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Title: Motorcycle, Solo (Harley-Davidson Model WLA) Technical Manual No. 9-879
Author: Department, United States War
Language: English
As this book started as an ASCII text book there are no pictures available.
Copyright Status: Not copyrighted in the United States. If you live elsewhere check the laws of your country before downloading this ebook. See comments about copyright issues at end of book.

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[Illustration: Cover]

[1]TM 9-879

RESTRICTED

  TECHNICAL MANUAL}              WAR DEPARTMENT
       No. 9-879  } Washington, 18 October 1943



MOTORCYCLE, SOLO

(Harley‐Davidson Model WLA)

  _Dissemination of restricted matter.—The information contained
  in restricted documents, and the essential characteristics of
  restricted materiel, may be given to any person known to be in the
  service of the United States, and to persons of undoubted loyalty
  and discretion who are cooperating in Government work, but will not
  be communicated to the public or to the press except by authorized
  military public relations agencies._ (_See also paragraph 18b, AR
  380-5, 28 September 1942._)



CONTENTS


PART ONE—VEHICLE OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

                                               Paragraphs  Pages

  SECTION   I Introduction                           1-2       3-6

           II Description and tabulated data         3-4       7-8

          III Controls and operation                5-13      9-19

           IV First echelon, preventive
                maintenance services               14-18     20-29

            V Lubrication                          19-20     30-34

           VI Tools and equipment stowage
                on the vehicle                     21-23     35-38


PART TWO—ORGANIZATIONAL MAINTENANCE

  SECTION VII Maintenance allocation               24-25     39-44

         VIII Second echelon preventive
                maintenance services                  26     45-59

           IX Organization tools and equipment        27        60

            X Trouble shooting                     28-38     61-71

           XI Engine                               39-44     72-77

          XII Engine—removal and installation      45-46     78-84

         XIII Clutch                               47-52     85-95

          XIV Transmission                         53-58    96-104

           XV Chains and sprockets                 59-66   105-114

          XVI Fuel system                          67-74   115-121

         XVII Intake and exhaust system            75-81   122-128

        XVIII Ignition system                      82-89   129-141

          XIX Generating system                    90-95   142-148

           XX Brake system                         96-97   149-153

          XXI Steering control                    98-101   154-166

         XXII Sheet metal and equipment          102-111   167-180

        XXIII Battery, lighting system, horn     112-118   181-190

         XXIV Instrument panel                   119-121   191-192

          XXV Tires, wheels, and hubs            122-127   193-199

  REFERENCES                                                   200

  INDEX                                                        201

[Footnote 1: For supersession of quartermaster manuals, refer to
paragraph 2.]



PART ONE—OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS



Section I

INTRODUCTION


                                         Paragraph
  Scope                                      1
  Supersession of quartermaster manuals      2


1. SCOPE.

=a.= This technical manual[2] is published for the information and
guidance of the using arm personnel charged with the operation,
maintenance, and minor repair of this materiel.

=b.= In addition to a description of the Harley‐Davidson motorcycle,
this manual contains technical information required for the
identification, use, and care of the materiel. The manual is divided
into two parts. Part One, section I through section VI, gives vehicle
operating instructions. Part Two, section VII through section XXV,
gives vehicle maintenance instructions to using arm personnel charged
with the responsibility of doing maintenance work within their
jurisdiction.

=c.= In all cases where the nature of the repair, modifications,
or adjustment is beyond the scope or facilities of the unit, the
responsible ordnance service should be informed so that trained
personnel with suitable tools and equipment may be provided, or proper
instructions issued.


2. SUPERSESSION OF QUARTERMASTER MANUALS.

=a.= This technical manual, together with TM 9-1879, supersedes and
replaces the following Quartermaster Corps publications:

  (1) TM 10-1175—Maintenance manual, motorcycle, solo,
  Harley‐Davidson (Model 42-WLA), 11 September 1941.

  (2) TM 10-1177—Maintenance manual, motorcycle, solo,
  Harley‐Davidson (Models 1940-41-42), 11 September 1941.

  (3) TM 10-1331—Maintenance manual, motorcycle, chain drive
  Harley‐Davidson (Model 42 WLA, solo).

  (4) TM 10-1359—Instruction folder (45-A) motorcycles, solo,
  Harley‐Davidson (Model 1941 WLA 45), 25 November 1941.

  (5) TM 10-1361—Instruction folder (45-B) motorcycle, solo,
  Harley‐Davidson (Model 1941 WLA 45), 25 November 1941.


[Illustration: RA PD 315708

_Figure 1—Top View of Motorcycle_]

[Illustration: RA PD 315709

_Figure 2—Left Side View of Motorcycle_]

[Illustration: RA PD 315710

_Figure 3—Right Side View of Motorcycle_]


[Footnote 2: To provide operating instructions with the materiel, this
technical manual has been published in advance of complete technical
review. Any errors or omissions will be corrected by changes or, if
extensive, by an early revision.]



Section II

DESCRIPTION AND TABULATED DATA


                 Paragraph
  Description        3
  Data               4


3. DESCRIPTION (figs. 1, 2, and 3).

=a.= This 2‐cylinder solo motorcycle is powered by a V‐type, air‐cooled
gasoline engine, operating on conventional 4‐stroke, 4‐cycle
principles. Air‐cooled engines rely upon movement of air over cylinder
and head radiating fins, and upon circulation of oil for dissipation
of excessive heat. Motorcycle engines, therefore, under no conditions
should be operated for more than 1 minute when motorcycle is not in
motion.


4. DATA.

=a. Vehicle Specifications.=

  Type of engine            2‐cylinder, V‐type L‐head, air‐cooled
  Cylinder bore                                             2-3/4 in.
  Stroke                                                  3-13/16 in.
  Engine number (serial) left side engine base,
    below front cylinder.
  Wheelbase                                           4 ft 11-1/2 in.
  Length over‐all                                         7 ft 4 in.
  Width over‐all (handle bars)                            3 ft 5 in.
  Wheel size                                                   18 in.
  Tire size                                             4.00 × 18 in.
  Tire type                                              Drop center
  Weight of vehicle (without rider or armament)               540 lb.
  Ground clearance (skid plate)                                 4 in.
  Kind and grade of fuel               Gasoline: 72 octane or higher
  High gear ratio                                             4.59:1
  Engine sprocket                                          31‐tooth
  Countershaft sprocket                                    17‐tooth
  Rear wheel sprocket                                      41‐tooth

=b. Performance.=

  Maximum allowable speed                                     65 mph
  Miles per gallon (hard surface)                                 35
  Cruising range (without refill)                          100 miles
  Fording depth (carburetor)                                   18 in.

=c. Capacities.=

  Fuel capacity (left tank)                           3-3/8 U.S. gal
  Oil tank capacity (right tank)                      1-1/8 U.S. gal
  Transmission capacity                                       3/4 pt



Section III

CONTROLS AND OPERATION

                                     Paragraph
  Controls                               5
  Engine prestarting instructions        6
  Starting the engine                    7
  Stopping the engine                    8
  Operation of vehicle                   9
  Driving precautions                   10
  Stopping and parking vehicle          11
  Towing vehicle to start engine        12
  Running‐in new engine (or vehicle)   13

[Illustration: RA PD 310201

_Figure 4—Controls_]


5. CONTROLS (fig. 4).

=a.= Controls are peculiar to the motorcycle. The rider must become
thoroughly familiar with the location and use of all control devices
before attempting to operate vehicle.

=b. Gasoline Valve= (figs. 5 and 6). Gasoline valve is located in left
tank, forward. Valve is closed by turning to the right, finger tight.
Turning to left opens valve. Valve is in normal operating position
when turned to left, with valve head down. Lifting valve head releases
emergency supply of fuel (3 quarts).

[Illustration: RA PD 310202

_Figure 5—Fuel Supply Valve_]

[Illustration: RA PD 310293

_Figure 6—Fuel Supply Valve Positions_]

=c. Throttle.= The throttle is controlled by right handle bar grip.
Turning grip inward opens throttle, turning it outward closes throttle.

=d. Spark.= Spark is controlled by left handle bar grip. Turning grip
inward advances spark, turning it outward retards spark.

=e. Clutch= (fig. 7). Clutch is operated by left foot (rocker‐type)
pedal, connecting with steel cable, which actuates clutch release
lever. Pedal is located on left side of motorcycle above footboard.
Forward downward (toe) position of pedal engages clutch. Rear downward
(heel) position of pedal disengages clutch. Foot pedal provided with
friction device to retain it in either engaged or disengaged position.

[Illustration: RA PD 310204

_Figure 7—Clutch Pedal Positions_]

[Illustration: RA PD 310205

_Figure 8—Gear Shifter Lever Positions_]

=f. Service Brake (Rear Wheel).= Foot pedal is located on right side
of motorcycle at forward end of footboard.

=g. Auxiliary Brake (Front Wheel).= Auxiliary brake is operated by
hand lever located on left handle bar. It is used in conjunction with
service brake, as an emergency brake, or for holding vehicle while
starting engine on grade. CAUTION: _Brake is to be applied lightly and
cautiously on wet and slippery roads._

=h. Gear Shifter= (fig. 8). Shifter lever is located on left tank,
forward position, and operates within a guide. Shifter lever guide is
notched for positive location of gears and each position is identified,
front to rear: “1”—low gear; “N”—neutral; “2”—second gear; “3”—direct
high gear.

[Illustration: RA PD 310206

_Figure 9—Carburetor Choke Lever Positions_]

=i. Steering Damper.= Steering damper is an adjustable friction
device to damper turning action of forks, steady front wheel, and
prevent wobble in rough terrain or at high speeds, and is located on
top of steering head in center of handle bars. Move handle to right to
apply desired friction.

=j. Foot Starter Crank= (fig. 1). The foot starter crank is located
on right side of motorcycle. Gear shifter lever must be in neutral
position, and clutch foot pedal in forward engaged position, before
using foot starter crank. Starter crank normally is in upward position.
Straddle motorcycle, place right foot on starter crank, and shift
weight of body for forceful downward crank operation to start engine.

=k. Ignition and Light Switch.= Earlier models are provided
with switch lock, later models are nonlocking. Switch is off in
straight‐forward position. First position to right is for engine
ignition only. Second position to right is for ignition and blackout
lights. To use vehicle service lights, depress button to turn switch to
third right position.

=l. Instrument Panel Signal Lights.= Instead of an ammeter and oil
pressure gage, signal lights indicate generator charging, and engine
oil pressure.

(1) Green light is located on left side of instrument panel. When
engine is running, and light is out, it indicates generator is charging.

(2) Red light is located on right side of instrument panel. When engine
is running, and light is out, it indicates engine oil is circulating.

=m. Carburetor Choke= (fig. 9). Choke lever is in full prime position
when all the way up, and in normal running position when all the way
down.


6. ENGINE PRESTARTING INSTRUCTIONS.

=a.= Before the engine is started, perform the Before‐operation Service
outlined in paragraph 15. Special care must be taken during starting
and warming‐up period to avoid unnecessary engine wear.

=b.= The rider must acquire correct motorcycle engine starting habits,
and learn to do the job the quickest, easiest, and most dependable way.
The following pointers will be helpful to the beginner as well as to a
seasoned rider:

(1) Mount (straddle) motorcycle to obtain firm grip on handle bars.

(2) Leave side stand (jiffy stand) outward to support vehicle while
operating foot starter crank with right foot.

(3) Engine starting will be benefited by use of front wheel,
hand‐operated brake, to prevent vehicle from rolling or shifting during
starting kicks. This is especially helpful if vehicle is parked on an
incline or on soft, uneven surface.

=c.= The procedure outlined below is preparatory to starting either
cold, warm, or hot engine:

(1) Place gear shifter lever in “N” (neutral) position (fig. 8).

(2) See that gasoline shut‐off valve is open (fig. 5).

(3) Engage clutch (fig. 7).

(4) Spark control (left) grip must be turned inward to fully advanced
position, or nearly so.

(5) Foot starter crank may travel 1/2 way downward before starting
engine. See that a full vigorous starter stroke is used. A vigorous
kick, using a full swing (not a jab) of right leg and hip, is correct
engine starting practice.


7. STARTING THE ENGINE.

=a.= Procedure for starting cold, warm, or hot motorcycle engines
differs. Therefore, following instructions are used with paragraph 6 c
to cover correct procedure in all three cases.

=b. Starting Cold Engine.= When vehicle has not been operated for
some time, and engine is normally cold, follow progressive procedure
for easiest starting.

(1) Set carburetor choke lever in full upward (closed) position.

(2) Open throttle wide by turning right grip inward as far as it will
go.

(3) Prime cylinders by operating foot starter crank one or two strokes.

(4) Set carburetor choke lever in 1/4 to 1/2 closed position for mild
weather starting: 3/4 closed (or leave fully choked) for extremely cold
weather starting. CAUTION: _It is only in extremely cold weather
that engine may start best with choke fully closed, and even then it
will have to be moved from this position immediately after engine is
started._

(5) Set throttle (right) grip to slightly open position.

(6) Turn ignition switch on, first right position.

(7) Start engine with vigorous strokes of foot starter crank.

(8) When engine starts, set throttle for moderate idling speed for
warming up, or until ready to set vehicle in motion. Do not race engine
unnecessarily.

(9) After engine warms up, and misfires due to an overrich mixture,
gradually move choke lever downward. After engine has thoroughly warmed
up, move choke lever to fully open (downward) position.

=c. Starting Warm Engine.= Following instructions apply to engine
when halfway between hot and cold. With engine in this condition,
carburetor choking must be handled cautiously.

(1) Lift choke lever to first upward position from normal (1/4 closed).

(2) Set throttle (right) grip to fully closed (outward) position.

(3) Operate foot starter crank one or two strokes.

(4) Set throttle grip to between 1/4 and 1/3 open position.

(5) Turn ignition switch on.

(6) Start engine with vigorous strokes of foot starter crank.

(7) Soon after engine starts, choke lever must be moved to fully open
(downward) position.

(8) Turn throttle grip to control idling speed of engine.

=d. Starting Hot Engine.= If engine has been shut off for only a
brief period and is near normal operating temperature, it is not
necessary to use carburetor choke lever. With some engines, depending
upon carburetor condition and adjustment, hot starting is easier and
more dependable if foot starter crank is operated one stroke before
turning ignition switch on.

(1) Close throttle grip by turning fully outward.

(2) Turn ignition switch on.

(3) Operate foot starter crank to start engine.

(4) When hot engine does not start readily after two or three strokes
of the foot starter crank, it is usually due to an overrich (flooded)
condition, and the proper procedure then is to open throttle wide so
that more air can enter: close throttle quickly after engine starts.
CAUTION: _After engine has warmed up to a normal operating temperature,
do not allow engine to stand idling for longer than a 1 minute
interval._

=e. Starting Engine with Dead Battery.= See paragraph 12.

=f. Behavior of Instrument Panel Signal Lights.= Function of
generator (green) signal light depends upon action of cut‐out
relay; engine oil pressure (red) signal light depends upon action
of oil feed pump. Rider must, therefore, thoroughly understand
operating characteristics of both signal lights to judge condition of
generator‐battery circuit and pressure in engine oil circulating system.

(1) When ignition light switch is turned to first (right) position,
preparatory to starting engine, both green and red signal lights should
go on. CAUTION: _When switch is turned on, immediately after engine has
been primed by cranking, red (oil pressure) signal light may not light
at once, but will light after a few seconds, due to oil pressure built
up by cranking, and is most likely to be noticed in cold weather._

(2) With engine started and running at medium idling speed, both signal
lights should go off. CAUTION: _Should oil pressure (red) signal light
fail to go off at speeds above idling, conditions must be brought to
attention of unit mechanic._

(3) At slow idle speed, or under approximately 20 miles per hour road
speed (in high gear), generator (green) signal light will normally
flash on and off, because at that speed generator voltage output is
very low and unsteady. CAUTION: _Should generator (green) signal
light fail to go off at speed above approximately 20 miles per hour,
generator is either not charging at all, or its current output is not
up to normal, and generator should be given attention at once._


8. STOPPING THE ENGINE.

=a.= Stop engine only by turning ignition and light switch to off
(straight‐ahead) position, to prevent discharge of battery through
spark coil primary circuit.


9. OPERATION OF VEHICLE.

=a. Starting on Level Ground.= The engine having been warmed up and
checked for satisfactory operation, the vehicle (with operator in
riding position) is put in motion as follows:

(1) Transfer body weight to right leg.

(2) Fold back side stand (jiffy stand).

(3) Disengage clutch by depressing clutch foot pedal with heel of left
foot.

(4) Shift gear shifter lever into “1” (low) gear position.

(5) Slowly engage clutch by depressing clutch foot pedal with toe of
left foot.

(6) When clutch starts to “take hold,” open throttle sufficiently to
maintain engine speed.

(7) Accelerate gradually to between 12 and 15 miles per hour in low
gear.

(8) Close throttle quickly.

(9) Disengage clutch.

(10) Shift through “N” (neutral) position into “2” (second) gear.

(11) Reengage clutch and accelerate to about 25 miles per hour.

(12) Close throttle quickly.

(13) Disengage clutch.

(14) Shift into “3” (high) gear.

(15) Reengage clutch and accelerate to desired speed.

=b. Starting on Uneven or Soft Ground.=

(1) If standing on an incline or in loose, heavy ground, more engine
power will be required to start vehicle without stalling engine.

(2) It may be necessary to keep vehicle from rolling by keeping
pressure on front brake hand lever. Brake pressure is released after
vehicle starts in forward motion.

(3) Open throttle and engage clutch at same time to provide power
needed for starting, without racing engine unnecessarily.

(4) Motorcycle starts should be made without excessive application of
power, with consequent unnecessary spinning of rear wheel.


10. DRIVING PRECAUTIONS.

=a.= Practice will enable a rider to judge at what rate of speed the
motorcycle should be moving before he shifts from a lower to higher
gear, and engine should never be permitted to labor unduly, when a
shift of gears, higher to lower, would improve operation.

(1) Operator must not look down at gear shifter when shifting gears,
but keep his eyes on the road ahead. Do not ride the clutch. The
operator’s foot should rest on clutch foot pedal only when he is
operating it. When shifting gears, disengage clutch fully to avoid gear
damage and shifting difficulties. CAUTION: _Many transmissions are
ruined through failure to disengage clutch fully when shifting gears._

=b. Braking.= Rear wheel service brake must be in such condition that
medium‐hard application will cause rear wheel to lock. Application of
service brake should be gradual, with just enough force to accomplish
desired result.

(1) Auxiliary front wheel brake, when used in conjunction with service
brake, must be applied with caution, especially on wet, muddy, or
slippery roads.

(2) After passing through water, the brakes should be set slightly, and
the vehicle operated for a short distance, until sufficient heat has
been generated to dry the brakes.

=c. Avoid Low Gear Operation.= Always operate vehicle in highest gear
possible, consistent with tactical situation, speed required, power
required, and kind and nature of road substance, to prevent overheating
of engine.

=d. High Speed Tips.= Only experienced riders should indulge in
high‐speed riding. A motorcycle operated for long distances at high
speed must be given closer than ordinary attention to avoid serious
engine overheating with consequent damage. For better motorcycle
service, apply the following suggestions:

(1) Develop habit of frequently snapping throttle shut for an instant
when running at high speed. This draws additional lubrication to piston
and cylinder and assists in cooling engine.

(2) In cool weather, operate engine slowly until it is thoroughly
warmed up, to avoid damage to pistons, rings, cylinders, and other
parts before oil is warm enough to circulate freely.

(3) If handle bar windshield and leg shields are used, engine is
more likely to overheat with continued high‐speed riding. Watch this
carefully.

(4) Adjust “steering damper” for best control of motorcycle consistent
with riding speed and condition and nature of road.


11. STOPPING AND PARKING VEHICLE.

=a. Stopping Vehicle.= Rider will make a “restart” easier and quicker
if he will apply the following instructions upon stopping vehicle:

(1) Close throttle.

(2) Disengage clutch.

(3) Apply brake (or brakes) to slow vehicle without sliding rear tire.

(4) Just before coming to a complete stop, shift into “N” (neutral)
position and engage clutch. CAUTION: _If immediate restart is to be
made, shift into “1” (low) gear and allow clutch foot pedal to remain
in disengaged position. (Rider will be mounted on motorcycle with
engine running.)_

(5) Continue brake application to complete stop.

(6) After vehicle slows to point where it can no longer be balanced by
steering, place left foot on ground to maintain balance until right
foot can be removed from brake operating pedal. CAUTION: _Do not idle
engine longer than 1 minute._

(7) Stop engine by turning ignition switch off.

=b. Parking Vehicle.=

(1) Lean motorcycle on side (jiffy) stand.

(2) Shift into “1” (low) gear.

(3) Engage clutch so vehicle cannot roll.

(4) Shut off gasoline supply by turning valve (to right) finger‐tight
against its seat.


12. TOWING VEHICLE TO START ENGINE.

=a.= In emergencies when engine cannot be started with foot starter
crank, it can be started by towing the motorcycle.

(1) Set gear shifter lever in “2” (second) gear position.

(2) Disengage clutch.

(3) Choke carburetor.

(4) Turn ignition switch on.

(5) After momentum of the towed motorcycle reaches between 10 and 15
miles per hour, engage clutch, and continue procedure until engine
starts.

=b. Engine Starting with Dead Battery.= Emergency engine starting
with dead battery can be effected by making use of freshly charged
battery, or by towing as outlined above. If vehicle with dead battery
is to be towed for engine starting, proceed as follows:

(1) Disconnect battery negative wire from ground on right side of
motorcycle.

(2) Tow motorcycle for engine starting.

(3) After engine is started, reconnect battery ground wire to frame to
prevent damage to electrical system.


13. RUNNING‐IN NEW ENGINE (OR VEHICLE).

=a.= A new motorcycle engine or newly overhauled engine must be given
proper “break‐in” consideration for at least the first 1,000 to 1,200
miles of service. Failure to do this may result in damage that will put
engine out of active service within a short period of time.

=b.= At the first 250 miles, check front and rear drive chains to make
sure they are receiving required amount of oil for ample lubrication.
If necessary, have chain oilers adjusted by unit mechanic. Drive chains
must be inspected for correct adjustment, and be given attention by
unit mechanic as needed.

=c.= At first 500 miles, drain oil tank and refill with fresh oil.
Check front and rear chains (step b above). Thereafter, follow
instructions in Maintenance Operation section.

=d.= After a new motorcycle has been run 500 to 1,000 miles it needs
to be thoroughly checked over and any loose screws and nuts tightened.
Particular attention must be given engine and transmission mounting
bolts and nuts, and to rear wheel mounting socket screws.

=e.= Following pointers must be observed when running‐in new engine or
newly overhauled engine:

(1) Do not exceed 30 miles per hour during first 100 miles.

(2) Do not exceed 35 miles per hour during next 200 miles.

(3) Do not exceed 40 miles per hour during next 400 miles.

(4) Do not exceed 50 miles per hour during next 500 miles.

(5) Avoid use of low gears during break‐in operation as much as
possible.



Section IV

FIRST ECHELON PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE SERVICES

                                       Paragraph
  Purpose                                  14
  Before‐operation service                15
  During‐operation service                16
  At‐halt service                         17
  After‐operation and weekly service      18


14. PURPOSE.

=a.= To insure mechanical efficiency it is necessary that the vehicle
be systematically inspected at intervals each day it is operated and
weekly, so that defects may be discovered and corrected before they
result in serious damage or failure. Certain scheduled maintenance
services will be performed at these designated intervals. The services
set forth in this section are those performed by driver or crew before
operation, during operation, at halt, after operation, and weekly.

=b.= Driver preventive maintenance services are listed on the back of
“Driver’s Trip Ticket and Preventive Maintenance Service Record,” W.D.
Form No. 48, to cover vehicles of all types and models. Items peculiar
to specific vehicles, but not listed on W.D. Form No. 48, are covered
in manual procedures under the items to which they are related. Certain
items listed on the form that do not pertain to the vehicle involved
are eliminated from the procedures as written into the manual. Every
organization must thoroughly school each driver in performing the
maintenance procedures set forth in manuals, whether or not they are
listed specifically on W.D. Form No. 48.

=c.= The items listed on W.D. Form No. 48 that apply to this vehicle
are expanded in this manual to provide specific procedures for
accomplishment of the inspections and services. These services are
arranged to facilitate inspection and conserve the time of the driver,
and are not necessarily in the same numerical order as shown on W.D.
Form No. 48. The item numbers, however, are identical with those shown
on that form.

=d.= The general inspection of each item applies also to any supporting
member or connection, and generally includes a check to see whether the
item is in good condition, correctly assembled, secure, or excessively
worn.

(1) The inspection for “good condition” is usually an external visual
inspection to determine whether the unit is damaged beyond safe or
serviceable limits. The term “good condition” is explained further by
the following: not bent or twisted, not chafed or burned, not broken
or cracked, not bare or frayed, not dented or collapsed, not torn or
cut.

(2) The inspection of a unit to see that it is “correctly assembled”
is usually an external visual inspection to see whether it is in its
normal assembled position in the vehicle.

(3) The inspection of a unit to determine if it is “secure” is usually
an external visual examination, a hand‐feel, or a pry‐bar check for
looseness. Such an inspection should include any brackets, lock
washers, lock nuts, locking wires, or cotter pins used in assembly.

(4) “Excessively worn” will be understood to mean worn close to, or
beyond, serviceable limits, and likely to result in a failure if not
replaced before the next scheduled inspection.

=e.= Any defects or unsatisfactory operating characteristics beyond
the scope of first echelon to correct must be reported at the earliest
opportunity to the designated individual in authority.


15. BEFORE‐OPERATION SERVICE.

=a.= This inspection schedule is designed primarily as a check to see
that the vehicle has not been tampered with, or sabotaged since the
After‐operation Service was performed. Various combat conditions may
have rendered the vehicle unsafe for operation and it is the duty of
the driver to determine whether or not the vehicle is in condition to
carry out any mission to which it is assigned. This operation will not
be entirely omitted, even in extreme tactical situations.

=b. Procedures.= Before‐operation Service consists of inspecting
items listed below according to the procedure described, and correcting
or reporting any deficiencies. Upon completion of the service, results
should be reported promptly to the designated individual in authority.

(1) ITEM 1, TAMPERING AND DAMAGE. Look for any injury to vehicle in
general, its accessories or equipment, that may have been caused by
tampering, sabotage, collision, falling debris, or shell fire since
parking vehicle. Look for loosened or damaged accessories, loose fuel
or oil lines, or any disconnected linkage.

(2) ITEM 3, FUEL AND OIL. Inspect tanks for fuel and oil levels, add
oil and fuel as necessary. Any appreciable change in levels since
performing After‐operation Service should be investigated and reported
to designated authority.

(3) ITEM 4, ACCESSORIES AND DRIVES. Examine all accessories such
as carburetor, air cleaner, generator, and cut‐out relay for loose
connections, loose mountings, or leaks. Examine rear chain (final
drive) for free up‐and‐down movement (slack), midway between sprockets.
Total up‐and‐down movement must not be more than 1 inch, nor less than
1/2 inch. Inspect rear chain for adequate lubrication.

(4) ITEM 6, LEAKS, GENERAL. Examine vehicle and ground under vehicle
for indications of fuel or oil leaks. Normally a few drops of waste oil
from chains may be expected to drop from skid plate.

(5) ITEM 11, GLASS. Clean glass on instruments; clean and adjust rear
view mirror; inspect glass for breakage.

(6) ITEM 12, LAMPS. If tactical situation permits, observe whether
blackout and service lights operate with switch in its respective
positions, and go out when switched off. Also see that lights are
secure, and that lenses are clean and not broken. Observe whether both
filaments of service headlight operate when dimmer switch on left
handle bar is moved to its respective positions.

(7) ITEM 13, WHEELS, AXLE NUTS AND SCREWS. Examine rear wheel mounting
socket screws, front and rear axle nuts, and front fork rocker stud
nuts for tightness. Observe rear chain adjusting screws for secure
locking. Inspect spokes for good condition and tightness.

(8) ITEM 14, TIRES. Examine tires for cuts or imbedded objects in
treads or carcass. If time permits, check air pressure, which should be
18 pounds front, and 20 pounds rear (tires cold). Inspect valve caps
for presence and secure mounting.

(9) ITEM 15, SPRINGS AND SUSPENSION. Examine front fork springs for
secure mounting and good condition. Push down rear of saddle to test
for full action of saddle post spring.

(10) ITEM 16, STEERING AND HANDLE BAR CONTROLS. Test steering head
bearing adjustment by exerting strong upward pull at handle bar grips,
and observing whether or not there is any noticeable play in bearing.
Operate steering damper lever and observe that damper is compressed
before lever reaches right‐side position, and is fully released with
lever in left‐side position. Test handle bar grip controls for full,
free action; also test for complete opening and closing of throttle,
and full advance and retard of timer.

(11) ITEM 17, FENDERS (MUDGUARDS), LUGGAGE CARRIER, SAFETY GUARDS, AND
STANDS. Examine these items for good condition and secure mounting.

(12) ITEM 21, TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT. Inspect tools and equipment for
presence, serviceability, and proper stowage. (See tool list in par.
21.)

(13) ITEM 7, ENGINE WARM‐UP. Start engine, noting any tendency toward
hard starting, or improper action of foot starter crank. Set throttle
to moderate idle speed. Listen for unusual noises. Watch instrument
indications and engine performance, such as misfiring. CAUTION: _Do not
idle engine longer than 1 minute with vehicle standing_.

(14) ITEM 8, CHOKE. During idling of engine, reset choke as required to
prevent excessive choking and dilution of engine oil.

(15) ITEM 9, INSTRUMENTS. When switch is turned on and engine is idling
at moderate speed both red light (indicating oil pressure) and green
light (indicating generator action) should be out. At lower operating
speeds generator‐indicating light may flicker. CAUTION: _Do not operate
engine with red light on (no oil pressure)_.

(16) ITEM 10, HORN. Tactical situation permitting, test horn.

(17) ITEM 22, ENGINE OPERATION. Engine should idle smoothly. Accelerate
and decelerate, listening for any unusual noises that may indicate
compression or exhaust leaks, worn, damaged, loose, or inadequately
lubricated engine parts, or accessories. Note any unusual smoke from
exhaust.

(18) ITEM 23, DRIVER’S PERMIT, ACCIDENT REPORT FORM NO. 26, AND VEHICLE
MANUAL. These items must be present on vehicle and safely stowed.

(19) ITEM 25, DURING‐OPERATION SERVICE. The During‐operation Service
should start immediately after vehicle is put in motion, in the nature
of a road test.


16. DURING‐OPERATION SERVICE.

=a.= While vehicle is in motion, listen for any sounds such as rattles,
knocks, squeals, or hums that may indicate trouble. Be alert to detect
any odor of overheated components or units such as generator, brakes,
or clutch, fuel vapor from a leak in fuel system, exhaust gas, or other
signs of trouble. Any time the brakes are used, gears shifted, or
vehicle turned, consider this a test and notice any unsatisfactory or
unusual performance. Watch the instruments constantly. Notice promptly
any unusual instrument indication that may signify possible trouble in
system to which the instrument applies.

=b. Procedures.= During‐operation Service consists of observing
items listed below according to the procedures following each item,
and investigating any indications of serious trouble. Notice minor
deficiencies to be corrected or reported at earliest opportunity,
usually at next scheduled halt.

(1) ITEM 27, FOOT AND HAND BRAKES. The foot brake should operate
smoothly and effectively, leaving reserve pedal travel of 1 inch.
Normal free play before operation is 1 inch. Test hand brake lever for
free play, which should be 1/4 of total handle travel. Test for ease and
smoothness of operation.

(2) ITEM 28, CLUTCH. Inspect clutch for disengagement at about 1/2 pedal
travel. Clutch should not chatter, squeal, or slip.

(3) ITEM 29, TRANSMISSION. Gears should shift smoothly, operate
quietly, and not jump out of mesh during operation. If transmission
jumps out of mesh in any gear, this indicates need of shifter control
adjustment.

(4) ITEM 31, ENGINE AND CONTROLS. Be alert for deficiency in engine
performance such as lack of usual power, misfiring, unusual noise,
stalling, indication of engine overheating, or unusual exhaust smoke.
Notice whether engine responds to controls satisfactorily, whether
controls appear to be in proper adjustment and are sufficiently tight.

(5) ITEM 32, INSTRUMENTS. Observe instruments for indication of normal
functioning of systems to which they apply.

(_a_) _Speedometer and Odometer._ Speedometer should indicate vehicle
speed without excessive noise or fluctuation. Odometer should record
trip and total mileage.

(_b_) _Oil Pressure Signal Light._ Red light should be off during
operation. If light goes on, stop vehicle and investigate for oil
pressure failure.

(_c_) _Generator Signal Light._ Green light should be off above 20
miles per hour. Battery discharge is indicated by green light being on.

(6) ITEM 33, STEERING. Adjust steering damper to desired steering
friction. Observe vehicle steering for wander, shimmy, leading to one
side, or wheel hop.

(7) ITEM 34, RUNNING GEAR. Listen for any unusual noises from wheels,
axles, or suspension parts that might indicate looseness or damage.

(8) ITEM 35, CHASSIS. Be alert for noises that might indicate loose
accessories, controls, attachments, or equipment.


17. AT‐HALT SERVICE.

=a.= At‐halt Service may be regarded as minimum maintenance procedures
and should be performed under all tactical conditions, even though more
extensive maintenance services must be slighted or omitted altogether.

=b. Procedures.= At‐halt Service consists of investigating any
deficiencies noted during operation, inspecting items listed below
according to the procedures following the items, and correcting any
deficiencies found. Deficiencies not corrected should be reported
promptly to the designated individual in authority.

(1) ITEM 38, FUEL AND OIL. Replenish fuel and oil as may be required to
reach next refilling point. CAUTION: _Left tank is for fuel; right tank
is for oil. Filler caps should not be interchanged, as only fuel tank
cap is vented._

(2) ITEM 39, TEMPERATURES. Hand‐feel wheel hubs and brake drums for
overheating.

(3) ITEM 40, VENTS. Make sure that crankcase breather outlet and rear
chain oil feed pipe are clear. Make sure grease drains in front and
rear brake side covers are open and clean.

(4) ITEM 42, SPRINGS AND SUSPENSIONS. Look for broken springs in fork.

(5) ITEM 43, STEERING. Investigate any difficulty developed during
riding.

(6) ITEM 44, WHEELS AND MOUNTING SCREWS. Inspect wheels for broken,
bent, or loose spokes. Also, look for loose axle nuts or rear wheel
mounting screws. Inspect wheel rims for good condition.

(7) ITEM 45, TIRES. Examine tires for low pressure or damage. Remove
foreign matter from tire treads; inspect for cuts.

(8) ITEM 46, LEAKS, GENERAL. Inspect vehicle for indication of fuel,
oil, or battery leaks.

(9) ITEM 47, ACCESSORIES AND CHAIN. Examine accessories for loose
connections, loose mountings, or damage. Examine rear drive chain
for broken rollers, broken link side plates, and broken or missing
connecting link spring clips. Inspect chain for adequate lubrication.

(10) ITEM 48, AIR CLEANER. Air cleaner must be secure, with air
passages in good condition and clean. When operating under extremely
dusty or sandy conditions, inspect air cleaner frequently and service
as required.

(11) ITEM 49, FENDERS (MUDGUARDS), LUGGAGE CARRIER, SAFETY GUARDS, AND
STANDS. Inspect these items for looseness or damage.

(12) ITEM 52, APPEARANCE AND GLASS. Clean windshield, rear view mirror,
and light lenses; inspect for good condition, secure attachment, and
broken glass.


18. AFTER‐OPERATION AND WEEKLY SERVICE.

=a.= After‐operation Service is particularly important, because at this
time the driver inspects his vehicle to detect any deficiencies that
may have developed, and corrects those he is permitted to handle. He
should report promptly, to the designated individual in authority, the
results of his inspection. If this schedule is performed thoroughly,
the vehicle should be ready to roll again on a moment’s notice. The
Before‐operation Service, with a few exceptions, is then necessary
only to ascertain whether the vehicle is in the same condition in
which it was left upon completion of the After‐operation Service. The
After‐operation Service should never be entirely omitted, even in
extreme tactical situations, but may be reduced to the bare fundamental
services outlined for the At‐halt Service, if necessary.

=b. Procedures.= When performing the After‐operation Service, the
driver must remember and consider any irregularities noticed during
the day in the Before‐operation. During‐operation, and At‐halt
Services. The After‐operation Service consists of inspecting and
servicing the following items. Those items of the After‐operation
Services that are marked with an asterisk (*) require additional Weekly
services, the procedures for which are indicated in step (_b_) of each
applicable item.

(1) ITEM 54, FUEL AND OIL. Fill fuel and oil tanks; fill oil tank
within 1 inch of top; be sure to put oil in right tank and fuel in left
tank; do not interchange caps. CAUTION: _When operating under extremely
dusty conditions, drain engine oil tank and refill with fresh oil as
frequently as excessive contamination of the oil occurs_.

(2) ITEM 55, ENGINE OPERATION. Test for satisfactory engine idle
without stalling. Accelerate and decelerate engine, noting any tendency
to miss or backfire, unusual noises, or vibration that may indicate
worn parts, loose mounting, incorrect fuel mixture, or faulty ignition.
Investigate any unsatisfactory engine operating characteristics noted
during operation. Learn to recognize noise caused by loose primary
(front) drive chain. Slack in excess of 1/2 inch total up‐and‐down
motion can cause excessive noise which sounds like engine knock. Remove
inspection cover for examination of chain.

(3) ITEM 57, HORN. If tactical situation permits, test horn.

(4) ITEM 59, LIGHTS. If tactical situation permits, observe whether
blackout and service lights operate with switch in its respective
positions, and go out when switched off. Also see that lights are
secure, and lenses clean and not broken. Observe whether both filaments
of service headlight operate when dimmer switch on left handle bar is
moved to its respective positions.

(5) ITEM 56, INSTRUMENTS. Before stopping engine, inspect instruments
to see that indicator lights are still out. Stop engine. After 30
seconds, turn on switch to see that oil pressure and generator signal
lights turn on. CAUTION: _Be sure to turn off ignition switch after
this test_.

(6) ITEM 58, GLASS. Clean rear view mirror, windshield, instrument, and
light glass. Examine for secure mounting and breakage.

(7) ITEM 62, *BATTERY.

(_a_) Inspect battery carrier for good condition and secure mounting.
Inspect electrolyte level (should be 5/16 inch above plates). Inspect
for any signs of leakage of electrolyte indicating battery has been
overfilled, poorly sealed, or damaged. CAUTION: _Do not add water
unless actually needed_.

(_b_) _Weekly._ Clean dirt from top of battery, remove battery caps,
bring electrolyte level to 5/16 inch above plates, using clean,
drinkable water. Clean terminals or posts if corroded; be sure felt
washers are on terminals and properly oiled; tighten terminal bolts
cautiously, if loose. Clean and paint battery carrier if corroded.

(8) ITEM 63, *ACCESSORIES AND CHAIN.

(_a_) Inspect carburetor, air cleaner, generator, and cut‐out relay
for loose connections, mountings, or damage. Examine rear drive chain
for broken rollers, broken link side plates, and broken or missing
connecting link spring clips. Examine rear chain (final drive) for free
up‐and‐down movement (slack) midway between sprockets; maximum total
allowable deflection is 1 inch, minimum, 1/2 inch.

(_b_) _Weekly._ Tighten any accessory connections found loose. Wipe
excess dirt from rear chain. Check front chain for adjustment, and
inspect for proper lubrication.

(9) ITEM 65, *AIR CLEANER.

(_a_) Examine oil cup for excessive dirt and correct oil level. If air
cleaner is excessively dirty, clean elements in dry‐cleaning solvent,
refill cup with fresh oil. Dip elements in oil in oil cup, replacing
elements and attaching oil cup immediately. If gaskets are damaged,
replace. Under extremely dusty or sandy conditions it may be necessary
to clean and refill the air cleaner more than once daily. Inspect hose
for leaks.

(_b_) _Weekly._ Inspect air cleaner for proper oil level and
excessively dirty oil. Clean and service air cleaner, tighten mounting
and hose clamps. NOTE: _Early‐type, round air cleaner does not have
removable filter elements. Complete cleaner must be removed to wash
element._

(10) ITEM 66, *FUEL FILTER (GASOLINE STRAINER).

(_a_) Clean cap and screen of fuel filter.

(_b_) _Weekly._ Clean cap and screen of fuel filter, remove carburetor
bowl drain plug, and drain off water and dirt. Be sure to replace plug,
being careful to avoid cross threading.

(11) ITEM 67, ENGINE CONTROLS. Examine throttle and spark controls
for damage to wires or for disconnected linkage. Observe for lack of
lubrication.

(12) ITEM 68, *TIRES.

(_a_) Remove foreign matter such as nails, glass, or stones from tire
treads. Inspect tires for abnormal tread wear, cuts, or bruises: also
for presence and tightness of valve caps. Inflate tires to 18 pounds
front, 20 pounds rear, with tires cool.

(_b_) _Weekly._ Replace badly worn or otherwise unserviceable tires.

(13) ITEM 69, *SPRINGS AND SUSPENSION.

(_a_) Inspect front fork for broken or sagged springs, loose bolts,
studs, and nuts.

(_b_) _Weekly._ Tighten wheel axle nuts and rear brake sleeve nut. Also
tighten rear wheel mounting socket screws very securely.

(14) ITEM 70, STEERING. Inspect steering head for proper adjustment of
bearings. Examine steering damper for correct adjustment.

(15) ITEM 72, *VENTS.

(_a_) Make sure that crankcase breather outlet and rear chain oil
supply pipe are clear. Make sure grease drains in front and rear brake
side covers are open and clean.

(_b_) _Weekly._ Clean crankcase breather outlet, rear chain oil supply
pipe, and grease drains in front and rear brake side covers.

(16) ITEM 73, LEAKS, GENERAL. Look around mechanism and beneath vehicle
for indication of fuel, oil, and grease leaks. Examine around brake
drums for evidence of grease in drums or on linings. Normally a few
drops of oil may be expected to drip from skid plate.

(17) ITEM 74, GEAR OIL LEVELS. Inspect transmission oil level with
vehicle standing on rear stand (not jiffy stand); refill, if required,
to level of filler plug opening with engine oil. CAUTION: _Do not use
gear oil_.

(18) ITEM 76, FENDERS (MUDGUARDS), LUGGAGE CARRIER, SAFETY GUARDS, AND
STANDS. Examine these items for good condition and secure mounting.

(19) ITEM 82, *TIGHTEN.

(_a_) Inspect all frame and assembly nuts, bolts, and cap screws for
tightness.

(_b_) _Weekly._ Tighten all vehicle assembly or mounting nuts. Driver
is cautioned not to tamper with or tighten screws or nuts about the
circuit breaker, as doing so may disturb ignition timing.

(20) ITEM 83, *LUBRICATE AS NEEDED.

(_a_) Lubricate all parts where inspection reveals need for
lubrication: wipe all dirt from fittings before applying lubricant.
Report any missing fittings.

(_b_) _Weekly._ When vehicle has been driven a sufficient number
of miles so that it is due for a regularly scheduled lubrication,
lubricate according to Lubrication Guide in manual and current
lubrication directives. Refrain from overlubricating wheel bearings,
front brake side cover bushing, and front and rear brake operating
lever camshafts.

(21) ITEM 84, *CLEAN ENGINE AND VEHICLE.

(_a_) Clean dirt and trash from vehicle and remove excess grease.

(_b_) _Weekly._ Wash vehicle if possible. If not, wipe off thoroughly.
Do not rub lustreless paint enough to cause shine. If vehicle is washed
in a stream, care should be taken that water or dirt does not get
into bearings, breather valve, or brakes. CAUTION: _It is extremely
important that high‐pressure streams or steam should not be directed
against wheel hubs, brakes, carburetor, air cleaner, or electrical
units_.

(12) ITEM 64, *ELECTRICAL WIRING.

(_a_) Inspect all ignition wiring to see that it is securely connected,
clean, and not damaged.

(_b_) _Weekly._ Inspect all wiring to see that it is securely connected
and supported, that insulation is not cracked or chafed, that loom,
shielding, and condensers are in good condition and securely attached.
Clean as required. Tighten any loose connections carefully. Radio
shielding or bonding defects, except cleaning or tightening, must be
referred to signal corps personnel.

(23) ITEM 85, *TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT.

(_a_) See that all tools and equipment assigned to vehicle are present,
in good condition, and properly stowed.

(_b_) _Weekly._ Check tools and equipment assigned to vehicle with
vehicle stowage list (par. 21) to see that they are present. Inspect
tools for good condition and proper stowage. Report missing or
unserviceable items to designated authority.



Section V

LUBRICATION

                      Paragraph
  Introduction           19
  Lubrication guide      20


19. INTRODUCTION.

=a.= Lubrication is an essential part of preventive maintenance,
determining to a great extent serviceability of parts and assemblies.


=20. LUBRICATION GUIDE= (fig. 10).

=a. General.= Lubrication instructions for this materiel are
consolidated in a Lubrication Guide (fig. 10). These specify the points
to be lubricated, the periods of lubrication, and the lubricant to be
used. Intervals indicated on the guide are for normal service. For
extreme conditions, high speed, heat, mud, snow, rough roads, dust,
etc., change engine oil and lubricate more frequently. In addition to
the items on the guide, brake, gear shifter, clutch control linkage,
and hinges must be lubricated at frequent intervals.

=b. Supplies.= In the field it may not be possible to supply a
complete assortment of lubricants called for by the Lubrication Guide
to meet the recommendations. It will be necessary to make the best use
of those available, subject to inspection by the officer concerned, in
consultation with responsible ordnance personnel.

=c. Lubrication Notes.= The following notes apply to the Lubrication
Guide (fig. 10). All note references in the guide itself are to the
steps below having the corresponding number:

(1) BRAKE FITTINGS. Exercise caution when lubricating brake operating
cams and front brake cover bushing, as excess grease working out of
these bearings is likely to get onto brake lining, reducing brake
efficiency. CAUTION: _When using air‐operated grease gun, make sure not
to overlubricate brake fittings_.

(2) BRAKE HAND LEVER OILCAN POINTS. Oil hand lever fittings and “oiler”
mounted on cable housing. Oil front brake control cable at ends of
control cable housing.

(3) GENERATOR COMMUTATOR END BEARING. Hand‐pack with general purpose
grease, No. 2, at temperatures above zero. Below zero, use lighter
grease. This operation requires removal of generator end cover. Bearing
outer grease retainer must be loosened and swung aside for access to
bearing. If not convenient to grease bearing at specified intervals, at
least lubricate with a few drops of engine oil applied to hole in outer
grease retainer. Do not overlubricate. CAUTION: _Generator regulating
brush plate must not be shifted while bearing outer grease retainer
is loose (par. 92). Generator drive end bearing requires no attention,
since it is lubricated by oil circulating through engine._

[Illustration: KEY

  +-------------------------------------+
  |              LUBRICANTS             |
  | OE—OIL, ENGINE (CRANKCASE GRADE)    |
  | CG—GREASE, GENERAL PURPOSE          |
  |     No. 1 (ABOVE +32°)              |
  |     No. 1 OR No. 0 (+32° TO +10°)   |
  |     No. 0 (BELOW +10°)              |
  | WB—GREASE, GENERAL PURPOSE (No. 2)  |
  +-------------------------------------+

  +--------------------------+
  |        INTERVALS         |
  | 1/4—250 MILES            |
  | 1/2—500 MILES            |
  |   1—1000 MILES           |
  |   6—6000 MILES           |
  | * L—SPECIAL LUBRICATION  |
  +--------------------------+
  |      CHECK DAILY         |
  |      -----------         |
  |      Air Cleaner         |
  |    Engine Oil Tank       |
  +--------------------------+

TABLE OF CAPACITIES WITH RECOMMENDATIONS AT TEMPERATURES SHOWN

  +--------------+----------+------------+--------------+------------+
  |     UNIT     | CAPACITY | ABOVE +32° | +32° TO +10° | BELOW +10° |
  +--------------+----------+------------+--------------+------------+
  |   OIL TANK   | 1 GALLON | OE         | OE           | OE         |
  |              |          | S.A.E. 50  | S.A.E. 30    | S.A.E. 10  |
  +--------------+----------+------------+--------------+------------+
  | TRANSMISSION | 3/4 pint | OE         | OE           | OE         |
  |              |          | S.A.E. 50  | S.A.E. 30    | S.A.E. 10  |
  +--------------+----------+------------+--------------+------------+

RA PD 310207

_Figure 10_—_Lubrication Guide_]

(4) SPARK AND THROTTLE CONTROL GRIPS. These grips require disassembly.
Twice a year, or whenever grips do not turn freely, indicating need of
lubrication, remove grips, clean parts, apply grease, and reassemble
(par. 101).

(5) AIR CLEANER. Examine oil cup daily for excessive dirt and correct
oil level. Under extremely dusty or sandy conditions it may be
necessary to clean and refill the air cleaner more than once daily.
Refill oil cup to indicated level with engine oil. Drain, clean, and
refill oil cup every 250 miles, depending upon operating conditions.
Every 1,000 miles (oftener if necessary), remove air cleaner filter
units, wash in dry‐cleaning solvent, lubricate, and reassemble (par.
76). NOTE: _Early type round cleaner did not have removable filter
element. Complete cleaner must be removed to wash element._

(6) WHEEL BEARINGS. When wheel hubs are lubricated at regular 500‐mile
interval, 1/8 ounce of grease with each greasing is sufficient. This
amounts to about 15 shots of the standard 1‐pound air gun, or four
strokes with a 1‐pound, hand‐operated gun. If vehicle has been operated
in water, wheel hubs submerged, apply hub greasing service immediately
afterward (or soon as situation permits). Do not overlubricate wheel
hub bearings, as excess grease may work into brake linings, reducing
brake efficiency. When using air‐operated grease gun, it is easy to
overlubricate wheel hub bearings.

(7) STEERING HEAD BEARINGS. Every 50,000 miles, repack upper and lower
bearings, or whenever there is occasion to remove rigid fork for repair
or replacement (par. 98).

(8) TANK, ENGINE OIL. Oil tank is located on right side of motorcycle.
Empty tank holds 1 U. S. gallon. Check daily and add engine oil as
necessary to refill tank within 1 inch of top. Oil level gage rod (dip
stick) is located directly below tank cap. When oil level is down to
“REFILL” mark on gage rod, 2 U. S. quarts may be added. Drain oil tank
every 1,000 miles and refill with fresh engine oil. Drain plug located
on underside of tank in forward position. In extremely dusty service,
and in winter weather, change oil oftener.

(_a_) _Winter Caution._ Water is a by‐product of combustion in any
internal combustion engine. In a condensed state, the water vapor
formed would equal approximately the quantity of gasoline burned. Some
of this water vapor escapes past the rings into the crankcase. When
starting and warming up in cold weather, considerable vapor getting
into crankcase condenses to water before crankcase is hot enough
to exhaust the vapor, without inside condensation, through outside
breather. If engine is driven enough to get crankcase thoroughly warmed
up frequently, most of this water is again vaporized and blown out
through outside breather. However, a moderately driven engine, making
only short runs now and then, and seldom thoroughly warmed up, is
likely to accumulate an increasing amount of water in oil tank. This
water will, in freezing weather, become slush or ice and, if allowed
to accumulate too long, may block oil lines with resulting damage to
engine. Also, water mixed with oil for some time, forms a heavy sludge
of considerable acid content that is very harmful to bearings and
other internal engine parts. To sum it up briefly, an engine that is
used only for short runs during freezing weather requires frequent oil
changes along with thorough flushing of tank to remove any accumulated
sludge.

(9) TRANSMISSION FILLER OPENING. Check oil level in transmission case
every 250 miles and add engine oil as necessary to bring level up to
filler opening. If motorcycle is run unusually long distances, inspect
more frequently. Motorcycle must be on rear stand in straight upright
position when checking oil level or filling transmission case. Use
same grade of oil used in engine, summer, and winter. If gear shifting
difficulty is caused by oil congealing in extremely cold weather, thin
oil with small amount of kerosene or dry‐cleaning solvent. Every 1,000
miles, drain and refill transmission to level of transmission filler
plug opening with specified grade of engine oil. Transmission holds
3/4 pint of oil. To drain transmission case remove filler plug and lay
motorcycle on right side. CAUTION: _Do not leave motorcycle on side
longer than two minutes_.

(10) DRIVE CHAINS.

(_a_) Front and rear drive chains are automatically supplied with
lubrication by engine oil pumps. Chain oilers are adjustable and may
need occasional readjustment to meet lubrication requirements of varied
operating conditions. Every 1,000 miles (or more often if operating
conditions are extremely severe) inspect front primary drive chain for
adequate lubrication (fig. 36).

(_b_) At every 1,000‐mile period rear drive chain should have
additional lubrication as follows: Remove chain, wash thoroughly in
dry‐cleaning solvent and hang it up to dry. Then soak chain in SAE 10
engine oil for a short period of time to allow oil to penetrate into
all chain bearings. Drain chain and wipe off excess oil. Install rear
chain (par. 63). (This attention is not required by front chain.)
Readjustment of chain oilers must be made only by organization mechanic
(par. 61). CAUTION: _Inspect frequently and make sure that rear chain
oiler supply pipe is clear, not bent or damaged_.

=d. Before Applying Lubricant.= Always wipe dirt from the lubrication
fittings or plugs so that dirt will not enter with the lubricant.
Lubricate all chassis points after washing vehicle or after vehicle has
been operated in streams or extremely muddy or slushy roads. CAUTION:
_It is extremely important that high‐pressure cleaning streams or
steam should not be directed against ends of wheel hubs, brake side
cover bearings, air cleaner, handle bar grips, or electrical system.
To do so will seriously affect correct lubrication and functioning of
these parts._

=e. Oilcan Points.= All brake, transmission, and clutch control
points not fitted with grease connections should be lubricated with
engine oil. Front brake control cable, spark, and throttle control
wires must be oiled at the ends of their respective housings,
especially after washing vehicle, or after operating it in wet weather.
Keep battery terminal felt washers saturated with engine oil to prevent
corrosion of connections.

=f. Warning Light.= Action of the engine oil feed pump is indicated
by red signal light in instrument panel. Rider must be thoroughly
familiar with operating characteristics of this signal light, to judge
condition of engine oil circulating system (par. 7 f).



Section VI

TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT STOWAGE ON THE VEHICLE


                        Paragraph
  Vehicle tools            21
  Vehicle equipment        22
  Vehicle spare parts      23

[Illustration: RA PD 310208

_Figure 11—Vehicle Tools_]


21. VEHICLE TOOLS (fig. 11).

=a. Kits.= Included in the tool kit assembly are the following:

  Legend
  Letter for              Number   Mfr’s   Federal Stock   Where
  Fig. 11      Tool       Carried  Number     Number       Carried

    A   Tool roll             1   11819-44       —         In saddle bag
    B   Irons, tire           2   11551-X   41-I-773-75    In tool roll
   *C   Handle, chain tool    1   11817-40  41-H-1510-400  In tool roll
    D   Wrench,
          5/8-in. by 3/4-in.  1   11804-44C      —         In tool roll
    E   Wrench,
          1/2-in. by 9/16-in. 1   11804-44B      —         In tool roll
    F   Wrench,
          7/16-in. by 1/2-in. 1   11804-44A      —         In tool roll
    G   Wrench,
          5/16-in. by
          3/8-in.             1   11804-44       —         In tool roll
    H   Wrench,
          3/8-in. by 7/16-in.
          (valve tappet)      1   11905-X        —         In tool roll
    I   Wrench, adjustable    1   11813-44       —         In tool roll
   *J   Wrench,
          3/4-in. by 1-3/4-in.
          (rear axle nut
           and trans.)        1   11814-35 41-W-1989-850   In tool roll
    K   Gage, tire            1   11562-43       ——        In tool roll
   *L   Tool, chain repair    1   12039-38       ——        In tool roll
   *M   Washers,
          0.002-in. thick
         (chain oiler adj.)   4     674-32       ——        In tool roll
   *N   Wrench,
          7/16-in. by 1-3/8-in.
          (valve cover)       1   11806-31   41-W-3617     In tool roll
   *O   Wrench,
          7/16-in. by 1-1/8-in.
          (use with spark
           plug socket)       1   11929-39       ——        In tool roll
   *P   Pliers, adjustable    1   11812-44       ——        In tool roll
   *Q   Screwdriver           1   11811-X        ——        In tool roll
    R   Wrench,
          9/16-in. socket
          (cyl. head bolt)    1   12047-30A  41-W01525     In tool roll
   *S   Wrench,
          wheel mounting      1   11815-35   41-W-3825-400 In tool roll
   *T   Wrench, socket
          (spark plug;
           use with O)        1   11805-40   41-W-3332     In tool roll
        Pump, tire            1   11553-41M   8-P-4900     On frame,
                                                             left side
        Grease gun (in case)  1   11661-38A      ——        In saddle bag

*EXCEPTION: _Earlier models furnished with smaller tool roll and kit
contain the items marked by asterisk._


22. VEHICLE EQUIPMENT (figs. 12 and 13).

=a. Attached to Vehicle.=

                                   Number         Where
         Item                      Carried       Carried

  Saddlebags                         2       On luggage carrier
  Mirror, rear view                  1       On left handle bar
  Box, submachine gun ammunition     1       Front fender, left side
  Bracket, submachine gun carrier    1       Front fender, right side
  Guard, front safety                1       Attached to frame
  Guard, rear safety                 1       Attached to frame
  Windshield, cpt                    1       On handle bar
  Leg shields, cpt (right and left)  2       Attached to frame

[Illustration: RA PD 310216

_Figure 12—Vehicle Equipment, Left Side_]

[Illustration: RA PD 310217

_Figure 13—Vehicle Equipment, Right Side_]

[Illustration: RA PD 310209

_Figure 14—Vehicle Spare Parts_]


23. VEHICLE SPARE PARTS (fig. 14).

[3]=a. Spare Parts.=

                                     Number          Where
          Item                      Carried         Carried

  A  Roll, parts kit                    1         In saddlebag
  H  Plug, spark (and gasket)           1         In kit roll
  F  Link, rear chain repair            1         In kit roll
  G  Link, front chain repair           1         In kit roll
  K  Lamp‐unit, tail blackout          1         In kit roll
  J  Lamp‐unit, stop blackout          1         In kit roll
  L  Lamp‐unit, tail and stop          1         In kit roll
  B  Lamp bulk kit, head lamps, 5 bulbs 1         In kit roll
  C  Kit, tire repair                   1         In kit roll
  I  Tape, friction                     1         In kit roll
  D  Caps, tire valve (5 in box)        1         In kit roll
  E  Cores, tire valve (5 in box)       1         In kit roll

[Footnote 3: EXCEPTION: _No spare parts kit supplied with earlier
models. Rear chain repair link only spare part furnished._]



PART TWO—VEHICLE MAINTENANCE INSTRUCTIONS



Section VII

MAINTENANCE ALLOCATION

                               Paragraph
  Scope                           24
  Allocation of maintenance       25


24. SCOPE.

=a.= The scope of maintenance and repair by the crew and other units
of the using arms is determined by the availability of suitable tools,
availability of necessary parts, capabilities of the mechanics, time
available, and the tactical situation. All of these are variable and no
exact system of procedure can be prescribed.


25. ALLOCATION OF MAINTENANCE.

=a.= Indicated below are the maintenance duties for which tools and
parts have been provided for the using arm and maintenance personnel.
Replacements and repairs which are the responsibility of ordnance
maintenance personnel may be performed by using arm personnel when
circumstances permit, within the discretion of the commander concerned.
Echelons and words as used in this list of maintenance allocations are
defined as follows:

  FIRST AND                 OPERATING ORGANIZATION DRIVER, OPERATOR
  SECOND ECHELON:           or crew, companies and detachments,
  Table III                 battalions, squadrons, regiments, and
  AR 850-15                 separate companies and detachments
                            (first and second echelons, respectively).

  THIRD ECHELON:            Technical light and medium maintenance
  Table III                 units, including post and port shops.
  AR 850-15

  FOURTH ECHELON:           Technical heavy maintenance and field
  Table III                 depot units including designated post
  AR 850-15                 and service command shops.

  FIFTH ECHELON:            Technical base units.
  Table III
  AR 850-15

  SERVICE:                  Checking and replenishing fuel, oil,
  (Including preventive     grease, water and antifreeze, air, and
  maintenance) par. 24 a    battery liquid; checking and tightening
  (2) and (3) in part       nuts and bolts; cleaning.
  AR 850-15

  REPLACE:                   To remove an unserviceable part, assembly,
  Par. 24 a (5)              or subassembly from a vehicle and
  AR 850-15                  replace it with a serviceable one.

  REPAIR:                    To restore to a serviceable condition,
  Par. 24 a (6) in part      such parts, assemblies or subassemblies
  AR 850-15                  as can be accomplished without completely
                             disassembling the assembly or
                             subassembly, and where heavy riveting,
                             or precision machining, fitting, balancing,
                             or alining is not required.

  REBUILD:                   Consists of stripping and completely
  Par. 24 a (6)              reconditioning and replacing in serviceable
  AR 850-15                  condition any vehicle or unserviceable
                             part, subassembly, or assembly of
                             the vehicle, including welding, riveting,
                             machining, fitting, alining, balancing,
                             assembling, and testing.

  RECLAMATION:               Salvage of serviceable or economically
  AR 850-15                  repairable units and parts removed from
  Par. 4 (c) in part CIR.    vehicles, and their return to stock. This
  75, dated 16 March ’43     includes the process which recovers
                             and/or reclaims unusable articles or
                             component parts thereof and places
                             them in a serviceable condition.

  NOTES: (1) Operations allocated will normally be performed in the
  echelon indicated by X.

  (2) Operations allocated to the third echelon as indicated by E may
  be performed by these units in emergencies only.

  (3) Operations allocated to the fourth echelon by E are normally
  fifth echelon operations. They will not be performed by the fourth
  echelon, unless the unit is expressly authorized to do so by the
  chief of the service concerned.


                                                       ECHELONS

  CLUTCH                                         2nd  3rd  4th  5th

  Bearings, clutch release—replace                X
  Clutch—replace and/or repair (reline)                X
  Hub, clutch—replace                                  X
  Hub, clutch—repair                                        X
  Sprocket assembly, clutch—replace                    X
  Sprocket assembly, clutch—repair                          X


  CONTROLS AND LINKAGE

  Controls and linkage—service and/or replace     X
  Controls and linkage—repair                          X


  ELECTRICAL GROUP

  Battery—service (recharge) and/or replace       X
  Battery—repair                                       X
  Battery—rebuild                                           E    X
  Cables, battery—replace and/or repair           X
  Coil, ignition—replace                          X
  Head, speedometer—replace                       X
  Head, speedometer—repair                             X
  Head, speedometer—rebuild                                 X
  Horn assembly—replace                           X
  Horn assembly—repair                                 X
  Light assemblies—service and/or replace         X
  Light assemblies—repair                              X
  Panel, instrument—replace                       X
  Panel, instrument—repair                             X
  Switch assemblies—replace                       X
  Switch assemblies—repair                             X
  Wiring—replace                                  X


  ENGINE
  (V-45″-Twin Engine)

  Bearings, main—replace                                    E    X
  Bearings, connecting rod—replace                          E    X
  Breaker assembly, circuit—replace               X
  Breaker assembly, circuit—repair                     X
  Breaker assembly, circuit—rebuild                         X
  Carburetor—replace                              X
  Carburetor—repair                                    X
  Carburetor—rebuild                                        X
  Cleaner, air—service and/or replace             X
  Cleaner, air—repair                                  X
  Cleaner, air—rebuild                                      X
  Cylinder assembly—replace                            X
  Cylinder assembly—repair                                  X
  Cylinder assembly—rebuild (recondition)                   E    X
  Condenser—replace                               X
  Engine assembly—replace                         *[4] X
  Engine assembly—repair                               X
  Engine assembly—rebuild                                   E    X
  Gasket, cylinder head—replace                   X
  Gears, timing—replace                                E    X
  Generator assembly—replace                      X
  Generator assembly—repair                            X
  Generator assembly—rebuild                                X
  Head, cylinder—replace and/or repair                 X
  Lines and connections—replace                   X
  Lines and connections—repair                         X
  Pistons, rings and pins assembly—replace             E    E    X
  Plug, spark—replace                             X
  Points, circuit breaker—service and/or replace  X
  Pump assembly, feed—replace                     X
  Pump assembly, feed—repair                           X
  Pump assembly, feed—rebuild                               X
  Pump assembly, oil—replace                      X
  Pump assembly, oil—repair                            X
  Pump assembly, oil—rebuild                                X
  Pump assembly, oil scavenger—replace and/or
    repair                                             X
  Pump assembly, oil scavenger—rebuild                      X
  Rod, connecting—replace and/or rebuild
    (recondition)                                           X    X
  Sprocket, engine—replace                        X
  Strained gasoline—replace and/or repair              X
  Valves—service                                  X


  EXHAUST GROUP

  Muffler and exhaust pipe—replace                X
  Muffler and exhaust pipe—repair                      X


            MISCELLANEOUS

  Bars, safety—replace                            X
  Bars, safety—repair                                  X
  Boxes, ammunition, battery and tool—replace     X
  Boxes, ammunition, battery and tool—repair           X
  Carriers, luggage and scabbard—replace          X
  Carriers, luggage and scabbard—repair                X
  Frame—replace and/or rebuild                              E    X
  Guards, mud—replace                             X
  Guards, mud—repair                                   X
  Plate, skid—replace                             X
  Plate, skid—repair                                   X
  Saddle—replace                                  X
  Saddle—repair                                        X
  Saddle—rebuild                                            X
  Springs, saddle post—replace                    X
  Tank, fuel—replace                              X
  Tank, fuel—repair                                    X
  Tank, oil—replace                               X
  Tank, oil—repair                                     X


  SUSPENSION (FRONT)

  Bars, handle—replace                            X
  Bars, handle—repair                                  X
  Damper, steering—replace                        X
  Drum, brake—replace                                  X
  Fork, front assembly—replace                    X
  Fork, front assembly—repair                          X
  Fork, front assembly—rebuild                              X
  Fork, spring—replace                            X
  Fork, spring—repair                                  X
  Fork, spring—rebuild                                      X
  Plate, rocker—replace                           X
  Plate, rocker—repair                                 X
  Shoe assembly, brake—service and/or replace     X
  Shoe assembly, brake—repair (reline)                 X
  Springs, cushion and rebound—replace            X


  SUSPENSION (REAR)

  Chains, all—replace and/or repair               X
  Drum, brake, rear—replace                            X
  Guards, chains—replace                          X
  Guards, chains—repair                                X
  Shoe assemblies, brake—service and/or replace   X
  Shoe assemblies, brake—repair (reline)               X
  Sprocket, rear—replace                               X
  Wheels—replace                                  X
  Wheels—repair                                        X
  Wheels—rebuild                                            E    X


  TIRES

  Casings and tubes—replace                       X
  Casings—repair                                            E    X
  Tubes, inner—repair                             X


  TRANSMISSION

  Spring, kick starter—replace                    X
  Sprocket, transmission countershaft—replace     X
  Starter, kick—replace                           X
  Starter, kick—repair                                 X
  Transmission—replace                            *[4] X
  Transmission—repair                                  X
  Transmission—rebuild                                      E    X


  VEHICLE ASSEMBLY

  Motorcycle—service                              X
  Motorcycle—rebuild (with serviceable unit
  assemblies)                                               X    E

[Footnote 4: The second echelon is authorized to remove and reinstall
items marked by an asterisk. However, when it is necessary to replace
an item marked by an asterisk with a new or rebuilt part, subassembly
or unit assembly, the assembly marked by an asterisk may be removed
from the vehicle by the second echelon _only after authority has been
obtained from a higher echelon of maintenance_.]



Section VIII

SECOND ECHELON PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE

                                                   Paragraph
  Second echelon preventive maintenance services      26


26. SECOND ECHELON PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE SERVICES.

=a.= Regular scheduled maintenance inspections and services are
a preventive maintenance function of the using arms, and are the
responsibility of commanders of operating organizations.

(1) FREQUENCY. The frequencies of the preventive maintenance services
outlined herein are considered a minimum requirement for normal
operation of vehicles. Under unusual operating conditions such as
extreme temperatures, and dusty or sandy terrain, it may be necessary
to perform certain maintenance services more frequently.

(2) FIRST ECHELON PARTICIPATION. The drivers should accompany their
vehicles and assist the mechanics while periodic second echelon
preventive maintenance services are performed. Ordinarily the driver
should present the vehicle for a scheduled preventive maintenance
service in a reasonably clean condition; that is, it should be dry,
and not caked with mud or grease to such an extent that inspection and
servicing will be seriously hampered. However, the vehicle should not
be washed or wiped thoroughly clean, since certain types of defects,
such as cracks, leaks, and loose or shifted parts or assemblies are
more evident if the surfaces are slightly soiled or dusty.

(3) If instructions other than those contained in the general
procedures in paragraph (4) or the specific procedures in paragraph (5)
which follow, are required for the correct performance of a preventive
maintenance service, or for correction of a deficiency, other sections
of the vehicle operator’s manual pertaining to the item involved, or a
designated individual in authority, should be consulted.

(4) GENERAL PROCEDURES. These general procedures are basic instructions
which are to be followed when performing the services on the items
listed in the specific procedures. The second echelon personnel must
be thoroughly trained in these procedures so that they will apply them
automatically.

(_a_) When new or overhauled subassemblies are installed to correct
deficiencies, care should be taken to see that they are clean,
correctly installed, properly lubricated, and adjusted.

(_b_) When installing new lubricant retainer seals, a coating of the
lubricant should be wiped over the sealing surface of the lip of the
seal.

(_c_) The general inspection of each item applies also to any
supporting member or connection, and usually includes a check to see
whether the item is in good condition, correctly assembled, secure,
or excessively worn. The mechanics must be thoroughly trained in the
following explanations of these terms:

_1._ The inspection for “good condition” is usually an external visual
inspection to determine whether or not the unit is damaged beyond safe
or serviceable limits. The term “good condition” is explained further
by the following: not bent or twisted, not chafed or burned, not broken
or cracked, not bare or frayed, not dented or collapsed, not torn or
cut.

_2._ The inspection of a unit to see that it is “correctly assembled”
is usually an external visual inspection to see whether or not it is in
its normal assembled position in the vehicle.

_3._ The inspection of a unit to determine if it is “secure” is usually
an external visual examination, a hand‐feel, or a pry‐bar check for
looseness; such an inspection should include any brackets, lock
washers, lock nuts, locking wires, or cotter pins used in assembly.

_4._ “Excessively worn” will be understood to mean worn, close to or
beyond serviceable limits, and likely to result in a failure if not
replaced before the next scheduled inspection.

(_d_) Special Services. These are indicated by repeating the item
numbers in the columns which show the interval at which the services
are to be performed, and show that the parts, or assemblies, are to
receive certain mandatory services. For example, an item number in
one or both columns opposite a _Tighten_ procedure, means that the
actual tightening of the object must be performed. The special services
include:

_1. Adjust._ Make all necessary adjustments in accordance with the
pertinent section of the vehicle operator’s manual, special bulletins,
or other current directives.

_2. Clean._ Clean units of the vehicle with dry‐cleaning solvent to
remove excess lubricant, dirt, and other foreign material. After the
parts are cleaned, rinse them in clean dry‐cleaning solvent, and dry
them thoroughly. Take care to keep the parts clean until reassembled,
and be certain to keep dry‐cleaning solvent away from rubber or other
material which it will damage. Clean the protective grease coating from
new parts, since this material is not a good lubricant.

_3. Special lubrication._ This applies both to lubrication operations
that do not appear on the vehicle Lubrication Guide, and to items
that do appear on such guides, but should be performed in connection
with the maintenance operations, if parts have to be disassembled for
inspection or service.

_4. Serve._ This usually consists of performing special operations,
such as replenishing battery water, and draining and refilling units
with oil.

_5. Tighten._ All tightening operations should be performed with
sufficient wrench‐torque (force on the wrench handle) to tighten the
nut according to good mechanical practice. Use torque‐indicating
wrench where specified. Do not overtighten, as this may strip threads,
or cause distortion. Tightening will always be understood to include
the correct installation of lock washers, lock nuts, and cotter pins
provided to secure the tightening.

(_e_) When conditions make it difficult to perform the complete
preventive maintenance procedures at one time, these can sometimes be
handled in sections, planning to complete all operations within the
task if possible. All available time at halts and in bivouac areas must
be utilized, if necessary, to assure that maintenance operations are
completed. When limited by the tactical situation, items with special
services in the columns should be given first consideration.

(_f_) The numbers of the preventive maintenance procedures that follow
are identical with those outlined on W.D. AGO Form No. 463, which
is the Preventive Maintenance Service Work Sheet for Motorcycles.
Certain items on the work sheet that do not apply to this vehicle
are not included in the procedures in this manual. In general, the
numerical sequence of items on the work sheet is followed in the manual
procedures, but in some instances there is deviation for conservation
of the mechanic’s time and effort.

(5) SPECIFIC PROCEDURES. The procedures for performing each item in the
1,000‐mile maintenance procedures are described in the following chart.
Each page of the chart has a column at its left edge corresponding to
the 1,000‐mile maintenance.


ROAD TEST

[Sidenote: 1000 Mile Maintenance]

NOTE: If tactical situation does not permit a full road test, perform
items 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 12, and 14, which require slight or no
movement of the vehicle. When a road test is possible, it should be for
preferably 5, and not over 10 miles.

[Sidenote: 1]

=Before‐operation Inspection.= Perform Before‐operation Service listed
on W.D. Form No. 418. “Driver’s Trip Ticket and Preventive Maintenance
Service Record” (described in par. 15), to determine if vehicle is in a
satisfactory condition to make the road test safely.

[Sidenote: 2]

=Ease of Starting.= Start engine and observe action of starter. Note if
engine responds readily.

[Sidenote: 3]

=Oil Circulation.= Oil circulation is normally indicated by oil signal
light (red light) in instrument panel being out. When red light is on,
oil is not circulating. Observe for excess smoke in exhaust. CAUTION:
_If red light fails to go out after engine has been started, stop
engine at once. Refer to paragraph 30 for possible causes._

[Sidenote: 4]

=Instruments.= Observe instruments for proper or normal indication and
functioning of system to which they apply.

SPEEDOMETER AND ODOMETER. Speedometer must indicate vehicle speed
without excessive noise or fluctuation; odometer must record trip and
total mileage. OIL PRESSURE SIGNAL LIGHT. Note whether oil signal light
(red light) indicates correctly. After ignition switch is turned on,
and before starting engine, the red light should go on, indicating no
oil circulation. When engine is started, light should go out.

GENERATOR SIGNAL LIGHT. With switch on, and before starting engine,
the green signal light should go on, indicating discharge of battery.
After starting engine, increase engine speed to a medium fast idle;
green signal light should then go out, indicating generator is charging
battery. CAUTION: _Continue observation of signal lights during road
test, and if lights should fail to operate as indicated above, stop
engine, investigate cause, and correct or report trouble to proper
authority._

[Sidenote: 5]

=Brake Operation.= Test foot brake for safe stop within reasonable
distance. Note squeaks or chatter that might indicate wet, oily,
dirty, or loose lining, damaged drum, or improper adjustment. Apply
hand‐operated front brake only in conjunction with rear brake and
observe whether it operates effectively in assisting to make a quicker
stop.

[Sidenote: 6]

=Clutch Operation.= Before moving vehicle, make sure that clutch pedal
has satisfactory free travel before it begins to disengage clutch; that
it releases clutch completely before reaching end of travel; and that
there are no unusual noises in clutch‐release mechanism. When starting
vehicle, observe whether clutch grabs, chatters, or slips when fully
engaged.

[Sidenote: 7]

=Gearshift.= Shift through entire gear range of transmission and
observe whether mechanism operates freely without clashing or jumping
out of gear. Note any unusual vibration that might indicate loose
engine or transmission mountings.

[Sidenote: 8]

=Unusual Noises.= During entire road test, listen for unusual noises
that might indicate worn, loose, damaged, or insufficiently lubricated
parts in the entire motorcycle, particularly in engine and accessories,
or in the power train.

CAUTION: _Loose primary (front) drive chain, with slack in excess of
1/2 inch total up‐and‐down motion, can cause excessive noise which
sounds like engine knock. Remove inspection cover for examination of
chain._

[Sidenote: 9]

=Steering.= Observe steering mechanism for indication of looseness
or excessive binding through full turning range. With hands resting
lightly on handle bars and vehicle in vertical position, observe
whether there is any tendency to pull to one side when operating at a
reasonable speed. Note any indication of steering instability at higher
speeds.

[Sidenote: 10]

=Balance.= If vehicle does not balance properly in operation, inspect
for misalinement of rear wheel.

[Sidenote: 11]

=Speedometer and Odometer.= Inspect speedometer for proper operation,
excessive fluctuation, or unusual noise. Observe odometer for correct
recording of trip and total mileage.

[Sidenote: 12]

=Throttle and Spark Controls.= Set throttle stop screw and low speed
needle adjustment so that engine will operate smoothly and will not
stall at idling speed. With vehicle running at a speed of 30 miles per
hour, or faster, in high gear, turn throttle control grip to “OPEN”
and “CLOSED” positions and note whether engine responds instantly to
throttle changes. Turn spark control grip and note whether it fully
advances and retards ignition timer.

[Sidenote: 13]

=Power and Operation.= Observe engine for normal pulling power, and
good operating characteristics in each speed, from first to high gear.
Also observe whether engine misses, stalls, knocks excessively, or
makes any other unusual noise.

[Sidenote: 14]

=Carburetor Adjustment.= No carburetor adjustment, other than idle
adjustment as performed in item 12, is required on this vehicle.

[Sidenote: 15]

=Brake Drum and Hub Temperature.= Immediately after completing road
test, feel front and rear brake drums and wheel hubs for overheating.

[Sidenote: 16]

=Power Train Temperatures.= Feel transmission for overheating.


MAINTENANCE OPERATION

[Sidenote: 17]

=Compression Test.= With throttle wide‐open, test compression with
starter. If engine lacks compression, inspect for leaks.

[Sidenote: 18]

=Transmission.= Inspect transmission for good condition, secure
mounting, and leaks. Inspect oil level. Drain and refill transmission
to level of transmission filler plug opening with specified grade of
engine oil. CAUTION: _Always drain transmission immediately after it
has been warmed and agitated by operation of engine. Refill as soon as
draining is completed to avoid hazard of operating without lubricant.
Tighten all mounting and assembly bolts securely._

[Sidenote: 20]

=Engine Oil.= Inspect oil tank for oil level: drain and refill tank.
CAUTION: _Fill to within 1 inch of filler opening and filler cap
with specified weight of oil. Always drain immediately after engine
operation and refill as soon as draining is completed, to avoid hazard
of operating without lubricant._

[Sidenote: 21]

=Battery and Carrier.= Clean top of battery. See that battery and
carrier are in good condition, and that carrier is securely mounted.
Remove cell caps: make sure that vents are open. Test specific gravity
with hydrometer and record readings on work sheet, W.D. AGO Form No.
463. Readings below 1.225 indicate need for recharge, or battery
failure. Variation between cells of more then 0.025 must be reported.
Read and record voltage of battery (6‐volt reading is normal). Bring
electrolyte to 5/16 inch above tops of plates, using clean, drinkable
water. If excessive looseness of battery in case is noted, check for
presence of rubber pad in bottom of case, and make sure rubber pad is
installed on top of battery, when battery service is completed.

[Sidenote: 22]

=Battery Wires and Terminals.= Inspect battery for good condition and
secure connections. Look for worn spots in wire insulation. Oil the
felt washers on battery terminals.

[Sidenote: 23]

=Electrical Wiring.= Inspect all electric wiring to see that it is in
good condition, securely attached, and connected. Look for worn spots
in insulation.

[Sidenote: 24]

=Generator Drive and Mounting, and Relay.= Inspect generator for secure
mounting. After removing left footboard assembly, remove generator and
cover. Examine commutator for cleanliness, good condition, or excessive
wear. If commutator is dirty, it must be cleaned with No. 00 sandpaper.
Blow out with compressed air. If commutator is in bad condition or
excessively worn, replace generator. Remove relay cover, being careful
to avoid damage to mechanism, and inspect for cleanliness. Blow out
with air if wet or dirty. CAUTION: _Do not attempt to adjust relay, or
to clean it in any other manner._

[Sidenote: 25]

=Timer= (=Circuit Breaker=). Clean and remove timer cover. See that
wiring leads are securely connected and that inside of the timer is
clean. Inspect breaker points to see that they are clean, well‐lined,
engaging squarely, and are not excessively pitted, burned, or worn.
See that condenser mounting screw is tight. Breaker lever should be
free on its pivot and well insulated from the pivot pin. Determine if
breaker arm spring exerts normal force against arm. Examine camshaft
by hand‐feel to see whether it is excessively worn in its bushings; if
camshaft bushings are worn excessively, install new timer. If points
are slightly burned or pitted, dress them with a fine file. If breaker
points are unserviceable, install a new set, taking care to aline them
and to adjust gap to 0.022 inch. Apply one drop of oil to breaker arm
pivot pin. Use clean cloth to wipe cam and then coat with a very light
film of light grease. CAUTION: _Be careful to avoid getting oil or
grease on breaker points._

[Sidenote: 26]

=Spark Plugs.= Remove spark plugs, clean with sandblast cleaner, and
inspect for cracked insulators: inspect electrodes for good condition
and adjust gap to 0.025 to 0.030 inch; replace faulty plugs. Be sure
to install new gasket with new plug. Inspect radio suppressors on plug
cables for good condition and secure attachment.

[Sidenote: 27]

=Ignition and Light Switch.= Make sure that the switch is in good
condition and operating properly in all positions.

[Sidenote: 28]

=Lights, Service and Blackout.= See that all lights are clean, in good
condition, properly aimed, and securely mounted. Tactical situation
permitting, turn switch to each of its positions and observe whether
service and blackout lights operate properly, and whether they go out
when switched off. Operate dimmer switch on left handle bar to see
whether it depresses beam of service headlight. Apply foot brake for
check of both blackout and service stop light operation. Inspect lenses
for breakage, and headlight reflector for discoloration. Clean all
lenses.

[Sidenote: 29]

=Horn.= Tactical situation permitting, sound horn to test for normal
signal. Examine horn for good condition, secure mounting, and tight
wiring connections.

[Sidenote: 30]

=Cylinder Heads.= If cylinder head gaskets show signs of leakage,
tighten head bolts: if leakage persists, new gaskets should be
installed. A head bolt wrench (Fed‐Stock No. 41-W-1525) is available
with which head bolts can be tightened without removing tanks for
wrench clearance. If tanks are removed to permit taking off heads and
installing new gaskets, bolts should then be tightened evenly with a
torque wrench to a tension of 60 foot‐pounds minimum, or 65 foot‐pounds
maximum, when engine is cold.

[Sidenote: 31]

=Cylinder Hold‐down Nuts.= If these nuts are loose, or there is
excessive oil leakage around cylinder bases, tighten nuts evenly when
engine is cold. If excessive leakage persists, new gaskets should be
installed. CAUTION: _If cylinder base nuts are loose, perform item 36
before starting engine._

[Sidenote: 32]

=Engine Mountings.= Inspect top engine mounting bracket and bolt for
good condition and security. CAUTION: _Tight seating of the engine
bracket mounting bolt is a necessity for effective radio bonding.
Inspect four lower engine mounting bolts for signs of looseness.
Tighten as required._

[Sidenote: 33]

=Engine Crankcase.= Examine engine crankcase for good condition and for
leaks. Make sure timing gear cover screws, and oil feed and scavenger
pump nuts, are tight.

[Sidenote: 34]

=Intake Manifold.= Examine manifold for good condition and secure
mounting. Make sure manifold nuts are tight.

[Sidenote: 35]

=Muffler and Exhaust Pipes.= Inspect muffler and exhaust pipes for good
condition, secure mounting, and for leaks. Be sure tail pipe opening is
not restricted.

[Sidenote: 36]

=Valve Mechanism.= When engine is cold, adjust valve tappet clearance
to 0.004-inch minimum, 0.005-inch maximum on intake valve; 0.006-inch
minimum, 0.007-inch maximum on exhaust valve. See that valve springs
are in good condition and properly secured; that valve tappet adjusting
screws and lock nuts are in good condition; and that valve covers are
in good condition, secure, and not leaking oil.

[Sidenote: 37]

=Starter.= Examine pedal, crank, and return spring for good condition,
correct assembly, and secure mounting. Starter should operate without
binding, and return spring should bring starter crank to its disengaged
position when foot pressure is removed. CAUTION: _Make sure that
starter crank pinch bolt is installed with head of bolt toward rear of
vehicle when crank is in upright position._

[Sidenote: 38]

=Engine Cooling Fins.= Inspect engine cooling fins for good condition
and cleanliness. Remove all dirt or foreign matter. Do not apply paint
to cooling fins.

[Sidenote: 39]

=Filler Caps and Vents.= Wipe dirt and dust from filler caps of fuel
and oil tanks. Inspect caps and gaskets to see that they are in good
condition. Note whether vent in fuel filler cap is open. Reinstall
caps, observing that each locks properly on filler neck. Do not
interchange fuel and oil tank filler caps.

[Sidenote: 40]

=Fuel Tank Valves and Lines.= See that valves and lines are in good
condition, secure, and not leaking. Test fuel shut‐off valve for ample
friction to hold valve in reserve position. See that valve lifts freely
enough to operate satisfactorily.

[Sidenote: 41]

=Oil System Leaks.= Examine oil tank, oil lines, vent line, and
connections for good condition, secure attachment, and for leaks.

[Sidenote: 42]

=Carburetor and Fuel Filter= (=Gasoline Strainer=). Examine carburetor
and fuel filter for good condition, secure connections, and for leaks.
Shut off fuel tank valve and remove filter (strainer) cap and screen.
Wash cap and screen in dry‐cleaning solvent, and open shut‐off valve
slightly to flush filter body. Reassemble screen, gaskets, and cap,
being careful not to damage gaskets. Use new gaskets if necessary.
Drain water and foreign matter from carburetor bowl by removing bowl
drain plug. Open shut‐off valve slightly to flush carburetor bowl while
plug is out. Replace plug, being careful to avoid crossing threads.
Open fuel tank shut‐off valve and check for leaks.

[Sidenote: 43]

=Air Cleaner.= Remove oil cup; inspect condition of oil, and amount of
sediment. If service is required, remove filter elements, clean and
fill cup to NORMAL level. Wash elements in dry‐cleaning solvent, dry
thoroughly with compressed air, immerse each element in oil in cup, and
reassemble elements and oil cup to air cleaner body immediately. Make
sure gaskets are in good condition. NOTE: _Early type round cleaner
does not have removable filter element; therefore, the complete cleaner
body must be removed to wash element._

[Sidenote: 44]

=Gearshift Lever and Linkage.= See that gearshift lever and linkage
are in good condition, secure, and not excessively worn. Lubricate
all joints with a few drops of engine oil. Adjust shifter lever so
that when moved to any gear position in shifter guide on tank, the
transmission is shifted to full engagement in corresponding gear.

[Sidenote: 45]

=Primary Drive.= Remove inspection hole cover from front chain guard.
With clutch engaged and transmission in neutral, rotate primary chain
to position of least slack. Check chain for 1/2-inch deflection.
Deflection measurement should be total up‐and‐down free movement.
Inspect chain for adequate lubrication. Loosen front and rear chain
oiler adjusting screws two turns each. Do not remove screws. Idle
engine 1 minute, then tighten screws firmly, but do not force. This
operation serves to flush control valves and rear chain oiler pipe.

[Sidenote: 46]

=Clutch Pedal and Linkage.= Inspect clutch pedal clevis connections and
cable to see that they are in good condition and not excessively worn.
Check free travel of clutch pedal to make sure it is within specified
limits. With foot pedal in fully disengaged position (heel against
footboard) clutch release lever must clear sprocket cover stud and nut
by about 1/16 inch: with foot pedal in fully engaged position, clutch
release lever must have between 1/8- and 1/4-inch of free movement
on end of foot pedal cable. Lubricate all joints with a few drops of
engine oil, including cable at each end of cable housing.

[Sidenote: 47]

=Rear Chain and Guard.= Inspect rear chain guard for good condition
and secure mounting. Remove chain, wash thoroughly in dry‐cleaning
solvent, and hang it up to dry. See that chain is in good condition,
not excessively worn, and has no broken rollers on side plates. Soak
chain in SAE 10 engine oil for a short period of time to allow oil
to penetrate into all rollers; drain chain, and wipe off excess oil.
Inspect countershaft sprocket, and rear wheel sprocket to see that they
are in good condition, not excessively worn, and that rear sprocket
rivets are tight. Do not reinstall chain until item 71 has been
performed. When reinstalling chain, make sure that connecting link is
in good condition and securely locked. See that open end of connecting
link spring clip is trailing in direction of chain travel. Adjust chain
(paragraph 60).

[Sidenote: 48]

=Final Drive Sprockets.= Inspection of final drive sprockets is made
when performing item 47.

[Sidenote: 50]

=Paint and Markings.= Examine vehicle for good condition and see that
paint is not rubbed to a polish, and has no bare spots that might rust
or reflect light. See that vehicle markings are legible.

[Sidenote: 51]

=Frame.= Examine frame for good condition; observe whether it seems to
be sprung out of alinement.

[Sidenote: 52]

=Steering Head and Fork Stem.= Raise front end of vehicle by placing
blocks under skid plate. Complete all following items to and including
item 71, before lowering vehicle to ground. Examine steering head and
fork stems for good condition. Note whether there is up‐and‐down play
caused by loose bearings. Move handle bars through complete range
and observe if there is any binding which might indicate improperly
adjusted or defective bearings.

[Sidenote: 53]

=Handle Bars.= Examine handle bars for good condition and secure
mounting.

[Sidenote: 54]

=Throttle Control.= See that grip is in good condition, that throttle
opens and closes completely as grip is turned to its extreme positions,
and that control wire and housing are in good condition and secure.
Lubricate lightly through hole in rear of grip to avoid rusting and
“freezing.” If grip does not rotate freely, disassemble grip, clean,
and lubricate spiral control parts.

[Sidenote: 55]

=Spark Control.= See that grip is in good condition, that spark is
fully advanced and retarded as the grip is turned to its extreme
positions; that the control wire and housing are in good condition and
secure. Lubricate lightly through hole in rear of grip to avoid rusting
and “freezing.” If grip does not rotate freely, disassemble grip,
clean, and lubricate spiral control parts.

[Sidenote: 57]

=Rear View Mirror.= Clean rear view mirror and examine for good
condition and secure mounting.

[Sidenote: 58]

=Front Fender= (=Mudguard=). Examine front fender for good condition
and secure mounting; see that fender does not scrape tire.

[Sidenote: 59]

=Weapon Carrier.= Inspect weapon carrier for good condition and secure
mounting.

[Sidenote: 60]

=Ammunition Box.= See that ammunition box and cover are in good
condition and securely attached.

[Sidenote: 61]

=Front Springs.= See that front springs and their mountings are in good
condition, correctly assembled, and secure.

[Sidenote: 62]

=Front Forks.= See that front forks are in good condition and securely
mounted.

[Sidenote: 63]

=Front Fork Rocker Plates (Rocker Arms).= See that front fork rocket
plates are in good condition, secure, and not excessively worn. Tighten
rocker plate stud nuts securely.

[Sidenote: 64]

=Front Fork Damper.= Inspect steering damper for good condition and to
see that it operates freely. Observe whether friction disks are glazed,
coated with grease, or excessively worn.

[Sidenote: 65]

=Front Brake and Control Linkage.= See that control linkage operates
freely, that all connections are tight, and that brake is adjusted so
that end of hand lever has 1/4 free travel before meeting resistance.
Look for any indications of a cracked or excessively worn brake drum:
badly worn, loose, or grease‐saturated linings. If there are any
such indications, remove wheel for closer inspection. Look for badly
worn brake side cover bushing, shackle bushings and studs, or brake
operating stud bearing. Apply a few drops of engine oil to control
cable, especially at control housing oiler at left handle bar, and to
pin joints.

[Sidenote: 66]

=Front Wheel Alinement and Spokes.= Examine front wheel spokes for
presence, good condition, and tightness. If loose spokes are found,
tighten evenly, taking care not to distort rim out‐of‐round, or to
cause run‐out. Examine rim for good condition, and spin wheel to see
that it has no appreciable run‐out.

[Sidenote: 67]

=Front Wheel Bearings.= Inspect wheel to see whether bearings are
excessively loose. Wheel should have slight amount of side play at
rim. Spin wheel and listen for unusual noises which might indicate dry
or defective bearings or races. Observe for excessive grease leak.
If wheel is found to need only slight cone readjustment to correct
excessive bearing play, remove wheel and make this adjustment (par.
126). If indications are found that hub is otherwise in bad order,
replace wheel.

EACH SIXTH 1,000-MILE MAINTENANCE SERVICE. Remove front wheel, axle
sleeve and bearing, and, together with wheel hub, clean thoroughly in
dry‐cleaning solvent. Inspect parts for good condition: inspect brake
drum. Inspect lining for good condition and secure attachment, and see
that it is neither excessively worn nor soaked with grease. Repack
bearings, hub, and axle sleeve with specified lubricant. CAUTION: _Make
sure that hands and grease are perfectly clean, and that grease is
forced between balls onto the cone._ Reassemble and adjust bearings
according to instructions in paragraph 126, taking care to see that
wheel is properly alined. If unusual operating conditions, such as
fording streams, have indicated probable contamination of lubricant,
this service should be performed more frequently.

[Sidenote: 68]

=Front Wheel Axle Nuts.= Tighten axle nuts, making sure that cotter
pins are installed. Slot in stabilizer plate must be anchored on
extended end of left‐front rocker plate stud.

[Sidenote: 69]

=Tires, Front and Rear.= Gage tires and inflate to 18 pounds front, and
20 pounds rear (cold). Make sure that valve stems are in good condition
and correctly installed, and that valve caps are present and secure.
Examine tires for cuts, bruises, breaks, and blisters: remove imbedded
glass, nails, or other foreign matter from tire treads; observe treads
for excessive or irregular tire wear. At any inspection when unusual or
irregular tire wear becomes evident, interchange front and rear tires.

[Sidenote: 70]

=Rear Wheel Alinement and Spokes.= With vehicle on rear stand, inspect
in same manner as front wheel (item 66). If it is necessary to aline
wheel in frame, make sure sprockets and chains are in correct alinement.

[Sidenote: 71]

=Rear Wheel Bearings and Seals.= Inspect wheel to see whether bearings
are excessively loose (wheel should have a slight amount of play at
rim). Spin wheel and listen for unusual noise which might indicate
dry or defective bearings. Also observe whether there is excessive
grease leak. Test for excessive end play. If wheel is found to have
considerable side play at rim, indicating excessively worn bearings, or
there is evidence of hub assembly being in bad order otherwise, replace
wheel. If wheel must be replaced, inspect brake drum and lining for
good condition, as indicated in item 75, before reinstalling wheel.
CAUTION: _Make sure that wheel mounting socket screws are tight._

[Sidenote: 72]

=Rear Wheel Axle Nut.= See that rear wheel axle nut is in good
condition and securely tightened.

[Sidenote: 74]

=Rear Fender= (=Mudguard=). Inspect rear fender for good condition and
secure attachment.

[Sidenote: 75]

=Rear Brake and Control Linkage.= See that brake control linkage
operates freely, and that all connections are secure. Look for
indications of badly worn or grease‐saturated linings. If brake
operating lever stands considerably ahead of vertical, excessive lining
wear is indicated. If grease has worked out between brake drum and
brake cover, grease‐saturated linings are indicated. In either case
the wheel should be removed for closer inspection. Inspect drum for
cracks or excessive wear. Make sure wheel mounting socket screws are
tight. Examine linkage for loose or worn pin or clevis, and for missing
washers or cotter pins. Apply a few drops of engine oil to all linkage
joints. Brake pedal should have 1-inch free travel before brake begins
to meet resistance. Adjust length of brake rod at brake operating lever
to provide 1-inch free pedal travel.

[Sidenote: 77]

=Footboard and Rest.= Examine footboard and rest for good condition and
secure attachment.

[Sidenote: 78]

=Saddle Spring and Hinge.= Examine saddle for good condition and secure
mounting, paying particular attention to torn leather, ripped seams,
sagging or broken spring in seat post, and excessive wear in front
hinge. CAUTION: _Make sure that spring wire clip properly locks the
saddle rear hinge clevis pin._

[Sidenote: 79]

=Luggage Carrier.= Examine luggage carrier for good condition and
secure mounting.

[Sidenote: 80]

=Saddle Bags.= Examine saddle bags for good condition, cleanliness, and
secure fastening to luggage carrier. Note particularly whether leather
is torn, seams ripped, or straps and buckles missing or damaged.

[Sidenote: 81]

=Tools, Tire Pump, and Equipment.= Inspect tool kit, tools, tire pump,
and other equipment for good condition, cleanliness, serviceability,
and proper stowage. Make sure that tire pump is securely clamped to
motorcycle frame. Check all items with stowage list (pars. 21, 22 and
23). Make sure that vehicle manuals and Accident Report Form No. 26 are
present on vehicle and legible.

[Sidenote: 82]

=Safety Guards.= Inspect safety guards for good condition and secure
mounting.

[Sidenote: 83]

=Leg Shields.= Inspect leg shields for good condition and secure
mounting. NOTE: _Motorcycles operating in warm weather should not be
equipped with leg shields, as they seriously hamper engine cooling._

[Sidenote: 84]

=Skid Plate.= Examine skid plate for good condition and secure
mounting. CAUTION: _Skid plate must be present._

[Sidenote: 85]

=Vehicle Lubrication.= Lubricate all points of vehicle in accordance
with instructions in this manual, Lubrication Guide, current
lubrication bulletins or directives, and the following instructions:

Any unit that required disassembly for inspection purposes must be
lubricated correctly unless the vehicle is to be deadlined for the
repair of that unit. Use only clean lubricant. Keep all lubricant
containers covered except when used during lubrication. Before applying
lubricant, always wipe dirt from the lubrication fitting or plug so
that dirt will not enter with the lubricant. If lubricant fittings or
plugs are missing or damaged, replace them. Clean the hole in which the
fitting is to be installed, and lubricate after the new fitting has
been installed.

Lubricant must be applied properly. On unsealed joints or bushings,
apply lubricant until it appears at openings. However, lubricate
sparingly the front wheel hub, rear wheel hub, front brake side cover
bushing, front brake operating lever stud, and rear brake operating
lever stud, to prevent grease reaching brake linings. Rider should
be advised whenever wheel bearings are serviced or adjusted, so that
during the next road operation he may determine whether bearings or
brake drums are running hot, due to overtight adjustment of bearings,
or a dragging brake.

Do not apply more than specified amount of lubricant to generator or
timer (circuit breaker). To do so may cause failure of the unit.

Wipe off excess applied lubricant that may drip onto brake or operating
surfaces, soil clothes, or detract from vehicle’s appearance.

Parts or assemblies that have already been lubricated while
disassembled for inspection, gear cases that have been drained and
refilled as mandatory items in the procedure, and those parts that
have been indicated for special lubrication, will be omitted from the
general lubrication of the vehicle.

[Sidenote: 86]

=Final Road Test.= Make a final road test, reinspecting items 2 to 16,
inclusive. Be sure to recheck transmission to see that lubricant is at
correct level and not leaking. Confine this road test to the minimum
distance necessary to make satisfactory observation. Correct or report
all deficiencies found during final road test to designated authority.



Section IX

ORGANIZATION TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT

                          Paragraph
  Tools and equipment       27


27. TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT.

=a.= Refer to SNL-N 19 for common hand tools available to second
echelon.

=b.= Refer to list given below for all special tools available to
second echelon.

       Special Tool                   Manufacturer’s  Federal Stock
       Description                        Number          Number

  Hydrometer, battery, special         HRD 11831-X      18-H-1242

  Tool, repair, drive chain,
    motorcycle universal               HRD 12039-X      41-T-3320

  Tool, spoke tightening,
    special, 3/4-inch, for
    small diameter spokes              IMC 7-T-3259     41-T-3368-20

  Wrench, cyl. base nut, twin          HRD 12650-29     2941-W-872-10

  Wrench, head bolt                    HRD 12047-30A    41-W-1525

  Wrench, manifold, 45-in. twin        HRD 12003-X      41-W-1570-10

  Wrench, spark plug                   HRD 11929-40     41-W-3334

  Wrench, spoke nipple, front wheel    HRD 12032-X      41-W-3339

  Wrench, spoke nipple, heavy
    duty rear wheel                    HRD 12033-39     41-W-3340

  Wrench, tappet and dbl-head
    open-end 7/16- and 1-3/8-in        HRD 11806-31     41-W-3617



Section X

TROUBLE SHOOTING

                              Paragraph
  Introduction                   28
  Engine                         29
  Engine lubricating system      30
  Fuel system                    31
  Ignition system                32
  Generating system              33
  Electrical system              34
  Transmission and clutch        35
  Wheels and chains              36
  Brakes                         37
  Steering                       38


28. INTRODUCTION.

=a.= Trouble shooting for the entire vehicle is given in this section.
The engine trouble shooting paragraph traces trouble to a system
affecting engine performance: for example, fuel or ignition. To
trace trouble to one or more defective components of a system, it is
necessary to refer to the pertinent paragraph of this section when the
defective system or systems have been located in the engine trouble
shooting paragraph.

=b.= The material given in this section applies to the operation of the
vehicle under normal conditions. If extreme conditions of temperature
occur, it is assumed the operator of the vehicle has prepared his
vehicle for use for the conditions encountered.


29. ENGINE.

=a. Instruction.= This subparagraph traces troubles to a system
affecting engine performance. Step b below gives simple engine tests
to determine the mechanical condition of the engine. References in
step b refer to step c for engine mechanical troubles, or to pertinent
paragraphs in this section for system troubles, or when a test
indicates a special unit is faulty, to the pertinent paragraph in this
manual.

(1) ENGINE DOES NOT TURN OVER WHEN FOOT STARTER IS OPERATED.

(_a_) Clutch slipping. Check adjustment (par. 48).

(_b_) Sheared engine sprocket key. Replace (par. 65).

(_c_) Starter clutch stuck by congealed oil. Free starter clutch. Use
proper grade of oil.

(_d_) Starter clutch worn. Refer to maintenance personnel.

(_e_) Engine locked (seized). Refer to organization mechanic.


(2) ENGINE TURNS OVER WHEN CRANKED BUT DOES NOT START.

(_a_) Fuel supply valve closed. Open valve.

(_b_) Empty fuel tank. Fill tank.

(_c_) Fuel system faulty. Refer to paragraph 31.

(_d_) Ignition system faulty. Refer to paragraph 32.

(_e_) Battery weak or dead. Refer to paragraph 34.

(_f_) Insufficient compression. Refer to step b, below.


(3) WEAK COMPRESSION. Refer to step b below for test.

(_a_) Improper valve tappet adjustment. Adjust (par. 43).

(_b_) Valves sticking. Use dry‐cleaning solvent to free valve stems in
guides.

(_c_) Faulty lubrication. Refer to paragraph 20.

(_d_) Loose cylinder head bolts and/or faulty gasket. Tighten head
bolts or replace gasket (par. 41).


(4) OVERHEATING.

(_a_) Faulty fuel system. Refer to paragraph 31.

(_b_) Dirt on cylinders. Clean fins on cylinder, especially the fins on
cylinder head.

(_c_) Defective lubrication system. Refer to paragraph 30.

(_d_) Defective ignition system. Refer to paragraph 32.

(_e_) Idling engine without having vehicle in motion. Do not idle
engine longer than 1 minute.

(_f_) Valve tappet adjustment incorrect. Refer to step b (1) below for
test, to paragraph 43 for adjustment.

(_g_) Drive chains too tight. Adjust (pars. 59 and 60).

(_h_) Excessive carbon deposits. Refer to organization mechanic.


(5) LACK OF POWER.

(_a_) Defective fuel system. Refer to paragraph 31.

(_b_) Defective ignition system. Refer to paragraph 32.

(_c_) Overheating. Refer to step (4) above.

(_d_) Defective lubricating system. Refer to paragraph 30.

(_e_) Poor compression. Refer to step (3) above.

(_f_) Drive chains too tight. Adjust (pars. 59 and 60).

(_g_) Brakes dragging. Adjust (pars. 96 and 97).


(6) POPPING AND SPITTING THROUGH CARBURETOR.

(_a_) Water in fuel. Water may be present in fuel tank and carburetor.
Drain and refill fuel tank and carburetor bowl.

(_b_) Incorrect valve tappet adjustment or sticky valves. Test (step
=b= (1) below). Adjust tappets (par. 43). (_c_) Defective ignition
system. Refer to paragraph 32.

(_d_) Defective fuel system. Refer to paragraph 31.

(_e_) Weak and/or broken valve springs. Refer to higher authority.


(7) SPARK KNOCK.

(_a_) Defective ignition system. Refer to paragraph 32.

(_b_) Excessive carbon deposits. Refer to step b (2) below.

(_c_) Defective fuel system. Refer to paragraph 31.

(_d_) Defective lubrication system. Refer to paragraph 30.


(8) POUNDING AND EXCESSIVE METALLIC NOISE.

(_a_) Front drive chain too loose. Refer to paragraph 36.

(_b_) Engine sprocket loose on shaft.

(_c_) Excessively loose valve tappets. Adjust (par. 43).

(_d_) Engine mounting bolts loose. Tighten.

(_e_) Transmission mounting stud nuts loose. Tighten (par. 60).

(_f_) Spark timing incorrect. Adjust.

(_g_) Internal parts of engine worn or broken. Notify organization
mechanic.

=b. Tests to Determine Mechanical Condition of Engine.=

(1) RINGS AND VALVES. This is a simple compression test. If possible,
make this test with the engine warm. Ignition switch must be off. Crank
engine slowly, placing entire weight of body on starter crank. Engine
compression should sustain the weight of an average size rider several
seconds before crank passes through complete range of its travel. If
engine offers little resistance to starter crank in testing either or
both cylinders, it is an indication that compression is not adequate in
one or both cylinders. No clearance or insufficient clearance at valve
tappets; valves sticking in guides; valves seating poorly; cylinder
heads leaking; spark plugs loose in heads; piston rings badly worn
and/or broken; cylinder and pistons badly worn, or lack of lubrication
could cause the above condition. Make external checks first: See that
oil is in tank, that spark plugs are tight, and examine around cylinder
heads for signs of leaking oil deposits. In extremely cold weather,
resistance to the starter crank is increased by “stiff” oil in engine
and transmission. Therefore, do not mistake this condition to indicate
actual engine compression.

(2) ABNORMAL ENGINE NOISE. Owing to constructional design of the
motorcycle, correct adjustment of the several units and components
is necessary for smooth and normally quiet engine operation. Many
motorcycles have been “deadlined” and engines exchanged because
simple tune‐up service and correct adjustment of components have been
neglected. Rough, jerky, and noisy engine action at low speed riding
is usually caused by excessively loose front and rear drive chains,
or by a transmission being loose in its frame mounting. Fast idling
of engine with the front drive chain too loose, may give the false
impression that the engine bearings and pistons need replacement
service. Engine sprocket loose on its shaft will cause a pounding noise
similar to that of badly worn engine bearings. If front drive chain
is too tight, or engine sprocket and chain are badly worn, a grinding
noise results, seeming to come from the engine. Excessively loose valve
tappets will cause abnormal metallic noise in the valve timing gear
train and engine crankcase. Spark advanced too far will cause rough
engine performance at low speeds as well as spark knock, pounding,
and overheating. Engine pounding and rough operation with consequent
noise, result from loose mounting bolts. Generator mounted to give
insufficient gear‐tooth clearance will cause “howl” in gear case.


30. ENGINE LUBRICATING SYSTEM.

=a.= Action of the oil feed pump is indicated by the red signal light
located in right side of instrument panel. (Red signal light is
normally grounded by the oil pressure switch. When oil pump pressure
is built up several pounds, diaphragm opens the signal light circuit.)
Action of the scavenger (oil return) pump is indicated (engine running)
by oil dripping from 1/8-inch hole in oil return tube (large tube)
inside oil tank, just back of oil gage rod (dip stick) tube. Since
the oil feed pump and scavenger pump are separate units, operated
individually, it is possible (due to faulty unit) for either to
function alone, thus affecting engine oil pressure and return of oil
to the tank. Action of the vent pipe (small pipe) located within the
oil tank is of a “breather” nature; its function not being indicated in
any manner. Before attempting to diagnose trouble in engine lubricating
system, rider must be familiar with and understand indications by
instrument panel signal lights (par. 7 =f=).

=b. Red Signal Light Fails to Burn When Ignition and Light Switch is
Turned On.=

(1) Check other lights to determine if battery is “up” and that switch
and wiring connections between battery and switch are in good order.
See that wire connection is secure and screw is tight on oil pressure
switch terminal. Failure of light to burn after these checks indicates
that either the lamp is burned out or oil pressure switch is faulty.

(2) Test to eliminate the oil pressure switch by removing wire from
switch terminal; ground wire on switch body and note if red light burns
with ignition and light switch in “ON” position. If light burns, it
indicates that oil pressure switch is faulty, and must be replaced.
If light does not burn in making this test, it indicates that lamp is
burned out. Remove panel cover (par. 119) and replace lamp.

=c. Red Signal Light Continues to Burn After Engine Is Operated Above
Idling Speeds.=

(1) Check oil supply in tank. If light fails to go out after engine
is warm, or after 1 minute of operation, further checks must be made
to locate trouble, as indication points to faulty engine lubrication
system, or fault in signal circuit. Eliminate the signal system first.

(2) Test oil pressure signal switch to panel signal light circuit.
Remove wire from oil pressure switch terminal by turning on ignition
and light switch and observing red signal light. If light burns, short
circuit in wiring exists. If light does not burn, it indicates normal
condition, leaving oil pressure switch of the signal circuit to be
tested.

(3) Install new oil pressure switch and start engine. If red signal
light goes out after engine is operated above idling speeds, it
indicates trouble in oil pressure signal switch. If red signal light
continues to burn, it indicates trouble in oil feed pump. Replace pump
(par. 44).

=d. Excessive Smoke Issues from Exhaust and Oil Spray Issues from
Gear Case Breather Outlet.= This is an indication that the scavenger
pump is not draining engine crankcase and returning oil to tank. With
engine running at idle speed, examine oil return in tank. Remove tank
oil cap, and with a small flashlight (tactical situation permitting),
observe whether or not oil is dripping from 1/8-inch hole in oil return
tube. Hole is on under side of tube and is located just back of oil
gage rod tube. If observation is poor, place finger over hole and
feel for pulsation of oil pressure. If oil does not return to tank,
scavenger pump is faulty. Should the crankcase breather valve be
incorrectly timed, smoke will issue from the exhaust, but not as
noticeably as when scavenger pump is not working. Refer to step e below
for this condition.

=e. Smoke Issues from Exhaust and Excessive Oil Condition Exists Around
Cylinder Exhaust Ports= (=where exhaust pipes enter cylinders=). Engine
scavenger pump and crankcase breather valve are one unit, operated by
worm gear located behind engine shaft pinion gear. Although scavenger
pump is not “timed,” the breather valve sleeve which drives it must be
timed to balance the engine lubricating system. If for any reason the
scavenger pump unit is removed from engine base, the breather valve
must be retimed (within the gear case) when pump assembly is replaced.
Incorrectly timed breather valve will force oil past piston rings,
causing some smoke, besides forcing oil out through exhaust ports,
causing excessive oily condition around exhaust pipes where they enter
cylinder ports.


31. FUEL SYSTEM.

=a.= Many symptoms which might be attributed to the air‐fuel system
are, in reality, due to faulty ignition. Before attempting any but the
obviously required adjustments, check the ignition system thoroughly.
Gasoline tank supply valve is a dual purpose valve, and its operation
is explained in paragraph 5 =b=.

=b.= Shut off gasoline supply valve. Disconnect fuel line at strainer,
open valve, and observe free flow of fuel from pipe. If line is
plugged, remove, clean out, and replace.

=c.= Remove, disassemble, clean, and install fuel strainer (par. 72).

=d. Hard Starting, Spitting, and Misfiring Caused by Water in Fuel.=
Remove drain screw from carburetor bowl, drain bowl, and replace screw.
Take care not to cross drain screw threads when replacing. If there is
still evidence of water, dirt, or other foreign matter after bowl is
drained, replace carburetor (pars. 70 and 71). Remove air cleaner oil
cup and inspect for evidence of water in oil. Drain, clean, refill to
correct level mark, and replace cup. Should above procedure fail to
eliminate trouble, drain fuel tank by removing drain plug located under
tank in forward position. Replace drain plug and refill tank with fuel.

=e. Hard Starting, or Missing at Idling and Low Speeds.= Carburetor
low speed circuit in need of adjustment (par. 68). Carburetor high
speed circuit is controlled by a fixed jet.

=f. Impossible to Obtain Satisfactory Carburetor Adjustment: Lean
Spot Between Idling and Up to 30 Miles per Hour Speeds.= Carburetors
in service for some time become dirty and crust forms in the throttle
barrel, making satisfactory low speed adjustment difficult, if not
impossible. Replace carburetor (pars. 70 and 71).

=g. Fuel Leaking from Carburetor.= Evidence of dirt in float valve,
incorrect float level, or faulty float. Replace carburetor (pars. 70
and 71).

=h. Difficult Starting, Fuel Mixture Too Rich.= Air cleaner oil
cup overfilled, or cleaner elements exceptionally dirty, choking off
adequate air supply to carburetor. Check the oil cup level. If oil cup
level is correct, remove, clean, and install cleaner elements (par. 76).


32. IGNITION SYSTEM.

=a.= When checking ignition system for trouble, make the most obvious
and simple checks first. For example: Turn on ignition and light
switch, observe lights to ascertain battery current supply; then check
to see that current is reaching spark coil, circuit breaker, etc.
Faulty spark plugs are responsible for the great majority of engine
ignition troubles. There is no service for spark plugs other than
sandblast cleaning and correct adjustment of electrodes. Questionable
spark plugs must be replaced (par. 83).

=b.= Remedy all poor connections in ignition wiring system (fig. 48).

=c.= Remove circuit breaker cover, operate engine with starter pedal,
and observe opening and closing of circuit breaker points. Correct
point gap when breaker lever fiber is on highest point of cam is 0.022
inch. For adjustment refer to paragraph 84.

=d. Testing for High Tension Spark.= Spark at plug gaps depends
upon condition and operation of circuit breaker points, condition of
condenser, and condition of spark coil and high‐tension cables. Testing
the ignition system is best done by means of elimination, testing
each unit by replacement until trouble is located; then replacing
serviceable units which were removed.

(1) Remove spark plug cable terminal from either plug, leaving other
cable and plug connected (to effect ground return of high‐tension
current); turn engine until circuit breaker points are closed; turn
ignition and light switch on; hold high tension cable terminal 1/4 inch
from cylinder; open and close circuit breaker points with finger and
observe spark jump at gap. If spark jumps gap, it indicates ignition
primary and secondary circuits are complete.

(2) No spark at high‐tension gap calls for testing of primary and
secondary circuits. Turn engine until breaker points are held open;
hold cable end 1/4 inch from cylinder; turn ignition switch on and with
the bit of a screwdriver, make a good ground connection between breaker
movable (lever) point, and the ground. If a good spark is obtained
at high‐tension cable terminal gap when ground connection made by
screwdriver is broken, clean or replace faulty breaker points (par. 84).

(3) If circuit breaker points are in good condition, but no spark (or
a very weak spark) occurs at high‐tension gap, replace condenser (par.
85) and repeat test under step (1) above. If replacement of condenser
does not remedy trouble, replace spark coil (par. 89).

(4) If tests made under steps d (1), (2), and (3) above show ignition
system to be in good order (no units having been replaced), and
ignition trouble still exists, it means that breaker points, condenser,
and spark coil must be replaced with new units and engine road test
made with each replacement until trouble has been located and remedied.

=e. Ignition System Tests Satisfactory but Engine Starts Hard,
Overheats or Misses.= Clearly an indication that spark plugs are
faulty. Remove spark plugs, clean with sandblast, regap points between
0.028 inch to 0.030 inch and reinstall. Replace defective plugs with
new ones of correct (No. 2) heat range (par. 83).

=f. Engine Misses After Warm‐up, or When Quite Hot.= Replacement of
spark plugs should remedy this trouble. If it does not, then either the
condenser or spark coil is at fault. Replace condenser first (par. 85).
If new condenser fails to correct trouble, replace spark coil (par. 89).


33. GENERATING SYSTEM.

=a. Panel Green Signal Light Continues to Burn Above 20 Miles
per Hour.= Correct faulty wiring and connections between battery
and generator. Refer to figure 55. Inspect condition of relay and,
if necessary, replace (par. 95). Inspect brushes and commutator of
generator. Clean commutator if necessary (par. 91). If brushes are
sticking in holders or badly worn, replace generator (pars. 93 and 94).

=b. Generator Output Fails to Keep Battery Charged Although Green
Signal Light Behavior Is Satisfactory.= Test battery: if it will not
hold charge, or is defective, replace (par. 113). If the machine is
used most of the time for night operation, have a higher echelon
increase the generating charging rate. Inspect brushes and commutator
of generator. Clean commutator if necessary (par. 91). If brushes are
badly worn or sticking in holders, replace generator (pars. 93 and 94).


34. ELECTRICAL SYSTEM.

=a. Panel Lamps Do Not Light When Switch Is Turned On.= Examine
each lamp and if burned out, replace (par. 120). Examine battery; if
discharged, replace (par. 113). Remedy defective wiring and connections
(fig. 71). Test light switch: if defective, replace (par. 116). Test
blackout light switch (in lamp body): if defective, replace lamp (par.
114).

=b. Lights Burn Dim but Brighten Up Considerably When Engine Is
Accelerated.= Test battery with hydrometer. If it is not fully charged,
replace (par. 113). Remedy defective wiring, connections, and switches
in circuit (fig. 73). If the battery runs down again after a short
period of operation, have the generator output increased (refer to a
higher echelon).

=c. Lights Exceed Normal Brilliancy When Accelerating Engine.=
Examine battery: if defective, replace (par. 113). Remedy faulty wiring
and connections (fig. 73). Do not forget the ground connection of the
lamp body.

=d. Blackout Stop Lamp and/or Service Stop Lamp Fail to Light.= If
the unit is burned out, replace it (par. 115). If the brake pedal is
not operating switch, remedy the faulty operation. Remedy all faulty
wiring and connections (fig. 73).

=e. Horn Does Not Sound When Ignition and Light Switch Is Turned
On and Horn Button Is Pressed.= Test battery by turning on lights. If
lights are dim, replace battery (par. 113). Remedy defective wiring
and connections (fig. 73). If the horn does not respond to adjustment,
replace (par. 117).


35. TRANSMISSION AND CLUTCH.

=a.= Need for attention to clutch and controls is indicated by clutch
slipping under load or dragging (transmission gears will shift hard and
clash) when in disengaged position. In either case, the first thing to
be checked is adjustment of controls; this being the attention usually
needed. Indication that gear shifter controls are in need of adjustment
is when transmission gears “jump” out of engagement when accelerating
vehicle or when under heavy pull. CAUTION: _This warning must not be
disregarded._

(1) CLUTCH SLIPS WHEN FULLY ENGAGED. Adjust clutch control (par. 48).
Adjust clutch spring tension (par. 48). If the clutch still slips,
replace either the disks, springs, or both (par. 48).

(2) CLUTCH DRAGS WHEN FULLY DISENGAGED. Adjust control (par. 48).
Adjust spring tension (par. 48).

(3) CLUTCH RATTLES WHEN IN DISENGAGED POSITION, ENGINE IDLING. In
this case, the clutch probably was not properly assembled. Refer to
paragraph 51 =a=.

(4) TRANSMISSION “JUMPS” OUT OF GEAR UPON ACCELERATING VEHICLE, OR WHEN
UNDER HEAVY PULL. Adjust shifter lever control linkage (par. 54).

(5) TRANSMISSION GEARS SHIFT HARD OR CLASH WHEN CLUTCH IS FULLY
DISENGAGED. Adjust clutch control linkage and spring tension (par. 48).
Make sure the transmission mounting bolts and units are tight (pars.
57 and 58). Drain and fill transmission with correct lubricant (fig.
10). If the above methods fail to cure the symptom, refer to a higher
authority.


36. WHEELS AND CHAINS.

=a. Transmission Countershaft and Rear Wheel Sprockets Show Excessive
Wear on One Side of Teeth.= Adjust the position of the rear wheel axle
to aline the rear wheel sprocket with the transmission sprocket (par.
60). If they cannot be alined, the frame is out of alinement, and the
trouble must be referred to a higher authority.

=b. Chains Produce Grinding Noise with Engine Idling and Vehicle on
Rear Stand.= If either chain is adjusted too tight, adjust to proper
tension (pars. 59 and 60). Examine both chains for presence of dirt
and grit. If dirty, clean and lubricate them (par. 20 =c= (10)). If
either chain is dry, adjust chain oilers (par. 61). Badly worn chains
and sprockets will cause this symptom; the worn parts must be replaced
(pars. 62 and 63).

=c. Front Chain Dry and/or Red (Rusty) in Appearance.= The chain in
this condition has not been receiving enough lubrication. Adjust chain
oiler (par. 61). If the chain is damaged from lack of oil, replace
(par. 62).

=d. Rough or Jerky Vehicle Operation at Low Speed.= Chains are too
loose. Adjust (pars. 59 and 60).

=e. Excessive Side Play at Rim of Front Wheel.= Adjust bearing cones
(par. 126). If the cones and or hub races are badly worn, replace wheel
(par. 125).

=f. Front Wheel Spinning Test Produces Grinding, Grating Noise (not
in brake).= The wheel bearings are defective. Replace wheel (par. 125).

=g. Rear Wheel Has Excessive Side Play at Rim of Wheel.= The hub
bearings are defective. Replace wheel (par. 127).

=h. Rear Wheel Has Side Play in Excess of 0.010 inch on Axle.= The
thrust washers of hub are worn or damaged. Replace wheel (par. 127).

=i. Rear Wheel Spinning Test Produces Grinding, Grating Noise=
(=chain removed=). Tighten wheel mounting screws. If this does not
correct noise, replace wheel (par. 127).


37. BRAKES.

=a. Rear Brake Does Not Hold When Foot Pedal Is Depressed.= If the
brake linings are wet, operate the vehicle and apply a slight pressure
to the brake pedal to dry out linings. After drying the linings adjust
brake rod length (par. 96 b). If the brake operating lever stands ahead
of the vertical position with brake applied, or the brake does not
hold, replace the defective brake shoes (par. 96).

=b. Rear Brake Squeaks or Chatters When Used.= Tighten side plate
sleeve nut, if it is loose. Adjust shoe position (par. 96). If the
operating camshaft and/or side cover bearing is worn, replace the
assembly (par. 96). If the brake shoe spring is defective, replace
(par. 96). If the lining on the brake shoes is loose, worn, or
defective, replace shoes (par. 96). If the brake drum is worn or
damaged, replace the brake drum and sprocket assembly (par. 96).

=c. Rear Brake Drags (vehicle on rear stand).= Adjust linkage (par.
96). If it still drags, equalize shoe assemblies, and adjust linkage
(par. 96).

=d. Front Brake Does Not Hold When Hand Lever Is Operated.= Adjust
brake control (par. 97). If brakes are wet, operate vehicle a short
distance with slight pressure on brake lever to dry out linings. If
brake does not hold, replace shoes (par. 97).

=e. Front Brake Drags.= Adjust control linkage (par. 97). If brake
still drags, equalize shoes and readjust control linkage (par. 97).

=f. Front Brake Action Rough and/or Chatters.= Adjust control linkage
assembly (par. 97). If malfunction continues, examine brake shoes,
shoe spring, camshaft bearing and side cover bearing. Replace any
defective parts or assemblies (par. 97).


38. STEERING.

=a. Motorcycle Pulls to One Side.= Inspect and correct alinement of
rear wheel (par. 60). If the front forks are bent or twisted, replace
(par. 98). If trouble persists, refer to higher authority.

=b. Motorcycle Weaves from Side to Side.= Adjust steering damper to
suit speed and road conditions. If this fails, inflate tires to correct
pressure. Make sure rear wheel mounting screws are tight. If the
steering head bearings are too tight, weaving will result. Check the
steering head bearings (par. 98), and adjust if necessary.

=c. Motorcycle Shimmies at High Speed.= Inflate tires to correct
pressure. Adjust steering damper to suit speed and road conditions. If
the tire tread is unevenly worn, and shifting tires does not correct
the condition, replace the defective casings. Make sure the axle nuts
are tight. If the rocker plate studs and bushings are badly worn, or
the fork springs are broken, replace (par. 98).



Section XI

ENGINE


                                 Paragraph
  Description and data              39
  Tune‐up                           40
  Replacement of head gasket        41
  Carbon removal                    42
  Valve tappet adjustment           43
  Replacement of oil feed pump      44


39. DESCRIPTION AND DATA.

=a. Description.= This 2‐cylinder, V‐type, air‐cooled gasoline engine
of L‐head design operates on the 4‐stroke, 4‐cycle principle. Flywheel
and connecting rod assemblies operate on roller bearings. Engine is
fitted with low‐expansion aluminum alloy, cam‐ground, horizontally
slotted pistons and with deep‐finned aluminum cylinder heads. As viewed
from left side of vehicle (drive chain side), rotation of engine is
counterclockwise.

=b.= Lubrication system is of dry‐sump type, in which oil supply
is maintained in a tank away from engine. Oil is circulated by a
supply feed pump and a scavenger, return pump. This oil circulating
system plays a most important part in cooling the engine as well as
lubricating it.

=c. Data.=

  Type of engine                 2‐cylinder, V‐type, L‐head,
                                    air‐cooled
  Cylinder bore                  2-3/4 in.
  Stroke                         3-13⁄16 in.
  Piston displacement            45.12 cu in.
  Compression ratio              5.0:1
  Horsepower (N.A.C.C. Rating)   6.05

  Engine number (serial), left side of engine base, just below front
  cylinder.


40. TUNE‐UP.

=a.= Tune‐up consists of making correct adjustment to valve tappets,
circuit breaker ignition points, spark plug electrodes: checking and
correcting ignition timing; draining and flushing carburetor bowl;
cleaning and flushing gasoline strainer; cleaning muffler outlet,
servicing air cleaner, and adjusting carburetor.

(1) Valve tappet adjustment (par. 43).

(2) Circuit breaker point adjustment (par. 84).

(3) Spark plug service (par. 83).

(4) Timing ignition (par. 86).

(5) Draining carburetor bowl (par. 73).

(6) Cleaning fuel strainer (par. 72).

(7) Cleaning muffler outlet requires freeing outlet of carbon deposits,
caked dirt, oil, etc., with blade of screwdriver, or other suitable
tool. Do not enlarge outlet size when cleaning.

(8) Servicing air cleaner (par. 76).

(9) Adjusting carburetor (par. 68).

[Illustration:

  A—CYLINDER BRACKET SPACERS AND WASHERS
  B—CYLINDER BRACKET AND FRAME BOLT
  C—CYLINDER UPPER MOUNTING BRACKET
  D—SPARK CABLE CLIP
  E—CYLINDER BRACKET BOLTS
  F—OIL RETURN PIPE CONNECTION HOLLOW BOLT AND WASHERS

RA PD 315711

_Figure 15—Disassembly for Head Gasket Replacement_]


41. REPLACEMENT OF HEAD GASKET (fig. 15).

=a. Removal.= Refer to figure 15, illustrating necessary parts and
units to be removed to perform this operation.

(1) Remove instrument panel cover (par. 119).

(2) Remove gasoline tank and oil tank (par. 107).

(3) Remove cylinder head bracket to frame lug bolt: this will free
clamp which secures front spark plug cable. Pay particular attention
to shim washers placed between cylinder head bracket and frame lug, as
these washers must be replaced when installing cylinder head.

(4) Remove spark plug, or plugs.

(5) Remove cylinder head bolts, using head bolt wrench 41-W-1525. NOTE:
_On some 42 WLA models, plain washers (0.095-inch thick), in addition
to regular (heavy) cylinder head bolt washers, were used to prevent
cylinder head bolts from bottoming._

(6) Perform carbon removal (head only). Refer to paragraph 42.


=b. Installing Gasket and Head= (fig. 15).

(1) Clean top of cylinder. Apply a light application of grease or oil
to both sides of gasket before locating on cylinder head. Place head on
cylinder.

(2) Install head bolts, using heavy washers (also 0.095-inch thick
plain washers, if any were removed). If in doubt as to use of
0.095-inch thick washers in addition to regular washers, measure depth
of bolt holes in cylinder head. Head having hole depth of 31/32 inch
must use the 0.095-inch thick washers in addition to regular washers.
Head having bolt hole depth of 1-1/16 inch does not require the
0.095-inch thick washers.

(3) Install cylinder frame bracket with the two long bolts, special
(spool‐shaped) spacers, and flat washers. The spacers go between
cylinder heads and frame bracket. A flat washer goes under the head of
each long cylinder bolt, above the bracket; some engines may have flat
washers between the spacers and the bracket.

(4) Tighten head bolts evenly to ensure a tight cylinder head joint.
Use head bolt wrench 41-W-1525, first turning down bolts just snug,
then tightening each bolt 1/8 to 1/4 turn at a time, until all are
securely tightened. If torque wrench is available, tighten head bolts
to 60 foot‐pounds minimum, 65 foot‐pounds maximum tension when engine
is cold.


42. CARBON REMOVAL.

=a.= At time cylinder head is removed for gasket replacement, carbon
must be removed from head only.


43. VALVE TAPPET ADJUSTMENT (fig. 16).

=a. Adjust Tappets with Engine Cold.= Before loosening valve spring
covers, a light application of oil around top edge of each cover will
facilitate raising cover without damage to seal packing.

(1) Loosen valve spring covers; use tappet and valve cover wrench
41-W-3617.

(2) Before checking or adjusting tappet clearance, make sure valve is
seated and that tappet is at lowest position, by turning engine ahead
until like tappet (inlet or exhaust, whichever one is being adjusted)
in the other cylinder is at highest position (valve fully open). Inlet
valves are located nearest the carburetor manifold.

[Illustration: RA PD 310211

_Figure 16—Valve Tappet Adjustment_]

(4) Loosen adjusting screw lock nut (“2,” fig. 16) slightly before
turning adjusting screw (fig. 16).

(5) Adjust inlet valve tappets to 0.004-inch minimum, and 0.005-inch
maximum clearance between valve stems and tappet (“1” and “4,” fig.
16). Use thickness gage to determine clearance; recheck (correcting if
necessary) clearance after lock nut has been securely tightened.

(6) Adjust exhaust valve tappets to 0.006-inch minimum, and 0.007-inch
maximum clearance between valve stems and tappet. Use thickness gage to
determine clearance; recheck (correcting if necessary) clearance after
lock nut has been securely tightened.

(7) Before turning down valve spring covers, inspect paper gasket
between each cover and tappet guide. If broken or damaged, fit a new
gasket to prevent oil leak. Turn down and securely tighten valve spring
covers.

[Illustration: RA PD 315712

_Figure 17—Oil Pump Removed_]


44. REPLACEMENT OF OIL FEED PUMP (fig. 17).

=a. Removal.=

(1) Disconnect oil tank feed pipe at oil tank. Install nipple cap on
tank nipple to prevent oil from running out, or drain tank. Disconnect
oil feed pipe from oil pump nipple.

(2) Oil pump is secured to engine gear case cover by one hexagon head
bolt and three nuts. Two of the nuts are extra long to provide wrench
clearance, and their location should be noted so they will be put back
where they belong when reinstalling pump. After removing screw and
nuts, remove pump. Unless a new pump gasket is available, take care
not to damage or break the old one, as this is a very special gasket
concerning both thickness and holes provided for oil channels. A
“homemade” gasket may put oiling system completely out of commission.

=b. Installing Oil Pump.=

(1) Clean surface of pump body mounting on gear case cover and see that
gasket is in good condition. Clean face of oil pump body.

(2) Start pump on mounting studs, turn engine slowly and press lightly
against pump until driving dogs on end of cam gear shaft line up with
and drop into driving slot in oil pump rotor.

(3) Insert hexagon‐head bolt and lock washer, and install the three
lock washers and nuts (two are long extension nuts) on pump mounting
studs. Make sure to replace the two extra long nuts on the studs from
which they were originally removed.

(4) Tighten mounting bolt and three nuts securely.

(5) Connect oil feed pipe to oil pump nipple. Remove nipple cap from
tank nipple and connect upper end of oil feed pipe to this nipple.
Tighten nipple nuts securely.



Section XII

ENGINE—REMOVAL AND INSTALLATION


                   Paragraph
  Remove engine       45
  Install engine      46


=45. REMOVE ENGINE= (figs. 18, 19, and 20).

=a.= A study of figures 18 and 19 will provide a good picture of the
steps necessary for engine removal. Do not attempt any short cut
methods, as this would consume more time and possibly cause damage to
parts or unit assemblies.

(1) Disconnect battery ground wire at frame lug connection on right
side of vehicle.

(2) To disconnect brake front rod from bell crank (located on right
side of rear support rod), remove cotter pin and plain washer.

(3) Loosen footboard rear support stud nut and remove footboard front
stud nut, then pull footboard outward to free right front end of safety
guard. Disconnect brake front rod at bell crank. Remove bolt which
secures front exhaust pipe clamp. Remove nut from rear support rod,
freeing stop light switch and rear end of side bar. Remove nut from
front support rod, freeing footboard and brake assembly for removal.

(4) Remove the two rear mounting bolts and drop rear end of skid plate
(fig. 37).

(5) Remove muffler (par. 81).

(6) Disconnect oil pipe from tank and install nipple cap on oil tank
feed pipe nipple to prevent oil from running out, or drain tank.
Disconnect pipe from oil pump and remove oil pipe.

(7) Disconnect spark control wire at circuit breaker lever, and free
control housing clamp at cylinder base.

(8) Disconnect brake rear rod from bell crank.

(9) Disconnect red wire and black wire from front end of relay; also
green wire from generator terminal.

(10) Remove spark plugs.

(11) Remove engine top mounting (cylinder head bracket) bracket to
frame lug bolt: this also frees front spark plug cable clamp. Pay
particular attention to shim washers (if any) between cylinder head
bracket and frame lug; these will have to be installed in the original
position.

(12) Remove lever bottom bolt, freeing gear shifter lever from shifter
rod.

[Illustration: RA PD 315713

  =A=—LEFT FOOTBOARD, CLUTCH PEDAL AND SIDEBAR ASSEMBLY AND MOUNTING
        NUTS AND WASHERS
  =B=—SPARK CONTROL WIRE AND HOUSING
  =C=—ENGINE SPROCKET, KEY, NUT AND FRONT DRIVE CHAIN
  =D=—ENGINE SPROCKET SHAFT
  =E=—REAR SUPPORT ROD
  =F=—INNER CHAIN GUARD
  =G=—AIR CLEANER AND BRACKET ASSEMBLY
  =H=—OUTER CHAIN GUARD REAR MOUNTING BOLT, WASHER, SPRING, NUT AND
        COTTER PIN
  =J=—SPARK COIL REAR TERMINAL NUT, WASHER AND SCREW
  =K=—OUTER CHAIN GUARD
  =L=—AIR CLEANER BRACKET UPPER MOUNTING BOLT NUTS AND WASHERS
  =M=—AIR CLEANER HOSE AND CARBURETOR FITTING ASSEMBLY AND MOUNTING
        SCREWS
  =N=—ENGINE LEFT REAR BASE MOUNTING BOLT CASTLE NUT, WASHERS AND
        COTTER PIN
  =O=—REAR SUPPORT ROD EXTENDED NUT
  =P=—INNER CHAIN GUARD MOUNTING SCREWS AND LOCKS
  =Q=—FUEL PIPE AND STRAINER ASSEMBLY
  =R=—ENGINE LEFT FRONT BASE MOUNTING BOLT, WASHERS, CASTLE NUT AND
        COTTER PIN
  =S=—GEAR SHIFTER AND ROD ATTACHING BOLT, WASHER AND NUT
  =T=—TANK, LOWER FRONT MOUNTING BOLT, WASHERS AND NUT
  =U=—ENGINE SPROCKET NUT WRENCH

RA PD 315713B

_Figure 18—Disassembly for Engine Removal—Left Side_]

[Illustration: RA PD 315714

  =A=—MUFFLER ASSEMBLY AND MOUNTING BOLTS AND NUTS
  =B=—SKID PLATE
  =C=—STOP LIGHT SWITCH
  =D=—REAR BRAKE ROD FRONT END
  =E=—CYLINDER BRACKET AND FRAME MOUNTING BOLT, SPACING WASHERS,
        SPARK CABLE CLIP AND NUT
  =F=—ENGINE RIGHT FRONT BASE MOUNTING BOLT, CASTLE NUT, WASHERS AND
        COTTER PIN
  =G=—RELAY TERMINAL SCREWS AND WASHERS
  =H=—SAFETY GUARD END
  =J=—RIGHT FOOTBOARD, BRAKE PEDAL AND SIDEBAR ASSEMBLY AND MOUNTING
        NUTS AND WASHERS
  =K=—FRONT EXHAUST PIPE CLAMP, BOLT, WASHER AND NUT
  =L=—EXHAUST PIPE ASSEMBLY
  =M=—SPARK PLUGS AND GASKETS
  =N=—REAR SUPPORT ROD, WASHER AND NUT
  =O=—BRAKE ROD BELLCRANK
  =P=—ENGINE REAR BASE MOUNTING BOLTS, WASHERS, CASTLE NUT AND
        COTTER PIN
  =Q=—OIL FEED PIPE
  =R=—VENT PIPE HOLLOW BOLT AND WASHER
  =S=—VENT PIPE
  =T=—OIL RETURN PIPE

RA PD 315714B

_Figure 19—Disassembly for Engine Removal—Right Side_]

(13) Close fuel tank valve. Remove gasoline pipe from tank nipple and
fuel filter nipple.

(14) Disconnect throttle control wire at carburetor lever.

(15) Disconnect air intake hose connection fitting from carburetor
(four screws) and leave attached to hose. Remove air cleaner from
mounting bracket (par. 78).

[Illustration: RA PD 310215

_Figure 20—Removing Engine_]

(16) Remove front chain guard (par. 102).

(17) Remove engine sprocket (par. 65).

(18) Remove two screws and locks securing inner chain guard to
crankcase.

(19) With 13/16-inch deep socket wrench slipped over rear footboard
support rod stud, remove extended nut, and withdraw support rod from
right side of vehicle.

(20) To disconnect the circuit breaker to coil wire and shielding
ground from coil rear terminals, disconnect oil pressure signal light
wire from oil pressure switch terminal. It will be necessary to free
air cleaner mounting bracket and swing it outward, to gain access to
coil rear shielding ground terminal.

(21) Engine mounting bolts are secured by cotter pins and castle nuts.
Remove all engine mounting bolts, except the one under generator; this
bolt cannot be removed without removing generator; merely push it up
far enough to clear frame engine lug when engine is removed from frame.

(22) Lift and remove engine from right side of frame.


=46. INSTALL ENGINE= (figs. 18, 19, and 20).

a.= Installing the engine is generally the reverse of the procedure
=followed in engine removal. Pay close attention to the following
procedure because checking and adjustment of controls and other items
is necessary to satisfactory vehicle operation.

(1) Lift engine into frame from right side of vehicle. Make sure that
mounting bolt under generator is raised to clear frame engine lug.

(2) Pass remaining three engine mounting bolts up from under side of
frame lugs through crankcase lugs: install plain washers and castle
nuts. Fit plain washer and castle nut on mounting bolt under generator.
Securely tighten all four castle nuts and lock with cotter pins.

(3) Connect circuit breaker to coil wire. Connect wire to coil rear
terminal and ground shielding on coil case terminal.

(4) Connect oil pressure switch wire to switch terminal.

(5) Pass rear footboard support rod through frame lug from right side
of vehicle and install the extended 13/16-inch nut.

(6) Secure inner chain guard by attaching the two screws and locks
mounting inner chain guard to engine base. Drift edge of locks into
screw slots for security.

(7) Install engine sprocket and front drive chain together. See that
engine shaft is clean, sprocket taper clean, and that key is in place
before tightening sprocket nut. Drift nut tight, using hammer on wrench.

(8) Install outer front chain guard (par. 102).

(9) Connect hose and fitting assembly by installing two bolts, washers,
and nuts securing air cleaner to frame bracket; then install four
screws securing hose fitting to carburetor. NOTE: _If cleaner frame
bracket was loosened and shifted to gain access to coil rear terminals,
securely mount bracket before installing air cleaner assembly._

(10) Connect throttle control wire to carburetor lever. Make sure that
throttle closes fully when right grip is turned outward; and that
throttle opens fully when grip is turned inward.

(11) Install fuel pipe. Securely tighten union nuts on tank and fuel
strainer nipples. Open fuel supply valve and check connections for
leaks.

(12) Connect gear shifter lever end to gear shifter rod by tightening
bolt and nut.

(13) Attach engine top mounting bracket (cylinder head bracket) to
frame lug, exercising care in installing required number of thin shims,
together with clamp for front spark plug cable, to fill space between
bracket and frame lug before tightening bolt nut. NOTE: _Frame lug must
be free from paint or grease to make clean “electrical” connection with
plated shims and mounting bracket for adequate radio bonding._

(14) Before installing spark plugs, inspect for cleanliness and correct
electrode adjustment. Service if necessary (par. 83). Replace gaskets
to ensure tight joints.

(15) Connect red and black wires to relay: connect green wire to
generator terminal marked “SWITCH.” Refer to wiring diagram (fig. 73).

(16) Attach rear brake rod to bell crank. Install plain washer and
secure with cotter pin.

(17) Connect spark control wire to circuit breaker lever and secure
control wire housing clamp under cylinder base nut. Make sure that
spark advances fully (lever inward) when control grip (left handle
bar) is turned inward, and that spark retards fully when control grip
is turned outward. Make needed adjustment at control wire and lever
connection.

(18) Remove nipple cap from tank oil pipe nipple (if one was used) and
connect oil feed pipe, securely tightening union nuts at tank and oil
pump.

(19) Position exhaust pipe and muffler assembly and attach rear hanger
frame bolt, washer, and nut. Secure muffler front mounting bracket
bolt, but do not tighten nut until skid plate rear bracket is located
on this bolt.

(20) Lift rear end of skid plate, secure rear mounting bracket and
muffler front mounting bracket with bolt, washer, and nut. Attach skid
plate left side bracket, tightening support rod nut and bracket bolt
and nut.

(21) Install right side footboard, sidebar, and brake pedal assembly.
Install stop light switch bracket on rear support rod before placing
lock washer and tightening nut. Attach front exhaust pipe clamp to
sidebar. Install lock washer, and tighten sidebar front support rod
nut. Attach right end of front safety guard to sidebar with footboard
front support stud. Replace lock washer, and tighten nut. Also tighten
footboard rear support stud nut. Connect stop light switch control to
brake foot pedal.

(22) Attach brake front rod to bell crank; fit plain washer and secure
with cotter pin.

(23) Connect battery ground wire to frame lug on right side of vehicle.

=b.= Check instrument panel signal lights for normal indications, and
see that oil is in tank before starting engine.



Section XIII

CLUTCH


                                          Paragraph
  Description                                47
  Maintenance and adjustment                 48
  Removal of disks                           49
  Inspection of disks and springs            50
  Installation of disks                      51
  Replacement of clutch release bearing      52


=47. DESCRIPTION= (fig. 21).

=a.= Clutch is of simple multiple‐dry‐disk type, having two steel disks
and three lined disks, one of which provides spring action within disk
pack to “cushion” clutch operation.


=48. MAINTENANCE AND ADJUSTMENT= (figs. 22, 23, 24, and 25).

=a.= If clutch adjustment is correctly maintained, clutch will
cause very little trouble. Ease of gear shifting and service life
of transmission gear shifter clutch dogs depend largely upon full
disengagement of the clutch. Clutch adjustment is in two parts; namely,
control linkage and spring tension. Do not adjust clutch spring tension
before correcting control adjustment.

=b. Clutch Control Linkage= (fig. 22). Operation of foot pedal,
control cable, and clutch release lever actuates the push rod through
hollow transmission shaft, disengaging or engaging clutch at will.
Correct adjustment to control cable and release lever must be made
before push rod adjustment is made.


=c. Clutch Control Adjustment= (figs. 23, 24, 25, and 26).

(1) ADJUSTING CABLE LENGTH. With clutch in fully disengaged position
(foot pedal heel down) the clutch release lever must clear the
countershaft sprocket cover stud and/or nut by 1/16 inch. Should clutch
release lever strike sprocket cover and nut, clutch push rod movement
is restricted, and clutch cannot be fully disengaged. Length of control
cable must be adjusted to obtain 1/16-inch clutch release lever and
sprocket cover stud and/or nut clearance. To lengthen or shorten clutch
control cable, cable adjustable end must be removed from foot pedal
stud (figs. 23 and 24). With foot pedal in forward (toe down) position,
remove cotter pin and washer retaining cable end. Release other end
of cable from notch in clutch release lever by pressing release lever
inward and lifting cable end out of notch. Rock the foot pedal to rear
(heel down) position and work cable adjustable end off foot pedal stud.
Loosen lock nut and turn cable end to right (clockwise) to shorten
cable; turn to left (counter‐clockwise) to lengthen cable. Tighten
lock nut, install cable end on foot pedal stud; install washer and
cotter pin, and install other end of cable in clutch release lever
notch.

[Illustration:

  =A=—CLUTCH HUB COMPLETE, WITH LINER, BEARING, STUDS, ETC.
  =B=—HUB DISK LINING.
  =C=—LINING RIVET (6 USED).
  =D=—PIN (7 USED).
  =E=—STUD.
  =F=—SPROCKET COMPLETE WITH DISK SPLINE RING.
  =G=—LINED DISKS (2 USED).
  =H=—PLAIN STEEL DISKS (2 USED).
  =J=—SPRUNG STEEL DISK WITH ONE LINING.
  =K=—RELEASING DISK (WITH PUSH ROD ADJUSTING SCREW AND
        ADJUSTING SCREW).
  =L=—CLUTCH SPRINGS (10 USED).
  =M=—STUD NUT LOCKING WASHER (3 USED).
  =N=—STUD NUT (3 USED).
  =O=—SPRING COMPRESSION COLLAR.
  =P=—PUSH ROD ADJUSTING SCREW.
  =Q=—ADJUSTING SCREW LOCK NUT.
  =R=—RETAINING PLATE LOCK RING (3 USED).
  =S=—BEARING RETAINING PLATE.
  =T=—60 7/32-INCH STEEL BALLS.
  =U=—BALL BEARING RETAINER.

RA PD 310218

_Figure 21—Clutch, Disassembled_]

[Illustration: RA PD 310219

_Figure 22—Clutch Control Linkage_]

[Illustration: RA PD 310220

_Figure 23—Clutch Lever and Stud Nut Clearance_]

[Illustration: RA PD 310221

_Figure 24—Control Cable Length Adjustment_]

[Illustration: RA PD 315715

_Figure 25—Clutch Adjustments_]

(2) ADJUSTING CLEARANCE OF CLUTCH RELEASE LEVER AND PUSH ROD (fig. 25).
With clutch release lever and sprocket cover stud clearance correctly
adjusted (step (1) above), clutch release lever must have between
1/8-inch and 1/4-inch free play at end where control cable engages lever
notch (fig. 25). This free play ensures a fully engaged clutch without
pressure on clutch release bearing. Adjustment is made by means of push
rod adjusting screw located in clutch outer disk. Remove two screws
which secure inspection hole cover to chain guard (fig. 25). If clutch
release lever has less than 1/8-inch free play at end of cable, loosen
push rod adjusting screw lock nut and turn push rod adjusting screw to
the left (counter‐clockwise) to increase amount of free play. If clutch
release lever has more than 1/4-inch free play at end of cable, turn
adjusting screw to the right (clockwise) to decrease amount of free
play. Tighten lock nut after correct adjustment is obtained. Replace
inspection hole cover. CAUTION: _If end of clutch release lever has no
free play as explained above, clutch will not hold when fully engaged.
If too much free play is allowed, clutch will drag when disengaged;
consequently, transmission gears will shift hard, clash, and eventually
become damaged._

[Illustration: RA PD 310223

_Figure 26—Adjusting Clutch Spring Tension_]

=d. Adjusting Clutch Spring Tension= (fig. 26). If clutch slips (does
not hold when starting engine or with vehicle in operation) after
controls have been correctly adjusted (step =c= (1) and (3) above),
spring tension must be increased. NOTE: _Do not increase spring tension
any more than actually required to make clutch hold._

(1) Remove front outer chain guard (par. 102).

(2) Bend down lock lips to free the three clutch adjusting nuts.

(3) Turning nuts to right (clockwise) increases clutch spring tension.
Tighten (turn to right) all three adjusting nuts, one‐half turn at a
time, until clutch holds. Test clutch after each half‐turn of the
three adjusting nuts by cranking engine. Usually a clutch that holds
without any noticeable slippage when cranking engine, also holds on the
road.

(4) After clutch spring tension adjustment is made, bend up nut lock
lips to secure adjusting nuts. Replace any broken or badly damaged
locks.

(5) When a new clutch is originally assembled and adjusted, the
distance from the inner edge of shoulder on spring collar to face of
outer (releasing) disk is 1-3/32 inches (fig. 27). In any case, do
not tighten the three adjusting nuts to the point where inner edge
of shoulder of spring collar is closer than ⅞ inch to face of outer
(releasing) disk. If compressed more, clutch probably cannot be fully
disengaged.

[Illustration: RA PD 310224

_Figure 27—Measuring Distance Between Spring Collar and Disk_]

(7) If clutch still does not hold, after correct control and spring
tension adjustments have been made, clutch “pack” assembly must be
replaced (par. 49).

(8) After making clutch spring tension adjustment, replace outer front
chain guard (par. 102).


49. REMOVAL OF DISKS (figs. 28, 29, and 30).

=a.= Clutch disks can be removed for inspection, cleaning, and/or
replacing. Springs can be removed for checking and/or replacing
without disturbing sprocket, which is integral with clutch shell. It is
advisable to remove releasing (outer) disk, springs, and collar as an
assembly because it is difficult to correctly aline, hold in place, and
reassemble springs in this unit. If springs show signs of overheating,
and appear to be “set,” they should be removed, measured, and replaced
if necessary (par. 50).

[Illustration: RA PD 315716

_Figure 28—Removing Spring and Outer Disk Assembly_]

(1) Remove outer front chain guard (par. 102).

(2) Remove push rod adjusting screw lock nut. Place a large flat
washer, approximately 1/8-inch thick, 1-3/4-inch in diameter with
a 3/8-inch center hole, over push rod adjusting screw, and replace
adjusting screw lock nut just removed (fig. 28). Tighten adjusting
screw lock nut against large washer until the three clutch spring
adjusting nuts are free. Bend nut lock down, remove the three adjusting
nuts, and withdraw releasing (outer) disk and spring assembly as one
unit. Remaining lined and plain steel disks can now be removed from
sprocket and clutch shell unit without further disassembly (fig. 30).
NOTE: _At time lined and plain disks are removed from shell, observe
relative position of each disk in order of correct assembly._


50. INSPECTION OF DISKS AND SPRINGS.

=a. Worn Disk Liners.= When disk liners are worn down flush (or
nearly flush) with rivet heads, disk and liner assembly must be
replaced.

[Illustration: RA PD 315717

_Figure 29—Outer Assembly Removed, Exposing Clutch Disks_]

[Illustration: RA PD 315718

_Figure 30—Clutch Disks, Removed_]

=b. Loose Liner Rivets.= If disk liner rivets are loose, replace disk
and liner assembly with like assembly in new or good order.

=c. Oil‐soaked Disk Liners.= If lined disks are not badly worn, but
are oil‐soaked, wash them thoroughly in clean gasoline and dry with air
or heat.

=d. Shrunken or Weak Springs.= If clutch has been badly overheated
as a result of slippage, springs may be found in shrunken or weakened
condition. Assuming disk liners are not badly worn, weakened springs
are indicated when the three spring tension nuts have been tightened
to make the clutch hold until the distance between spring collar and
releasing (outer) disk is ⅞ inch. If shrunken or weak springs are
suspected, remove them for inspection.

(1) To remove springs, remove push rod adjusting screw lock nut,
freeing spring collar and the 10 springs from the releasing (outer)
disk assembly.

(2) Measure springs for free length. Free length of new clutch springs
is approximately 1-1/2 inches (they may vary plus or minus 1/32 inch).
Old springs found to be shrunk 1/8 inch (total free length of spring
is 1-3/8 inch or less) must be replaced with new springs. NOTE: _Before
replacing springs, select 10 springs that do not vary more than 1/32
inch to make up the assembly._

(3) ASSEMBLING RELEASING DISK, SPRINGS, AND SPRING COLLAR. Place the
10 springs upright on releasing disk to centrally locate each of the
10 stud holes. Place spring collar (flanged edge down) over ends of
springs, locating the collar plate “dimples” in ends of 7 of the
springs. Place the large washer over push rod adjusting screw; tighten
adjusting screw nut, and compress springs lightly. Turn assembly over
and observe alinement of springs and disk holes. If necessary, insert
a 3/8-inch rod through holes to aline springs. Tighten down adjusting
screw nut; assembly is now ready for complete clutch assembly.


51. INSTALLATION OF DISKS (figs. 30, 29, and 28).

=a.= It is important when assembling a clutch to start with a lined
disk. Install the two steel disks so that the antirattle devices are
staggered on splines in the shell, and the “sprung” disk (lined on one
side) is the last of the pack, its lined side facing the steel disk.
Before installing disks, see that bearing retaining plate lock rings
(“R,” fig. 21) are in place on the short studs, and are tight against
the retaining plate. This is to prevent noise in the clutch.

(1) Install one of the two lined disks on clutch hub studs first.

(2) Next, engage one of the two steel disks with the splines within the
clutch shell, with side stamped “OUT” facing outward.

(3) Install the remaining lined disk on the clutch hub studs.

(4) Engage remaining steel disk with shell splines with “OUT” side
facing outward.

(5) Install “sprung” (one side lined) steel disk, lined side inward, on
clutch hub studs.

(6) It will be noted that the three long, threaded‐end, clutch hub
studs are not spaced an equal distance apart. It will also be noted
that the three holes (keyhole shaped) in the spring collar are not
spaced equidistantly. Therefore, when installing releasing disk and
spring assembly on clutch hub studs, the three threaded studs and holes
in spring collar must be alined. Install assembly on studs, replace
the three nut locks, replace the three adjusting nuts, and tighten all
three evenly until the distance between shoulder of spring collar and
face of releasing disk is 1-1/32 inch (fig. 27).

(7) Remove the large washer and replace push rod adjusting screw lock
nut. Do not attempt adjustment of clutch release lever and push rod
adjusting screw until outer front chain guard and footboard have been
installed.

[Illustration: RA PD 315719

_Figure 31—Removing Clutch Releasing Bearing Assembly_]

(8) Install outer front chain guard (par. 102).

(9) Check controls and clutch adjustment. If necessary, correct
according to paragraph 48.


52. REPLACEMENT OF CLUTCH RELEASE BEARING (fig. 31).

=a.= Clutch release lever acts against a thrust bearing and push rod
assembly which actuates clutch releasing disk.

=b. Remove Clutch Release Bearing.= Engage clutch fully (foot pedal
toe down) and disengage clutch control cable end from slotted end of
clutch release lever.

(1) Loosen rear chain guard by removing cap screw which retains rear
chain oil pipe and secures front end of rear drive chain guard to
transmission countershaft sprocket cover.

(2) Remove the four nuts which secure sprocket cover to transmission.

(3) Remove filler plug.

(4) Hold down starter crank with screwdriver.

(5) Remove sprocket cover and clutch release lever assembly. It may be
necessary to pry cover off studs. With cover removed, clutch release
bearing is exposed.

(6) Withdraw clutch release bearing and push rod assembly from
transmission shaft.

=c. Install Clutch Release Bearing.=

(1) Insert push rod with clutch release bearing assembly into
transmission shaft hole, as far as rod will go. See that bearing is
clean and well greased.

(2) Install sprocket cover. Securely tighten the four nuts.

(3) Install cap screw which secures rear chain guard end and chain
oiler pipe clamp to sprocket cover.

(4) Engage clutch control cable end in slotted end of clutch release
lever.

(5) Check clutch release lever for free play at end of cable.



Section XIV

TRANSMISSION


                                        Paragraph
  Description                              53
  Control linkage                          54
  Replacement of foot starter crank        55
  Replacement of starter crank spring      56
  Remove transmission                      57
  Install transmission                     58


53. DESCRIPTION.

=a.= Transmission has three speeds: low, second, and high, and is of
the constant‐mesh, non‐selective type. High gear is direct drive. Since
“dogs” on gear shifter clutches are used to engage transmission gears,
it is of great importance that vehicle clutch is correctly adjusted.
Clutch must be fully disengaged when shifting gears, to prevent
clashing of gears, and possible damage to the shifter clutch “dogs”
and transmission gears. It is also important that gear shifter control
linkage be kept in correct adjustment to ensure full engagement of
shifter clutch driving dogs in all positions, thus preventing possible
damage caused by dogs jumping out of engagement under driving load.
Close fitting and needle roller bearings, within the transmission,
necessitate use of engine oil (seasonal grade) in transmission case for
adequate lubrication.


54. CONTROL LINKAGE (fig. 32).

=a. Transmission Shifted to Adjust Front Drive Chain.= The
transmission is located to receive power from front (engine) drive
chain and transmit power through rear drive chain to rear wheel, and
is movable on its mounting for adjustment of the front (engine) drive
chain. When front (engine) drive chain is adjusted, transmission gear
shifter control linkage is affected. Therefore, after each front drive
chain adjustment, gear shifter control linkage must be checked, and, if
necessary, correctly adjusted to ensure proper gear shifting with full
engagement of the gear shifter clutch driving “dogs” as well as prevent
transmission from jumping out of gear under load.

=b. Checking Gear Shifter Control Linkage.= Before making adjustment
to gear shifter control linkage, make the following checks: See that
all linkage points from transmission gear shifter lever to gear shifter
hand lever are well oiled and free‐working. Check hand lever pivot bolt
nut for tightness. Observe whether there is binding or interference
with shifter rod at any point in the shifting range; this sometimes
results from a bent snifter rod. Check whether or not shifter rod
is correctly adjusted so that when hand lever is moved to any gear
position in tank shifter guide, transmission lever moves to the proper
position to fully engage shifter clutch dogs and shifter cam spring
plunger in cam‐locating notch (inside transmission).

[Illustration: RA PD 310229

_Figure 32—Adjusting Gear Shifter Rod_]

=c. Adjusting Gear Shifter Control Linkage= (fig. 32).

(1) Set hand lever in “N” (neutral) position in shifter guide.

(2) Remove nut and bolt to disconnect shifter rod from hand lever.

(3) With slight backward and forward movement of shifter rod, carefully
“feel” transmission lever into exact position where shifter cam spring
plunger (inside transmission) seats fully in cam‐locating notch.

(4) Next, see that hand lever is in exact “N” (neutral) position in
tank shifter guide.

(5) Readjust length of shifter rod by loosening rod end lock nut, and
turning rod end (onto or off rod as necessary) until its bolt hole
lines up with bolt hole in hand lever.

(6) Replace bolt and tighten nut.

(7) CHECK ADJUSTMENT. It is advisable to shift hand lever into “L”
(low) and “S” (second) gear positions and check shifter rod adjustment
to be sure of having best all‐round adjustment.

(8) When shifter clutches become worn or damaged to the extent of
jumping out of engagement under driving load, even though shifter
control linkage is correctly adjusted, transmission must be removed and
referred to higher authority for service.


55. REPLACEMENT OF FOOT STARTER CRANK.

=a. Remove.=

(1) Remove starter crank clamp bolt nut and remove bolt from crank.

(2) Pull starter crank off squared shaft.

=b. Install.= In installing foot starter crank, notch (for clamp‐bolt
clearance) must be in upward position in squared shaft to put return
spring tension on crank.

(1) Use a ⅝-inch, open‐end wrench and turn square shaft
counterclockwise until bolt slot is upward. Hold shaft in this position
and press starter crank onto shaft until clamping bolt can be inserted.

(2) Insert clamp bolt with bolt head toward rear wheel (crank in upward
position) to provide clearance when starter crank is operated.

(3) Fit lock washer and nut and tighten nut securely.


56. REPLACEMENT OF STARTER CRANK SPRING (fig. 33).

=a.= Starter crank spring fits rather snugly behind rear edge of
countershaft sprocket cover; however, it can be removed and installed
without removing sprocket cover.

=b. Remove.=

(1) Remove foot starter crank (par. 55).

(2) With the blade of a screwdriver or with pliers, pry hooked end of
spring off stud. NOTE: _If spring is broken, this operation will not
be necessary._ Pull on spring end, at same time prying spring free of
sprocket cover so as to pull spring off square shaft.

=c. Install.=

(1) Turn squared shaft so that clamp bolt notch is in bottom position.
Engage square hole in spring on shaft with the hooked spring end to
rear, in line with starter spring stud. Work spring onto shaft, prying
it to rear to clear sprocket cover. Press all the way on squared shaft.

[Illustration: RA PD 315720

_Figure 33—Removing Starter Crank Spring_]

(2) Hook end of spring in place on spring stud.

(3) Install foot starter crank (par. 55).


=57. REMOVE TRANSMISSION= (figs. 34 and 35).

=a.= Transmission and clutch are assembled in one unit and must
be removed and installed together. To make sure trouble is in
transmission, check clutch adjustment (par. 48) and transmission
control linkage (par. 54) before replacing a faulty unit.

[Illustration: RA PD 315721

  =A=—TOOL BOX AND BRACKET ASSEMBLY AND MOUNTING BOLT, WASHER AND NUT
  =B=—BATTERY
  =C=—BATTERY BOX REAR MOUNTING BOLTS, WASHERS, FITTINGS AND NUTS
  =D=—BATTERY BOX ASSEMBLY AND COVER
  =E=—BATTERY BOX FRONT MOUNTING BOLT, WASHERS AND NUT
  =F=—TRANSMISSION AND CLUTCH ASSEMBLY
  =G=—FRONT CHAIN ADJUSTING SCREW
  =H=—TRANSMISSION MOUNTING STUD NUTS AND WASHERS
  =J=—REAR CHAIN OILER PIPE
  =K=—REAR CHAIN GUARD FRONT MOUNTING BOLT AND WASHERS
  =L=—MUFFLER ASSEMBLY AND ATTACHING BOLT, WASHERS AND NUTS
  =M=—REAR BRAKE ROD ASSEMBLY, WASHER AND COTTER PIN
  =N=—REAR CHAIN GUARD
  =O=—REAR BRAKE CLEVIS PIN, WASHERS AND COTTER PIN

RA PD 315721B

_Figure 34—Disassembly for Transmission Removal from Right Side_]

=b. Remove.=

(1) Drop rear end of skid plate (par. 111).

(2) Remove front chain guard (par. 102).

(3) Remove oil bath air cleaner and mounting bracket (par. 80). Lower
bracket bolt also secures clutch cable tube to frame tube bracket on
left side.

(4) Remove engine sprocket and front drive chain (par. 65).

(5) Remove the two mounting screws and locks in engine case to free
inner front chain guard.

(6) Remove tool box from mounting bracket (par. 106). Remove bracket
from frame.

(7) Remove rear brake rod (par. 96).

(8) Remove rear drive chain (par. 63).

(9) Remove rear drive chain guard (par. 102). Remove rear chain oiler
pipe after disconnecting at oil pump.

(10) Remove battery box (par. 105).

(11) Remove nut, washer, and bolt securing clutch tube assembly bracket
to frame bracket on right side of vehicle. Disengage clutch operating
cable end from end of clutch release lever and remove cable and tube
assembly.

(12) Remove gear shifter rod by disconnecting at hand shifter lever and
at transmission gear shifter lever.

(13) Remove the three transmission mounting stud nuts, then remove lock
washers and large plain washers (located under frame bracket), and lift
transmission sufficiently to permit removal of front chain adjusting
screw.

(14) Loosen upper U‐bolts on ignition coil mounting, then remove the
lower U‐bolt nuts and shift coil on frame tube as far as possible
toward the front.

(15) Remove transmission and clutch assembly from vehicle by lifting
complete unit sufficiently to free mounting studs from frame bracket;
then rotate top of transmission backward about 1/4 turn (fig. 34) and
remove unit from left side of frame (fig. 35).


58. INSTALL TRANSMISSION (figs. 34 and 35).

=a. Install from Left Side.= Working from left side of frame, tilt
top of transmission backward, and as unit passes into position, rotate
top forward, until unit is squarely in position and mounting studs pass
through slots in frame mounting bracket.

(1) Shift ignition coil mounting back into correct position and
tighten U‐bolt nuts.

[Illustration: RA PD 315722

_Figure 35—Disassembly for Transmission Removal from Left Side of
Vehicle_

  =A=—LEFT FOOTBOARD, CLUTCH PEDAL AND SIDEBAR ASSEMBLY AND
        MOUNTING NUTS AND WASHERS
  =B=—ENGINE SPROCKET, NUT, KEY AND FRONT CHAIN
  =C=—INNER CHAIN GUARD MOUNTING SCREWS AND LOCKS
  =D=—INNER CHAIN GUARD
  =E=—TRANSMISSION AND CLUTCH ASSEMBLY
  =F=—OUTER CHAIN GUARD
  =G=—OUTER CHAIN GUARD REAR MOUNTING BOLT, WASHER, SPRING, NUT
        AND COTTER PIN
  =H=—AIR CLEANER AND BRACKET ASSEMBLY
  =J=—AIR CLEANER BRACKET UPPER MOUNTING BOLT NUTS AND WASHERS
  =K=—SPARK COIL LOWER MOUNTING U‐BOLT NUTS AND WASHERS
  =L=—CLUTCH CABLE AND HOUSING ASSEMBLY AND MOUNTING BOLTS, WASHERS
        AND NUTS
  =M=—GEAR SHIFTER ROD ASSEMBLY WITH ATTACHING BOLT, WASHERS, PIN
        AND NUT

RA PD 315722B

_Legend for Figure 35—Disassembly for Transmission Removal from Left
Side of Vehicle_]

(2) Install front chain adjusting screw. Lift transmission to engage
screw in frame notch.

(3) Install large plain washers, lock washers, and nuts on the three
transmission mounting studs. Do not tighten.

(4) Install gear shifter rod by connecting to hand shifter lever and
transmission gear shifter lever.

(5) Install clutch operating cable and tube assembly. Connect cable
end to clutch release lever. Position tube assembly bracket to frame
bracket and install bolt, washer, and nut to hold in place.

(6) Install battery box (par. 105).

(7) Install rear drive chain guard (par. 102).

(8) Install rear drive chain (par. 63).

(9) Install rear brake rod (par. 96).

(10) Install tool box bracket and tool box (par. 106).

(11) Secure inner front chain guard to engine base by installing screw
locks and screws. After screws are tightened, drift edge of each lock
into screw slot for security.

(12) Install engine sprocket and front drive chain (par. 65).

(13) If necessary, adjust front drive chain (par. 59).

(14) Securely tighten transmission mounting stud nuts.

(15) Install outer front chain guard cover (par. 102). Connect rear
chain oiler pipe to oil pump.

(16) Install air cleaner and mounting bracket, air hose, and
connections (par. 79).

(17) Lift skid plate into position and install two mounting bolts, lock
washers, and nuts.

(18) Check gear shifter control, and, if necessary, adjust linkage
(par. 54).

(19) Check rear drive chain adjustment and adjust if necessary (par.
60).

(20) Check rear brake adjustment. If necessary, adjust rear brake
linkage (par. 96).

(21) Check clutch controls and adjust if necessary (par. 48).

(22) Before operating vehicle, see that transmission oil level is up to
filler opening (vehicle standing upright).



Section XV

CHAINS AND SPROCKETS


                                           Paragraph
  Adjust front chain                          59
  Adjust rear chain and aline rear wheel      60
  Chain oilers                                61
  Replacement of front chain                  62
  Replacement of rear chain                   63
  Chain repair tool                           64
  Replacement of engine sprocket              65
  Replacement of countershaft sprocket        66


=59. ADJUST FRONT CHAIN= (figs. 36, 37, and 38).

=a.= At the time front chain adjustment is made, inspect chain for
correct lubrication and, if necessary, adjust front chain oiler (par.
61).

=b.= Chains wear unevenly and some stretch may result, making tight
and loose sections. For this reason, engine must be turned and chain
rotated to position of least slack at the time adjustment is made.

=c.= A correctly adjusted front chain has 1/2-inch, or slightly more,
free up‐and‐down movement midway between sprockets, at inspection
hole. Chain must never be run taut (no slack at tightest point). Chain
must never be allowed to run loose enough to cause jerky, noisy action
and/or strike the chain guard.

=d.= Adjustment of front chain is made by shifting transmission on its
mounting base. This will affect adjustment of gear shifter control
linkage, clutch control linkage, and rear chain.

=e. How to Adjust Front Chain.=

(1) Remove inspection hole cover by removing screws and lifting cover
from front outer chain guard, exposing chain (fig. 36).

(2) Obtain tightest chain position by rotating chain to position of
least slack. Test amount of slack by lifting and depressing chain with
finger. Use a free up‐and‐down motion of the finger to make this test.

(3) Loosen the three transmission mounting stud nuts underneath
transmission mounting base. (It is not necessary to drop skid plate
to reach stud nuts (fig. 37).) Transmission can now be shifted on its
mounting base by means of adjusting screw, head of which protrudes
through notch of frame fitting, located at rear of transmission (fig.
38).

[Illustration: RA PD 310233

_Figure 36—Front Chain Inspection Hole Cover Removed_]

(4) Turn adjusting screw clockwise (to the right) to move transmission
backward and tighten front chain. Turn adjusting screw counterclockwise
(to the left) to move transmission forward and loosen front chain.

(5) After moving transmission by means of adjusting screw, check front
chain adjustment; then securely tighten the three transmission mounting
stud nuts and again check chain adjustment, as tightening stud nuts
sometimes changes chain adjustment.

(6) After front chain adjustment has been made, securely tighten the
three transmission mounting stud nuts.

(7) Install front chain inspection hole cover and tighten screws.

(8) Check shifter lever control linkage adjustment (par. 54).

(9) Check clutch control linkage adjustment (par. 48).

[Illustration: RA PD 310234

_Figure 37—Skid Plate Dropped to Show Location of Transmission
Mounting Nuts_]

[Illustration: RA PD 310235

_Figure 38—Transmission Mounting Nuts and Chain Adjusting Screw_]


60. ADJUST REAR CHAIN AND ALINE REAR WHEEL (fig. 39).

=a.= In moving transmission backward on its mounting to tighten
front chain, the rear chain will be loosened. Rear chain must then
be adjusted by moving rear wheel backward. When rear wheel is moved
either forward or backward, adjustment of the rear wheel brake is
affected.

=b.= When checking rear chain for slack midway between the sprockets,
turn wheel and rotate chain to position of least slack. Use free
up‐and‐down movement of finger to lift chain and depress it to
determine tightest position.

[Illustration: RA PD 310236

_Figure 39—Brake Sleeve Nut_]

=c.= At position of least slack, a correctly adjusted rear chain has
1/2-inch, or slightly more, free up‐and‐down movement midway between
sprockets. Chain must never be run taut (no slack at tightest point).
Chain must never be allowed to run loose enough to cause jerky
operation and/or strike the chain guard or other chassis parts.

=d.= At the time rear chain adjustment is made, inspect chain for
correct lubrication and if necessary, adjust rear chain oiler (par. 61).

=e.= Rear chain adjustment and rear wheel alinement are both made by
means of the rear wheel adjusting screws. Therefore, adjustment of
either the chain or the wheel alinement can affect adjustment of the
other, making it necessary to consider both adjustments at the same
time.

(1) Remove rear axle nut and lock washer (right side of vehicle).

(2) Loosen brake sleeve nut enough to allow brake assembly to slide
backward or forward in frame mounting (fig. 39).

(3) Loosen the two (right and left side) rear wheel adjusting screw
lock nuts.

(4) Turn wheel adjusting screws clockwise (to right) to move wheel and
sprocket backward. This tightens chain. NOTE: _If chain is too tight,
turn wheel adjusting screws counterclockwise (to left) so that wheel
can be shifted forward. This will loosen chain._ Always turn the two
wheel adjusting screws an equal number of turns in order to keep wheel
alined.

(5) Check correct alinement of wheel by noting that tire (not tire
rim) runs approximately midway between lower rear frame tubes at the
point where tubes join transmission mounting. It is desirable to have
tire run slightly closer (not more than 1/16 in.) to right than to
left side lower tube. A further check of alinement is observing that
rear sprocket runs centrally in chain. CAUTION: _If rear wheel is not
correctly alined, vehicle steering will be affected, and sprockets will
wear excessively on one side._

(6) With adjustment of chain and wheel alinement completed, securely
tighten wheel adjusting screw lock nuts, and brake sleeve nut: replace
axle lock washer and nut, tightening nut.

(7) Recheck adjustment of chain as tightening brake sleeve nut and axle
nut sometimes changes the chain adjustment.

(8) After tightening rear chain, rear brake may be found too tight.
Check and correct brake adjustment (par. 96).


=61. CHAIN OILERS= (fig. 40).

=a.= Both front and rear chains are automatically lubricated by
engine oil pumps. Chain oilers are adjustable and may need occasional
readjustment to meet lubrication requirements of varied operating
conditions. Chains under most operating conditions require a very small
amount of oil; therefore, chain oilers require very fine adjustment to
supply just enough oil without waste.

=b.= When adjusting chain oilers, it is advisable to add or remove only
one thin washer at a time and inspect chain again after vehicle has run
approximately 100 miles, to determine whether or not further adjustment
is necessary.

=c.= If inspection of front chain through inspection hole reveals that
chain is not getting enough oil, adjust front chain oiler as follows:

(1) Add thin (0.002-inch thick) washer under head of front chain oiler
adjusting screw (fig. 40). Do not remove any washers already under head
of screw.

(2) To check results, refer to step =b= above.

=d.= Evidence of too much oil on front chain requires cutting down on
chain oiler.

[Illustration: RA PD 310237

_Figure 40—Chain Oilers_]

(1) To adjust oiler, remove thin (0.002-inch thick) washer from under
head of front chain oiler adjusting screw (fig. 40).

(2) To check results, refer to step =b= above.

=e.= If inspection reveals that rear chain is not getting enough oil,
and that oil pipe end is open, is not bent, and is directed on chain;
then the rear chain oiler must be adjusted.

(1) Adjust oiler by adding thin (0.002-inch thick) washer under head of
rear chain oiler adjusting screw (fig. 40). Do not remove any washers
already under head of screw.

(2) To check results, refer to step =b= above.

=f.= Evidence of too much oil on rear chain (supplied by oiler)
requires cutting down on chain oiler.

(1) To adjust oiler, remove thin (0.002-inch thick) washer from under
head of rear chain oiler adjusting screw (fig. 40).

(2) To check results, refer to step =b= above.

=g.= At 1000-mile intervals, loosen both front and rear chain oiler
adjusting screws (fig. 40) two turns each. Do not remove screws. Start
and idle engine 1 minute, then tighten screws firmly, but do not force.
This operation serves to flush oiler control valves and rear chain
oiler pipe.


62. REPLACEMENT OF FRONT CHAIN.

=a.= A new or original duplex front chain is endless, not provided with
connecting link, and engine sprocket must be removed in order to remove
or replace chain.

=b. Remove.=

(1) Remove outer front chain guard (par. 102).

(2) Remove engine sprocket (par. 65). Chain can now be lifted off
clutch sprocket.

=c. Install.= When installing a new front chain and/or sprocket, it
may be necessary to shift transmission ahead in order to get chain on
(par. 59 e).

(1) Clean engine shaft taper and sprocket hole.

(2) Place chain on clutch sprocket teeth and install sprocket (par. 65).

(3) Check chain adjustment (par. 59).

(4) Install outer front chain guard (par. 102).


63. REPLACEMENT OF REAR CHAIN (fig. 41).

=a. Remove.= Support vehicle on rear stand. With transmission in “N”
(neutral) position, turn rear wheel until chain connecting link is
located on rear sprocket teeth, about straight back from axle.

(1) Using pliers, lift split end of connecting link spring clip out of
link pin notch, taking care not to damage spring clip. Remove spring
clip from other link pin notch.

(2) Pull off link side plate and push link out of chain ends. Replace
connecting link and spring clip in one end of chain to prevent its loss.

[Illustration: RA PD 310238

_Figure 41—Rear Drive Chain and Connecting Link_]

(3) Pull on lower half of chain, guiding upper part while it rotates
around countershaft sprocket, until removed. If a new rear chain is to
be installed, one end can be linked to the upper half end of old chain
and can be pulled onto countershaft sprocket as old chain is removed.

=b. Install.= When installing a new rear chain and/or countershaft
sprocket, it may be necessary to set rear wheel ahead in order to get
chain on (par. 60).

(1) Start end of chain over countershaft sprocket teeth, using starter
crank to turn sprocket. After chain end has reached front half of
sprocket, it will be necessary to guide end under sprocket and out of
sprocket cover. Center chain so that ends engage rear sprocket teeth,
back of the axle.

(2) Install connecting link, side plate and spring clip. See that open
end of spring clip is to the rear with regard to chain travel (like the
end of an arrow). If original spring clip is bent or damaged, use a new
one.

(3) Adjust rear chain (par. 60).

(4) Check rear brake adjustment (par. 96).


=64. CHAIN REPAIR TOOL= (fig 42).

=a.= Damaged or broken chain links can be replaced with connecting
(repair) links after bad links have been removed. To remove damaged
or broken link, push out chain side plate pins with the chain repair
tool (41-T-3320). Front chain is a double row of duplex chain; rear
chain is a single row chain. The chain tool furnished in the tool kit
is designed to accommodate both. To put a connecting link in the front
chain, it will be necessary to remove front chain guard (par. 102).

[Illustration: RA PD 310239

_Figure 42—Chain Repair Tool in Use_]

=b.= When connecting (repair) links have been fitted to chain, make
sure that spring clips are correctly and securely locked on link pin
ends.


65. REPLACEMENT OF ENGINE SPROCKET.

=a. Remove.=

(1) Remove front outer chain guard (par. 102).

(2) Remove engine sprocket nut (right‐hand thread). It will be
necessary to strike wrench with a hammer to loosen nut.

(3) Give flat surface of engine sprocket, near outer edge, a light
but sharp rap with a hammer, being careful not to strike and damage
sprocket teeth. Take care not to lose sprocket shaft key.

=b. Install.= If new sprocket is being installed, it may be necessary
to shift transmission forward to get chain to fit on sprockets (par.
59).

(1) Thoroughly clean engine shaft taper and see that key is in place.
Clean sprocket taper hole, fit front chain on sprocket teeth, and
rotate chain until keyway in sprocket lines up with key in engine
shaft. Slip sprocket onto engine shaft, install nut, and tighten
securely. Strike wrench with a hammer to make sure sprocket nut is very
tight.

(2) Install front outer chain guard (par. 102).


66. REPLACEMENT OF COUNTERSHAFT SPROCKET.

=a. Remove.=

(1) Remove foot starter crank (par. 55).

(2) Remove starter crank spring (par. 56).

(3) Remove countershaft sprocket cover (par. 52).

(4) Bend back extension of sprocket nut lock.

(5) Remove sprocket retaining nut. It will be necessary to strike
wrench with a hammer to loosen nut.

(6) Give sprocket a light but sharp rap with a hammer near outer edge,
being careful not to strike the sprocket teeth, and remove sprocket
from shaft taper. Do not lose the two sprocket shaft keys.

=b. Install.=

(1) Clean shaft taper and taper hole in countershaft sprocket. Install
the two keys.

(2) Install sprocket on shaft. Place rear chain on sprocket before
installing sprocket cover.

(3) Examine nut lock and, if badly damaged, use a new one.

(4) Install sprocket retaining nut. Tighten by striking wrench with a
hammer. NOTE: _This nut must be tight._ Bend up extension of nut lock
against side of nut.

(5) It will be easier to install starter crank spring at this step to
avoid interference with sprocket cover.

(6) Install sprocket cover.

(7) Install starter crank.



Section XVI

FUEL SYSTEM


                                     Paragraph
  General                               67
  Carburetor adjustment                 68
  Throttle control wire adjustment      69
  Carburetor removal                    70
  Carburetor installation               71
  Fuel strainer                         72
  Carburetor bowl cleaning              73
  Fuel pipe                             74


67. GENERAL.

=a.= Carburetor is of the side‐outlet, plain‐tube type with a fixed
venturi. Fuel feed is by gravity from tank above. Carburetor has
two manual controls: the throttle, which is operated by the right
handle bar grip, and the choke, which is operated by a lever on the
carburetor itself. The high speed fuel supply is governed by a fixed
(non‐adjustable) jet. The idling to medium speed (30 mph) fuel supply
is governed by an adjustable (low speed) needle valve located on rear
side of carburetor body.


=68. CARBURETOR ADJUSTMENT= (fig. 43).

=a.= Before attempting to adjust carburetor to correct faulty engine
performance, attention should be given other items which have a direct
bearing on and can affect carburetor adjustment as well as engine
performance.

(1) Inspect fuel tank cap and make sure air vent is not plugged.

(2) See that throttle control adjustment is correct (par. 69).

(3) See that spark control adjustment is correct (par. 88).

(4) Drain and flush carburetor bowl (par. 73).

(5) Drain and flush fuel strainer (par. 72).

(6) Inspect air cleaner to see that passage of air through cleaner
is not restricted by oil level being too high in oil cup, or by an
excessive accumulation of dirt in filter elements (par. 76).

(7) Check manifold packing nuts and carburetor mounting screws for
tightness.

(8) See that spark plugs are clean and that gaps are adjusted between
0.025 inch to 0.030 inch. If condition of spark plugs is questionable,
install new ones.

(9) Check adjustment of valve tappets (par. 43).

(10) Check compression of both cylinders (par. 29 b.) (1)

(11) Check condition and adjustment of circuit breaker points (par. 84).

(12) Check ignition to battery wiring connections (diagram fig. 48).

(13) See that battery is not entirely discharged by turning on lights
(tactical situation permitting) and observing brilliancy.

=b.= A carburetor, once correctly adjusted, should require little, if
any, readjusting. At most, it should not be necessary to adjust the low
speed needle more than one or two notches either way to correct mixture
to meet changes in weather conditions.

=c. Low Speed Adjusting Needle= (figs. 43 and 44). Adjustment of this
needle valve controls only idling and low speed (up to approximately 30
mph) fuel mixture. Turn needle valve down (to right) to make mixture
leaner. Back out (to left) needle valve to make mixture richer. Needle
valve is held in any desired position by a spring‐and‐ball plunger
which engages notches in the needle adjusting screw.

=d. Complete Readjustment of Carburetor.= A carburetor that is badly
out of adjustment, and/or a new carburetor just installed, must be
adjusted as follows:

(1) Turn the low speed needle valve all the way down (to right).

(2) Back needle valve out (to left) about three full turns. With needle
valve in this position, engine will start, but mixture will probably be
too rich.

(3) Start engine as follows: After choke lever has been moved to normal
open running position and engine is normally hot, correct adjustment
of needle valve by turning needle valve down (to right) one notch at a
time until mixture becomes so lean that engine misses, and is inclined
to stop: then back out (to left) needle valve 5 to 10 notches, or until
engine fires regularly with spark advanced and throttle closed (or as
nearly closed as it can be set and still have engine running at idling
speed).

(4) Adjust throttle lever stop screw (fig. 43) as necessary to make
engine idle at proper speed with throttle in fully closed position.
Turning stop screw to the right makes engine idle faster. Turning stop
screw to the left makes engine idle slower. Do not idle engine at the
slowest possible speed, because an extremely slow idling adjustment
causes hard engine starting. Changing idling speed with throttle stop
screw is likely to change the low speed fuel mixture to some extent:
therefore, it will be necessary to again check and correct the low
speed needle valve adjustment (step (3) above).

(5) Engine starting and all‐round carburetion will be improved with
low speed fuel adjustment slightly rich, rather than extremely lean.

[Illustration: RA PD 310240

_Figure 43—Throttle in Fully Closed Position_]

[Illustration: RA PD 310241

_Figure 44—Throttle in Fully Open Position_]


=69. THROTTLE CONTROL WIRE ADJUSTMENT= (figs. 43 and 44).

=a.= Carburetor throttle is opened and closed by means of the right
handle bar grip, operating a control wire (within a housing) which
connects to the throttle lever. Adjustment for full opening and closing
of the throttle to correspond with full inward and outward motion of
the handle bar grip is made at the junction of the control wire end and
the throttle lever connection.

=b. Adjust Fully Closed Throttle= (fig. 43). See that there is about
1 inch distance between end of control wire housing and throttle lever
when in fully closed position, so that housing end does not interfere
with forward movement of throttle lever. If adjustment of control wire
housing is necessary, refer to paragraph 101. Proceed with closed
throttle adjustment.

(1) Loosen control wire clamp screw in connector block.

(2) Turn right handle bar grip outward as far as it will go: then
turn it inward slightly. Holding throttle grip in this position, move
throttle lever forward against its stop (closed position) and secure
control wire in connector block with clamp screw. Check closing of
throttle after tightening control wire set screw. If necessary, reset
the control wire in the connector block until throttle is closed with
full outward grip movement.

=c. Adjust Fully Open Throttle= (fig. 44). Follow instructions under
step =b= above, then:

(1) Turn right handle bar grip inward as far as it will go and see that
throttle lever is against its stop in fully open position. If throttle
does not open fully when grip is turned inward, reset the control wire
in the connector block to correct the adjustment.


70. CARBURETOR REMOVAL.

=a. Remove Carburetor for Replacement Only.=

(1) Shut off fuel supply valve.

(2) Loosen connector block clamp screw and disconnect throttle control
wire at throttle lever.

(3) Disconnect fuel feed pipe at strainer nipple.

(4) Loosen air cleaner hose clamp at carburetor air intake fitting, and
remove four screws and air intake fitting from carburetor.

(5) Remove the three mounting bolts (from right side of vehicle) which
secure carburetor to manifold flange. CAUTION: _Take care not to damage
or lose gaskets found between carburetor flange and manifold flange,
and/or 1/2-inch thick steel spacer fitted between carburetor and
manifold on some models._

(6) Remove carburetor.

(7) Remove fuel strainer assembly from carburetor bowl nipple.


71. CARBURETOR INSTALLATION

=a.= When installing carburetor be sure to fit the 1/2-inch thick steel
spacer (if one was originally fitted) between carburetor and manifold
flanges, with two gaskets on one side and one gasket on the other side.
Later models have a longer manifold neck, extending carburetor farther
to the left, away from cylinders, and do not need the spacer.

(1) Install fuel strainer assembly on bowl nipple. Leave coupling nut
loose until after fuel pipe is connected.

[Illustration: RA PD 310242

_Figure 45—Removing Fuel Strainer_]

(2) To install carburetor on manifold, locate carburetor flange and
two gaskets (1/2-inch steel spacer and gaskets if originally fitted) to
aline with holes in manifold flange, and insert and securely tighten
the three carburetor mounting screws. Use a 7/16-inch socket wrench,
or a large screwdriver, to securely tighten these screws. NOTE: If
carburetor manifold is loose in manifold packing nuts (_carburetor can
be lifted and manifold turns in packing nuts), tighten manifold nuts
securely, using manifold wrench_ (_41-W-1570-10_).

(3) Insert carburetor air intake fitting into end of air hose and mount
fitting on carburetor with the four screws. Tighten air hose clamp.

(4) Connect fuel pipe to fuel strainer nipple by tightening the union
nut and also the strainer union nut on bowl nipple.

(5) Attach throttle control wire to throttle lever connector block and
adjust (par. 69).

(6) Open fuel supply valve and observe for leaks.

(7) Adjust carburetor (par. 68).


=72. FUEL STRAINER= (fig. 45).

=a. Cleaning.=

(1) Shut off fuel supply valve.

(2) Unscrew cap from bottom of strainer body.

(3) Lift strainer screen element with cork washer out of cap and clean
thoroughly. Remove any dirt or sediment collected in cap. NOTE: _If
compressed air is not available for cleaning, gasoline from the fuel
pipe can be used for cleaning screen and cap._

(4) Install one cork washer in bottom of cap, set strainer screen
element in place, and locate the other cork washer over screen element.
Turn cap with screen element and washers onto bottom of strainer body,
handtight.

=b. Remove Strainer Assembly.=

(1) Shut off fuel supply valve.

(2) Disconnect fuel feed pipe at strainer body nipple.

(3) Remove filter assembly from carburetor bowl nipple. It will be
noted that coupling nut is an integral part of the filter body assembly.

=c. Install Strainer Assembly.=

(1) Install fuel strainer assembly on carburetor bowl nipple. Leave
coupling nut loose until after fuel pipe is connected.

(2) Connect fuel pipe to strainer body nipple and tighten union nut.
Strainer coupling nut can now be tightened on bowl nipple.

(3) Open fuel supply valve. Inspect fuel pipe and coupling nuts for
leaks.


73. CARBURETOR BOWL CLEANING.

=a.= Water from fuel, water moisture, and dirt entering air cleaner
will settle in bottom of carburetor bowl and will interfere with engine
starting and carburetion. At periodic intervals bowl must be drained.
NOTE: _Before draining and flushing bowl, clean fuel strainer_ (par.
72).

(1) Support vehicle on jiffy (side) stand.

(2) Shut off fuel supply valve.

(3) Remove bowl drain screw. Let fuel, water, and dirt run out of bowl.
With drain screw still removed, open fuel supply valve (turn to left)
and leave open only a few seconds, to allow fresh gasoline to flush out
bowl.

(4) Replace bowl drain screw, taking care to avoid thread crossing. Set
screw snug, but not tight enough to strip the threads.


74. FUEL PIPE.

=a. Remove.=

(1) Shut off fuel supply valve.

(2) Remove pipe union nut from tank nipple. Remove pipe after
disconnecting union nut from fuel strainer body nipple.

=b. Install.= Fuel pipe must be installed without putting undue twist
or strain on pipe or end fittings. Therefore, bend and/or shape pipe
to “fit” between nipple connections before replacing and drawing up on
union nuts.

(1) Connect lower end of pipe to fuel filter body nipple. Do not
tighten nut.

(2) Connect upper end of pipe to tank nipple. Securely tighten this
nut. Next, tighten union nut on strainer body nipple.



Section XVII

INTAKE AND EXHAUST SYSTEM


                                                Paragraph
  Description                                      75
  Air cleaner                                      76
  Hose and carburetor fitting                      77
  Remove air cleaner                               78
  Install air cleaner                              79
  Replacement of air cleaner mounting bracket      80
  Exhaust system                                   81


75. DESCRIPTION.

=a. Intake System.= The air intake system consists of oil bath air
cleaner, connecting air hose, and carburetor intake hose fitting. This
system is located on left side of vehicle.

=b. Exhaust System.= The exhaust system consists of muffler and
tailpiece assembly, front exhaust pipe assembly, and rear exhaust pipe.
Exhaust pipe ends are a slip fit in cylinder exhaust ports.


=76. AIR CLEANER= (figs. 46 and 47).

=a. General.= Air cleaner should not be submerged in water, nor
should high‐pressure stream be directed into cleaner louvers (where air
enters on rear of body) when cleaning vehicle. Either water or dirt
entering air cleaner in excessive quantities will raise the oil level
in oil cup and choke off proper air supply to carburetor.

=b. Service.= With vehicle in normal use on hard‐surfaced roads,
clean and refill air cleaner oil cup with engine oil (seasonal grade)
at least each time engine oil tank is drained and refilled. CAUTION:
_Service more frequently under dusty conditions; daily under extremely
dusty conditions. Check oil supply daily._

(1) Hold oil cup with one hand and release (unlatch) oil cup retaining
spring clips to remove oil cup.

(2) If oil in cup is clean, with no signs of dirt and grit in oil or
cup, but the oil level is below the indicated level mark, add engine
oil (seasonal grade) to bring level up to mark. NOTE: _If oil and cup
are dirty, empty out oil and wash out cup with dry‐cleaning solvent.
Refill with clean engine oil (seasonal grade) to indicated level mark._

(3) Before installing oil cup make sure that the oil cup gasket is in
place and in good condition.

(4) Check baffle plate thumb screw for tightness.

[Illustration: RA PD 310243

_Figure 46—Air Cleaner Oil Cup Removed_]

(5) Install oil cup, making sure that retaining spring clips are fully
engaged in lip of oil cup and hold oil cup securely to cleaner body.

(6) Oil bath air cleaners on earlier models are of “round” type, oil
cup being secured to body with a metal clamp band and thumb screw. When
oil cup is removed on this type of cleaner, the baffle plate will come
out with the cup. Make sure that baffle plate is correctly installed
and that gasket is in place when installing cup.

=c. Maintenance= (fig. 47). The rectangular‐type oil bath air cleaner
is provided with two filter elements, retained in filter body by means
of the baffle plate. If daily check reveals excessive accumulation
of dirt and grit in oil and cup, filter elements must be removed and
cleaned. NOTE: _Check several times daily under extremely dusty or
sandy conditions._

(1) Hold oil cup with one hand and release (unlatch) oil cup retaining
spring clips; remove cup.

(2) Unscrew baffle plate thumb screw and remove baffle plate.

(3) Filter elements may “bind” in cleaner body. If so, rap side of body
with hand to loosen them; or, if necessary, withdraw elements from body
with pliers or a hooked wire.

(4) Check for presence and condition of gasket above the two filter
elements (in filter body); also for oil cup gasket.

[Illustration: RA PD 310244

_Figure 47—Air Cleaner, Disassembled_]

(5) Clean both filter elements thoroughly in dry‐cleaning solvent.
Allow elements to dry out (use air hose if available).

(6) Clean oil cup and refill to indicated level mark. Use clean engine
oil (seasonal grade).

(7) Dip one screen surface of each filter element about 1/2 inch into
oil in the oil cup (to “oil wet” filter pack). Install the two filter
elements, baffle plate, and oil cup immediately after “oil wetting” the
filter elements. Make sure gaskets are in place. NOTE: _Do not add more
oil to oil cup after elements have been dipped into it, because excess
oil absorbed by elements will drip back into oil cup, bringing level
back to normal._

(8) Round‐type oil bath air cleaner used on earlier models does not
have removable filter element. Complete cleaner body must be removed
from vehicle, immersed and agitated in cleaning solvent to wash out
dirt. After cleaning, allow filter element to dry (use air hose if
available), then apply a few squirts of engine oil to inside of cleaner
element, using oilcan. Refill cup, replace baffle plate and cup,
securely tightening clamp band thumb screw.


77. HOSE AND CARBURETOR FITTING.

=a. Remove.= Carburetor intake and hose connection must be removed
from carburetor to remove and/or install air hose.

(1) Loosen screws in the two hose clamps.

(2) Remove four screws retaining carburetor air intake fitting. Remove
carburetor fitting from end of hose, and pull hose off air cleaner body
connection.

=b. Install.= Before installing air hose, inspect for
breaks or faulty condition that might prevent airtight seal between air
cleaner and carburetor fitting.

(1) Install one end of hose on carburetor fitting. Do not tighten clamp
screw.

(2) Install other end of hose on air cleaner connection. Do not tighten
clamp screw.

(3) Install carburetor fitting. Securely tighten the four screws. Next,
center air hose between carburetor fitting and air cleaner connection
and securely tighten hose clamp screws.


78. REMOVE AIR CLEANER.

=a.= Loosen hose clamp screw at air cleaner body connection and remove
two nuts and gear‐toothed washers from bolts securing air cleaner
assembly to frame bracket. NOTE: _Gear‐toothed lock washers are also
used under heads of the two mounting bolts. Withdraw cleaner from end
of air hose._

=b.= The same procedure applies to round‐type air cleaners used on
earlier models.


79. INSTALL AIR CLEANER.

=a.= Engage air cleaner hose connection in end of hose and mount
cleaner assembly on frame bracket with two bolts, gear‐toothed lock
washers, and nuts. Securely tighten mounting nuts. NOTE: _The plated
(whitened) mounting bolts, four gear‐toothed lock washers, and bolt
nuts must effect a ground connection between bracket and filter
mounting to insure adequate radio bonding._ Tighten air hose clamp
screw at cleaner body connection.

=b.= The same procedure applies to round‐type air cleaners used on
earlier models.


80. REPLACEMENT OF AIR CLEANER MOUNTING BRACKET.

=a.= Air cleaner mounting bracket and air cleaner can be removed or
installed as an assembly.

=b. Remove.=

(1) Loosen hose clamp connection at air cleaner body.

(2) Disconnect battery ground wire. This prevents shorting battery when
removing cleaner bracket clamp bolt.

(3) Remove the two upper cleaner bracket frame clamp bolts.

(4) Remove lower mounting bolt. Cleaner lower bracket mounting and
clutch cable tube mounting are secured to frame bracket by the same
whitened radio bonding bolt, gear‐toothed lock washers, and nut. Remove
nut and drop bolt to free cleaner bracket.

=c. Install.=

(1) Engage air hose and cleaner body connection.

(2) Attach lower bracket first. Locate cleaner bracket so that hole
lines up with bolt holes in frame bracket and clutch cable tube
mounting. Pass whitened radio bonding bolt upward through bracket hole,
install shakeproof lock washer, and securely tighten nut.

(3) Attach bracket to the two upper frame clips. Tighten the clamp bolt
nuts.

(4) Connect battery ground wire.

(5) Tighten air hose clamp screw at cleaner connection.


81. EXHAUST SYSTEM.

=a. Remove Muffler Assembly.=

(1) Support vehicle on rear stand.

(2) Remove bolt from end of hanger bracket on left side of vehicle, and
remove bolt from muffler clamp and skid plate bracket on right side of
vehicle. Drop skid plate.

(3) Loosen nut and bolt on clamp which secures front end of muffler at
exhaust pipe connection (clamp is attached to muffler).

(4) Remove muffler rear hanger bracket bolt nut. Pull muffler assembly
free from exhaust pipe connection.

=b. Install Muffler Assembly.=

(1) Engage muffler pipe and exhaust pipe at muffler pipe clamp
connection. Do not tighten clamp bolt nut as yet.

(2) Attach muffler rear hanger bracket to frame bracket bolt,
installing lock washer, and tightening nut. NOTE: _It may be advisable
to loosen hanger bracket on muffler so that muffler can be lined up for
front end connection._

(3) Tighten muffler and exhaust pipe clamp bolt nut and rear hanger nut.

(4) Raise skid plate into position and install right side mounting bolt
which secures muffler front bracket and skid plate bracket to frame
clip. Tighten all mounting nuts.

=c. Remove Exhaust Pipes.=

(1) Refer to step =a= (1), (2), (3) above.

(2) Remove right side footboard and brake pedal assembly as follows:
Loosen footboard rear support stud nut, remove front support stud
nut, and pull footboard outward to free end of safety guard. Remove
bolt which secures front exhaust pipe clamp, and remove nut from rear
support rod, freeing stop light switch and rear end of footboard
sidebar. Remove nut from front support rod, and drop footboard and
brake foot pedal assembly to provide clearance for exhaust pipe
removal. Disengage rear exhaust pipe at cylinder port, at same time
prying and pulling front exhaust pipe forward and downward to free
from cylinder port. Both exhaust pipes can now be worked downward and
removed from vehicle as an assembly.

=d. Install Exhaust Pipes.=

(1) Position exhaust pipe (front and rear) assembly, working it into
position so that front pipe end slips into cylinder port; then, pry and
force rear pipe end into rear cylinder port.

(2) Mount footboard, brake foot pedal, and sidebar assembly on support
rods, installing washer and nut on front support rod.

(3) Position and mount stop light switch on rear support rod. See that
spring and operating control wire exert a straight pull on switch
plunger when foot pedal is operated.

(4) Install bolt, washer, and nut which secure front exhaust pipe clamp
to footboard sidebar.

(5) To attach safety guard to sidebar, pull front end of footboard away
from sidebar, line up holes in sidebar and safety guard end, then pass
footboard support stud through both pieces, and secure with washer and
nut.

(6) Tighten footboard rear support stud nut.

(7) To complete installation, follow procedure outlined in step =b=
(1) through (4) above.

[Illustration:

  =10=—INSTRUMENT PANEL TERMINAL.
  =12=—BATTERY POSITIVE.
  =13=—BATTERY NEGATIVE (GROUND).
  =18=—TERMINAL JUNCTION ON FRAME.
  =26=—IGNITION—LIGHT SWITCH.
  =28=—SPARK COIL.
  =33=—CIRCUIT BREAKER.
  =34=—COIL TO TIMER WIRE.
  =*A=—RADIO BOND, COIL TO TIMER WIRE.
  =*B=—RADIO BOND, COIL TO ENGINE.
  =*C=—NOISE SUPPRESSION CONDENSER.
  =*D=—SHIELDED COIL TO TIMER WIRE.
  =*E=—SPARK PLUG SUPPRESSORS.

RA PD 315723

_Figure 48—Ignition to Battery Wiring Diagram_]



Section XVIII

IGNITION SYSTEM


                                       Paragraph
  Description                             82
  Spark plugs                             83
  Circuit breaker points                  84
  Condenser                               85
  Circuit breaker and timer assembly      86
  Coil to timer wire                      87
  Adjust spark control                    88
  Spark coil                              89


82. DESCRIPTION.

=a.= The ignition system differs from that of the conventional
automotive types in that it has no distributor. A circuit breaker alone
is used. Both coil high‐tension winding ends lead directly to both
spark plugs. Thus both plugs spark at the same time, one cylinder being
on compression stroke while the other cylinder is on exhaust stroke.


83. SPARK PLUGS.

=a.= Defective spark plugs are indicated by engine missing,
overheating, knocking excessively, and lacking normal power.

=b. Type.= Spark plugs are medium heat range, manufacturer’s (H-D)
No. 3.

=c. Cleaning.= Do not take plugs apart for cleaning. Use the
sandblast cleaner method.

=d. Point Adjustment.= Bend electrode located in plug base to adjust
point gap 0.025 inch to 0.030 inch.

=e. Replacement.= Use spark plug wrench (41-W-3334) to install plugs,
using new gaskets. Never draw a cool plug up tight in a hot cylinder
head, rather turn down snug and wait l/2 minute until plug base is
warm: then tighten securely. CAUTION: _Take care not to cross‐thread
when installing spark plug._


=84. CIRCUIT BREAKER POINTS= (fig. 49).

=a.= Circuit breaker lever is insulated from ground and connects to
primary wire binding post by means of a “pig‐tail” wire. Stationary
point is grounded to timer base and is movable in order to adjust
circuit breaker points. Circuit breaker points that are burned or
pitted should be renewed or dressed with a clean fine‐cut, contact
point file. The file should not be used on other metals and should
not be allowed to become greasy or dirty. CAUTION: _Never use emery_
_cloth to clean points._ Contact surfaces, after considerable use, may
not appear bright and smooth, but this is not necessarily an indication
that they are not functioning satisfactorily.

=b. Remove Breaker Lever.=

(1) To disconnect condenser terminal, remove nut from end of condenser
and remove gear‐toothed washer, plain washer, and the brass terminal
strip. Do not remove fiber washer and plain washer located back of
brass terminal strip on condenser terminal post.

[Illustration: RA PD 310248

_Figure 49—Circuit Breaker Points Removed_]

(2) Bend brass terminal strip down and remove binding nut which secures
brass terminal strip and breaker lever “pig‐tail” to primary wire
binding post.

(3) Compress breaker lever spring at end of lever, disengaging spring.
CAUTION: _Do not lose spring._ Release and remove lever from insulated
pivot post.

=c. Remove Adjustable Contact Point.=

(1) Remove the two lock screws and washer plate, securing adjustable
contact point assembly to timer base. Point assembly is free to be
lifted off lever pivot stud.

=d. Install Adjustable Contact Point.=

(1) Install contact point assembly, replacing washer plate and the two
lock screws. Do not tighten lock screws until circuit breaker points
are adjusted (step =f= below).

=e. Install Breaker Lever.=

(1) Install brass terminal strip on primary wire binding post.

(2) Connect end of brass terminal strip to condenser terminal post.
Install flat washer, gear‐toothed washer, and nut.

(3) Install breaker lever on pivot post insulated bearing.

(4) Install breaker lever spring. Make sure that ends of spring are
retained correctly.

(5) NOTE: _Keep breaker lever cam very lightly greased._

=f. Adjusting Circuit Breaker Points= (fig. 51).

(1) Correct point gap is 0.022 inch. Circuit breaker point faces must
seat squarely against each other. If bent, square up and aline by
bending contact plate. Turn timer breaker cam until breaker lever fiber
is located on highest point of cam.

(2) With the adjustable point lock screws loose, shift the adjustable
point plate to obtain a 0.022-inch gap between the circuit breaker
points. Measure gap with an accurate thickness gage before retightening
lock screws, and again recheck point gap after tightening the lock
screws. NOTE: _Wrong circuit breaker point gap affects ignition timing._


85. CONDENSER.

=a.= The condenser is connected in parallel with the circuit breaker
points, one of its terminals being grounded (for the adjustable point)
to the timer base by means of the mounting screw, the other terminal
making connection with the circuit breaker lever (for the lever point)
by means of the lever “pig‐tail.”

=b. Remove.=

(1) Unlatch circuit breaker cover retainer and remove cover.

(2) Remove nut from end of condenser and remove gear‐toothed washer,
plain washer, and the brass terminal strip. NOTE: _A small plain washer
and a large fiber washer are located behind brass terminal strip._

(3) Remove screw which secures condenser to timer base. Remove
condenser.

[Illustration: RA PD 310249

_Figure 50—Circuit Breaker (Timer), Disassembled_]

=c. Install.=

(1) Mount condenser on timer housing. Install lock washer and screw.
Make sure small plain washer and large fiber washer are in place on
condenser end terminal screw before connecting the brass terminal strip.

(2) Connect brass terminal strip to condenser. Replace plain washer,
gear‐toothed washer and terminal nut.

(3) Install circuit breaker cover.


=86. CIRCUIT BREAKER AND TIMER ASSEMBLY= (figs. 50 and 51).

=a.= When the circuit breaker timer shaft and base assembly must be
replaced due to excessive wear in timer shaft bearing, sheared worm
gear pin, and/or worn or damaged worm gear, engine ignition must be
retimed. Ignition timing for the V‐type twin engine is difficult and
should be attempted only by experienced personnel.

=b. Remove= (fig. 50). Before the timer shaft and base assembly can
be removed, the circuit breaker timer head assembly must be removed.
NOTE: _If the timer head only, or timer wire, is to be replaced, it is
not necessary to remove timer shaft and base assembly, and thus throw
engine ignition out of time._

(1) Remove timer head cover.

(2) Unlatch cover retainer ends from holes in the timer head and remove.

(3) Disconnect spark control wire at timer lever.

(4) Lift the timer head assembly off base. The head seating tension
(ground) spring (underneath shaft base) is also free, and can now be
removed. NOTE: _It is not necessary to disconnect timer to coil wire
from timer head terminal post, unless head or wire is being replaced._

(5) Remove the two timer base mounting screws and lock washers. It will
be noted that one screw grounds the timer to coil wire shielding.

(6) Timer shaft and base assembly can now be lifted out of engine gear
case cover. Take care not to damage or misplace base gasket.

=c. Install Timer Shaft and Base Assembly and Timing Ignition=
(fig. 51). This calls for retiming engine ignition as follows: (NOTE:
_Circuit breaker cam turns in clockwise direction_):

(1) Unscrew and raise front cylinder inlet valve spring cover, using
tappet wrench (41-W-3617).

(2) Turn engine in direction in which it runs until valve tappet
indicates front cylinder is on compression stroke (directly after front
cylinder intake valve closes).

[Illustration:

  =A=—FLYWHEEL TIMING MARK IN CRANKCASE INSPECTION HOLE.
  =B=—COVER RETAINER.
  =C=—CIRCUIT BREAKER LEVER.
  =D=—CIRCUIT BREAKER CAM.
  =E=—CONDENSER.
  =F=—SPARK CONTROL WIRE HOUSING.
  =G=—SPARK CONTROL WIRE.
  =H=—SPARK LEVER QUADRANT.
  =J=—SPARK LEVER.
  =K=—TIMER HEAD ADJUSTING BAND SCREW.
  =L=—TIMER HEAD ADJUSTING BAND.
  =M=—MARK ON BREAKER CAM AND MARKS ON TIMER HEAD AND HAND
        INDICATING ORIGINAL FACTORY TIMING.
  =N=—CIRCUIT BREAKER POINTS.
  =O=—ADJUSTABLE CONTACT POINT PLATE.
  =P=—ADJUSTABLE CONTACT POINT LOCK SCREWS.
  =Q=—CIRCUIT BREAKER LEVER PIVOT (INSULATED).
  =R=—BREAKER LEVER SPRING.

RA PD 310281

_Figure 51—Circuit Breaker Marks and Flywheel Mark Correctly Alined_]

(3) Remove plug from timing inspection hole in left‐side crankcase.

(4) Continue turning engine slowly until flywheel timing mark is in
center of inspection hole (fig. 51). Do not turn engine further.

(5) Install paper gasket and timer head tension (ground) spring on
timer shaft base assembly. Make sure bent ends of tension spring are
facing downward (away from timer base).

(6) Insert timer shaft and base assembly all the way down into place in
timing gear case cover, trying to locate mark on small end of breaker
cam in position shown in figure 51. Do not install base mounting screws
as yet.

(7) Install timer head assembly so that spark control lever is within
the advance and retard quadrant (fig. 51). NOTE: _Do not install cover
retainer until later._

(8) Fully advance spark lever (push inward toward engine) and observe
how closely mark on breaker cam lines up with breaker lever fiber.
If mark does not line up, lift timer base and turn shaft gear so its
engagement with its driving gear is changed one tooth. Check again
according to breaker cam mark and breaker lever fiber. Repeat this
procedure until gear engagement is obtained which closely alines cam
mark and breaker lever fiber.

(9) See that timer base is turned so that timer to coil wire is toward
rear of engine.

(10) Install timer base screws and lock washers. Make sure that timer
to coil wire shielding is grounded under head of screw farthest away
from engine (fig. 52). Securely tighten screws.

(11) Install timer head on base and secure with ground spring and cover
retainer. Be sure ground spring is in its proper place so that when
cover retainer ends are fitted through holes in the timer head, they
will also fit into spring locating notches. It will be necessary to
press ground spring upward under timer base to engage retainer ends
in the spring notches. NOTE: _If cover retainer ends do not engage
ground spring notches, spring will have no tension and timer head
will be loose on its base._ Circuit breaker points and condenser are
electrically grounded through timer base, and ground spring holds the
head and base in close contact, thus assuring a good ground.

(12) Connect spark control wire and timer lever and adjust (par. 88).

(13) Engine is now timed according to original factory setting,
providing mark on side of timer head and hole in head adjusting band
are still in alinement, and circuit breaker point gap is 0.022 inch.
Even though all ignition timing marks are in perfect alinement, as
outlined in the foregoing instructions, it is advisable to accurately
check ignition timing (step =d= following).

=d. Recommended Recheck of Ignition Timing= (fig. 51). Even though
all ignition timing marks are in perfect alinement, as when engine was
originally timed, ignition timing may change somewhat after engine has
been in service for a while, due to normal wear and seating of the
various moving parts that can affect ignition timing. Since accurate
ignition timing is the first essential to good engine performance, it
is advisable to check ignition timing on new vehicle after first 1,500
miles of service, and at each 2,000 miles thereafter.

(1) See that circuit breaker points are adjusted for correct gap of
0.022 inch (par. 84 =f=).

(2) Advance timer lever fully (toward engine).

(3) Turn engine in direction in which it runs until front cylinder
is on compression stroke, and continue to turn it ahead slowly until
narrow timer cam (the end with the timing mark), just starts to open
the circuit breaker points.

[Illustration: RA PD 318205

_Figure 52—Shielding of Coil to Timer Wire Grounded on Base_]

(4) An accurate test light check as to when points just start to break
can be made, using the instrument panel red light for the purpose.
Disconnect panel light wire from the oil pressure switch, attaching
this wire to the insulated terminal post on timer head. Turn ignition
and light switch on. As long as circuit breaker points are closed,
lamp will remain lit; as points start to open, lamp will go out. NOTE:
_After making use of instrument panel red light for above purpose,
reconnect wire to oil pressure switch._

(5) When exact position is found, where points just start to open,
flywheel mark should be in the center of the inspection hole.

(6) If flywheel mark is not in center of hole when points open,
readjust ignition timing as necessary (slower or faster) by means of
the timer head and band adjustment.

[Illustration: RA PD 318203

_Figure 53—Shielded Coil to Timer Wire Correctly Connected at Coil_]

(7) To readjust timer head, loosen adjusting band screw and shift
timer head in band. If flywheel timing mark shows forward of center
in inspection hole, the timing is slow. To correct, shift timer head
counterclockwise against rotation of breaker cam. If flywheel mark is
to rear of center of inspection hole, timing is fast and timer head
must be shifted with rotation (clockwise) of breaker cam, to correct
timing.

(8) With ignition timing correct, front cylinder piston is 9/32 inch
before top dead center, on compression stroke, when circuit breaker
points just start to open. At this point spark occurs, igniting front
cylinder fuel charge.

(9) Install flywheel inspection hole plug in left crankcase.


=87. COIL TO TIMER WIRE= (figs. 52 and 53).

=a.= Models provided with radio shielding are identified by “S” on
either side of instrument panel. The coil to timer wire (low‐tension
wire) on these models is shielded for radio noise suppression.

=b. Remove.=

(1) Disconnect battery negative ground wire at frame connection.

(2) Remove the two bolts which secure upper end of air cleaner bracket
to frame tube. Swing air cleaner and bracket outward and forward to
gain access to spark coil rear terminal.

(3) Disconnect coil to timer wire terminal from coil rear connection.
Disconnect wire shielding from coil rear ground connection.

(4) Refer to paragraph 86 =b= (1) to (4) for timer head removal.

(5) Remove timer base mounting screw which secures wire shielding (fig.
52).

(6) Note position of coil to timer wire inside of timer head; then
remove nut washer connecting wire to insulated contact stud.

(7) Work old wire and loom out of timer head hole and free from vehicle.

(8) On earlier models, the coil to timer wire was soldered to end of
insulated stud. Removal of stud is necessary to remove this wire, or
replace it with a shielded wire. Note location of stud insulations
on inside and outside of timer head, for correct installation when
reassembling.

=c. Install.=

(1) Pass end of wire, shield terminal, and loom up through hole in
timer base.

(2) Ground the wire shield terminal under head of timer base mounting
screw (fig. 52).

(3) Connect wire end terminal to insulated stud so that wire leads away
from stud in direction shown (fig. 52).

(4) Pass coil to timer wire up alongside and to rear of frame saddle
post tube to reach rear of spark coil.

(5) Ground the wire shield terminal to coil rear ground connection
(fig. 53).

(6) Connect wire terminal to coil rear primary connection (fig. 53).

(7) Install timer head on base (par. 86 =c= (11)).

(8) Connect spark control wire to timer lever and adjust (par. 88).

(9) Connect battery negative post wire to frame ground terminal.

(10) Swing air cleaner bracket back into place and install two bolts,
washers, and nuts securing bracket to frame clips.

(11) Replace timer cover and check engine for starting.


88. ADJUST SPARK CONTROL.

=a.= Spark advance and retard is controlled by left handle bar grip.
Spark lever operates within a quadrant mounted on engine. Spark must
be fully advanced (lever inward toward engine) when handle bar grip is
turned inward to full extent of its travel. When handle bar grip is
turned outward, spark lever retards (lever outward away from engine).

(1) With control wire in lever stud and clamp screw loose, turn left
grip fully inward; then back it out just a little.

(2) Shift spark lever inward toward engine as far as it will go; then
tighten control wire clamp screw. Test by turning left grip fully
inward and noting position of spark lever. It should be against inner
side of quadrant (fig. 51). Retard spark and check position of lever
within quadrant; it should be against outer side of quadrant.

(3) Check final adjustment. Readjust full advance and retard timer
lever positions as necessary when left grip is turned inward, and
outward, respectively.


=89. SPARK COIL= (fig. 54).

=a.= Spark coil high‐tension cables go directly to the spark plugs, no
distributor being used. When the coil is faulty, it must be replaced,
since internal repairs are not possible. The high‐tension cables can be
replaced, however. Coil is provided with a condenser for radio noise
suppression, and metal coil case is grounded to engine by bonding.

=b. Remove.=

(1) Disconnect battery negative ground wire from frame connection.

(2) Free high‐tension cable ends (with radio noise suppressors) from
spark plugs. Free front cylinder high‐tension cable from clip at upper
engine frame mounting.

(3) Loosen air intake hose connection at carburetor fitting.

(4) Remove two nuts, washers, and bolts securing upper end of air
cleaner mounting bracket to frame clamps.

[Illustration: RA PD 318204

_Figure 54—Coil Front Connections Showing Radio Bonding and Noise
Suppression Condenser_]

(5) Swing air cleaner and bracket assembly outward to gain access to
coil rear terminals.

(6) Disconnect coil to timer wire from coil rear terminal screw.
Disconnect wire shielding from coil rear ground terminal (fig. 53).

(7) Swing cleaner back and remove wire connections from coil front
terminal screw (fig. 54).

(8) Disconnect radio bonding at coil front ground terminal (fig. 54).

(9) Remove nuts and bolts which mount coil to bracket. Coil is now free
for removal.

=c. Install.=

(1) Mount coil on frame bracket with high‐tension cables upward, and
reinstall mounting bolts, lock washers, and nuts. Tighten nuts.

(2) Connect terminals of the two green wires to coil front terminal
screw. Refer to wiring diagram, figure 48.

(3) Connect radio bonding to coil front ground terminal. Tighten nut
securely.

(4) Connect coil to timer wire terminal to coil rear terminal screw.
Connect wire shielding to coil rear ground terminal. Tighten nut
securely.

(5) Swing air cleaner and bracket assembly back in place and install
two bolts, lock washers, and nuts securing bracket to frame clamps.
Tighten nuts securely.

(6) Connect battery negative ground wire to frame connection.

(7) Pass front cylinder high‐tension wire under tank, secure in cable
clip at upper engine frame mounting, and attach cable end (radio noise
suppressor) to front spark plug. Attach rear high‐tension cable end
(radio noise suppressor) to rear spark plug.

(8) Check wiring connections (fig. 48) and test coil by engine
starting.



Section XIX

GENERATING SYSTEM


                                         Paragraph
  Description                               90
  Clean commutator                          91
  Armature bearing special lubrication      92
  Remove generator                          93
  Install generator                         94
  Cut‐out relay                            95

[Illustration:

  =8=—GENERATOR SIGNAL LIGHT
  =12=—BATTERY POSITIVE TERMINAL
  =13=—BATTERY NEGATIVE TERMINAL (GROUND)
  =14=—“SWITCH” TERMINAL OF GENERATOR
  =15=—“RELAY” TERMINAL OF GENERATOR
  =18=—FRONT JUNCTION TERMINAL
  =26=—IGNITION AND LIGHT SWITCH
  =32=—CUT‐OUT RELAY
  =*H=—NOISE SUPPRESSION CONDENSER

RA PD 317200

_Figure 55—Generator to Battery Wiring Diagram_]


90. DESCRIPTION (fig. 55).

=a.= The generator is shunt connected. The two field coils, regulating
coil, and shunt coil are not connected in series in the conventional
manner. The regulating field coil provides adequate current output
(approx. 4 amperes) for daytime operation. The shunt field coil is
controlled through the ignition and light switch to increase current
output (approx. 8 amperes) when vehicle lights are in use. Generator
uses the third (regulating) brush system of current regulation. A
cut‐out relay serves as a magnetic switch in the generator‐battery
circuit, also operating the instrument panel green signal light to
indicate generator charge.

[Illustration: RA PD 310259

_Figure 56—Generator Cover Removed for Commutator Cleaning_]


=91. CLEAN COMMUTATOR= (fig. 56).

=a.= If battery is in good condition, cut‐out relay is functioning,
and wiring connections are made according to diagram (fig. 55), yet
generator does not charge or charge rate is low, proceed to clean the
commutator.

(1) Remove left footboard, sidebar, and clutch foot pedal assembly,
following procedure outlined under paragraph 102 =a= (1) to (6),
to permit generator cover removal.

(2) Remove the two end cover screws and pull end cover off generator.

(3) Clean armature commutator with No. 00 sandpaper until bright and
clean. Blow out with air. CAUTION: _Do not remove or disturb brushes in
their holders. Never use emery cloth to clean the commutator._

[Illustration: RA PD 310260

_Figure 57—Generator End Cover and Grease Retainer Removed_]

(4) Temporarily install footboard assembly and operate engine, to
observe whether or not generator is charging (green signal light
goes off at above 20 mph). If cleaning commutator does not remedy
generator charge, and/or commutator is badly worn, then generator must
be replaced (par. 93). If cleaning of commutator remedied generator
charge, reinstall generator end cover, and the footboard and clutch
pedal assembly (par. 102 =b=).


=92. ARMATURE BEARING SPECIAL LUBRICATION= (fig. 57).

=a.= At the 6,000-mile second echelon preventive maintenance service
period, the commutator end bearing must be hand‐packed. In performing
this operation, care must be taken not to shift or move the generator
third (regulating) brush, thus disturbing generator current regulation.
Generator drive end bearing is adequately lubricated by oil circulating
through engine.

=b. To Lubricate Commutator End Bearing.=

(1) Remove left footboard, sidebar, and clutch pedal assembly,
following procedure outlined in paragraph 102 =a= (1) to (6).

(2) Remove the two end cover screws and pull end cover off generator.

(3) Remove two of the three screws which secure the outer grease
retainer plate to end of generator (fig. 57).

(4) Loosen the other grease retainer plate screw slightly to permit
shifting plate to one side.

(5) Pack ball bearing with general purpose grease No. 2, pressing
lubricant into bearing with finger.

(6) Shift the outer grease retainer plate back into position. Install
the two screws removed, and securely tighten all three screws.

(7) Install generator end cover and the two retaining screws.

(8) Install left footboard, sidebar, and clutch foot pedal assembly,
following procedure outlined in paragraph 102 =b=.


=93. REMOVE GENERATOR= (figs. 58 and 59).

=a.= Generator is gear driven through engine timing gear train.
Generator can be removed and installed without removing timing gear
case cover, or affecting alinement of timing gears.

=b.= Before replacing generator because of failure of instrument panel
green signal light to indicate charge, check panel light wiring and
bulb for good condition (par. 120).

=c.= When it has been determined that generator must be removed for
replacement, proceed as follows:

(1) Disconnect wires from the two generator terminals marked SWITCH and
RELAY.

(2) Remove the two long screws, through timing gear case cover, that
secure end of generator against gear case (fig. 58).

(3) Remove strap nut, lock washer, and curved washer from end of strap
that clamps generator in its cradle on engine crankcase (fig. 59).

[Illustration: RA PD 310261

_Figure 58—Removing Generator End Mounting Screws_]

[Illustration: RA PD 310262

_Figure 59—Removing Generator Strap Nut_]

(4) Lift strap high enough to permit raising generator so that oil
slinger (on end of generator gear) will clear adjacent gear, and allow
generator to be removed from engine. Be sure to observe and count
number of paper shims between generator and cradle. Lay these shims
aside to be used again when generator is reinstalled. Also, note
location of hole in shims for oil drain. These shims were required in
original assembly to adjust driving gears for proper mesh and, if left
out, gears may mesh too deeply and “howl,” even though considerably
worn. Unless a new generator gasket is available, to be used when
generator is reinstalled, be careful not to damage the old one.


94. INSTALL GENERATOR.

=a.= When installing generator, the important point to consider is
correct shimming of generator in its cradle to provide correct mesh of
driving gear with intermediate timing gear. Make sure same number of
paper shims are used in reassembling as were found underneath generator
when it was removed. After an engine has been run a considerable
length of time and gears have worn to some extent, they have possibly
developed sufficient lash or play to safely remove one or more of the
original shims, and thus affect closer meshing and quieter operation.
However, this should not be done unless timing gear case cover is
removed so that gear mesh and lash can be carefully checked.

(1) Pass generator drive gear end through gear case hole, lifting
generator so that oil slinger clears intermediate timing gear. Turn
generator in its cradle so that end holes line up with long mounting
screws which pass through gear case cover. Tighten mounting screws
securely.

(2) Install curved washer, lock washer, and nut on end of clamp strap;
tighten nut securely.

(3) Connect red‐black wire to generator terminal marked RELAY, and
green wire to generator terminal marked SWITCH. Refer to wiring diagram
(fig. 55).

(4) Operate engine and check generator for current output, as well as
check for gear noise. If shimming under generator is proper, generator
and timing gears will run quietly. If necessary, readjust shimming
until gears operate quietly.


95. CUT‐OUT RELAY.

=a.= Operation of the instrument panel green signal light, indicating
generator charge, is controlled by the cut‐out relay. Therefore, if
relay is faulty the signal light will not operate properly, falsely
indicating generator trouble. Rust around the contact points, burned
points, and loss of armature spring tension are sources of most relay
trouble. NOTE: _Before condemning a relay because of failure of green
signal light, make light test_ (par. 120).

=b.= Correct adjustment of relay point gaps and tensioning of armature
springs require use of precision electric meters and expert knowledge
on the subject. A faulty relay, other than removing cover and cleaning
with air, should be replaced. No adjustment of points should be
attempted.

=c. Remove.=

(1) Disconnect the three wires from relay terminal screws.

(2) Remove the two mounting screws and lock washers. Remove relay from
engine base.

=d. Install.=

(1) Mount relay on engine base with two screws and lock washers. Make
sure that mounting is clean to make good electrical ground contact
between relay and engine.

(2) Reconnect the three wire terminals to relay terminal screws. Follow
wiring diagram, figure 55.

(3) Operate engine and observe action of relay, also action of
instrument panel green signal light to indicate generator charge.



Section XX

BRAKE SYSTEM


                      Paragraph
  Rear wheel brake       96
  Front wheel brake      97


=96. REAR WHEEL BRAKE= (figs. 60, 61, and 62).

=a. Linkage.= Brake foot pedal on right side of vehicle is connected
to bell crank (located on rear footboard support rod) by means of the
front brake rod (nonadjustable). The bell crank is connected to rear
brake operating lever by means of the rear brake rod with adjustable
clevis end.

[Illustration: RA PD 310277

_Figure 60—Rear Brake Adjustment_]

=b. Adjusting Rear Wheel Brake= (fig. 60). If brake operating lever
stands ahead of vertical position, excessive lining wear is indicated.
Brake shoes must be replaced (steps =c= and =d= below). Normal free
play of brake foot pedal before brake operation is 1 inch. After brake
takes effect in vehicle operation, brake foot pedal should have 1-inch
reserve travel before bottoming on footboard. If brake foot pedal
operation does not come within these limits, adjust rear brake rod as
follows:

(1) Remove cotter pin, plain washer, and clevis pin from end of rear
brake rod clevis.

(2) Loosen clevis lock nut on brake rod.

(3) Turn clevis onto (clockwise) brake rod to shorten rod and take up
foot pedal free play.

(4) Turn clevis off (counterclockwise) brake rod to lengthen rod and
increase foot pedal free play.

(5) After making brake adjustment, spin rear wheel and make sure brake
is not dragging. When correct brake adjustment is attained, install
clevis pin in clevis and brake operating lever with plain washer, and
retain with cotter pin. NOTE: _Cotter pin must be in good condition._

[Illustration: RA PD 310273

_Figure 61—Rear Brake Assembly_]

=c. Remove Brake Shoes= (fig. 61).

(1) Remove rear wheel (par. 127).

(2) Remove brake drum and sprocket assembly. Brake shoes are now
accessible. Do not remove side cover assembly from frame.

(3) Disconnect brake rod clevis at brake operating lever.

(4) Place end of large screwdriver blade between ends of brake shoes at
pivot stud. Move brake‐operating lever forward to hold brake shoes in
fully expanded position, and pry ends of shoes off pivot stud without
removing brake shoe springs.

=d. Install Brake Shoes.= Observe that brake shoes are made for upper
and lower positions and are not interchangeable. Recess in end of shoe
for pivot stud head determines position of shoe in assembly.

(1) Engage ends of springs in shoe assembly holes from the inside
before installing shoes on side cover (fig. 61).

(2) With brake shoes and springs assembled, install so that ends of
shoes will slip over pivot stud and shaft‐operating cam.

(3) Connect brake rod clevis to brake operating lever.

(4) Install brake drum and sprocket assembly. Lock brake to hold drum
in place while installing wheel (fig. 84).

(5) Install rear wheel (par. 127). NOTE: _If rear chain is in need of
adjustment, it should be done at this time._

(6) To equalize brake shoes, loosen nut on brake shoe adjustable pivot
stud (on outside of brake side plate), and while applying pressure
on brake foot pedal (to “center” the brake shoes within the drum),
retighten the pivot stud nut.

(7) After new or relined shoes have been installed, check foot pedal
for free play (step =b= above).


=97. FRONT WHEEL BRAKE= (fig. 62).

=a. Linkage= (=control=). Handle bar hand lever control wire which
operates front wheel brake can be adjusted and or replaced. Keep brake
control wire lubricated (through oiler in housing and at ends of
housing) with engine oil.

=b. Remove Control Wire.= Remove control wire clamp nut from brake
lever clevis, and free lower end of control wire from clevis.

(1) Remove cotter pin and flat washer from hollow pin, permitting
hollow pin to be pulled out of hand lever. Control wire can now be
pulled out of housing through the hole in hand lever.

=c. Install Control Wire.= Apply grease or engine oil to
new control wire and insert, through hand lever, into control wire
housing. Use caution when inserting a new control wire into housing,
to prevent wire end from fraying. A frayed wire with loose end strands
will not feed through the housing.

(1) With control wire in housing, insert hand lever hollow pin so that
narrow slot straddles control wire: then fit flat washer over end of
hollow pin, retaining both with cotter pin.

(2) Insert lower end of control wire through clamp nut, then through
clevis and back through clamp nut again. Grasp end of wire with pliers
and pull until all slack is taken up. Then, while pulling wire snug,
tighten clamp nut securely. Cut off excess wire.

(3) Adjust brake control (refer to step =d= below).

[Illustration: RA PD 310274

_Figure 62—Front Brake Control and Adjusting Members_]

=d. Adjusting Front Wheel Brake.= End of brake hand lever must
move freely about 1/4 of its travel before meeting resistance of brake
operation.

(1) Loosen adjusting sleeve lock nut and turn adjusting sleeve as
necessary to attain correct free movement of hand lever.

(2) After correct hand lever adjustment is made, tighten adjusting
sleeve lock nut.

=e. Remove Brake Shoes.=

(1) Remove front wheel (par. 125). After front wheel is removed, brake
side cover and shoe assembly is accessible for shoe replacement.

(2) Remove brake shoes. Brake shoes and springs can be pried off pivot
stud and freed from operating cam without removing springs.

=f. Install Brake Shoes.= Observe that brake shoes are made for upper
and lower positions and are not interchangeable. Recess in end of shoe
for pivot stud head determines position of shoe in assembly.

(1) Engage ends of springs in shoe holes from the inside before
installing shoes in brake side plate.

(2) With shoes and springs assembled, install the shoes so that ends of
shoes will slip over pivot stud and shaft operating cam.

(3) Install front wheel and brake assembly (par. 125).

(4) Loosen nut on brake shoe adjustable pivot stud and while applying
pressure on brake hand lever, retighten pivot stud nut. This is to
center brake shoes within the brake drum.

(5) After new or relined shoes have been installed, check brake hand
lever and, if necessary, adjust the control wire (step =d= above).



Section XXI

STEERING CONTROL


                         Paragraph
  Forks                     98
  Steering damper           99
  Handle bars              100
  Handle bar controls      101


=98. FORKS= (figs. 63 and 64).

=a.= Either the spring fork can be removed and replaced, or the
complete fork assembly (spring fork and rigid) can be replaced.

=b. Remove Spring Fork= (fig. 63).

(1) Support vehicle on rear stand.

(2) Remove the fork spring rod lock nuts (acorn‐type).

(3) Sit on front mudguard, or otherwise provide weight, to compress
fork cushion (lower) springs. The spring rod large nuts can then be
easily removed, freeing the upper recoil and upper bumper springs for
removal.

(4) Remove front wheel (par. 125).

(5) Remove front mudguard (par. 104).

(6) Remove spring fork right and left side rocker plate studs. NOTE:
_Leave rigid fork rocker studs, with rockers, attached._

(7) Remove spring fork from vehicle.

=c. Install Spring Fork.=

(1) Place buffer springs and lower cushion springs on fork rods. Apply
grease to rods. Pass fork rods up through rigid fork bracket. Bind
lower end of spring fork to lower end of rigid fork with a strap or
piece of heavy wire (fig. 64), to prevent forks from separating while
compressing cushion springs.

(2) Install two bolts in the rigid fork brackets which mount the
mudguard; then place a rod about 8 inches long on the brackets to
provide a pry base for the leverage bar when compressing cushion
springs (fig. 64). With a leverage bar about 18 inches long, anchored
on top of the pry base rod and under the spring fork, lift upward to
compress cushion springs sufficiently to install one of the rocker
plates. Then install the other rocker plate (fig. 64). NOTE: _Left side
spring fork rocker plate stud has a button end which fits into notch in
brake stabilizer plate._

(3) Install mudguard (par. 104).

(4) Install front wheel (par. 125).

(5) Install the two spring rod bushings. Install upper bumper springs
and upper recoil springs on the fork rods, applying grease to rods.

(6) Remove blocks from under vehicle.

(7) Sit on mudguard to compress fork cushion (lower) springs. Tighten
the two large spring rod nuts sufficiently to provide full thread for
the spring rod lock nuts (acorn‐type). Install spring rod lock nuts and
tighten.

(8) See that all nuts, bolts, and screws securing lamp bracket,
mudguard, scabbard carrier, and ammunition carrier are tightened
securely.

(9) Check front wheel brake for operation.

=d. Remove Upper Recoil Springs and/or Upper Bumper Springs.=

(1) Support vehicle on rear stand. Remove the fork spring rod lock nuts
(acorn‐type).

(2) Sit on front mudguard, or otherwise provide weight, to compress
fork cushion (lower) springs. The spring rod large nuts can then be
easily removed, freeing the upper recoil and upper bumper springs for
removal.

=e. Install Upper Recoil Springs and/or Upper Bumper
Springs.=

(1) Apply grease to fork spring rods and install upper bumper springs.

(2) Install upper recoil springs over bumper springs on fork spring
rods.

(3) Sit on front mudguard to compress cushion (lower) springs
sufficiently to start on spring rod large nuts.

(4) Tighten both spring rod large nuts. Install and tighten the two
spring rod (acorn‐type) lock nuts.

=f. Remove and Install Lower Cushion Springs and/or Lower Buffer
Springs.= This operation calls for same procedure followed in removing
and installing spring fork (steps =b= and =c= above).

=g. Remove Complete Fork Assembly.=

(1) Remove ammunition box carrier (par. 103).

(2) Remove scabbard carrier (par. 103).

(3) Remove front wheel (par. 125).

(4) Remove steering damper (par. 99).


[Illustration: RA PD 315728

_Figure 63—Spring Fork Disassembled_

  =A=—UPPER (RECOIL) SPRINGS
  =B=—UPPER BUMPER SPRINGS
  =C=—SPRING ROD LOCK NUTS (ACORN‐TYPE)
  =D=—SPRING ROD BUSHINGS
  =E=—LARGE SPRING ROD NUTS
  =F=—LOWER CUSHION SPRINGS
  =G=—SPRING RODS
  =H=—LOWER BUFFER SPRINGS
  =J=—SPRING FORK ASSEMBLY
  =K=—ROCKER PLATE STUD NUTS AND LOCKS
  =L=—RIGHT SIDE ROCKER PLATE STUD AND WASHER
  =M=—LEFT SIDE ROCKER PLATE STUD (HAS BUTTON END) AND WASHER
  =N=—AMMUNITION BOX CARRIER MOUNTING BOLT, WASHERS AND NUT
  =O=—HEADLIGHT BRACKET AND MUDGUARD BOLT, WASHER AND NUT (LEFT SIDE)
  =P=—FRONT AXLE, CASTLE NUT AND COTTER PIN
  =Q=—SCABBARD CARRIER MOUNTING BOLT, WASHERS AND NUT
  =R=—HEADLIGHT BRACKET AND MUDGUARD BOLT, MARKER LIGHT GABLE CLIP,
        WASHER AND NUT (RIGHT SIDE)
  =S=—BRAKE SHACKLE BOLT, LOCK AND NUT
  =T=—BRAKE AND SIDE COVER ASSEMBLY
  =U=—MUDGUARD BRACKET MOUNTING LOCK, WASHER AND NUTS (RIGHT SIDE)
  =V=—MUDGUARD AND RIGID FORK MOUNTING SCREWS, WASHERS AND NUTS
  =W=—MUDGUARD BRACKET MOUNTING LOCK, WASHER AND NUTS (LEFT SIDE)
  =X=—NOTCHES IN MUDGUARD BRACKETS FOR SPECIAL LOCKS

RA PD 3157288

_Legend for Figure 63—Spring Fork Disassembled_]

(5) Remove front mudguard, after removing nuts and locks from rear
rocker plate studs, two screws and nuts securing mudguard to rigid
fork, and the two bolts mounting headlight bracket to mudguard. NOTE:
_Front mudguard blackout light wire connects to ignition and light
switch and care must be exercised not to break this wire if it is not
disconnected from the switch._

(6) Disconnect battery negative ground wire at frame connection. Remove
blackout light (par. 114). Remove headlight, horn, and bracket assembly
as one unit.

(7) Remove handle bar brake fittings and brake control wire housing
from side of fork. Remove handle bars after removing handle bar bracket
lock nut and cone lock plate. It is not necessary to disconnect spark
and throttle control wire housings from frame. Unscrew fork upper
adjusting cone from fork stem, freeing fork assembly to be removed
from frame head. NOTE: _Steering head ball bearings are loose (not in
retainers) in upper and lower frame head bearing cups. Take care not to
lose balls._

=h. Install Fork Assembly.= With vehicle on rear stand, and front end
up by blocking under frame loop or skid plate, proceed with installing
fork assembly, as follows:

(1) Thoroughly clean upper and lower frame head bearing cups and pack
with general purpose grease No. 2, installing fifteen 5/16-inch ball
bearings in each cup. Work grease thoroughly in between balls.

(2) See that lower fork stem cone is clean and in place, pass fork stem
up through frame head, turning on upper adjusting cone. Do not try to
adjust bearing cone as yet.

(3) Install handle bars by locating mounting bracket on ends of fork
sides and center stem, making sure that spark and throttle control wire
housings are in place.

(4) Adjust upper fork stem adjusting cone so that there is no
perceptible shake in head bearings when handle bars are worked up and
down, and fork does not bind when turned to right and left extremes.

(5) Install cone lock plate by engaging pin in one of the cone notches.

(6) Install lock nut on stem and tighten securely. NOTE: _Check head
bearing play, as tightening lock nut sometimes makes head bearing too
tight. Readjust if necessary._

(7) Attach handle bar brake fittings and brake control wire housing to
side of fork.

(8) Reinstall headlight, horn, and bracket assembly. Connect wires (per
wiring diagram fig. 73) before front mudguard is reinstalled. Install
blackout light (par. 114). Reconnect battery negative ground wire to
frame ground connection.

(9) Install steering damper (par. 99).

[Illustration: RA PD 310266

_Figure 64—Compressing Cushion Springs for Spring
Fork Assembly_]

(10) Install front mudguard. Attach two screws, washers, and nuts for
rigid fork mounting and two bolts, washers, and nuts for headlight
bracket mounting. Fit right and left mudguard brace clip locks to right
and left side rocker plate studs respectively. Do not put on nuts until
after installing ammunition box carrier and scabbard carrier.

(11) Install front wheel (par. 125).

(12) Install scabbard carrier and ammunition box carrier (par. 103).

(13) Check lights, horn, spark control, throttle control, front brake
control, steering damper control, and steering head bearing for freedom
without binding.

=i. Remove Rocker Plate Studs.= Studs and/or rocker plates can be
removed and installed in the same operation. In removing and installing
studs, remove only one fork rocker plate at a time, leaving the other
plate attached to opposite side fork ends to hold fork springs in
compressed position. This will eliminate necessity of compressing fork
springs to fit rocker plates on studs.

(1) Remove front wheel (par. 125).

(2) Remove nuts and locks from rocker plate studs on right side of
vehicle. This releases gun scabbard carrier and mudguard stay clip.
NOTE: _Remove the large nut which secures the long stud to rigid fork._

(3) Drive out studs from fork ends, releasing rocker plate.

(4) Install studs and rocker plate before removing studs from left side
of vehicle.

=j. Install Rocker Plate Studs.= Apply grease to studs and insert in
rocker plate, then install large flat washers on studs before mounting
this assembly on fork ends. Make sure that short stud is in front
position, and that long stud is in rear position for the rigid fork.

(1) Drift studs (with plate assembly) into fork end holes from the
inside.

(2) Install special nut lock (with half round hole) on front stud and
turn stud as necessary to make lock “cup” over end of fork. Install
and tighten stud nut and bend up end of lock for security. Place lock
washer over long stud and install thick nut, securely tightening it.

(3) Attach end of gun scabbard carrier and mudguard brace clip with
special lock to long stud, replacing washer and nut.

(4) After right side rocker plate and/or studs have been installed,
remove and install studs and/or plate on left side of vehicle following
same step‐by‐step procedure as above. The exceptions will be ammunition
box carrier instead of scabbard carrier; also, the left side front stud
is special, having a “button” end.

(5) Install front wheel (par. 125).

[Illustration: RA PD 310276

_Figure 65—Steering Damper Assembly_]


=99. STEERING DAMPER= (fig. 65).

=a.  Remove= (fig. 65).

(1) Remove front wheel (par. 125).

(2) Remove front mudguard (par. 104).

(3) Remove lock nut from steering damper rod, then remove upper end
parts in the following order: adjusting nut, keyed steel washer, fiber
washer, operating lever, and actuating sleeve. This entire assembly is
located in the central part of the handle bar mounting bracket.

(4) Steering damper rod, cushion spring, pressure disk, fiber disk, and
steel disk assembly can now be withdrawn (downward) from fork stem hole.

=b. Install= (fig. 65). Before installing steering damper, make sure
that the parts are in correct order on the lower end of the rod before
passing rod up through hole in fork stem. Check parts and order of
assembly.

(1) Assemble parts on rod end (fig. 65), making sure that the bent down
lip of the steel pressure disk engages with notch in end of the rod
lock plate.

(2) Pass rod with its lower end assembly up through hole in fork stem,
turning steel pressure disk to front position so that “bent‐up” lip
engages with notch in front side of rigid fork crown, at the same time
engaging curved end of steel disk torque arm in slot in underside of
frame head. Maintain pressure against end of rod to keep lower disks in
order while assembling upper rod end parts.

(3) Install upper rod end assembly in the following order: Small plain
washer, releasing spring, adjusting sleeve screws into end of fork
stem, operating lever registers on the adjusting sleeve, fiber washer,
keyed steel washer registers in rod slot, large adjusting nut, and lock
nut.

(4) Turn actuating sleeve all the way into fork stem and then back
it out (up) 1/2 turn or more. Register the operating lever on flat of
actuating sleeve, and see that lever has full movement to the left
without bottoming sleeve in the fork stem.

(5) Adjust steering damper by setting adjusting (large) nut so that
operating lever must be moved nearly straight back from the free
(left‐side) position, before damper takes noticeable effect (applies
friction to movement of the handle bars). Hold large adjusting nut and
tighten the small lock nut.

(6) Install front mudguard (par. 104).

(7) Install front wheel (par. 125).


100. HANDLE BARS.

=a. Remove Complete Assembly.= If vehicle is equipped with handle
bar windshield and rear view mirror, remove these accessories before
starting to remove handle bar assembly.

(1) Disconnect throttle control wire at carburetor lever, and spark
control wire at timer lever.

(2) Release spark control wire housing clip at front cylinder base bolt
(near timer). Also release housing from frame clip on left side of
vehicle. Release throttle control wire housing clip, located at tank,
lower front connection bolt.

(3) Remove front brake hand lever fittings from handle bars. Also
release brake control wire housing at handle bar clamp.

(4) Disconnect battery negative ground wire at frame connection and
wires at headlight. Headlight must be removed for access to the two
terminal screws (fig. 73).

(5) Disconnect horn wire leading to handle bars and red wire (terminal
No. 17, fig. 73) leading to handle bars.

(6) Remove steering damper rod upper end fittings in the following
order: Lock nut, adjusting nut, keyed steel washer, fiber washer,
operating lever, and operating sleeve (screws into end of fork stem).
Removal of these parts gives access to handle bar lock nut. Remove
handle bar lock nut and cone lock plate.

(7) Loosen handle bar bracket‐fork end pinch bolts. Handle bars are now
free to be drifted off ends of fork sides and center stem.

(8) Remove handle bar windshield apron spring guard after handle bars
are removed from vehicle.

=b. Install Complete Assembly.= If vehicle is equipped with handle
bar windshield and rear view mirror, attach these accessories after
handle bar assembly is installed.

(1) Attach windshield apron spring guard to handle bar bracket. Do not
tighten bolt nut until after handle bars are installed.

(2) Start handle bar bracket holes over ends of fork, seeing that spark
control wire housing is on right side of frame head: then drive handle
bars onto fork ends, using a rawhide mallet, or a hammer and wood block.

(3) To install cone lock plate, enter registering pin through hole in
handle bars and engage notch in the adjusting cone. Install and tighten
handle bar lock nut securely. CAUTION: _When tightening this nut,
always make sure that register (shoulder) of nut enters hole in lock
plate and handle bars._

(4) Check adjustment of head bearing. The fork must turn freely but
without perceptible shake. Readjust head cone to obtain proper bearing
adjustment if necessary.

(5) Tighten handle bar bracket‐fork end pinch bolts.

(6) Position windshield apron guard so that it clears fork springs.
Securely tighten mounting bolt nut.

(7) Install steering damper upper end fittings (fig. 65). Make sure
that lower end disks and plates are properly engaged. Adjust (par. 99).

(8) Connect handle bar wires to terminal plate, horn, and headlight.
Consult wiring diagram (fig. 73). Install headlight. Adjust beam and
secure mounting nut (par. 114). Connect battery negative ground wire to
frame connection.

(9) Check operation of lights and horn, tactical situation permitting.

(10) Attach front brake hand lever fittings to left handle bar. Secure
control wire housing in handle bar clamp, just ahead of housing oiler.
Check front brake for correct operation and, if necessary, adjust (par.
97).

(11) Pass spark control wire housing along left side of frame front
tube, between cylinders (under carburetor) to position housing end
clamp on cylinder stud near timer. Secure clamp under cylinder stud
nut. Secure wire cable under clamp on left side of frame front tube,
with white paint mark slightly ahead of clamp front edge. Engage end of
spark control wire in timer lever and adjust spark control (par. 88).

(12) Pass throttle control wire housing along right side of frame
front tube and over top of front cylinder head to reach carburetor
connection. Install tank (lower front) mounting bolt to secure wire
housing clamp. See that white paint mark on wire housing is slightly
ahead of clamp, then secure bolt nut on left side of vehicle. Engage
end of throttle control wire in throttle lever and adjust (par. 69).

[Illustration: RA PD 310282

_Figure 66—Removing Handle Bar Grip Sleeve Retaining Nut_]


=101. HANDLE BAR CONTROLS= (figs. 66 and 67).

=a.= Construction of the throttle and spark controls is the same, thus
replacing a control wire or wire housing follows the same general
procedure up to the point where control adjustment is made. Handle bar
grip sleeves (spirals) are interchangeable.

=b. Remove Throttle Control Wire= (fig. 67).

(1) Disconnect control wire at throttle lever connection.

(2) Insert blade of a large, square‐shank screwdriver through hole in
end of grip and turn out end nut by using a wrench on the shank of the
screwdriver (fig. 66). Sometimes this nut is difficult to remove. In
this case, insert punch into the slot in the nut and strike punch two
or three sharp blows to “free” nut in handle bar end threads. Remove
nut as above. NOTE: _Nut remains inside the grip and is removed with
the grip and spiral sleeve assembly._

(3) Remove grip and spiral assembly from handle bars. Control wire and
working parts are now accessible.

(4) Remove plain roller from pin. Remove roller block from pin. Remove
pin from plunger.

(5) Pull plunger with wire attached out of handle bar end. Remove
hexagon head screw which secures wire to plunger. NOTE: _If wire is
broken, remove other half from housing at carburetor connection end._

(6) Remove any rust, dirt, or gum from grip spiral, handle bar end,
wire plunger, and inside of handle bar where plunger operates.

[Illustration:

  =A=—END NUT.
  =B=—GRIP.
  =C=—GRIP SLEEVE ASSEMBLY.
  =D=—ROLLER PIN.
  =E=—ROLLER.
  =F=—ROLLER BLOCK.
  =G=—PLUNGER.
  =H=—CONTROL WIRE.
  =I=—WIRE RETAINING NUT.

RA PD 310263

_Figure 67—Handle Bar Grip and Wire Control, Disassembled_]

=c. Install Throttle Control Wire= (fig. 67).

(1) Pass hollow screw over control wire with threaded end of hollow
screw facing button on end of wire. Install screw in end of plunger.
Securely tighten screw.

(2) Apply grease or engine oil to control wire and insert end into
control wire housing.

(3) Apply grease to plunger and push plunger and wire into handle bar
until plunger pin hole is exposed in handle bar slot. Work plunger or
turn it within handle bar so that pin hole and flat side are upward and
are centered in slot; then insert roller pin into plunger hole, roller
block (with flat sides), and roller in order named. Apply grease to
plunger pin and roller and to outside of handle bar end.

(4) Install grip and spiral assembly by engaging plunger roller in
spiral opening in end of grip sleeve. Grip spiral sleeve nut can best
be started without danger of cross threading, by holding grip assembly
back slightly while starting nut in handle bar end. This squares nut
with end of grip sleeve, alining threads. Securely tighten nut with
screwdriver and wrench.

(5) Connect control wire at throttle lever connection. Adjust control
(par. 69).

=d. Remove Spark Control Wire= (fig. 67). Disconnect control wire at
timer lever and follow procedure outlined under step =b= above.

=e. Install Spark Control Wire= (fig. 67). Follow procedure outlined
under step c above, then connect control wire at timer lever and adjust
control (par. 88).

=f. Remove and Install Control Wire Housings.= Remove either control
wire housing after following procedure outlined above (step b), then
remove set screw on under side of handle bar, just ahead of grip sleeve
shoulder. NOTE: _Set screw for spark control wire housing is located
under headlight dimmer switch._ After set screw is removed and housing
freed from attaching clamps, housing can be pushed out through end of
handle bar.

(1) When installing control wire housings, see that housing end is
secured in handle bar with set screw, and that housing is correctly
attached to vehicle clamps.

(2) Install control wire and grip (step =c= above) and adjust
controls: spark (par. 88), throttle (par. 69).



Section XXII

SHEET METAL AND EQUIPMENT


                  Paragraph
  Chain guards       102
  Carriers           103
  Mudguards          104
  Battery box        105
  Tool box           106
  Tanks              107
  Stands             108
  Saddle post        109
  Safety guards      110
  Skid plate         111


102. CHAIN GUARDS.

=a. Remove Outer Front Chain Guard= (figs. 68 and 69).

(1) Remove nut and washer which secures center of chain guard and skid
plate left‐side support bracket.

(2) Loosen skid plate support bracket lower bolt and nut and remove
bracket from stud.

(3) Loosen the nut which secures footboard rear stud to sidebar, then
remove nut which secures footboard front stud to sidebar. Pull front
end of footboard away from sidebar so that stud will clear end of
safety guard.

(4) Remove extended nut which secures sidebar to frame front support
rod.

(5) Disconnect clutch control cable end at clutch foot pedal by
removing cotter pin and plain washer from stud.

(6) Left side footboard, sidebar, and clutch foot pedal assembly can
now be removed. If rear end of sidebar is lowered, the front end will
clear end of safety guard.

(7) Remove cotter pin, nut, spring, washer, and bolt from chain guard
rear mounting. Outer front chain guard can now be removed, exposing
engine sprocket, front drive chain, and clutch assembly.

=b. Install Outer Front Chain Guard.=

(1) Locate outer front chain guard on center support stud (frame rear
support rod end). Line up rear mounting bracket with frame bracket.

(2) Install bolt, washer, spring, nut, and cotter pin to secure rear
mounting.

(3) Install footboard, sidebar, and clutch foot pedal assembly on frame
support rod ends.

[Illustration: RA PD 310264

_Figure 68—Left Footboard Assembly Removed_]

[Illustration: RA PD 315729

_Figure 69—Outer Front Chain Guard Removed_]

(4) Attach front end of sidebar. Install extended nut and lock washer
to secure front sidebar and support rod mounting.

(5) Install skid plate support bracket on support rod (in center of
chain guard), tightening nut on bolt. Install nut and lock washer which
secure skid plate bracket and chain guard on rear support rod. Tighten
nut.

(6) Pull front end of footboard away from sidebar so that hole in end
of safety guard lines up with hole in sidebar, then pass footboard stud
through both pieces, installing washer and securing stud nut. Tighten
footboard rear stud nut.

(7) Attach brake control cable end to foot pedal stud.

=c. Remove Rear Chain Guard.=

(1) Remove cap screw which secures rear chain oil pipe clamp, and
provides mounting for front end of chain guard on transmission sprocket
cover. Remove chain guard.

(2) Remove chain guard from rear mounting by pushing the guard back so
that stud (with washers and spring) slips out of mounting clip notch.

=d. Install Rear Chain Guard.=

(1) Locate rear chain guard in position for mounting. Spread the large
washer on the rear stud to engage clip notch. Push guard forward until
front end hole lines up with chain oiler pipe clamp, then install cap
screw and washer, securing guard and clip to sprocket cover.


103. CARRIERS.

=a. Remove Ammunition Box Carrier.=

(1) Remove nut and screw which secures carrier bracket to front
mudguard.

(2) Remove nut and lock washer from rocker plate rear stud. This frees
lower end of carrier.

(3) Remove nut, washer, cable clip, and plain washer from rigid fork
stud. Remove carrier and box.

=b. Install Ammunition Box Carrier.=

(1) Locate hole in lower end of bracket on rocker plate rear stud.
Attach upper end of bracket to rigid fork stud. Replace lock washers
and nuts. Tighten nuts.

(2) Attach carrier bracket to front mudguard with screw, washer, and
nut. Tighten nut.

=c. Remove and Install Scabbard Carrier.= The procedure for removing
and installing scabbard carrier is the same as outlined for ammunition
box carrier, except that scabbard carrier is on left side of vehicle.
Follow procedure outlined under steps =a= and =b= above.

=d. Remove Luggage Carrier.=

(1) Loosen straps of both saddlebags, and remove saddlebags from
keyhole notches in luggage carrier side plates. Remove nuts from right
and left side mounting studs, which secure luggage carrier to frame
clips. Deflate rear wheel tire so that a piece of wood or suitable
object can be used to depress top part of tire under mudguard, to
provide clearance, and access to the three nuts which secure screws for
luggage carrier mudguard mounting. NOTE: _If rear wheel is removed,
mounting screws are accessible._

(2) Remove the three luggage carrier center mounting screws. Remove
luggage carrier from vehicle.

=e. Install Luggage Carrier.=

(1) Mount luggage carrier on frame clip studs. Install washers and
nuts. With rear tire deflated and depressed for clearance under
mudguard, install the three screws, lock washers, and nuts for
carrier‐mudguard mounting. NOTE: _If rear wheel is removed, mounting
screws are accessible._

(2) Tighten frame stud nuts to secure both sides of carrier.

(3) Attach saddlebags and securely strap to frame stays.

(4) Inflate tire to 20 pounds.


104. MUDGUARDS.

=a. Remove Front Mudguard.=

(1) Remove front wheel (par. 125).

(2) Remove instrument panel cover (par. 119), disconnect front mudguard
blackout marker light wire at switch. Pull wire out, free from tanks.

(3) Remove the two screws and nuts from rigid fork and mudguard
mounting. Remove the two screws and nuts securing lamp bracket to
mudguard.

(4) Remove bolt and nut which secure ammunition box carrier to mudguard.

(5) Remove bolt and nut which secure gun scabbard carrier to mudguard.

(6) Remove nuts from fork left rocker plate stud. These nuts secure
ammunition box lower bracket, and mudguard stay clip. Remove nuts from
fork right rocker plate stud. These nuts secure gun scabbard carrier
lower bracket, and mudguard stay clip.

(7) Pull carrier brackets off rocker plate studs. Remove mudguard brace
clip locks from slots in clips so that mudguard can be dropped. When
removing mudguard from vehicle, take care not to break and/or damage
blackout light wire.

=b. Install Front Mudguard.=

(1) Locate mudguard in mounting position. Engage slots in stay clips
on rocker plate studs, installing the special locks in the clip slots.
NOTE: _Brace clip locks are made for right and left side installation.
Secure both clip locks with stud nuts._

(2) Attach ends of ammunition and scabbard carriers to rocker plate
studs. Secure with lock washers and nuts.

(3) Mount mudguard to rigid fork bracket. Tighten the two screws,
washers, and nuts.

(4) Attach lower end of headlight bracket to mudguard with two bolts,
washers, and nuts.

(5) Attach ammunition box carrier bracket to mudguard. Tighten bolt,
washer, and nut.

(6) Attach gun scabbard carrier bracket to mudguard. Tighten bolt,
washer, and nut.

(7) Reinstall front wheel and brake assembly (par. 125).

(8) Connect mudguard blackout light wire to switch terminal. Refer to
wiring diagram, figure 73.

(9) Install instrument panel cover (par. 119).

=c. Remove Rear Mudguard.=

(1) Support vehicle on rear stand. Remove rear wheel (par. 127).

(2) Remove luggage carrier (par. 103).

(3) Remove rear chain guard (par. 102).

(4) Remove the two U‐bolt nuts which mount safety guard at upper frame
bracket. Then pull safety guard away from studs and remove studs from
frame bracket, freeing mudguard at this point. NOTE: _These two studs
screw into a “plate” nut._

(5) Remove bolt and nut which secure battery box left‐side bracket to
mudguard.

(6) Remove bolt and nut which secure battery box right‐side bracket.
This bolt also secures lower tool box bracket and speedometer cable
clip to mudguard.

(7) Remove nut and washers from bolt which secures lower end of
mudguard to frame (behind transmission).

(8) Remove taillight connector plugs from sockets and remove cable from
mudguard spring clips.

(9) Remove nuts from studs which secure right‐ and left‐side mudguard
brace clips to frame axle clips. Mudguard can now be removed from
vehicle.

=d. Install Rear Mudguard.=

(1) Locate mudguard in position for mounting. Install the two studs,
washers, and nuts which secure right‐ and left‐side brace clips to
frame axle clips. NOTE: _If brake side cover interferes with locating
nut on right side, loosen the brake sleeve nut and push brake side
cover assembly inward for clearance. Be sure to retighten brake sleeve
nut._

(2) Attach front lower end of mudguard. Install flat washer, lock
washer, and nut on bolt to secure lower end of mudguard to frame (in
back of transmission).

(3) Install the two studs which mount mudguard and upper battery box
bracket on frame bracket. These two studs screw into a plate nut
located underneath the battery box bracket. Removing the battery box
cover will give more access to plate nut in this step. Install battery
box cover if it is removed for this job.

(4) Attach rear safety guard to the two frame bracket studs. Install
washers and nuts. Securely tighten nuts and tighten U‐bolt nuts, which
secure ends of safety guard to frame stays.

(5) Attach battery box bracket to mudguard bracket. Install bolt,
washer, and nut which secure battery box right‐side bracket, tool box
bracket lower end, and speedometer cable clip to mudguard bracket. Bolt
is inserted from front side, head toward engine. NOTE: _Speedometer
cable clip is under head of bolt._

(6) Attach left‐side mudguard bracket and battery box bracket. Install
bolt, washer, and nut which secure battery box left‐side bracket to
mudguard bracket. Bolt is inserted from front side, head toward engine.

(7) Install rear chain guard (par. 102).

(8) Locate and retain taillight cable in mudguard spring clips. Attach
connector plugs to taillights (wiring diagram, fig. 73).

(9) Install luggage carrier (par. 103).

(10) Install rear wheel (par. 127).

(11) Securely tighten all bolts and nuts.


105. BATTERY BOX.

=a. Remove Battery Box.=

(1) Remove battery (par. 113).

(2) To remove rear brake rod, disconnect clevis from brake lever, and
free front end of rod at brake shaft bell crank.

(3) Remove rear chain guard (par. 102).

(4) Remove tool box and bracket in one piece (par. 106).

(5) Remove nut and bolt securing left side lower battery box mounting
to mudguard bracket. Remove nut and bolt securing battery front
mounting to frame saddle post tube bracket.

(6) Remove the two nuts securing rear safety guard center connection
to mounting studs. Unscrew mounting studs to free the plate nut which
clamps the battery box bracket to frame cross member.

(7) Remove battery box from right side of vehicle.

=b. Install Battery Box.= Locate battery box in vehicle
from left side and secure upper rear mounting bracket with the two
frame cross member studs and the plate nut. Install washers and nuts
which secure safety guard to these same two studs.

(1) Install bolt to secure battery box front mounting to frame tube.
Make sure that bolt passes through frame tube bracket from left side,
and that large plain washer bears against battery box front bracket
(bracket has open end). Tighten nut to secure box bracket to frame tube
bracket.

(2) Install tool box and bracket (par. 106).

(3) Install bolt, washer, and nut which secure battery box left‐side
mounting to mudguard. Insert bolt from the front.

(4) Install rear chain guard (par. 102).

(5) Connect rear brake rod end to bell crank fitting. Attach clevis to
brake operating lever, installing plain washer, clevis pin, and cotter
pin.

(6) Install battery (par. 113).


106. TOOL BOX.

=a. General.= When tool box only is to be removed and/or installed,
it is a simple matter to open box and remove and/or install the three
large screws. Gear‐toothed lock washers and large recessed washers fit
under screw heads.

=b. Remove Box and Bracket Assembly.= Remove bolt and nut which
secure tool box upper mounting bracket to frame clip. Lower end of
mounting bracket, battery box bracket, and speedometer cable are all
secured to the mudguard bracket by the same bolt and nut. Remove
speedometer cable from clip and remove bolt and nut, freeing tool box
and bracket assembly for removal. NOTE: _Removal of rear brake rod will
make bracket lower mounting bolt and nut more accessible._

=c. Install Box and Bracket Assembly.= Locate box and bracket
assembly on vehicle and install bolt, washer, and nut at the upper
frame clip mounting. To attach bracket lower end to mudguard bracket,
place bolt through speedometer cable clip, then through box mounting
bracket, battery box bracket, and mudguard bracket, securing assembly
with lock washer and nut.

[Illustration: RA PD 310245

_Figure 70—Fuel and Oil Tanks Removed_]


=107. TANKS= (fig. 70).

=a. General.= Fuel and oil tanks are separate, fitting together,
saddle‐type, in upper frame tubes, and are retained in position with
three mounting bolts. Either tank can be removed and/or installed
without disturbing line connections of the other tank.

=b. Fuel Tank.= Fuel tank is located on left side of vehicle and
holds slightly over 3 U.S. gallons. It provides mounting for shifter
lever and shifter lever guide. Drain is located in forward position on
under side of tank.

=c. Oil Tank.= Oil tank is located on right side of vehicle and holds
1 U.S. gallon. Oil feed pipe, scavenger (return) pipe, and breather
pipe connections are on under side of tank. Drain is located in forward
position on under side of tank.

=d. Remove Fuel Tank.=

(1) Disconnect battery negative ground wire at frame connection.

(2) Loosen the two cap screws which secure caution plate and tank top
strip.

(3) Remove instrument panel cover (par. 119).

(4) Disconnect gear shifter lever and shifter rod by removing bolt.

(5) Shut off fuel supply. Disconnect fuel pipe at tank union nipple.

(6) Remove nuts, lock washers, and flat washers from the two front (one
upper and one lower) mounting bolts, and nut, lock washer, and flat
washer from the rear mounting bolt. Leave bolts in place so that oil
tank will stay in position after fuel tank is removed. Remove fuel tank
from vehicle.

=e. Install Fuel Tank.=

(1) Position fuel tank on vehicle. Pass the three mounting bolts
through tank brackets from right side of vehicle. It will be necessary
to pry up on tank top strip in order to slip top edge of tank under
strip. Install large flat washers, lock washers, and nuts on mounting
bolts and securely tighten the nuts.

(2) Tighten the two cap screws, securing caution plate and tank top
strip.

(3) Connect fuel pipe at tank nipple union. Open supply valve.

(4) Install instrument panel cover (par. 119).

(5) Connect gear shifter lever and shifter rod by installing bolt, lock
washer, and nut.

(6) Connect battery negative ground wire to frame connection.

(7) After fuel tank has been filled, check pipe connection and drain
plug for leaks.

=f. Remove Oil Tank.=

(1) Disconnect battery negative ground wire at frame connection.

(2) Loosen the two cap screws which secure caution plate and tank top
strip.

(3) Remove instrument panel cover (par. 119).

(4) Drain oil from tank by removing drain plug. Use a trough (of
cardboard or tin) to keep oil from draining on engine. NOTE: _If oil
feed pipe nipple cap (manufacturer’s (H-D) No. 3583-15) is available,
it can be screwed on to tank nipple, thus eliminating draining of oil._

(5) Disconnect oil feed pipe at rear nipple union.

(6) Disconnect scavenger (return) pipe at nipple union.

(7) Disconnect breather pipe banjo‐type connection by taking out bolt.

(8) Remove nuts, lock washers, and flat washers from the two front
(one upper and one lower) mounting bolts, and nut, lock washer, and
flat washer from rear mounting bolt. NOTE: _To prevent fuel tank
from falling out of frame, remove upper front mounting bolt and rear
mounting bolt and pass both back through fuel tank mounting brackets
from the left side of vehicle. Oil tank can then be removed, and fuel
tank will stay in place._

=g. Install Oil Tank.=

(1) Position oil tank on vehicle. Make sure that composition buffer is
in place before installing mounting bolts from right side of vehicle.
Pry up on tank top strip in order to slip top edge of tank under strip.

(2) Install large flat washers, lock washers, and nuts on mounting
bolts. Securely tighten the nuts.

(3) Tighten the two cap screws securing caution plate and tank top
strip.

(4) Connect oil feed pipe to tank nipple. Tank nipple is located at
lower rear end of tank.

(5) Connect scavenger (return) pipe to tank nipple. Nipple is located
underneath tank, near center.

(6) Connect breather pipe with banjo‐type fitting to tank. Use hollow
bolt, making sure flat washers are in place on both sides of banjo
fitting and that mounting bolt is tight.

(7) Install instrument panel cover (par. 119).

(8) See that oil tank drain plug and washer are in place, and that the
plug is tight.

(9) Connect battery negative ground wire to frame connection.

(10) After filling oil tank, check all pipe fittings for leaks.


108. STANDS.

=a. Remove Rear Stand.= Remove nuts which secure rear stand mounting
bolts. Drift bolts out of frame clip holes, freeing stand.

=b. Install Rear Stand.= Locate stand in position so that bracket
stop is downward and will bear against frame axle clips to support
vehicle when stand is in use. See that cupped spring washers are on
mounting bolts before attaching stand to frame. Drift mounting bolts
into frame axle clips and secure with lock washers and nuts.

=c. Remove Jiffy Stand.=

(1) Support vehicle on rear stand.

(2) Loosen footboard rear support stud nut. Remove footboard front
support rod nut and pull footboard outward to release end of safety
guard. Remove extended nut from footboard sidebar front mounting.
Remove nut securing upper end of skid plate hanger and sidebar rear
mounting (located in center of chain guard cover). Loosen nut and bolt
which secure skid plate hanger bracket to skid plate: drop bracket.
Disconnect clutch control cable from foot pedal stud to prevent damage
to cable end piece. Remove left footboard, clutch foot pedal, and
sidebar assembly from support rod ends.

[Illustration: RA PD 310269

_Figure 71—Saddle and Suspension_]

(3) Remove the two nuts from U‐bolt which secure safety guard bracket
to frame tube, remove bracket from U‐bolt, and slide safety guard
assembly out of support rod.

=d. Install Jiffy Stand.=

(1) Install safety guard assembly on support rod and secure mounting
bracket to frame tube with U‐bolt, washers, and nuts.

(2) Install footboard, clutch foot pedal, and sidebar assembly. Attach
skid plate hanger bracket and secure to support rod. Attach clutch
control cable end to foot pedal stud, installing plain washer and
cotter pin. Install washer and extended nut on end of front support
rod. Securely tighten nut. Attach front end of sidebar to end of
safety guard by pulling front of footboard outward, alining hole in
safety guard end with hole in sidebar, and passing footboard front
support stud through both parts, securing with washer and nut. Tighten
footboard rear support stud nut.

(3) Return vehicle to operating position.


=109. SADDLE POST= (fig. 71).

=a.= Saddle is mounted on saddle bar by means of three mounting bolts
and can be shifted forward or backward to provide three positions
on saddle bar. Spacer collars can be added and or removed from the
two rear mountings to raise or lower rear of saddle to alter riding
position. Saddle bar hinges on frame bracket and is clevis‐connected
to saddle spring post. Saddle and saddle bar can be lifted upward and
forward after releasing spring latch (on left side) from groove in
clevis pin end and removing clevis pin from saddle bar.

=b. Remove Saddle Spring Post.= Support vehicle on rear stand.
Raise saddle and saddle bar after removing saddle post clevis pin.
Remove bolt and nut from left‐side skid plate bracket and remove nut
to free right‐side skid plate bracket at muffler pipe clamp and frame
connection. Drop skid plate. Remove saddle spring post clamp nut, which
is located underneath frame at bottom end of saddle post frame tube.
Saddle spring post assembly can be pulled upward out of frame tube.

=c. Install Saddle Spring Post.= When saddle spring post assembly is
inserted in frame tube, see that flat side machined on post rod end nut
registers in flat side of hole in bottom of frame tube. Install and
securely tighten saddle spring post clamp nut at bottom end of frame
tube. Lift skid plate and secure in position with left‐side bracket
bolt, washer, and nut and with right bracket bolt, washer, and nut
(this also secures muffler pipe clamp to frame clip). Lower saddle and
saddle bar into position. Insert clevis pin from right side and secure
with spring latch, making sure that spring is in pin groove.


110. SAFETY GUARDS.

=a. Remove Front Safely Guard.=

(1) Loosen nuts which secure right and left footboard rear support
studs to sidebars. Remove nuts which secure right and left footboard
front support studs (and mount ends of safety guard) to sidebars. Pull
front end of each footboard outward so that support stud will free end
of safety guard. Remove four nuts from the two U‐bolts which mount
safety guard upper bracket to frame tube. Remove safety guard.

=b. Install Front Safety Guard.= Locate safety guard and mount upper
bracket to frame tube with the two U‐bolts, washers, and nuts, but do
not tighten nuts as yet. Pull front end of right footboard outward,
line up hole in safety guard end with hole in sidebar, and pass
footboard front support stud through both parts, securing with washer
and nut. Follow same procedure to mount left end of safety guard.
Tighten U‐bolt nuts securely.

=c. Remove Rear Safety Guard.= Remove nuts from U‐bolts which mount
ends of safety guard to lower frame stays. Remove the two nuts from
upper safety guard mounting. After removing U‐bolts, safety guard can
be removed from vehicle.

=d. Install Rear Safety Guard.= Position safety guard on vehicle.
Install U‐bolts, washers, and nuts for lower end mounting on frame
stays. Do not tighten nuts. Engage upper mounting holes on studs and
replace washers and nuts. Tighten all mounting nuts.

[Illustration: RA PD 310234

_Figure 72—Showing Skid Plate Dropped_]


111. SKID PLATE.

=a.= Rear end of skid plate must be dropped when removing and or
replacing muffler assembly, saddle spring post, transmission, and
engine.

=b. Drop Skid Plate= (fig. 72).

(1) Remove nut from bolt which secures skid plate side mounting bracket
to frame clip. This bolt also mounts muffler tube clamp to frame clip.

(2) Remove left side mounting. Remove nut and bolt which secures lower
end of hanger bracket to skid plate on left side of vehicle. Drop rear
end of skid plate.

=c. Install Dropped Skid Plate.=

(1) Lift rear end of skid plate into position. Attach right‐side
bracket at frame clip bolt. Secure mounting with washer and nut.

(2) Attach lower end of left‐side hanger bracket to skid plate. Install
bolt, washer, and nut. Tighten nut.

=d. Remove and/or Install Skid Plate.=

(1) To remove skid plate from vehicle, follow instructions in step b
above; then remove nut and bolt from U‐clamp which secures skid plate
to frame bracket, and remove nut and belt from clamp which secures
right front end to support rod.

(2) To install skid plate, mount right front end to support rod clamp,
and install bolt and nut to secure U‐clamp under frame bracket. Then
follow instructions in step =c= above.



Section XXIII

BATTERY, LIGHTING SYSTEM, HORN


                              Paragraph
  Description                    112
  Battery                        113
  Headlights                     114
  Taillights                     115
  Ignition and light switch      116
  Horn                           117
  Wiring                         118


112. DESCRIPTION.

=a.= Lighting system and horn are supplied 6‐volt current from the
22‐ampere‐hour battery. Negative side of battery and system is
grounded. Blackout lights and service lights are controlled by the
same switch (ignition and light switch) which also controls ignition.
Blackout headlight has auxiliary control switch in body. Service
headlight upper and lower beam is controlled by toggle switch on
left handle bar. Horn is operated by button on left handle bar after
ignition and light switch is in “ON” position. Blackout stop light and
service stop light are operated by brake foot pedal switch.


113. BATTERY.

=a.= The 3‐cell, 15‐plate, 6‐volt, 22‐ampere‐hour battery is located
in battery box back of frame seat post tube, and is accessible for
inspection and or service after removing box cover. Normally charged
battery has specific gravity reading of 1.275. Normally discharged
battery has specific gravity of 1.150.

=b. Check Electrolyte Level= (fig. 74).

(1) Raise saddle and bar assembly after releasing and removing swivel
pin.

(2) Loosen wing thumb nuts on box top hold‐down studs sufficiently to
disengage bracket slots, then lift off box cover.

(3) Remove the three filler plugs. Check and or adjust electrolyte
level. See that electrolyte level is 5/16 inch above plates. If
necessary, bring electrolyte to that level, using clean, drinkable
water.

(4) Clean top of battery before installing box cover.

(5) Clean terminals or posts, if corroded. Make sure that the felt
washers are on posts and are saturated with engine oil.

=c. Remove Battery.= Raise saddle and bar assembly. Release and
remove swivel pin. Loosen wing thumb nuts on box top hold‐down studs
sufficiently to disengage bracket slots, then lift off box cover.
Disconnect positive and negative wires from battery terminals. Lift
battery upward out of battery box.

[Illustration: RA PD 310278

_Figure 73—Complete Wiring Diagram_

  1. SWITCH TERMINAL (Three Wires connected)—=Black= wire from
  blackout marker light 24; taillight cable =green= wire from
  blackout taillight 22; single wire direct from blackout headlight
  as shown by dotted line in illustration 43, or horn and headlight
  cable =black= wire from junction terminal 35 as shown in
  illustration 44.

  2. SWITCH TERMINAL (Four wires connected)—Generator and relay
  cable =green= wire from “=switch=” terminal (14) of
  generator; taillight cable =black= wire from service stop
  and taillight (23); horn and headlight cable =red= wire from
  junction terminal 17; =black= wire from speedometer light (11).

  3. SWITCH TERMINAL (Two wires connected)—Generator and relay cable
  =red= wire from terminal marked “BAT” on relay; coil and
  battery cable =red= wire from junction terminal 18.

  4. SWITCH TERMINAL (One wire connected)—=Black= wire from oil
  signal light terminal (10).

  5. SWITCH TERMINAL (One wire connected)—Taillight cable
  =yellow= wire from blackout stop lamp (21).

  6. SWITCH TERMINAL (One wire connected)—Battery and coil cable
  =black= wire from junction terminal 19.

  7. SWITCH TERMINAL (One wire connected)—Taillight cable =red=
  wire from service stop and taillight (23).

  8. GENERATOR SIGNAL LIGHT TERMINAL (One wire connected)—Generator
  and relay cable =black= wire from relay right front terminal.

  9. OIL PRESSURE SIGNAL LIGHT TERMINAL (One wire
  connected)—=Black= wire from oil pressure switch (16).

  10. SIGNAL LIGHT TERMINAL (Four wires connected)—=Black= wire
  (under switch panel) from generator signal light terminal (8);
  =black= wire from switch terminal (4); battery and coil cable
  =green= wire from coil front terminal; horn and headlight
  cable =green= wire from horn.

  11. SPEEDOMETER LIGHT—=Black= wire from switch terminal 2.

  12. BATTERY POSITIVE TERMINAL (LEFT SIDE)—=Red= wire with
  =black= tracer from junction terminal 18.

  13. BATTERY NEGATIVE TERMINAL (RIGHT SIDE)—=Black= wire from
  ground clamp on frame.

  14. “SWITCH” TERMINAL OF GENERATOR—Generator and relay cable
  =green= wire from switch terminal 2.

  15. “RELAY” TERMINAL OF GENERATOR—=Red= wire with =black
  tracer= from relay rear terminal.

  16. OIL PRESSURE SIGNAL SWITCH—=Black= wire from signal light
  terminal 9.

  17. JUNCTION TERMINAL (BAKELITE TERMINAL PLATE ON HORN
  MOUNTING)—Horn and headlight cable =red= wire from switch
  terminal 2,—=red= wire with =black tracer= from
  handlebar toggle switch (31).

  18. FRONT JUNCTION TERMINAL (in motorcycle frame, under
  saddle)—Coil and battery cable =red= wire from switch
  terminal 3; =red= wire with =black tracer= from battery
  positive terminal (12).

  19. REAR JUNCTION TERMINAL (in motorcycle frame, under
  saddle)—Coil and battery cable =black= wire from switch
  terminal 6; =red= wire from stop light switch (20).

RA PD 310278B

  20. STOP LIGHT SWITCH—=Red= wire from junction terminal 19;
  =green= wire from coil terminal.

  21. BLACKOUT STOP LIGHT (Top socket in right taillight)—Taillight
  cable =yellow= wire from switch terminal 5.

  22. BLACKOUT TAILLIGHTS—Taillight cable =green= wire from
  switch terminal 1.

  23. SERVICE TAIL AND STOP LIGHT (top socket in left taillight—two
  wires in one plug)—Taillight cable =black= wire from switch
  terminal 2 is for service taillight, and taillight cable =red=
  wire from switch terminal 7 is for service stop light.

  24. BLACKOUT MARKER LIGHT (ON FRONT MUDGUARD)—=Black= wire
  from switch terminal 1.

  25. SERVICE HEADLIGHT—=Black= wire with =red tracer=
  from handlebar toggle switch (31) to large terminal screw;
  =red= wire with =yellow tracer= from handlebar toggle
  switch to small terminal screw.

  26. IGNITION AND LIGHT SWITCH (TOP VIEW)—Switch “OFF” in
  straight‐ahead position.

  27. BLACKOUT HEADLIGHT—Blackout headlight is fitted with
  independent switch in lamp body.

  28. SPARK COIL—Coil and battery cable =green= wire from
  terminal 10 to coil front terminal; =green= wire from stop
  light switch (20) to coil front terminal; low tension wire (34)
  from circuit breaker (33) to coil rear terminal.

  29. HORN—Horn and headlight cable =green= wire from terminal
  10; =black= wire from horn switch (30).

  30. HORN SWITCH—=Black= wire from horn.

  31. HANDLEBAR TOGGLE SWITCH—=Black= wire with =red
  tracer= from service headlight terminal with large terminal
  screw; =red= wire with =yellow tracer= to service
  headlight terminal with small terminal screw; =red= wire with
  =black tracer= from junction terminal 17.

  32. CUT‐OUT RELAY—=Red= wire with =black tracer= from
  “=relay=” terminal of generator to relay rear terminal;
  generator and relay cable =red= wire from switch terminal 3 to
  relay terminal marked “BAT”; generator and relay cable =black=
  wire from terminal 8, to relay right front terminal.

  33. IGNITION CIRCUIT BREAKER AND TIMER—Low tension wire (34) from
  coil rear terminal.

  34. CIRCUIT BREAKER‐TO‐COIL LOW TENSION WIRE—See Description 33.

  35. JUNCTION TERMINAL ON BAKELITE TERMINAL PLATE—Horn and
  headlight cable =black= wire from switch terminal 1; wire from
  blackout headlight (27).

All WLA model motorcycles originally equipped with radio interference
suppression‐devices, or to which suppression‐devices have been added,
can be identified by a large letter S stenciled on left and right sides
of instrument panel cover.

  =*A= GROUND TERMINALS ON COIL HOUSING.
  =*B= FLEXIBLE BRAID CONDUCTOR.
  =*C= CONDENSER.
  =*D= SHIELDED CIRCUIT BREAKER‐TO‐COIL LOW TENSION WIRE.
  =*E= SPARK PLUG SUPPRESSORS.
  =*H= CONDENSER.

RA PD 310278C

_Legend for Figure 73—Complete Wiring Diagram_]

[Illustration: RA PD 310247

_Figure 74—Battery Box Open and Filler Plugs Removed for Service_]

=d. Install Battery.= See that rubber mat is in place in bottom of
battery box and install battery in box so that positive post is on left
side of vehicle, and negative post is on right side of vehicle. Connect
wires to battery positive and negative posts. Fit rubber mat on top
of battery. Install cover and securely tighten thumb wing nuts. Lower
saddle and bar assembly. Install swivel pin on right side of vehicle so
that retaining spring fits in groove in end of swivel pin.


114. HEADLIGHTS.

=a. Service Headlight.=

(1) Remove nut which secures light body to bracket, observing that
conical washer bears against cup of bracket for secure light mounting.
Disconnect wires from light body terminals.

(2) Before installing service headlight, connect wires to light body
terminals, noting that black wire with red tracer connects with the
larger terminal screw. Mount light on bracket. Position conical‐shaped
washer and lock washer and install mounting stud nut. Do not tighten
mounting nut.

=b. Adjust Service Headlight.= Adjustment should be made in darkened
area or at night, tactical situation permitting. Vehicle must be
standing on a level surface about 25 feet away from and headed toward a
wall or screen upon which a horizontal line has been drawn at exactly
the same height as service headlight center. Set handle bar toggle
switch in “BRIGHT” position and check light beam for height and
direction. The top of main beam of light should register on wall or
screen even with, but not higher than, the horizontal line mentioned.
Tilt light body in bracket up or down to correctly aim it in relation
to the horizontal line, making sure that light body is not turned
either to right or left. Securely tighten mounting stud nut.

[Illustration: RA PD 310275

_Figure 75—Blackout Headlight Installation_]

=c. Blackout Headlight.= Blackout headlight is mounted on bracket
which attaches to left upper side of front fork. Blackout headlight
operates when ignition and light switch is turned to the second right
position. However, blackout headlight is fitted with an independent
switch in light body to permit turning it off while other blackout
lights are in use. Blackout headlight body is secured to mounting
bracket by means of a conical washer, lock washer, and mounting nut,
providing a swivel mounting to permit light adjustment.

=d. Blackout Marker Light.= The blackout marker light is secured to
front mudguard by means of a hollow mounting stud, with plain washer,
lock washer, and nut. Light wire passes through hollow stud and is
protected by tubing on under side of mudguard. Blackout marker light
wire connects with No. 1 post on ignition and light switch. Lamp is on
with ignition and light switch in second right position.


115. TAILLIGHTS.

=a. Blackout Stop and Taillight.= Blackout stop and taillight is
mounted on right side of taillight bracket. Light is provided with
top unit to provide blackout stop light controlled by brake‐operated
stop light switch. Bottom unit in the blackout stop and taillight is
regularly used as service blackout taillight and is controlled by
ignition and light switch.

[Illustration: RA PD 310272

_Figure 76—Ignition and Light Switch, Front and Back Positions_]

=b. Service Stop and Taillight.= Light is located on left side of
light mounting bracket. Top unit is used for service stop and taillight
(double filament lamp). Taillight filament is controlled by ignition
and light switch; stop lamp filament is controlled by brake‐operated
stop light switch. Stop light does not operate in daytime when ignition
only is turned on. Bottom unit serves as a spare blackout taillight.
In case the regularly used (right‐side) blackout taillamp fails, its
socket plug can be transferred to this taillight socket.

=c. Stop and Taillight Switch.= This switch is operated by brake
pedal and is located on end of rear support rod on right side of
vehicle. Refer to wiring diagram (fig. 73) and paragraph 118 for wiring
connections.


116. IGNITION AND LIGHT SWITCH.

=a.= Earlier models are provided with lock, later models are
non‐locking.

[Illustration:

  =8=—GENERATOR SIGNAL LIGHT.
  =14=—GENERATOR TERMINAL TO SWITCH.
  =15=—GENERATOR TERMINAL TO RELAY.
  =26=—IGNITION‐LIGHT SWITCH.
  =32=—RELAY.
  =35=—TERMINAL STRIP BINDING POST.
  =36=—MAGNETIC SWITCH FOR BLACKOUT LIGHT.
  =H=—NOISE SUPPRESSION CONDENSER.

RA PD 310279

_Figure 77—Blackout Headlight Magnetic Switch on Later Models_]

=b. Remove.= Disconnect battery ground wire. Remove instrument panel
cover (par. 119). Disconnect all wires from switch. Remove the four
switch mounting screws and spacers. Switch is now free for removal.

=c. Install.= Mount switch on instrument panel base. Install four
screws and spacers. Connect wires (fig. 73). Connect battery negative
ground wire to frame. Turn switch on. Check lights and horn, tactical
situation permitting. Install instrument panel cover (par. 119).

[Illustration: RA PD 310270

_Figure 78—Wiring Cables, Left Side_]

[Illustration: RA PD 310271

_Figure 79—Wiring Cables, Right Side_]


117. HORN.

=a. Description.= Horn is mounted to headlight bracket by means of
four bolts, lock washers, and nuts. One horn terminal is connected with
operating button, and other terminal is connected to No. 4 ignition and
light switch terminal (fig. 73).

=b. Adjust.= Tone adjusting screw is located in rear side of horn. If
horn fails to operate and moving the adjusting screw does not remedy
the trouble, horn must be replaced. NOTE: _Do not change position of
the adjusting screw located in center of diaphragm._


118. WIRING.

=a. Cable System.= Since ignition and lights are controlled by the
ignition and light switch, all wires terminate at the ignition and
light switch. Cables for wire protection are used, making it necessary
to replace cables rather than individual wires. A study of figure 73
will be helpful when removing or installing any of the wiring cables.
Also study figures 78 and 79 and note how cables are arranged on frame,
and how they lead to the switch panel.

=b. Remove and Install Cables.= When it becomes necessary to replace
wiring cables leading to the ignition and light switch, both fuel and
oil tanks must be removed (par. 107) and instrument panel cover removed
(par. 119) for accessibility.



Section XXIV

INSTRUMENT PANEL


                     Paragraph
  Panel cover           119
  Indicator lights      120
  Speedometer head      121


=119. PANEL COVER= (fig. 80).

=a. Remove.= Remove speedometer light switch knob and remove screw.
Remove hexagon‐head screw on front of cover. Remove two screws from
side of cover. Remove two screws and washers which fasten plate to
right side of cover. Lift cover off panel.

[Illustration: RA PD 315731

_Figure 80—Panel Cover Removed_]

=b. Install.= Position cover on panel. Install two side mounting
screws and washers and install hexagon‐head screw, plain washer, and
lock washer in front end of cover. Attach cover side plate, installing
two screws and washers. Install speedometer light switch knob and screw.


120. INDICATOR LIGHTS.

=a.= Three 2-c.p. single‐contact lamps are located on instrument panel.
One for oil pressure (red) indicator light: one for generator‐charge
(green) indicator light, and one for speedometer illumination.

=b. Remove and/or Install.= Remove and/or install panel cover (par.
119).

=c. Test Generator‐Charge (Green) Indicator Lamp.= Disconnect black
wire from relay terminal (top terminal at front end of relay) and
ground on relay base. Turn ignition and light switch on. Lamp should
light. If it does not light, check wire for condition and/or replace
lamp after removing panel cover (par. 119).

=d. Test Oil Pressure (Red) Indicator Lamp.= Disconnect wire from oil
pressure switch. Ground the wire on engine. Turn ignition and light
switch on. Lamp should light. If it does not light, check wire for
condition and/or replace lamp after removing panel cover (par. 119). If
lamp and wiring are satisfactory, replace oil pressure switch.


121. SPEEDOMETER HEAD.

=a. Remove.= Remove instrument panel cover (par. 119). Loosen the
two tank front mounting bolts and remove rear mounting bolt to free
speedometer cable clamp. Disconnect speedometer cable at drive unit.
Free cable from clip located below tool box. Remove two screws which
mount head to frame. Pull head upward, working cable forward under
tank, until head and cable connection nut is clear of frame. Unscrew
cable nut. NOTE: _Cable may be secured to frame tube, between tanks,
with friction tape. If so, cut tape._

=b. Install.= Attach speedometer head to cable end and tighten nut.
Pass cable down into frame hole, pulling on rear of cable at same time.
Mount speedometer head to frame with two screws and lock washers.
Install panel cover (par. 119). Secure cable clamp under head of tank
rear mounting bolt. Secure cable in clip, located under tool box.
Attach end of cable to drive unit. Tighten the two tank front mounting
bolts.



Section XXV

TIRES, WHEELS, AND HUBS


                               Paragraph
  Description                     122
  Tires                           123
  Rims and spokes                 124
  Front wheel replacement         125
  Front wheel hub adjustment      126
  Rear wheel replacement          127


122. DESCRIPTION.

=a.= Wheels have drop center rims to accommodate 4.00 x 18 tires.
Front and rear wheels are not interchangeable. Front wheel hub is
of ball‐bearing design, having cone adjustment similar to that of a
bicycle hub. Rear wheel hub is of roller‐bearing design and must be
taken apart for adjustment. Both wheels have “knock‐out” type axles.


123. TIRES.

=a. Description.= Wheel rims are of the drop‐center type, having a
depression, or well, in center of rim. The rim well, being smaller in
circumference than the rest of the rim, allows one casing bead to fit
loosely in it while other bead is being worked over edge of rim. Bear
in mind the importance of keeping one bead in rim well while other bead
is being worked onto or off rim. NOTE: _It is not always necessary to
completely remove casing from rim. Removing one side only allows inner
tube to be removed and reinstalled, and also allows inside of casing to
be inspected._

=b. Remove.=

(1) Remove wheel from vehicle and lay wheel on its side. To remove
front wheel, refer to paragraph 125. To remove rear wheel, refer to
paragraph 127.

(2) Remove valve cap and valve core to free all air from tube.

(3) Press casing head into rim well to within a short distance of each
side of valve.

(4) Using tire iron “B” in vehicle kit (fig. 11), start bead over edge
of rim at valve. Do not use force when starting bead over edge of rim
with tire iron, because bead wires may be broken or stretched, and tire
ruined. With first bead in rim well, bead on other side can be started
easily over edge of rim. After a portion of second bead is started over
rim edge, casing can be further removed from wheel without aid of tire
iron.

[Illustration: RA PD 310254

_Figure 81—Disassembly for Front Wheel Removal_]

=c. Install.= Before applying casing to rim, see that rubber rim
strip is in place in rim well and that rim strip valve hole alines with
valve hole in rim.

(1) Start either bead of casing over rim edge. Work around wheel until
entire bead is on rim.

(2) Place inner tube in casing. NOTE: _Inner tube may be placed in
casing before or after first bead of casing is on rim._ Insert valve
stem through hole in rim and start valve stem lock nut. While pressing
first bead into rim well, work remaining bead over edge of rim,
starting directly opposite valve stem. Work both ways around wheel
toward valve.

(3) Inflate front tire to 18 pounds, and rear tire to 20 pounds.

(4) Reinstall front wheel (par. 125): reinstall wheel (par. 127).
CAUTION: _Tire casings are balanced and must be applied to rim with
balance mark located at valve stem. On Firestone tires the balance mark
is a red triangle, and on Goodyear tires a red dot._


124. RIMS AND SPOKES.

=a.= Wheels with broken and or missing spokes, with rims in badly
kinked and or distorted condition, or having considerable run‐out, must
be replaced.

=b.= Loose wheel spokes must be tightened evenly, being careful not
to distort rim out‐of‐round or cause run‐out. Use spoke nipple wrench
(41-W-3339) for front wheel spokes, and wrench (41-W-3340) for rear
wheel spokes.


=125. FRONT WHEEL REPLACEMENT= (fig. 81).

=a. Remove.=

(1) Support vehicle on rear stand. Raise front end of vehicle by
blocking up under frame loop on skid plate.

(2) Remove brake shackle bolt from rigid fork on left side of vehicle.

(3) Front axle is knock‐out type. Remove cotter pin and axle castle
nut and pull out axle. Wheel is free for removal. CAUTION: _Before
removing axle note how slot in brake stabilizer plate is fitted over
the extended (button) end of the left‐front rocker plate stud. It is
necessary that this be correctly assembled when replacing front wheel._

(4) Roll wheel forward and remove brake assembly from brake drum,
leaving the assembly attached to brake control wire and control wire
housing.

=b. Install= (fig. 81). NOTE: _At the time wheel and brake assembly
is located in front fork, and before axle is installed, make sure that
the curved slot in brake stabilizer plate engages with the button end
of the left‐front rocker plate stud._

(1) Install brake assembly in brake drum.

(2) Roll wheel into position. Engage stabilizer plate notch and rocker
plate stud button end, and at same time insert front axle.

(3) Install castle nut (no lock washer used) on axle and securely
tighten.

[Illustration: RA PD 310252

_Figure 82—Front Hub Prepared for Cone Adjustment_]

(4) Use good cotter pin to secure nut.

(5) Install brake shackle bolt and special lock washer and nut. Tighten
nut.

(6) Check front brake control wire and housing to make sure everything
is in order and correctly adjusted (par. 97).

(7) Remove blocking from under vehicle.


126. FRONT WHEEL HUB ADJUSTMENT.

=a.= Front wheel, ball‐bearing hub, is similar to a bicycle front hub
as far as adjustment is concerned. Do not completely disassemble hub
for adjustment as balls are not in retainers, and will fall out when
cone is removed. Hub is provided with grease deflector sleeve and felt
retainer. NOTE: _Earlier models are not equipped with grease deflector
sleeve or felt retainer washer. Front wheel should have slight play or
shake on bearings, and should turn freely._

[Illustration: RA PD 315733

_Figure 83—Disassembly for Rear Wheel Removal_]

(1) Remove front wheel (par. 125).

(2) Back off cone lock nut to end of axle sleeve. Do not remove nut.

(3) Turn cone on axle sleeve to the right (clockwise) to take up wheel
play, and to the left (counterclockwise) to give more wheel play.
Adjust so that wheel has slight play on bearing.

(4) Tighten cone lock nut. After tightening nut, again try for slight
wheel play on bearing. Sometimes tightening lock nut takes up on
bearing play. If necessary, readjust for desired results when cone lock
nut is tight.

(5) Install front wheel and brake assembly (par. 125).

(6) Check adjustment of front brake.


=127. REAR WHEEL REPLACEMENT= (figs. 83 and 84).

=a. Remove.=

(1) Support vehicle on rear stand.

(2) Release mudguard rear stays. Loosen mounting nuts, and raise end of
mudguard for wheel clearance.

[Illustration: RA PD 310253

_Figure 84—Brake Rod Lock_]

(3) Remove the five wheel mounting socket screws which secure wheel
hub to brake shell and sprocket assembly. Use vehicle kit wrench “S”
and sleeve (handle) “C” (fig. 11). NOTE: _Wrench can be inserted from
left side through holes in hub, and wheel must be turned to bring each
mounting screw directly to the rear of axle for accessibility._

(4) Use brake rod lock to set and lock brake to prevent brake shell and
sprocket from coming off brake assembly while wheel is being removed.
Apply brake pedal and shift brake rod lock against tool box bracket,
securing lock in this position with wing nut (fig. 84).

(5) Remove axle nut (right side of vehicle), using vehicle kit wrench
“J” (fig. 11).

(6) Pull out axle from left side of vehicle.

(7) Remove spacer from between wheel hub end and left side of frame.

(8) Wheel is now free to come out by pulling and working it away from
dowel pins located in brake shell assembly. A wheel being removed for
the first time may offer some resistance. It will be observed that
chain, sprocket, and brake assembly remain in the vehicle frame.

=b. Install= (figs. 83 and 84).

(1) Position wheel on brake shell dowel pins. Work hub onto dowels as
far as it will go.

(2) Install axle spacer at left end of hub so that axle will pass
through it and the hub.

(3) Install axle from left side of vehicle. Pass it through sleeve and
hub, with end of axle engaging the frame left axle clip notch.

(4) See that lock washer is in place. Turn on and securely tighten axle
nut, using vehicle kit wrench “J” (fig. 11).

(5) Loosen wing nut clamping brake rod lock. Move brake rod lock
forward so that it will not strike any object when brake is operated;
tighten wing nut to retain in position (fig. 84).

(6) Install and securely tighten the five wheel mounting socket screws.

(7) Lower mudguard into position and attach ends of rear stays.
Securely tighten the clamping nuts.



REFERENCES


  STANDARD NOMENCLATURE LISTS
    Motorcycle, chain drive (Harley‐Davidson)         SNL G-523

    Cleaning, preserving and lubricating materials,
      recoil fluids, special oils, and miscellaneous
      related items                                    SNL K-1

    Soldering, brazing, and welding materials, gases,
      and related items                                SNL K-2

    Tools, maintenance, for the repair of automotive
      vehicles                                         SNL G-27

    Tool sets—motor transport                          SNL N-19

    Tool sets for ordnance service command, automotive
      shops                                            SNL N-30

    Current Standard Nomenclature Lists are listed above.

    An up‐to‐date list of SNL’s is maintained in the
      Index to Maintenance Publications                OFSB 1-1


  EXPLANATORY PUBLICATIONS
    Military motor vehicles                            AR 850-15

  Automotive Materiel
    Automotive electricity                             TM 10-580
    Electric fundamentals                              TM 10-455
    The motor vehicle                                  TM 10-510
    Chassis, body, and trailer units                   TM 10-550

  Maintenance and Repair
    Automotive lubrication                             TM 10-540
    Motor transport inspections                        TM 10-545
    Tire repair and retread                            TM 9-1868
    Cleaning, preserving, lubricating and welding
      materials and similar items issued by the
      ordnance                                         TM 9-850
    Detailed lubrication instructions for ordnance
      materiel                                         OFSB 6-series

  Protection of Materiel
    Explosives and demolitions                         FM 5-25
    Defense against chemical attack                    FM 21-40
    Decontamination of Armored Force vehicles          FM 17-59
    Chemical decontamination, materials and equipment  TM 3-220

  List of Publications for Training                    FM 21-6

  Storage and Shipment
    Registration of motor vehicles                     AR 850-10
    Storage of motor vehicle equipment                 AR 850-18
    Ordnance storage and shipment chart,
      group G—Major items                              OSSC-G



INDEX


  A          Page No.

  Air cleaner, 122

  Allocation of maintenance by echelons, 40

  Ammunition box carrier, 169

  Armature bearing special lubrication, 145

  Auxiliary brake, 12


  B

  Battery, lighting system, horn
    battery
      check electrolyte level, 181
      installation, 185
      removal, 181
    description, 181
    horn
      adjustment, 190
      description, 190
    ignition and light switch
      installation, 188
      removal, 188
    service headlights
      adjustment, 185
      blackout, 186
      marker, 187
    taillights
      blackout stop and taillight, 187
      service stop and taillight, 187
    wiring
      cable system, 190
      removal and installation, 190

  Brake system
    brake shoe installation, 151
    brake shoe removal, 150
    front wheel brake, 151
    rear wheel brake
      adjustment, 149
      linkage, 149


  C

  Carburetor
    adjustment, 116
    bowl cleaning, 120
    installation, 118
    removal, 118

  Chains and sprockets
    chain oilers, 109
    chain repair tool, 113
    countershaft sprocket replacement, 114
    engine sprocket replacement, 113
    front chain adjustment, 105
    front chain replacement, 111
    rear chain adjustment, 107
    rear chain replacement, 111
    rear wheel alinement, 107

  Clutch
    control adjustment, 85
    description, 86
    disk and spring inspection, 91
    disk installation, 93
    disk removal, 90
    maintenance and adjustment, 86
    release bearing
      installation, 95
      removal, 95
    spring tension adjustment, 89

  Controls and operation
    controls
      auxiliary brake (front wheel), 12
      carburetor choke, 13
      clutch, 10
      foot starter crank, 12
      gasoline valve, 9
      gear shifter, 12
      ignition and light switch, 12
      instrument panel signal lights, 13
      service brake (rear wheel), 12
      spark, 10
      steering damper, 12
      throttle, 10
    driving precautions
      avoid low gear operation, 17
      braking, 17
      high‐speed tips, 17
    engine prestarting instructions, 13
    operation of vehicle
      starting on level ground, 16
      starting on uneven or soft ground, 16
    running‐in new engine (or vehicle), 19
    starting engine
      behavior of instrument panel signal lights, 15
      cold engine, 14
      engine with dead battery, 15
      hot engine, 15
      warm engine, 14
    stopping and parking vehicle
      parking vehicle, 18
      stopping vehicle, 17
    stopping the engine, 16
    towing vehicle to start engine
      engine starting with dead battery, 18


  D

  Data, tabulated
    engine, 72
    vehicle specifications, 7
      capacities, 8
      performance, 7

  Description
    battery, lighting system, horn, 181
    clutch, 86
    engine, 72
    generating system, 142
    ignition system, 129
    intake and exhaust system, 122
    tires, wheels and hubs, 193
    transmission, 96

  Description of vehicle, 7


  E

  Echelon system of maintenance allocation, 40

  Engine
    carbon removal, 74
    data, 72
    description, 72
    head, gasket replacement
      installation, 74
      removal, 73
    installation, 82
    oil feed pump replacement, 77
    removal, 78
    tune‐up, 72
    valve tappet adjustment, 74

  Exhaust system, 126


  F

  First echelon preventive maintenance services
    after‐operation and weekly service, 25
    at‐halt service, 24
    before‐operation service, 21
    during‐operation service, 23
    purpose, 20

  Fuel system
    carburetor
      installation, 118
      removal, 118
    carburetor adjustment
      complete readjustment of carburetor, 116
      low speed adjusting needle, 116
    carburetor bowl cleaning, 120
    fuel pipe
      installation, 121
      removal, 121
    fuel strainer
      cleaning, 120
      install strainer assembly, 120
      remove strainer assembly, 120
    general, 115
    throttle control wire adjustment
      closed throttle, 118
      open throttle, 118


  G

  Generating system
    armature bearing special lubrication, 145
    commutator cleaning, 143
    cut‐out relay, 147
    description, 142
    generator installation, 147
    generator removal, 145

  Generator removal and installation, 145, 147


  H

  Horn, 190


  I

  Ignition system
    circuit breaker and timer assembly installation, 133
      recommended recheck of ignition timing, 135
      removal, 133
    circuit breaker points
      adjustable contact point installation, 131
      adjustable contact point removal, 131
      adjustment, 131
      breaker lever installation, 131
      breaker lever removal, 130
    coil to timer wire
      installation, 138
      removal, 138
    condenser
      installation, 133
      removal, 131
    description, 129
    spark coil
      installation, 140
      removal, 139
    spark control adjustment, 139
    spark plugs
      cleaning, 129
      point adjustment, 129
      replacement, 129
      type, 129

  Installation procedure
    air cleaner, 126
    ammunition box carrier, 169
    battery, 185
    battery box, 173
    carburetor, 118
    circuit breaker and timer assembly, 133
    circuit breaker lever, 131
    circuit breaker points, 131
    clutch release bearing, 95
    coil to timer wire, 138
    condenser, 133
    control wire housings, 166
    engine, 82
    engine head gasket, 74
    exhaust pipe, 127
    foot starter, 98
    fork assembly, 158
    front wheel, 196
    fuel pipe, 121
    fuel strainer assembly, 120
    fuel tank, 175
    generator, 147
    handle bar assembly, 163
    ignition and light switch, 188
    instrument panel cover, 191
    jiffy stand, 177
    luggage carrier, 170
    mudguards, 171
    muffler assembly, 127
    oil tank, 176
    outer front chain guard, 167
    rear chain guard, 169
    rear stand, 176
    rear wheel, 199
    saddle post, 178
    safety guards, 178
    scabbard carrier, 169
    skid plates, 180
    spark coil, 140
    spark control wire, 166
    speedometer, 192
    spring forks, 154
    starter crank springs, 101
    steering damper, 161
    throttle control wire, 165
    tires, 195
    tool box and bracket assembly, 173
    upper bumper springs, 155
    upper coil springs, 155
    wiring, 190

  Instrument panel
    indicator lights, 191
    panel cover
      installation, 191
      removal, 191
    speedometer
      installation, 192
      removal, 192

  Intake and exhaust system
    air cleaner
      general, 122
      installation, 126
      maintenance, 123
      removal, 125
      service, 122
    air cleaner mounting bracket replacement, 126
    description
      exhaust, 122
      intake, 122
    exhaust system
      muffler assembly installation, 127
      muffler assembly removal, 126
      pipe installation, 127
    hose and carburetor fitting
      installation, 125
      removal, 125

  Introduction
    scope of manual, 3
    supersession of quartermaster manuals, 3


  L

  Lighting system, 181

  Lubrication
    introduction, 30
    lubrication guide, 30
      general, 30
      lubrication notes, 30
      oilcan points, 34
      supplies, 30
      warning light, 34


  M

  Maintenance allocation
    allocation of maintenance by echelons
      clutch, 40
      controls and linkage, 40
      electrical group, 41
      engine (V‐45″ twin engine), 41
      exhaust group, 42
      miscellaneous, 42
      suspension (front), 43
      suspension (rear), 43
      tires, 44
      transmission, 44
      vehicle assembly, 44
    scope of maintenance, 39

  Manual, scope of, 3


  O

  Organization tools and equipment, 60


  P

  Preventive maintenance services
    first echelon, 20
    second echelon, 45


  R

  References
    explanatory publications
      automotive materiel, 200
      list of publications for training, 200
      maintenance and repair, 200
      protection of materiel, 200
      storage and shipment, 200
    standard nomenclature lists, 200

  Removal procedure
    air cleaner, 125
    ammunition box carrier, 169
    battery, 181
    battery box, 172
    carbon, 74
    carburetor, 118
    circuit breaker and timer assembly, 133
    circuit breaker lever, 130
    condenser, 131
    control wire housings, 166
    engine, 78
    engine head gasket, 73
    foot starter, 98
    fork assembly, 155
    front wheel, 195
    fuel pipe, 121
    fuel strainer assembly, 120
    fuel tank, 174
    generator, 145
    handle bar assembly, 162
    ignition coil to timer wire, 138
    instrument panel cover, 191
    jiffy stand, 176
    luggage carrier, 170
    mudguards, 170, 171
    muffler assembly, 126
    oil tank, 175
    outer front chain guard, 167
    rear chain guard, 169
    rear stand, 176
    rear wheel, 198
    release bearing (clutch), 95
    saddle post, 178
    safety guards, 178
    scabbard carrier, 169
    skid plates, 180
    spark coil, 139
    spark control wire, 166
    speedometer, 192
    spring forks, 154
    starter crank spring, 98
    steering damper, 161
    throttle control wire, 164
    tires, 193
    tool box and bracket assembly, 173
    upper bumper springs, 155
    upper coil springs, 155

  Road test chart of maintenance operations, 49


  S

  Second echelon preventive maintenance
    road test chart, 47
      maintenance operation, 49
    services
      first echelon participation, 45
      frequency, 45
      general procedures, 45
      specific procedures, 47

  Sheet metal and equipment
    battery box
      installation, 173
      removal, 172
    carriers
      ammunition box carrier installation, 169
      ammunition box carrier removal, 169
    fuel tank
      installation, 175
      removal, 174
    chain guards
      outer front chain guard installation, 167
      outer front chain guard removal, 167
      rear chain guard installation, 169
      rear chain guard removal, 169
    jiffy stand
      installation, 177
      removal, 176
    luggage carrier
      installation, 170
      removal, 170
    mudguard (front)
      installation, 171
      removal, 170
    mudguard (rear)
      installation, 171
      removal, 171
    oil tank
      installation, 176
      removal, 175
    rear stand
      installation, 176
      removal, 176
    saddle post
      description, 178
      installation, 178
      removal, 178
    safety guards
      installation, 178
      removal, 178
    scabbard carrier
      installation, 169
      removal, 169
    skid plates
      installation, 180
      removal, 180
    tanks
      fuel tank, 173
      general, 173
      oil tank, 173
    tool box
      box and bracket assembly installation, 173
      box and bracket assembly removal, 173

  Spark plugs, 129

  Speedometer
    installation, 192
    removal, 192

  Steering control
    control wire housings
      installation, 166
      removal, 166
    fork assembly (complete)
      installation, 158
      removal, 155
      rocker plate studs, 160
    forks (springs)
      installation, 154
      removal, 154
    handle bar controls
      install throttle control wire, 165
      remove throttle control wire, 164
    handle bars
      installation of assembly, 163
      removal of assembly, 162
    spark control wire
      installation, 166
      removal, 166
    steering damper
      installation, 161
      removal, 161
    upper coil springs and upper bumper springs
      installation, 155
      removal, 155

  Stowage on vehicle (tools and equipment), 35


  T

  Tabulated data
    engine, 72
    vehicle specifications, 7
      capacities, 8
      performance, 7

  Tires, wheels, and hubs
    description, 193
    front wheel
      hub adjustment, 197
      installation, 196
      removal, 195
    rear wheel
      installation, 199
      removal, 198
    rims and spokes, 195
    tires
      description, 193
      installation, 195
      removal, 193

  Tools and equipment stowage on the vehicle
    vehicle equipment, 36
    vehicle spare parts, 38
    vehicle tools, 35

  Transmission
    control linkage
      adjustment, 97
      checking gear shifter control linkage, 96
      transmission shifted to adjust front drive chain, 96
    description, 96
    foot starter
      installation, 98
      removal, 98
    installation, 101
    removal, 99
    starter crank springs
      installation, 98
      removal, 98

  Trouble shooting
    brakes, 70
    electrical system, 68
    engine
      instruction, 61
      tests to determine mechanical condition, 63
    engine lubricating system, 64
    fuel system, 65
    generating system, 68
    ignition system, 66
    introduction, 61
    steering, 71
    transmission and clutch, 69
    wheels and chains, 69


  W

  Wheels and hubs, 195

  Wiring, 190



[A.G. 300.7 (17 Aug. 1943)]

BY ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF WAR:

  G. C. MARSHALL,
  _Chief of Staff_.


  OFFICIAL:
  J. A. ULIO,
  _Major General_,
  _The Adjutant General_.


  DISTRIBUTION: R9 (4): IR 5, 7 and 17 (5): Bn 9 (2): IBn 5, 6,
                7 and 17 (5): C9 (8): IC 5, 6, 7 and 17 (5)

(For explanation of symbols, see FM 21-6)

RAPD3OEC43-81M

PUBLICATIONS DEPARTMENT ‐ RARITAN ARSENAL



Transcriber’s notes:

In the Fig. 51 caption M—MARK ON BREAKER CAM AND MARKS ON TIMER HEAD
AND HAND - ‘HAND’ should possibly read ‘BAND’.

In the echelon table, section 25. ALLOCATION OF MAINTENANCE, ‘strained
gasoline’ should possibly read ‘strainer gasoline’.





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