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Title: Valentine and Orson, a Romantic Melo-Drame, as Performed at the Theatre-Royal Covent-Garden
Author: Dibdin, Thomas Frognall
Language: English
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Copyright Status: Not copyrighted in the United States. If you live elsewhere check the laws of your country before downloading this ebook. See comments about copyright issues at end of book.

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VALENTINE AND ORSON,

A ROMANTIC MELO-DRAME,

AS PERFORMED AT THE

THEATRE-ROYAL COVENT-GARDEN.


WRITTEN BY T. DIBDIN.

AUTHOR OF

  THE JEW and DOCTOR, BIRTH-DAY, WILL for the DEED,
  CABINET, ENGLISH FLEET, FAMILY QUARRELS,
  IL BONDOCANI, SCHOOL for PREJUDICE, FIVE
  THOUSAND a YEAR, SAINT DAVID's DAY,
  NAVAL PILLAR, MOUTH of the NILE,
  HORSE and the WIDOW, &c. &c.


AND PRODUCED UNDER THE DIRECTION OF

MR. FARLEY.

The OVERTURE and MUSIC by MR. JOUVE.


_LONDON_:

  PRINTED AND PUBLISHED BY BARKER AND SON,
  DRAMATIC REPOSITORY,
  GREAT RUSSELL STREET, COVENT GARDEN.

1804.



To CHARLES FARLEY.


AS A FEEBLE, THOUGH SINCERE, ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF HIS PROFESSIONAL
EXERTIONS, UNREMITTING ZEAL, ATTENTION, AND ASSIDUITY, IN THE
STAGE-ARRANGEMENT OF THE FOLLOWING BAGATELLE, ITS PAGES ARE MOST
CORDIALLY INSCRIBED BY

                                        T. DIBDIN.

The LADIES and GENTLEMEN, who have so eminently distinguished
themselves in the Performance, are also respectfully desired to accept,
as they most amply merit, the Author's best Thanks.

       *       *       *       *       *

⁂ The Lines marked by inverted Commas, are omitted in Representation.



_CHARACTERS._


FRENCH.

  Pepin, _King of France_                    Mr. CORY.
  Henry,   }                               { Mr. KLANERT.
  Haufray, } _his Relations_               { Mr. CLAREMONT.
  Valentine, (_a Foundling_)                 Mr. FARLEY.
  Orson, (_a Wild Man_)                      Mr. DUBOIS.
  Hugo, (_Valentine's Armourer_)             Mr. BLANCHARD.
  Blandiman, (_Page to the Empress_)         Mr. CHAPMAN.
  Page to Valentine,                         Master BLANCHARD.

  _Peers of France_, _Messrs._ Curties, Lee, &c.

  _Citizens of Orleans_, _Messrs._ Abbot, Atkins, Truman, &c.

  _Peasants and Pilgrims_, _Messrs._ Byrne, Darley, King, Street, &c.

  _Choristers_, _Messrs._ Kenrick, Linton, Odwell, Tett, Thomas, &c.

  Alexander, _Emperor of Greece_,            Mr. FIELD.
  Princess Eglantine,                        Mrs. St. LEDGER.
  Empress Belisanta, _Sister to the King_,   Mrs. DIBDIN.
  Florimonda, _of Aquitaine_,                Mrs. FREDERICK.
  Female Pilgrim,                            Miss MARTYR.
  Agatha, (_Attendant on Eglantine_)         Mrs. MARTYR.
  Cicely, (_an old Peasant_)                 Mrs. POWELL.

  _Nuns_, _Mesdames_ Atkins, Benson, Bologna, Burnet, Castelle, Gaudry,
      Iliff, Leserve, Price, Wheatley, &c.


SARACENS.

  The Sorcerer Agramant (_the Green Knight_) Mr. BOLOGNA, jun.
  Iman,                                      Mr. HARLEY.
  The Giant Ferragus,                        Mons. LE GRAND.
  The Genius Pacolet,                        Master MENAGE.
  Golden Oracle,                             Mr. CRESSWELL.
  Guardian of the Giant's Castle,            Mr. POWERS.

  _The other Characters by Messrs._ L. Bologna, Lewiss, Platt, Sarjant,
      Wilde.--Mrs. Blurton, Mrs. Bologna, Miss Cox, Miss Dibdin, Mrs.
      Findlay, Mrs. Masters, Mrs. Norton, Mrs. Watts, Miss Willis, Mrs.
      Whitmore, &c.

  The Scenery by RICHARDS PHILLIPS, WHITMORE, HOLLOGAN, &c.--The
      Decorations and Machinery by GOOSTREES, SLOPER, and CRESSWELL.



Valentine and Orson.



ACT I.


SCENE I.--

  _A long Perspective of the Suburbs of Orleans, terminating
      with the ancient City Gates--On one Side a Convent, the Windows
      of which are illuminated from within--The Stage is at first dark,
      which gives Effect to the Transparency of the Windows--As the
      Curtain rises slowly, the following choral Chaunt, accompanied by
      the Organ, is heard from the Interior of the Monastery._

      Hear, while our choral numbers flow,
          Hear! and avert the awful doom,
      Which human frailty fears below,
          When summon'd to the insatiate tomb.

  _The Monastery Gates open, and the Friars and Nuns enter in
      Procession, singing the following_

_CHORUS._

      Now bolder raise the hallow'd strain,
          While living worth we haste to meet,
      Our King, victorious comes again,
          Again our foes sustain defeat.

        _They cross to the opposite Side, and exeunt while
            singing.----As they go off, the Stage becomes lighter
            (descriptive Music) The Dawn reddens, and the Sun rises
            over the City; the Gates of which are thrown open, HUGO,
            with a Mob of Citizens, Soldiers, and Peasantry, come
            shouting down to the Front of the Stage, the Music ceases
            and HUGO speaks_.

HUGO.

Stop! stop! stop! now don't be in such a plaguy hurry. The holy
brethren and sisters are just before us, and you, with your noise,
would interrupt their merry solemnity.

First CITIZEN.

Merry solemnity, do you call it?

HUGO.

Ay, truly--they have just chaunted a solemn requiem in annual memory
of the king's departed sister--and now, a merry occasion calls them
forth to meet our good old king himself, who has been fighting for his
people, conquered his foes, and deserves the thanks of all his friends.

Second CITIZEN.

Then why stand we here?

HUGO.

Why not? The king will pass through that gate, for the opening of which
we have so long waited--and instead of going to the _show_, if we tarry
a few moments, the _show_ will come to us.

Third CITIZEN.

They say the king's favourite, young Valentine, hath gained great
honour in these wars.

HUGO.

That he hath:--and humble though I seem, I have helped him to no small
part of it.

All.

You!

HUGO.

To be sure--I made the very sword with which he slew the Saracens; and
I defy any man to be killed with a better tempered weapon. Oh! I'll
be bound he laid about him.--He had 'em here, and he had 'em there.
(_Flourishing his stick to the annoyance of the mob._)

Second CITIZEN.

But, friend Hugo, why shou'd the king lavish so much favour on a
foundling?

Old WOMAN.

Aye, aye, he was found in a forest--Well, well, when great men go
a-hunting, and find children in the woods, it's time for the fair sex
to look about 'em.

Third CITIZEN.

And mark the end of it--In that very spot where Valentine was found,
there has suddenly appeared a strange wild man, some say he is fourteen
feet high.

Second CITIZEN.

No, no; thirteen feet and a half.

Third CITIZEN.

Who, to feed an old weather-beaten she-bear, bears down all before him.

First CITIZEN.

Nay, but Valentine is well-beloved among us too: the old men admire
him, and his courtesy has gained him the hearts of all the young women.

Old WOMAN.

He never said a civil thing to me in all his life.

HUGO.

There it is--his honesty has made him enemies. There's Henry and
Haufray, the cousins of the king, have determined to destroy him,
because one is said to want to be heir to the throne, by marrying the
king's daughter, the Princess Eglantine; and the other conceits himself
to be the only man in the kingdom, fit for the office of captain
general over all our victorious armies. Stand aside!--Here come all our
noble peers to meet the king.


_GRAND MARCH._

  _The Peers of France advance from the Gate to meet the king, who
      enters with the following_

_ORDER OF PROCESSION._

An Officer.

Banner of France.

Men at Arms, two and two.

Officer.

Banner.

Soldiers with Spears and Shields.

Choristers, two and two.

Grand Cross.

Lady Abbess.

Choristers.

Grand Crozier.

Nuns and Friars, two and two.

Black Musicians.

Officer bearing the Oriflamme.

Peers of France, two and two.

The King.

Pages and Armour bearers.

Henry and Haufray.

Officer.

Red Banner.

Men at Arms.

Officer.

Banner.

Soldiers.

Page with Valentine's Standard.

Valentine.

Saracen General and Officers in Chains.

  _The Chorus forms an Accompaniment to the March._

_CHORUS._

      With the gladsome notes of victory,
          Let the merry cymbals ring,
      Till earth resounds a people's cry,
          Whose hearts proclaim--_Long live the King!_

        _During the Chorus the Characters are so arranged that the King
            is in the centre, and when the Music stops, he speaks_:

KING.

This genuine welcome from my people is the most brilliant trophy I have
gained:--but thank not _me_, my friends--to this young warrior's arm we
owe success. (_pointing to Valentine_) The giant chieftain of yon pagan
host measures his length on earth, subdued by valour and by Valentine.

VALENTINE.

My gracious liege; the child of chance, the creature of your bounty can
never atchieve a thousandth part of what he owes to you, his sovereign,
and his _father_.

KING.

Yet, in requital of that sense of honour, take from thy king the
Earldom of Auvergne.

HENRY.

(_Apart to the King._) Auvergne! a royal title!--He'll next obtain the
crown--Sure, my liege, a man unknown--

KING.

It is my best prerogative to rescue unknown merit from obscurity.

HAUFRAY.

(_Aside._) If this goes on, he will aspire to gain the princess.
(_apart to the king_) Men of birth, great sir--

KING.

Will be most proud of him, whose zeal, at once, supports my crown,
their honours, and the people's cause.

OFFICER.

Dread sir, your daughter, beauteous Eglantine, impatient waits you at
the royal palace.

KING.

Tell her, we long to clasp her to a father's bosom. Captives, your
lives were spared on the condition that you receive our faith (_the
Saracens bow_). Be preparation made, and let Religion's triumph grace
our feast. Auvergne, my daughter's lips, again, shall speak her
father's thanks--Our citizens of Orleans ope' their gates with loyal
welcome to receive their sovereign. Thus ever may the king and people
of this happy land, endeared by firm affection to each other, own the
dear ties of father and of children! and, woe to those, who, with a
traitor's hand, would tear the bond asunder!--Lead on.

        _Exeunt in procession. The King and Attendants go off thro' the
            city gates--The Captives, accompanied by the Friars and
            Nuns, enter the Monastery._


SCENE II.--

  _Interior of the Convent._

  _Enter BLANDIMAN and BELISANTA._

BELISANTA.

Have all retired? Are we observed, my friend?

BLANDIMAN.

The fathers seek their cells to offer prayers for the new converts.

BELISANTA.

Alas! 'tis now the twentieth year since I have sought the mournful
consolation of recounting how much a wretched woman owes thy
friendship.

BLANDIMAN.

Away with sorrow, and in this moment of rejoicing, demand an audience
of the king, your brother.

BELISANTA.

He thinks his sister guilty. Was I not banished by my husband the
Emperor of Greece, fatally wrought on by traiterous slander, when, you,
alone, accompanied a weak, defenceless woman?

BLANDIMAN.

Never shall I forget when, wearied with anguish and fatigue, you sat
beneath a blasted oak; the wind with mournful sound scattered the
falling leaves--meanwhile your groans were echoed by the distant murmur
of nightly prowling wolves.

BELISANTA.

When, at my request you left me, in the hope of finding human aid,
two babes, the offspring of my unkind husband, first saw the light.
Starting with agony, these eyes beheld one of my children in the savage
gripe of a most hideous bear. One desperate effort, short as furious,
impelled me to attempt pursuit. I fell, and knew no more of sense, till
from a peasant's wife I learned that she had found and borne me to her
humble dwelling.

BLANDIMAN.

I wandered far, till the sound of horns led me to where I met the king,
who with a frown at hearing of your name, on pain of death, warned me
to leave his presence.

BELISANTA.

Vainly I sought my infant left behind--reason a second time forsook
her seat.--The sisters of this convent poured balm into my bosom, and
religion, cloathed in the garb of patience, brought me peace.

BLANDIMAN.

Have you ne'er yet disclosed your name and rank?

BELISANTA.

Accounted dead, and masses for my soul's health yearly ordered, I vowed
that as my children were for ever lost to me, my husband and my brother
unconvinced of the cruel treacheries employed against me, ne'er to be
known but as a sister of this order.

BLANDIMAN.

Yet may you hope that providence will watch o'er piety and innocence,
and but to-day, I learned that Valentine, a favourite of the king's was
found--

  _Enter a Friar._

FRIAR.

The duties of our order require your presence to join the Pagan
captives in preparation for the sacred change they are about to make.

BELISANTA.

We attend you, father.----(_To BLANDIMAN_) The ceremony past, I wait
your leisure--and for your friendly deeds, they'll meet reward from
where I hope my prayers have long since registered them.

                                        [_Exeunt._


SCENE III.--

  _The Palace._

(_Descriptive Music._)

  _The KING discovered on his Throne, attended by VALENTINE, HENRY,
      HAUFRAY, and the Peers of France--the Princess is announced by
      her Ladies, and enters--the KING presents VALENTINE to her as
      the Preserver of his Life, she receives him with a warmth of
      Gratitude approaching to Love--the KING leads her to a Seat,
      resumes his Throne, and speaks_:

KING.

Be it proclaimed that any of my subjects who have petitions to our
throne, may now approach. The best acknowledgement we offer heaven
for good received, is when we use the ample power it gives to
bless our people.--The greatest monarch he, whose subjects are the
happiest.----Let all enter.

        _The Music plays a characteristic Symphony--a Group of
            Peasantry enter, the Principal of whom unfolds a Petition,
            and while he and the rest kneel, recites the following_

_CHAUNT._

    With lowly respect, zeal, devotion, and duty,
    To your Majesty's state, and our Princess's beauty,
    We entreat that you'll graciously grant us assistance
    Against a wild man, who in spite of resistance,
    Whoe'er in his road he may meet with, destroys,
    And your peaceable subjects and liegemen annoys,
    Then let your brave knights take this wild-man away,
    And your humble petitioners shall ever pray.
                              _Chorus_--Then let, &c.

KING.

What armed force will undertake this enterprize? When a savage strikes
at the general safety, 'tis the duty of all good citizens to join
against him.

HENRY.

Haply, young Valentine, in gratitude for the high favours he receives,
would gladly go alone on such an errand.

HAUFRAY.

Ay, good my liege, his all-subduing valour must succeed.

VALENTINE.

For once, whate'er your motives you're my friends. It had been
arrogance, had _I_, before so many gallant knights, proposed myself;
but now I swear, living or dead, to bring this fell destroyer to your
presence, or in the forest he inhabits, leave this form a worthless
token of his victory.

  (_Pantomime Music._)

        _VALENTINE takes a respectful Leave of the KING, and an
            affectionate one of EGLANTINE, who seems to reproach
            HENRY and HAUFRAY with causing his departure--VALENTINE
            goes off with the Peasants; the KING, &c. on the opposite
            Side----The Scene closes._


SCENE IV.--

  _An Apartment in the Palace._

  _Enter HUGO, furbishing VALENTINE's Shield._

There--I have made Lord Valentine's shield so bright, that if the
wild man does but see his face in it, he may haply take fright at his
own ugly features. It's monstrous unlucky that though I have been
armour-bearer and armour-maker to the young knight from the time of his
first campaign, yet something has always happened to prevent my going
with him, and now when so handsome an opportunity offers, I'm sadly
afraid I shan't be able to find an excuse for staying behind. I've been
ill of every thing I could think of, in turn, and have obtained more
certificates of bad health, than would have paid for the cure of real
sickness.--Let's see--what can I think of next?

  _Enter AGATHA._

AGATHA.

So, Mr. Hugo, your poor master is going again, I fear?

HUGO.

Yes, I fear we are both going. But you see how it is with us--a willing
horse, you know----

AGATHA.

The poor princess will cry her eyes out, she's so sorry----

HUGO.

And so am I.

AGATHA.

_You_ sorry!--for what?

HUGO.

Why, to think that----that----

AGATHA.

Oh, I know what you are sorry for--you've heard that Valentine has
sworn to go alone, and that you will lose the honour of sharing in so
hopeful an enterprize.

HUGO.

Has he? how lucky! (_aside_) Yes, I'm monstrous sorry--I didn't know it
sooner. (_apart_)

AGATHA.

I knew you'd feel hurt.

HUGO.

True--to think I that carried him in arms, when a boy, should see him
go _alone_ at these years.

AGATHA.

Well, but if you were to ask him.----

HUGO.

What, to break his vow? I wou'dn't have such a sin at my door, for the
honour of fighting the wildest man in Christendom.

  _Enter VALENTINE, with a Letter._

VALENTINE.

Agatha, present this to the princess, and tell her till Valentine can
prove that gentle blood flows in his veins, her roseate cheek shall
ne'er have cause to blush for him she has so honoured.

AGATHA. (_gives VALENTINE a Scarf._)

Sir, she sends this parting token, and will pray incessantly for your
return.

                                        [_Exit._

VALENTINE.

Then success is certain! Come, see my armour.

HUGO.

(_While arming him._) I humbly hope, my lord, that, now, I have no
hinderance you'll graciously permit my services. I have kill'd divers
wild things in my time, and might be useful.

VALENTINE.

Well, then, thou shalt go with me.

HUGO.

(_Dropping the armour._) Shall I! O dear!

VALENTINE.

How now?

HUGO.

'Twas but a sudden qualm--That was a real pain i' the back. [_Aside._

VALENTINE.

I mean to take thee but to the entrance of the forest.

HUGO.

I cou'dn't think of intruding further.

VALENTINE.

There secure my horse, and wait my return. (_Draws his sword._) Now
gentle fortune aid thy knight.

    And let the Fates for good or ill combine,
    The star that leads me on, is, Eglantine.

                                        [_Exeunt on opposite sides._


SCENE V.--

  _The Forest of Orleans._ (Richards.)

        _On one side a large Tree which can be climbed, at the back, a
            Cavern nearly covered with Underwood._

  _The_ Peasants _enter who presented the Petition at Court._

First PEASANT.

Well, the king hath heard our petition, and here we go joyfully on our
way home.

Second PEASANT.

Troth, I am weary;--let us rest awhile; for when the wild man is once
killed, this forest will be quite safe, and things will run in the
right road again.

Third PEASANT.

For my part I fear nothing but the wild man--Lack-a-day! it would do
you good only, an't were to hear him roar--

  (_Music heard without._)

Mercy on us? What was that?

First PEASANT.

That was no honest roaring. Such sweet sounds mean no good. I have
rested enough now.

                                        [_Going._

Second PEASANT.

Don't hurry so, goodman Ambrose, the music is not so bad.

Third PEASANT.

No matter--I wou'dn't dance with old nick for a partner, to the
prettiest tune that ever was composed.

                                        [_Exeunt._

  _Enter Three_ Pilgrims, _who join in the following_


_GLEE._

  (_Accompanied by one of them on the lute._)

    "_Pilgrims._ The sun to ocean hies away.
                     "The curfeu bell is ringing,
                 "And pilgrims thro' the twilight grey,
                     "Now cheer the way by singing.
                 "While each, tho' weary, feels delight,
                 "In thinking of his inn at night,
                 "And ev'ry footstep moves in time,
                 "As plays the distant village chime."

  _Re-enter the Peasants running._

    _Peasants._ Mercy on us!

    _Pilgrims._           Strangers, say--

    _Peasants._ Here he comes,

    _Pilgrims._             Which is our way?

    _Peasants._ Have you seen him?

    _Pilgrims._               Whom?

    _Peasants._                 He's coming.
                   Hark! the wild man--

    _Pilgrims._         Tell us, pray.

    _Peasants._ Here you must not stand humdrumming.
                Yes, 'tis he--away! away!

    _All._              Away! away!

                                        [_Exeunt hastily._

  _Characteristic Music, which varies with the Incidents of the
      following Scene._

  _A strange kind of howling is heard--ORSON presents himself with an
      animal in his grasp, which he has just slain--a faint roar is
      heard of the old Bear--ORSON expresses satisfaction, intimating
      he has got food for her. The Bear enters--ORSON shews her the
      food, and in a playful manner, follows her into the cave._

  _VALENTINE enters, followed at cautious distance by HUGO, who puts
      down a basket containing some cordage, fruits, and a flask,
      and seems very anxious to be dismissed--VALENTINE, in dumb
      shew, charges him with a token for EGLANTINE and the KING, and
      recommending himself to heaven, takes his way into the thicket._

  _HUGO, being left alone, seems terrified, and as much afraid to go
      back, as to follow VALENTINE--looks warily about him, hears a
      noise, and runs to the cave for shelter--a roar is heard from the
      cave, HUGO instantly returns running, most whimsically terrified,
      and pursued by ORSON--HUGO throws his cloak at the wild man, and
      while he is tearing it to pieces, HUGO runs off--ORSON throws
      down the cloak, and doubly enraged by the escape of his intended
      victim, follows._

  _VALENTINE re-enters, cannot find the wild man--sees HUGO's cloak,
      laments his supposed death, and mounts a tree to look out for his
      enemy._

  _ORSON re-enters, and expresses disappointment at not having
      overtaken HUGO--as he approaches the tree where VALENTINE is,
      VALENTINE plucks a branch, and throws it at him--ORSON looks
      up with astonishment, chatters uncouthly to VALENTINE, throws
      the branch back to him, and beckons him to come down--VALENTINE
      hesitates--ORSON enraged, immediately ascends the tree--and while
      he is climbing up one side, VALENTINE gets down on the other, and
      in turn beckons his opponent.--ORSON makes but one jump from the
      tree to the ground--runs to VALENTINE, who opposes his polished
      shield--ORSON seeing his own figure reflected in it, suddenly
      starts back--VALENTINE, with his sword drawn, keeps ORSON at bay,
      and leads him round the stage, still wondering at the figure he
      sees.--ORSON at length struggles for the shield, takes it from
      VALENTINE, and throws it away--VALENTINE has another shield at
      his back, which he immediately uses, slightly wounds ORSON with
      the point of his sword, at which he, enraged, looks round for
      a weapon, pulls up a young tree by the roots, and uses it as a
      club._

  _A fierce combat ensues--VALENTINE, by his lightness and activity,
      escapes many dreadful blows, aimed at him by ORSON.--They stand
      to breathe awhile, when the Bear suddenly totters from the
      cave--VALENTINE, at the moment she opens her mouth, presents his
      sword in the attitude of thrusting it down her throat--ORSON, as
      if instinctively apprised of the danger of his foster-mother,
      drops his club, and seems to implore mercy for the old and
      feeble Bear--VALENTINE retires, the Bear follows--ORSON recovers
      his club, and is about to attack VALENTINE, when the latter
      cuts ORSON's hand--the club falls, and VALENTINE is once
      more attacking the Bear, when ORSON supplicates--VALENTINE
      suddenly throws a cord round ORSON's hands, and bids him follow
      him--VALENTINE holding the other end of the cord.--ORSON looks
      at the Bear, and then at VALENTINE, who throws him fruit--he
      gives it to the Bear--VALENTINE gives him wine from a flask, he
      tastes it, likes it, and gives some to the Bear, who seems half
      strangled with it, and totters towards the cave._

  _VALENTINE again bids ORSON follow him--ORSON suddenly snaps the
      cord, and follows the Bear--the Bear unable to reach the cave,
      drops with a faint roar, and dies, as if from old age._

  _ORSON shakes her, puts the food and bottle by her, throws himself on
      the ground, and seems to weep._

  _VALENTINE ventures to caress him--ORSON turns short on him, snatches
      at his sword by the blade, and again cuts his fingers--resumes
      his club, but throws it down again on seeing the dead
      Bear.--VALENTINE caresses ORSON again (still keeping on his
      guard), ORSON seeing VALENTINE's attention to himself and the
      Bear, seems pleased and overcome by it--presents VALENTINE with
      one end of the cord, and holding the other, suffers himself to be
      led off, looking back from time to time, at the dead Bear, and
      making an uncouth and mournful kind of lamentation._



ACT II.


SCENE I.--

  _A Court-Yard of the Palace at Orleans_--(Phillips.)--_in front a
      pair of great Gates, with Posts before them, and a Chain across
      from one to the other_.

  (_Pantomime Music._)

  _Officers and Servants run on terrified--go in at the great gates,
      and make them fast--VALENTINE enters on horseback, leading ORSON,
      who seems amazed at every thing around him--VALENTINE blows a
      horn at the gate, ORSON is surprised at the noise, tries to
      blow it, but cannot, which makes him very angry--Some one looks
      out from above, sees ORSON, shakes his head and retires--ORSON
      imitates him--VALENTINE angrily tries to force the gate, but is
      unable; ORSON assists, without effect--at length, seeing that
      VALENTINE is eager to obtain entrance, ORSON pulls up a post,
      breaks the chain by which it is attached to the next post, and
      batters the gate open--attendants rush out armed, are going to
      attack ORSON--VALENTINE interposes--HENRY and HAUFRAY enter,
      shake hands with VALENTINE--HENRY, in turning from VALENTINE,
      half draws his sword, ORSON sees him, and pushes it rudely
      back into the scabbard--VALENTINE signifies to ORSON that he
      must shake hands with his friends--he takes a hand of each,
      and squeezes them violently--he then shakes hands with the
      others--EGLANTINE enters, runs into VALENTINE's arms--ORSON is
      astonished, delighted at her beauty, he runs to embrace her,
      as VALENTINE has done, but is repulsed and much displeased at
      it--VALENTINE makes him kneel and kiss her hand--drums and
      trumpets are heard, the wild man is alarmed--the KING and
      Courtiers enter and welcome VALENTINE--ORSON's attention is
      still fixed on the Princess--he approaches her again, she,
      terrified, runs for protection to VALENTINE--ORSON seems hurt,
      and makes a savage kind of moaning--the KING admires ORSON, who
      wants to shake hands with him, but is taught the proper mode of
      approaching him by VALENTINE--the KING orders ORSON a dress, and
      goes off with the Princess and attendants--VALENTINE and ORSON
      are following, when the latter espies HUGO, and remembering the
      adventure of the cloak in the forest, runs furiously towards him,
      and reminds him of it by action--VALENTINE interposes in behalf
      of his terrified armour-bearer, whom he reconciles to ORSON, and
      leaves them together--Attendants bring on apparel, as ordered by
      the KING, for ORSON, who makes many whimsical mistakes in putting
      it on, when suddenly missing VALENTINE, he throws the dress at
      the Officers, and runs into the palace in search of his friend._


SCENE II.--

  _An Apartment in the Palace._ (Phillips.)

  (_Laughing heard without._)

  _Re-Enter HUGO._

HUGO.

Ha! ha! ha! the wild man has began to shew his breeding with a
vengeance--he has overturned the kitchen, set the cellar afloat, and
sent every thing in the stable to rack and manger; for he hath eaten
the beast's provender, given wine to the horses, and thrown the cook
into the dripping pan, where he basted him with his own ladle.

  _Enter AGATHA._

AGATHA.

Ah, Hugo--what, are you laughing at the wild man? I'm sure he frightens
me.

HUGO.

He'd have frightened you more, if you had seen him, as I did, in his
own dining room in the forest.

AGATHA.

Why now, really, had you courage enough to venture there?

HUGO.

To be sure I had--I went in boldly--by mistake. (_Aside._)

AGATHA.

When he was out, I suppose?

HUGO.

O, no; he was there, and wanted me to stay. I took off my cloak to
oblige him, and to avoid ceremony, came away without it. Your lady may
well be glad that Valentine had power to tame him.

AGATHA.

Glad! she's more uneasy than ever; and if she hasn't fallen _out_ of
_love_ into _jealousy_, I'll give you leave to say that Agatha is no
conjuror.

HUGO.

I'm sure I never said you was one: but who is she jealous of?

AGATHA.

You shall hear. The Duke of Acquitane has arrived to beg relief against
a pagan, they call the Green Knight, who holds his daughter unlawfully
a prisoner, and unless, by a certain hour she is rescued, she will be
forced to marry this Saracen monster, who has already vanquished and
hanged up twenty knights who fought for her.

HUGO.

Poor fellows! And what is he to have who conquers the pagan?

AGATHA.

The lady's hand.

HUGO.

Hanging on one side, and marriage on the other! bless me! Where could
they find twenty knights mad enough to undertake such a terrible
alternative?

AGATHA.

Why; your master, Valentine, will go, if it's only for the honour of
the thing: and the Princess is distracted lest he should fall in love
with the lady, or be killed by the knight.

HUGO.

And for fear he shou'd once more ask me to bear him company I'll get
out of the way as fast as possible.

  (_Going, meets the PRINCESS._)

EGLANTINE.

Hugo, where are you going?

HUGO.

I'm going, madam, to----to unarm my master before the banquet, and fear
I shall be too late.

EGLANTINE.

Hold, sir--Can you be secret?

HUGO.

Ask Agatha, your grace's hand-maid--she knows I can.

AGATHA.

I know you are a blockhead. Mark my lady.

EGLANTINE.

Can you not bring, Sir Valentine's armour to Agatha's apartment?

HUGO.

Aye, madam, if she be there to receive it--but when, and how long must
I--

AGATHA.

How rude of you to want to know more than I do--Go, fetch the armour,
quick!

EGLANTINE.

And here's a purse of gold to speed thee.

HUGO.

I lack no spur but your commands, and a kiss from Agatha.

AGATHA.

No, no--(_he is going away_) Well, take it.

HUGO.

Now, why did you say no, no?

AGATHA.

Why, one must refuse at first for decency.

EGLANTINE.

Here, Hugo.

                                        [_Gives the purse._

HUGO.

[_Takes it._] Madam, I'm gone.

AGATHA.

[_Apart to HUGO._] I thought you didn't want the money.

HUGO.

One must refuse at first, you know, for decency.

                                        [_Exit._

EGLANTINE.

In Valentine's disguise I'll see this beauty he would venture
for;--for, should he conquer in the fight, how many Cupids smiling,
through her tears, may aim at Valentine! And, shou'd he fall----

AGATHA.

It wou'd be a sad thing, truly, my dear lady; but how will your going
help it?

EGLANTINE.

There is a prophecy, that no _man nursed by woman_ can subdue this
pagan--Perhaps it is his fate to fall by woman.

AGATHA.

He wou'dn't be the first if he did, madam.

EGLANTINE.

My mother's martial spirit trained me up to Amazonian sports--Foremost
in the chace, thrice have I pierced the monarch of our woods; and, more
than once, have been where battles roar, and undismayed, beheld the
mortal conflict.

AGATHA.

I shou'd have been frighten'd out of my wits.

EGLANTINE.

By force or stratagem it may be mine to free this lady, and save my
lover from a double danger.

AGATHA.

But will he go, knowing this prophecy?

EGLANTINE.

He disregards it as an artful fable, coined by the Saracen; or else as
pagan sorcery, which he, a christian knight, fears not to combat with.
Come, thou, as my page, shalt follow me, and learn my purpose on the
journey.

AGATHA.

Me!

  _Enter HUGO._

HUGO.

The armour is all in Agatha's apartment, your highness. My master had
taken it all off before I came.

AGATHA.

But, madam, wont you go to the banquet, you purposely provided for the
king and Valentine?

EGLANTINE.

No time for feasting now--obey my orders----We'll to the Green Knight's
Camp----Away, my girl.

                                        [_Exit._

"AGATHA.

"With all my heart. Its my opinion my lady is so in love, that, to save
Valentine from danger, she'd follow him to the world's end.

"HUGO.

"I dare say she would, but when I am in danger nobody talks of
following me.

"AGATHA.

"No; that's impossible--you run so fast.

_DUET.--HUGO and AGATHA._

    "_Hugo._ The man who fights and runs away,

    "_Agatha._ Wou'd make a sorry lover,

    "_Hugo._ May live to fight another day,

    "_Agatha._ But ne'er his fame recover.
                 "While he who boldly meets the foe,

    "_Hugo._ May boldly die, 'tis true,

    "_Agatha._ Will live in history, you know,

    "_Hugo._ I'd rather live with you.
                 "Nay come I'll boldly meet the foe,

    "_Agatha._ I'll love you if you do;

    "_Hugo._ And when to fame I'm wed you know,

    "_Agatha._ Then I'll be wed to you.

    "_Both._ Then I'll be wed to you.

II.

    "_Agatha._ The hero slain, claims beauty's tear,

    "_Hugo._ Her smiles more pleasure giving;

    "_Agatha._ She holds his mem'ry ever dear,

    "_Hugo._ And marries some one living.
               "But come, I'll bravely meet the foe, &c.

                                        "[_Exeunt._"


SCENE III.--

  _A grand Banquet under Pavilions in the Palace Gardens._ (Hollogan.)

  _The KING; and VALENTINE (unarmed) discovered in great state, Nobles
      and Ladies seated at the Banquet Tables, &c._

  _ORSON enters, pleased at the sight, goes from one table to the
      other--the KING orders him wine, he imitates their manner of
      drinking--takes another cup, is going to drink, VALENTINE tells
      him to be careful, pointing to his head, indicating that wine
      will intoxicate him, ORSON does not understand him--a Servant
      entering with wine, he forces it from him, and goes off with
      it--the Princess's Ladies enter, much alarmed at missing her, and
      bring with them her cloathes._

  _VALENTINE calls for HUGO, who informs him that the Princess bribed
      him to let her have VALENTINE's armour to go to the Green
      Knight's camp--VALENTINE, goes off, followed by the KING, &c.
      in search of EGLANTINE.--ORSON re-enters, and from the effects
      of the wine, appears half intoxicated--HUGO sits down at the
      table, pours out a goblet of wine, when ORSON suddenly takes
      it out of his hand, shewing him, by pointing to his head, in
      VALENTINE's manner, it is not good for him; he misses VALENTINE,
      runs anxiously about, seems to enquire of HUGO, looks under the
      tables, and in every place, and at last tears his hair, stamps,
      and throws himself on the ground--HUGO, alarmed, runs off.--ORSON
      rises, once more looks about for VALENTINE, and not seeing him,
      goes distractedly off, leaping over the tables, and overturning
      all before him._


SCENE IV.--

  _A Wood._ (Richards.)

  _Enter AGATHA, dressed as a_ Page.

AGATHA.

There goes my lady, drest and arm'd so like Sir Valentine, that if
he were to meet her, he'd think it were a second self. She bade me
follow at some distance to avoid suspicion, and mislead any who might
pursue her--I fear she will prove but a weak defender of the poor Lady
Florimonda, who, if Sir Valentine do not quickly overtake us, must, of
force, be married to the pagan sorcerer.


_ROMANCE._

    'Tis far away o'er yonder plains,
    A cruel pagan tyrant reigns,
    And holds a christian maid in chains,
          Ah, well-a-day, poor lady!

II.

    And ev'ry day some gallant knight,
    Who strives to win this lady's right,
    Is by the pagan slain in fight.
          Ah, well-a-day, poor lady!

III.

    And ere the sun forsake the sky,
    Unless more powerful aid is nigh,
    The pagan she must _wed_, or _die_.
          Ah, well-a-day, poor lady!

IV.

    And, now, fair Eglantine is gone,
    By jealous pangs her bosom torn,
    To save her love, or die forlorn.
          Ah, well-a-day, poor lady!

                                        [_Exit._

  _Enter HENRY and HAUFRAY, from opposite sides._

HENRY.

This way, my friend, our foe is in our power. Yonder he walks in
_armour_, but _alone_.

HAUFRAY.

Nay, Henry, this way lies the road--Unarm'd he comes perhaps to meet
the princess.

HENRY.

Your jealousy has blinded you. I say with swiftest pace he there eludes
our vengeance, close followed by his page.

HAUFRAY.

Ambition makes you mad. Stand back, and as he passes, unprotected by
his wild associate, here let's attack him.

HENRY.

You fear to face him. I'll believe my eyes and go alone. By heav'n,
'tis he indeed.

HAUFRAY.

Now will you believe your eyes?

  _They conceal themselves--VALENTINE enters, and is attacked by
      HAUFRAY, who is overthrown, when HENRY aims a blow behind
      VALENTINE--ORSON suddenly enters, catches HENRY up, and carries
      him away--HAUFRAY is beaten off by VALENTINE, who follows--ORSON
      re-enters, signifies that he has thrown HENRY into the river,
      but not finding VALENTINE where he left him, the wild man picks
      up the swords of the disarmed adversaries, and runs off, in
      pursuit of him._


SCENE V.--

  _The Encampment and Pavilion of the Green Knight--on one
      Side a large Oak Tree, on which several Knights in shining
      Armour, are seen hanging--on the other Side is a Tree, to which a
      Shield, marked with magical Characters, is suspended, and guarded
      by a Saracen Priest._ (Phillips.)

  _The Lady FLORIMONDA discovered embroidering a Scarf--She hears a
      distant march, looks out in hopes of some Knight's approach--the
      Green Knight enters, in brilliant armour, preceded by Saracen
      Warriors--he offers the Lady FLORIMONDA his hand, which she
      rejects, and shews him these words, embroidered on the scarf_:

      "Florimonda will wed the Knight, who frees
          her from Agramant."

  _He threatens, and strikes the scarf from her hand--she falls on her
      knees in despair--a trumpet is sounded without--AGRAMANT orders
      it to be answered--EGLANTINE enters, and offers to fight with
      him--the Green Knight points to the tree where the other knights
      are hanging, and disdaining the youthful appearance of EGLANTINE,
      advises her to avoid the combat--she insists on a trial--they
      fight--she is overthrown--the Green Knight is about to put her
      to death, when VALENTINE rushes on, discovers EGLANTINE, and
      fiercely defies AGRAMANT, who, in derision, bids him try to pull
      down the shield from the tree--when VALENTINE approaches the
      shield, the Saracen Priest interposes, and speaks_:

PRIEST.

Forbear!--this shield protects a prince not nursed by woman.

  _VALENTINE persists, and encounters the Green Knight, with
      battle-axe, broad sword, &c.--VALENTINE is worsted--ORSON rushes
      on, and begs to fight AGRAMANT--VALENTINE recollects the words of
      the priest, and bids ORSON try to pull away the shield--which he
      is about to seize, when the priest again says_:

Forbear!--this shield protects a prince not nursed by woman.

  _ORSON, not regarding him, approaches the shield, and it flies
      into his hand--the Green Knight, forewarned of his fate,
      rushes on ORSON in savage desperation--but every weapon
      breaks on the enchanted shield--ORSON strikes AGRAMANT to
      the ground--VALENTINE's soldiers rush on, and vanquish the
      Saracens--thunder is heard, and the Genius PACOLET is seen
      descending on a flying horse--he alights, comes forward, and
      addresses the characters._

PACOLET.

    (_To Agram._) Thine ill-earned laurels must to virtue yield,
    (_To Orson_) While thou hast freed the Genius of the Shield;
    To yonder castle haste (_To Valen._) a golden head,
    The wild-man's birth, and your's, shall truly read.
    Then hence, brave knight, while honour you pursue,
    This ring has power enchantment to subdue.

        _PACOLET gives a ring to VALENTINE, waves his wand, they follow
            him._


SCENE VI.--

  _Castle of the Giant Ferragus._ (Richards.)

  _VALENTINE and ORSON enter, and approach the gates. ORSON seeing a
      horn, blows it--it utters a dreadfully discordant blast--the
      gates fly open--two Fiends rush out, one of them speaks._

FIEND.

The invincible sovereign of this castle, the mighty and gigantic
Ferragus, warns you to fly--hence!--begone!

  _They rush on VALENTINE and ORSON, are overthrown and sink--as
      VALENTINE and ORSON are proceeding, a Lion enters, VALENTINE
      presents the magic ring, and the Lion disappears--PACOLET is seen
      in place of the monster, and conducts VALENTINE and ORSON into
      the Giant's dwelling._


SCENE VII.--

  _A Magic Chamber in the Castle_--(Whitmore.) _In the Centre, on a
      Pillar, a golden Head, and on one side of it, stands the enormous
      Giant FERRAGUS, leaning on a massive Club--VALENTINE and ORSON
      enter--the Giant raises his monstrous club--PACOLET enters--waves
      his wand, the club changes to a heavy chain, incircling the arms
      of the giant--ORSON catches up the giant, throws him down, and
      stands over him, PACOLET waves his wand._

  _EGLANTINE, FLORIMONDA, and BELISANTA enter._

  _PACOLET touches the Golden Oracle, which speaks as follows_:

ORACLE.

Hear!

  _ORSON is alarmed--PACOLET makes a sign for silence, again touches
      the head, which proceeds to say_:

ORACLE.

Orson is endowed with reason!

  _ORSON falls on his knees, and shews his sensibility by thanking the
      Gods--the head proceeds_:

GOLDEN ORACLE.

Valentine and Orson are brothers, and sons of the Emperor of Greece,
and the much-wronged Empress Belisanta.

  _The Empress BELISANTA throws off her Nun's dress, and appears as
      herself, embraces her sons, who embrace each other--PACOLET
      addresses the Oracle._

PACOLET.

    Agent of sorcery, thy task is o'er,
                              [_the head falls, and the giant sinks_.
    And thy gigantic master sinks, to rise no more.

  _ORSON approaches FLORIMONDA, she still rejects him, he looks at
      his uncouth figure and dress, and rushes out, followed by
      PACOLET, but immediately returns, splendidly dressed--he again
      presses his suit to FLORIMONDA, she is pleased with him--the
      Empress joins the hands of VALENTINE and ORSON with EGLANTINE
      and FLORIMONDA--the Genius signifies his approbation, and thus
      addresses BELISANTA._

PACOLET.

    Lady, most wrong'd, rejoice!--your royal lord,
        Repentant, comes with splendid honours due,
    To suffering virtue, to a throne restored,
        Days of delight remain for these and you.
    While my task over, gaily hence I hie,
    Distress still aiding, as I onward fly.
    To realms of light and fields of liberty.

  _PACOLET changes the scene, mounts his winged horse, and flies up,
      while the transformation is making from the Mystic Chamber to the
      last scene._


SCENE VIII.--

  _A most brilliant Hall, hung round with all the
      ornamental Trophies and Devices of ancient Chivalry, disposed in
      long and varied perspective._----(Whitmore.)

  _The Emperor, &c. enter in_


GRAND PROCESSION.

Soldiers of King Pepin's Guard.

Officers bearing Banners.

Choristers.

Captives, with Presents.

Guards.

Captives, with Presents.

A SUPERB PYRAMID,

containing

A MILITARY BAND.

Guards.

Valentine's Banner.

FIRST GRAND TROPHY,

on which are borne

_VALENTINE AND EGLANTINE_.

Guards.

SECOND GRAND TROPHY,

on which are borne

_ORSON AND FLORIMONDA_.

The Peers of France.

Attendants of the Emperor.

The Royal Banners of

France and Constantinople.

Dancers.

Ladies of the Court.

The Empress BELISANTA,

supported by

The EMPEROR,

and

The KING OF FRANCE.

  _The Characters come to the front of the stage, and the Piece
      concludes with the following_

_FINALE._

    Moment of triumph! virtue's power,
    Resplendent rising, gilds the day,
    Surmounts misfortune's clouded hour,
    And drives each wint'ry storm away.
    Thrice, happy day!
    Huzza! huzza!

FINIS.

       *       *       *       *       *

Printed by Barker and Son, Great Russell Street, Covent Garden.



TRANSCRIBER'S NOTES.


Unusual, inconsistent and archaic spellings, formatting and punctuation
have been maintained as close to the original book as possible. Obvious
spelling errors have been fixed, as detailed below.

In the list of CHARACTERS of the original book, the name "Haufray" was
spelled "Hausray", unlike the spelling in the rest of the book.

In Act I Scene II of the original book, the word "offspring" was
spelled "offpring".

In the FINALE of the original book, the word "away" was spelled "awayr".





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