Home
  By Author [ A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z |  Other Symbols ]
  By Title [ A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z |  Other Symbols ]
  By Language
all Classics books content using ISYS

Download this book: [ ASCII | HTML | PDF ]

Look for this book on Amazon


We have new books nearly every day.
If you would like a news letter once a week or once a month
fill out this form and we will give you a summary of the books for that week or month by email.

Title: Joseph Pennell's Pictures of War Work in America - Reproductions of a series of lithographs of munition works made by him - with the permission and authority of the united states government, with - notes and an introduction by the artist
Author: Pennell, Joseph
Language: English
As this book started as an ASCII text book there are no pictures available.
Copyright Status: Not copyrighted in the United States. If you live elsewhere check the laws of your country before downloading this ebook. See comments about copyright issues at end of book.

*** Start of this Doctrine Publishing Corporation Digital Book "Joseph Pennell's Pictures of War Work in America - Reproductions of a series of lithographs of munition works made by him - with the permission and authority of the united states government, with - notes and an introduction by the artist" ***

This book is indexed by ISYS Web Indexing system to allow the reader find any word or number within the document.



                       JOSEPH PENNELL’S PICTURES
                        OF WAR WORK IN AMERICA

                  *       *       *       *       *

           JOSEPH PENNELL’S PICTURES OF WAR WORK IN ENGLAND


 Reproductions of a Series of Drawings and Lithographs of the Munition
  Works made by him with the permission and authority of the British
Government. With notes by the Artist and with an Introduction by H. G.
                 Wells. 51 Plates. Octavo. $1.50 net.


            JOSEPH PENNELL’S PICTURES OF THE WONDER OF WORK

Reproductions of a Series of Drawings, Etchings, Lithographs made by him
about the World, 1881-1915. With impressions and notes by the Artist. 33
                          plates. $2.00 net.


           JOSEPH PENNELL’S PICTURES IN THE LAND OF TEMPLES

  Reproductions of a Series of Lithographs made by him in the Land of
 Temples, March-June, 1913, together with impressions and notes by the
                     Artist. 40 plates. $1.50 net.


             JOSEPH PENNELL’S PICTURES OF THE PANAMA CANAL

Reproductions of a Series of Lithographs made by him on the Isthmus of
Panama, January-March, 1912, together with impressions and notes by the
                     Artist. 28 Plates. $1.50 net.


                           OUR PHILADELPHIA

                      BY ELIZABETH ROBINS PENNELL
                     ILLUSTRATED BY JOSEPH PENNELL

  _Regular Edition._ Containing one hundred and five reproductions of
 Lithographs by Joseph Pennell. Quarto, 7½ by 10 ins. xiv + 552 pages.
           Handsomely bound in red buckram, boxed $7.50 net.

_Autograph Edition._ Limited to 289 copies (now very scarce). Contains
  illustrations that appear in the regular edition. Quarto, xiv + 552
pages. Specially bound in genuine English linen buckram in City colors,
                   in cloth-covered box. $18.00 net.


                  THE LIFE OF JAMES MCNEILL WHISTLER

                      BY ELIZABETH ROBINS PENNELL
                          AND JOSEPH PENNELL
                       _New and Revised Edition_

The Authorized Life, with much new matter added which was not available
 at the time of issue of the elaborate two-volume edition, now out of
  print. Fully illustrated with 97 plates reproduced from Whistler’s
works. Crown 4to, xx + 450 pp. Whistler binding, deckle edge. $4.00 net.
               Three-quarter levant morocco. $8.50 net.


                                NIGHTS

                             ROME--VENICE
                       In the Æsthetic Eighties

                             LONDON--PARIS
                       In the Fighting Nineties

                      BY ELIZABETH ROBINS PENNELL

             Large Crown 8vo, 16 illustrations. $3.00 net

                  PHILADELPHIA: J. B. LIPPINCOTT CO.

                   *       *       *       *       *



                       JOSEPH PENNELL’S PICTURES
                        OF WAR WORK IN AMERICA

               REPRODUCTIONS OF A SERIES OF LITHOGRAPHS
                     OF MUNITION WORKS MADE BY HIM
                 WITH THE PERMISSION AND AUTHORITY OF
                  THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT, WITH
                NOTES AND AN INTRODUCTION BY THE ARTIST

                            [Illustration]

                        PHILADELPHIA AND LONDON
                       J. B. LIPPINCOTT COMPANY
                                 1918


                  COPYRIGHT, 1918, BY JOSEPH PENNELL
                        PUBLISHED JANUARY, 1918

                  PRINTED BY J. B. LIPPINCOTT COMPANY
                    AT THE WASHINGTON SQUARE PRESS
                        PHILADELPHIA, U. S. A.



INTRODUCTION--MY LITHOGRAPHS OF WAR WORK


I have come back from the Jaws of Death--back from the Mouth of Hell--to
my own land, my own people. I have never passed such an exciting year in
my life--and beside, I hope I have been able to accomplish something in
my work which shall show one phase of the Wonder of the World’s Work of
to-day. I was honoured a year ago by being permitted by the Rt. Hon.
David Lloyd George, then Minister of Munitions in England, to make
drawings in the various factories and works and shipyards which were
engaged in war work in that country--and the records of what I saw were
published as lithographs of War Work in England and in a previous volume
in this series. Now, though I do not believe in war, I do not see why
some pictorial record of what is being done to carry on the war should
not be made--made from an artist’s standpoint--for we are in it--being
in the world--but I am not of it.

When my work--or as much of it as I was allowed to do--was finished and
exhibited and published--I was invited by the French Minister of
Munitions, M. Albert Thomas, to visit the front and make studies of
similar subjects in France, but--owing to a combination of unfortunate
circumstances--though I went to France twice during the Summer of this
year, I was unable to get anything of importance. This was my fault, or
my misfortune--I failed--and the memory of my failure will haunt me, and
be a cause of regret to me, all my life--unless I am able to wipe out my
failure--in another visit to France. But though I failed to make any
drawings--any records of the subjects I was so freely shown--I was shown
on my two visits many subjects, which were supremely interesting, could
I have but drawn them--had I been able to do so they would have been
worth doing. Not only was I taken to the front, which was not the part I
saw, picturesque, but I was also taken to see some of those parts of
France which have been fought over, some of the towns which have been
destroyed, some of the land which is desolate, and I have also seen some
of the French munition factories. Then I came home, for I believe the
place for an American at the present time is at home. And on my arrival
I was authorized to make records by our Government similar to those I
had made in England, and had failed to make in France--what I have done
in the United States is shown in this book.

I have had more opportunities of seeing what is being done in war work
in England, France and the United States than any one else--and in a
fashion that no one else has been permitted to see. I have seen war in
the making. Yet I did not do these drawings with any idea of helping to
win the war, but because for years I have been at work--from my earliest
drawings--trying to record The Wonder of Work, and work never was so
wonderful as it is to-day. And never had any one such help--such aid,
such encouragement given him to record its wonder--and by the
Governments of the three great countries which are engaged in “this
incredibly horrible, absolutely unnecessary war, easily avoided war,” to
quote a British Statesman.

Not only have I seen the Wonder of Work in these three lands--but before
the war I saw it in Belgium, Germany and Italy. I have drawn it
everywhere, save in Luxembourg, and there, too, I have seen it--but made
no drawings--for it was so easy to get to that land--and so that country
was put off for a more convenient season--a season I fear which will
never come again. I am not going to make comparisons--but I am going to
say that the Wonder of Work is more wonderful in the United States than
anywhere else in the world to-day. True, we are not working with that
unbelievable energy which the French and English--yes, the English--have
put at last into their work--but we do so much more--with so much
less--appearance of work--we are working for the Allies--but they are
not working for us. And we are doing for them what they cannot do for
themselves. In Europe the war worker works all day and every day in the
year. Here most of the great industrial works have only added war work
to their peace work, in Europe scarce anything else but war work is
being done.

And also in America the women have not to any extent gone into the
factories, mills and shipyards of the country. And I hope they never
will. I have never seen a woman shell maker here, yet I know of
factories in France and England where there are scarce any work people,
save women, one where there are ten thousand women. Here they are only
making fuses and doing other light work, but I have not seen a woman at
a lathe as I have seen them in France and England. I have never seen a
woman ship builder here--yet I have seen women in shipyards abroad doing
work that men would have grumbled at when put to it--because it was
thought hard work--before the war.

And I am glad that our women are not forced to undertake such work, and
hope they never may be, for I have seen the black side of this work,
which already has led to strikes and labour troubles in Europe--and when
the war is over, will lead to greater trouble--for the Captains of
Industry in Europe tell me that women run machines better than men--they
devote themselves to the machine--never try to improve it--to make
changes in it--only to keep it going and in good order, while the man is
always trying to improve it, to make it do more, so that he can do less.
“Stick matches in it,” one manager said--while the women just run the
machines as they are shown how.

But making shells is more interesting than washing dishes, or waving
flags and marching in parades--and more exciting--but there will be an
end to that some day; and the lathes--which have been turned to war
work--will be turned back to peace work--and the question is, will the
women go back to their dishes?--and if they do not there will be more
trouble. I have seen a women’s strike--or a little of it--for with the
manager who was showing me around, I left at once. It was not an
orderly, peaceful, or womanly strike. That shop was no place for me.
Those women were not lady-like.

But just as the greatest human energy has been given to war work, given
to make things to explode, to kill, to destroy; so the greatest machines
have been turned to do this work with the greatest skill and accuracy
and the greatest speed--the workers are but a necessary detail--and it
is the working of the great machinery in the great mills which I find so
inspiring--so impressive--for the mills are shrines of war. The mills
are the modern temples and in them do the people worship. And if only
the engines turned out were engines of peace--how much better would the
world be--but everything made in a war factory is made to destroy and to
be destroyed. But one must not think of that, for if one did the war
would stop, and not every one wants it to stop--or it would stop
to-day--a universal demand for peace would make peace,--really would
have prevented war. But war work in America is the most wonderful work
in the world and that is the reason why I have drawn some of the work I
have seen--seen in these endless looms of time--where history is being
woven. The attitude of the workman toward the artist is curious; in
France he understands, in England he looks down on you as a poor thing
who has to work--in America you are regarded as a fellow workman, as an
artist is!

I want to thank the Secretaries of the Navy and of War, Messrs. Daniels
and Baker, Mr. Creel and the other members of the Board and staff of the
Committee on Public Information, and the various heads of the various
sub-departments of the Army and Navy, who stood my pestering and
querying and obtained for me permission to visit every industrial
establishment I wanted. In every plant, camp, yard, works, field, which
I wanted to work in--I was taken to, and treated with courtesy. I should
like to thank and mention by name the various officials, government and
civilian, who gave me every facility to see and to draw everything I
wished in the War Works they directed--but we are at war--and I am not
permitted to say where these drawings were made, and if I mentioned the
names of some of the directors of these works the places in which I made
the drawings would be known. As it is, I imagine many of them are pretty
well known already.

Finally I wish to thank my life-long friend, Dr. F. P. Keppel--who
suggested, directed, arranged, calmed down and cheered up all those with
whom I was brought in most interesting contact. He knows what he did and
I know--and I shall not forget.

PHILADELPHIA, THANKSGIVING DAY, 1917      JOSEPH PENNELL



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS


THE KEEL                                                       I

UNDER THE SHED                                                II

THE ARMOR PLATE PRESS                                        III

IN THE LAND OF BROBDIGNAG: THE ARMOR PLATE BENDING PRESS      IV

BUILDING THE BATTLE SHIP                                       V

MAKING A TURBINE ENGINE                                       VI

MAKING PROPELLER BLADES                                      VII

THE PROW                                                    VIII

READY TO START                                                IX

THE COLLIER                                                    X

BUILDING SUBMARINE CHASERS                                    XI

BUILDING DESTROYERS. NO. ONE                                 XII

BUILDING DESTROYERS. NO. TWO                                XIII

IN THE DRY DOCK                                              XIV

THE OLD AND THE NEW                                           XV

SUBMARINES IN DRY DOCK                                       XVI

THE TRANSPORTS                                              XVII

READY FOR SERVICE AGAIN                                    XVIII

THE BALLOON SHED                                             XIX

THE LARKS                                                     XX

MAKING RIFLES                                                XXI

THE FORGES                                                  XXII

CASTING SHELLS                                             XXIII

FORGING SHELLS: THE SLAVES OF THE WHEEL                     XXIV

THE WHITE AND THE BLACK HAMMERS                              XXV

SHELL FACTORY NO. TWO: FROM SHOP TO SHOP                    XXVI

SHAPING A GUN FROM AN INGOT                                XXVII

THE GUN PIT. NO. ONE                                      XXVIII

THE GUN PIT. NO. TWO                                        XXIX

THE GUN FACTORY                                              XXX

THE BIGGEST LATHE IN THE WORLD                              XXXI

THE GUN TESTING GROUND                                     XXXII

THE RIVETERS                                              XXXIII

BUILDING ENGINES FOR THE ALLIES                            XXXIV

THE FLYING LOCOMOTIVE                                       XXXV

THE CAMP: THE NEW ARCHITECTURE                             XXXVI



I

THE KEEL


The shipyards are endless and their forms are endless and ever new--but
I never before found one where from the water I could look down on the
ship while it grew as it did here, amid its forests, its walls--which
it, in turn, would soon tower over.

[Illustration]



II

UNDER THE SHED


It seemed as though this yard was built for me, and if it was not that I
found it so practical, I should have thought it only pictorial.

But in the shed in rows, in piles, in layers, lay every part of the ship
ready to fit together--all in order. As I drew, boats and boilers came
out of the shop and went to their places on board.

[Illustration]



III

THE ARMOR PLATE PRESS


The English maker rolls rapidly his armor plate in heat and smoke and
flame. The American slowly presses it, but with a press so powerful it
will crush the huge ingot--so sensitive that it will not crack a watch
crystal placed under it.

[Illustration]



IV

IN THE LAND OF BROBDIGNAG: THE ARMOR PLATE BENDING PRESS


Only Swift never imagined, and Gulliver never saw, presses and ladles
and chains and cranes like these, but I have seen them, and there is no
imagination in my study of the press or the ladle. A press so powerful
it will slowly bend the thickest plate. A ladle so big the men were lost
in it.

[Illustration]



V

BUILDING THE BATTLE SHIP


Inside the huge shed where she was built and launched she lay getting
her finishing touches--or rather those that could be given her, for her
masts were too big to finish, her turrets were being fitted and her
turbines put in--and soon she would begin her life of terror and
horror.

[Illustration]



VI

MAKING A TURBINE ENGINE


This is the finest shop, in which the most impressive work of modern
times is done and it is “somewhere in America”; and as I worked away
after five, one man said--“Wot’s yer hours, mate?”

[Illustration]



VII

MAKING PROPELLER BLADES


Blue in the shadows and such blue--gold in the lights and such
gold--were those blades--in this great shop--and as I worked the engine
steamed in and carried one of the propellers off, to fit in the ship,
standing in the dock just outside.

[Illustration]



VIII

THE PROW


“Very pretty drawing,” said the officer when I showed him this leering,
staring, slobbering monster, the spirit of war, a creation of our time
and our country. It is fascinating but intolerable.

[Illustration]



IX

READY TO START


Dignified, solemn, immense she stood, held to the long dock by the great
cables; and the great cranes swung great carloads of war work aboard
her, as fast as the engines could bring them.

On land she was guarded by marines. In the air the Planes were guarding
her.

[Illustration]



X

THE COLLIER


This is a Freighter and Collier and the huge erections on its decks are
cranes and derricks, by which other ships are coaled and loaded at sea.
The system is not new, but I imagine many landsmen, like myself, till I
drew it, had never seen such a creature.

[Illustration]



XI

BUILDING SUBMARINE CHASERS


All round the big ship the little boats gathered--being built out of
doors, anywhere near the water, into which the crane swings them as soon
as they are ready. It is like this they are being built all over the
country.

[Illustration]



XII

BUILDING DESTROYERS. NO. ONE


Amid the great ways, the little destroyers are built. While the work of
building is going on, there seem to be no workmen about--though the
noise they make is terrible. The various parts of the ships lie about
apparently in confusion, but the crane knows what it wants and where to
find it, and picks it up and carries it to its proper place. It is only
when the men knock off that you see what an army is engaged in
shipbuilding. And it was too funny to be told as I went about--I must
not smoke--yet hundreds of drills and riveters were shedding showers of
sparks and there is nothing but iron to be seen.

[Illustration]



XIII

BUILDING DESTROYERS. NO. TWO


How the cranes minister to the ships, carrying them the things they
want, lowering them gently into the places where they belong and then
hovering over the vessels they are building to see that everything is in
its proper place--the cranes do it all--the men who run them are mere
details.

[Illustration]



XIV

IN THE DRY DOCK


These are the things that tower--that shine--whose power is
terrible--but their smile does not make glad.

The admiral said he could not see the ship like that--“Don’t you wish
you could?” was the only answer I could think of.

[Illustration]



XV

THE OLD AND THE NEW


Whether the old wooden ship is finer in line than the new steel monster
is more than I can decide, but I do know that both are well worth
drawing.

[Illustration]



XVI

SUBMARINES IN DRY DOCK


There they lay in long lines--soon to be ready to start on their
venturesome voyages.

[Illustration]



XVII

THE TRANSPORTS


The spoils of war, for what had been great traders were now to be great
troop ships--and with their transformation what an awful change has come
to our world.

[Illustration]



XVIII

READY FOR SERVICE AGAIN


Just as retired Officers have offered their services again to the
Country--so these old Ships, even more pictorial than the new, are being
found places where they can do their “bit.”

[Illustration]



XIX

THE BALLOON SHED


I only know of this one “balloon shed” in the country--probably in
design it is out of date--but pictorially it is fine.

[Illustration]



XX

THE LARKS


“Hark, Hark the Lark,” this one sings a song too, all his own, as he
soars up to greet the coming sun, then away to battle or to train for
it. Our Lark.

[Illustration]



XXI

MAKING RIFLES


Gallery after gallery is like this in the great building, all filled
with tiny men working at tiny machines making the tiny guns they fight
with; and over them hangs the flag of the country, put there, the
director told me--not by the management--but by the men.

[Illustration]



XXII

THE FORGES


How fine are the forges--but one man said as I drew the figure leaning
back to rest--“Hully gee! He’s got Creeper all right. Look at his
pants!” But the noise is awful--and one day as I sat on a bit of boiler
a roar ten times worse than ever before broke out beneath me and I
jumped right off, and from the boiler crawled a grimy human who, putting
his hand to his mouth, yelled “What yer making all that racket fur?”

[Illustration]



XXIII

CASTING SHELLS


Slowly the ladle moves, carried by the crane man, steered by the
workmen, goggled and gloved--I had no time to draw those details. Into
each mould it dropped just enough molten metal to make a shell head. And
when all the moulds were filled, a man from another shop dropped
in--“Say, what youse up to now?” “Me--I’m makin’ shells for the Kaiser.”
“What! an’ here?” “Sure”--and as a French Inspector passed--“Ain’t we
sending ’em to him as quick as we kin?”

[Illustration]



XXIV

FORGING SHELLS: THE SLAVES OF THE WHEEL


No composition could be finer, no movement more expressive, no grouping
more perfect, and yet all this was happening every day and all day in an
oily, dirty, greasy, smoky shell factory where no artist had ever worked
before and the workmen, black men, were turning the big shell, under the
big hammer, by the big capstan wheel that held it, and I noted in the
shop that the black men saw more in my drawings than the white, yet
there’s only one black painter in the country.

[Illustration]



XXV

THE WHITE AND THE BLACK HAMMERS


The biggest hammer in the world, said the foreman, maybe--any way the
Shop was amongst the most pictorial of all those I have drawn devoted to
shell making.

“Say, friend,” said the workman, “won’t they let yer use a machine, in
war time, is that why youse does it by hand?”

[Illustration]



XXVI

SHELL FACTORY NO. TWO: FROM SHOP TO SHOP


The contrast between the dark old shop and bright new one was wonderful.

“Pretty good, Dad,” said a precocious apprentice. I suppose they don’t
mean anything but compliments, still I never fail to lose my temper,
then the peace maker appears--“Don’t mind that kid, mate, he dunno no
better, he’s edurkated.” “Say, wot paper’s it comin’ out in--I’ll buy
that paper.” That was a compliment.

[Illustration]



XXVII

SHAPING A GUN FROM AN INGOT


When the ingot comes from the furnace, it is put in this press, deep
buried in a pit, and the hot metal is compressed into the shape of a
section of a great Gun--then it is taken out and bored and planed and
finally, after about a year of work, the gun is ready to do its work.

[Illustration]



XXVIII

THE GUN PIT. NO. ONE


These Pits which I have drawn in Europe and America have the greatest
individuality of all the processes of war industry. The buildings are
most impressive, towering, windowless, sombre without, very spacious
within, filled with strong shadows and strange shapes.

And as I looked out from the blackness to the ore crane, making new
ranges of Alps on its hillside, I wanted a gun--or rather wanted to know
how it was moved.

“Why, bring him one,” said the manager--and it came and posed while I
drew, and was such a good sitter. And so I find my studio and my models
wherever I work.

[Illustration]



XXIX

THE GUN PIT. NO. TWO


No better proof could be shown of the way each big plant puts big
character into its products than this and the previous drawing. Here
everything is done deep down under ground; in the other shop it is all
above, away up high in the air. And one day, they told me, the President
of the Company passed with a party--and he saw a man, tired out, sitting
with his head in his hands. “Why don’t you clean out the pit, boy?”
“Well, Sammie, if you want to know why, you go down an’ find out for
yourself.”

[Illustration]



XXX

THE GUN FACTORY


So like a British one, that I wonder which one got the idea of
arrangement of the Shop from the other. Here the guns are turned; and
one man said to me: “Well, I don’t know whether I’ll be drafted by the
U. S.--but I do know, I’d sooner waste my time makin’ guns, than spend
it havin’ ’em shot at me by some Dutchman.”

[Illustration]



XXXI

THE BIGGEST LATHE IN THE WORLD


Many of the subjects I have chosen are probably the “biggest in the
world” and the most impressive, too--that is the reason why I have drawn
them. I have seen great lathes and great guns in Europe, but this one is
certainly greater than any other.

“You couldn’t do that, Fatty,” said the man.

“Couldn’t I,” said the other. “You bet I could if I had been drawin’
lathes as long as him!” It was the second one I have drawn.

[Illustration]



XXXII

THE GUN TESTING GROUND


Into the rocky cliff great holes had been bored, and into them the Guns
mounted on their carriages, by the great gantry, were fired, passing
through wires hung from screens, to test their velocity. One thing that
interested me, standing behind the guns--interested me too much,
really--was, that there was no smoke, save that which came out of the
hole where the shells exploded. And another fact was, that I could not
see the shell in its flight--nor can those at whom it is fired--it goes
so fast the sound cannot keep up with it. Sight cannot follow it.

[Illustration]



XXXIII

THE RIVETERS


What perpendicular cathedral is as full of mystery as this shop. I know
of none and I know most of them, and when the fires glow on the work
altar, and the great jaws pierce and rivet the boiler plates, then is
heard the Hymn of Work.

[Illustration]



XXXIV

BUILDING ENGINES FOR THE ALLIES


In serried lines they stood--first one for Russia--then one for
France--and on the other side several for ourselves--and I said, “Why,
this is Ford’s idea!” for the parts came in at the sides of the shop and
the finished engine steamed out at the end. “Oh, yes!” said the manager,
“only we have been doing it twenty years,” and now they build a
locomotive in four days.

[Illustration]



XXXV

THE FLYING LOCOMOTIVE


Yes, locomotives can soar--can fly--and, like Mahomet’s coffin, stand in
the air; and they do these things in a blaze of glory--because the shop
where they are built is not big enough to shift them about in any other
way. As the engine sailed toward me I tried to make a note of it. “Why
would you like to draw it?” said the manager, as I frantically went on
making notes of the approaching monster. “Which end would you like up?”
He made a signal, they don’t talk in these shops, it stopped and there
it hung. “Bring on another,” signalled the manager--and so I drew and so
the creature posed till I had finished--an excellent model in a
wonderful studio.

[Illustration]



XXXVI

THE CAMP: THE NEW ARCHITECTURE


In the centre of the new city is something like a long train of box
cars--yet when you see their sides you find they are houses. As you look
they grow--and from a few holes in the ground till the building is
finished takes about forty-five minutes, the architects tell me. They
are better built than the English Munition towns--they are
unbelievable--these Cities of fifty thousand inhabitants built while the
army was formed. This drawing is but a bit of one of them--to right and
to left and behind the town stretched--the embodiment of usefulness,
respectability--a triumph of ugliness and energy.

[Illustration]





*** End of this Doctrine Publishing Corporation Digital Book "Joseph Pennell's Pictures of War Work in America - Reproductions of a series of lithographs of munition works made by him - with the permission and authority of the united states government, with - notes and an introduction by the artist" ***

Doctrine Publishing Corporation provides digitized public domain materials.
Public domain books belong to the public and we are merely their custodians.
This effort is time consuming and expensive, so in order to keep providing
this resource, we have taken steps to prevent abuse by commercial parties,
including placing technical restrictions on automated querying.

We also ask that you:

+ Make non-commercial use of the files We designed Doctrine Publishing
Corporation's ISYS search for use by individuals, and we request that you
use these files for personal, non-commercial purposes.

+ Refrain from automated querying Do not send automated queries of any sort
to Doctrine Publishing's system: If you are conducting research on machine
translation, optical character recognition or other areas where access to a
large amount of text is helpful, please contact us. We encourage the use of
public domain materials for these purposes and may be able to help.

+ Keep it legal -  Whatever your use, remember that you are responsible for
ensuring that what you are doing is legal. Do not assume that just because
we believe a book is in the public domain for users in the United States,
that the work is also in the public domain for users in other countries.
Whether a book is still in copyright varies from country to country, and we
can't offer guidance on whether any specific use of any specific book is
allowed. Please do not assume that a book's appearance in Doctrine Publishing
ISYS search  means it can be used in any manner anywhere in the world.
Copyright infringement liability can be quite severe.

About ISYS® Search Software
Established in 1988, ISYS Search Software is a global supplier of enterprise
search solutions for business and government.  The company's award-winning
software suite offers a broad range of search, navigation and discovery
solutions for desktop search, intranet search, SharePoint search and embedded
search applications.  ISYS has been deployed by thousands of organizations
operating in a variety of industries, including government, legal, law
enforcement, financial services, healthcare and recruitment.



Home