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´╗┐Title: Moby Pronunciation List
Author: Ward, Grady
Language: English
As this book started as an ASCII text book there are no pictures available.
Copyright Status: Not copyrighted in the United States. If you live elsewhere check the laws of your country before downloading this ebook. See comments about copyright issues at end of book.

*** Start of this Doctrine Publishing Corporation Digital Book "Moby Pronunciation List" ***

This book is indexed by ISYS Web Indexing system to allow the reader find any word or number within the document.



Moby (tm) Pronunciator II Documentation Notes

This documentation, the software and/or database are:

Public Domain material by grant from the author, January, 2001.


Moby (tm) Pronunciator II for MSDOS operating systems is compressed
and distributed as a single zip file.  After decompression the
hyphanation file included with this product is in ordinary ASCII
format with CRLF (ASCII 13/10) delimiters.



MOBY Pronunciator II CONTENTS

Read Me First File (aaREADME.txt)
Acknowledgments (abreadme.txt)
CMU Dictionary list (cmudict.txt)
Pronunciation List (mpron.txt)
Phone Set List (phoneset.txt)



Quick Start
1) Insure you have at least 9Mb of free disk space to hold the contents
   of this zip file.
2) Create a directory to hold these files listed above.
3) Extract the contents of this zip file into the destination directory
   using any compatible zip file extraction utility.
4) Delete the original zip file from your disk to save space.  (optional)


LEGEND

Each pronunciation vocabulary entry consists of a word or phrase
field followed by a field delimiter of space " " and the
IPA-equivalent field that is coded using the following ASCII symbols
(case is significant).  Spaces between words in the word or phrase or
pronunciation field is denoted with underbar "_".

/&/     sounds like the "a" in "dab"
/(@)/   sounds like the "a" in "air"
/A/     sounds like the "a" in "far"
/eI/    sounds like the "a" in "day"
/@/     sounds like the "a" in "ado"
or the glide "e" in "system" (dipthong schwa)
/-/     sounds like the "ir" glide in "tire"
or the  "dl" glide in "handle"
or the "den" glide in "sodden" (dipthong little schwa)
/b/     sounds like the "b" in "nab"
/tS/    sounds like the "ch" in "ouch"
/d/     sounds like the "d" in "pod"
/E/     sounds like the "e" in "red"
/i/     sounds like the "e" in "see"
/f/     sounds like the "f" in "elf"
/g/     sounds like the "g" in "fig"
/h/     sounds like the "h" in "had"
/hw/    sounds like the "w" in "white"
/I/     sounds like the "i" in "hid"
/aI/    sounds like the "i" in "ice"
/dZ/    sounds like the "g" in "vegetably"
/k/     sounds like the "c" in "act"
/l/     sounds like the "l" in "ail"
/m/     sounds like the "m" in "aim"
/N/     sounds like the "ng" in "bang"
/n/     sounds like the "n" in "and"
/Oi/    sounds like the "oi" in "oil"
/A/     sounds like the "o" in "bob"
/AU/    sounds like the "ow" in "how"
/O/     sounds like the "o" in "dog"
/oU/    sounds like the "o" in "boat"
/u/     sounds like the "oo" in "too"
/U/     sounds like the "oo" in "book"
/p/     sounds like the "p" in "imp"
/r/     sounds like the "r" in "ire"
/S/     sounds like the "sh" in "she"
/s/     sounds like the "s" in "sip"
/T/     sounds like the "th" in "bath"
/D/     sounds like the "th" in "the"
/t/     sounds like the "t" in "tap"
/@/     sounds like the "u" in "cup"
/@r/    sounds like the "u" in "burn"
/v/     sounds like the "v" in "average"
/w/     sounds like the "w" in "win"
/j/     sounds like the "y" in "you"

/Z/     sounds like the "s" in "vision"
/z/     sounds like the "z" in "zoo"

Stress or emphasis is marked in the data with the primary "'" or
secondary "," marks:

"'" (uncurled apostrophe) marks primary stress
"," (comma) marks secondary stress.

Moby Pronunciator contains many common names and phrases borrowed from
other languages; special sounds include (case is significant):

"A"  sounds like the "a" in "ami"
"N"  sounds like the "n" in "Francoise"
"R"  sounds like the "r" in "Der"
/x/  sounds like the "ch" in "Bach"
/y/  sounds like the "eu" in "cordon bleu"
"Y"  sounds like the "u" in "Dubois"


Words and Phrases adopted from languages other than English have the
unaccented form of the roman spelling.  For example, "etude" has an
initial accented "e" but is spelled without the accent in the Moby
Pronunciator II database.

Each two-part vocabulary record is delimited from others with CRLF
(ASCII 13/10).

SPECIAL FEATURE OF THIS LEXICON:
several hundred words pronounced differently because of their
part-speech have been distinguished.

For example, the entries:

close/v kl/oU/z  and  close/aj kl/oU/s
(terminal sibilant varies)

or

effect/n '/I/,f/E/kt  and  effect/v ,/I/'f/E/kt
(stress varies)

distinguish those two parts of speech.  (Any word with this
information will terminate with the virgule (slash) in the vocabulary
field, followed by one or more of the following part-of-speech
abbreviations:

n, v, av, aj, interj, followed by the rest of the pronunciation record.


Acknowledgements:
Date: 9-15-93


This directory contains a pronunciation dictionaries (cmudict.txt is
the most up-to-date) containing approximately 100k words and their
transcriptions.  We use these dictionaries at CMU in our speech
understanding systems.

The phone set for this dictionary contains 39 phones, which can be
found in phoneset.txt.

Stress is indicated by means of a numeral [012] attached to a vowel:
  0 = no stress
  1 = primary stress
  2 = secondary stress

Alternate transcriptions are identified with a numeral in parentheses as
part of the lexical entry.

We generated this dictionary using the following independent sources:
- a 20k+ general English dictionary, built by hand at CMU
  (extensively proofed and used).
- a 200k+ UCLA-proofed version of the shoup dictionary.
- a 32k subset of the Dragon dictionary.
- a 53k+ dictionary of proper names, synthesiser-generated, unproofed.
- a 200k dictionary generated with Orator, unproofed.
- a 200k dictionary generated with Mitalk, unproofed.

All entries that occur solely in copyrighted sources, like the Dragon
dictionary, are not currently included in this dictionary.  If you
have words and transcriptions that you would like included in this
unrestricted resource, please send them to Robert L. Weide (weide@cs.
cmu.edu) and we will consider them for an upcoming version.

All of the above sources were preprocessed and the transcriptions in
the current cmudict.0.1 were selected from the transcriptions in the
sources or a combination thereof.  We have removed some potentially
unreliable transcriptions from this dictionary, including those based
on only one source, and will reintroduce them once we have verified
the transcriptions.

CMU does not guarantee the accuracy of this dictionary, nor its
suitablity for any specific purpose.  In fact, we expect a number of
errors, omissions and inconsistencies to remain in the current result.
We intend to continually update the dictionary as we make progress
in correcting them.  We will make subsequent versions available via
anonymous ftp, and those who would like notification when updated
versions are available should send email to weide@cs.cmu.edu.

We welcome input from users: send e-mail to Robert L. Weide (weide@cs.
cmu.edu) for comments and suggestions on the content of the
dictionary, or to Peter Jansen (pjj@cs.cmu.edu) for questions
regarding the combination process.

The Carnegie Mellon Pronouncing Dictionary [cmudict.0.1] is Copyright
1993 by Carnegie Mellon University.  Use of this dictionary, for any
research or commercial purpose, is completely unrestricted.  If you
make use of or redistribute this material, we would appreciate
acknowlegement of its origin.

Finally, if you add words to or correct words in this dictionary, we
would like the additions and corrections sent to us (weide@cs) for
consideration in a subsequent version.  All final entries will be
approved by Robert L. Weide and Peter Jansen, editors of the
dictionary.


Quick Start


1) Create a destination directory to hold the files listed above.

2) On the PG Catalog page click on the selection "More Files". You will
see a "files.zip" folder in the list. Move this zipped folder to your
computer. On your computer open "files.zip", double click on its "files"
subdirectory and copy the contents into the  destination directory on
your computer.



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