._     _Giacomo Meyerbeer_
 Puritani, I                _I._     _Vincenzo Bellini_
 Rheingold, Das (The
   Rhinegold)               _G._     _Richard Wagner_
 Rigoletto                  _I._     _Giuseppe Verdi_
 Robert le Diable           _I._     _Giacomo Meyerbeer_
 Roméo et Julietta          _F._     _Charles Gounod_
 Romeo e Giulietta          _I._            do.
 Ruddigore                           _Sir Arthur S. Sullivan_
 Samson et Dalila           _F._     _Camille Saint-Saëns_
 Semiramide                 _I._     _Gioacchino A. Rossini_
 Siegfried                  _G._     _Richard Wagner_
 Sonnambula, La             _I._     _Vincenzo Bellini_
 *Sorcerer, The                      _Sir Arthur S. Sullivan_
 *Spectre Knight, The                _Alfred Cellier_
 *Stradella                          _Friedrich von Flotow_
 Tannhäuser                 _G._     _Richard Wagner_
 Traviata, La               _I._     _Giuseppe Verdi_
 Tristan und Isolde         _G._     _Richard Wagner_
 Trovatore, Il              _I._     _Giuseppe Verdi_
 Ugonotti, Gli (The
   Huguenots)               _I._     _Giacomo Meyerbeer_
 Verkaufte Braut, Die
   (The Bartered Bride)     _G._     _Friedrich Smetana_
 Walküre, Die               _G._     _Richard Wagner_
 William Tell               _I._     _Gioacchino A. Rossini_
 Zauberflöte, Die (The
   Magic Flute)             _G._     _W. A. Mozart_

          Boston: OLIVER DITSON COMPANY: New York

   Chicago: LYON & HEALY, Inc. London: WINTHROP ROGERS, Ltd.

Order of your local dealer

Made In U. S. A.



SONGS FROM THE OPERAS

       *       *       *       *       *

EDITED BY H. E. KREHBIEL

_Bound in paper, cloth back, $2.50 each, net_

 _In full cloth, gilt.... 3.50 each, net_

In these volumes of _The Musicians Library_ the editor has presented
in chronological order the most famous arias from operas of every
school. Beginning with songs from the earliest Italian productions,
a comprehensive view of operatic development is given by well-chosen
examples from German, French, and later Italian works, down to
contemporary musical drama.

Each song or aria is given in its original key with the original text,
and a faithful and singable English translation.

Each volume contains an interesting preface by Mr. Krehbiel, with
historic, descriptive, and interpretative notes on each song.

Portraits of the most noted composers represented are given in each
volume.

 Size of each volume, 9½ × 12½ inches.


SOPRANO SONGS FROM THE OPERAS

Contains twenty-three numbers by nineteen composers. The music covers
188 pages, the prefatory matter 25 pages. Portraits are given of
Beethoven, Bellini, Gluck, Gounod, Meyerbeer, Mozart, Rossini, Verdi,
and Weber.


MEZZO SOPRANO SONGS FROM THE OPERAS

Contains thirty numbers by twenty-five composers. The music covers 186
pages, the prefatory matter 29 pages. Portraits are given of Auber,
Bizet, Donizetti, Handel, Massenet, Saint-Saëns, Spontini, Thomas, and
Wagner.


ALTO SONGS FROM THE OPERAS

Contains twenty-nine numbers by twenty-two composers. The music covers
176 pages, the prefatory matter 20 pages. Portraits are given of Glinka,
Gluck, Handel, Lully, Meyerbeer, Purcell, Rossini, Thomas, and Verdi.


TENOR SONGS FROM THE OPERAS

Contains twenty-nine numbers by twenty-one composers. The music covers
192 pages, the prefatory matter 27 pages. Portraits are given of
Beethoven, Bizet, Gluck, Gounod, Mascagni, Massenet, Verdi, Wagner, and
Weber.


BARITONE AND BASS SONGS FROM THE OPERAS

Contains twenty-seven numbers by twenty-four composers. The music
covers 188 pages, the prefatory matter 20 pages. Portraits are given of
Bellini, Bizet, Cherubini, Gounod, Halévy, Handel, Mozart, Ponchielli,
and Tchaikovsky.

       Boston: OLIVER DITSON COMPANY: New York

   Chicago: LYON & HEALY, INC. London: WINTHROP ROGERS, LTD.

_Order of your local dealer_





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