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Title: Encyclopedia of Diet, Vol. 3 (of 5) - A Treatise on the Food Question
Author: Christian, Eugene
Language: English
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ENCYCLOPEDIA OF DIET



    ENCYCLOPEDIA OF

    DIET

    _A Treatise on the Food Question_

    IN FIVE VOLUMES

        EXPLAINING, IN PLAIN LANGUAGE, THE
      CHEMISTRY OF FOOD AND THE CHEMISTRY OF
     THE HUMAN BODY, TOGETHER WITH THE ART OF
    UNITING THESE TWO BRANCHES OF SCIENCE IN THE
     PROCESS OF EATING, SO AS TO ESTABLISH NORMAL
      DIGESTION AND ASSIMILATION OF FOOD AND
       NORMAL ELIMINATION OF WASTE, THEREBY
         REMOVING THE CAUSES OF STOMACH,
            INTESTINAL, AND ALL OTHER
               DIGESTIVE DISORDERS

    BY
    EUGENE CHRISTIAN, F. S. D.


    VOLUME III


    NEW YORK
    THE CHRISTIAN DIETETIC SOCIETY
    1914



    COPYRIGHT, 1914

    BY

    EUGENE CHRISTIAN

    ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


    PUBLISHED AUGUST, 1914



CONTENTS


VOLUME III


    _Lesson XII_                                             _Page_

    HARMONIOUS COMBINATIONS OF FOOD AND TABLES
    OF DIGESTIVE HARMONIES AND DISHARMONIES                    591


      Starch Digestion--Cooked and Uncooked                    597

      Excuses for Cooking Our Food                             599

      Experiment upon Animals                                  601

      Food Combinations                                        603

        How to Interpret the Tables                            607

        Tables of Digestive Harmonies and Disharmonies         609


    _Lesson XIII_

    CLASSIFICATION OF FOODS AND FOOD TABLES                    619

      Simple Classification of Foods Based on
        Principal Nutritive Substances                         621

      Purposes which the Different Classes of Food
        Serve in the Human Body                                625

          Purpose of Carbohydrates                             625

          Purpose of Fats                                      626

          Purpose of Proteids                                  626

          Purpose of Mineral Salts                             629

      Difference between Digestibility and Assimilability      630

      Table showing Comparative Assimilability and
        Carbohydrate and Water Content of Cereals,
        Legumes, and Vegetables                                632


    _Lesson XIV_                                            _ Page_

    VIENO SYSTEM OF FOOD MEASUREMENT                           637

      Energy                                                   639

      Nitrogen                                                 641

      Systems of Food Measurements Compared                    642

        The "Old" System                                       642

        The New or "Vieno" System                              645

      Necessity for a Simple System                            646

      Explanation of Table                                     648

      Table of Food Measurements                               655


    _Lesson XV_

    CURATIVE AND REMEDIAL MENUS                                665

      Introduction                                             667

      Cooking                                                  669

        Grains                                                 669

        Vegetables                                             670

          Cooking en casserole                                 671

        Rice and Macaroni                                      672

        Fruits                                                 672

      Canned Goods                                             673

      Buttermilk                                               674

      Home-made Butter                                         674

      The Banana                                               675

        How to Select and Ripen Bananas                        676

        Baked Bananas                                          677

      Recipes:

        For Coddled Egg                                        677

        For Uncooked Eggs                                      678

        For Baked Omelet                                       678

        For Fish and Fowl                                      678

        For Green Peas in the Pod                              679

        For Pumpkin                                            680

        For Vegetable Juice                                    680

        For Sassafras Tea                                      681

      Wheat Bran                                               681

      Bran Meal                                                683

    Choice of Menus                                            683

    Normal Menus                                               685

      Introduction to Normal Menus                             685

        For Normal Child, 2 to 5 years                         687

        For Normal Youth, 5 to 10 years                        692

        For Normal Youth, 10 to 15 years                       696

        For Normal Person, 15 to 20 years                      700

        For Normal Person, 20 to 33 years                      704

        For Normal Person, 33 to 50 years                      708

        For Normal Person, 50 to 65 years                      712

        For Normal Person, 65 to 80 years                      716

        For Normal Person, 85 to 100 years                     720

    Introduction to Curative Menus                             724

      Curative Menus:

        Superacidity                                           726

        Fermentation                                           753

        Constipation                                           761

        Gastritis                                              763

        Nervous Indigestion                                    784

        Nervousness                                            789

        Subacidity                                             801

        Biliousness                                            809

        Cirrhosis of the Liver                                 822

        Diarrhea                                               832

        Emaciation                                             845



LESSON XII

HARMONIOUS COMBINATIONS OF FOOD

AND

TABLES OF DIGESTIVE HARMONIES

AND DISHARMONIES



LESSON XII

HARMONIOUS COMBINATIONS OF FOOD AND TABLES OF DIGESTIVE HARMONIES AND
DISHARMONIES


CHEMICAL CHANGES PRODUCED BY COOKING

The application of heat to food is comparatively of recent origin in
the evolution of mankind. The use of fire involves a certain amount
of mental ingenuity, and could not be practised by man's anthropoid
ancestors. Anthropoid animals, whether human or ape, have a great
amount of curiosity for the unusual and the new.

Man probably began his cooking experiments by soaking hard foods
in warm water, then in hot water, or by warming cold foods at his
camp-fire. As heat volatilizes the pleasant odorous substance present
in many foods, the custom of heating them probably became popular. The
habit of cooking spread, as many other novel and interesting customs
have spread, from this primitive process to the French chef, regardless
of whether the results were beneficial or harmful.

The question whether foods should be eaten cooked or uncooked can best
be answered by examining the chemical and mechanical changes produced
in the process of cooking, and their consequent physiological effects.

Cooking may be divided into two classes, namely, MOIST HEAT and DRY
HEAT. To illustrate:

[Sidenote: Effect of heat on sugars]

Sugars are not chemically affected by boiling with water, while starch,
cooked with boiling water, or steam, absorbs from three to five times
its bulk of moisture, and changes into a soft, pasty, or semi-dissolved
mass. Under dry heat, sugars are converted into a brown substance,
known as caramel, while starch cooked under a temperature of 300°
to 400° of dry heat, is changed into a dextrin, of which toast and
zwieback are examples.

[Sidenote: Effect of heat on fats]

Fats are not changed chemically by moist heat; that is, by being boiled
in water, but the globules are melted and the hot fat spreads in a
film over other material which may be present. In dry heat, fats are
chemically decomposed, forming irritating vapors. The odors of frying
fat are due to the presence of small quantities of these decomposition
products. In larger quantities, and with greater heat, these substances
are exceedingly irritating to the mucous membrane of the stomach and
the intestines.

[Sidenote: Effect of heat on proteids]

The chemical changes produced by heating proteids are of much
more importance than are those which take place in other foods.
Simple proteids, such as albumin and globulin, are coagulated at a
temperature of about 160°. This change is familiar in the coagulation
of egg whites under low temperature. Other proteids undergo similar
changes, governed by the degree and kind of heat (dry or moist), to
which they are subjected. This change in proteid material continues
with the application of prolonged heat, until the proteid, under dry
heat, is converted into a dark brittle mass, wholly insoluble and
indigestible.

If the student will take the white of an egg, and bake it for some
time in an oven, he will observe the coagulation or hardening of the
proteid. The chemical nature of this change is one of great complexity.
The molecules combine with each other, forming almost indestructible
substances. The combined or coagulated forms of proteid are represented
in nature by horns, hoofs, finger nails, and hair.


STARCH DIGESTION--COOKED AND UNCOOKED

[Sidenote: Comparative digestion of cooked and uncooked grain]

The student will remember the reference made in Lesson V to experiments
concerning the digestibility of starch when taken in various forms. In
these experiments, though conducted for the purpose of demonstrating
the supposed advantage of excessive cooking, the results showed that
at the time the contents of the stomach were removed, all the proteids
of the uncooked grain had been digested, while the percentage of
proteid digested from the various forms of cooked grain grew less as
the cooking was increased. As the chief function of the gastric juice
is the digestion of proteids, the real significance of the above
experiments was exactly the opposite from that which was intended to be
proved.

[Sidenote: Reasons given for cooking starch]

The statement is frequently made that the starch of grain cannot be
digested without cooking, because the cells enclosing the starch
grains have indigestible or insoluble cellulose walls. The old theory
is that cooking expands the starch and ruptures or tears down these
walls, freeing the contents so that the digestive juices may act upon
the enclosed starch granules. This is a theory unsupported by facts.
The cell walls on the interior of the grain kernel are very filmy,
and in the mature grain scarcely exist at all. The analysis of wheat
flour shows only a trace of cellulose fiber. Were these cellulose walls
within the wheat grain, as this theory commonly teaches, flour would
show a liberal quantity of cellulose. The cellulose wall theory, as a
necessity for cooking starch, is an excellent illustration of the ease
with which a groundless statement or theory may be used to prove or to
explain some popular prejudice.

In the process of cooking, the tendency is to render the organic salts
contained in food entirely inorganic. This change from organic to
inorganic salts is measured by the temperature to which the foods
are subjected. Many of these salts are combined with the nitrogenous
constituents of food, therefore when subjected to certain degrees
of heat they are of little value in the construction of the proteid
molecules within the body. This is especially true of fresh or green
vegetables.


EXCUSES FOR COOKING OUR FOOD

[Sidenote: Ancestral habits not inherited]

Inasmuch as the majority of people favor cooking, probably forgetting
that about half of the food consumed in the world at the present time
is taken in its natural or uncooked state, it may be well to mention
some of the views advanced by those who believe that the present diet
of cooked grain is better for modern man than an elementary diet, and
who attempt to give a natural explanation. One theory is that man has
subsisted so long upon cooked foods that his organs have become fitted
for a cooked diet, and a cooked diet only. Another view sometimes
advanced is, that while cooked foods were originally detrimental, yet
by continued use man has become fitted for such a diet and unfitted
for a natural diet. These are but other forms of the old belief in
the inheritance of acquired characteristics. This belief, however, is
steadily losing ground among evolutionists. There is no more reason to
believe that a modified function of the stomach would be inherited,
than there is to believe that small feet would be inherited among the
Chinese women just because these organs are mutilated by local custom.

The best light of scientific knowledge now leads us to believe that the
healthy child of today is, in its capacity for nutrition, essentially
like the primitive child, and would thrive best upon a varied diet of
natural foods.


EXPERIMENT UPON ANIMALS

While I do not claim that the methods of animal feeding apply
accurately to man, yet the digestive and the assimilative processes of
animals are so closely related to the human processes, that the results
obtained in animal nutrition are very instructive to the student of
human food science.

About thirty years ago, when the scientific study of agriculture first
became prevalent, an experiment was made in cooked food for animals,
upon an extensive basis. At that time it was the universal belief that
man owed much of his superiority over other animals to the use of
cooked food. This argument was put forth with great force and appeared
quite reasonable. It was asked whether animals other than man would be
benefited by changing to a cooked bill of fare.

[Sidenote: Governmental experiments on cooked food for animals]

During this agitation numerous western farmers put their hogs,
chickens, cows, horses, and sheep upon a cooked bill of fare, and many
enthusiastic feeders claimed beneficial results. Later the various
Governmental Experimental Stations took up the subject and made many
careful, complete, and comparative tests of the effects of cooked and
uncooked food for animals. The result did not show the expected thing.
The cooking experiments in the majority of cases proved injurious, and
the general decision of the Government investigators was that cooking
food for animals was useless and detrimental to the great live stock
industry. Stock food cookery has now become entirely obsolete.

[Sidenote: Cooking a habit of civilization]

Man is the only animal that cooks his food, and has made great progress
in civilization while subsisting on a cooked diet, but cooking is no
more the cause of his advancement than silk hats and swallow-tailed
coats. He has advanced only according to the degree that he has
thought, studied, and experimented. Cooking has undoubtedly enabled man
to utilize many things as food, that he could not and would not have
used otherwise, but whether this has aided or retarded in his material
progress is yet an unsolved question.


FOOD COMBINATIONS

The following tables are designed to convey, in the most condensed and
simplified form, the results of my investigations in regard to food
combinations.

It is somewhat difficult to give in any one table exact information
concerning food combinations under the varying conditions of the body
and its ever-changing requirements. The best that can be done is to
lay out such groups as are fundamentally harmonious from a chemical
point of view.

[Sidenote: Quantity an important factor]

The particular condition of the patient often reveals certain special
requirements which must be dealt with according to the symptoms given
off by the body. Many of these combinations, when taken under certain
conditions, may appear disagreeable, but this can be overcome by
leveling the proportions and limiting the quantity. Quantity is of very
great importance for the reason that the most perfect selections of
food can be made and blended into perfect chemical harmony, and still
disagree with the normal stomach if a quantity is taken in excess of
physical demands.

The use of these tables will serve to bring to the student's attention
the advantage to be gained from a health-giving and curative point of
view, as well as from simplicity in diet.

In considering the chemical harmony of foods, the student should keep
in mind the time required for digestion, which involves not only the
question of combining foods at the same meal, but also the taking,
within a few hours after eating, of other articles that may produce
chemical inharmony. For example: Milk, cereals, and sweet fruits are in
chemical harmony, but a lemonade introduced into the stomach an hour or
two later would produce inharmony, and be almost as harmful as if it
had been taken with the meal.

[Sidenote: Instinct a safe guide, if cultivated]

There are many injurious combinations which the student will learn to
omit from a sense of taste and instinct, and while our instincts have
in many cases ceased to guide us aright, they will rapidly return and
assume command if given a fair opportunity.

The perfect meal can be made from three or four articles, and the
entire menu can be changed three times a day, but to take eight, ten,
or a dozen things at the same meal, puts the quantity, as well as every
article composing the meal, into jeopardy.

After one has eaten a sufficient quantity of food, and the taste has
signalled "ENOUGH," something sweet or pungent is introduced. This
puts into activity another set of taste buds which will accept a given
quantity of another food. However, the stomach has already given off
one signal of "enough," hence every pennyweight taken in excess of that
amount is that much more than should be eaten.

In order to simplify the making of harmonious combinations, I have
grouped the foods whose use I recommend in nine different divisions.
A further subdivision of vegetables and fruits might have been made,
but this would have increased the number of groups, making them more
complicated and less practical.


HOW TO INTERPRET THE TABLES

In order to ascertain the articles with which any special food will
combine, the student should turn to the table headed with the desired
article of that group. If foods from three groups are to be considered,
the student will look for two of them in the first vertical column on
the left-hand side of the page, and will then follow across to the
vertical column for the third article.

    Figure (1) means especially beneficial
    Figure (2) means good combinations
    Figure (3) means somewhat undesirable
    Figure (4) means particularly harmful

(a) "Fats with" figure (1), under the heading _Grains_, first table,
page 609, means that the combination of "fats with grains" would be
"especially beneficial."

(b) "Fats and eggs with" figure (2), under the heading _Milk_, page
609, means that "fats and eggs with milk" make a good combination.

(c) "Fats and milk with" figure (3), page 609, under column headed
_Nuts_, means a "somewhat undesirable" combination.

(d) "Fats and acid fruits with" figure (4), under heading _Milk_, page
609, means that this combination would be "particularly harmful," etc.

It is impractical to print ready reference tables showing the
harmony of more than three articles, but the student can judge this
sufficiently well for himself by comparing the respective harmonies of
the several foods of the group.


TABLES OF DIGESTIVE HARMONIES AND DISHARMONIES

    1 Especially beneficial    3 Somewhat undesirable
    2 Good combinations        4 Particularly harmful

FATS

(Such as Butter, Salad Oils, Cream, etc.)

                                                     Acid   Sweet
                  Eggs  Milk  Nuts Grains Vegetables Fruits Fruits Sugars

    Fats with      2     2     3      1       1        2       2       2

    Fats and
      Eggs with   --     2     3      2       2        2       2       2

    Fats and
      Milk with    2    --     3      2       2        4       2       2

    Fats and
      Nuts with    3     3    --      2       2        3       3       2

    Fats and
      Grains with  2     2     2      --      1        2       2       2

    Fats and
      Veget. with  2     2     1      1       --       3       2       2

    Fats and acid
      fruits with  2     4     2      2       3        --      2       3

    Fats and sweet
      fruits with  2     2     2      2       2        3      --       3

    Fats and
      Sugars with  2     2     2      2       2        2       3      --


TABLES OF DIGESTIVE HARMONIES AND DISHARMONIES

    1 Especially beneficial    3 Somewhat undesirable
    2 Good combinations        4 Particularly harmful

EGGS

                                                     Acid    Sweet
                  Fats  Milk  Nuts Grains Vegetables Fruits  Fruits Sugars

    Eggs with      2     1     3     2        2         2       1      2

    Eggs and
      Fats with   --     2     3     2        2         2       2      3

    Eggs and
      Milk with    2    --     2     1        3         4       1      2

    Eggs and
      Nuts with    3     2    --     1        1         1       1      2

    Eggs and
      Grains with  2     1     1    --        2         2       2      2

    Eggs and
      Veget. with  2     2     1     2       --         3       1      2

    Eggs and acid
      fruits with  2     4     1     2        3        --       4      2

    Eggs and sweet
      fruits with  2     1     1     2        2         2      --      3

    Eggs and
      Sugars with  2     2     2     2        2         2       3      --


TABLES OF DIGESTIVE HARMONIES AND DISHARMONIES

    1 Especially beneficial    3 Somewhat undesirable
    2 Good combinations        4 Particularly harmful

MILK

(Including skimmed and clabbered milk, buttermilk and fresh cheese)

                                                     Acid   Sweet
                  Fats  Eggs  Nuts Grains Vegetables Fruits Fruits Sugars

    Milk with       2     1    2     1        4         4      1     3

    Milk and
      Fats with    --     2    3     2        2         4      2     2

    Milk and
      Eggs with     2    --    2     1        2         4      1     2

    Milk and
      Nuts with     3     2    --    1        3         4      1     2

    Milk and
      Grains with   2     1    1     --       3         4      2     2

    Milk and
      Veget. with   2     2    2     3        --        4      2     3

    Milk and acid
      fruits with   4     4    4     4        4        --      4     4

    Milk and sweet
      fruits with   2     1    1     2        3         4     --     2

    Milk and
      Sugars with   2     2    2     2        3         4     2     --


TABLES OF DIGESTIVE HARMONIES AND DISHARMONIES

    1 Especially beneficial    3 Somewhat undesirable
    2 Good combinations        4 Particularly harmful

NUTS

(All common nuts except chestnuts and peanuts)

                                                      Acid    Sweet
                  Fats  Eggs  Milk  Grains Vegetables Fruits Fruits Sugars


    Nuts with       3     3    2      1        1         2       1      2

    Nuts and
      Fats with    --     3    3      2        2         2       2      3

    Nuts and
      Eggs with     3    --    2      1        2         2       1      2

    Nuts and
      Milk with     3     3   --      1        2         4       1      2

    Nuts and
      Grains with   2     1    1     --        1         3       1      1

    Nuts and
      Veget. with   1     1     2     1       --         3       1      2

    Nuts and acid
      fruits with   2     1     4     2        2        --       2      3

    Nuts and sweet
      fruits with   2     1     1     1        1         2      --      2

    Nuts and
      Sugars with   3     2     2     1        2         2       2     --


TABLES OF DIGESTIVE HARMONIES AND DISHARMONIES

    1 Especially beneficial    3 Somewhat undesirable
    2 Good combinations        4 Particularly harmful

GRAINS

(All cereal and starchy products)

                                                     Acid    Sweet
                   Fats Eggs  Milk  Nuts Vegetables  Fruits  Fruits Sugars

    Grains with     1     2     1     1      2         3       2       2

    Grains and
      Fats with    --     2     2     2      1         3       2       2

    Grains and
      Eggs with     2    --     1     1      2         3       2       2

    Grains and
      Milk with     2     1    --     1       3        4       2       2

    Grains and
      Nuts with     2     1     1    --       1        3       1       1

    Grains and
      Vege. with    1     2     2     1      --        3       1       2

    Grains and acid
      fruits with   2     2     4     2       2       --       2       3

    Grains and sweet
      fruits with   2     2     2     1       1        2      --       2

    Grains and
      Sugars with   2     2     2     1       2        2       2      --


TABLES OF DIGESTIVE HARMONIES AND DISHARMONIES

    1 Especially beneficial    3 Somewhat undesirable
    2 Good combinations        4 Particularly harmful

VEGETABLES

     (Leafy or succulent vegetables as lettuce, spinach). Fresh peas,
     carrots, parsnips, etc.--Potatoes being starchy, not included.

                                                   Acid    Sweet
                    Fats  Eggs  Milk  Nuts Grains  Fruits  Fruits Sugars

    Veget. with       1     2     4     1     2      3       2      3

    Veget. and
      Fats with      --     2     2     2     1      3       2      3

    Veget. and
      Eggs with       2    --     2     2     2      3       2      3

    Veget. and
      Milk with       2     3    --     2     3      4       3      3

    Veget. and
      Nuts with       1     1     3    --     1      3       1      2

    Veget. and
      Grains with     1     2     3     1    --      3       1      2

    Veget. and acid
      fruits with     3     3     4     2     3     --       3      2

    Veget. and sweet
      fruits with     2     2     3     1     1      3      --      2

    Veget. and
      Sugars with     2     2     4     2     2      3       2     --


TABLES OF DIGESTIVE HARMONIES AND DISHARMONIES

    1 Especially beneficial    3 Somewhat undesirable
    2 Good combinations        4 Particularly harmful

ACID FRUITS

     (All acid and subacid fruits as listed in Lesson VIII)

                                                           Sweet
                     Fats Eggs Milk Nuts Grains Vegetables Fruits Sugars

    Acid fruits with   2   2    4    2     3       3         3      2

    Acid fruits and
      Fats with       --   2    4    2     3       3         2      2

    Acid fruits and
      Eggs with        2  --    4    2     3       3         4      2

    Acid fruits and
      Milk with        4   4    --   4     4       4         4      4

    Acid fruits and
      Nuts with        3   1    4    --    3       3         2      3

    Acid fruits and
      Grains with      2   2    4    3     --      3         2      3

    Acid fruits and
      Veget. with      3   2    4    3     2       --        3      3

    Acid and sweet
      fruits with      3   2    4    2     2       3        --      3

    Acid fruits and
      Sugars with      2   2    4    2     2       3         4      --


TABLES OF DIGESTIVE HARMONIES AND DISHARMONIES

    1 Especially beneficial    3 Somewhat undesirable
    2 Good combinations        4 Particularly harmful

SWEET FRUITS

     (All non-acid fruits as listed in Lesson VIII)

                                                            Acid
                      Fats Eggs Milk Nuts Grains Vegetables Fruits Sugars

    Sweet fruits with   2   1    1    1     2        2       3       2

    Sweet fruits and
      Fats with        --   2    2    2     2        2       2       2

    Sweet fruits and
      Eggs with         2  --    1    1     2        2       4       3

    Sweet fruits and
      Milk with         2   1   --    1     2        3       4       2

    Sweet fruits and
      Nuts with         3   1   1    --     1        1       3       2

    Sweet fruits and
      Grains with       2   2   2    1     --        1       3       2

    Sweet fruits and
      Veget. with       2   1   2    2     1        --       3       2

    Sweet and acid
      fruits with       2   2   4    2     2         3      --       3

    Sweet fruits and
      Sugars with       3   3   2    2     2         2       4      --


TABLES OF DIGESTIVE HARMONIES AND DISHARMONIES

    1 Especially beneficial    3 Somewhat undesirable
    2 Good combinations        4 Particularly harmful

SUGARS

(Cane and maple-sugars, sirup, and honey)

                                                             Acid   Sweet
                   Fats  Eggs  Milk  Nuts Grains Vegetables  Fruits Fruits

    Sugars with      2     2     3     2     2        3         2      2

    Sugars and
      Fats with     --     3     2     3     2        3         2      2

    Sugars and
      Eggs with      2    --     2     2     2        3         3      3

    Sugars and
      Milk with      2     2    --     2     2        3         4      2

    Sugars and
      Nuts with      2     2     2    --     1        2         3      2

    Sugars and
      Grains with    2     2     2     1     --        2        3      2

    Sugars and
      Veget. with    2     2     3     2     2       --         3      2

    Sugar and acid
      fruits with    3     2     4     3     3        2        --      3

    Sugar and sweet
     fruits with     3     3     2     2     2        2         4     --



LESSON XIII

    CLASSIFICATION OF FOODS
    AND
    FOOD TABLES



LESSON XIII

SIMPLE CLASSIFICATION OF FOODS


While there is a dominating substance in all foods, yet they usually
contain many compounds which render them, from a chemical standpoint,
very difficult to classify accurately. For example, the principal
nutrients in wheat are carbohydrates (starch and sugar), yet wheat
contains mineral salts, fat, and protein, the latter being a compound
consisting of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur. Wheat
would, therefore, be placed in the carbohydrate class, but it would
overlap into several other classes. What is true of wheat, is true of
nearly all other articles of food. Furthermore, foods do not chemically
reproduce themselves when taken into the body, but in the process of
metabolism they are converted either into other elements or into other
compounds. From this it will be understood that the articles listed
under the following headings are classified according to the nutritive
substance which predominates in them, and are given for the purpose of
guiding the practitioner in the selection of such foods as will supply
the various chemical constituents of the body.

Foods which contain two or more substances in generous proportions
may appear under two or more of the following headings, as in the
case of peanuts. This humble article of food contains 19 per cent
carbohydrates, 20 per cent protein, and 29 per cent fat, hence it is
listed under the three headings--carbohydrates, proteids, and fats.

The tables comprise the best selections of food available in all
countries and at all seasons of the year. They contain everything the
body needs under the varying conditions of age, climate, and activity,
except, perhaps, in some parts of the frigid zone.

In compiling these tables I have selected only such articles of food as
experience has proved most useful.


SIMPLE CLASSIFICATION OF FOODS BASED ON PRINCIPAL NUTRITIVE SUBSTANCES

    /----------------_Carbohydrates_----------------\

    Chocolate        Honey              VEGETABLES--
    FRUITS--         NUTS--               Asparagus
      Dates            Chestnuts          Bananas
      Figs             Peanuts            Beets
      Grapes           Pignolia or        Cabbage
      Persimmons       pine nuts          Carrots
      Raisins        Sirups               Celery
    GRAINS--         Sugar                Lettuce
      Barley         Tapioca              Onions
      Corn                                Parsnips
      Oats                                Potatoes--
      Rice                                  sweet
      Rye                                 Potatoes--
      Wheat                                 white
                                          Pumpkin
                                          Spinach
                                          Squash
                                          Turnips

                                        _Foods rich in
      _Fats_           _Proteids_        Mineral Salts_

    Butter           Cheese             VEGETABLES--
    Cheese           Eggs                 Asparagus
    Chocolate        Fish                 Beet-tops
    Cream            LEGUMES--            Cabbage
    NUTS--             Beans--dried       Carrots
      Almonds          Lentils--dried     Celery
      Brazil-nuts      Peas--dried        Dandelion
      Cocoanuts      Milk                 Green peas
      Hickory-       NUTS--               Lettuce
        nuts           Peanuts            Onions
      Peanuts          Pignolia or        Radish-tops
      Pecans             pine nuts        Romaine
      Pignolia or    Poultry              Spinach
        pine nuts    VEGETABLES--         String beans
      Walnuts          Cabbage            Turnip-tops
    OILS--             Lettuce            Watercress
      Cottonseed       Onions           Wheat bran
      Nut-oil          Spinach
      Olive-oil        Turnips
                     Wheat bran


PURPOSES WHICH THE DIFFERENT CLASSES OF FOOD SERVE IN THE HUMAN BODY

While all the articles of food in the four above-named classifications
contain other elements than the one under which heading they appear,
yet the body uses or appropriates them for the following purposes:


PURPOSE OF CARBOHYDRATES

The carbohydrate substance in food is used by the body chiefly for
the purpose of keeping up body-weight; that is, for the purpose of
supplying the various fluids which fill the cell-structure. If one is
suffering from emaciation, the carbohydrate element in food should
predominate. While some of the more soluble proteids, especially milk
and eggs, will give a rapid gain in weight, the weight will not be
permanent unless sufficient carbohydrates are taken to supply the
blood with all the required elements of nutrition, or, in other words,
to level or to balance the body requirements.


PURPOSE OF FATS

Fats are used by the animal body primarily for the purpose of producing
heat. Food is burned or oxidized in the blood, undergoing very much the
same action as does the combustion of coal in a grate. The heat thus
generated is delegated to the blood, and the blood, by its circulation,
distributes this heat throughout the body. The carbon dioxid or waste
matter formed during the circulation, is carried to the lungs, where
it reunites with the oxygen which we breathe, and thereby again passes
back into the atmosphere.


PURPOSE OF PROTEIDS

Proteid is a compound containing chiefly nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon.
Its purpose is to form the muscular and the tissue structure of the
body. To use a homely illustration, proteid may be compared to the
material which makes the honeycomb, while the carbohydrate substance
may be compared to the honey; that is, to the fluids which fill the
cells.

Those performing heavy or active muscular labor should eat liberally of
the proteid class of foods.

Under normal conditions, natural hunger will call for the quantity of
proteid needed. The tendency, however, should be toward the minimum;
that is, one should take the lowest quantity of proteid that the body
requires to keep up the cell-structure. (See Lesson VI, p. 216.) Modern
investigations have shown that, in many cases of extreme athletic
tests, a low proteid diet has given the greatest endurance. This is
accounted for by the fact that nearly all carbohydrates, especially of
the grain family, contain from 8 to 12 per cent of proteids, which is
quite sufficient, in many instances, to supply the body with all the
tissue-building material necessary.

Inasmuch as the several nutritive elements found in a single article of
food are better proportioned by Nature, than man can usually proportion
them, the relation of one substance to another will be better divided
if the entire meal be made to consist of only one kind of food, and
both digestion and assimilation will therefore be more perfect. Under
these conditions the blood will be laden with very little waste matter,
which is the thing that reduces our powers of endurance. Therefore,
when it is possible to secure the carbohydrate, the proteid, and the
fatty substances from a single article of food which will give to
the body greater strength and endurance than when we secure these
substances from several sources, we should confine our menus to single
articles of well-proportioned food. This thought, carried to its
logical end, leads one more and more, as experience progresses, toward
the mono-diet system.


PURPOSE OF MINERAL SALTS

Mineral salts serve two distinct purposes in the body:

     1 They assist in building up the cartilage and the body-structure

     2 They assist in the digestion, and in the dissolution of other
     foods, especially of the carbohydrate group, and more especially
     of the grain family

Grains are very difficult to subdivide into their constituent elements;
that is, to reduce to a solution so fine that assimilation will be
perfect. A liberal use of the foods containing mineral salts aids very
materially in this process of solution.


DIFFERENCE BETWEEN DIGESTIBILITY AND ASSIMILABILITY

The true interpretation of the word "digestion" is the preparation of
food by the action of:

    1 The saliva
    2 The gastric juice
    3 The bile, and
    4 The pancreatic juice

When food is properly prepared by mastication by the time it reaches
the pancreas, it should be thoroughly split up or subdivided, in which
state it is ready for assimilation.

The true interpretation of the word "assimilation" is the absorption of
all food substances through the walls of the intestinal tract, and the
final passing of them into the circulation.

It is nothing unusual, however, for a person to become afflicted with
predigestion, and, at the same time, with poor or faulty assimilation;
in other words, digestion being too rapid, and assimilation being too
slow. This condition frequently occurs in cases of superacidity. On
account of the excess of acid, the food digests or passes from the
stomach prematurely; that is, before it has been dissolved by the
action of the hydrochloric acid. The food, thus super-charged with
acid, passes from the stomach into the lower intestines, and sets up
a condition of irritation. This irritation or swelling of the mucous
surface (lining) of the intestines, closes the small canals, or winking
valves, as they are sometimes called, thus seriously interfering with
the passing of the dissolved food matter into the circulation.

       *       *       *       *       *

The following table is designed to show the comparative assimilability
of the leading articles of food, together with their starch, sugar, and
water content:


TABLE SHOWING COMPARATIVE ASSIMILABILITY AND CARBOHYDRATE AND WATER
CONTENT OF CEREALS, LEGUMES, AND VEGETABLES

    ------------------+----------------+---------------------
                      |                |    Percentage of
          FOOD        | Assimilability +------+-------+------
                      |                |Starch| Sugar |Water
    ------------------+----------------+------+-------+------
         CEREALS      |                |      |       |
                      |                |      |       |
    Barley            | Somewhat       | 61.6 |  1.5  | 13.7
                      |   Difficult    |      |       |
    Buckwheat         | Difficult      | 48.0 |  6.0  | 12.0
    Corn              | Difficult      | 60.5 |  3.0  | 12.2
    Oats              | Difficult      | 54.0 |  2.0  | 12.0
    Rice              | Medium         | 79.1 |  0.4  | 13.0
    Rye               | Somewhat       | 62.0 |  0.95 | 15.06
                      |   Difficult    |      |       |
    Wheat             | Medium         | 62.0 |  0.95 | 15.08
                      |                |      |       |
         LEGUMES      |                |      |       |
                      |                |      |       |
    Beans--dried      | Good           | 53.0 |  3.0  | 12.0
    Lentils--dried    | Good           | 50.0 |  2.0  | 11.0
    Peas--dried       | Good           | 57.0 |  4.0  | 11.0
                      |                |      |       |
      [A]VEGETABLES   |                |      |       |
                      |                |      |       |
    Banana--very ripe | Very good      |  8.0 | 11.0  | 48.0
    Beets             | Good           |  1.7 |  7.8  | 68.0
    Cabbage           | Medium         |  4.3 |  --   | 78.0
    Carrots           | Very good      |  1.0 |  6.1  | 83.0
    Parsnips          | Very good      |  1.5 |  6.0  | 82.0
    Potatoes { Sweet  | Good           | 24.4 |  5.6  | 69.0
             { White  | Very good      | 19.8 |   .7  | 72.0
    Pumpkin           | Very good      |  3.9 |  2.0  | 74.3
    Squash            | Very good      |  4.1 |  1.2  | 83.0
    Turnips           | Good           |  5.1 |  2.1  | 91.0
    ------------------+----------------+------+-------+------

[A] While all the vegetables mentioned in the above table belong to
the carbohydrate class, yet the starch element contained in them is
very much more assimilable than the starch contained in grains or
legumes, therefore these vegetables may be eaten freely by those having
rheumatic or gouty tendencies.

The starch and the sugar content in fresh vegetables appears low owing
to the fact that they contain a large percentage of water. Eliminating
the water, these foods rank in their starch and sugar content with
cereals and legumes, and are much more easily digested and assimilated.
In other words, if the chemist should reduce the water content to the
same per cent as that of cereals, the carbohydrate content would rise
in the same ratio as the water content is reduced. Both the starch and
the sugar content of these vegetables is more digestible, and more
readily assimilated than the starch and the sugar found in cereals and
legumes.


PURPOSE OF THE VIENO TABLE

The student should remember that not only the quantity but the quality
of food must be considered. The vieno system of food measurement, as
herein explained, is the simplest system of food measurement that has
ever been published. It is amply complete, and accurate enough for the
purpose for which it is intended, and that is the calculation of the
energy and the available nitrogen contained in natural dietaries.

This measurement is really a quantitative measurement; that is, it
measures the quantity, not the quality. In order to have a full
knowledge of a bill of fare, it is necessary to know, in addition to
the quantity, the exact chemical nature of each particular food, and
also to know the other foods with which that food will combine.

This food table tells accurately the amount of energy that may be
derived from food by chemical analysis, but it does not tell the
amount of energy that the body must expend in the work of assimilation.
This cannot be given in a table, because it varies with the individual
and the condition of his digestive organs.



LESSON XIV

    VIENO SYSTEM
    OF
    FOOD MEASUREMENT



LESSON XIV

VIENO SYSTEM OF FOOD MEASUREMENT


The amount of nutrition contained in a given quantity of food is often
a determining factor in curative dietetics.

The two most important things to be considered in prescribing foods are:

     1 The amount of energy contained in a given quantity

     2 The amount of available nitrogen or tissue-building material in
     a given quantity


ENERGY

Energy is the power to do work. That form of energy with which we are
most familiar is mechanical energy, as raising a stone or turning a
wheel.

Heat is another form of energy. Heat and work can be converted into
each other. The steam-engine turns heat into work, while a "hot box" on
a car-wheel is a case of work being turned back into heat.

[Sidenote: Amount of heat a food produces determines its energy]

Experience shows that a definite amount of heat will yield a definite
amount of work, so that the amount of heat produced by a given amount
of food, when combined with oxygen, is taken as a measure of its
energy. This is ordinarily expressed in calories, a calorie being the
amount of heat required to raise the temperature of one thousand grams
of water one degree on the centigrade thermometer scale.

The use of these terms need not concern the student. Instead of using
the calorie I will use a unit which is equal to one hundred calories. I
have selected a unit of this size because it gives about the ordinary
service of food at meals which is easily measured and remembered.


NITROGEN

Nitrogen is the chemical element that is most concerned with the
function of life. All animal tissue contains nitrogen, which forms
about one-sixth part, by weight, of all the nitrogenous or protein
substances.

[Sidenote: Proportion of Nitrogen in lean meat]

If we were to take a hundred pounds of lean meat, or muscle, and
evaporate from it all the water, we would have about eighteen pounds
of dry material left. If we should analyze this dry substance, we
would find that about one-sixth, or three pounds, would be the
element nitrogen. Thus we say that muscle contains eighteen per cent
of protein, or three per cent of nitrogen. In ordinary practise the
protein is mixed with fats and salts, and cannot be measured by simply
drying out the water, so the chemist finds the amount of nitrogen
present and multiplies by 6.25, which gives about the correct per
cent of protein. This method is not exact because the per cent of
nitrogen in various proteids is not always the same, but it will give
an intelligent average. I will discard the use of the term protein, and
refer to the amount of nitrogen directly.

All compounds of the element nitrogen are not available as food. For
example: The nitrogen of the air, of ammonia gas, or gunpowder cannot
be utilized in the animal body. The nitrogen in foods only refers to
available nitrogen. Compounds containing other forms of nitrogen are
not foods, but are frequently poisons.


SYSTEMS OF FOOD MEASUREMENTS COMPARED

THE "OLD" SYSTEM

Under the old system of food measurement, feeding the human body cannot
be made a practical science for the masses, therefore a new system
becomes necessary. That we may more fully appreciate the value of a
new system, let us consider the methods hitherto available.

Suppose a man is using two quarts of milk a day, and wishes to
determine the amount of available nitrogen or tissue-building material
and energy it contains. Under the old system he must get a book on
food analysis, or send to Washington for a Government bulletin. If he
does not understand the meaning of the terms and figures used, the
tables would be useless to him until he goes to a chemist to have them
explained. He is now ready to work out the nutritive value of his milk,
and proceeds as follows:

First, he gets the number of cu cm in the milk, thus--952.8 (number
cu cm in 1 quart) x 2 = 1905.6, number of cu cm in 2 quarts of milk.
Second, he gets the weight of his milk in grams--1.032 (number grams
in 1 cu cm of milk) x 1905.6 = 1966.57, number of grams in 2 quarts of
milk.

He now turns to a table of analysis which tells him that milk contains
3 per cent of protein, 3-1/2 per cent of fat, and 4-1/2 per cent of
sugar. As the amount of nitrogen in milk is approximately one-sixth of
its entire protein, he would now get 16 per cent of the 3 per cent (.16
x .03 = .0048), which is the percentage of nitrogen contained in milk.

His next step would be--1966.57 (number grams in 2 quarts of milk) x
.0048 = 9.44, the number of grams of nitrogen in 2 quarts of milk.

I will not explain the way in which the energy would have to be
figured, but will merely give the arithmetical processes by which the
result is obtained:

         3    ×  4.1  = 12.3
         3.5  ×  9.3  = 32.55
         4.5  ×  4.1  = 18.45
        12.3  + 32.55 + 18.45 = 63.30
      1966.57 × 63.30 = 124483.88
    124483.88 ÷  100  = 1244, the No. of calories or
        energy (heat units) contained in two quarts of milk.


THE NEW OR "VIENO" SYSTEM

[Sidenote: Derivation of the word Vieno]

To a unit of food-energy which is equal to one hundred calories (see
last paragraph on "Energy"), I have given the name of _Vieno_, derived
from "vital" and "energy," and pronounced _vi-eń-o_. The Vieno
system, therefore, will measure all foods by vi-en-os, or units of
energy equal to one hundred of the chemist's calories. One vieno of
milk is one-sixth of a quart, or two-thirds of an ordinary glass. From
this it is readily seen that two quarts of milk will give twelve vienos
of energy, or, if we wish to express it in the chemist's term, twelve
hundred calories.

[Sidenote: How to compute amount of nitrogen in food]

The table also states that milk has a nitrogen factor of .8. Therefore,
if we wish to know the amount of nitrogen in the two quarts of
milk, all we need do is to multiply the number =of= vienos by the
nitrogen factor; 12 x .8 = 9.6, which figure represents the nitrogen
consumption expressed in grams. (See explanation of fourth column of
table.) These results are practically the same as those obtained by
the old system of computation, but expressed in simpler terms. Thus we
see that the vieno system of computing food values is unique in its
simplicity, and will be a very material aid in putting Food Science on
a practical basis.


NECESSITY FOR A SIMPLE SYSTEM

[Sidenote: Neither volume nor weight are correct standards for
measuring food values]

Things are commonly measured by volume, or by weight. That volume could
not be made sufficiently accurate in the measurement of food values is
evident. A bushel of lettuce leaves would contain much less food value
than a bushel of wheat. Weight would seem to be a fairer way to compare
foods, but all foods contain water, which may vary from five to
ninety-five per cent. A pound of turnips, which is nine-tenths water,
would not be comparable with sugar, which has scarcely any water.

Even if it were not for the water, weight would not be a fair method of
comparison because some foods are of more value per pound than others,
owing to their difference in chemical composition. For instance, a
pound of butter gives about two and one-fourth times as much heat to
the body as sugar.

As before mentioned, the two chief food factors which we ought to
measure are energy-producing and tissue-building power.

[Sidenote: What constitutes a true food]

All true foods when assimilated in the body produce some energy. In
fact, only such substances as produce bodily energy, when combined with
the oxygen taken in through the lungs, can be correctly termed food.

I have taken this energy-producing power of food as the best basis
for measurement and comparison. The nitrogen could have been taken
as a unit, and the energy figured by a table, but it is simpler to
use energy as a unit (as given in column 3, p. 655), and figure the
nitrogen in the various foods by means of a table which gives the
amount of nitrogen per unit of energy. (Column 4, p. 655.)

Multiplication of units of energy (column 3) by the nitrogen factor
(column 4) is necessary because the ratio of nitrogen to energy is
different in each food.


EXPLANATION OF TABLE

In the table that follows, I have attempted to give in the simplest way
the amount of each particular food that one vieno equals.

The second column shows, in the plainest language possible, what one
vieno of food equals--as, one vieno of barley equals one ounce; or,
one vieno of nuts equals one rounded tablespoonful, etc. This method
is, of course, only approximate, as in some foods it is impossible
to find a simple term to express the amount of one vieno. This is
especially true of cooked foods because of the varied amounts of water
contained. In such cases the way for the student to become familiar
with a vieno is to weigh one pound of the raw material, and, after it
is cooked, weigh it again, and then calculate the water content.

The definition given in the second column in the case of milk, butter,
eggs, and cheese is fairly accurate. The description given in the case
of cereals and bread is also fairly accurate. In the list of fresh
vegetables, no attempt has been made to describe one vieno by volume,
as, vegetables being loose and bulky, it is practical to measure them
only by weight.

[Sidenote: Only the edible portion of food considered]

In the case of fresh fruits, one vieno has been defined as "one large
orange" or "six plums," etc. In such cases allowance for the non-edible
portion has been made; all weights given in the table consider only the
edible portion.

In the case of nuts, the definition of a vieno in so many spoonfuls
is fairly accurate. This is done only as an illustration, and not
continued throughout the table. The student should use only the
second column of the table for rough work, and to help him figure the
approximate amount of one vieno.

The third column of the table, which gives the number of vienos or the
amount of heat-energy in one pound, is the column to which the student
should refer in his work. A pound of food referred to in this column
invariably means one pound of the edible portion.

[Sidenote: Simple method of reducing food to vienos]

The way for the student to calculate the amount of food in one vieno is
to take a pound of the food that he is to use and divide it equally
into as many portions as the number in the third column. For example:
If one pound of wheat is given as equal to sixteen vienos, the student
should weigh a pound of wheat and divide it into sixteen portions, and
each of these portions will equal one vieno.

[Sidenote: The nitrogen factor simplified]

The fourth column of the table gives the approximate nitrogen factor;
that is, the percentage of nitrogen by weight in one vieno. This column
is to be used for computing the amount of nitrogen in the diet under
all ordinary circumstances. The student should take the total number of
vienos of each food and multiply this number by the nitrogen factor.
The product will be the approximate amount of the nitrogen consumed,
expressed in grams. _This is the direct method of ascertaining the
amount of available nitrogen in food._

[Sidenote: Grams reduced to vienos]

If in reading other works, the student finds the amount of nitrogen
given in decigrams, he needs only to divide by ten in order to reduce
it to this system, as a decigram is one-tenth of a gram. Likewise,
protein can be reduced to grams, or decigrams, by a simple process
of multiplication and division, as follows: Sixty grams of protein
contains practically ten grams (one hundred decigrams) of nitrogen.
Divide the amount of protein by six to change protein to the nitrogen
unit. That is (Protein ÷ 6) = amount of nitrogen in grams.

The old-fashioned food table gave the amount of protein in per cent by
weight, making it necessary to weigh the food, figure the amount of
protein by multiplying the weight by the per cent, and then reducing
this according to the rule given above. I explain this so that the
student may be able to compare results expressed in the old table, with
the vieno method, but in all practical work the student should use
only this _direct_ method which is much more simple and accurate.

The fifth column of the table gives the weight of one vieno in grams.
This adds no new information, but only gives the weight of one vieno in
the metric system. It should be used by those who wish to be accurate
in their work, or by those who take a scientific interest in their
dietary.

[Sidenote: Examples for the student who desires to be exact]

The last column of the table gives the actual amount of nitrogen in
one vieno of food expressed in grams. This is the accurate figure
from which the approximate nitrogen factor for ordinary use has been
derived. For example: The actual amount of nitrogen in one vieno of
chestnuts is .396. If this number is multiplied by the number of
vienos of chestnuts eaten, we would have the actual number of grams of
nitrogen consumed. Suppose ten vienos of chestnuts are eaten; we would
multiply .396 by ten, which would give us 3.96 grams of nitrogen. For
ordinary purposes, I use the nearest decimal, which is .4, and which
I give in the fourth column as the nitrogen factor. Those who wish to
figure the nitrogen with scientific accuracy should use the figures
given in the last column of the table, as in the example I have given.

The Vieno system of food measurement is new, and is intended to give
to the practitioner and to the housewife the greatest aid in balancing
or proportioning the diet. I have therefore included in the following
tables, all classes of foods, many of which I do not recommend or use
in my scientific work.


TABLE OF FOOD MEASUREMENTS

DIRECT METHOD OF CALCULATING AVAILABLE NITROGEN IN FOOD

     Multiplying the number of vienos (column 3) by the nitrogen factor
     (column 4) will give the amount of available nitrogen in the
     various foods, expressed in grams

          1                 2             3         4        5        6
  ================+=================+==========+========+========+=========
                  |                 |No. vienos|        |        |
                  |Quantity equaling|or amount |        |Weight  |Grams of
    Name of Food  |    one vieno    | of heat  |Nitrogen|of one  |nitrogen
                  | *(100 calories) |energy in | factor |vieno   | in one
                  |                 |one pound |        |in grams| vieno
  ----------------+-----------------+----------+--------+--------+---------

    CEREAL FOODS
  Barley, pearled   One ounce            16        .4       27.5     .37

  BREAD--
    Graham          Loaf size,
                      3/4 in. thick      12        .6       37.5     .59
    White           Loaf size,
                      3/4 in. thick      12        .6       39.3     .58

TABLE OF FOOD MEASUREMENTS--(Continued)

            1                 2             3         4        5        6
  ================+=================+==========+========+========+========
                  |                 |No. vienos|        |        |
                  |Quantity equaling|or amount |        |Weight  |Grams of
    Name of Food  |    one vieno    | of heat  |Nitrogen|of one  |nitrogen
                  | *(100 calories) |energy in | factor |vieno   | in one
                  |                 |one pound |        |in grams| vieno
  ----------------+-----------------+----------+--------+--------+--------

  Christian's
    Vieno bran      Two ounces            8        .3       21.2     .30
  Christian's Vieno
    self-raising
    bran meal       1-1/2 ounces         12        .4       33.5     .55
  Corn-meal         One ounce            16        .4       27.4     .41
  Corn-starch       One ounce, scant     17        .0       27.1     .00
  Crackers          Four, average size   19        .4       23.8     .39
  Hominy            One ounce            16        .4       27.5     .36
  Macaroni or
    spaghetti       One ounce            16        .6       27.2     .58
  Oatmeal or
    rolled oats     Scant ounce          15        .6       24.4     .63
  Rice              One ounce            16        .4       27.8     .36
  Rye flour         One ounce            16        .3       27.8     .30
  White flour       One ounce            16        .5       27.9     .49
  Whole wheat or
   graham flour     One ounce            16        .6       27.8     .61
  Whole wheat       One ounce            16        .6       27.8     .61

    DAIRY PRODUCTS

  Butter            Not quite an inch
                      cube               36        .0       12.6     .00

  CHEESE--
    Cottage         Three ounces          5       3.0       89.0    2.97
    Full cream      Portion size of
                      walnut             20       1.0       22.0    1.01
  Cream (20% fat)   Five tablespoonfuls  10        .2       45.0     .17

  MILK--
    Buttermilk      One full glass        2       1.3      274.0    1.32
    Condensed       Three
                      tablespoonfuls     15        .4       30.0     .42
    Skimmed         One full glass        2       1.5      267.0     .46
    Whole           Two-thirds of a
                      glass               3        .8      140.0     .78

    FISH

  Fresh fish
    (Run of the
    market)         Quarter of a lb.      6       3.1      102.0    3.13


TABLE OF FOOD MEASUREMENTS--(Continued)

          1                 2             3         4        5        6
  ================+=================+==========+========+========+========
                  |                 |No. vienos|        |        |
                  |Quantity equaling|or amount |        |Weight  |Grams of
    Name of Food  |    one vieno    | of heat  |Nitrogen|of one  |nitrogen
                  | *(100 calories) |energy in | factor |vieno   | in one
                  |                 |one pound |        |in grams| vieno
  ----------------+-----------------+----------+--------+--------+--------

       FRUIT
  Apples            One, 2-1/2 in.        3        .1      156.4     .10
                      thick
  Apricots          Six of moderate       3        .3      168.0     .29
                      size
  Bananas           One large             5        .2       98.6     .21

  BERRIES--
    Blackberries    One moderate          3        .3      168.0     .35
                      sauce-dish
    Raspberries     One moderate          3        .4      146.3     .39
                      sauce-dish
    Strawberries    One sauce-dish        2        .4      252.0     .40
  Cantaloup         One five-inch         2        .3      299.0     .29
                      in diameter
  Cherries          One moderate          4        .2      103.0     .16
                      sauce-dish
  Currants          Three                13        .1       33.4     .11
    (dried)           tablespoonfuls
  Dates             Five, average        16        .1       28.1     .09
                      size
  Figs              Two, average          5        .2       30.7     .21
                      size
  Grapes            One moderate          4        .2      108.8     .23
                      sauce-dish
  Lemons            Three, moderate       2        .3      221.0     .35
                      size
  Olive-oil         One                  42        .0       10.1     .00
                      tablespoonful
  Olives (ripe)     Eight                12        .0       37.5     .00
  Oranges           One large orange      2        .2      189.0     .24
  Pears             One, large            3        .2      154.0     .15
  Plums             Six, small            4        .2      115.0     .18
  Prunes            Three, large         14        .1       32.4     .11
  Raisins           Two heaping          16        .1       28.3     .12
                      tablespoonfuls
  Watermelon        1-1/2 pound           1        .2      324.0     .20
                      melon meat

      MEAT
  Bacon (smoked)    Slice 1/4 in.        30        .2       15.0     .24
                      thick, 4 in.
                      long

  CHOPS--
  Lamb              Portion size of      15        .9       29.4     .88
                      an egg
  Pork (medium      Slice 1/2 in.        16        .8       28.7     .76
    fat)              thick, 2 in.
                      square
  Ham (smoked)      Slice 1/2 in.        19        .6       23.3     .57
    (medium fat)      thick, 2 in.
                      square


TABLE OF FOOD MEASUREMENTS--(Continued)

          1                 2             3         4        5        6
  ================+=================+==========+========+========+========
                  |                 |No. vienos|        |        |
                  |Quantity equaling|or amount |        |Weight  |Grams of
    Name of Food  |    one vieno    | of heat  |Nitrogen|of one  |nitrogen
                  | *(100 calories) |energy in | factor |vieno   | in one
                  |                 |one pound |        |in grams| vieno
  ----------------+-----------------+----------+--------+--------+--------
  Leg of mutton     Portion size of      11       1.2       41.0    1.20
    (medium fat)      an egg
  Ribs of beef      Portion size of      15        .9       31.3     .87
                      an egg

  STEAK--
  Porterhouse       Slice 1/2 in.        13        .9       35.7     .90
                      thick, 2 in.
                      square
  Round beef        Slice 1/2 in.        12       1.6       47.7    1.55
                      thick, 2 in.
                      square

      NUTS
  Almonds           One heaping          30        .5       15.0     .53
                      tablespoonful
  Brazil-nuts       One heaping          32        .4       13.9     .38
                      tablespoonful
  Chestnuts         One heaping          11        .4       40.3     .40
                      tablespoonful
  Cocoanuts,        Half an ounce        32        .2       16.4     .16
    fresh
  Cocoanut,         Two rounded          31        .2       14.5     .15
    prepared          tablespoonfuls
  Filberts          One heaping          33        .3       13.8     .34
                      tablespoonful
  Hickory-nuts      One rounded          33        .3       13.6     .33
                      tablespoonful
  Peanuts           One heaping          26        .7       17.7     .73
                      tablespoonful
  Pecans            One rounded          34        .2       13.1     .23
                      tablespoonful
  Pignolias         One rounded          28        .8       15.9     .83
                      tablespoonful
  Pistachios        One heaping          29        .5       15.2     .54
                      tablespoonful

  WALNUTS--

  Black             One heaping          31        .6       14.6     .64
                      tablespoonful
  English           One heaping          33        .4       14.6     .38
                      tablespoonful

     POULTRY
     AND EGGS
  Chicken           Three ounces          7       3.1       90.0    3.09
    (broiler)
  Chicken           Two ounces            8       1.4       43.7    1.44
    (matured)
  Eggs (albumin)    White of six          2       3.6      181.4    3.56
                      eggs
  Eggs (whole)      One large egg         8       1.4       63.0    1.35
  Eggs (yolk)       Yolk of very         17        .7       26.0     .66
                      large egg
  Turkey            1-3/4 ounces         10       1.1       33.3    1.12
      SUGARS
  Honey            One ounce              16       .0      29.8      .02
  Molasses--New    1-1/2 ounces           13       .0      36.5      .01
    Orleans
  Maple-sirup      Four                   13       .0      34.8      .00
                     tablespoonfuls

  SUGAR--
    Cane,          Three rounded          19       .0      24.4      .00
      granulated     teaspoonfuls
    Maple          One ounce              16       .0      30.0      .00

    VEGETABLES
  BEANS--
    Lima (dried)    One ounce             16       .8      27.9      .81
    Navy (dried)    One ounce             16      1.1      28.1     1.13
    String          Half a pound          2        .8      232.6     .85
  Beets             Half a pound          2        .5      211.0     .54
  Cabbage           Three-fourths         1        .8      313.0     .80
                      pound
  Carrots           Half a pound          2        .5      215.0     .54
  Celery            One pound             1        .9      533.5     .94
  Corn (green)      One large ear         5        .6       96.5     .62
  Lettuce           One pound             1       1.0      504.0     .98
  Onions            Half a pound          2        .5      202.0     .52
  Parsnips          Six ounces            2        .5      181.0     .46

  PEAS--
    Dried           One ounce             16      1.1       27.4    1.06
    Green           Quarter of a pound    4       1.1       97.5    1.02

  POTATOES--
    Sweet           Three ounces          6       .2        80.0     .23
    White           Quarter of a pound    4       .4       118.0     .41
  Spinach           One pound             1      1.5       412.0    1.49
  Squash            Half a pound          2       .5       211.0     .47
  Tomatoes          One pound             1       .6       408.0     .65
  Turnips           Half a pound          2       .5       245.0     .51


HANDY TABLE

    One pound = 16 ounces
    One pound = 453.57 grams
    One ounce = 28.35 grams

     The weight of such foods as meat, fruit, etc., is so nearly equal
     to that of water that the weight may be calculated from the size,
     if that is known.

    One cubic inch = 16.5 grams
    One cubic inch = about a half ounce
    One cubic foot = 62 pounds
    One gallon     =  8 pounds
    One pint       = 476.4 grams

     Milk is slightly heavier than water, while oils or fats are
     lighter.

    One quart of milk       = 980 grams
    One quart of olive-oil  = 876 grams
    One average egg         =  50 grams
    One average olive       =   6 grams
    One _Vieno_             = 100 calories
    One decigram nitrogen   = 3/5 of a gram of
                                 protein



LESSON XV

CURATIVE AND REMEDIAL MENUS CONCLUDED



LESSON XV

CURATIVE AND REMEDIAL MENUS


INTRODUCTION

[Sidenote: Scientific eating leads toward simplicity]

Scientific eating consists in selecting the food the body requires
according to age, occupation, and climate. These requirements can be
supplied with a very few articles. The necessary changes in diet can
always be made by varying the proportions. It is possible to select,
for each of the four seasons of the year, three or four articles that
will contain all the elements of nourishment the body needs, therefore
true food science leads one inevitably toward the mono-diet plan; that
is, making a meal of only one kind of food. Owing to our inherent
desire to sit at the "groaning table" we may yet be a long distance
from the mono-diet plan, but the science of human nutrition points
with unerring certainty toward simplicity. It should be remembered,
however, that one may eat, under nearly all conditions except extreme
superacidity all he desires of one or two things--one preferred.

[Sidenote: How foods become curative]

In the light of modern medicine, no food has any specific curative
property. Foods become curative only as they remove abnormal
conditions, and they will remove abnormal conditions just to the extent
that they can be perfectly digested and assimilated, and to the extent
that waste matter is thoroughly eliminated from the body. In this
way all possible resistance is removed, and Nature will build up the
dis-eased and broken-down tissue in obedience to the law of animal
evolution. This constructive process we call "curing."

While the menus for each season of the year may seem to vary but
little, especially when compared with the conventional omnivorous diet,
yet experience has proved that the fewer the articles composing the
meal, the better will be the results.


COOKING

SOME IMPORTANT FACTS REVEALED BY MODERN SCIENCE

The object of cooking is to tear down the cell-structure of foods, and
to make them more digestible. After the cell-structure is demolished,
every degree of heat to which foods are subjected injures the foods
instead of improving them.


GRAINS

Grains should be cooked whole. They should be cleansed, well covered
with water, and boiled until the grains burst open as in making
old-fashioned corn hominy. This will often take from three to four
hours' constant boiling.

Cereals prepared in this way are more delicious, more nourishing, and
far more healthful than any of the prepared or patented "breakfast
foods," while the cost is perhaps about one-eighth or one-tenth of that
of the popular patented products.


VEGETABLES

The old or popular method of cooking vegetables is to cover them
generously with water and to boil them much longer than is necessary,
then to drain off the water, season, and serve. By this process the
mineral salts, in many cases the most valuable part of the food, are
dissolved, passed into the water, and lost. In this way many excellent
articles of food are greatly impoverished and reduced perhaps 50 per
cent in nutritive value.

The time vegetables are cooked should be measured by their solidity.
As an example, spinach can be thoroughly cooked in about fifteen
minutes. In this way some of its elements are volatilized, giving it a
delicious flavor and taste, while if cooked in an abundance of water,
from half to three-quarters of an hour, which is the customary way, its
best nutritive elements are lost by draining away the water, and it is
rendered almost tasteless.


COOKING EN CASSEROLE

All succulent and watery vegetables such as cabbage and spinach, beans,
carrots, onions, parsnips, peas, squash, turnips, etc., should be
cooked in a casserole dish.

Prepare vegetables in the usual manner as for boiling. A few
tablespoonfuls of water may be added to such articles as green beans
and peas, beets, carrots, cauliflower, onions, parsnips, etc. Cover,
and place in an ordinary baking oven until the vegetable is thoroughly
cooked or softened. In this way vegetables in reality are cooked
in their own juices, rendered much softer, more digestible, more
delicious, and all their mineral salts and other nutritive elements are
preserved, making them also more nutritious.


RICE AND MACARONI

Rice, macaroni, and spaghetti are exceptions to the above rules. They
should be cooked in an abundance of water and thoroughly drained. In
this way the excess of starch which they contain is disposed of, and
their nutritive elements are better balanced. They are also rendered
much more palatable and digestible.


FRUITS

If fruits can be obtained thoroughly ripe, they should never be cooked.

Dried or evaporated fruits can be prepared for the table by soaking
them thoroughly in plain water for a few hours, or over night. In this
way the green and inferior pieces are exposed and can be discarded.
The excess of water can be boiled down to a sirup and poured over the
fruit. In this way the fruit-sugar is developed, and sweetening with
cane-sugar becomes unnecessary.

Soaking as above described is merely a process of putting back into the
fruit the water that was taken out of it by evaporation or dehydration.

It is evident that that part of the fruit which will not soften
sufficiently by soaking, to become palatable, was not ripe enough for
food.


CANNED FOODS

The average table, especially hotels and restaurants, are supplied
largely from canned foods. A process of perfect preservation of foods
has never been invented and probably never will be. No matter how
well foods may taste, they undergo constant chemical changes from the
time they leave the ground or parent stalk until they are thoroughly
decomposed. All vegetables, therefore, should be used fresh, if
possible.


BUTTERMILK

An excellent quality of buttermilk may be made as follows: Allow sweet
milk to stand (well covered) in a warm room until it thickens or
coagulates; whip with an ordinary rotary egg beater without removing
the cream.


HOME-MADE BUTTER

Sweet butter may be made in a few minutes from ordinary cream by
placing it in a deep bowl and whipping with a rotary egg beater.


SUGGESTIONS CONCERNING THE SELECTION AND THE PREPARATION OF CERTAIN
ARTICLES MENTIONED IN THE MENUS

THE BANANA

The banana is a vegetable. It is one of our most valuable foods, as
well as the most prolific. It will produce more food per acre, with
less care and labor, than any other plant that grows.

While the banana grows only in the tropical countries, it is equally as
good and useful to people of the northern zones.

Bananas that are transported to the North are cut green, and often
immature; that is, before they have attained their full growth. This
latter variety should never be used. In their green and unripened
state, they are wholly unfit for food, and for these reasons there has
arisen a broadcast prejudice against this most excellent article of
diet.


HOW TO SELECT AND RIPEN BANANAS

Care should be exercised to select the largest variety--only those that
have attained their full growth on the parent tree. If bananas cannot
be procured "dead ripe" from the dealer, they should be purchased, if
possible, by the bunch, or a few of the lower "hands" can be purchased
and left on the stalk. They should be kept in the open air (that is,
uncovered), in an even, warm temperature, and the end of the stalk
covered with a clean white cloth, or immersed in water, kept fresh by
changing daily. In this way the banana will mature, ripen slowly, and
be almost as delicious as if obtained ripe from its native tree.

Bananas should not be eaten until they are "dead ripe"--black spotted.
In this state, the carbohydrates which they contain are as readily
digestible as fresh milk.


BAKED BANANAS

Peel large ripe bananas; bake in an open pan in a very hot oven from
ten to fifteen minutes, or until slightly brown.

Baked bananas make a delicious dessert served with either of the
following:

    a CREAM
    b NUT BUTTER
    c DAIRY BUTTER
    d BOTH DAIRY BUTTER AND A SAUCE MADE BY
        GRADUALLY DILUTING NUT BUTTER WITH A
        LITTLE WATER, UNTIL A SMOOTH PASTE IS
        FORMED

Bananas need much mastication, not for the purpose of reduction, but
for the purpose of insalivation.


RECIPES

RECIPE FOR CODDLED EGG

Place an egg in a pint cup; cover with boiling water and allow to
stand, covered, five or six minutes.


RECIPE FOR UNCOOKED EGGS

Break the number desired into a narrow bowl; add a teaspoonful of sugar
to each egg, and a pinch of salt; whip _very briskly_ with a rotary egg
beater from five to eight minutes.

To each egg a teaspoonful of lemon juice and half a glass of milk may
then be slowly whipped into the mixture, if desired.


RECIPE FOR BAKED OMELET

Whip two eggs very thoroughly for about five minutes; add a dash of
salt, a dessert-spoonful each of corn-starch and of heavy cream. Bake
very lightly in a small pan.


FISH AND FOWL

SELECTION AND PREPARATION

If we must eat the flesh of animals the young should be selected. It
contains more digestible protein, especially albumin, than the old or
matured animal, and has had less time in which to become contaminated
by unhygienic habits. Both fish and fowl should be baked, boiled, or
broiled; never fried.


RECIPE FOR PREPARING GREEN PEAS IN THE POD

After thoroughly cleansing the desired amount of fresh tender peas,
unshelled, put them into a covered pot or casserole dish; add a few
spoonfuls of water, a little butter and salt, and cook slowly until
thoroughly softened; serve in the pod.

The peas may be eaten by placing the pod between the teeth, and then
giving it a gentle pull. This strips off the outer coating or pulp,
leaving only the thin film of cellulose.

NOTE: The pea pulp, or substance upon the pod, is rich in mineral
salts, highly nutritious, slightly laxative, and an excellent aid
in the digestion of other foods. It is a better balanced and a more
valuable food than the pea.


PUMPKIN

Pumpkin may be made very delicious by stewing or boiling in just enough
water to prevent burning. Mash well and put through a colander. Season
and serve same as squash, or, prepare as directed, and bake until
slightly brown.


VEGETABLE JUICE

Chop fine and boil carrots, peas, asparagus, or any other fresh
vegetable from eight to ten minutes in sufficient water to make the
amount of juice required; strain and serve.

The tender parts of the fresh vegetable may be thoroughly cooked, put
through a colander, and served as a purée.


HOW TO MAKE SASSAFRAS TEA

Crush the bark of the red sassafras root, allowing a piece as large as
a silver dime to each cup. Add the quantity of water desired; simmer
from five to ten minutes. Drink with cream and sugar.


WHEAT BRAN

Wheat bran is the outer coating of the wheat grain. Chemically, it is
pure cellulose, which is insoluble and indigestible in the ordinary
digestive solvents of the body.

Wheat bran serves a valuable medicinal purpose in the stomach and
in the alimentary tract. When introduced into the stomach, its cell
structure fills with water, and it increases from four to eight times
its size in its dry state. It excites both stomach and intestinal
peristalsis, thereby preventing stomach indigestion, and by carrying
the water along down the intestinal tract, it prevents intestinal
congestion, or what is commonly called constipation. Wheat bran may be
properly called an intestinal broom or cleansing agent.

Man, in the process of preparing his food, has invented expensive and
complicated machinery for removing all cellulose and roughness from his
diet. He has suffered both stomach and intestinal congestion just to
the extent that this refining process has been carried on. Bran puts
back into the diet not only what modern milling methods have taken out
of it, but that which civilized habits of refining have eliminated
from our food. It therefore naturalizes the diet, promotes digestion,
cleanses the mucous surfaces of both the stomach and the intestines,
and prevents congestion in the ascending colon, which is the primary
cause of appendicitis, so called.


BRAN MEAL

Bran meal is the product of the entire wheat, ground coarsely, and
mixed with a certain per cent of wheat bran. It makes an excellent
bread.

Bread made from bran meal acts on the digestive and the alimentary
organs, the same as the pure bran, only in a milder capacity. It also
aids the stomach in the digestion of other foods. It is more nourishing
than wheat flour, for the reason that it is better balanced, containing
all the carbohydrate and the proteid elements of the grain.

Bread made from bran meal is better in the form of gems baked in small
gem rings.

This meal requires neither baking powder nor soda, and should not be
sifted.


CHOICE OF MENUS

Wherever two menus are given, choice may be exercised, but whichever
menu is chosen, it should be taken in its entirety. In other words,
do not select articles from one menu and combine them with articles
mentioned in another menu. Neither should any article of food be eaten
with a particular menu, other than that which is mentioned therein.
By observing these suggestions, the proper combinations of food are
observed, which is equally as important as the selections.

NOTE: In this volume there are some menus which contain combinations of
food classed as No. 3 in Lesson XII, "Tables of Digestive Harmonies and
Disharmonies," pp. 609 to 617 inclusive. This is explained by the fact
that said "tables" are laid out for the normal person, while the menus
were prescribed for the treatment of some special disorder, or for the
purpose of removing some offending causes.


NORMAL MENUS

The following menus are intended for those possessing normal digestion
and assimilation of food; that is, for those having no digestive
disorders.


INTRODUCTION TO NORMAL MENUS

While a majority of the menus composing this volume were prescribed
for the purpose of removing the causes of some specific disorder, a
vast number of those treated remained under the care of the author long
after they had become normal or cured, as the transition from dis-ease
to health is usually termed.

Another large number of comparatively healthy persons, recognizing the
relation between diet and health, came under the care of the writer for
the purpose of having their diet selected, proportioned, and balanced
according to age, occupation, and the season of the year.

The excellent results that were obtained, in nearly all such cases,
emphasized the importance of giving a set of normal menus for normal
people. All the following menus have been tested, under the direction
of the author, and have been chosen because they gave the desired
results.


SPRING MENU FOR THE NORMAL CHILD

From 2 to 5 Years of Age

BREAKFAST

    A few soaked prunes, with cream
    A small portion of coarse cereal, thoroughly cooked
    From one to two glasses of milk

LUNCHEON

    A baked potato
    Onions or carrots, well cooked
    Milk

DINNER

    Home-made vegetable soup or cream soup
    Green peas or asparagus tips
    A baked potato
    Milk


SUMMER MENU FOR THE NORMAL CHILD

From 2 to 5 Years of Age

BREAKFAST

    One very ripe peach
    A small portion of coarse cereal
    A baked sweet potato
    Milk

LUNCHEON

    Cream of rice, bean, or pea soup--home-made
    Whole wheat crackers, with butter
    Milk

DINNER

    A baked potato
    Peas or lima beans
    Whole wheat crackers or bran biscuits
    Milk


FALL MENU FOR THE NORMAL CHILD

From 2 to 5 Years of Age

BREAKFAST

    Cantaloup or a very ripe peach
    Coarse cereal
    Milk

LUNCHEON

    A baked potato or whole wheat gem
    A coddled egg (See recipe, p. 677)
    Milk or junket

DINNER

    Cream soup--home-made
    Mashed turnips or carrots
    A very ripe banana, with cream and sugar


WINTER MENU FOR THE NORMAL CHILD

From 2 to 5 Years of Age

BREAKFAST

    A baked apple, with a little sugar
    Cereal--small portion
    Milk

LUNCHEON

    One or two bananas
    Milk

DINNER

    Corn hominy--small portion; thoroughly cooked
    Milk

The articles of food for children ranging from two to five years of age
are about the same. The proportions, however, should be administered
according to age.

The child from two to three years of age may be given a glass of milk
between meals, but should eat a very light dinner, consisting of only
two or three articles, while the child from three to five, especially
after it has engaged in vigorous play, can, with safety, follow the
menus herein prescribed.


SPRING MENU FOR THE NORMAL YOUTH

From 5 to 10 Years of Age

BREAKFAST

    A banana, with cream
    Milk or an egg
    Corn hominy

LUNCHEON

    A potato, or whole wheat bread, with butter
    Clabbered milk or cottage cheese

DINNER

    Peas, turnips, or carrots
    A potato--sweet or white
    Milk or an egg


SUMMER MENU FOR THE NORMAL YOUTH

From 5 to 10 Years of Age

BREAKFAST

    A peach
    Milk or an egg
    Boiled rice, with either honey or sugar and cream

LUNCHEON

    Tender corn or a potato
    Milk

DINNER

    Vegetable soup or cream soup
    Asparagus or string beans
    Tender corn or a potato
    Gelatin or Junket
    Milk


FALL MENU FOR THE NORMAL YOUTH

From 5 to 10 Years of Age

BREAKFAST

    Prunes or grapes
    Cereal--a small portion
    Cream
    Milk

LUNCHEON

    Boiled onions
    Rice or potatoes
    Milk

DINNER

    One fresh vegetable
    Milk, fish, or an egg
    Potatoes or baked beans


WINTER MENU FOR THE NORMAL YOUTH

From 5 to 10 Years of Age

BREAKFAST

    Cereal
    Honey
    Milk

LUNCHEON

    Cabbage or cauliflower
    Potatoes or baked beans

DINNER

    Boiled onions
    Corn bread
    Cottage cheese


SPRING MENU FOR THE NORMAL YOUTH

From 10 to 15 Years of Age

BREAKFAST

    Dried peaches--stewed
    Oatmeal, or corn hominy, with either cream or butter
    Milk

LUNCHEON

    Rice with rich milk

DINNER

    Potatoes, either sweet or white
    Turnips, asparagus, or peas
    Fish, junket, or an egg


SUMMER MENU FOR THE NORMAL YOUTH

From 10 to 15 Years of Age

BREAKFAST

    Cantaloup
    A banana or a sweet potato
    Corn cake with butter
    Milk

LUNCHEON

    Tender corn
    Milk

DINNER

    Vegetable soup or cream soup
    Spinach, onions, carrots, peas, beans, asparagus--any two of these
    A potato or whole wheat bread


FALL MENU FOR THE NORMAL YOUTH

From 10 to 15 Years of Age

BREAKFAST

    A banana, with cream and nuts
    Honey or maple-sirup
    Corn cake
    Milk

LUNCHEON

    Baked sweet potatoes, with butter
    Milk

DINNER

    Carrots, parsnips, or squash
    Potatoes, or corn bread, with butter
    Milk
    Nuts, raisins, and cream cheese


WINTER MENU FOR THE NORMAL YOUTH

From 10 to 15 Years of Age

BREAKFAST

    Oatmeal or flaked wheat, thoroughly cooked; serve with thin cream
    A baked banana
    Milk

LUNCHEON

    One or two eggs
    Whole wheat bread
    Milk

DINNER

    One or two fresh vegetables
    Boiled rice or baked potatoes
    Gelatin or junket
    Milk


SPRING MENU FOR THE NORMAL PERSON

From 15 to 20 Years of Age

BREAKFAST

    A very ripe banana with cream and dates
    Plain boiled wheat, or oatmeal, with cream
    Milk

LUNCHEON

    Home-baked beans
    Whole wheat gems
    Milk

DINNER

    Cream or vegetable soup
    Asparagus or peas
    Rice or a baked potato
    Egg custard or ice-cream
    Milk or cocoa


SUMMER MENU FOR THE NORMAL PERSON

From 15 to 20 Years of Age

BREAKFAST

    Melon or peaches
    One or two eggs with whole wheat gems
    Milk

LUNCHEON

    Fresh peas, beans, or carrots
    Corn or potatoes
    Milk--sweet or sour

DINNER

    Boiled onions, beets, or squash
    Potatoes or lima beans
    Lettuce and tomato salad with nuts
    Bran meal gems


FALL MENU FOR THE NORMAL PERSON

From 15 to 20 Years of Age

BREAKFAST

    Cantaloup
    Corn cake with maple-sirup, or rice cake with honey
    Milk

LUNCHEON

    Broiled fish
    Baked potatoes

DINNER

    Cantaloup
    Turnips, carrots, spinach, peas, beans, or onions--any two of these
    Corn bread or baked potatoes
    Milk or cocoa


WINTER MENU FOR THE NORMAL PERSON

From 15 to 20 Years of Age

BREAKFAST

    Soaked prunes
    Rice, or corn hominy, with cream
    Very ripe banana with nuts and cream

LUNCHEON

    Whole wheat bread with nut butter and nuts
    Rich milk

DINNER

    Soup
    Winter squash or stewed pumpkin
    Sweet potatoes
    Celery and nuts


SPRING MENU FOR THE NORMAL PERSON

From 20 to 33 Years of Age

BREAKFAST

    Cherries or very sweet berries with sugar--no cream
    Cereal with butter
    One or two eggs
    Whole wheat muffins
    Milk or cocoa

LUNCHEON

    Peas in the pod
    Baked potatoes or whole wheat gems
    Buttermilk

DINNER

    Soup
    Asparagus or fresh peas
    Potatoes
    A green salad--optional
    Bran meal gems


SUMMER MENU FOR THE NORMAL PERSON

From 20 to 33 Years of Age

BREAKFAST

    Cantaloup or peaches
    Coddled eggs
    Whole wheat or corn muffins
    Cocoa or milk

LUNCHEON

    Boiled corn
    Lettuce and tomato salad, with nuts and raisins

DINNER

    A light soup
    One or two fresh vegetables
    Rice or tender corn
    Ice-cream or gelatin


FALL MENU FOR THE NORMAL PERSON

From 20 to 33 Years of Age

BREAKFAST

    Choice of non-acid fruit
    Two baked bananas with cream
    Whole wheat, boiled
    Nuts
    Milk or cocoa

LUNCHEON

    Home-baked beans
    Lettuce, or celery, with nuts
    Cottage cheese with whole wheat bread

DINNER

    Soup--optional
    Sweet or white potato
    String or lima beans
    Lettuce, or romaine, with nuts
    Whole wheat or bran meal gems


WINTER MENU FOR THE NORMAL PERSON

From 20 to 33 Years of Age

BREAKFAST

    A very ripe banana with dates, nuts, and cream
    Oatmeal or corn hominy--choice; small portion
    Milk or cocoa

LUNCHEON

    A poached egg or a baked potato
    A glass of buttermilk

DINNER

    Tender fish, broiled
    Baked potatoes
    Lettuce, or celery, with nuts and raisins


SPRING MENU FOR THE NORMAL PERSON

From 33 to 50 Years of Age

BREAKFAST

    Boiled whole wheat, or hominy, or corn bread
    Two eggs or a bowl of clabbered milk

LUNCHEON

    One whipped egg and a pint of milk
    A whole wheat cracker or a baked potato

DINNER

    Cream soup
    Asparagus, peas, turnips, or carrots
    Potatoes or baked beans


SUMMER MENU FOR THE NORMAL PERSON

From 33 to 50 Years of Age

BREAKFAST

    Berries, peaches, or melon
    A baked sweet potato
    A banana (very ripe) with nuts, cream, and raisins
    Milk or cocoa

LUNCHEON

    Tender corn on the cob, with butter
    A glass of milk--optional

DINNER

    Fresh peas, beans, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, beets--any two of these
    Green corn or a potato
    Lettuce and tomato salad, with nuts
    Orange ice or peach ice


FALL MENU FOR THE NORMAL PERSON

From 33 to 50 Years of Age

BREAKFAST

    Two large, very ripe bananas, baked; serve with cream
    Whole wheat or graham gems
    One egg or a glass of milk

LUNCHEON

    A large, baked potato and a poached egg
    Cocoa or chocolate

DINNER

    Soup--cream of celery or tomato
    Turnips and lima beans
    Bran meal gems or a baked potato
    Cocoa or chocolate


WINTER MENU FOR THE NORMAL PERSON

From 33 to 50 Years of Age

BREAKFAST

    Two eggs, coddled
    Whole wheat muffins
    A cup of chocolate or a cup of hot water with sugar and cream

LUNCHEON

    Home-baked beans
    Lettuce or celery
    A few nuts

DINNER

    Carrots, parsnips, or cabbage
    A baked potato
    Broiled fish or a nut omelet
    Cocoa, chocolate, or sassafras tea

NOTE: Sassafras tea is made from the bark of red sassafras. (See p.
681.)


SPRING MENU FOR THE NORMAL PERSON

From 50 to 65 Years of Age

BREAKFAST

    A cup of hot water with milk or sugar
    A coddled egg and a baked potato

LUNCHEON

    Junket or a bowl of clabbered milk
    One or two baked bananas

DINNER

    Peas or asparagus
    New potatoes or bran meal gems
    A cup of cocoa or a cup of hot water with cream


SUMMER MENU FOR THE NORMAL PERSON

From 50 to 65 Years of Age

BREAKFAST

    Peaches, plums, or melon
    Coarse cereal with cream
    Cocoa or hot water with cream

LUNCHEON

    A sweet potato with butter
    Cheese with water-cracker
    Milk or chocolate

DINNER

    Peas, beans, or carrots
    Lettuce or spinach
    Green corn or a potato
    Cottage cheese with cream and a water-cracker


FALL MENU FOR THE NORMAL PERSON

From 50 to 65 Years of Age

BREAKFAST

    A bunch of grapes or a melon
    Bran meal gems or plain boiled wheat
    Cocoa or hot water with cream

LUNCHEON

    Very ripe bananas with cream
    Dates and nuts
    A glass of milk

DINNER

    Lima beans and creamed onions
    A baked potato
    Whole wheat or bran meal gems


WINTER MENU FOR THE NORMAL PERSON

From 50 to 65 Years of Age

BREAKFAST

    Soaked prunes
    Baked chestnuts
    Clabbered milk or junket

LUNCHEON

    A bowl of milk with boiled rice

DINNER

    Baked onions and winter squash
    Baked beans
    A cup of cocoa
    One or two whole wheat crackers and cottage cheese


SPRING MENU FOR THE NORMAL PERSON

From 65 to 80 Years of Age

BREAKFAST

    Two or three very ripe bananas, baked; serve with cream
    Nuts, raisins, and either cream or cottage cheese
    Cocoa or hot water

LUNCHEON

    A bowl of sour milk
    Rye bread or bran meal gems

DINNER

    Cabbage, cauliflower, carrots, or squash
    A potato
    Cheese or an egg

NOTE: If there is a tendency toward rheumatism, gout, or lumbago, eggs
should be omitted.


SUMMER MENU FOR THE NORMAL PERSON

From 65 to 80 Years of Age

BREAKFAST

    Peaches, pears, grapes, or melon
    A baked sweet potato or potato cakes
    Sassafras tea with cream
      (See recipe, p. 681)

LUNCHEON

    String beans or new peas
    Rye bread
    Cottage cheese

DINNER

    Carrots, squash, beets, or onions
    Lima beans or a potato
    Buttermilk
    Bran meal gems


FALL MENU FOR THE NORMAL PERSON

From 65 to 80 Years of Age

BREAKFAST

    Melon, persimmons, or a baked apple
    Boiled chestnuts or rice with cream
    A cup of chocolate or a cup of hot water

LUNCHEON

    A bowl of milk with corn bread

DINNER

    Boiled onions, carrots, or stewed pumpkin
    A potato--sweet or white
    A baked banana with cream cheese
    A cup of cocoa or chocolate


WINTER MENU FOR THE NORMAL PERSON

From 65 to 80 Years of Age

BREAKFAST

    Soaked prunes
    Boiled wheat--small portion
    Cream, hot water, or chocolate

LUNCHEON

    A Spanish onion cooked en casserole
    A baked potato
    Buttermilk

DINNER

    Stewed pumpkin or winter squash
    A sweet potato
    Broiled fish--small portion
    Cocoa


SPRING MENU FOR THE NORMAL PERSON

From 85 to 100 Years of Age

BREAKFAST

    Two baked bananas, with cream
    Two egg whites, whipped into a glass of milk

LUNCHEON

    New peas in the pod (See recipe p. 679)
    A glass of sour milk

DINNER

    Bean soup
    Baked sweet or white potatoes
    Cottage cheese with cream and sugar


SUMMER MENU FOR THE NORMAL PERSON

From 85 to 100 Years of Age

BREAKFAST

    Cantaloup
    A bowl of clabbered milk
    Bran meal gems

LUNCHEON

    Purée of rice with milk

DINNER

    A baked or boiled sweet potato
    Purée of peas
    Egg custard or gelatin


FALL MENU FOR THE NORMAL PERSON

From 85 to 100 Years of Age

BREAKFAST

    Wheat flakes, thoroughly cooked; serve with cream
    Warm milk

LUNCHEON

    A coddled egg with a baked potato
    A cup of chocolate

DINNER

    Cream of celery soup
    Bran meal gems
    A potato
    Cocoa or sassafras tea (See recipe, p. 681)


WINTER MENU FOR THE NORMAL PERSON

From 85 to 100 Years of Age

BREAKFAST

    Two very ripe bananas, baked, eaten with nut butter and cream
    Sassafras tea or a cup of chocolate

LUNCHEON

    Cream of potato soup
    Whole wheat crackers

DINNER

    Purée of peas or beans
    A potato--sweet or white
    Chocolate or hot milk


CURATIVE MENUS

INTRODUCTION TO CURATIVE MENUS

Scientific investigation leads one inevitably to the conclusion that
a vast number of so-called dis-eases are caused by errors in eating;
that is, by wrong selections, wrong combinations and wrong proportions
of food. (See chart, Vol. I, p. 9, showing the number of dis-eases
caused by superacidity.) This chart will give the reader some idea of
the number of disorders that may originate from one source or from one
fundamental cause.

While superacidity is a true dis-ease, and may cause all the disorders
shown on this chart, yet behind superacidity there is a parent cause,
namely, wrong eating. In the light of these facts, it is obvious that
a department of curative and remedial menus should constitute an
important feature of this work.

For each patient who came under the care of the author (over 23,000 in
all), there was prescribed an average of six menus, covering a period
of six weeks. Each patient was required to keep an accurate record
of his or her diet, and the symptoms that developed after each meal.
This record was either brought to the author in person, or sent to him
through the mails.

From this vast amount of data and clinical experience, the writer was
enabled to select all the menus composing this volume, from those that
had proved successful in the various disorders treated. This volume,
therefore, is composed of only such menus as gave the desired results.
It represents the refined experience of twenty years' active practise
in Scientific Feeding.


MENUS FOR SUPERACIDITY


SPRING MENU

_ABNORMAL APPETITE_

_SUPERACIDITY_

Abnormal appetite is caused by the surplus acid which is left in the
stomach after digestion has taken place. This surplus acid causes
irritation of the mucous membrane of both the stomach and the pylorus.
The supersecretion of acid, in turn, is caused by overeating, by taking
foods in combination which are chemically inharmonious, by sedative and
intoxicating beverages, by tobacco, and by all stimulating drugs. The
logical remedy, therefore, is to omit the use of these things, and to
regulate the diet according to age, occupation, and chemistry, and to
drink copiously of water both at meals and between meals.

BREAKFAST

    Plain or flaked wheat, boiled very thoroughly; serve with butter,
      cream, and nuts
    A baked or broiled banana

LUNCHEON

    Purée of pea soup, made from the pod
    Baked potatoes
    One egg, boiled two minutes, or lightly shirred

DINNER

    Spinach or dandelion, cooked
    Boiled onions, peas, asparagus--any two of these
    A very small portion of tender fish (optional)
    A baked potato
    Gelatin or junket

NOTE: For all cases of superacidity, see "Importance of
Water-drinking," Vol. II, p. 434.


SUMMER MENU


_ABNORMAL APPETITE_

_SUPERACIDITY_

BREAKFAST

    A melon or extremely ripe peaches; melon preferred
    Two or three eggs, whipped; flavor with sugar and fruit-juice, and
      add half a glass of milk to each egg

LUNCHEON

    A liberal portion of tender corn, with butter
    Half a glass of milk

DINNER

    A green salad with grated nuts
    Any two fresh vegetables
    A very small portion of fish
    A small, baked potato
    Cantaloup

Drink one or two glasses of water at each meal.


FALL MENU


_ABNORMAL APPETITE_

_SUPERACIDITY_

BREAKFAST

    Cantaloup, or very ripe tomatoes with a sprinkle of sugar and a
      spoonful of cream
    A morsel of smoked fish
    A baked potato or a bran meal gem

LUNCHEON

    A green salad
    Turnips, Brussels sprouts, onions, green corn, lima beans--any
      two of these
    A wheat muffin or a slice of corn bread

DINNER

    Slaw or celery
    Any vegetable from the luncheon selection
    Baked beans or a baked potato
    Junket or gelatin

The noon meal should be omitted if the breakfast is late.


WINTER MENU


_ABNORMAL APPETITE_

_SUPERACIDITY_

BREAKFAST

    Three egg whites and one yolk whipped, eaten with baked bananas and
      thin cream
    Bran meal gems
    Salted almonds

LUNCHEON

    Boiled Spanish onions
    A baked potato

DINNER

    Cream of pea soup or corn soup
    Celery or slaw
    Carrots or parsnips
    Spinach, with egg
    Baked dried beans or a sweet potato

Drink an abundance of cool water at each meal.

If the patient is suffering, or recovering from a severe attack of
stomach irritation, the quantity of solid food should be reduced, and
the quantity of water increased.


SPRING MENU


_SOUR STOMACH_ (_SUPERACIDITY_)

_IRRITATION OF STOMACH AND INTESTINES_

On rising, drink two glasses of cool water. Devote from three to five
minutes to vigorous, deep breathing exercises.

BREAKFAST

    Whole wheat or a corn-meal gem
    Two eggs very lightly cooked
    Half a cup of wheat bran, cooked and served as a porridge,
      with butter and salt
    Half a glass of water

LUNCHEON

    Tender asparagus, peas, or beans
    New potatoes
    A small portion of wheat bran
    A glass of water

DINNER

    New peas or asparagus
    New potatoes, baked
    Whole wheat, boiled; serve with butter
    A glass of water

At least two glasses of water should be drunk between breakfast and
luncheon, and between luncheon and dinner.

The quantity of food may be slightly increased as the patient improves,
and the meals may be varied by changing the vegetables current in the
market. The general combinations and the proportions, however, should
be observed for two or three weeks.


SUMMER MENU


_SOUR STOMACH_ (_SUPERACIDITY_) _IRRITATION OF STOMACH AND INTESTINES_

Immediately on rising, drink two glasses of water.

BREAKFAST

    Cantaloup, or very ripe peach--neither sugar nor cream
    Tender corn, scraped from the cob; cook slightly with a whipped egg
      and butter, stirring constantly
    A glass or two of water
    (Mastication should be very thorough)

LUNCHEON

    String beans and either young carrots or onions
    A baked potato
    One egg, prepared choice

DINNER

    Fish--very tender
    A baked potato
    A green salad with nuts
    An ear of tender corn
    A glass or two of water

Just before retiring, drink two glasses of water.


FALL MENU


_SOUR STOMACH_ (_SUPERACIDITY_) _IRRITATION OF STOMACH AND INTESTINES_

Observe the instructions in regard to water-drinking and deep
breathing, which were given in connection with the spring menu.

BREAKFAST

    Cantaloup, peaches, or persimmons
    A glass of clabbered milk
    One whipped egg
    A small portion of steamed or boiled whole wheat
    A tablespoonful of clean, wheat bran

LUNCHEON

    Choice of the following--

    _a_ Two or three exceedingly ripe bananas (red
         variety preferred), eaten with cream, two figs,
         and either nuts or nut butter
    _b_ A baked sweet potato

DINNER

    Lettuce, endive, or romaine salad, with dressing
      or olive-oil and whipped egg
    Tender corn or string beans
    A baked potato
    A baked banana

From one to three glasses of water should be drunk at each of these
meals--half a glass at the beginning; a glass during the progress of
the meal, and a glass at the close.


WINTER MENU


_SOUR STOMACH_ (_SUPERACIDITY_) _IRRITATION OF STOMACH AND INTESTINES_

On rising, drink two or three glasses of water, and take vigorous
exercise and deep breathing.

BREAKFAST

    Two heaping tablespoonfuls of plain wheat,
      thoroughly cooked, or simmered over night;
      eat with butter and nuts
    One or two eggs, either whipped or cooked two minutes

The entire meal may consist of boiled wheat and butter, with a very
little cream, unless the weather is exceedingly cold, in which event
the wheat may be reduced in quantity, and two, or even three, whipped
eggs taken.

LUNCHEON

    A liberal portion of baked sweet potato
    Stewed pumpkin or winter squash, with either butter or olive-oil
    A cup of chocolate

DINNER

    Carrots, parsnips, turnips, beets, onions--any two of these
    A small portion of tender fish or fowl; or, an egg preferred
    A baked potato
    Celery, or slaw, with nuts

Avoid overeating. Stomach fermentation is caused largely by taking
into the stomach a quantity of food in excess of digestive ability or
of bodily requirements. The logical remedy, therefore, is to limit the
quantity of food, or to increase the amount of physical exercise.


SPRING MENU


_SOUR STOMACH--INTESTINAL GAS CONSTIPATION_

On rising, drink a glass or two of water, eat a spoonful of cherries or
berries, and devote a few minutes to vigorous exercise.

BREAKFAST

    Half a cup of wheat bran
    One or two red bananas--very ripe; baked if preferred. Served with
      either a spoonful of nuts or nut butter
    Raisins and cream

LUNCHEON

    Two tablespoonfuls of wheat bran
    Two eggs--preferably whipped
    Lettuce, with young carrots and grated nuts
    Boiled onions
    A baked potato

DINNER

    Wheat bran
    Choice of the following vegetables, baked in casserole dish:
      peas, asparagus, or onions
    Spinach, with egg
    A few spoonfuls of plain boiled wheat
    A baked potato

Drink two glasses of cool water at each of these meals.

Just before retiring, take a small portion of wheat bran, and spend at
least ten minutes in vigorous exercise.


SUMMER MENU


_SOUR STOMACH--INTESTINAL GAS CONSTIPATION_

Drink copiously of cool water, and take a brisk walk or vigorous
exercise and deep breathing before breakfast.

BREAKFAST

    Cantaloup or peaches--no cream
    Half a cup of wheat bran, cooked
    Whipped egg--a dash of sugar
    A baked banana--very ripe
    One or two glasses of water

LUNCHEON

    A green salad
    An ear or two of tender corn, masticated very thoroughly
    Nuts
    Wheat bran
    A glass or two of water

DINNER

    A green salad
    Choice of two fresh vegetables--peas, corn, beans, okra, eggplant
    A potato
    Cream cheese with nuts and raisins
    A small portion of bran, cooked
    Water

Cool water should be drunk freely at meals, and mastication should be
thorough.


FALL MENU


_SOUR STOMACH--INTESTINAL GAS CONSTIPATION_

FIRST DAY: On rising, drink two glasses of water, and devote three or
four minutes to Exercises 3 and 5. (See Vol. V, pp. 1344 and 1345.)
Inflate the lungs every fourth or fifth movement to their extreme
capacity.

BREAKFAST

    Steamed or boiled whole wheat
    A tablespoonful or two of coarse wheat bran
      (This may be cooked, and served the same as any ordinary cereal,
       and eaten with butter and salt)
    One or two exceedingly ripe bananas (baked if preferred), eaten
      with cream and nut butter
    One egg whipped very briskly, to which add a teaspoonful each of
      sugar and of lemon juice while whipping

LUNCHEON

    Four glasses of milk, drinking half a glass every six or eight minutes


DINNER

    Choice of two of the following vegetables:
    Carrots, parsnips, squash, beets, tender cabbage
    A baked potato or whole wheat bread
    A green salad or celery
    One egg, whipped (The egg could be omitted, and the combination of
      foods would still be well balanced)
    Wheat bran

Just before retiring, take a spoonful of wheat bran in half a glass of
water. Exercise as prescribed for the morning.


SECOND DAY: The same as the first, increasing the quantity of food,
if hungry. The noon meal could consist of two eggs, prepared as
prescribed, and one fresh vegetable, uncooked, such as carrots or
turnips, eaten with a green salad and either nuts or olive-oil. A
banana, with very thin cream, might also be taken.


THIRD DAY: Practically the same as the second, varying the breakfast
by omitting eggs, allowing it to consist of bananas, soaked prunes
and cream; or, oatmeal in small quantity, with thin cream; or, if
agreeable, let it consist of the same articles as prescribed for the
first day.


FOURTH DAY:

BREAKFAST

    A cup of hot water
    Bran meal gems, with butter
    Bananas, with soaked prunes, and either nuts or nut butter
      (Bananas should be baked unless very ripe)

LUNCHEON

    Two egg whites and one yolk rolled with whipped cream into a very
      rare omelet
    A small, baked potato

DINNER

    Anything in the way of a salad--celery, lettuce, cabbage
    String beans, parsnips, pumpkin, squash, onions, or carrots
    One egg whipped or cooked two minutes
    A baked potato or baked beans

Just before retiring, take a heaping tablespoonful of wheat bran and
the exercises which were prescribed for the first day.


FIFTH DAY: Same as the fourth.


SIXTH DAY: Same as the first, repeating the diet, day by day, for
twelve or fifteen days.


WINTER MENU


_SOUR STOMACH--INTESTINAL GAS CONSTIPATION_

Immediately on rising, take a cup of hot water, into which put two
tablespoonfuls of wheat bran. Devote from three to five minutes to deep
breathing exercises.

BREAKFAST

    Half a cup of wheat bran cooked from twenty to thirty minutes;
      eat with cream and a very little salt
    One or two very ripe bananas, with cream and nuts
    Whole wheat, thoroughly cooked

LUNCHEON

    Boiled onions, carrots, or squash--any one or two of these
    A bit of green salad or celery
    A baked white potato--eat skins and all
    A tablespoonful of wheat bran, either cooked or uncooked

DINNER

    A bit of slaw or celery
    Spinach, carrots, parsnips, beets, turnips, pumpkin, or squash--any
      one or two of these
    Baked beans or baked sweet or white potatoes
    A small portion of fish or chicken (If this is not convenient,
      an egg, lightly cooked, may be eaten)

If something sweet is desired, a small portion of plain ice-cream or
gelatin may be eaten once a week.

From one to two glasses of water should be drunk at each of these meals.

If it is cold, and something hot is desired, a cup of sassafras tea,
made from the bark of the red sassafras root, may be taken at the
morning and the evening meal. (See p. 681.)

Just before retiring, devote three or four minutes to deep breathing
exercises.

At the beginning of the evening meal, or on retiring, two or three
tablespoonfuls of bran may be taken in a little hot water. The quantity
of bran may be reduced according to the condition of the bowels.


SPRING MENU


_STOMACH AND INTESTINAL CATARRH_

Catarrh of the stomach is merely a form of chronic irritation caused by
a residue of hydrochloric acid in the stomach following the process of
digestion. This condition is augmented by intoxicating and stimulating
beverages--tobacco, liquor, beer, tea, coffee; by acids, such as
vinegar, lemon, grapefruit, and pineapple juices; by cane-sugar, cereal
starches, and meat. The remedy, therefore, is found in eliminating
these things, and in confining the diet to the following foods:

    All fresh vegetables     Milk
    Eggs                     Nuts
    Green salads             Subacid fruits
    Melon                    Very tender fish or white
                               meat of fowl--occasionally

Inasmuch as the primary cause of stomach catarrh is supersecretion of
hydrochloric acid, an abundance of pure water should be drunk at meals
and also between meals.

BREAKFAST

    A cup of hot water
    Egg whites, whipped, mixed with lukewarm milk; drink slowly

Drink a cup of hot water about 11 a. m.

LUNCHEON

    A cup of hot water
    A green salad or one fresh vegetable
    A new potato, baked; serve with butter
    Rice, simmered over night; serve with rich milk
    Half a cup of water at close of meal

Drink a cup of hot water about 4 p. m.

DINNER

    A cup of hot water
    Two fresh vegetables
    A new potato, baked
    Bran gems, with butter
    An egg, or a very small portion of either tender fish or chicken

Mastication must be perfect.

Bread, flour, and cereal products should be omitted, with the exception
of a very limited quantity of thoroughly cooked rice and wheat bran.

Sweets, desserts, tea, coffee, all sedative and stimulating beverages,
and drugs and narcotics should be omitted.

Water should be drunk copiously both at meals and between meals.


SUMMER MENU


_STOMACH AND INTESTINAL CATARRH_

BREAKFAST

    A bit of subacid or non-acid fruit--pear, peaches, plums, or melon
    Whipped eggs, using an excess of whites
    An extremely ripe banana, baked, eaten with very little thin cream

LUNCHEON

    A green salad with nuts
    Tender corn or string beans
    A baked sweet or a white potato

DINNER

    A salad with grated nuts--no dressing
    One or two fresh vegetables--corn, peas, beans, carrots
    A baked white potato
    A whipped egg, or fish, if engaged in manual labor
    A very ripe peach or a melon


FALL MENU


_STOMACH AND INTESTINAL CATARRH_

BREAKFAST

    A melon or a very ripe peach
    Two or three glasses of fresh milk, taken slowly
    Half a cup of wheat bran, cooked

LUNCHEON

    A very small portion of green salad, with grated nuts
    Tender corn, lima beans, or lentils

DINNER

    A green salad, with grated nuts
    Stewed pumpkin or squash
    Corn, carrots, or parsnips
    A baked potato or baked beans


WINTER MENU


_STOMACH AND INTESTINAL CATARRH_

BREAKFAST

    A pint of junket
    One whipped egg

LUNCHEON

    Vegetable soup
    Boiled onions, carrots, or turnips
    An egg or a small portion of tender fish
    A baked potato

DINNER

    Choice of the following cooked in a [B]casserole
      dish:

    _a_ Cauliflower, cabbage, or Brussels sprouts
    _b_ Carrots, parsnips, or turnips

    A baked potato
    A vegetable salad with ripe olives and nuts

[B] For cooking en casserole, see p. 671.


MENUS FOR FERMENTATION


SPRING MENU

_FERMENTATION--INTESTINAL GAS FEVERED STOMACH AND LIPS CANKERS ON
TONGUE_

BREAKFAST

    A glass of cool water
    Three or four egg whites and one yolk, whipped;
      sweeten slightly; add half a glass of milk
    Gelatin, without fruit, or two extremely ripe
      bananas baked in a casserole dish

LUNCHEON

    Carrots, parsnips, or turnips
    Peas or asparagus
    A white potato, either baked or boiled

DINNER

    Cream of asparagus soup, made rather thin
    Peas in the pod (See recipe, p. 679)
    A new, white potato, baked; serve with very little butter
    One egg, whipped
    A glass or two of cool water

An abundance of cool water should be drunk between meals, and from one
to two glasses at meals.

Fevered stomach is caused by fermentation of food--hyperacidity. After
the diet is balanced so as to be chemically harmonious, the next most
important thing is copious water-drinking at meals and between meals.

See Vol. II, p. 434.


SUMMER MENU


_FERMENTATION--INTESTINAL GAS FEVERED STOMACH AND LIPS CANKERS ON
TONGUE_

Immediately on rising, drink a glass or two of water. Also take
vigorous exercise and deep breathing.

BREAKFAST

    Cantaloup, or watermelon, eliminating the pulp
    Half a pint of junket or gelatin
    A baked banana or bran meal gems

LUNCHEON

    A liberal portion of fresh green corn, boiled or steamed in the
      husk; eat with a very little butter

DINNER

    Two fresh green vegetables
    Choice of fish or an egg
    A baked potato

From one to two glasses of water should be drunk at each of these
meals, eliminating all sweets and acids.

If there is a tendency toward constipation, half a cup of wheat bran,
cooked, and served as an ordinary cereal, should be taken at the
morning and the evening meal.


FALL MENU


_FERMENTATION--INTESTINAL GAS FEVERED STOMACH AND LIPS CANKERS ON
TONGUE_

Immediately on rising, drink a cup of cool water, and take vigorous
exercise and deep breathing.

BREAKFAST

    A bunch of California grapes
    One egg--coddled (See recipe, p. 677)
    Choice of very ripe bananas, baked--served with butter and
      thin cream, or a corn-meal muffin
    A cup of hot water into which put a little sugar or cream

LUNCHEON

    Two or three eggs whipped very thoroughly, to which slowly add a
      teaspoonful each of lemon juice and of sugar while whipping.
      Add half a glass of milk to each egg

EMERGENCY LUNCHEON

    A scrambled egg or a morsel of fish, eaten with a baked potato
    A boiled onion
    A cup of water

DINNER

    Choice of carrots, parsnips, squash, or string beans, seasoned with
      a little butter
    A baked potato or green corn
    A cup of milk

EMERGENCY DINNER

    Two baked potatoes
    A boiled onion
    A glass of milk, and an egg, if desired

If one is engaged in heavy manual labor, the food may be increased
beyond the amount herein prescribed. The combination, however, should
be observed.

The emergency luncheon is to be taken if one does not like the regular
luncheon. The same rule should be observed with the emergency dinner.
The regular luncheon contains considerable protein, which is very
necessary in these conditions. The emergency dinner contains the same
in another form. The one may be chosen which appeals most to natural
hunger.

Now and then the breakfast may consist of one or two extremely ripe
bananas, eaten with nut butter and cream, and one or two whipped eggs.


WINTER MENU


_FERMENTATION--INTESTINAL GAS FEVERED STOMACH AND LIPS CANKERS ON
TONGUE_

BREAKFAST

    A small bunch of grapes
    Two egg whites and one yolk, whipped very fine, into which whip a
      teaspoonful of sugar. Whip until stiff and smooth
    One or two exceedingly ripe bananas, baked, eaten with cream
    A cup of hot water with a little sugar and cream

LUNCHEON

    A baked potato or a bran meal gem
    A boiled onion or baked squash

DINNER

    Vegetable soup
    One fresh vegetable such as carrots, parsnips, squash, or turnips
    A baked potato--eat skins and all
    A cup of chocolate, or a whole wheat cracker

If the tongue should become coated, or the mouth sore, the amount of
food prescribed for the evening meal should be reduced until digestion
is perfect, which can be aided largely by drinking copiously of water.

If the bowels should become slightly constipated, take two heaping
tablespoonfuls of wheat bran in a cup of hot water just before
retiring. It is not necessary to masticate the bran. Devote two or
three minutes to deep breathing exercises, Nos. 1 and 5, as shown in
Vol. V, pp. 1343 and 1345.

The eggs can be taken uncooked, without whipping, if preferred.


MENUS FOR CONSTIPATION

SPRING MENU


_CONSTIPATION_ (_CHRONIC_) _NERVOUSNESS_


FIRST DAY: Immediately on rising, take half a cup of wheat bran, in hot
water, and eat a tablespoonful of soaked evaporated apricots.

Devote five minutes to exercises Nos. 3 and 5. (See Vol. V, pp. 1344
and 1345.) These should be taken vigorously, before an open window, and
before dressing. Then take a cool shower bath and a vigorous rub down.

If possible, take half an hour's walk before breakfast.

BREAKFAST

    Half a cup of coarse wheat bran, cooked ten minutes; eat with
      thin cream
    Two bran meal gems
    Two large, very ripe bananas, with thin cream and either nuts
      or nut butter (The bananas may be baked if preferred)
    Two glasses of water

Devote two or three minutes to exercises 3 and 5, about ten o'clock, if
possible.

LUNCHEON

    A dozen soaked prunes and one very ripe banana
    Two tablespoonfuls of nuts, or a rounded tablespoonful of nut butter
      (The prunes, the banana, and either the nuts or nut butter may be
      eaten together)
    One egg, whipped, or cooked two minutes (If whipped, add sugar and
      lemon juice)
    Peas or asparagus
    Half a cup of coarse wheat bran

Drink two glasses of water during the progress of the meal.

DINNER

    A salad of lettuce, asparagus, peas or carrots; or anything green,
      eaten with either nuts or nut butter
    One egg, coddled; serve with butter and salt
    A baked potato or a whole wheat muffin
    A cup of wheat bran, slightly cooked if desired, and eaten with thin
      cream
    Two glasses of water

Just before retiring, take half a cup of wheat bran.


SECOND DAY: The same as the first, slightly increasing the quantity of
food if there is a tendency toward weakness or unusual fatigue.


THIRD DAY: The same as the second, varying the meals by changing the
vegetables.


FOURTH DAY: On rising, eat a cup of soaked apricots, and take the
exercises which were prescribed for the first day.

BREAKFAST

    A cup of wheat bran, with cream
    A cup of hot water
    The juice of one sweet orange
    A small portion of plain wheat, boiled (simmered over night)
    One egg, coddled

LUNCHEON

    A dozen soaked prunes
    Two extremely ripe bananas, with two tablespoonfuls of nuts
    Three or four figs, and cream cheese--fresh
    Two glasses of water

DINNER

    A cup of hot water
    A cup of wheat bran
    Two large, boiled Spanish onions
    One other vegetable
    A baked potato
    One glass of cool water

Just before retiring, eat a few soaked evaporated apricots, or half a
cup of bran.

NOTE: The apricots should be omitted if there is a tendency toward sour
stomach (premature fermentation), or rheumatism.


FIFTH DAY: the Same As the Fourth.


SIXTH DAY: The same as the first.

Repeat this diet until the bowels become normal. The bran and the
apricots may then be reduced according to the condition of the bowels,
and the quantity of vegetables, eggs, and other solids increased
sufficiently to meet the demands of normal hunger.


SUMMER MENU


_CONSTIPATION_ (_CHRONIC_) _NERVOUSNESS_

Immediately on rising, eat two or three very ripe peaches or plums,
and drink a glass or two of water. Devote from five to ten minutes to
vigorous exercise and deep breathing, especially exercise No. 3. (See
Vol. V, p. 1344.)

BREAKFAST

    A dish of sliced peaches--very ripe; a little sugar, but no cream
    Half a cup of wheat bran, with a spoonful or two of crushed wheat,
      thoroughly cooked (simmered over night)
    An ear of tender corn--prepared choice

LUNCHEON

    A liberal portion of tender corn
    A lettuce and tomato salad, eaten with grated nuts

DINNER

    A liberal green salad, with grated nuts
    A baked sweet potato
    Fresh peas, beans, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, corn--any two of these
    A portion of wheat bran, cooked

If the above menus do not seem sufficient to sustain the body while
performing manual labor, one or two whipped eggs may be added.

Just before retiring, eat three or four ripe peaches, or a large bunch
of blue grapes, swallowing seeds without mastication. Take exercises as
prescribed for morning.

From two to three glasses of water should be drunk at each of these
meals.


FALL MENU


_CONSTIPATION_ (_CHRONIC_) _NERVOUSNESS_

(For general instructions see Spring Menu.)

Just after rising, eat a bunch of grapes.

BREAKFAST

    Cantaloup or melon
    Wheat bran and a small portion of whole wheat
    Two or three baked bananas, eaten with raisins and nuts

LUNCHEON

    Celery or slaw
    One fresh vegetable
    An ear of tender corn or a baked potato
    Wheat bran

DINNER

    Lettuce and tomato salad
    Okra, eggplant, cauliflower, carrots, squash, cabbage, string
      beans--any two of these
    Chicken or fish--very limited portion
    A cantaloup or a baked banana

From two to three glasses of water should be drunk at each of the above
meals, and mastication should be very thorough.


WINTER MENU


_CONSTIPATION_ (_CHRONIC_) _NERVOUSNESS_

Immediately on rising, take the juice of a sweet orange.

For general instructions see Spring Menu.

BREAKFAST

    Two extremely ripe bananas, eaten with nuts or nut butter
      (The bananas may be baked if preferred)
    A liberal portion of whole wheat, boiled until very soft--simmered
      over night; serve with butter or cream

LUNCHEON

    Spinach, with an egg
    Endive, kale, or cabbage
    Peas, beans, lentils, or corn

DINNER

    Celery, with nuts
    Carrots, parsnips, beets, onions, stewed pumpkin, or squash
    A small rare omelet, or a very small portion of fish; omelet preferred
    A potato

A glass of pure apple cider may be drunk just after rising, and just
before retiring.

From two to three glasses of water should be drunk at each of the above
meals.


SPRING MENU


_CONSTIPATION--AUTOINTOXICATION LOW VITALITY_

Choice of the following menus:


    MENU I                             MENU II

BREAKFAST

    Half a cup of wheat bran,          Two glasses of water
      cooked                             Wheat bran, cooked
    The juice of a sweet Florida       Boiled whole wheat, with
      orange (Russet seedling)           cream
    One glass of water                 Two tablespoonfuls of nuts
    One whole egg, whipped               or one tablespoonful of
      with teaspoonful of sugar          nut butter
    One or two extremely ripe          One very ripe banana, with
      bananas, with nuts and cream       nuts and raisins

LUNCHEON

    Peas or asparagus                  A boiled onion
    A baked potato                     Whole wheat or a bran meal gem
    A cup of hot water                 A cup of hot water

DINNER

    Green peas                        A small portion of fish or
    Spanish onions                      of white meat of chicken
    A small, baked white potato       One very small, baked white
      (Eat skins and all)               potato
    Two eggs, lightly poached         A salad of lettuce or anything
    Nuts and raisins, if something      green, with oil
      sweet is desired                A baked banana

A spoonful or two of coarse wheat bran should be taken both at
breakfast and at dinner; also, just before retiring, a glass of water
and a few pieces of soaked evaporated apricots.

(The apricots should be omitted if there is a tendency toward either
fermentation or rheumatism.)


SUMMER MENU


_CONSTIPATION--AUTOINTOXICATION LOW VITALITY_

Choice of the following menus:


    MENU I                             MENU II

BREAKFAST

    Fresh fruit--grapes preferred      Wheat bran
    A baked sweet potato               Melon or peaches
    Two very ripe bananas,             Very ripe bananas with cream,
      with figs and cream                nuts and raisins
    Wheat bran                         One glass of water
                                       One whipped egg

LUNCHEON

    Melon                              One or two fresh vegetables
    One fresh vegetable                  (choice)
    A bran gem with either             A baked potato or corn
      butter or nut butter             A green salad
    Two tablespoonfuls of nuts         Bran, or a bran gem
      (choice)
    One glass of water

DINNER

    A fruit salad made of bananas,    Practically the same as for
      raisins, and grated               luncheon, with choice of
      nuts; serve with whipped          junket or gelatin
      cream
    Two tablespoonfuls of nuts (choice)
    Cream cheese and one fig
    Boiled wheat, with sweet butter
    Two glasses of water
    A melon

SUPPLEMENTARY MENU

    Corn
    Spinach
    Two egg whites--poached or whipped
    A potato
    A salad
    Water and wheat bran

If there is a craving for something sweet, let the evening meal consist
entirely of ice-cream and three or four glasses of water. All sweets
may be omitted, however, if they do not especially appeal to the taste.

Take vigorous exercise and deep breathing just after rising, and just
before retiring.


FALL MENU


_CONSTIPATION--AUTOINTOXICATION LOW VITALITY_

Just after rising, eat a large bunch of grapes and drink a glass of
water.

Choice of the following menus:


    MENU I                              MENU II


BREAKFAST

    Peaches, plums, or melon           Two or three exceedingly
    Whole wheat, or barley,              ripe bananas, eaten with
      boiled until soft; serve           nut butter and cream;
      with butter and cream              also raisins, if something
    Wheat bran cooked, eaten             sweet is desired
      with thin cream                    (Bananas may be baked
    Water                                if preferred)


LUNCHEON

    A bowl of clabbered milk,          A baked white potato
      eaten with a very little  sugar   (Eat skins and all)
    One whipped egg                    One fresh vegetable
    Half a cup of wheat bran           A morsel of fish

DINNER

    Spinach, cooked                    Same as dinner (Menu I)
    One egg white                        with the addition of buttermilk
    Baked beans                          or a morsel of   fish
    One fresh vegetable                (Some simple dessert may be
                                        taken with this meal, if desired)

Just before retiring, take wheat bran or eat a large bunch of grapes.


WINTER MENU


_CONSTIPATION--AUTOINTOXICATION LOW VITALITY_

BREAKFAST

    A small portion of plain wheat boiled until
      soft, or until the grains burst open; serve with cream and salt
    A cup of wheat bran, cooked, eaten with butter and salt
    Two egg whites and one yolk
    One exceedingly ripe banana--must be very ripe; eat with one fig,
      cream, and a spoonful of either nuts or nut butter
    A cup of hot barley water

LUNCHEON

    A spoonful of wheat bran
    A portion of boiled onions
    A baked white potato--skins and all--with butter and salt
    A cup of hot barley water

DINNER

    A salad of anything green
    Choice of carrots, turnips, eggplant, parsnips,
      or squash, cooked in casserole dish--no cream
    A baked white potato
    A morsel of fish or chicken, or an egg, cooked
      two minutes, eaten with butter
    (One of the fresh vegetables should be made
      very hot with red pepper, or a small capsule of
      red pepper may be taken at the close of the meal)

From one to two glasses of water should be drunk at each of these meals.

Either grapes or wheat bran should be taken just before retiring. The
wheat bran may be taken uncooked in hot water.

If constipation is not relieved after taking the quantity of bran
prescribed, increase the quantity until the desired results are
obtained, then gradually decrease the quantity, taking it only at the
morning and the evening meal.


MENUS FOR GASTRITIS


SPRING MENU

_GASTRITIS_

In severe cases of gastritis, all food, and even water should be
omitted. As the patient begins to recover, water, cool or hot, may be
taken, and after a time, when normal hunger appears, the following
suggestions in diet should be observed:

BREAKFAST

    Choice of the following--

    _a_ One large, very ripe banana, baked; preferably en casserole
    _b_ A baked white potato, with butter

LUNCHEON

    Onions, or fresh tender peas, thoroughly cooked, en casserole
    A baked potato

DINNER

    Peas, asparagus, or onions
    A baked potato or rice (If rice is chosen, a tablespoonful of
      clean wheat bran should be eaten)

As the patient recovers, the articles composing the meals may be
increased, confining entirely to such foods as peas, asparagus,
potatoes, carrots, parsnips, beets, spinach, and the green salad
vegetables.


SUMMER MENU


_GASTRITIS_

In regard to the omission of food in severe cases, see Spring Menu.

BREAKFAST

    Cantaloup or melon, discarding the pulp of the melon
    Two or three egg whites, lightly whipped with a sprinkle of sugar

LUNCHEON

    Tender peas, string beans, green corn, or young carrots,
      thoroughly cooked
    Bran meal gems

DINNER

    Carrots, parsnips, squash, spinach, or turnip-tops
    Graham gems or a baked potato


FALL MENU


_GASTRITIS_

BREAKFAST

    A cantaloup or very ripe peaches--no cream
    Baked chestnuts, or boiled rice, with butter
    A tablespoonful of wheat bran in hot water

LUNCHEON

    Eggplant, okra, or a Spanish onion
    Tender corn or a potato

DINNER

    Celery or lettuce
    Nuts and ripe olives
    Green corn or a baked potato
    Carrots or winter squash


WINTER MENU


_GASTRITIS_

BREAKFAST

    A baked banana
    A spoonful or two of plain wheat, boiled
    A cup of hot water

LUNCHEON

    Winter squash, or onion, en casserole
    A baked potato
    Celery hearts

DINNER

    A light vegetable soup--no crackers
    Celery
    Carrots or parsnips
    A potato

For instructions in cooking "en casserole," see p. 671.


MENUS FOR NERVOUS INDIGESTION


SPRING MENU

_NERVOUS INDIGESTION_

Nervous indigestion is a condition in which the mucous membrane of the
stomach is in a chronic state of irritation caused by hydrochloric acid
fermentation.

The appetite is usually keen; sometimes ravenous. This, however, is the
best evidence that the diet should be limited to just enough food to
sustain strength when no manual labor is performed.

BREAKFAST

    A pint of clabbered milk with a light sprinkle of sugar,
      if desired
    Two tablespoonfuls of clean wheat bran, well cooked;
      serve with cream

LUNCHEON

    Onions, en casserole, or fresh peas
    Bran meal gems or graham muffins
    A baked potato
    A glass of water

DINNER

    Peas, asparagus, onions--any two of these
    A potato and bran meal gems
    A glass of buttermilk
    A spoonful or two of bran prepared as for breakfast


SUMMER MENU


_NERVOUS INDIGESTION_

BREAKFAST

    Cantaloup or baked bananas
    Two or three egg whites, lightly poached
    One or two bran meal gems
    A glass of milk

LUNCHEON

    Peas, string beans, carrots, okra--any two of these
    Tender corn or a baked potato
    Spinach, with egg
    A spoonful or two of wheat bran

DINNER

    Young carrots, string beans, or squash
    Tender corn, lima beans or a baked potato
    Gelatin, if something sweet is desired; a very small portion,
      and very little sugar


FALL MENU


_NERVOUS INDIGESTION_

BREAKFAST

    Persimmons, cantaloup, or a baked banana
    A baked potato
    Half a glass of milk
    A spoonful of wheat bran

LUNCHEON

    Two and one-half to three glasses of fresh milk
    Two tablespoonfuls of wheat bran

DINNER

    Eggplant, okra, Brussels sprouts, tender spinach, string beans,
      carrots, or onions--one or two of these
    A baked potato or rice

NOTE: From one to three glasses of cool water should be drunk at each
of these meals.


WINTER MENU


_NERVOUS INDIGESTION_

BREAKFAST

    Very ripe bananas with cream
    Two bran meal gems with butter, or two tablespoonfuls of plain
      boiled wheat

LUNCHEON

    Vegetable soup--omit crackers
    Cauliflower, boiled onions, or carrots
    A baked potato

DINNER

    Soup--cream of corn or of rice
    Celery, ripe olives, and nuts
    Carrots, parsnips, beets, turnips--choice of two of these
    Bran meal gems or a baked potato
    A spoonful or two of wheat bran (A glass or two of water should
      be drunk at this meal)

NOTE: Acids, sweets, white bread, oatmeal, corn hominy, and the cereal
foods from which the bran has been removed, should be entirely omitted
in all cases of stomach irritation, of which nervous indigestion is
merely an expression. The use of tea, coffee, tobacco, all stimulating
and intoxicating drinks should also be discontinued.


MENUS FOR NERVOUSNESS


SPRING MENU

FOR BUSINESS MAN

_THIN--NERVOUS--IRRITABLE INSOMNIA--STOMACH AND INTESTINAL TROUBLE_

Menu No. 1 is for use at home where one can get all the staple
vegetables prepared as directed.

Menu No. 2 consists of emergency meals to be taken when away from home.

They practically contain the same nutritive elements, however, but in
slightly different proportions.


    MENU I                             MENU II

BREAKFAST

    A dish of whole wheat or           A cup of hot water
      flaked wheat, thoroughly         Bran meal gems
      cooked                           Corn muffins
    Two tablespoonfuls of nuts
    One egg, coddled                   A potato eaten with either
    A cup of hot water                   butter or cream

LUNCHEON

    One or two fresh vegetables        Two glasses of milk (One whipped
    A baked sweet or a white  potato     egg mixed with the milk)
    A salad, if desired                A potato or one fresh vegetable
    One or two spoonfuls of nuts
    A glass of water

DINNER

    A green salad--either lettuce      Vegetable soup
     and tomatoes, or endive           One fresh vegetable
    Gems made from corn meal           An omelet or a very small
      or bran meal, eaten with           portion of fish or white
      butter and nuts                    meat of chicken; omelet
    Choice of peas, beans, or            preferred
      asparagus                        One extremely ripe banana
    A baked potato                       with cream, nuts, and
    Dessert--gelatin or home-made        either figs or raisins
      ice-cream

Intestinal gas can be largely controlled by thorough and complete
mastication.

If the use of milk should cause slight constipation, the constipation
can be relieved by taking a small portion of wheat bran, either cooked
or uncooked, at both the morning and the evening meal.


SUMMER MENU


FOR BUSINESS MAN

_THIN--NERVOUS--IRRITABLE INSOMNIA--STOMACH AND INTESTINAL TROUBLE_

Choice of the following menus for a week or ten days:



    MENU I                             MENU II

BREAKFAST

    Cantaloup or sliced peaches        Melon or peaches
    One tablespoonful of steamed       Two very ripe bananas
      whole wheat                        with cream, nuts, and  raisins
    One glass of milk                  Two or three glasses of milk
    Two baked bananas

LUNCHEON

    One or two ears of corn--boiled    Baked sweet potatoes, with
    A few nuts--choice                   butter
    One whipped egg and one            Two tablespoonfuls of nuts--choice
      glass of milk, mixed             A green salad


DINNER

    Spinach, lima beans, carrots,      Cantaloup
      squash--any two of these         Boiled corn and lima beans
    One egg, coddled                   Lettuce and tomato salad
    Small piece of corn bread          A baked potato
      or whole wheat bread             An egg or a small portion of fish
    Two glasses of buttermilk

NOTE: From one and a half to two glasses of water should be drunk at
each of these meals.

If constipation occurs, soaked prunes or soaked evaporated apricots may
be taken just before retiring. A glassful of water in which the prunes
or apricots have been soaked should also be drunk just after rising.

If stomach-acidity or intestinal fermentation should occur, omit all
acid fruits and regulate the bowels by the use of wheat bran.

One hour during the day should be devoted to vigorous physical
exercise.


FALL MENU


FOR BUSINESS MAN

_THIN--NERVOUS--IRRITABLE INSOMNIA--STOMACH AND INTESTINAL TROUBLE_

FIRST DAY: Immediately on rising, drink one glass of cool water and eat
half a pound of Concord grapes. Eliminate the seeds, but thoroughly
masticate and swallow the skins.

Devote from five to six minutes to exercises Nos. 3 and 5. (See Vol.
V, pp. 1344 and 1345.) Inflate the lungs to their fullest capacity at
every third or fourth breath.

BREAKFAST

    A cantaloup
    One or two exceedingly ripe bananas, baked; must be very ripe--red
      variety preferred; serve with thin cream
    One cup of hot water

LUNCHEON

    A lettuce and tomato salad
    An ear of tender corn

DINNER

    Choice of boiled corn, string or lima beans
      (With the corn, eat a teaspoonful of either nut
      butter or nuts; masticate to exceeding fineness)
    A lettuce and tomato salad, with a simple dressing
    One coddled egg

From one and a half to two glasses of water should be drunk at each of
the above meals.

Just before retiring, eat a small bunch of Concord grapes and drink
half a glass of water.

Devote from five to ten minutes to exercises Nos. 3 and 5, as above
directed, giving special attention to deep breathing. Endeavor to
inflate the lungs to their fullest capacity every third or fourth
breath.


SECOND DAY: The same as the first, slightly increasing the quantity of
food if desired. This may be done by more thorough mastication and by
devoting more time to exercise.


THIRD DAY:

BREAKFAST

    Two or three exceedingly ripe peaches, eaten with grated maple-sugar
    Two or three egg whites poached, served on a crisp cracker; or,
      one whole egg if the appetite will accept it
    Half of a cantaloup
    A cup of hot water or cocoa

LUNCHEON

    Cooked spinach or a green salad
    An ear of tender corn
    A potato
    A glass of water

DINNER

    String beans and young onions--cooked
    A green salad
    A bit of fish or white meat of chicken, with a baked potato


FOURTH DAY:

BREAKFAST

    Cantaloup or peaches
    One or two extremely ripe bananas, baked, and eaten with cream
    One large pulled fig, with cream
    One glass of water

LUNCHEON

    Cantaloup
    One whole egg, coddled
    A baked sweet or a white potato

DINNER

    Corn, lima beans, or a potato
    A cup of hot water


FIFTH DAY: The same as the first.


SIXTH DAY: The same as the second, and so on, day by day, for about
twelve days.


LETTER OF ADVICE

ACCOMPANYING ABOVE MENU

Rise at a regular hour every morning. Take a lukewarm sponge bath,
following it by a cool splash and a vigorous rub down, practising deep
breathing all the while.

Before dressing, devote from two to three minutes to exercises Nos. 3
and 5. (See Vol. V, pp. 1344 and 1345.) Take these movements calmly.

Do not worry. Masticate all food to infinite fineness. Take plenty of
time to eat.

Inflate the lungs to their fullest capacity one hundred times a day.
This is of very great importance.

If the quantity of food prescribed is more than the appetite calls for,
eliminate any one thing entirely, or reduce the quantity of the whole.


WINTER MENU


FOR BUSINESS MAN

_THIN--NERVOUS--IRRITABLE INSOMNIA--STOMACH AND INTESTINAL TROUBLE_

FIRST DAY: Immediately on rising, drink two cups of cool water and
devote from five to ten minutes to vigorous exercise.

BREAKFAST

    A cup of hot water
    A small portion of boiled wheat or rice
    One or two eggs, coddled
    Cocoa or chocolate

LUNCHEON

    Three eggs, whipped; add a glass of milk and a flavor of sugar and
      fruit-juice

DINNER

    Carrots, parsnips, turnips, winter squash--any two of these
    A baked potato
    A small portion of fish or chicken (white meat); or, one egg
      prepared choice, eaten with either a baked potato or a bit
      of whole wheat bread

Just before retiring, repeat the exercises which have been prescribed
for the morning, and, if constipated, take two or three tablespoonfuls
of wheat bran in hot water.


SECOND DAY: Same as the first, slightly increasing the quantity of
food, if hungry.


THIRD DAY: Same as the second, adding one or two whipped eggs for
breakfast, and changing vegetables to suit the appetite for luncheon
and for dinner. Nearly all vegetables such as beets, carrots, parsnips,
and turnips may be substituted for one another.


FOURTH DAY:

BREAKFAST

    A cup of hot water
    Two eggs lightly poached; or, a very rare omelet rolled in nuts and
      whipped cream, eaten with a whole wheat muffin
    A cup of chocolate
    A liberal portion of wheat bran, cooked and served as an ordinary
      cereal, with butter and cream

LUNCHEON

    Three eggs. See recipe, p. 678.

DINNER

    Endive, lettuce, or celery
    Choice of any two fresh vegetables
    A potato or a whole wheat gem

Exercise as prescribed for the first day.


FIFTH DAY: The same as the fourth.


SIXTH DAY: The same as the first, repeating these menus for a period of
about three weeks.

For diet and general instructions in regard to nervousness, see
menus for "Fermentation" and "Superacidity." See also Lesson XVII,
"Nervousness--Its Cause and Cure," Vol. V, p. 1211.


MENUS FOR SUBACIDITY


SPRING MENU


_INDIGESTION_ (_CHRONIC_)

BREAKFAST

    A dish of very ripe berries or apricots
    A cup of hot water
    A baked white potato, served with a very little butter and salt
    One or two egg whites, lightly poached
    Half a cup of wheat bran, cooked twenty minutes

LUNCHEON

    A cup of hot water
    Two or three bananas, baked in casserole dish. (For baked bananas,
      see recipe, p. 677)

DINNER

    A cup of hot water
    Purée of peas
    A baked white potato, asparagus, or carrots
    Half a cup of wheat bran cooked, served as an ordinary cereal

A few tablespoonfuls of pineapple juice should be taken half an hour
after each meal.

The above menus may be increased in quantity as the digestion improves,
taking special care, however, not to overeat. Fresh vegetables, from
the list given below, may be added to the noon and the evening meal, as
the season advances, and the patient becomes stronger.

    Asparagus
    Beans
    Brussels sprouts
    Cabbage
    Carrots
    Cauliflower
    Celery
    Kale
    Lettuce
    Parsnips
    Peas
    Spinach
    Squash


SUMMER MENU


_INDIGESTION_ (_CHRONIC_)

Immediately on rising, drink a cup of water, and devote from five to
ten minutes to vigorous exercise, with deep breathing.

BREAKFAST

    Melon or peaches
    A large red banana, baked, or broiled in butter; eat with soaked
      prunes
    One egg, either coddled or whipped

LUNCHEON

    Melon or cantaloup
    A liberal portion of gelatin, with thin cream

DINNER

    A light vegetable soup
    A very small portion of green salad
    A very little tender fish or chicken--white meat
    Baked potatoes or green corn
    Any fresh vegetables
    A small portion of wheat bran, cooked


FALL MENU


_INDIGESTION_ (_CHRONIC_)

Immediately on rising, drink a cup of water, and devote a few minutes
to vigorous exercise.

BREAKFAST

    A bunch of Tokay or Malaga grapes
    One or two eggs, coddled or poached
    A baked white potato
    A cup of hot water

LUNCHEON

    Purée of corn or beans
    One or two egg whites, whipped

DINNER

    Stewed pumpkin or squash
    A baked white potato
    One extremely ripe banana (black spotted), eaten with cream


WINTER MENU


_INDIGESTION_ (_CHRONIC_)

BREAKFAST

    A cup of coarse wheat bran
    Whole wheat, cooked until the grains burst open; serve with thin
      cream or rich milk, and either a spoonful of nuts or nut butter
      (This should be masticated exceedingly fine)

LUNCHEON

    One egg whipped very fine, or boiled one and one-half minutes; if
      whipped, add a sprinkle of sugar; if boiled, eat with a baked
      potato
    A very small vegetable salad--grated carrots, onion, and lettuce
      leaves

DINNER

    Boiled onions, carrots, or parsnips
    A baked white potato
    Half a glass of milk, mixed with one whipped egg white

Take a spoonful or two of wheat bran and a spoonful of pineapple juice
at the close of this meal, either cooked, or in hot water, uncooked.

The above menus are the minimum of food for this condition. The
quantity may be increased according to the demands of normal hunger.
Hunger, however, should be determined by labor or exercise. Abnormal
appetite, caused by supersecretion of acid in the stomach, is very
often mistaken for hunger. In such cases, the patient should cease
eating before the appetite is satisfied.


INDIGESTION (ACUTE)

In nearly all cases of acute indigestion, food should be omitted. The
patient should be given hot water morning, noon, and evening, and, if
possible, a stomach tube should be inserted, and the hot water and
stomach contents removed. If this cannot be done, the patient should
drink copiously of hot water, and vomit as much of it as possible.
After the stomach has been cleansed, a cup of coarse wheat bran, or
a large bunch of Concord or blue grapes may be given (if they are in
season), swallowing skins, seeds, and pulp. Both bran and grapes are
preferable to laxative medicines, and much more effective. The high
enema should be administered, thus removing the contents of the lower
bowels. After the stomach and the bowels have been thoroughly cleansed,
if the patient is not able to exercise, artificial manipulation of the
abdomen should be administered for a period of half an hour three
times a day. These suggestions may be repeated until the patient is
relieved, when the diet for chronic indigestion may be followed in
rather modified form, omitting the heavier vegetables, and increasing
the lighter foods.


MENUS FOR BILIOUSNESS


SPRING MENU

_BILIOUSNESS--HEADACHE SLUGGISH LIVER_

Supersecretion of bile by the liver is termed biliousness. This may be
expressed by the presence of bile in the stomach, which usually causes
headache, beginning at the base of the brain, and after five or six
hours settling over the eyes. This is sometimes associated with nausea
or sick headache.

Again, the excess of bile is absorbed into the blood, causing the skin
to become yellow and spotted, and sometimes it assumes the appearance
of jaundice.

Biliousness is caused by taking an excess of sweets, coffee, liquors,
fats, and sometimes starches--cereal, bread, etc. The remedy,
therefore, is a very simple one, and largely confined to elimination,
vigorous exercise, deep breathing, and copious drinking of water.

The following menus are suggestive. The diet may consist of any group
of fresh, natural foods which are in season.

BREAKFAST

    Grapefruit, oranges, pineapple, or berries
    Eggs, whipped, flavored with fruit-juice, and a bit of sugar
    A banana, baked, or eaten uncooked, if very ripe

LUNCHEON

    Vegetable soup
    One or two fresh vegetables
    Spinach or green salad
    A small portion of fish
    One egg
    Junket or gelatin

DINNER

    A green salad
    Spinach or dandelion
    Asparagus, peas, or any fresh vegetable
    Baked beans or lentils
    A baked potato
    Gelatin

Sufficient coarse wheat bran should be taken at each meal to keep the
bowels in normal condition.


SUMMER MENU


_BILIOUSNESS--HEADACHE SLUGGISH LIVER_

BREAKFAST

    Soaked prunes, apricots, or berries
    Choice of the following--

    _a_ A very ripe banana, with either nuts or nut butter
    _b_ A baked sweet potato, with dairy butter

    A cup of water

LUNCHEON

    Lettuce, celery, or slaw
    A baked potato or corn
    A cup of junket
    Sliced peaches

DINNER

    Tender corn, peas, beans, okra, or eggplant
    Any green vegetable or a salad
    A whipped egg or a glass of buttermilk
    A melon or peach ices


FALL MENU


_BILIOUSNESS--HEADACHE SLUGGISH LIVER_

BREAKFAST

    Grapefruit, oranges, pineapple, peaches, or plums
    A very rare omelet
    A whole wheat muffin, or a slice of corn bread

LUNCHEON

    Green corn or baked beans
    Boiled onions or turnips
    Carrots or parsnips

DINNER

    A salad of anything green, with grated nuts and oil
    A baked sweet potato
    Any fresh vegetable such as turnips, carrots, beets, squash, or
      stewed pumpkin
    Gelatin
    (One-half pound of grapes an hour after eating)


WINTER MENU


_BILIOUSNESS--HEADACHE SLUGGISH LIVER_

BREAKFAST

    Any acid fruit that appeals to the taste
    Two eggs--prepared choice
    A very little corn bread or a baked potato; potato preferred
    Thin cocoa

LUNCHEON

    Two or three bananas, extremely ripe, eaten with nuts, raisins
      and cream

DINNER

    Cream soup, onions, or celery
    One fresh vegetable
    Baked beans or a baked potato
    A baked banana, eaten with a whipped egg


SPRING MENU


_HEADACHE--TORPID LIVER_

BREAKFAST

    Cherries or berries--neither sugar nor cream
    Two bananas broiled in butter, or baked, eaten with cream
      (They may be eaten uncooked if sufficiently ripe)
    A few raisins, with either butter or nuts

LUNCHEON

    Boiled onions--a liberal portion
    A baked potato

DINNER

    Peas or asparagus
    A green salad--just a very little
    Baked beans or a baked potato; potato preferred

Just before retiring, drink a cup of water and eat a dozen ripe
strawberries, without sugar or cream. This should be followed by
vigorous exercise and deep breathing.

For recipe for baked bananas, see p. 677.


SUMMER MENU


_HEADACHE--TORPID LIVER_

BREAKFAST

    Melon, peaches, or berries
    One or two whipped eggs
    A small portion of plain boiled wheat, with very little butter;
      no cream

LUNCHEON

    Spinach or a green salad
    Any fresh vegetable
    A potato--baked, boiled, or mashed

DINNER

    Cantaloup or melon
    Okra, eggplant, string beans, spinach, Brussels sprouts, carrots,
      or turnips
    One whipped egg, or a portion of gelatin with cream and fruit


FALL MENU


_HEADACHE--TORPID LIVER_

FIRST DAY: Immediately on rising, take a glass or two of water and
a bit of any juicy fruit--grapes preferred. Devote as much time as
possible to exercises Nos. 1, 3, and 5. (See Vol. V, pp. 1343, 1344,
and 1345, giving preference to No. 3.) Do not exercise until too much
fatigued, but rest every twenty or thirty movements.

BREAKFAST

    A bunch of grapes--California variety; swallow seeds and pulp whole;
      masticate and swallow the skins
    Half a glass of water
    An egg, cooked one and a half minutes; eat with a potato
    Whole wheat, boiled
    A cup of hot water or chocolate at the close of the meal

LUNCHEON

    One or two fresh vegetables; preferably boiled onions, string beans,
      or carrots
    A baked potato
    Anything green in the way of a salad--either lettuce, endive or
      romaine, with oil, lemon juice, and sugar
    A cup of hot water

DINNER

    A green salad or spinach
    Choice of two of the following vegetables--carrots, string beans,
      boiled onions, squash, or turnips; preferably boiled onions
      and carrots
    A baked potato
    Just a bite or two of the proteids, such as egg, fish, or white meat
      of chicken
    A cup of hot water

Just before retiring, take the juice of half an orange, half a glass of
water, and devote as much time as possible to exercises prescribed for
the morning.


SECOND DAY: Same as the first, slightly varying the meals according to
choice of vegetables.


THIRD DAY: Same as the second.


FOURTH DAY: In regard to water-drinking, exercising, and eating a
particle of fruit just after rising, see the rules which were given for
the first day.

BREAKFAST

    A portion of wheat bran, served with thin cream
    Coarse cereal, with either nut butter or nuts
    A sweet potato, baked, or sliced and broiled in butter

LUNCHEON

    A tomato, stuffed with fine vegetables, and baked
    One fresh vegetable
    A salad or celery
    A baked sweet or, a white potato
    A cup of hot water
    (A cup of cool water during the progress of the meal)

DINNER

    Celery or a salad--a very small quantity
    One fresh vegetable such as boiled onions, carrots, parsnips,
      or turnips
    Choice of one whipped egg, fish, or white meat of chicken
    A cup of hot water or cocoa
    Half a cup of wheat bran

Just before retiring, eat a small bunch of grapes, drink a glass of
water, and take exercise, as prescribed for the first day.


FIFTH DAY: Same as the fourth.


SIXTH DAY: Same as the first.


SEVENTH DAY: Same as the second, continuing for ten or twelve days.


WINTER MENU


_HEADACHE--TORPID LIVER_

The element protein slightly predominates in these menus, while the
fat-producing nutrients are minimized.


Choice of the following:

    MENU I                              MENU II

BREAKFAST

    A cup of hot water                 One egg, whipped with a
    Half a cup of bran                   very little sugar and a
    Baked sweet potatoes                 spoonful of lemon juice
    Cocoa                              One banana with very little
                                         nut butter and cream,
                                         and a few raisins

LUNCHEON

    A vegetable salad--lettuce,        A fruit salad--lettuce; seeded
    grated carrots and tomatoes,         grapes, banana, and
    eaten with a dressing                a piece of an orange,
    of nut butter, reduced               chopped; serve with
    to a solution by                     either whipped cream or
    adding water                         nut-butter dressing
    A boiled onion                     One fresh vegetable, with
    A baked sweet or a white             a whole wheat cracker
      potato, or baked beans
      (Eat sparingly of the latter)

DINNER

    Two fresh vegetables               One fresh vegetable
    Fish or an egg; egg preferred      A baked potato
    A potato or a whole wheat  gem     Two eggs, either boiled two
                                       minutes or whipped with just
                                         a little lemon juice and sugar


MENUS FOR CIRRHOSIS OF THE LIVER


_CIRRHOSIS OF THE LIVER_

Cirrhosis is a word derived from the Greek meaning _yellow_. It was
originally intended to convey the idea of over-growth or enlargement of
this much-abused organ, but inasmuch as atrophic conditions often show
yellow or tawny, there are now two kinds of cirrhosis, namely, atrophic
cirrhosis, meaning a shrinkage, and hypertrophic cirrhosis, meaning
enlargement of the liver.

Atrophic cirrhosis is caused by alcoholism, often augmented by milder
stimulants such as tea and coffee.

Hypertrophic cirrhosis is caused by overeating, especially of meat,
sweets, and starchy foods.

The causes of the former should be removed by ceasing the use of tea,
coffee, and all alcoholic stimulants, and of the latter by omitting
sweets, and limiting the diet in quantity to, or in severe cases below,
the actual needs of the body.

The following menus are laid out for the treatment of severe cases.
They are designed both as a counteractive and as a remedial measure.

In mild cases, or as the patient recovers, the diet may be increased in
quantity, but it should be confined very rigidly to the articles named
in the list below, and in the menus which follow.

Foods to be used in the treatment of cirrhosis of the liver:

    PROTEIDS          VEGETABLES        FRUITS

    Egg whites        Asparagus         Apples
    Fish              Beets             Apricots
    Fowl--white meat  Beans             Cantaloup
    Nuts              Brussels sprouts  Cherries
    Sour milk         Cauliflower       Grapes
                      Cabbage           Melons
    CARBOHYDRATES     Carrots           Oranges
    Bananas           Celery            Peaches
    Corn bread        Onions            Pears
    Flaked rye        Potatoes          Plums
    Wheat bran        Spinach           Prunes
    Whole wheat       Squash            Raisins
                      Turnip-greens     Tomatoes
    FATS              Turnips
    Butter
    Nut butter
    Nuts


SPRING MENU


_CIRRHOSIS OF THE LIVER_

BREAKFAST

    Soaked apricots; neither sugar nor cream
    Very ripe bananas
    Nuts

NOTE: If bananas are not "dead ripe" they should be baked.

LUNCHEON

    Peas in the pod
    Bran meal gems
    Buttermilk

DINNER

    Peas or asparagus
    Lettuce, spinach, or turnip-greens
    Carrots or turnips
    A potato


SUMMER MENU


_CIRRHOSIS OF THE LIVER_

BREAKFAST

    Peaches, cherries, apricots, or cantaloup
    Three or four egg whites whipped with a spoonful of cream
    Flaked rye, well cooked

LUNCHEON

    Beans, Brussels sprouts, or cauliflower
    Lettuce and tomato
    A potato
    A glass of buttermilk

DINNER

    Vegetable soup--very little fat
    Any fresh vegetable in above list
    Fish or chicken--very little
    A potato or tender corn


FALL MENU


_CIRRHOSIS OF THE LIVER_

BREAKFAST

    Grapes, peaches, or plums
    Two baked bananas
    Whole wheat

LUNCHEON

    Boiled onions
    Squash
    Lima beans or bran gems

DINNER

    Celery or spinach
    Any fresh vegetable in above list
    A potato or corn bread
    Two tablespoonfuls of wheat bran


WINTER MENU


_CIRRHOSIS OF THE LIVER_

BREAKFAST

    A baked banana or a baked apple
    A baked potato--eat skins and all

LUNCHEON

    Celery soup
    Corn bread
    Winter squash

DINNER

    Parsnips or turnips
    A potato or baked beans
    Celery, with nuts
    Fish or buttermilk

If the breakfast is late, and the labor is light, the noon meal should
be omitted.


SPRING MENU


_CIRRHOSIS OF THE LIVER_

BREAKFAST

    Baked apples or very ripe berries without sugar
    A very ripe banana with cream
    Flaked wheat, thoroughly cooked with one-half bran

LUNCHEON

    Peas in the pod--en casserole
    A baked potato

DINNER

    Peas, asparagus, or onions
    A baked potato
    Nuts with cream
    Cheese with water-cracker

From one to three glasses of water should be drunk at each of these
meals. Mastication should be very thorough.

For cooking "en casserole," see p. 671.


SUMMER MENU


_CIRRHOSIS OF THE LIVER_

BREAKFAST

    Cantaloup, peaches, plums, or berries
    Two tablespoonfuls of plain boiled wheat
    A pint of rich milk; buttermilk preferred

LUNCHEON

    Young onions, lettuce, romaine, or any fresh
      salad with either nuts or oil
    Carrots, squash, or tender corn
    A baked potato--sweet or white

DINNER

    Vegetable soup
    A Spanish onion, en casserole
    Squash, carrots, parsnips, okra, cauliflower--any two of these
    A baked potato
    Tender corn or lima beans
    Cheese, with nuts and raisins


FALL MENU


_CIRRHOSIS OF THE LIVER_

BREAKFAST

    Cantaloup, peaches, or grapes
    One egg, prepared choice
    Bran meal gems or a potato
    A glass of milk

LUNCHEON

    Squash
    Okra, or an onion, en casserole
    A corn muffin or a baked potato
    Celery, or lettuce, with nuts

DINNER

    Vegetable or cream soup
    Celery, or slaw, with nuts--no vinegar
    Winter squash, stewed pumpkin, or a baked sweet potato
    Bran meal gems
    A morsel of cheese, with either raisins or nuts


WINTER MENU


_CIRRHOSIS OF THE LIVER_

BREAKFAST

    A baked apple or soaked prunes
    A pint of milk
    Plain boiled wheat or corn hominy. (If hominy is chosen, a heaping
      tablespoonful of wheat bran should be taken)

LUNCHEON

    Two or three glasses of buttermilk
    Two tablespoonfuls of wheat bran

DINNER

    Cream of tomato soup
    Turnips, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower--any two of these
    A potato or a bran meal gem
    (A small portion of tender fish may be added if much desired)

If there is a tendency toward constipation, two or three tablespoonfuls
of wheat bran should be taken, and an abundance of water drunk both at
meals and between meals.


MENUS FOR DIARRHEA

SPRING MENU


_DIARRHEA_

BREAKFAST

    Two egg yolks, hard boiled
    Zweibach or boiled rice
    A glass of lukewarm milk

LUNCHEON

    A sweet potato or corn hominy
    Two glasses of milk

DINNER

    Cream of rice soup
    Boiled rice or spaghetti
    A glass of hot milk

(If the milk should prove disagreeable, it may be boiled or heated to
200° Fahrenheit.)


SUMMER MENU


_DIARRHEA_

BREAKFAST

    Blackberries, sugar, cream
    A sweet potato broiled in butter
    One glass of clabbered milk

LUNCHEON

    Two egg yolks, hard boiled, eaten with rice and cream

DINNER

    Cream of rice soup
    A baked sweet potato
    A water-cracker with cheese and raisins


FALL MENU


_DIARRHEA_

BREAKFAST

    Cantaloup
    Two egg yolks, hard boiled
    Toast or zweibach
    Baked chestnuts--cream

LUNCHEON

    Two glasses of milk
    A baked sweet potato

DINNER

    Cream of rice soup
    A sweet potato or baked beans
    Rice or chestnuts
    Cheese, with a water-cracker and almonds


WINTER MENU


_DIARRHEA_

BREAKFAST

    Fish balls or two egg yolks, hard boiled
    Chestnuts, rice or a potato
    Chocolate

LUNCHEON

    Two glasses of milk or two cups of chocolate
    Corn hominy or rice

DINNER

    Soup--cream of rice or of corn
    Fish or turkey--white meat, omit cranberry sauce
    Chestnuts, rice, or a sweet potato

Omit water at meals.

Mastication should be very thorough. The principle involved in treating
diarrhea is to eliminate from the diet all coarse and fibrous foods,
and to limit water, watery foods, and fats to the minimum.


SPRING MENU


_DIARRHEA--DYSENTERY_

FIRST DAY: Immediately on rising, drink a cup of hot water and devote
from five to ten minutes to vigorous, deep breathing exercises, giving
special preference to Nos. 3 and 5. (See Vol. V, pp. 1344 and 1345.)

BREAKFAST

    Two eggs, whipped. See recipe, p. 678
    A baked sweet potato, eaten with butter
    A cup of chocolate--very little sugar

LUNCHEON

    Boiled rice
    A glass or two of milk or a cup or two of chocolate

DINNER

    Cream of rice soup or boiled rice
    Peas or asparagus
    Baked beans or a baked sweet potato
    Milk or chocolate

NOTE: Omit coffee and tea.

Just before retiring, take vigorous exercise and deep breathing as
prescribed for the morning.


SECOND DAY: Same as the first, increasing the quantity of food if weak
or faint.


THIRD DAY: Same as the second.


FOURTH DAY:

BREAKFAST

    Hot milk or a cup of malted milk
    Sweet potatoes, broiled in very little butter
    A large banana, either broiled in butter, or
      baked
    (See recipe, p. 677)

LUNCHEON

    A baked sweet potato, boiled rice, or baked beans
    (Make the entire meal of either of these, adding a little cream or
      milk to the rice, if that is chosen)

DINNER

    Soup--cream of rice or pea
    A very small lettuce salad with oil
    Baked beans or lentils
    Rice or corn hominy
    A cup of junket or a whipped egg prepared as prescribed for the
      first day


FIFTH DAY: Same as the fourth, adding a whipped egg to the morning
meal, and one or two whipped eggs to the evening meal, if faint or
weak, omitting other foods in the same proportion.


SIXTH DAY: Same as the first, repeating the diet herein given, for a
period of from twenty to thirty days, with variations confined to the
things prescribed.

If there be no improvement by the third day, the quantity of food
should be materially reduced.


SUMMER MENU


_DIARRHEA--DYSENTERY_

On rising, drink a glass or two of cool water.

BREAKFAST

    Cantaloup, watermelon, or blackberry juice
    A liberal portion of boiled rice, with cream
    A cup of chocolate or cocoa, with very little sugar
    Half a glass of cool water

LUNCHEON

    A liberal portion of baked sweet potato, with butter
    A glass of water

DINNER

    Cream of rice soup
    Lima beans or a baked potato
    A glass of milk or a cup of junket
    Cantaloup


FALL MENU


_DIARRHEA--DYSENTERY_

BREAKFAST

    One egg, boiled three minutes
    Rice, boiled plain, or baked chestnuts, served with cream and salt
    A cup of hot cocoa

LUNCHEON

    A baked sweet potato
    Boiled onions
    Baked chestnuts, eaten with cream

DINNER

    One egg or a glass of buttermilk
    A baked potato or baked chestnuts
    Turnips, string beans, or carrots
    Rice purée made with milk

Drink a cup of hot water at the close of each of these meals.


WINTER MENU

_DIARRHEA--DYSENTERY_


FIRST DAY: Immediately on rising, devote about five minutes to
exercises Nos. 3 and 5 (see Vol. V, pp. 1344 and 1345) before an open
window, or in a thoroughly ventilated room. Drink two glasses of water.

BREAKFAST

    A cup of hot chocolate
    One egg, whipped
    A glass of clabbered milk
    A small portion of boiled rice, with cream.
    The rice should be allowed to simmer over night in a double boiler

LUNCHEON

(This meal should be very light)

    A portion of boiled onions, carrots, parsnips, turnips, or
      squash--any one or two of these
    A baked sweet potato
    Half a glass of milk
    A cup of hot water

DINNER

    Three eggs, whipped. See recipe, p. 678.


SECOND DAY: The same as the first.


THIRD DAY: The same as the second, slightly increasing the quantity of
food.


FOURTH DAY:


BREAKFAST

    One exceedingly ripe banana (must be black spotted), with cream
      and either nut butter or nuts
    One egg, cooked three minutes
    Rice or whole wheat, boiled
    Thin cocoa or a cup of hot water

LUNCHEON

    One fresh vegetable
    A baked sweet potato
    A cup of hot cocoa or chocolate

DINNER

    One fresh vegetable, such as onions, carrots, parsnips, turnips
    Choice of rice, baked potato, or baked beans
    A very small portion of fish, or white meat of chicken, if there
      is a craving for meat; if not omit, and take one egg
    A cup of hot water with cream and sugar

Exercise and deep breathing, and a glass of water just before retiring.


FIFTH DAY: The same as the fourth.


SIXTH DAY: The same as the first, repeating the diet herein given, day
by day, for a week or ten days.


MENUS FOR EMACIATION


SPRING MENU

_EMACIATION--UNDERWEIGHT--RATHER ANEMIC_

Immediately on rising, devote from twenty to thirty minutes to vigorous
exercise and deep breathing.

BREAKFAST

    A whole wheat muffin
    One two-minute egg
    Two exceedingly ripe bananas, baked; serve with thin cream
    A cup or two of milk
    Half a cup of bran, cooked; serve with cream

LUNCHEON

    Two or three whipped eggs, with two glasses of milk and two
      teaspoonfuls of sugar
    Half a cup of bran

DINNER

    A cup of hot water
    Green peas, asparagus, spinach, turnips, carrots, or creamed onions
    A baked potato or whole wheat gems
    Half a glass of buttermilk, or whipped eggs, prepared as for luncheon
    A cup of chocolate

Drink from one to three glasses of either water or milk at each of
these meals.

Take sufficient wheat bran to keep the bowels in normal condition.

For recipe for baked bananas, whipped and coddled eggs, see pp. 677 and
678.


SUMMER MENU


_EMACIATION--UNDERWEIGHT--RATHER ANEMIC_

On rising, drink two glasses of water and take vigorous exercises and
deep breathing.

BREAKFAST

    A small quantity of very ripe fruit, such as peaches, plums,
      or cantaloup
    Two fresh eggs, whipped seven or eight minutes; sweeten to taste,
      adding half a glass of milk to each egg; drink slowly
    A spoonful or two of wheat bran and crushed wheat (half of each),
      thoroughly cooked, eaten with butter and cream

LUNCHEON

    Three eggs, prepared as for breakfast
    A spoonful of wheat bran

DINNER

    A cantaloup or one or two very ripe peaches
    A morsel of salt fish or chicken
    A baked potato
    Two or three eggs, prepared as for breakfast
    Two or three exceedingly ripe peaches and a small portion of bran

Just before retiring, eat a few peaches or plums, and take a spoonful
of bran.


FALL MENU


_EMACIATION--UNDERWEIGHT--RATHER ANEMIC_

BREAKFAST

    A cup of hot water
    A small bunch of grapes
    Two or three egg whites and one yolk, whipped from four to five
      minutes. While whipping, add slowly one tablespoonful of sugar
      and one of lemon juice
    One very ripe banana with thin cream, raisins, and either nuts
      or nut butter

LUNCHEON

    Two or three eggs, prepared as for breakfast
    Two medium-sized baked sweet potatoes, with butter
    A small portion of rice, or corn hominy, with butter and cream

DINNER

    Cooked spinach, or anything green, as a salad
    Carrots, parsnips, turnips, squash--any one or two of these
    A small portion of fish or half a glass of butter milk
    A baked white potato
    A cup of hot water

Sufficient coarse wheat bran or bran gems should be taken to keep the
bowels in natural or normal condition. Unless elimination of waste is
normal, it is difficult to gain weight.


WINTER MENU


_EMACIATION--UNDERWEIGHT--RATHER ANEMIC_

BREAKFAST

    A cup of hot water, with a very little sugar and cream
    Just a bite of fruit--preferably grapes
    Whole wheat, thoroughly cooked, eaten with cream
    Two eggs prepared any way they are most agreeable; preferably
      (uncooked) whipped


    MENU I                             MENU II

LUNCHEON

    One or two fresh vegetables        Three or four eggs whipped
    Choice between a bit of fish         with sugar and lemon
      or tender chicken if there         juice. Add half a glass
      is a craving for something         of milk to each egg
      salty

Emergency Luncheon III

    A baked sweet potato, eaten with butter
    A liberal portion of gelatin
    Two cups of cocoa or chocolate

DINNER

    Spinach, cooked, eaten with        One egg or fish
      a baked potato and one           A baked potato
      very lightly scrambled           A glass of clabbered milk,
      egg                                with a sprinkle of sugar
    A boiled onion                     Half-cup of wheat bran,
    Carrots, parsnips, or turnips        cooked, with a little cream

For cooking "Vegetables," see p. 670.


SPRING MENU


_RUN-DOWN CONDITION FLATULENCY--UNDERWEIGHT_

FIRST DAY: On rising, drink copiously of cool water, and devote from
five to eight minutes to deep breathing exercises.

BREAKFAST

    The juice of a sweet orange (Florida Russet preferred)
    A cup of water
    Two glasses of fresh milk
    Two or three corn-meal muffins, with fresh butter

LUNCHEON

    From one to three glasses of buttermilk, according to hunger
    One egg, whipped as for breakfast

DINNER

    One glass of water
    Fresh string beans, peas, or asparagus, cooked preferably in a
      casserole dish
    Two medium-sized baked white potatoes (new); eat skins and all
    An egg or a cup of junket
    A cup of hot water
    A tablespoonful of wheat bran

Just before retiring, take a glass of water and the juice of half
an orange, and devote from three to five minutes to deep breathing
exercises.


SECOND DAY: The same as the first, slightly increasing or decreasing
the quantity of food according to normal hunger.


THIRD DAY:

BREAKFAST

    Very ripe berries or a baked apple with a spoonful of cream
    A cup of hot water with a very little sugar and cream, or taken
      clear if desired
    Two extremely ripe bananas (must be black spotted), eaten with
      cream and either nuts or nut butter
    One or two eggs whipped or taken whole in orange juice

LUNCHEON

    A cup or two of chocolate, with thin cream
    A whole wheat gem or a corn-meal gem
    A tablespoonful of wheat bran

DINNER

    A salad of lettuce or endive, with nuts
    A large, boiled Spanish onion
    Two medium-sized baked sweet or white potatoes
    Fish or chicken
    One glass of water


FOURTH DAY: Same as the third.


FIFTH DAY: Same as the first, repeating these menus for a week or ten
days as here given. The menus may be varied according to vegetables,
fruits, and berries that may come into market as the season advances.


SUMMER MENU


_RUN-DOWN CONDITION FLATULENCY--UNDERWEIGHT_

    MENU I                             MENU II

BREAKFAST

    Peaches with cream                 Cantaloup or Japanese  plums
    One exceedingly ripe banana         Two tablespoonfuls of nuts,
      with cream and nut                 masticated to exceeding
      butter, and one fig or two         fineness; eat with bananas
      dates                              and soaked prunes
    Two eggs, whipped; mix             A large cup of junket or
      with a pint of milk                buttermilk
    Wheat bran                         Wheat bran

LUNCHEON

    Choice of okra, parsnips,          A green salad
      or carrots                       Choice of onions, squash,
    A white potato or corn on cob       beans, carrots, or beets
    One glass of water                 A white potato
                                       One glass of water

DINNER

    Fish or junket                     Any two of the following:
    A baked potato eaten with            Beans, corn, sweet potato,
      butter                             squash, or onions
    Onions, squash, beans, or          One egg, boiled two minutes
      corn                               (chicken, if preferred)
    A green salad with nuts            A potato
    A Japanese persimmon or a          A salad with a few nuts
      cantaloup

The above menus are composed of the fewest number of articles that will
supply the nutritive elements required. They may be increased according
to normal hunger, but the combinations should be observed.


FALL MENU


_RUN-DOWN CONDITION FLATULENCY--UNDERWEIGHT_

FIRST DAY: On rising, drink two cups of hot water. Also eat half a
pound of grapes, and devote from three to five minutes to exercises
Nos. 3 and 5. (See Vol. V, pp. 1344 and 1345.)

BREAKFAST

    Corn bread or a baked white potato
    One extremely ripe banana, eaten with thin cream, nut butter,
     and a few raisins
    Cocoa or milk

LUNCHEON

    Choice of carrots, parsnips, squash, or any fresh vegetable
    A baked sweet potato

DINNER

    A salad of anything green
    Any two of the following:
    [C] Boiled onions, string beans, carrots, squash, parsnips, turnips,
      or pumpkin
    A baked potato
    A very small portion of fish or white meat of chicken. (If neither
      of these are convenient, an egg cooked two minutes may be
      substituted.)

Eggs, buttermilk, or cheese are preferable to fish or chicken, but the
latter may be used to bring up the proteid balance, when the former
articles cannot be procured.

[C] Some one of these vegetables should be made very hot with red
pepper for the purpose of exciting stomach and intestinal peristalsis.

A glass of water should be drunk at each of these meals.


SECOND DAY: The same as the first, increasing or decreasing the
quantity of food according to normal hunger. Do not overeat.


THIRD DAY: The same as the second.

No doubt the symptoms the first two or three days will be that of
weakness and emptiness. This will pass away during the week. There is
ample nourishment in the articles prescribed to sustain the body even
under strenuous physical labor, but these combinations of food may not
be well assimilated the first few days.


FOURTH DAY:

BREAKFAST

    A cup of hot water
    One whole egg cooked two minutes
    Whole wheat muffins
    A cup of chocolate

LUNCHEON

    A salad
    A portion of tender fish or two glasses of milk
    A baked potato or a whole wheat gem
    A cup of hot water

DINNER

    A bit of green salad
    Choice of fish, eggs, or buttermilk
    One fresh vegetable--preferably string beans made very hot with
      red pepper
    A baked white potato
    (A liberal portion of spinach could be eaten at this meal)
    A cup of hot water

Wheat bran or a few Concord grapes just before retiring.


FIFTH DAY: The same as the fourth.


SIXTH DAY: The same as the first.


SEVENTH DAY: The same as the second and so on, for a period of about
fifteen days.


WINTER MENU


_RUN-DOWN CONDITION_

_FLATULENCY--UNDERWEIGHT_

It is well to remember that the best nourished person is the one who
subsists upon the fewest number of things that will give to the body
the required amount and character of nutrition.

       *       *       *       *       *

Two glasses of cool water on rising, and the juice of a sweet orange.
Devote as much time as possible to vigorous deep breathing exercises
before an open window.


    MENU I                            MENU II

BREAKFAST

    A cup of hot water               A spoonful or two of bran,
    A spoonful or two of wheat         cooked
      bran, cooked; serve with       Whole wheat gems with nut
      thin cream                       butter
    Whole wheat gems eaten           One egg, boiled two minutes
      with nuts or nut butter        A glass of milk or a cup
    A cup of milk, cocoa, or           of cocoa
      chocolate

LUNCHEON

    Three or four glasses of milk Three or four eggs, whipped,
    Half a cup of wheat bran        into which put a teaspoonful
      Or                            of sugar to each
    Baked white potatoes            egg, and a flavor of lemon
    Butter                          juice, omitting milk
                                  A cup of water
                                  The juice of an orange an
                                    hour later

DINNER

    Carrots, squash, or boiled    Turnips, carrots, or beets--any
      onions--any two of these      two or all of these
    A baked potato                A baked potato
    One egg                       Fish
    A cup of milk or chocolate    A baked banana eaten with
                                    cream, and something sweet if desired

A baked omelet may be used now and then. (See recipe, p. 678.)

For "Choice of Menus," see p. 683.





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