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Title: Uncle Wiggily's Auto Sled - or How Mr. Hedgehog Helped Him Get Up the Slippery Hill and How Uncle Wiggily Made a Snow Pudding. Also What Happened in the Snow Fort
Author: Garis, Howard Roger
Language: English
As this book started as an ASCII text book there are no pictures available.
Copyright Status: Not copyrighted in the United States. If you live elsewhere check the laws of your country before downloading this ebook. See comments about copyright issues at end of book.

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UNCLE WIGGILY’S AUTO SLED

Or

How Mr. Hedgehog Helped Him Get Up the Slippery
Hill and How Uncle Wiggily Made Snow
Pudding. Also What Happened in
the Snow Fort.

[Illustration]


Text by

HOWARD R. GARIS

Author of Three Little Trippertrots and Bed Time Stories

Pictured by Lang Campbell



Charles E. Graham & Co.
Newark, N.J.      ——      New York


       *       *       *       *       *

    IF YOU LIKE THIS FUNNY LITTLE PICTURE BOOK ABOUT THE
         BUNNY RABBIT GENTLEMAN YOU MAY BE GLAD
                TO KNOW THERE ARE OTHERS.


So if the spoon holder doesn’t go down cellar and take the coal shovel
away from the gas stove, you may read

     1 UNCLE WIGGILY’S AUTO SLED.
     2 UNCLE WIGGILY’S SNOW MAN.
     3 UNCLE WIGGILY’S HOLIDAYS.
     4 UNCLE WIGGILY’S APPLE ROAST.
     5 UNCLE WIGGILY’S PICNIC.
     6 UNCLE WIGGILY GOES FISHING.
     7 UNCLE WIGGILY’S JUNE BUG FRIENDS.
     8 UNCLE WIGGILY’S VISIT TO THE FARM.
     9 UNCLE WIGGILY’S SILK HAT.
    10 UNCLE WIGGILY, INDIAN HUNTER.
    11 UNCLE WIGGILY’S ICE CREAM PARTY.
    12 UNCLE WIGGILY’S WOODLAND GAMES.

Every book has three stories, including the title story.

[Illustration: Handwritten: Uncle Wiggily]

Made in U. S. A.

Copyright 1919 McClure Newspaper Syndicate. Trade mark registered.
Copyright 1920, 1922 Charles E. Graham & Co., Newark, N. J., and New York.

       *       *       *       *       *


[Illustration]

One day Uncle Wiggily Longears took Nurse Jane Fuzzy Wuzzy for an auto
ride. “I suppose a sleigh ride would be more stylish,” spoke Uncle
Wiggily, “but I have no cutter.” Nurse Jane said the auto would suit
her very well, and away they went. But soon they came to the bottom of
a steep and slippery hill. “Will the auto go up?” asked Nurse Jane.
“Oh, I guess so,” answered Uncle Wiggily, but it did not. The wheels
slipped and skidded. “Oh, dear!” cried Nurse Jane. “What shall we do?”
Uncle Wiggily also wondered.

[Illustration]

After trying two or three times to get up the ice-covered hill, and
finding his wheels kept slipping, Uncle Wiggily said: “I will try a
new plan.” “Are you going to put chains on?” asked Nurse Jane. “I have
none, or I would,” said Mr. Longears. “But I’ll try going up the hill
backwards.” So the auto was turned around and Uncle Wiggily tried it
that way. But the wheels whizzed around, and the auto stayed in the
same place—at the foot of the hill. “We shall never get anywhere at
this rate,” said Nurse Jane.

[Illustration]

“Are you pushing, Nurse Jane?” cried Uncle Wiggily, as he turned on
more gasolene. “Are you pushing?” The muskrat lady, who had gotten out
and was in back of the auto, answered: “Am I pushing? Well, I should
say I was! Aren’t we going up the hill?” Uncle Wiggily gave a look. “We
aren’t going up a bit,” he answered. With all Nurse Jane’s pushing, the
auto seemed to be slipping back instead of going ahead. “What shall
we do?” asked the muskrat lady. “I don’t know,” sadly answered Uncle
Wiggily.

[Illustration]

“What’s the matter, Uncle Wiggily?” asked Jackie. “Won’t your auto go
up the hill?” The rabbit gentleman shook his head. “We can’t get up,”
he said. “Maybe we could help,” offered Peetie. The two Bow Wow doggie
boys had come along with their sleds to coast on the hill. “Thank you
for offering, but how could you help get Uncle Wiggily’s auto up?”
asked Nurse Jane. “He could put our sleds under the front wheels,” said
Jackie, “and then he would have an auto sled. Maybe it would go up
easier then.”

[Illustration]

“It was very kind of you to offer me your sleds,” said Uncle Wiggily
to Jackie and Peetie. The sleds of the doggie boys were tied to the
two front wheels of the auto with ropes. “Now we will surely go up the
hill!” said Nurse Jane. So they all got in the machine again, and Uncle
Wiggily started off. But alas! Once more the back wheels spun around
like an alarm clock. “Oh, we shall never get up,” said Nurse Jane. “And
I am afraid something is going to happen! Suppose the Pipsisewah and
Skeezicks come along now?”

[Illustration]

“What did I tell you!” cried the Pipsisewah to the Skeezicks. “This is
our lucky day.” The Skee sort of wrinkled up his nose preposterous like
and remarked: “Lucky day? What do you mean?” The Pipsisewah, with his
paw, pointed to Uncle Wiggily, Nurse Jane and Jackie and Peetie Bow
Wow, still in the auto sled at the foot of the hill. “That is what I
mean—souse!” grunted the Pip. “There is Uncle Wiggily at the foot of a
slippery hill. He can’t get up, and we can catch him. Are you with me?”
The Skee said: “Yes!”

[Illustration]

“What seems to be the trouble, Uncle Wiggily?” asked Mr. Prickly
Porcupine Hedgehog, as he came walking along. “What’s the matter?” Mr.
Longears stopped the wheels from spinning. “The matter is this hill is
so slippery we can’t get up. Our wheels skid, even though the boys’
sleds are in front.” Mr. Hedgehog gave a sneeze. “I can help you.”
“How, if you please?” asked Nurse Jane. “I have a lot of loose, sharp
quills, like horseshoe nails,” answered Mr. Porcupine. “Fasten them to
your wheels.”

[Illustration]

“It is very lucky you came along, Mr. Hedgehog,” said Uncle Wiggily,
as, with the doggie boys to help, the rabbit gentleman tied some of the
loose, sharp quills around the rear wheels of his auto. “Yes, I am glad
I had plenty of loose quills,” spoke the porcupine gentleman. “They
will be the same as a lot of stickery spikes and your wheels won’t slip
any more. Take a few more quills, and I have another ball of cord.” But
Uncle Wiggily had enough string. “Oh, hurry!” squeaked the Squiggle
Bugs.

[Illustration]

Just as Uncle Wiggily, Jackie and Peetie finished putting the sharp,
stickery quills of Mr. Hedgehog Porcupine on the auto wheels, along
came the Pipsisewah and Skeezicks. “We want souse!” they cried. But the
rabbit gentleman and his friends jumped into the auto sled, and away
they went. The wheels did not skim around because the stickery quills
caught on the ice, and they sent up a shower of frozen splinters into
the faces of the two bad chaps. “Hurray! now we are safe!” cried the
jolly Squiggle Bugs, and all was well.

    And if the Parrot doesn’t go fishing with the lollypop
        stick, and catch the Canary Bird when it’s
       playing tag with the loaf of bread, the next
            pictures and story will tell how

[Illustration]

Uncle Wiggily Made a Pudding, and the Skeezicks Came Around. But He Was
Quite Surprised to Find the Nutmegs Were Unground.

[Illustration]

“What are you going to do when you finish shoveling that path, Uncle
Wiggily?” asked Nurse Jane Fuzzy Wuzzy, the muskrat lady housekeeper.
“Oh, nothing special,” answered the bunny rabbit. “Then perhaps you
will take this pail of rice pudding over to Mr. Twistytail, the pig
gentleman?” asked Nurse Jane. “He isn’t feeling very well, and maybe
some rice pudding will do him good.” “I’ll take it over as soon as I
finish cleaning off the snow,” said the rabbit gentleman.

[Illustration]

“Well, where are you going, Floppy and Curly?” asked Uncle Wiggily, as
he met the two piggie boys with their snow plow when he was on his way
to take Nurse Jane’s rice pudding to Mr. Twistytail. “Oh, we were just
making a path to your bungalow,” answered Floppy. “Well, I am going to
your house, to take your father some rice pudding, because he is ill,”
said the rabbit gentleman. “Good!” grunted Floppy and Curly. “We’ll
ride you there on our snow plow.”

[Illustration]

Curly and Floppy gave Uncle Wiggily a nice ride to their pen-house.
When the rabbit gentleman saw Mr. Twistytail sitting near the fire,
wrapped in a bed quilt, and with his feet in a tub of hot water, Mr.
Longears was very sorry for his friend. “Eat some of Nurse Jane’s rice
pudding. That will make you feel better.” Mr. Twistytail gave Floppy
and Curly each a taste of the pudding. “Oh, I wish there was a whole
lot of it!” grunted Curly! and Floppy said the same thing. “I’ll make a
pudding,” promised Uncle Wiggily.

[Illustration]

“Oh, will you really make us a pudding?” asked Floppy. “I’ll make you
a snow pudding. Just ask your mother to let me take some eggs, sugar,
molasses, nutmeg and a few things like that. Then I’ll easily make a
snow pudding.” Curly and Floppy clapped their feet in delight. “But
our mother isn’t home,” said Floppy. She went to the store for some
medicine for Daddy’s cold. Mr. Longears said Mrs. Twistytail didn’t
really need to be home. “We’ll go to the kitchen and make the pudding
ourselves,” he added.

[Illustration]

“Let me see now,” said Uncle Wiggily, as the pudding was almost
finished. “I have put in the sugar, milk, eggs and cocoanut. And you
put in the snow, to make it like ice cream, didn’t you, Curly, my boy?”
The little piggie chap said he had put in plenty of snow. “And now I
have forgotten how to put in the nutmegs to make the pudding spicy. I
forget whether you put them in whole like hickorynuts, or grate them up
fine, like powder. I really have forgotten. I guess I’ll put them in
whole.”

[Illustration]

At last the snow pudding was finished. Uncle Wiggily dropped into it
the box full of whole, hard, round nutmegs. “They ought to give it a
fine flavor—just like lemonade,” said the rabbit gentleman, as he set
the pudding out in the snow of the back porch to cool and freeze, like
ice cream. Curly and Floppy were sure they would. “We’ll give daddy
some of the nice snow pudding when he wakes up,” said Floppy. “And
we’ll save some to give mother when she comes home,” spoke Curly.

[Illustration]

“Hello! What have we here?” asked the Pipsisewah, as he and the
Skeezicks jumped over the snow drift and sneaked up to the piggie boys’
house. The Skeezicks gave a grunt: “I was just wondering that myself.
I saw Uncle Wiggily set it out. It must be something good.” They took
a sniff and the Pip cried: “It’s a pudding! Hurray! Lucky I have this
long-handled spoon! I’ll dip it in and we’ll take turns eating this
pudding. If we can’t get Uncle Wiggily’s souse we’ll have his pudding.
Come on!”

[Illustration]

“Here you are, my friend,” said the Pipsisewah, as he dipped up a
large spoonful of the snow pudding, and held it out toward the skinny
Skeezicks. “Have a big bite.” The Skeezicks saw something dropping from
the spoon the Pip had just used. “What are those things?” asked the
Skee. “Oh, just large, fat juicy raisins, I guess,” the Pip answered.
“Take a hard bite now, and I’ll do the same.” As the Pip and Skee were
eating the pudding Uncle Wiggily opened the door and saw them. He and
the boys were surprised.

[Illustration]

“Ha! Ha!” laughed Uncle Wiggily as he saw the Pip and Skee run away.
“Ho! Ho! That’s the time I fooled them!” They saw the bad chaps running
away, holding their jaws. “They bit too hard on the nutmegs in our
pudding,” said the bunny rabbit. “I remember, now, I should have grated
the nutmeg. It’s just as well I didn’t, or else the Pip and the Skee
would have eaten it all. I can pick out the whole nutmegs, grate one,
and our pudding will be as good as ever.” And it was.

    Now if the lemonade doesn’t slip on the butter knife, and
        fall downstairs when the teacup is trying to dance
             in the sugar bowl, the next pictures and
                      story will tell how

[Illustration]

The Bad Pip, Skee and Fox Chased Uncle Wiggily and the Bunny Thought
Surely He Would Be Caught. But the Snow Fort Saved Him.

[Illustration]

Uncle Wiggily Longears, the bunny rabbit gentleman, was out walking
in the snow-covered fields one day, when he met Sammie and Susie
Littletail, the two rabbit children, and Johnnie and Billie Bushytail,
the two squirrel brothers. “Where are you going, Uncle Wiggily?” asked
Susie. “Oh, just to look for an adventure,” replied Mr. Longears.
“Don’t you want to come?” They started, Uncle Wiggily holding Susie’s
paw, the boys throwing snowballs. “I’d like to see the bad Pipsisewah
or Skeezicks now!” said Billie.

[Illustration]

“Why do you want to see the Pipsisewah or Skeezicks, Billie?” asked
Johnnie, the other squirrel boy. “Oh, so I could throw snowballs at
’em!” answered Billie, “and pay them back for trying to get Uncle
Wiggily’s souse.” The bunny rabbit made some holes in the snow with
his red, white and blue-striped rheumatism crutch, and then, all of a
sudden, Susie cried: “Well, you have you wish, Billie Bushytail! Look,
there’s the Skeezicks now, and the Pipsisewah and bad fox are with him!
Oh! Oh! What shall we do?”

[Illustration]

When Uncle Wiggily saw the bad Pipsisewah, the Skeezicks and the fuzzy
fox, the rabbit gentleman said: “Come on! We must run as fast as we can
to get away from these creatures!” And Uncle Wiggily ran, pulling Susie
along by her paw. Johnnie and Billie scampered along. “Take your white
handkerchief off that stick, Sammie!” called Billie to the rabbit boy.
“Else they’ll think we have surrendered, and we haven’t—we’re going to
fight ’em! Take down the white flag!”

[Illustration]

“Run along, children, run along!” cried Uncle Wiggily. Sammie and
Susie and Johnnie and Billie ran over the hard, cold water of a frozen
brook. “What are you going to do, Uncle Wiggily?” asked Susie, when the
little rabbit girl was safe on the other side of the brook. “I’m going
to make a hole in the ice so the Pip, the Skee and the fox can’t cross
and get us, I hope.” With his crutch he made a hole in the ice. But the
Pip, Skee and fox had not given up the chase. On they came, faster and
faster.

[Illustration]

After Uncle Wiggily had chopped a hole in the ice with his crutch, he
ran on with the animal children. But Susie, looking back, cried: “Oh,
Uncle Wiggily! See what they’re doing!” And, surely enough, the bad
chaps had pulled some boards off a fence, and, making a bridge of them,
they crossed the hole in the ice and still kept on after Uncle Wiggily
and the animal children. “We must have our souse to-day,” said the Pip;
also the Skee, and the funny fox joined in the chorus.

[Illustration]

“Oh, Uncle Wiggily!” cried Susie, after she had run on a little
farther, after the Pip, Skee and fox had crossed the ice on the fence
boards. “Oh, Uncle Wiggily, I can’t go another step!” “I’ll carry you!”
said the brave rabbit gentleman. “We won’t leave you behind, Susie, for
the bad Pipsisewah!” Susie cuddled down in Uncle Wiggily’s warm, fur
coat. Billie threw a snowball at the bad chaps. All of a sudden Sammie
cried: “Oh, if we can reach the old snow fort we made last week, maybe
we will be saved!”

[Illustration]

Running fast, Uncle Wiggily and his little animal friends reached the
old snow fort before the Pip, Skee and fox could catch them. But the
bad chaps still came on. “Quick, now!” cried Uncle Wiggily, “we must
get ready to snowball the bad chaps!” Susie made herself a little red
cross from a piece of Johnnie’s red neckerchief, and Sammie gave his
sister his white handkerchief to tear up into bandages in case any of
them should be hurt in the battle soon to take place. “We want souse!”
howled the Pip.

[Illustration]

“Come on now!” cried the Pip to the Skee and fox. “We must charge on
them in the fort! We must capture Uncle Wiggily!” The Skee and fox ran
up the hill with the Pip. “Ouch! Wouch!” cried the Skee. “Some one
hit me in the eye with a snowball!” Uncle Wiggily had made a lot of
snowballs for the animal boys to throw at the enemy. “Bang away! Bang
away!” cried brave Uncle Wiggily. “Hurray! Hurray! Hurray!” shouted the
boys, while Red Cross Nurse Susie was all ready with rolls of bandages.

[Illustration]

The boys throw so many hard snowballs over the wall of the fort at the
Pip, Skee and fox, that the bad animals were glad enough to run away.
“Oh, wow! Come on out of this!” howled the Pip to the Skee, and down
the hill they ran. “Hoist the flag! We’ve won the fight!” cried Sammie.
He made a banner from red and blue pieces of Billie’s and Johnnie’s
neckerchiefs and pieces of white from his own handkerchief. A hole was
in Uncle Wiggily’s hat, but Susie bandaged it up. The snow fort saved
Uncle Wiggily.

[Illustration]

When you have finished reading this nice little book, perhaps you would
like to read a larger volume about Uncle Wiggily.

If so, go to the book store and ask the Man for one of the Uncle
Wiggily Bedtime Story Books, they have a lot of Funny Pictures in and
31 stories—one for every night in the month. If the book store man has
none of these volumes ask him to get you one or send direct to the
Publishers,

    A. L. BURT COMPANY,
    114 EAST 23rd STREET
    NEW YORK CITY

[Illustration]

    LOOK
    HERE!

    UNCLE WIGGILY
    HAS A MESSAGE FOR _YOU_

Dear Boys and Girls:—

I know you will like this little book, and I want to tell you something
else that my author-father, Mr. Garis, has done for you. He has made
a wonderful game, played on a big, beautiful, colored board. It’s all
about me and he calls it

    The Uncle Wiggily Game

It is sold by all stores and toy-dealers. Ask for _The Uncle Wiggily
Game_.

                                   Yours for happy hours,
                                                   Uncle Wiggily

                                       [Illustration: HIS MARK]



       *       *       *       *       *



Transcriber’s note:

Obvious punctuation errors were corrected.

Correction: “ouselves” changed to “ourselves” (make the pudding
ourselves)





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