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Title: Lowney's Cook Book - Illustrated in Colors
Author: Howard, Maria Willett
Language: English
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Copyright Status: Not copyrighted in the United States. If you live elsewhere check the laws of your country before downloading this ebook. See comments about copyright issues at end of book.

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    LOWNEY’S

    COOK BOOK

    _ILLUSTRATED IN COLORS_

    A NEW GUIDE FOR THE HOUSEKEEPER, ESPECIALLY
    INTENDED AS A FULL RECORD OF
    DELICIOUS DISHES SUFFICIENT FOR ANY
    WELL-TO-DO FAMILY, CLEAR ENOUGH FOR
    THE BEGINNER, AND COMPLETE ENOUGH
    FOR AMBITIOUS PROVIDERS

    PREPARED AND REVISED BY

    ONE OF THE MOST EXPERIENCED AND SUCCESSFUL TEACHERS OF
    COOKING IN THE COUNTRY, AS THE LATEST FRUITS OF
    PRACTICAL AND SCIENTIFIC KNOWLEDGE OF THE ART

    MARIA WILLETT HOWARD


    _REVISED EDITION_


    PUBLISHED BY
    THE WALTER M. LOWNEY CO.
    486 HANOVER STREET, BOSTON

    1908



    COPYRIGHT, 1907, 1908,
    BY THE WALTER M. LOWNEY CO.
    BOSTON.


    Norwood Press
    J. S. Cushing Co.—Berwick & Smith Co.
    Norwood, Mass., U.S.A.



PREFACE TO REVISED EDITION


WE are giving the public in this new edition eighteen admirable colored
plates on three inserts which show the two most common methods of
cutting beef, a chapter on economical dishes, one on Southern or Creole
dishes, and about fifty new receipts, in addition to the same superfine
cook book that has been received with so much favor.

It is our aim to improve the book in every way and keep it abreast
of the times. No one—not even the United States government—has ever
attempted such expensive illustrations of cuts of meat, and we believe
they will be appreciated by every one who has occasion to order
provisions.

The price of the book remains the same, and we are glad to furnish a
greatly improved cook book of increased cost as our recognition of the
friendly attitude of the great public toward our goods.

                                       THE WALTER M. LOWNEY CO.

BOSTON.



INTRODUCTION


WE present this cook book with confidence that it brings up to date
has devoted her life to scientific and artistic cooking, and who has
recently been honored by appointment to full charge of the culinary
department of one of the most advanced colleges for self-supporting
women in the country. She speaks with knowledge and authority.

We hope the book will contribute something to the fine art of living
in many homes, making those homes the happier and more attractive for
the husband and children, and solving many a problem for brides and
beginners.

Thousands of our most valued customers cannot afford to prepare many
of these dishes very often for their tables. But there are special
occasions when we all feel that we can have the best for ourselves and
our guests. This book will stand the strain of such occasions.

There are hundreds of simple dishes here for all tastes, suitable for
all pocket-books. With this book as a guide, it will be possible for
any woman to live within her means and still have that infinite variety
on the table which means so much for appetite and health, which we all
wish for and which we wish for you all.

                                      THE WALTER M. LOWNEY CO.

BOSTON.



CONTENTS


    PART I

                                                      PAGE
    VALUE OF FOOD TO THE BODY                           3

    METHODS OF COOKING                                  7

    JUST HOW                                           10

    CARVING                                            15

    MARKETING                                          18

    DINNERS AND LUNCHEONS                              25

    BUTLER’S DUTIES                                    31

    GARNISHINGS                                        32

    WEIGHTS AND MEASURES                               33


    PART II. RECEIPTS

    CHAPTER
        I. FIRST COURSE DISHES                         37

       II. SOUPS                                       42

      III. FISH                                        69

       IV. MEATS                                       82

        V. VEGETABLES                                 103

       VI. CEREALS                                    115

      VII. EGGS                                       118

     VIII. SAUCES FOR MEAT AND VEGETABLES             124

       IX. ENTRÉES                                    134

        X. BREAD                                      164

       XI. SALADS                                     181

      XII. SANDWICHES                                 197

     XIII. DESSERTS                                   203

      XIV. CAKE AND COOKIES; FROSTINGS AND FILLINGS   258

       XV. FROZEN DISHES                              293

      XVI. BEVERAGES                                  306

     XVII. FRUITS AND NUTS AND CANDY                  313

    XVIII. PRESERVING                                 318

      XIX. CHAFING DISH DELICACIES                    340

       XX. COOKERY FOR THE SICK AND CONVALESCENT      349

      XXI. CREOLE DISHES                              360

     XXII. ECONOMICAL RECEIPTS                        372


    BIBLIOGRAPHY                                      385

    GLOSSARY                                          387

    INDEX                                             389



PART I


    VALUE OF FOOD TO THE BODY.
    METHODS OF COOKING.
    JUST HOW.
    CARVING.
    MARKETING.
    DINNERS AND LUNCHEONS.
    BUTLER’S DUTIES.
    GARNISHING.
    WEIGHTS AND MEASURES.



PART I



VALUE OF FOOD TO THE BODY


“FOOD is that which when taken into the body tends either to build
tissue or to yield energy.”

The chief offices of food are to build the material of the body, to
repair the waste which is continually going on and to yield heat to
keep the body warm.

Foods may be divided into tissue-building foods and fuel foods.

The tissue-building foods are such foods as milk, eggs, cheese, wheat,
meat and the legumes. The fuel foods are sugars and starches and fats
and oils.

In order to keep the body in a good condition a combination of the
tissue-building foods and the fuel foods is necessary, with a supply of
water to dissolve them. About 125 grams of tissue-building foods and
550 grams of the fuel foods is the amount required daily. A mixed diet,
therefore, is the ideal diet for the healthy adult.

The changing of the tissues and the assimilation of food are very rapid
in childhood and youth, so that the system demands at that time an
abundant supply of such foods as meat, milk and eggs. When middle age
is reached, the amount of such food should be decreased. Otherwise the
tax on the organs which take care of the wastes will be so great that
disease will follow.

Thus it is clear that people of different ages require different
combinations and amounts of food. The kinds of food required to nourish
the healthy body vary also with the sex, occupation and climate, as
well as with the age and peculiarities of the individual. In order
to judge of the relative value of food to the body it is necessary
to find out what percentage of each nutritive constituent the food
contains, how much energy it is capable of yielding, how much of the
food eaten is digested, how much is absorbed, and whether the nutritive
constituents are obtained at a reasonable cost.

Farmers’ Bulletin No. 23, published by the United States Department of
Agriculture, will be found interesting to those caring to study foods
from the above standpoints.

Mr. W. O. Atwater, Ph. D., writes in Farmers’ Bulletin No. 142, on
“Food and Food Economy,” the following table:—


NUTRITIVE INGREDIENTS (OR NUTRIENTS) OF FOOD

                    {_Edible_ portion       } Water
                    {_e.g._, flesh of meat  }           { Protein
  Food as purchased {yolk and white of eggs } Nutrients { Fats
  contains:         {wheat, flour, etc.     }           { Carbohydrates
                    {_Refuse._                          { Mineral matters
                    {_e.g._, bones, entrails,
                        shell, bran, cellulose,
                        etc.


USES OF NUTRIENTS IN THE BODY

  _Protein_                       Forms tissue       }
    _e.g._, white (albumen) of eggs                  }
    curd (casein) of milk                            } All serve as
    lean meat                                        } fuel to yield
    gluten of wheat, etc.                            } energy in the
  _Fats_                          Are stored as fat  } forms of heat
    _e.g._, fat of meat, butter,    olive oil        } and muscular
    oils of corn, wheat, etc.                        } power.
  _Carbohydrates_                 Transformed into   }
    _e.g._, sugar, starch, etc.      fat             }

  _Mineral Matters_ (ash)         Share in forming bone, assist in
    _e.g._, phosphates of lime      digestion, etc.
    potash, soda, etc.

Thus foods have different functions. The proteid or nitrogenous foods
build up and repair the tissues; mineral matter and water are also
necessary for this purpose. The tissues of the body cannot be kept in
a healthy state unless _these_ constituents of food are taken into
the system regularly; only the proteid foods can repair the waste
of the living tissue. The proteid foods, together with the fats and
carbohydrates, may supply both power and heat for the body, but the
special functions of the carbohydrates and fats are to keep the body
warm and to supply energy.

The amount of proteid food required for a healthy adult is very
difficult to determine. It is safe to state that too much proteid
brings about undue strain upon the digestive apparatus, and that too
little proteid reduces the working equipment of the body. The amount
of fats and carbohydrates needed depend largely upon occupation and
climate. The proteid foods are many, and contain the same chemical
elements as the bodies which they are destined to feed; also they seem
to be more completely taken care of in the body than the carbohydrate
foods. Milk, cheese, eggs, meat, and fish are proteid foods. Of these
milk is regarded as a typical food, as it contains all the nutritive
constituents required by the body,—proteid, carbohydrates, fats,
mineral matter, and water,—but it does not contain these constituents
in the correct proportion. It is too rich in proteid and fat and too
poor in carbohydrate to be a perfect food. It is a perfect food for
the infant, because an excess of proteid and of fat is needed for the
growth of the child. For the healthy man about eight pints daily would
be required for complete nutrition. This, it is apparent, would be a
very bulky food, and the system would be burdened with too large a
proportion of water. Milk, on the other hand, is the cheapest source
of proteid. It is claimed that one quart of good milk is equivalent
in proteid to a pound of beefsteak, and that when combined with the
correct proportion of carbohydrate food it possesses great nutritive
and economic value. All of the proteid foods are deficient in starch,
so must be combined with carbohydrates to properly nourish the body.

According to Mr. Atwater the proteid foods are more completely digested
than the carbohydrates. This is probably because there is found in all
carbohydrate foods a large proportion of cellulose or indigestible
material enveloping the starch and sugar. The nutritive value of the
carbohydrate foods is large if the starch and sugar, of which they are
composed, can be separated from the cellulose. The normal diet is one
which contains proteid foods, carbohydrate foods, fatty foods, with the
correct proportion of mineral matter and sufficient water to moisten
them.

The proper diet depends largely upon the occupation. People of
sedentary habits and brain workers need more digestible food than the
day laborer—therefore, the necessity of mixed diets; but diets should
be varied as well as mixed, and the true housekeeper in planning meals
thinks what was served at the preceding meal.

The cheapest diet is that which yields the largest amount of nutriment
for the least expenditure of money. The most economical diet is that
which is cheapest and at the same time best adapted to the needs of the
user. The most expensive diet is not necessarily the most nutritious.

Every good housekeeper should know approximately the composition of
the various foodstuffs, and so be able to make proper combinations of
foods and substitutions when necessary. Hunger and thirst are provided
by nature as guides in the choice of food, and if the bodily conditions
are normal, these, as a rule, are safe guides to follow.

The nutritive value of many foods depends upon how they are cooked.
Many raw foods are indigestible, but these same foods cooked are
nutritious. The importance of proper cooking cannot be overestimated.
Cooking changes the food so that the digestive juices can take care of
it; cooking improves the flavor and the appearance, thus making the
food more appetizing; and cooking kills disease germs, parasites, and
other dangerous organisms.

Proper cooking and dainty serving make even cheap foods more palatable.
This stimulates the digestive juices; hence food should be made
appetizing in order to obtain the greatest nutritive value from it.



METHODS OF COOKING


Boiling

Boiling point is the temperature at which a fluid is converted into
vapor, with the phenomenon of ebullition. The boiling point of water
is 212 degrees Fahrenheit. In cooking, the term _boiling_ means the
cooking of food in a boiling liquid, and water is the liquid generally
used. Rapidly boiling water is no hotter than when the agitation is
less, but in some cases, as in the boiling of rice, violently boiling
water is recommended for the purpose of keeping the grains of rice
separated. The boiling point of water once reached can be held with a
moderate amount of heat.

Food is generally boiled by putting immediately into boiling water.
This sears the surface, and keeps in the juices; but if the water is
to be used for soups, gravies, and so forth, the food is put into cold
water and brought slowly to the boiling point. Salt is added to the
boiling water ordinarily when cooking food, as it tends to keep the
flavor in the food.


Roasting

Roasting, truly speaking, is cooking food before an open fire, so that
roasting is seldom accomplished in modern kitchens.


Baking

Baking is cooking food by dry heat in an inclosed oven. The oven should
be very hot when the food is first put in, then the heat reduced.

In baking meats, basting frequently with hot fat will drive the heat to
the center and make the meat juicy.


Stewing

Stewing is cooking food in water kept below the boiling point, and is
similar to simmering.


Fricasseeing

Fricasseeing is a combination of sautéing and simmering. The food is
first sautéd and then simmered until tender.


Steaming

Moist steaming is accomplished by placing the food in a perforated dish
over a kettle of boiling water and cooking until tender.

Dry steaming is accomplished by placing the food in the top of a double
boiler and keeping the water boiling in the lower part until the food
is cooked.


Simmering

Simmering is cooking in water at 185 degrees Fahrenheit or 27 degrees
below the point of boiling. This method of cooking is employed where
long, slow cooking is desired, as in making stews, soups and so forth;
also for cooking tough cuts of meat.

As a rule, in both boiling and simmering, the kettle should be tightly
covered.


Braising

Braising is a form of cooking generally adopted for cooking tough
meats. The food to be braised is placed in a kettle with a few slices
of salt pork, some vegetables, seasonings and a small amount of liquid,
either water or stock. The kettle is then covered closely and the food
cooked until tender. Braising is a long, slow process.


Frying

Frying is cooking food in hot fat, deep enough to cover the food.
Lard, olive oil, cottolene or drippings may be used. The fat should be
heated hot enough to brown a piece of bread a golden brown in forty
seconds for cooked food, and in sixty seconds for uncooked food.
There are various theories about the digestibility of fried food. The
latest seems to be that food properly fried and drained may not be
very indigestible. To prepare fat for frying, fill frying kettle one
half full, and heat gradually. Avoid frying too much at a time, as the
temperature will be reduced and the food much more liable to absorb
fat. Reheat fat after each frying. Drain the food on brown paper.


Sautéing

Sautéing is cooking food in a frying pan in a small amount of fat. Food
is less digestible cooked in this way than fried food.


Broiling

Broiling is cooking the food on a greased broiler before hot coals or
the gas flame. The broiler should be held very near the flame at first
to sear the surface of the food, and should be turned every ten seconds
for the first minute of cooking, and afterwards occasionally.


Pan Broiling

Pan broiling is cooking the food in a hissing-hot frying pan without
fat. It is employed where it is impossible to broil, and may be better
accomplished where two frying pans are used, and the food turned from
one to the other every ten seconds for the first minute and afterwards
occasionally, as in broiling.



JUST HOW


How to Crumb, Egg and Crumb

For crumbing, dried bread crumbs which have been pounded or rolled
until fine and then sifted are best. The bread may be broken in pieces
and dried in the oven or merely allowed to stand in the open air until
dried.

To prepare the egg, break into soup plate, beat until yolk and white
are well blended, season with salt and pepper, dilute with two
tablespoons cold water and use for dipping.

Food to be fried should be dried as much as possible, then dipped in
crumbs, then placed in the egg, and thoroughly covered with the egg,
then drained and dipped again in crumbs.

It is an economy of time to crumb all of the pieces to be fried,
then egg all, and when drained, to crumb all. This may be done in
the morning and the food fried when wanted. In this case, allow the
prepared food to stand in kitchen fifteen or twenty minutes before
frying. When fried always drain on brown paper.


How to bone Meat, Fish, Birds

Legs and loins of lamb and mutton are the meats ordinarily boned. The
butcher will do it; but if it must be done at home, wipe the meat, and
with a sharp knife scrape the meat from the bone, being careful not to
cut through the skin. Fish to be boned generally have the heads cut
off; then remove the flesh from one side of the backbone, and then from
the other.

To bone birds, chickens, or turkeys, select undrawn birds, with head
and feet left on. Remove pin feathers and singe. Draw tendons from
legs by making an incision just below the knee joint, and with a
strong skewer draw the tendons out one at a time. Loosen the skin near
the feet and cut off feet. Make an incision through the skin from
the neck to the tail, the entire length of the backbone. Scrape the
flesh from the bones until the shoulder blade is found, then continue
scraping around the wing joint. Scrape down the backbone to the thigh,
then around the second joint and leg, cutting tendinous portion when
necessary. When one side of backbone is boned, bone the other, then
remove flesh from breastbone, on either side of bird. When flesh is all
separated from bone, discard carcass, wipe flesh and skin, and arrange
in original shape. The birds may be seasoned and broiled; or stuffed,
sewed into shape and steamed. Small birds are generally prepared the
former way, and large birds the latter way.


How to clarify Fat

When through frying, add a pared potato, cut in slices, to the fat, and
let stand on back of range until potato has browned. Remove potato and
strain fat through a cheese cloth. Fat clarified in this way may be
used indefinitely.


How to clarify Melted Butter

Let melted butter stand in a dish on back of the range until the salt
has settled, then pour off butter, leaving sediment in the bottom of
the dish.


How to avoid the Burning of Fat

When fat is put on the range to heat for frying, put in a cube of
bread. If the fat is forgotten, the bread will burn first, and the
odor of the burned crumb will attract the attention. The burned flavor
cannot be removed from burned fat.


How to try out Suet

Cut the suet in small pieces, place in top of double boiler, cover, and
cook over hot water until all the fat is tried out; strain through a
cheese cloth. This can be done in the oven if the top of the range is
crowded.


How to Lard

Larding is accomplished by cutting strips of salt pork lengthwise with
the rind two inches long and one quarter inch wide, and with aid of the
larding needle drawing these pieces through the surface of the meat,
taking a stitch an inch long and a quarter inch deep.


How to test Fat for Frying

Heat the fat. When a blue smoke begins to appear, drop in a cube of
bread; if the bread browns a golden brown in forty seconds, the fat is
hot enough for any food which has previously been cooked. Uncooked food
requires a longer, slower frying; the cube of bread should brown in
sixty seconds for such food.

Food cooked in fat tested in this way should never soak fat if one is
careful to put a small enough quantity of food in at a time—not enough
to cool the fat.


How to make Croquettes

For meat croquettes, cold cooked meat should be freed from skin and
gristle, and cut quite fine, then mixed with a thick sauce to as soft
a consistency as it is possible to handle. Chill before shaping. For
vegetable croquettes the vegetables should be boiled, then mashed and
seasoned. Chill before shaping.

_To Shape._—Allow one rounding tablespoon of croquette mixture for each
croquette, roll into a round ball, roll ball in crumbs, then shape
either like a cylinder or pyramid; when all are perfect and uniform,
dip in egg, then in crumbs.


How to prepare Sweetbreads

Soak in cold water from the time they come from the market until used.
Drain, cover with two cups cold water, add four cloves, one and a half
teaspoons salt, two tablespoons vinegar or lemon juice, and a slice of
onion; simmer for one half hour, drain, cover with cold water, remove
tubes and membranes. Broil whole; or if for larding, dip in egg, wrap
in cheese cloth, and press under weight over night.


How to care for the Refrigerator

Select a large refrigerator, of simple construction and of
hardwood,—the lining of zinc or marble and the shelves of slate or
hardwood.

To keep the refrigerator clean, remove instantly any food spilled in
any of the compartments. Wash the ice compartment and food chambers at
least once a week with hot soapsuds, and for economy’s sake do this
when the ice is low. Pour boiling water down the waste pipe. Sal soda
dissolved in the water tends to keep every part sweet and clean.

Shelves and all portable parts, when washed and scalded, should be
placed in the sun to dry; if this is impossible, dry before a fire.

Keep a good supply of ice in the ice chamber; it is cheaper in the end.

Never keep the doors or covers of the refrigerator open unnecessarily
long; it wastes the ice.

A good refrigerator properly cared for should last at least twenty-five
years.


How to Caramelize

Place sugar in clean agate-ware frying pan, and stir continually until
the sugar becomes a golden brown sirup.


How to Poach

Place food to be poached in frying pan half filled with boiling salted
water. Cook below the boiling point from three to eight minutes.


How to cream Butter

Place butter in bowl, and mash against the sides of the bowl, with a
spoon, until of a creamy consistency.


How to cut and Fold

Pour mixture into bowl, and cut through and through mixture with a
spoon, then take up some of mixture in spoon, and turn spoon completely
over, and fold under mixture. Continue this process until mixture is
blended.


How to crease Frosting

When frosting is nearly cold, cut with a silver knife, wiping knife
after making each crease.



CARVING


To master the art of carving one must understand the anatomy of the
meat to be carved.

The carver should insist upon having a sharp knife, a large platter,
and sufficient space to move his arms.


Whole Fish

The carving of fish is extremely simple. Run the knife the whole length
of the back, then cut from the back to the middle of the fish; the
flesh may then be separated from the bone. When one side is served,
turn the fish over and carve the other side in the same way.

The center of the fish is considered the best, as it is the fattest
portion. The meat around the head and neck is decidedly gelatinous.

Medium-sized fish, like mackerel, salmon, trout, and so forth, are cut
through the bone, thus giving a piece of fish on either side of the
backbone for each serving.

Small fish are generally served so as to make four fillets,—two fillets
on either side of the backbone.


Beef

For carving roast beef, a long, broad-bladed knife is required. Always
cut across the grain of the meat; never with the grain.

The joint of beef known as the Porterhouse roast or sirloin roast
consists of the sirloin, the tenderloin, and the flank. The flank is
tough, and if roasted with the meat, is generally used for some made
dish, such as croquettes, or hashed meat on toast; it is seldom carved
at the table.

The _tenderloin_ and _sirloin_ must be carved across the grain. Cut
thin slices parallel to the ribs or at right angles with the backbone,
then cut close to the backbone, thus separating the slices. Rib roasts
are carved in the same way as the sirloin.

_Rolled ribs_ and round of beef are carved in round slices as thin as
possible, each slice having considerable fat mixed with the lean.

_Beefsteaks_ are carved across the grain.

_Sirloin Steak._—Cut slices at right angles to the vertebræ in both the
sirloin and the tenderloin, then separate.


Lamb and Mutton

_A leg of mutton_ is considered by many the most difficult piece of
meat to carve. If the hip bone is removed, the carving of this joint is
simple, but it is usually left in. Place the leg on the platter, with
the skin side next the platter. Carve from the hip bone across the leg;
these will be the largest slices, as they come from the part of the
joint which has the most meat. The portions near the knuckle are to be
carved in the same way; they will not be so rare as the thicker slices.
Chops may be cut from the upper part of the leg.

_Fore Quarter of Mutton or Lamb._—Remove the fore leg and the shoulder,
then separate the rib chops. Every part of the fore quarter of lamb is
sweet and tender, but the neck in the fore quarter of mutton should
be used only for stewing. In carving the shoulder of either lamb or
mutton, one must study the meat before cooking.

_The Saddle of Mutton._—There are several ways of carving this joint.
The fat, tenderloin and kidney should all be removed in one piece.

The most popular way is to cut long slices parallel with the backbone,
on the portion nearest the tail, and slices diagonally on the portion
nearest the neck.

_The Loin of Mutton._—Generally this joint is carved by merely
separating the chops, but it may be carved in the same manner as the
saddle of mutton.


Veal

_Fillet of Veal._—This cut is carved like the round of beef.

_Shoulder of Veal._—The shoulder is often boned and stuffed. In that
case, cut through the meat from side to side. If the bone is left in,
carve in the same manner as the shoulder of mutton.

_Loin of Veal._—-This cut is often stuffed, and the kidney is always
cooked with the meat. Carve the same as the sirloin of beef, in large,
thin slices.


Pork

_Pork Spareribs._—Serve one rib to each person.

_Loin of Pork._—Chops may be carved and served, or the roast may be
carved exactly like the sirloin of beef.

_Roast Ham._—Cut through the meat to the bone, using the portion
nearest the knuckle first. Ham should be cut in very thin slices.

_Tongue._—The small end of the tongue is inferior to the thicker
portion. Cut slices crosswise of the tongue and serve a slice from both
portions to each person.

_Roast Pig._—Place the head of the pig at the right hand of the carver.
Cut off the ears, then the head; cut the head in halves. Cut the whole
length of the backbone, dividing the creature in two pieces.

Cut off the leg of one half, then separate the shoulder from the body.
Carve the ribs and loin at right angles with the backbone. Cut the
other half in the same way. Young pig meat is very tender and the bones
are soft, so that carving is an easy matter.


Poultry and Game

_To carve Poultry._—Place the bird on the platter, with the head to
the left and the side toward the carver. Insert the fork across the
center of the breastbone. Remove the wing, then the leg, then the
side bone between leg and body. Cut slices from the breast, running
from breastbone to place from which wing was removed. Remove wishbone
by cutting from end of breast to the left of the wing joint. Make an
incision to the right of breastbone for removing stuffing.

Remove fork from breastbone and cut the leg in small portions. Serve a
slice of light and a slice of dark meat to each person.

Serve one side of bird before carving the other side.

_Broiled Chicken._—Cut through the breast and cut in halves at right
angles with the top of leg. But if birds are small, serve one to each
person.

_To carve a Duck._—Cut off the wing and the leg the same as for
poultry. Cut the breast meat parallel with the breastbone, beginning at
the side between the wing joint and the thigh.

_To carve a Goose._—Carve in the same manner as a roast duck, but cut
the leg in several portions.

_Grouse and Partridge._—These birds are carved like duck, although
sometimes the breast is separated from the bone and one half breast is
served to each person.

Pigeons, quails, and small birds are served whole and generally on
toast.



MARKETING


The term _marketing_ means to the ordinary housekeeper the buying of
meats and vegetables only, but the buying of all articles necessary for
housekeeping should be included under this head.

[Illustration: PLATE A SIDE OF BEEF BOSTON CUTS

     1 NECK
     2 CHUCK RIB
     3 PRIME RIB
     4 SIRLOIN
     5 BACK OF RUMP
     6 MIDDLE OF RUMP
     7 FACE OF RUMP
     8 AITCH BONE
     9 ROUND
    10 VEIN
    11 HIND SHIN
    12 FLANK
    13 RATTLE RAND
    14 BRISKET
    15 FORE SHIN]

In order to market well the housekeeper must know what articles to buy
in quantity and when to buy to the best advantage.

It is much more economical proportionately to buy for a large family
than for a small one.

[Illustration: PLATE B BOSTON CUTS

    SIRLOIN ROAST
    A SIRLOIN
    B TENDERLOIN
    C FLANK
    D KIDNEY SUET

    TIP OF SIRLOIN

    RIB ROAST

    TIP OF SIRLOIN

    MIDDLE CUT OF SIRLOIN]

Staple articles such as bread flour, rice, spices, and so forth, should
be bought in large quantities. Vegetables which keep well, such as
potatoes, squashes, turnips, and so forth, should be bought in the
early fall to last until spring, provided there is a cool, dark place
in which to keep them. Meats must necessarily be purchased as needed,
unless one has a large refrigerator in which to hang them.

Fish, with the exception of salt or smoked kinds, should be bought only
when absolutely fresh. Fruits such as apples and pears may be bought in
large quantities, but perishable fruits in small amounts only.


Beef

The beef creature is first divided into halves the length of the
backbone, then each half is separated into the fore quarter and the
hind quarter.

In the fore quarter we have in Boston markets—

    Parts                   How Cooked
    Brains                  Stewed or Scalloped
    Tongue                  Boiled, Fresh or Corned
    Neck                    Stewed
    Sticking Piece          Stewed or Baked
    Five Chuck Ribs         Roasted or Broiled
    Five Prime Ribs         Roasted
    Fore Shin               Stewed
    Rattle Rand }
                } Corned    Boiled
    Brisket     }

In the hind quarter we have in Boston markets—

    Parts                   How Cooked
    Sirloin                 Roasted or Broiled
    Rump                    Roasted or Broiled
    Round                   Roasted or Broiled
    Hind Shin               Stewed
    Flank                   Braised or Boiled
    Tail                    Stewed for Soups

Other parts of the beef creature used as food are—

    Parts                   How Cooked
    Heart                   Braised
    Liver                   Braised, Fried, Sautéd
    Kidneys                 Sautéd, Braised, Stewed
    Tripe                   Stewed, Broiled, Fried
    Suet                    Sautéd and used for Frying

A side of beef weighs on the average about 450 pounds.

Beef when first cut is dark purple, but turns red on exposure to the
air. Good beef has a heavy layer of fat on the outside, which is
yellowish white and crumbly; the inside fat is white. Best quality beef
has a large percentage of fat and a small proportion of water.


Description of Cuts of Beef

In the Boston markets, the part marked (4) in the side of beef in Plate
A has three ribs left on and the whole piece is called the sirloin. It
is divided by the butcher into the tip which has one muscle only, the
middle and the first cut. The fillet or tenderloin of beef is found
just under the first rib. It begins in a small point and increases
in thickness as it runs back. It ends in an obtuse point at the hip
bone. It is always covered with a thick bed of suet and the kidneys
are embedded in this suet at the end near the ribs. Sirloin roasts are
considered by many the best roasts. They are expensive cuts as they
contain considerable bone, and in a large creature, a large amount of
tough flank, but as they are tender, juicy and of good flavor they are
popular pieces.

[Illustration: PLATE C BOSTON CUTS

    SIRLOIN OR PORTERHOUSE STEAK
    A SIRLOIN
    B TENDERLOIN
    C FLANK

    AITCH BONE

    ROUND OF BEEF
    A TOP ROUND
    B BOTTOM ROUND
    C VEIN
    D SHIN

    BACK OF RUMP

    FACE OF RUMP

    MIDDLE CUT OF RUMP]

Porterhouse Steaks are sirloin steaks cut from the sirloin nearest the
rump; they always have a large piece of tenderloin. They are generally
a few cents per pound more than the sirloin without the tenderloin.
Sirloin Steaks are cut from all parts of the loin.

The rump joins the sirloin as shown in Plate A. The back of the
rump is the best piece for roasting as it contains no bone; it is more
economical than the sirloin roasts, but as the flavor is different it
is not so popular. The middle and face of the rump are both used for
roasts, but are less juicy and tender than the back. Both of these
pieces are often used for beef à la mode.

[Illustration: PLATE D SIDE OF BEEF NEW YORK CUTS

     1 NECK
     2 CHUCK
     3 RIB ROAST
     4 LOIN
     5 RUMP
     6 ROUND
     7 BOTTOM OF ROUND
     8 HIND SHIN
     9 FLANK
    10 PLATE
    11 NAVEL
    12 CROSS RIBS
    13 BRISKET
    14 CLOD
    15 FORE SHIN]

Rump Steaks are cut _with_ the grain of the meat and _across_ the
grain; the former are tough and the latter are generally tender and
juicy; they are cut from the part marked (5) in Plate A. In the cross
cut rump steak there is a piece of tenderloin.

The aitch bone, number (8) in Plate A, contains a large proportion of
bone; if a large roast is cut, a portion of the rump and a part of the
round is included, so considering the price, which is as many cents per
pound as there are pounds, it is not an expensive piece as it can be
used for a roast one day and made into a stew the next.

The round of beef as shown in Plate C is divided into the top and the
bottom. The top is used for steaks and roasts. The first few slices
are quite tender. The third slice is the best for steak as it has only
one muscle. The farther down the leg the steak is cut the tougher it
becomes. The bottom of the round must necessarily be tough because of
the large number of tendons. It may be easily distinguished from the
top as it contains two muscles. It is used principally for making beef
tea or Hamburg Steak.

The vein is used for roasting or braising. The meat is usually stringy
but of very good flavor.

The hind shin is used only for stews or soup stock. The fore shin
contains less meat but is sometimes used for the same purposes as the
hind shin. The pieces marked 12, 13, 14 in Plate A are usually corned.

Number (3) in Plate A is the rib roast. It contains five ribs, the
first three ribs being the best part of the piece. Number (2) in Plate
A is the chuck rib piece. This contains the shoulder blade and is
consequently tough. It is best for stews or braising, although it may
be used for roasting. The bones are frequently removed and the piece
tied into a round roast, but at best it is tough although the flavor is
good. The neck is used principally for soup stock, stews and beef tea.

[Illustration: PLATE E NEW YORK CUTS

    RUMP OF BEEF

    LOIN OF BEEF]

If we consult Plate D representing the New York cuts of beef, we find
that the part marked (3) is called the Rib Piece. The thirteen ribs are
left in this piece. It takes in part of what is called Sirloin in the
Boston markets. In New York the ribs are cut much longer than in Boston
and the price per pound is less, but as this gives a tough portion of
the flank, the cost, in reality, is just as great. The part marked (4)
is the sirloin and is used both for roasts and steaks. When there is
a large piece of tenderloin on the steak it is called a Porterhouse
Steak, but when there is only a small piece of tenderloin it is called
Short Steak or Delmonico Steak. From this cut nearest the rump we get
the hip bone, the flat bone, and the round bone steaks. There are three
round bone steaks, which are generally rather inferior. The flat bone
steaks are also three in number and better than the round bone steaks.
The hip bone steaks are the best of these three and contain a small
piece of tenderloin. The rump (5) is divided into two pieces, one piece
having the hip bone and the other the backbone. It is generally corned.
The round furnishes meat for steaks, which are of excellent flavor, but
not very tender. It also makes a good piece for braising. The bottom
of the round is a much poorer cut, it contains so many muscles and
tendons. It is tough and so only suitable for stock or beef tea.

The Cross Ribs, number (12), make a good roasting piece. It is
economical as it is solid meat, and it is quite tender as the
muscles all run in one direction. The Shoulder Clod, number (14), has
tendons running in all directions; it is consequently tough. It is used
for Hamburg Steak or for any dishes which require long slow cooking.
Numbers 9, 10, 11 and 13 are used for corning and numbers 8 and 15 are
used for soup stock.

[Illustration: PLATE F BOSTON CUTS

    LEG OF LAMB

    RIB AND LOIN CHOPS
    A RIB CHOPS
    B LOIN CHOPS

    SIDE OF LAMB

    FOREQUARTER OF LAMB]


Lamb and Mutton

Lamb and mutton are divided into halves, or “sides,” by cutting the
entire length of the backbone the same as beef.

The fore quarter is divided into the—

    Parts        How Cooked
    Shoulder     Boiled, Steamed, Roasted
    Neck         Stewed, Braised

The hind quarter is divided into the—

    Parts        How Cooked
    Leg          Roasted, Braised, Boiled
    Loin         Roasted, Broiled
    Saddle       Roasted

The best lamb is from a creature eight to twelve weeks old. Lamb may
always be distinguished from mutton by the inner redness of the bone.
Mutton should have a large amount of white hard fat, and the flesh
should be fine-grained and pink to red in color.

The strong mutton flavor may be lessened by removing the pink outer
skin, and also by taking off the caul before cooking the leg.


Veal

Veal is cut similarly to lamb.

The fore quarter is divided into—

    Parts        How Cooked
    Head         Boiled
    Breast       Stewed
    Shoulder     Stewed or Roasted
    Ribs         Stewed or Roasted
    Neck         Stewed

The hind quarter is divided into—

    Parts        How Cooked
    Loin         Stewed, Sautéd, Roasted, Broiled
    Leg          Stewed, Sautéd, Roasted

Other parts of the veal creature used as food—

    Parts           How Cooked
    Tongue          Boiled, Braised
    Brains          Stewed, Scalloped
    Heart           Baked, Braised
    Liver           Broiled, Sautéd
    Kidneys         Boiled, Stewed
    Sweetbreads     Stewed, Sautéd, Fried

The best veal is from a calf six to twelve weeks old. The meat should
be pinkish white, fine-grained, and tender, and there should be a large
amount of fine white fat on the legs and around the kidneys.


Pork

Fresh pork is not so popular a meat as corned or salted, although
fresh pork from a pig which has been carefully fed before killing is a
delicate meat.

The upper part of the fore legs, or the shoulders, and the upper parts
of the hind legs, or the hams, are salted and smoked. The sides of the
pork creature are salted and smoked for bacon.

The fat is removed from the loin and ribs, and these are sold for
roasts or chops; the fat is pickled and used for salt pork.

The head is used for making souse and cheese.

The feet are sold fresh or pickled.

The brains, livers, and kidneys are also used the same as those of
beef.


Poultry and Game

Poultry includes all domestic birds.

In buying poultry, select birds which have been freshly killed and
hand-picked.

Pin feathers are found on young birds, and hairs on older birds. The
birds should be short and plump, with considerable meat on the breast,
fat, but not too fat.

Young birds have the cartilage at the end of the breastbone soft and
pliable.

For roasting, buy poultry from three months to a year old. For
braising, stewing, and slower methods of cooking, buy older birds, as
they contain a larger proportion of meat than the younger birds.

Game includes animals that are hunted in field or forest.

Venison is cut like mutton. The meat is much darker than beef meat, and
the fat is whiter; it is cooked in the same ways as mutton.

Birds are sold with the feathers on, but have the market man remove
them. All game is expensive, and so is a delicacy. In buying game, that
which has hung three weeks or more is considered best.



DINNERS AND LUNCHEONS


The Formal Dinner

A formal dinner generally consists of ten courses, but may be eight or
twelve. In order to have one harmonious whole, the different courses
must blend well with each other. Avoid repetition; if oysters appear
in the first course, they must not appear again. Observe these two
points particularly in arranging the table: first, have the table
linen immaculate and without folds; and second, arrange the covers with
mathematical exactness.

The table may be square, oblong, or round; it must be covered with a
soft pad, and then with the tablecloth, which should hang over the
sides of the table at least one quarter of a yard on every side.

The selection of guests for a formal dinner is extremely important, and
the seating at the table so that all are congenial takes some time to
plan. Name cards should be placed at each cover. Each gentleman should
be given a card, on entering the dressing room, with the name of the
lady whom he is to escort to the dining room, and the letters R or L,
also on the card, indicating to the right or left of the hostess.

When dinner is announced, the host with the guest of honor leads the
way to the dining room, followed by the other men with their ladies,
and the hostess with the gentleman of honor brings up the rear. The
guests all stand behind their chairs until the hostess makes a move to
be seated; then the men push up the chairs for the ladies, each lady
seating herself from the left of her chair.

_The decoration_ of the table should be simple and low in design and in
the center of the table. A small flower may also be placed at the right
of each cover. Of course the colors of the flowers must harmonize with
the china, but otherwise individual taste should be exercised.

_The illumination_ of the table is most important. If candles are used,
they must be so arranged as not to interfere with the guests, and the
shades so placed that they will slip down as the candle burns. If
candle light is insufficient, try if possible to have the lights come
from the side rather than from above.

_The Cover._—The place for each guest and the necessary plate, silver,
glasses, knives, and napkin is called the cover.

_Arrangement of Cover._—Allow twenty inches for every person. Place
a ten-inch service plate, having decorations, right side up, in the
center of this space, and one and one half inches from the edge of the
table.

Arrange knives, edges toward plate, in the order in which they will
be needed, beginning at the right. At the right of knives, place soup
spoon, bowl up; at the right of soup spoon, the oyster fork, with tines
up; the other forks, with tines up, at the left of the plate, in the
order in which they will be needed, beginning with the extreme left.

If there are too many courses to admit of all the silver being put on
at once, extra silver may be placed at each cover just before serving
the course requiring it.

The glass for water should be placed just above the center of the
plate, to the right, the wineglasses to the right of the water glass,
in the order in which they are to be used. Place the napkins either to
the left of the forks, or over service plate. They should be so folded
as to hold a bread stick or dinner roll.

_The name card_ is generally placed on top of the napkin or over the
plate.

_Serving the Formal Dinner._—The dinner maybe served from the butler’s
pantry, having each course arranged on individual plates, and placed by
the waitress, on the right side of the guest, with the right hand, and
anything which is to be served with the course, passed on a tray to the
left of the guest and low enough and sufficiently near to the guest, to
be easily taken with the right hand. Served in this way, there is less
interruption to conversation.

Or each dish may be so arranged on a platter or serving dish on a
tray that the guest may easily serve himself. Served in this way, the
waitress places plates before each guest before passing the courses.

At present the service plate is quite universally used; that is, the
space in front of the guest is always occupied with a plate. When
the waitress removes the course plate with the left hand, she places
another plate with the right hand. In this way of serving, the tray,
if used at all, is only used when the food is passed, not for removing
dishes.

_Removal of Courses._—When every one has finished, the waitress removes
one plate at a time, beginning with the hostess or with the guest at
the right of the hostess.

Before the dessert, everything not needed for this course should
be removed from the table; if there are crumbs, they should be
carefully brushed with a napkin on to a plate or tray. After this
is accomplished, place the dessert dishes from the right. While the
dessert is being eaten, the finger bowl, filled one third full of tepid
water, with a slice of lemon or a geranium leaf or a flower in it, set
on a doily on a plate, may be placed in front of and above the dessert
plate. When the dessert plate is removed, the finger bowl is moved into
the space. If fruit follows the dessert, the guest removes the finger
bowl and doily from the plate and uses that plate for the fruit.

If coffee is served in the dining room, the finger bowls are not placed
until after the coffee, but coffee is usually served in the drawing
room.

_Order of Service._—The guests on the right of the host and hostess are
served first in the first course, in the second course the guests on
the left, in the third course the second guest on the right of the host
and hostess, and so on in rotation, so that no guest is served twice
first. Some hostesses insist upon being served first. If the different
courses are passed rather than served from the butler’s pantry, this
may be a good plan, but otherwise there seems to be no reason for it.


    MENU FOR A FORMAL DINNER
    First Course
    Oysters or Clams in Shells      Brown Bread Sandwiches

    Second Course
    Consommé      Croûtons

    Third Course
    Broiled Trout—Maître d’hôtel Butter
    Cucumbers

    Fourth Course
    Croquettes or Sweetbreads

    Fifth Course
    Saddle of Mutton      Currant Jelly      Potatoes
    Peas in Fontage Cups

    Sixth Course
    Punch

    Seventh Course
    Broiled Quail with Chestnut Purée      Tomato Salad

    Eighth Course
    Bombe Glacé      Sponge Cake

    Ninth Course
    Fruit and Bonbons

    Tenth Course
    Black Coffee

    Salted almonds and bonbons to be on the table all the time.
    Celery to be passed with oysters.
    Radishes or olives to be passed with fish course.


When and How to serve Wines

    Sauterne slightly cold with oysters.
    Sherry slightly cold with soup.
    Rhine Wine not very cold with fish.
    Claret slightly cold with entrées.
    Champagne very cold with poultry and meats.
    Burgundy a little warm with game.
    Burgundy and Champagne with salads.
    Port Wine or Madeira temperature of wine cellar with desserts.
    Cordials and brandies with coffee.


Courses

_First Course._—Appetizers, cold hors-d’œuvres, eaten preliminary to
the dinner, supposed to stimulate the flow of the digestive juices and
create an appetite.

_Second Course._—Oysters or Shellfish. Salt, pepper, cayenne, Tabasco
sauce, and tiny brown-bread sandwiches are passed with this course.

_Third Course._—A Clear Soup. Hors-d’œuvres, such as celery, olives,
radishes, or pimolas are passed with this course.

_Fourth Course._—Fish, boiled, fried, or baked; sometimes potatoes, and
generally cucumbers or tomatoes dressed, are served.

_Fifth Course._—Entrées.

_Sixth Course._—The Meat Course, one vegetable besides the potato.

_Seventh Course._—Frozen Punches or Cheese Dishes.

_Eighth Course._—Game or Poultry and Salad.

_Ninth Course._—Hot Desserts or Cold Desserts.

_Tenth Course._—Frozen Desserts, Cakes, and Preserves may be passed
with this course.

_Eleventh Course._—Fruits.

_Twelfth Course._—Coffee and Liqueurs.


The Informal Dinner

The hostess serves the soup, and the host the fish and the roast.
Vegetables, sauces, and entrées are served from the side.

Either the host or hostess makes the salad, and the hostess serves the
dessert and the coffee.

The cover is arranged the same as for the Formal Dinner.


The Formal Luncheon

The table may be covered or bare. If bare, use doilies for plates and
glasses.

The arrangement of the cover is the same as for the Formal Dinner.

Lighter dishes are served for luncheon than for dinner; entrées take
the place of the roast.

Soup or bouillon is served in cups. Fruit may be served for the first
course instead of canapés.

The hostess sometimes serves the salad and the coffee, but it is better
to have all serving from the side.


The Formal Breakfast

This really is the same as the Formal Luncheon except that men are
invited with the ladies, and coffee is served throughout the meal.


The Informal Luncheon

Like the Informal Dinner except that the roasts are omitted.

When luncheon is announced, the first course may be on the table, and
the dishes required for the remaining courses arranged on the side
table.

Seldom more than three courses are served.

Tea, coffee, or cocoa are served throughout the meal.



BUTLER’S DUTIES


A butler is generally given full charge of the dining room, as well as
of the other men servants.

He waits on the table at breakfast, usually alone; but if the family is
large or there are guests present, he may be assisted.

He directs the washing of dishes and the cleaning of the silver. He
prepares the salad. He attends to the bell, to the fires, to the
lighting of the house. He makes and serves afternoon tea and sets the
table for dinner.

He announces all the meals, serves the dinner, does all the carving.
If he is assisted, he serves the principal dishes, and the assistant
serves the vegetables and sauces.

He is responsible for the safety of the silver, for the arrangement
of the flowers and fruits, and for the proper serving of the wines.
He has full charge of all refreshments served in the evening and is
responsible for the locking of the house at night.

He alternates with the footman or waitress in answering the bell in the
evening.



GARNISHINGS


It has been said that “what appeals to the eye generally appeals to the
palate.”

Use care and taste in serving; dainty service will make the simplest
food most attractive.

Never allow any food which looks unsightly to be served. Toasted bread,
burned on one side, may take away the appetite, but toasted a golden
brown on both sides, with crusts cut off and then cut in strips and
served in between the folds of a fresh doily, will appeal to the most
fastidious.

Parsley is always used to garnish meats. Meats should be skewered into
shapely pieces before being cooked, and served on dishes to display
them well.

Steaks and chops should be trimmed before cooking, then broiled evenly
on all sides—never burned.

Rib chops should be garnished with chop frills.

Slices of lemon, hard-cooked eggs cut in strips, chopped pickles, and
parsley are used for garnishing fish.

Cold sweet dishes are garnished mostly with jellies cut in cubes, and
candied fruits, red cherries, and angelica being the most popular.

Nuts and raisins are also used.

Ice creams are garnished with meringues and spun sugar.

Cakes are garnished with nuts and plain and fancy frostings put through
a pastry bag and tube.

Whatever garnishing is used, avoid overdoing the matter; the simplest
is always the most attractive.



WEIGHTS AND MEASURES


    4 gills make   1 pint
    2 pints make   1 quart
    4 quarts make  1 gallon

    1 measuring cup  = 2 gills
    4 measuring cups = 1 quart
    2 measuring cups = 1 pint

All measures in this book are level.

To measure a spoonful of dry material fill spoon and level off with a
knife.

One half spoonful is measured by cutting one spoonful through
lengthwise.


Table of Measures

    3 teaspoons = 1 tablespoon
    4 tablespoons = ¼ cup
    2 tablespoons butter = 1 ounce
    1 cup solid butter = ½ pound
    2 cups flour = ½ pound
    9 large eggs = 1 pound


Table of Proportions

    1 cup liquid to 3 cups flour for bread
    1 cup liquid to 2 cups flour for muffins
    1 cup liquid to 1 cup flour for batters
    1 teaspoon soda to 1 pint sour milk
    1 teaspoon soda to 1 cup molasses
    ¼ teaspoon salt to 4 cups custard
    2 teaspoons salt to 4 cups water
    ¼ teaspoon salt to 1 cup white sauce
    ⅛ teaspoon pepper to 1 cup white sauce.



PART II

RECEIPTS



PART II



CHAPTER I

FIRST-COURSE DISHES


Canapés

Canapés are made from white, graham, and brown bread, sliced very thin
and cut in various shapes. They may be dipped in melted butter, toasted
or fried. The slices may be covered with any of the following mixtures.
Served hot or cold.


Anchovy Canapés

Cut bread in slices one quarter inch thick, cut in circles, dip in
melted butter, sprinkle with salt and cayenne, spread with anchovy
paste, and sprinkle with a few drops of lemon juice.


Caviare Canapés

Cut bread in quarter-inch slices, cut slices four inches long and two
inches wide. Fry in deep fat, or toast. Spread toast with caviare
paste, sprinkle with a few drops of lemon juice and paprika. Garnish
with finely chopped green or red pepper.


Cheese Canapés

Cut bread in quarter-inch slices, spread lightly with French mustard,
sprinkle with grated cheese and finely chopped olives. Or brown in oven
before sprinkling with olives.


Crab Canapés

Cut bread in slices one quarter inch thick, three inches long, and one
inch and a half wide. Spread with butter and brown in oven. Mix one cup
chopped crab meat, one tablespoon lemon juice, two drops Tabasco, one
half teaspoon salt, a few drops of onion juice, and two tablespoons
olive oil. Mark the bread diagonally in four sections and spread them
alternately with melted cheese and crab mixture. Separate sections with
finely chopped pimento.


Bacon Canapés

Cut bread in triangles one fourth inch thick, sauté in bacon fat.
Spread with French mustard, cover with cooked bacon finely chopped, and
sprinkle with finely chopped pimolas.


Ham Canapés

Cut bread in slices one quarter inch thick, then in circles. Sauté in
butter. Spread with finely chopped ham mixed to a paste with creamed
butter and seasoned highly. Sprinkle with finely chopped, hard-cooked
eggs.


Lobster Canapés

Cut bread in one-fourth-inch slices; shape with doughnut cutter. Cream
two tablespoons butter, add one cup finely chopped lobster meat, one
teaspoon mustard, few drops Worcestershire sauce, few grains cayenne,
and six olives finely chopped. Sauté bread in butter and spread with
above mixture.


Salmon Canapés

Shape bread, cut one fourth inch thick, with a cooky cutter. Spread
with butter and brown in the oven. Arrange around the outer edge of the
circle finely chopped truffles. Next finely chopped white of egg. Next
yolk of egg which has been pressed through a sieve. Then finely flaked
salmon. Garnish salmon with a small sprig of parsley.

Just before serving pour over a few drops of olive oil or place a
teaspoonful of mayonnaise on the salmon.


Sardine Canapés

Cut brown bread in circles, spread with butter, and heat in the oven.
Pound sardines to a paste, add an equal amount of finely chopped,
hard-cooked eggs, season with lemon juice and Worcestershire sauce.
Spread on brown bread. Garnish each canapé in the center with a circle
of hard-cooked white of egg capped with a teaspoonful hard-cooked yolk.


Tomato and Cucumber Canapés

Fry circles of bread in deep fat. Fry slices of tomato in deep fat.
Place one slice of tomato on each circle of bread. Sprinkle with
salt and pepper. Garnish each slice with one slice of cucumber and
hard-cooked white of egg cut in shape of petal, to represent a daisy.


Nut and Olive Canapés

Cut bread in crescents. Fry in deep fat. Mix equal quantities of
chopped nuts and olives, with enough mayonnaise dressing to spread.
Spread on fried bread, and garnish with small diamonds of pimentoes.


Tongue Canapés

Toast triangles of graham bread, spread with butter. Cut slices of
cooked tongue in small pieces, mix with creamed butter to a paste, add
two tablespoons capers to each half cup of tongue. Spread on bread.
Sprinkle with salt and cayenne, and garnish with chopped water cress.


Clam Cocktail

    1 pint small clams
    2 tablespoons Worcestershire Sauce
    2 tablespoons vinegar
    3 tablespoons lemon juice
    1 tablespoon tomato catsup
    1 tablespoon horse-radish
    1 teaspoon salt
    few grains cayenne
    few drops Tabasco

Place clams in shallow dish after removing the black parts. Mix other
ingredients. Pour over clams, and let stand for several hours. Serve
ice cold in small glasses, as a first course.

The clams may be mixed with the sauce and served in halves of grape
fruit, in lemon shells, or tomato cups. Set on a bed of ice.


Oyster Cocktail

Follow receipt for Clam Cocktail, using one pint small oysters drained
from their liquor in place of clams.


Shrimp Cocktail

Substitute one pint shrimps for clams, and proceed as for Clam Cocktail.


Lobster Cocktail

    meat from 2-pound lobster
    2 tablespoons sherry wine
    2 tablespoons tomato catsup
    1 tablespoon horse-radish
    1 teaspoon salt
    few grains cayenne
    1 tablespoon chopped olives
    1 tablespoon lemon juice

Cut lobster meat in small pieces and place in shallow dish. Mix other
ingredients. Pour over lobster meat and let stand one hour. Serve ice
cold in cocktail glasses; just before sending to table sprinkle with
powdered lobster coral.


Oysters on Half Shell

    30 oysters in the shell
    6 teaspoons grated horse-radish
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    cayenne
    3 lemons cut in halves
    6 teaspoons vinegar
    1 tablespoon tomato catsup
    paprika
    parsley

Open oysters; loosen. Serve in shell on bed of ice, having the small
ends of the shell point toward the center of the dish. Wash lemons,
cut in halves, remove seeds, and serve one half in the center of each
plate. Garnish with parsley. Mix horseradish, salt, vinegar, and tomato
catsup, seasoned with paprika and cayenne. Serve in small glass dish
and pass to each person.


Clams on Half Shell

Follow receipt for Oysters on Half Shell, substituting clams.



CHAPTER II

SOUPS


SOUP ACCESSORIES


Browned Crackers

    8 crackers
    salt
    butter
    cayenne

Spread crackers with butter, sprinkle with salt and cayenne, and brown
in oven.


Cheese Crackers

    8 crackers
    salt, cayenne
    grated cheese
    butter

Spread crackers thinly with butter, sprinkle with salt and cayenne, and
cover with grated cheese. Cook in oven until cheese is melted.


Crisps

    4 slices of bread
    salt
    butter
    cayenne

Spread bread with butter or dip in melted butter. Sprinkle with
seasonings. Remove crusts and cut in long narrow strips. Brown in slow
oven.

Rings may be cut from the prepared bread and browned in the oven. Three
of the narrow strips may be inserted in each ring.


Croûtons

Cut bread one fourth inch in thickness, remove crust. Cut slices in
strips, and strips in cubes. Dip in melted butter, brown in the oven or
fry in deep fat.


SOUP GARNISHINGS


Cheese Balls

    ¼ cup butter
    ¾ cup flour
    ½ cup water
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    cayenne and paprika
    3 eggs
    ¼ cup grated cheese

Melt butter, add water, and cook two minutes; add seasonings and flour,
boil until mixture forms in a mass in center of pan. Cool slightly, add
eggs unbeaten, one at a time, add cheese, drop from teaspoon into hot
fat, drain, and serve immediately.


Egg Balls

    4 hard-cooked eggs
    1 raw egg yolk
    salt and cayenne
    1 white of egg
    flour or
    sifted cracker crumbs

Mash yolks of eggs, add seasonings, and enough yolk of egg to form a
paste. Shape into balls the size of a walnut, dip in slightly beaten
white of egg, dip in flour or cracker crumbs, and fry in deep fat.
Drain and serve with soup.


Rice Balls

    1 cup cold cooked rice
    2 tablespoons flour
    salt, cayenne, nutmeg
    1 teaspoon grated lemon rind
    1 teaspoon chopped parsley
    1 egg

Press rice through sieve, add flour, egg and seasonings. Roll in balls,
allowing a teaspoon for each ball. Cook in boiling salted water until
they harden on the outside. Serve hot with soup.


Marrow Balls

    4 tablespoons marrow
    1 egg
    salt, cayenne, nutmeg
    soft bread crumbs

Cook marrow in frying pan, strain, beat, add egg, seasonings, and
enough bread crumbs to make of a consistency to shape. Form in small
balls and poach in hot water.


Fritter Beans

    2 eggs
    1 teaspoon butter
    1 teaspoon lard
    4 tablespoons milk
    4 tablespoons grated cheese
    salt, pepper, cayenne

Melt butter and lard, add milk; when boiling, add flour and seasonings;
cook two minutes, stirring constantly; add cheese and eggs, cool, drop
from teaspoon into hot fat, drain, and serve with soups.


Noodles

    flour
    ½ teaspoon salt
    1 egg
    cayenne
    slight grating of nutmeg

Beat egg. Add seasonings and enough flour to make a stiff dough. Work
on floured board until smooth and elastic. Cut a small portion and roll
thin as a wafer. Cut in fancy shapes and cook in boiling salted water
or soup stock twenty minutes. Serve hot in soups.

This paste may be spread on the bottom of inverted dripping pans and
baked in a quick oven. Crease before removing from pan.


Noodle Balls

Use Noodle Mixture, allowing less flour, shape into round marbles, and
cook in boiling salted water twenty to thirty minutes. Serve hot in
soups.


Vegetable Cubes

    2 egg yolks
    ½ cup beef stock
    1 whole egg
    ½ cup mashed peas
    salt, pepper, cayenne
    nutmeg

Mix yolks of egg, whole egg, peas and seasonings, add hot stock. Pour
into buttered tin to the depth of one inch, set into hot water, and
bake in slow oven until mixture is firm. Cool, cut in cubes, and serve
in soups.


Chicken Quenelles

    ½ pound chicken
    2 tablespoons butter
    cayenne
    2 tablespoons bread crumbs
    salt and nutmeg
    milk
    1 egg

Chop chicken and press through a sieve. Soak bread in milk, press
through sieve, add melted butter, egg slightly beaten, chicken,
seasonings, and milk to make of the consistency to shape. Shape between
two spoons, and poach in boiling salted water.


Fish Quenelles

    1 cup fish
    1 egg white
    salt, pepper, cayenne
    ⅓ cup cream

Chop fish and press through a sieve. Add unbeaten white of egg and
cream beaten until stiff; add seasonings, and poach in boiling water.

This mixture may be rolled in balls or shaped in teaspoons.


SOUPS

Brown soup stock is made from beef and vegetables, or from beef, veal
and fowl, and vegetables.

Veal with onion and celery and seasonings makes white stock; or veal
and chicken together, with celery, onions, and seasonings, are used for
white stock.

Cream soups are generally made without stock, milk or cream being the
liquid used, the foundation made from fish or vegetables.

_Chicken Stock_ is made from fowl, resembles white stock, but not quite
so rich.

The meats used for soups are the poorer parts of the creature—the shin,
the round, the neck of beef, the knuckle of veal, and the whole bird of
fowls.

A bouquet of sweet herbs is used for seasoning soups; it is composed
of parsley, bay leaf, cloves, peppercorns, thyme and marjoram.


Stock Soups

Skill, patience and good materials are necessary for the making of good
soup. In order to draw out and dissolve the nutritive and flavoring
qualities of meat, cut the meat into small pieces, cover with cold
water, and let stand at least an hour, then heat very gradually.

For a rich stock allow one pint of water to each pound of meat and
bone, having only one quarter pound bone and three quarters meat.
One kind of meat may be used, or several kinds. If soup is made from
remnants of cold meat, be sure to add a small amount of fresh meat to
give added flavor. Remember that if the contents of the soup kettle are
allowed to boil for any length of time, it will be almost impossible to
secure a clear soup from the stock.


How to clear Soup Stock

Allow the white and shell of one egg for two quarts of strained stock.
Beat the white, add crushed shell and the cold stock, pour into kettle,
set over the fire, and stir constantly until the boiling point is
reached; boil three minutes without stirring, then simmer for ten
minutes, strain through sieve, then through a cheese cloth; reheat and
serve. If these directions are followed, an absolutely clear soup will
be the result.


To keep Soup Stock

When the stock is ready to strain, strain into several receptacles;
a coating of fat will form on the top, which serves to keep out the
air. This fat must be removed before clearing the stock. Stock with a
coating of fat will keep a week in summer and several weeks in winter.
If the weather is very warm, scald the stock, then cool quickly.


Asparagus Soup

    1 can of asparagus or
    1 bunch of asparagus
    4 cups cold water
    3 tablespoons butter
    3 tablespoons flour
    2 teaspoons salt
    a few grains cayenne
    1 cup cream
    2 slices onion
    ¼ teaspoon white pepper
    2 cups milk

Wash asparagus if fresh and break off tips; break remainder of stalks
into small pieces. Cook tips and stalks in cold water separately. When
tender, drain; reserve water. Keep tips for garnishing soup. Press
stalks through a purée sieve. Scald milk with onion, remove onion, add
asparagus water, and thicken with flour and butter cooked together.
Bring mixture to boiling point; add cream and seasonings. Pour over
tips and serve.

    NOTE.—If canned asparagus is used, drain, add water and
    cook in milk in a double boiler twenty minutes. Then
    drain and proceed as with fresh asparagus.


Artichoke Soup

    1 can artichokes
    3 cups cold water
    2 tablespoons butter
    2 tablespoons flour
    2 cups scalded milk
    1 egg
    1 teaspoon salt
    1 slice onion
    few grains cayenne

Cook artichokes and onion in water till tender. Drain, press through
sieve, and return to water. Melt butter; add flour and scalded milk.
Cook until mixture thickens. Combine mixtures, add seasonings, and just
before serving pour on to beaten egg.


Bean Soup

    1 cup Lima beans
    4 cups cold water
    2 tablespoons chopped onion
    1 sprig parsley
    1 stalk celery
    2 tablespoons carrot
    4 tablespoons butter
    2 tablespoons flour
    3 cups milk
    salt and cayenne
    1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
    ½ teaspoon pepper

Soak beans over night. Cook beans, onion, parsley, celery and carrot in
cold water; when tender rub through a sieve. Melt butter; add flour,
milk and seasonings; cook five minutes. Combine mixtures and serve.

One cup stewed tomatoes added to this soup makes a pleasant variation.


Kidney Bean Soup

Use receipt for Bean Soup, substituting kidney beans for Lima beans and
adding one tablespoon vinegar.


Baked Bean Soup

    2 cups baked beans
    2 tablespoons onion
    2 cups tomatoes
    2 cups water
    4 tablespoons butter
    2 tablespoons flour
    salt, pepper and celery salt
    2 tablespoons chopped pickle

Cook beans in water ten minutes; press through a sieve. Cook onion in
butter five minutes; add flour and seasonings. When well blended, add
tomato, cook five minutes, strain, add bean mixture, reheat, and serve
with chopped pickles.

If beans are very sweet, it may be necessary to add one to two
tablespoons of lemon juice or vinegar.


Cabbage Soup

    1 small cabbage
    2 cups water
    2 cups milk
    3 slices onion
    4 tablespoons butter
    1 teaspoon salt
    ⅛ teaspoon pepper
    few grains cayenne
    2 tablespoons flour

Chop cabbage, add water, and cook until tender; press through a sieve.
Melt butter, add chopped onion, cook slowly five minutes, add flour,
scalded milk, cabbage mixture; cook five minutes. Add seasonings,
strain and serve.


Carrot Soup

    carrots
    2 slices onion
    sprig parsley
    ¼ cup rice
    4 tablespoons butter
    1½ teaspoons salt
    few grains cayenne
    2 cups water
    2 cups scalded milk
    2 tablespoons flour

Chop enough carrots to make two cups. Cook in water until tender. Press
through sieve, reserving liquor. Cook rice in milk in double boiler.
Cook onion in butter; add flour and seasonings. Mix carrot mixture with
rice and milk and pour on to butter and flour; bring to the boiling
point, strain and serve. Garnish with chopped parsley. If this soup
seems too thick, thin with cream or milk.


Cauliflower Soup

    1 medium-sized cauliflower
    4 cups cold water
    4 tablespoons butter
    4 tablespoons flour
    2 tablespoons grated cheese
    2 cups scalded milk
    2 teaspoons salt
    2 slices onion
    1 egg yolk
    few grains cayenne

Cook cauliflower in cold water until tender; drain, press through a
sieve, add scalded milk. Cook onion in butter, add flour; when well
blended, add cauliflower mixture, seasonings; cook five minutes,
strain, add yolk of egg slightly beaten, and cheese.


Celery Soup

    2 cups celery
    1 quart cold water
    2 slices onion
    4 tablespoons butter
    2 tablespoons flour
    2 cups scalded milk
    1½ teaspoons salt
    1 blade of mace
    cayenne
    celery salt

Chop celery; cook in water until tender. Cook onion and mace in
milk twenty minutes; strain. Melt butter; add flour and seasonings.
Combine celery and milk mixtures, thicken with butter and flour cooked
together, cook five minutes and serve.

    NOTE.—Pieces of celery not suitable for the table may
    be utilized for this soup. The leaves and root of
    celery make a very good soup.


Chestnut Soup

    2 cups chestnuts shelled and blanched
    3 cups cold water
    2 cups scalded milk
    ⅛ teaspoon celery salt
    salt
    cayenne
    nutmeg
    2 tablespoons onion
    4 tablespoons butter
    2 tablespoons flour
    1 cup cream

Cook chestnuts in cold water until tender, press through a sieve,
and add scalded milk. Cook onion in butter five minutes, add flour,
seasonings and chestnut mixture. Cook five minutes, add cream, strain
and serve.

    NOTE.—To shell chestnuts, make a cross on either side
    of the nut with a sharp knife. Put one teaspoon melted
    butter in dripping pan; add chestnuts and cook in oven
    until shells come off easily.


Cucumber Soup

    4 cucumbers
    4 stalks of celery
    4 cups milk
    2 slices onion
    1 tablespoon chopped pepper
    4 tablespoons butter
    4 tablespoons flour
    salt and pepper
    cayenne and celery salt
    1 cup cream or rich milk

Chop cucumbers and celery; add onion and pepper; cook in milk in double
boiler twenty minutes. Add flour and butter cooked together, and
seasonings. Cook five minutes, strain, add cream, reheat and serve.


Corn Soup

    1 can corn or
    6 ears of corn
    2 cups cold water
    2 tablespoons chopped onion
    2 cups scalded milk
    1½ teaspoons salt
    celery salt and cayenne
    3 tablespoons butter
    3 tablespoons flour
    1 cup beaten cream
    1 cup popped corn

Cook corn in cold water twenty minutes. Press through a sieve; add
scalded milk. Cook onion in butter, add flour and seasonings, corn
mixture, cook five minutes, strain, add beaten cream, and serve.
Garnish with popped corn.


Onion Soup

    6 medium-sized onions
    3 cups cold water
    2 cups scalded milk
    salt and cayenne
    3 tablespoons butter
    4 tablespoons flour
    1 egg yolk
    2 tablespoons Parmesan cheese
    1 tablespoon pimento

Chop onions, cook in two tablespoons butter five minutes; add water,
cook thirty minutes, press through a sieve. Melt remaining butter,
add flour, scalded milk and seasonings, cook five minutes. Combine
mixtures, add egg yolks slightly beaten, Parmesan cheese and pimento.


Pea Soup

    1 can peas
    2 cups cold water
    1½ teaspoons salt
    a bit of bay leaf
    3 tablespoons butter
    3 tablespoons flour
    3 cups scalded milk
    1 tablespoon chopped onion
    cayenne and celery salt

Cook peas, bay leaf, onion, and cold water twenty minutes. Press
through a sieve. Make a white sauce of butter, flour, and milk. Combine
mixtures, add seasonings, and serve.

    NOTE.—Cold cooked peas may be used instead of canned
    peas.


Rice Soup

    1 cup rice
    6 cups cold water
    1 small onion
    1 green pepper
    1 teaspoon chopped parsley
    2 cups cream
    4 tablespoons butter
    2 tablespoons flour
    salt, cayenne and nutmeg
    1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce

Cook rice, onion and pepper in cold water until rice is tender. Press
through a sieve. Melt butter, add flour, cream and seasonings; boil
five minutes. Combine mixtures. Add parsley and serve.


Sorrel Soup

    1 cup chopped sorrel
    1 pint cold water
    2 tablespoons butter
    1 cup milk
    4 tablespoons flour
    salt and cayenne
    1 tablespoon tomato catsup
    2 eggs
    1 cup cream
    2 slices onion

Cook onion and sorrel in butter five minutes, add water, cook thirty
minutes. Cook milk and flour in double boiler twenty minutes, add
cream, beaten eggs, catsup and strained sorrel mixture. Season and
serve.


Spinach Soup

    2 quarts spinach
    6 cups cold water
    bit of bay leaf
    1 teaspoon salt
    3 tablespoons butter
    2 cups milk
    1 clove of garlic or
    2 tablespoons chopped onion
    cayenne pepper and celery salt
    3 tablespoons flour
    ½ cup cream

Cook spinach in water thirty minutes. Press through a sieve, scald milk
with onion and bay leaf, add butter and flour cooked together, strain,
add seasonings and spinach mixture; cook five minutes and serve.
Garnish with beaten cream.


Squash Soup

    2 cups cooked and strained squash
    4 cups milk
    2 slices onion
    bit of bay leaf
    3 tablespoons butter
    3 tablespoons flour
    salt and cayenne
    ½ cup cream
    2 tablespoons butter
    1 teaspoon Liebig’s beef extract

Cook onion in butter five minutes, add flour, extract, seasonings, and
milk in which bay leaf has been scalded, cook five minutes; add squash,
strain, add two tablespoons of butter and serve. Garnish with beaten
cream.


Potato Soup

    5 potatoes, boiled
    2 tablespoons onion
    2 tablespoons carrot
    ¼ teaspoon celery salt
    salt, pepper and cayenne
    3 tablespoons butter
    2 tablespoons flour
    1 quart milk

Cook onion and carrot in butter five minutes, add flour, milk,
seasonings; cook in double boiler twenty minutes; add mashed potato,
and serve after straining. One cup stewed and strained tomatoes or one
fourth cup tomato catsup may be used to vary this soup.


Tomato Soup

    1 can tomatoes
    2 slices onion
    2 sprigs parsley
    bit of bay leaf
    few gratings of nutmeg
    3 tablespoons butter
    2 tablespoons flour
    4 cups water
    3 cloves
    salt and cayenne

Melt butter, add flour. Cook remaining ingredients together twenty
minutes. Press through a sieve and thicken with flour mixture. If
tomato lacks flavor, season highly with Worcestershire sauce and
Tabasco sauce.


Tomato Bisque Soup

    1 can tomatoes
    1 quart milk
    2 tablespoons chopped onion
    ¼ cup flour
    ¼ cup butter
    1½ teaspoons salt
    1 teaspoon chopped parsley
    ¼ teaspoon soda
    cayenne and celery salt
    6 cloves

Melt butter, add onion, cook five minutes; add flour, milk and
seasonings, cook in double boiler twenty minutes. Cook tomatoes,
press through a sieve, add soda. Combine mixtures and strain. Serve
immediately. If tomato is very acid, it may be necessary to add more
soda to neutralize.


Tomato Soup with Stock

    1 can tomatoes
    2 tablespoons chopped onion
    2 tablespoons flour
    2 tablespoons butter
    2 tablespoons green pepper
    1 teaspoon lemon juice
    1 sprig parsley
    bit of bay leaf
    2 cups brown stock
    salt and cayenne
    2 tablespoons horse-radish
    ¼ cup cooked macaroni cut in rings

Melt butter, add green pepper and onion, cook five minutes; add tomato,
horse-radish, stock and seasonings. Thicken with butter and flour
cooked together. Simmer ten minutes, strain, add macaroni and serve.
This soup unstrained would be a purée.


Turnip Soup

    2 cups hot mashed turnip
    1 cup hot mashed potato
    2 tablespoons flour
    2 teaspoons salt
    ½ onion
    4 cups scalded milk
    4 tablespoons butter
    ⅛ teaspoon pepper

Mix turnip, potato and scalded milk. Melt butter, add flour, salt and
pepper; when well blended add turnip mixture and onion cut in small
pieces. Cook in double boiler twenty minutes, stirring occasionally;
strain and serve.


Water Cress Soup

    3 cups chopped cress
    4 tablespoons butter
    2 tablespoons chopped onion
    1¼ teaspoons salt
    1 cup whipped cream
    4 cups milk
    2 tablespoons flour
    1 teaspoon beef extract
    cayenne and Worcestershire Sauce

Cook cress, butter and onion together five minutes; add flour and
seasonings. When smooth add milk in which extract has been mixed, cook
twenty minutes, strain, serve and garnish with whipped cream.


Vegetable Soup

    1 cup chopped carrot
    1 cup chopped turnip
    1 cup chopped celery
    ½ cup butter or pork fat
    2 cups chopped potato
    1 cup chopped onion
    4 cups milk
    salt, pepper, cayenne

Parboil potatoes ten minutes. Melt butter, add vegetables, cook ten
minutes, stirring occasionally. Add milk and cook in doubler boiler
until vegetables are tender. Season, strain, garnish with parsley and
serve.


Black Bean Purée

    2 cups black beans
    8 cups water
    4 tablespoons chopped pork
    3 tablespoons chopped onion
    2 tablespoons flour
    1½ teaspoons salt
    6 cloves
    ½ teaspoon mustard
    2 tablespoons butter
    1 hard-cooked egg
    1 lemon sliced

Soak beans over night, drain, add water and cook until tender—four
or five hours. Press through a sieve; cook pork in a frying pan, add
onion, cook five minutes; add bean mixture, melt butter, add flour and
seasonings; combine mixtures, strain. Garnish with egg cut in slices
and lemon.

A ham bone cooked with the beans is considered by many to be an
improvement.


Split Pea Purée

    2 cups split peas
    8 cups water
    3 tablespoons chopped onion
    1 teaspoon salt
    2 drops Tabasco Sauce
    4 tablespoons chopped pork
    2 tablespoons butter
    2 tablespoons flour
    2 cups milk

Soak peas over night, drain, cook until tender. Cook onion and salt
pork together ten minutes; add to pea mixture. Press through a sieve,
melt butter, add flour, milk, seasonings, and cook five minutes.
Combine mixtures, and serve.


Lentil Purée

Prepare the same as Split Pea Purée, substituting one and one half cups
lentils for split peas.


Potato Chowder

    3 cups potatoes cut into dice
    ½ cup salt pork cut into dice
    ¼ cup onion
    2 tablespoons butter
    2 tablespoons flour
    3 cups milk
    1 cup water
    1 tablespoon parsley
    1 teaspoon salt
    cayenne and celery salt

Cook salt pork in frying pan ten minutes; add onion, cook ten minutes.
Put a layer of parboiled potatoes in kettle, cover with onions and salt
pork, and so continue until all potatoes and onions are used.

Cover with water and simmer until potatoes are tender. Melt butter; add
flour, milk and seasonings. Cook five minutes. Combine mixtures.

If potatoes are very old, it is better to parboil them before putting
them with the onion.


Corn Chowder

    1 can corn
    1 cup salt pork cut in cubes
    1 cup potatoes
    ½ cup onion
    salt and cayenne
    3 cups water
    2 cups milk
    1 tablespoon butter
    1 tablespoon flour
    ½ cup cracker crumbs

Cook salt pork in frying pan five minutes; add onion and cook until
yellow. Parboil potatoes five minutes; add to onion with corn and
water; cook twenty minutes. Thicken milk with butter and flour cooked
together. Combine mixtures; add cracker crumbs and seasonings, and
serve.

Succotash may be substituted for corn.


Clam Chowder

    4 cups clams
    4 cups potatoes
    ½ cup onion
    ½ cup salt pork cut in cubes
    2 tablespoons flour
    1 teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon Tabasco Sauce
    2 cups boiling water
    4 cups milk, scalded
    2 tablespoons butter

Remove heads from clams and chop. Parboil potatoes. Cook onion and salt
pork together ten minutes. Arrange clams, potatoes, onion and salt pork
in layers in the kettle; cover with boiling water, and simmer until
tender. Thicken milk with flour and butter cooked together; add fish
mixture and seasonings, and serve.


Fish Chowder

    1 haddock weighing five pounds
    4 cups potato dice
    ½ cup onion dice
    ½ cup salt pork dice
    salt, pepper, cayenne
    4 cups hot water
    2 tablespoons butter
    4 tablespoons flour
    4 cups milk
    10 buttered crackers

Remove head and skin and cut fish into fillets. Cover head, skin and
bones with cold water; simmer twenty minutes; strain. Reserve liquor.

Parboil potatoes ten minutes. Cook onions in salt pork until yellow.
Arrange in layers, fish, potatoes, onions and salt pork; cover with
water in which bones were cooked, and simmer until potatoes are tender.
Thicken milk with butter and flour cooked together, combine mixtures,
add seasonings, and pour over buttered crackers which have been
previously soaked in cold milk.

_Caution._—Do not allow onion or salt pork to burn.


New England Chowder

    4 cups clams or
    4 pounds haddock
    4 tablespoons onion
    4 cups tomatoes
    4 tablespoons salt pork fat
    4 tablespoons butter
    2 tablespoons flour
    2 cups boiling water
    salt, pepper and cayenne
    10 buttered crackers
    3 cups potato dice

Cook onion in salt pork fat until yellow; add clams or fish free from
bone; simmer twenty minutes. Parboil potatoes, drain, and add to fish
with boiling water. Cook until potatoes are tender.

Melt butter; add flour, tomatoes and seasonings. Combine mixtures, and
pour over buttered crackers which have been previously soaked in cold
milk.


Lobster Chowder

    2 cups lobster meat
    ¼ cup onion
    ¼ cup salt pork fat
    2 tablespoons butter
    4 cups milk
    salt, cayenne, blade of mace
    1 cup hot cream
    2 tablespoons flour

Cook onion in salt pork fat; melt butter; add flour, milk and
seasonings, and cook in double boiler with lobster cut in cubes twenty
minutes; add strained salt pork fat, hot cream, and serve.


Crab Chowder

Prepare the same as Lobster Chowder, substituting crab meat for lobster
meat.


Shrimp Chowder

Prepare the same as Lobster Chowder, substituting shrimps for lobster
meat.


Salt Codfish Chowder

    ¼ cup salt pork fat
    2 onions cut in small pieces
    2 cups shredded codfish
    1 cup cream
    4 tablespoons butter
    3 cups potato cut in cubes
    salt, pepper, cayenne
    1 cup boiling water
    8 crackers buttered
    2 tablespoons flour

Soak codfish in cold water one hour; drain. Parboil potatoes ten
minutes. Cook onions in pork fat, add drained potatoes, fish, and one
cup of boiling water; cook until potatoes are tender. Melt butter; add
flour, milk, cream and seasonings. Combine mixtures, cook five minutes,
and serve with crackers which have been previously soaked in milk.


Clam Bisque No. 1

    2 cups clams
    2 tablespoons onion
    bit of bay leaf
    3 tablespoons butter
    4 tablespoons flour
    2 cups chicken stock
    1 teaspoon salt
    pepper and cayenne
    2 cups hot cream
    1 teaspoon Worcestershire Sauce

Chop clams, and cook in stock twenty minutes. Melt butter, add onions,
cook five minutes; add flour, strained clam liquor, cook five minutes;
add seasonings, cream, and serve.


Crab Bisque

    6 crabs
    2 tablespoons butter
    2 tablespoons onion
    1 teaspoon salt
    2 tablespoons flour
    2 cups milk
    ½ cup boiled rice
    cayenne and blade of mace

Boil crabs in water to cover twenty minutes. Remove meat, add rice,
and cook in two tablespoons butter five minutes; add onion, cook five
minutes, and press all through a sieve. Scald mace in milk. Thicken
milk with butter and flour cooked together; add seasonings.

Combine mixtures, reheat and serve.


Lobster Bisque

    2 cups lobster meat
    2 cups boiled rice
    2 cups white stock
    ½ tablespoon salt
    lobster coral
    4 tablespoons butter
    2 tablespoons flour
    2 cups milk
    pepper, cayenne and nutmeg
    2 tablespoons Madeira

Cook lobster, rice and white stock twenty minutes; press through
a sieve. Thicken milk with flour and butter cooked together;
add seasonings. Combine mixtures and thin with cream to desired
consistency. Garnish with lobster coral pressed through a sieve.


Oyster Bisque

    2 cups white stock or milk
    1 teaspoon chopped parsley
    blade of mace
    2 cups oysters
    1 cup cream
    salt, pepper, cayenne
    1 egg
    2 tablespoons butter
    2 tablespoons flour

Cook oysters in white stock until edges curl. Strain, reserve liquor
and chop oysters; press through a sieve; add butter and flour cooked
together, seasonings and cream; cook five minutes, add to egg slightly
beaten and serve.


Clam Bisque No. 2

Substitute clams for oysters and proceed as for Oyster Bisque.


Oyster Bisque à la Reine

    4 cups oysters
    1 cup milk
    1 egg
    2 tablespoons butter
    salt, paprika, cayenne
    ½ cup cracker crumbs
    1 cup finely chopped chicken meat
    parsley
    dash nutmeg

Cook oysters in their own liquor until edges shrivel. Drain, reserve
liquor; chop oysters. Melt butter, add cracker crumbs and milk. Cook
five minutes, add seasonings, combine mixtures, strain thoroughly. Add
beaten egg and chicken meat.


Bisque of Shrimps, Bretonne

    1 quart shrimps
    2 tablespoons onion
    3 tablespoons butter
    2 cups white stock
    1 tablespoon carrot
    2 tablespoons celery
    ¼ cup chopped mushrooms
    salt and cayenne
    1 cup white wine

Cook shrimps and vegetables in butter; add seasonings, white stock,
and boil five minutes. Press through a sieve. Add wine and serve
immediately.

By adding one cup of cream and two tablespoons of butter a much richer
and smoother soup may be made.


Bouillon

    6 pounds round of beef finely chopped
    3 quarts cold water
    1 pound bones, cracked
    2 teaspoons salt
    1 teaspoon finely chopped red or green pepper
    1 small onion stuck with cloves
    ¼ cup celery
    ¼ cup carrot
    6 peppercorns
    2 cloves
    ¼ cup sherry
    2 tablespoons butter

Cover meat and bones with cold water; simmer four hours. Sauté
vegetables in butter; add to stock with seasonings except sherry. Cook
one hour longer, strain, cool, remove fat and clear. Add sherry and
serve.


Brown Soup Stock

Is made like bouillon, with the addition of three sprigs of parsley,
one sprig of thyme and omission of the sherry. If the stock is not
sufficiently brown, add one teaspoon Kitchen Bouquet for each quart of
stock, or one teaspoon of caramelized sugar.

Many prefer browning a portion of the meat before covering with cold
water, to give color to the soup.

If this method is employed, use one quart less water.


St. Germain Soup

    6 cups brown stock
    2 tablespoons onion
    1 sprig parsley
    3 tablespoons butter
    1 can peas
    bit of bay leaf
    salt, pepper, cayenne
    3 tablespoons flour
    2 cups milk

Reserve one fourth cup of peas for garnishing; cook remainder of peas,
onion, bay leaf and parsley in stock ten minutes; mash through a sieve.
Make a white sauce of butter, flour and milk; combine mixtures, cook
five minutes, add peas, and serve with sippets of bread.


Consommé

    8 pounds beef
    2-pound knuckle of veal
    1 small fowl
    ¼ cup carrot
    ¼ cup turnip
    ¼ cup onion
    1 tablespoon salt
    1 sprig marjoram
    1 sprig thyme
    1 bay leaf
    1 sprig parsley
    6 quarts cold water

Simmer beef, veal and fowl in water four hours; add vegetables, salt,
and herbs tied in a bag; cook slowly one hour. Strain, cool, remove fat
and serve.

Consommé is the foundation for all clear soups, each soup taking its
name from the garnishing which is used.


Consommé with Barley

    2 tablespoons pearl barley
    8 cups boiling water
    2 quarts consommé
    1 teaspoon salt

Cook barley in boiling water until tender; add salt, reheat in consommé
and serve.


Consommé with Eggs

    2 quarts consommé
    6 eggs
    4 cups water
    1 teaspoon salt

Poach eggs in salted water. Place in a tureen and pour hot consommé
over them.


Consommé Claret

    2 quarts consommé
    1 inch stick cinnamon
    3 egg yolks
    2 cups claret
    2 cups hot water
    3 egg whites

Cook cinnamon in consommé; add claret and hot water. Beat egg yolks;
add hot mixture slowly to them. Cut and fold in the beaten whites.
Serve immediately.


Vegetable Consommé

    8 cups consommé
    2 tablespoons carrots
    2 tablespoons string beans
    2 tablespoons turnips
    2 tablespoons green peas
    2 tablespoons asparagus tips

Cut carrots and turnips in inch straws, add remaining vegetables, and
cook in boiling salted water until tender; add consommé, reheat and
serve.


Consommé à l’Italienne

    2 tablespoons spaghetti
    4 tablespoons mushrooms
    2 cups consommé
    2 tablespoons butter

Cook spaghetti in boiling salted water; when tender, cut in rings. Cut
mushrooms in slices and sauté with spaghetti in melted butter. Heat
consommé, add spaghetti and mushrooms, and serve.


Consommé au Riz

    8 cups consommé
    ¼ cup rice
    8 cups boiling water
    1½ teaspoons salt

Cook rice in boiling salted water until tender; drain, pour over rice
six cups boiling water to wash off starch and separate kernels; drain,
add hot consommé and serve.


Swiss Consommé

    6 cups consommé
    ½ cup carrots cut in fancy shapes
    2 tablespoons butter
    ¼ cup turnips cut in fancy shapes
    1 cup celery cut in small pieces
    2 tablespoons cold cooked chicken
    1 cup roasted chestnuts cut in slices

Melt butter, add vegetables and cook until yellow. Cook in boiling
water until tender, being careful not to overcook. Drain, add hot
consommé, chestnuts and chicken. Season with salt and pepper if
necessary.


Chicken Consommé

    1 fowl cut in pieces
    4 quarts cold water
    ¼ cup onion
    ¼ cup celery
    1½ tablespoons salt
    pepper, cayenne and celery salt
    bit of bay leaf
    sprig of parsley

Cover fowl with cold water, bring to the boiling point, then simmer
four hours; add vegetables and seasonings, and simmer one hour. Strain,
cool, remove fat, clear and serve.

If all the stock is not needed at once, remove fat from portion
required only, as fat prevents the stock from spoiling.


Chicken Consommé with Macaroni

    2 quarts chicken consommé
    ½ cup cooked macaroni cut in rings

Reheat consommé and add macaroni rings.


Chicken Consommé with Custard

    ½ cup milk
    1 slice onion
    ½ teaspoon Worcestershire Sauce
    salt, cayenne
    bit of bay leaf
    1 egg
    6 cups consommé

Scald milk with onion and bay leaf. Strain; beat egg slightly; add
seasonings and milk. Bake in shallow pan until firm. Cool; remove from
pan; cut in fancy shapes. Heat consommé, add custard and serve.


White Soup Stock No. 1

    1 knuckle veal
    1 onion stuck with 6 cloves
    ⅓ cup celery
    water
    1 fowl
    ⅓ cup carrot
    1 tablespoon salt
    parsley
    pepper and cayenne

Break the knuckle of veal in small pieces; add cut and disjointed
fowl and water, allowing one quart to each pound of meat and bone.
Cook three hours, keeping below the boiling point. Add remaining
ingredients; simmer one hour; strain; cool; use as needed.


White Soup Stock No. 2

    6-pound knuckle of veal
    2 pounds chopped veal
    ¼ cup celery
    4 quarts water
    ¼ cup onion
    1 teaspoon peppercorns
    2 teaspoons salt

Break knuckle in pieces; add chopped veal; cover with water; let stand
one hour. Simmer four hours; add vegetables; simmer one hour; add
seasonings and strain.

The meat used in this receipt or in White Soup Stock No. 1 may be
chopped and used for croquettes, soufflés, veal loaf, or hash, but as
it lacks flavor, the dishes must be highly seasoned to be palatable.


White Soup

    2 cups white stock
    2 cups cream
    salt and pepper
    1 cup cooked rice
    2 tablespoons butter
    2 tablespoons flour

Make a white sauce of butter, flour and cream. Add white stock, cooked
rice, seasonings; reheat and serve.


Chicken Stock

Cook a fowl in cold water to cover; add seasonings, strain, and use for
stock.


Peanut Soup

    2 cups shelled and blanched peanuts
    ¼ cup onion
    ¼ cup celery
    2 cups white stock
    4 tablespoons butter
    2 tablespoons flour
    2 cups milk
    salt, cayenne, paprika

Chop peanuts in meat chopper. Cook chopped nuts, onion and celery
in white stock twenty minutes. Melt butter; add flour, milk and
seasonings; cook five minutes. Combine mixtures, strain and serve.


Mushroom Soup

    4 cups mushrooms
    4 cups water
    4 cups chicken stock
    4 tablespoons butter
    3 tablespoons flour
    1 cup cream
    salt and pepper
    celery salt

Clean and chop mushrooms; cook in water until tender; press through
a sieve. Melt butter; add flour, white stock; cook five minutes; add
mushroom mixture, cream and seasonings; reheat, strain and serve.


Chicken Gumbo

    1 chicken cut in pieces
    1 cup salt pork cubes
    ¼ cup onion
    4 quarts water
    4 tablespoons flour
    salt, pepper, cayenne
    1 cup cream
    1 quart green okra
    1 tablespoon chopped red pepper
    1 bay leaf, sprig of thyme
    4 tablespoons butter
    1 cup rice cooked
    1 clove garlic

Cook salt pork in frying pan five minutes; add chicken, and sauté a
golden brown. Remove chicken; add onion, garlic, okra cut in slices,
and sauté one half hour. Add to chicken and cover with boiling water.
Add red pepper, seasonings, and cook slowly until chicken is tender.
Melt butter; add flour and cream; cook five minutes; add chicken
mixture. Serve garnished with rice.


Oyster Gumbo

    ¼ cup onion
    ¼ cup butter
    1 quart oysters
    4 quarts water
    1 chicken cut in pieces
    1 cup cooked rice
    1 tablespoon chopped red pepper
    1 quart okra
    2 tablespoons butter
    2 tablespoons flour
    salt and pepper

Melt butter, add chicken, and sauté. Remove chicken; add onion, okra,
pepper. Cook ten minutes. Add to chicken and cover with boiling water.
When chicken is tender, add oysters and cook until edges curl. Melt
butter, add flour, and thicken soup. Serve garnished with rice.


Crab Gumbo

Prepare same as Chicken Gumbo, substituting one quart crab meat for
chicken and using the crab liquor.


Mulligatawny Soup

    6 cups chicken stock
    ¼ cup onion
    2 tablespoons chopped cooked ham
    1 tablespoon carrot
    4 cloves
    1 teaspoon curry powder
    1 teaspoon chopped parsley
    salt, pepper, cayenne
    ½ cup cooked chicken
    2 cups tomato
    ½ cup green apple
    1 tablespoon tomato catsup
    ¼ cup boiled rice
    1 lemon sliced

Melt butter, add vegetables, and cook five minutes. Add remaining
ingredients, except lemon, and cook one half hour. Serve garnished with
lemon.


Green Turtle Soup

    1 can green turtle
    4 cups brown stock
    4 cloves, 6 peppercorns
    bit of bay leaf
    blade of mace
    cayenne
    1 sliced lemon
    sprig each of savory, marjoram, thyme and sage
    3 tablespoons butter
    ¼ cup onion
    3 tablespoons flour
    1 teaspoon salt
    2 cups brown stock
    ¼ cup sherry

Separate the green fat from the rest of the turtle. Cut fat in cubes.
Cook turtle and herbs in four cups of stock one half hour. Melt butter;
add onion, flour, salt, cayenne and two cups stock; boil five minutes;
add turtle mixture; cook five minutes; add fat cubes. Pour into tureen,
and garnish with lemon; add sherry. Serve.


Terrapin Soup

    1 can terrapin
    4 cups white stock
    4 tablespoons butter
    2 egg yolks hard cooked
    salt, cayenne
    blade of mace
    1 cup cream
    2 tablespoons flour
    ¼ cup sherry

Cook terrapin, stock and mace twenty minutes. Melt butter, add flour,
cream and egg yolks; combine mixtures, add sherry, and garnish with
rice balls.


Mock Turtle Soup

    1 calf’s head
    1 teaspoon vinegar
    2 tablespoons onion
    2 tablespoons turnip
    bit of bay leaf
    6 peppercorns
    2 tablespoons butter
    3 tablespoons flour
    3 tablespoons Madeira
    ½ lemon, thinly sliced
    2 quarts cold water
    2 tablespoons carrot
    2 tablespoons celery
    2 sprigs parsley
    2 tablespoons chopped ham
    1 cup meat from calf’s head
    1 tablespoon salt
    2 cups brown stock
    1 tablespoon mushrooms

Cover calf’s head with cold water, add vinegar, vegetables, seasonings,
and simmer two hours. Remove one cupful of meat. Simmer two hours
longer. Strain; cool; remove fat. Brown butter; add flour, and brown;
add brown stock, strained liquor, chopped ham, calf’s head meat, lemon,
Madeira and mushrooms. Reheat and serve.

Should it be necessary to keep the soup hot, delay adding wine until
serving.


Ox-tail Soup

    2 ox-tails
    1 onion stuck with 6 cloves
    ¼ cup salt pork fat
    2 quarts cold water
    pepper and cayenne
    1 cup brown stock
    1 sprig parsley
    2 tablespoons carrot
    2 tablespoons celery
    2 teaspoons salt
    3 tablespoons Madeira wine
    2 tablespoons butter
    2 tablespoons flour

Cut ox-tails at joints, add onion, and sauté in pork fat; add cold
water, and simmer four hours; add vegetables and seasonings; simmer
one hour. Strain; cool; remove fat. Brown butter; add flour and brown;
add strained stock, brown stock and meat cut from bones. Reheat, add
Madeira, and serve.



CHAPTER III

FISH


FOR convenience’ sake we divide fish into two classes—vertebrate and
shellfish.

The freshness of fish is best determined by the odor. If the flesh of
the fish is soft and flabby, the fish has been frozen, or has been kept
too long.


Fish Fillets

Fish fillets are the flesh of vertebrate fish separated from the bone
and cut into large or small pieces.


Fish Forcemeat

Is the flesh of fish finely chopped and pressed through a fine sieve
before being cooked.


Fish Stock

Is the seasoned liquid in which fish has been cooked.


Garnishings for Fish

Parsley, lemon slices, lemon baskets, lemon slices sprinkled with
finely chopped parsley, chopped red or green pepper, potato balls,
olives, hard-cooked eggs, capers, and pickles cut lengthwise and spread
to resemble a fan; mashed potato and mushrooms, cucumbers and tomatoes;
maître d’hôtel butter and water cress.


Boiled Fish

    a 4-pound cod
    2 tablespoons chopped onion
    2 tablespoons chopped carrot
    1 sprig parsley
    2 quarts water
    1 tablespoon salt
    bay leaf and clove
    ½ cup vinegar

Wash and wipe fish. Cover with boiling water and add remaining
ingredients; bring quickly to the boiling point, and keep just below
the boiling point until fish separates slightly in flakes—about thirty
minutes.

A fish kettle is the most convenient receptacle for cooking fish whole.
If one is not available, use a piece of cheese cloth just large enough
to cover fish and tie loosely with string.

All other boiled fish may be cooked in the same way as boiled cod.


STEAMED FISH


Steamed Salmon

Wrap four pounds of salmon in a piece of cheese cloth. Set in a plate
in a steamer and cook until fish separates from bone—from forty-five to
sixty minutes, according to thickness of fish.

All other fish may be steamed in the same way.


BROILED FISH


Broiled Mackerel

Wash and wipe fish; grease a wire broiler with clarified butter, lard,
or pork fat. Season fish with salt and pepper, place on greased broiler
and broil over clear fire, turning every five seconds. If the fish is
a thick one, hold at quite a distance from fire until fish is cooked
through, then hold nearer embers to brown. Separate, first skin side,
then flesh side, with sharp knife from the broiler. Remove to hot
platter, butter, garnish and serve.


FRIED FISH


Fried Smelts

Wash, dry thoroughly, and sprinkle smelts with salt, pepper and flour;
dip in beaten egg which has also been seasoned with salt and pepper;
drain and dip in flour, meal, or sifted bread crumbs.

The fish must be completely covered with egg and crumbs. Fry in deep
fat, first testing fat with a crumb of bread, which should brown
delicately in one minute.

Smelts may be cooked with their heads on, or the backbone may be
removed and the fish rolled up in the shape of a muff, or they may be
skewered in the shape of a ring.

When fried, drain on brown paper and serve on hot platter; garnish with
lemon baskets filled with Mayonnaise Dressing and parsley.

Any small fish may be fried in the same way; large fish are generally
cut in fillets, prepared and fried in the same way.


BAKED FISH


Baked Bluefish

STUFFING

    2 tablespoons butter
    1 cup cracker crumbs or dried bread crumbs
    1 teaspoon finely chopped parsley
    1 tablespoon chopped pickles
    1 teaspoon salt, few drops onion juice
    ¼ to ½ cup milk or water

Melt butter, add remaining ingredients, and stir lightly with a fork
until heated through. If a dry stuffing is preferred, omit liquid.

Wash and wipe bluefish, stuff, and sew. Cut three gashes on either side
of fish and insert a slice of salt pork in each gash (if desired fancy,
pink the edges of the salt pork). Season with salt and pepper, brush
with melted butter, and dredge with flour. Place on a greased fish
sheet, or on two four-inch-wide pieces of cheese cloth. Set in dripping
pan, surround with finely chopped pork; bake, allowing fifteen minutes
to the pound; baste with salt pork fat. There should be sufficient in
the pan; if not, try out an additional quantity of pork.

When the fish is browned on one side, it should be turned, basted and
browned on the other. To avoid this turning, many prefer to skewer the
fish in the shape of the letter S, and place as if swimming in the pan.


BAKED HADDOCK WITH OYSTER STUFFING

Oyster Stuffing

    2 cups oysters
    ¼ cup butter
    1 tablespoon chopped parsley
    1 cup cracker crumbs
    salt
    pepper

Drain oysters; mix crumbs, melted butter and parsley. Season highly
with salt and pepper. Sprinkle oysters with salt and pepper and mix
with crumbs.

Remove head, tail and bone from haddock. Season with salt, pepper and
lemon juice. Stuff with oyster stuffing and sew. Place on fish sheet
or strips of cheese cloth in baking pan, dot with butter, and sprinkle
with salt and pepper. Bake, allowing twelve minutes to the pound,
basting with melted butter, or after fish is stuffed, place in pan;
cover with buttered cracker crumbs and baste.

Remove from pan to hot platter; garnish with parsley and pickles, and
serve with Tomato, Hollandaise Sauce, or Egg Sauce.


BAKED FILLET OF FISH


Baked Fillet of Halibut

    2 slices of halibut cut from middle of fish
    salt, pepper, lemon juice, melted butter
    2 cups oyster stuffing

Wash and wipe fish. Place one slice on a buttered fish sheet, brush
with melted butter, sprinkle with salt and pepper, cover with oyster
stuffing. Place second slice on top of oysters, season, and brush with
butter. Bake forty minutes, basting frequently with melted butter,
turning pan often in order that the fish may be uniformly browned.

Remove to hot platter; garnish with potato balls, parsley, and lemon;
Hollandaise, Tomato, or Béchamel Sauce.


Finnan Haddie Baked

Wash the fish, put flesh side down in dripping pan, cover with cold
water, let stand on back of range ten minutes. Drain and rinse with
cold water. Place on platter, cover with milk, and bake twenty minutes.


SAUTÉD FISH


Sautéd Trout

    6 medium-sized trout
    olive oil or melted butter
    cornmeal, salt and pepper
    2 tablespoons lard or butter

Wash and wipe fish. Sprinkle with salt and pepper, dip in olive oil,
roll in cornmeal, and sauté until brown, and crisp in butter or lard.
Drain on brown paper. Serve on hot platter, and garnish with lemon and
cress. All kinds of small fish may be cooked in the same manner.


Deviled Fillets of Fish

    6 fish fillets
    1 teaspoon mustard
    2 tablespoons lemon juice
    1 tablespoon hot water
    1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
    ½ teaspoon salt
    ½ teaspoon paprika
    ½ cup cracker crumbs seasoned

Mix mustard, lemon juice, Worcestershire sauce, salt and paprika. Wipe
and broil the fish, spread with mustard mixture, roll in crumbs, and
broil until crumbs are brown. Serve hot, with Sauce Tartare or Tomato
Tartare.


Fried Fillet of Sole

    6 fillets of sole
    4 anchovies boned and skinned
    2 teaspoons lemon juice
    2 teaspoons butter
    ¼ teaspoon mustard
    salt, cayenne pepper

Prepare the fillets, sprinkle with salt and pepper; spread with
remaining ingredients blended. Roll fillets, dip in crumbs, egg and
crumbs, fry in deep fat, and drain on brown paper. Serve on a napkin
and garnish with lemon and water cress.

Fillets prepared in this way may also be baked in the oven with white
wine, and served garnished with French fried potatoes and parsley.


Finnan Haddie Croquettes

Prepare fish as for Baked Finnan Haddie. Flake the fish, moisten
with thick White Sauce, season with Worcestershire Sauce. Shape in
croquettes, dip in crumbs, egg and crumbs, and fry in deep fat.


Planked Shad

    1 shad with backbone removed
    4 tablespoons butter
    few drops onion juice
    1 tablespoon salt
    2 tablespoons finely chopped parsley
    2 tablespoons Tomato Catsup or
    2 tablespoons white wine
    few grains cayenne

Wipe shad; place skin side down on oak plank. Sprinkle with salt and
pepper; spread with butter. Cook in hot oven twenty to thirty minutes.
Brown with a salamander. Spread with parsley and catsup or white wine.
Garnish with highly seasoned hot mashed potato pressed through a pastry
bag and tube. Also radishes cut in shape of roses, lemons cut in shape
of crescents and dipped in chopped parsley, and sprigs of parsley.


Fried Whitebait

    2 pounds whitebait
    salt, pepper
    flour
    lemon slices

Dry whitebait in towel; sprinkle with salt and pepper; dredge napkin
with flour. Shake whitebait in napkin until each little fish is covered
with flour. Dip frying basket in hot fat; cover bottom of frying basket
with floured whitebait; plunge into hot fat; fry until a golden brown;
drain on brown paper. Serve on napkin. Garnish with lemon and parsley.
Brown bread is served with these fish.


SHELLFISH


Scalloped Oysters

    1 quart oysters
    1 cup fine bread crumbs
    1 teaspoon salt
    ¼ cup butter
    2 tablespoons parsley
    2 tablespoons celery
    ½ teaspoon paprika
    1 cup cream
    ¼ cup wine

Clean oysters. Butter a baking dish; arrange a layer of oysters in the
bottom of the dish. Mix butter and bread crumbs; sprinkle oysters with
crumbs, parsley, celery, paprika, salt and two tablespoons of cream.
Continue arranging in layers until dish is filled, having crumbs for
the last layer. Just before baking, add wine and bake twenty minutes.
Oysters are best baked in a shallow dish so as to have two layers of
oysters only.


Scalloped Fish and Oysters

    2 cups cold cooked fish
    2 cups oysters
    2 cups White Sauce
    1 cup buttered crumbs

Arrange fish, oysters and White Sauce in alternate layers. Cover with
buttered crumbs and bake until crumbs are brown.


Oyster Stew

    1 quart oysters
    1 quart milk
    4 tablespoons butter
    salt and pepper
    4 tablespoons cracker crumbs

Drain oysters from liquor; heat liquor to boiling point. Skim. Scald
milk in double boiler; add liquor and oysters; cook until edges of the
oysters shrivel; add butter, salt and pepper. Serve at once.

If cracker crumbs are used, combine butter and cracker crumbs and add
to oyster mixture.

Oysters and oyster liquor must not be added to milk until just before
serving, as the mixture is apt to curdle if the oysters are allowed to
stand in the milk.


Spindled Oysters

    1 quart oysters
    12 slices bacon
    salt, pepper
    6 squares buttered toast

Drain oysters from their liquor and dry between towels. Cut the bacon
in pieces half the size of the oysters. Arrange the oysters and bacon
in alternate layers on wooden skewers, being careful to pierce the hard
muscle. Place in a hot pan and bake in a hot oven until bacon is done.
Ten minutes should suffice.

Serve one skewerful on each slice of buttered toast. Many persons like
the liquor of the oysters heated, strained, and poured over the toast
just before serving.


Broiled Oysters

Look over oysters, reject shells, and dry oysters between towels. Dip
in melted butter or olive oil seasoned with salt and pepper. Heat
broiler; grease; arrange oysters on broiler; broil over a clear fire
four to six minutes, turning often. Serve on squares or rounds of
toasted bread spread with butter and slightly moistened with oyster
liquor. Garnish with a sprig of parsley and one quarter slice of lemon.


Panned Oysters

Melt two tablespoons of butter in hot frying pan, add one pint of
cleaned and drained oysters, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and cook in
hot oven until edges shrivel. Serve on hot buttered squares of toast
with strained liquor from oysters. Garnish with finely chopped parsley.


Sautéd Oysters

Pick over, drain, and dry oysters; dip in crumbs, egg and crumbs,
season with salt and pepper. Melt one tablespoon each of lard and
butter in frying pan. When hissing hot, cover bottom of pan with
prepared oysters and sauté until a golden brown on both sides. Drain
on brown paper; reheat in oven if necessary. Serve on hot platter and
garnish with parsley, lemon and Sauce Tartare.


Fried Oysters

Fried oysters are prepared same as Sautéd Oysters except they are fried
in deep fat.


Suprême Oysters

    1 pint oysters
    2 tablespoons butter
    2 tablespoons onion
    4 tablespoons flour
    ½ cup cream
    ½ cup finely cut chicken
    ½ cup chicken stock
    ½ cup oyster liquor
    salt, cayenne, nutmeg
    3 egg yolks
    parsley

Melt butter; add onion; when yellow, add flour; when well blended, add
liquids and seasonings. Cook five minutes; add chicken, yolks of eggs
beaten until thick and cream beaten until stiff. When thick, cool.
Parboil oysters; drain and dry. Cover oysters with chicken mixture, dip
in crumbs, egg and crumbs, and fry in hot fat. Drain. Serve on hot dish
and garnish with lemon and Mayonnaise Dressing.


Clams

Clams may be cooked and served in all ways like oysters.


Steamed Clams

Wash and scrub clam shells; place in kettle; add water, allowing one
half cup of water for each peck of clams. Cover kettle and cook until
shells open. Serve hot with melted butter.

Kettle should be removed from the range as soon as shells open,
otherwise clams will be overcooked.


Clam Fritters

    2 egg yolks well beaten
    ½ cup milk
    1 tablespoon olive oil
    ⅞ cup flour
    salt, pepper, cayenne
    2 egg whites stiffly beaten
    1 tablespoon lemon juice

Combine ingredients in order given; let stand ten minutes. Remove clams
from shell, cut off heads, cover with batter, and fry until golden
brown in hot fat. Drain on brown paper. As clams contain so much water,
only a few should be put into the fat at once.

Oysters in batter may be prepared in the same way as Clam Fritters.


Fried Scallops

    1 quart scallops
    salt and pepper, 1 egg
    flour
    crumbs

Wash, drain, and parboil scallops. Season; dip in flour, egg and crumbs
and fry in deep fat. Drain and serve with Sauce Tartare. Garnish with
parsley and lemon.


Fried Scallops in Batter

Parboil scallops, and proceed as with Clam Fritters.


Scalloped Scallops

    1 pint scallops
    1 cup mushrooms, chopped
    2 tablespoons onion
    4 tablespoons butter
    4 tablespoons flour
    1 cup cream
    ½ cup scallop liquor
    salt, pepper, cayenne

Parboil scallops. Drain and cut in slices. Melt butter; add onion and
mushrooms, cook five minutes; add scallops, cook five minutes; add
liquids, cook until thick.

Place mixture in buttered baking dish or scallop shells; dot with
butter; cover with buttered and seasoned crumbs; bake until crumbs are
brown.


Lobster

To open a lobster: wipe lobster, break or sever small and large claws
from the body. Separate tail from body portion by twisting and pulling
at the same time. Remove meat from body portion carefully, picking
edible portion from small bones. Reserve liver and coral if there is
any; discard stomach, or “lady.” Meat from the body of the lobster is
the sweetest and tenderest, but is often thrown away because of the
difficulty in removing it.

Break the large claws, or if the shell is tender, cut with scissors and
remove meat whole.

Crush the tail shell and remove the meat in one piece. Cut entire
length of the tail meat and remove the intestinal canal.

The small claws are attractive for garnishing, and should be reserved.


Creamed Lobster

    1 pint lobster meat
    4 tablespoons butter
    4 tablespoons flour
    parsley
    salt, pepper, cayenne
    2 cups cream
    1 red pepper cut in ribbons
    1 teaspoon lemon juice

Make a White Sauce of butter, flour, seasonings and cream. Parboil red
pepper, add to sauce with lobster meat, reheat, and serve on rounds of
buttered toast.


Scalloped Lobster

Use receipt for Creamed Lobster and bake in lobster shell, scallop
shells, ramekins, or baking dishes, covered with buttered and seasoned
cracker crumbs. Garnish with small lobster claws and parsley.


Deviled Lobster

Prepared same as Creamed Lobster, with addition of one teaspoon each of
onion juice, Worcestershire sauce, mustard, few grains of cayenne and a
few drops of Tabasco.


Shrimps and Crabs

Shrimps and crabs may be creamed, scalloped, or deviled, like lobster,
garnished and served in the same way.


Deviled Crabs

    1 cup crab meat
    1 teaspoon chopped chives
    1 teaspoon mustard
    2 egg yolks
    salt, pepper
    2 tablespoons butter
    2 tablespoons flour
    ¾ cup stock or milk
    1 teaspoon Worcestershire Sauce
    buttered bread crumbs

Melt butter, add flour, mustard, salt and pepper; when blended, add
stock; cook five minutes; add egg yolks, crab meat and chives. Arrange
in crab shells or in ramekin dishes. Cover with Worcestershire Sauce
and bread crumbs. Bake until crumbs are brown.


Crabs in Red Peppers

    8 red peppers
    1 pint crab meat
    4 tablespoons butter
    4 tablespoons flour
    1 tablespoon onion
    salt, pepper, paprika
    mustard, cayenne, nutmeg
    1 cup cream

Parboil red peppers. Make a White Sauce with butter, flour, cream and
seasonings. Add crab meat, fill peppers with crab mixture, cover with
buttered and seasoned soft bread crumbs, and bake until crumbs are
brown.


Broiled Live Lobster

Select a heavy lobster. Cut with a quick, sharp thrust the whole length
of the body from the mouth down. Remove the stomach and intestinal
canal; reserve the liver or tomalley and coral, if there is any. Crack
large claws and place on greased broiler, inserting skewers between the
sides of the lobster to keep it open. Place in oven for twenty minutes,
then broil over hot coals about five minutes. Serve immediately, plain
or with Deviled Sauce.


Curried Lobster

    a 4-pound lobster
    4 tablespoons butter
    1 tablespoon chopped onion
    4 tablespoons flour
    2 cups cooked rice
    1 cup cream
    1 cup stock
    1 tablespoon Curry
    2 eggs
    salt, paprika

Melt butter; add onion; cook until yellow; add flour, curry, liquid;
cook until thickened; add eggs, salt and pepper, and coral, if you have
it; strain over lobster meat.

Serve on a bed of rice garnished with parsley.


Lobster Suprême

Prepare the sauce as for Suprême Oysters, substituting two cups of
chopped lobster for oysters.


Lobster in Red Peppers

Prepared same as Crabs in Red Peppers, substituting one pint lobster
meat for crab meat.


Fried Soft-shell Crabs

Prepare crabs by removing sand bags. Raise apron; cut from crab; remove
spongy substance surrounding apron. Wipe; season with salt and pepper;
dip in crumbs, egg and crumbs; fry in hot fat about three minutes.
Serve immediately with Tartare Sauce.



CHAPTER IV

MEATS


MEAT is expensive; therefore every housekeeper should inform herself in
regard to the different cuts in different creatures, and the prices of
these cuts.

Various methods are employed in cooking meats; but this fact should be
remembered, that all meat should be subjected to a high temperature
for a short time, in order to sear the surface and shut in the juices,
whatever method of cooking is used.

Tough meats should have long, slow cooking.

Dry meats, like the fillet, should be larded to give flavor.

As a rule, dark meats are more palatable and digestible if cooked rare,
and white meats are considered better if thoroughly cooked.

Remove all meats from paper as soon as sent from the market. Set on
plate and keep in ice chest or cool place until ready to use.

Never put meat in cold water, but always wipe with a damp cloth to
remove any foreign matter, before cooking.

A description of the various meats will be found in the chapter on
Marketing.


BEEF


Boiled Beef

The flank is one of the best pieces for boiling.

Select a five-pound piece; wipe; remove membrane, shape, stuff, tie,
and skewer. Cover with cloth; place in kettle; cover with boiling
water; bring to the boiling point, and cook just below the boiling
point five or six hours, or until tender. Simmered beef would be a more
correct term than boiled beef, but it is ordinarily known as boiled
beef.

Season with salt one half hour before serving. Reserve liquor for
making gravies and soups.

Boiled beef should have a rich, highly seasoned gravy served with it.


Braised Beef

An iron, or agate-ware kettle, with closely fitting cover, is
absolutely necessary for perfectly cooking braised beef.

Select six pounds of round of beef, or any tough, inexpensive piece.
Try out one cup salt pork cubes; add one cup each of chopped celery,
carrot, onion and turnip. Wipe meat; sprinkle with salt and pepper and
dredge with flour. Place meat on bed of vegetables and cook in covered
kettle twenty minutes; add two pints hot water and cook slowly until
tender, about four hours, turning meat and basting occasionally. It
may be necessary to add more water, for there should be about a pint
and a half when meat is cooked. Thicken gravy with four tablespoons
flour, blended with two tablespoons butter, added twenty minutes before
serving. A bouquet of sweet herbs may be added to improve the flavor.


Fillet of Beef

The tenderloin of beef is known as the fillet.

Trim into shape a fillet of beef weighing about four pounds, removing
tendinous portions and veins. Tie and skewer into a pear-shaped piece.
Lard top; sprinkle with salt and pepper, and dredge with flour. Cover
the bottom of a small dripping pan with cubes of salt pork. Set trivet
on top of pork, and meat on trivet. Bake from twenty to thirty minutes
in hot oven, basting frequently.

Serve with gravy made from fat in pan, flour and hot water. Same as
receipt for Brown Gravy, under Roast Beef.


Broiled Fillet of Beef

Cut slices about two inches thick from fillet. Shape in circles. Place
on greased broiler and broil over hot coals from four to six minutes,
turning every ten seconds. Serve on hot platter; garnish with slices of
broiled tomato and brown Mushroom Sauce.


Broiled Fillets of Beef with Oysters

Broil steak according to receipt; place on hot platter; sprinkle with
salt and pepper; cover with oysters; dot with butter; and bake in oven
until edges of oysters curl. Serve immediately, garnished with parsley
and lemon.


Sautéd Fillet of Beef

Sauté steak two minutes. Mix two tablespoons Worcestershire sauce, one
half teaspoon salt, one quarter teaspoon mustard, one tablespoon melted
butter, and one tablespoon chopped pimolas. Spread on both sides of
steak, dip in bread crumbs, and sauté until crumbs are brown.


Corned Beef

Wash beef; place in kettle; cover with cold water; bring to the boiling
point, then simmer until tender; allow thirty-five minutes for each
pound. Cool partially in water in which it was cooked; place in square
pan; apply pressure and serve cold.


Corned Beef Hash

Chop beef; add an equal amount of cold boiled potatoes, chopped; season
with salt, pepper and a few drops of onion juice.

Melt one tablespoon butter in an iron frying pan; add beef and potatoes
and sufficient milk or hot water to make the mixture quite soft. Cover
frying pan and cook slowly until a brown crust is formed. Turn like an
omelet on to a hot platter. Garnish with parsley.


Roast Beef

Pieces used for roasting are sirloin, rib, back of the rump, face of
the rump, and upper round.

Eight to ten minutes a pound should be allowed for cooking the meat
moderately rare.

Wipe the meat; place on rack in dripping pan; dredge meat and pan well
with flour, then sprinkle well with salt and pepper.

Cook in hot oven for fifteen minutes, until flour is well browned.
Reduce heat and continue roasting, basting every ten minutes until
cooked.

Baste with fat tried out from the meat. If that is not sufficient, add
beef suet, beef drippings, or butter.

Avoid the use of water in the pan, as by its use the meat is steamed
rather than roasted.

Serve with brown gravy, made by browning four tablespoons of fat from
the pan, adding four tablespoons flour. When brown, add one and one
half cups water or beef stock and cook five minutes.


Yorkshire Pudding

    2 cups milk
    2 cups flour
    ½ teaspoon salt
    4 eggs

Beat eggs; add flour and salt, gradually; continue beating. Add milk
and continue beating five minutes. The mixture should be perfectly
smooth. One half hour before meat is done, pour this mixture into
dripping pan under meat and baste when basting meat, turning pan that
pudding may be golden brown throughout.

Yorkshire pudding cooked in this way is considered by many to be too
rich. A very good substitute is obtained by cooking in hissing hot gem
pans, thirty minutes.

Serve pudding, cut in squares, on platter around beef.


Spiced Beef

Wash and wipe six pounds of any inexpensive piece of beef; cover with
boiling water; bring to the boiling point, then simmer until meat is
tender, adding, the last hour of cooking, one cup each of carrot and
onions, a bouquet of sweet herbs tied in a bag, pepper, and one half
tablespoon salt. Remove meat and reduce liquid to one and one half cups.

Shred meat, add liquid, and press in bread pan, packing closely. When
cold serve in thin slices.


Stewed Beef

Cut beef taken from the round in small squares; cover with boiling
water, and simmer until meat is tender, four or six hours. Season
with salt and pepper one hour before serving. Remove meat and thicken
liquid, allowing one and one half tablespoons of flour for each pint of
liquid.


Pot Roast

Wipe a six-pound piece of beef; put into hot frying pan, and sear until
brown; then lard the upper surface. Place in tightly covered kettle
or bean pot; add one cup of water. Cook slowly in oven until meat is
tender, keeping only enough water in kettle to prevent burning. When
nearly done, sprinkle with salt and pepper. Serve with a Brown Gravy
made with water in the pan.


Beef Ragoût

Wipe three pounds from the flank or round. Cut into small cubes; dredge
with salt, pepper and flour. Brown meat in hot frying pan, being
careful to avoid burning.

Remove meat to kettle with close-fitting cover. Brown four tablespoons
butter; add four tablespoons flour, and continue browning; add one and
one half cups stock or water, one half cup each of carrot and onion;
season with salt and pepper and simmer one and one half hours.


Broiled Beefsteak

Use a slice cut from the rump, round, or sirloin, cut one and one half
inches to two and a half inches thick. Wipe meat; place on hot broiler,
and broil over a clear fire from five to ten minutes, turning every ten
seconds. Serve on a hot platter, spread with butter, and season with
salt and pepper.

If there is a large amount of fat on the steak, be sure it is well
browned before serving.


Beefsteak smothered in Onions

    1 dozen small onions
    1 slice porterhouse steak, cut thick
    salt
    pepper

Heat a frying pan hissing hot. Put in beefsteak, searing first on
one side, then on the other; cook five minutes; season with salt and
pepper; add onions which have been cooked one half hour in boiling
salted water. Cover and simmer twenty or thirty minutes.

Remove steak to platter, spread with butter, and season with salt and
pepper. Season onions with salt, pepper, and butter, and serve around
steak.


Hamburg Steak à la Tartare

    1 pound round steak
    2 ounces beef suet
    ¼ cup chopped onion
    ¼ cup bread crumbs
    salt and pepper

Put meat and suet through meat chopper; add finely chopped onion, and
season with salt and pepper. Shape in balls; roll in crumbs, and broil
over a clear fire, or pan-broil. Serve on hot platter with brown gravy,
Tomato Sauce, or Spanish Sauce. Garnish with parsley.


VEAL


Roast Veal

Six pounds of veal taken from the leg, from the loin, or from the
breast.

Skewer meat into shape; dredge with flour, and sprinkle with salt and
pepper. Cover top with slices of salt pork. Allow twenty minutes to the
pound, bake in a hot oven, and baste every ten minutes with fat from
the pan. If there is not sufficient fat in the pan, try out some pork
on top of the stove and use that for basting.

Remove pork slices from top of meat one half hour before it is done,
and brown.

A gravy may be made from the fat in the pan, same as Brown Gravy.


Roast Veal Stuffed

Select a shoulder of veal and have the bone removed; stuff with same
stuffing used for Baked Fish, adding one cup chopped mushrooms. Sew up
stuffed meat and roast same as Roast Veal.


Veal Fricassee

Cut meat in small pieces, sauté in melted butter. Cover meat with
boiling water and cook slowly until meat is tender.

Melt four tablespoons butter or pork fat. When brown, add one fourth
cup flour browned, and four cups of water in which veal was cooked.
Season with salt, pepper, onion juice and lemon juice.

Just before serving add one fourth cup cream, or two tablespoons
butter.

Serve veal in center of hot platter and surround with hot sauce.
Garnish with parsley.

Dumplings may be served with this fricassee, in which case it is
ordinarily called a stew.


Veal Cutlets

Choose only the tenderest of veal for cutlets. Cut meat from leg, shape
either in individual cutlets or one large cutlet. Cover veal with oil
and let it stand one hour. Drain; cover with boiling water and simmer
until tender, having only sufficient water in stewpan to keep cutlets
from burning. Remove from stewpan; cool; sprinkle with salt and pepper,
dredge with flour, dip in egg and crumbs, and sauté in pork fat or fry
in deep fat.

Serve on hot platter with Brown Sauce, Tomato Sauce, or Mushroom Sauce.


Loin of Veal à la Jardinière

    a 6-pound loin of veal
    1 cup salt pork cubes
    1 cup potatoes
    1 cup carrots
    2 cups green peas
    1 cauliflower
    1 cup onion
    4 tablespoons butter
    4 tablespoons flour
    salt, pepper and lemon juice

Remove the bone from veal; wipe meat, and season with salt and pepper.
Roll and tie in shape.

Cook bones in water to cover, one hour. Melt butter; add vegetables,
except potatoes, peas and cauliflower; cook five minutes. Try out salt
pork; add veal, and brown.

Place veal in dripping pan; surround with pork fat, onion and carrot,
and cook three hours. To the melted butter add flour. When well
blended, add water in which bones were cooked.

Season with salt, pepper and lemon juice. Cook cauliflower, peas and
potatoes separately in boiling salted water. Place cooked meat in
center of platter, pour over sauce, and arrange vegetables in mounds
around the meat.


Braised Veal

Use rule for Braised Beef, substituting six pounds of the shoulder of
veal.


Veal Chops

Wipe chops taken from the rack of veal; make an incision, and put
in a few drops of onion juice, lemon juice, salt and pepper. Dip in
flour, egg and crumbs, and sauté in pork fat until tender. Serve on hot
platter with Tomato Sauce and parsley.


MUTTON AND LAMB


Boiled Mutton

Trim off the outside fat from a fore quarter or loin. Place in kettle;
cover with boiling water and cook until tender, allowing fifteen
minutes to the pound. Serve with Caper Sauce made from the water in
which mutton was boiled. Reserve the remainder of the water for soup
for next day.


Roast Mutton

The leg, loin, saddle, and shoulder are used for roasting.

Allow twelve minutes to the pound, if liked rare, fifteen if desired
well done, basting every ten minutes.

To roast a leg of mutton, first remove the pink outer skin, as this
contains the strong flavor. Never roast with the caul left on. The bone
from the leg may be removed and the cavity stuffed and edges sewed;
or the leg may be roasted without removing bone. In either case wipe
meat, dredge with flour, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and place on
rack in dripping pan. Dredge pan with flour, and if the mutton flavor
is desired, place pieces of mutton fat in the pan, or salt pork may be
substituted.


Braised Mutton

Remove the bone from the leg or fore quarter. Stuff and follow rule for
Braised Beef.


Ragoût of Mutton

Use breast or fore quarter of mutton, or cold cooked mutton, and follow
receipt for Beef Ragoût.


Roast Saddle of Mutton

The saddle is what the name implies—the back. In large pieces the tail
is included.

Wipe meat; remove pink skin, kidneys and fat. Fold flanks inside and
tie in shape. Place on rack; dredge meat and pan with flour, and
sprinkle with salt and pepper. Cook in hot oven; allow ten minutes to
the pound basting frequently.

Serve with Currant Jelly Sauce.


Crown Roast

Or Rack of Mutton. Prepare the loin as for French chops and arrange
like a crown, rolling the loin backward. Tie securely. Cover each chop
bone with thin strip of salt pork to prevent burning. Place on rack in
dripping pan with a bowl in center of the crown to preserve its shape.
Dredge with flour, sprinkle with salt and pepper, basting frequently,
and allowing nine minutes to the pound for roasting.

Serve on hot platter, with potato balls, green peas, French fried
potatoes, or purée of chestnuts in center of crown. Paper frills on
chop bones and parsley around the base.


Breaded Lamb or Mutton Chops

Prepare loin or French chops as for broiling. Dip in crumbs, egg and
crumbs and fry in deep fat. Drain on brown paper and serve.


Stuffed Lamb or Mutton Chop, with Spanish Sauce

Prepare French chops. Cut through meat to the bone, making a pocket;
fill pocket with Mushroom Mixture; close with skewer; and broil.


Mushroom Mixture

Melt two tablespoons butter, add two tablespoons flour, one tablespoon
finely chopped onion, one half cup chopped mushrooms, one teaspoon
salt, and cream to make of consistency to shape. This is sufficient to
stuff eight chops.


Lamb Chops with Soubise Sauce

Prepare eight French chops. Sprinkle with salt and pepper, spread with
Soubise Sauce, and broil.


Soubise Sauce

Melt two tablespoons butter; add two tablespoons flour, one half
teaspoon salt, three small onions which have been boiled and pressed
through a sieve, a dash of cayenne, and sufficient cream to make of
consistency to spread.


Baked Chops Soubise

Prepare as for Broiled Chops with Soubise Sauce; dip in buttered
crumbs; wrap in buttered paper cases. Bake thirty minutes in hot oven.
Serve with Tomato or Olive Sauce.


Lamb or Mutton Chops

Wipe chops, shape, place on broiler, and cook over a clear fire,
turning every ten seconds, allowing eight minutes for chops cut one
inch thick.

Serve on hot platter. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and spread with
butter.

Arrange chops in circle, overlapping each other, or around a mound of
vegetables.


Broiled French Chops

Lamb or mutton chops trimmed of superfluous fat, the bones scraped and
cut uniformly, are called French Chops. Broil like Lamb or Mutton Chops.


Broiled Loin Chops

Trim loin chops, skewer in rounds, and proceed as with Broiled French
Chops.


Pan-broiled Chops

Prepare as for Broiled Chops. Heat frying pan hissing hot; place chops
in pan. Do not grease pan. Sear one side and then the other, and
continue turning every ten seconds, for five minutes if liked rare, and
eight minutes if liked well done.


PORK


Roast Pork

Select sparerib, loin, or shoulder for roasting. Wipe meat; place on
pan; dredge meat and pan with flour. Sprinkle with salt and pepper.

Bake in a moderate oven, allowing twenty-five minutes to the pound.

Serve with cooked apples in some form—Apple Sauce, Apple Jelly, or
Fried Apples.


Roast Little Pig

Clean, wipe, and stuff a three-weeks-old pig. Skewer into shape; place
on rack in pan; rub with butter, dredge with flour, and sprinkle with
salt and pepper.

Place in moderate oven; when heated through increase heat, baste
every ten minutes with melted butter, turning often to cook and brown
uniformly.

Cook from three to four hours, according to size of pig. Serve on hot
platter on a bed of parsley. Garnish with Apple Sauce in red apple
shells, lemon and parsley.


Broiled Pork Chops

For broiling, chops should be cut very thin and broiled at least
fifteen minutes, holding the broiler some distance from coals, to avoid
burning.


Baked Pork Chops

Prepare as for Broiled Pork Chops and cook in hot oven twenty minutes,
turning when half cooked.


Sautéd Pork Chops

Cook chops in hissing hot frying pan in small amount of fat. Drain and
serve.


Broiled Ham

Cut ham very thin, cover with cold water, heat slowly to the boiling
point. Drain, dry, and broil.


Boiled Ham

Select a medium-sized ham; soak over night in cold water. Clean and
wipe; cover with cold water; bring to the boiling point, and then
simmer until tender, allowing thirty minutes to the pound. Cool in
water in which it was cooked. Take off the skin, sprinkle with sugar,
and cover with seasoned cracker crumbs. Bake twenty to thirty minutes.
Decorate with cloves, garnish with parsley and lemon, and serve hot or
cold.

A more aromatic flavor is given to the ham if a bouquet of sweet herbs
and one half cup each of onions, carrots, and turnips are boiled with
it. Many baste the ham, when baking, with cider.


Broiled Bacon

Lay thin slices of bacon on a hissing hot frying pan. When transparent,
turn. When dry and crisp, drain and dry on brown paper.


Bacon cooked in the Oven

Place thin slices on broiler and cook over dripping pan in hot oven.
This method requires more time, but is much more wholesome.


Sausages

Buy the best. Pierce several times with skewer. Cook in hot frying pan
in hot oven, fifteen to twenty minutes. Many prefer to cover sausages
with boiling water after piercing and boil twenty minutes, then brown
in frying pan on top of range. Always drain on brown paper before
serving. Serve around a mound of mashed browned potatoes.


POULTRY


Boiled Chicken

Clean, stuff, truss, and wrap chicken in cheese cloth; cover with
boiling water, and cook until tender, below the boiling point. Serve
on hot platter, sprinkle with chopped parsley, and garnish with Oyster
Sauce.

Allow twenty minutes to the pound for cooking.


Braised Chicken

Braised chicken is generally a fowl.

Wipe, stuff, sew, skewer, and place on rack in kettle with
tight-fitting cover.

Place six slices of salt pork on bottom of kettle, add one fourth cup
each, carrot, onion, turnip, and celery, bit of bay leaf, sprig of
parsley, one teaspoon peppercorns, two teaspoons salt, and three cups
boiling water.

Cover kettle, and cook in oven three to four hours, always keeping
enough water in kettle to prevent vegetables from burning. When fowl is
tender, brush over with melted butter, dredge with flour, and brown in
oven.

Serve with gravy and vegetables pressed through sieve. Garnish with
parsley.


Broiled Chicken

Clean, wipe, and split down the back, a young chicken. Sprinkle with
salt and pepper; place on greased broiler, and cook over dripping pan
in hot oven twenty minutes. Remove from oven, and broil over clear fire
until golden brown. Remove from broiler, spread with melted butter,
sprinkle with chopped parsley, and serve on hot platter on bed of water
cress.


Sautéd Chicken

Cut chicken in pieces for serving. Dip in water, sprinkle with salt
and pepper, dredge with flour. Try out two tablespoons salt pork
cubes. Cover bottom of frying pan with pieces of chicken. Cook until a
delicate brown on one side, then turn and brown on the other. Drain on
brown paper.

Take three tablespoons of fat from the pan, brown, add three
tablespoons flour and brown, add one fourth teaspoon each of salt,
nutmeg and paprika, and a cup and a quarter of cream. Cook five
minutes, pour around chicken, and garnish with parsley and toast points.


Fried Chicken

Cut chicken in pieces for serving; dip in milk, sprinkle with salt and
pepper, dip in flour or in crumbs, egg and crumbs, and fry in deep fat.
Drain on brown paper; serve on slices of buttered toast with Béchamel
Sauce, Allemande, or Mushroom Sauce.


Baltimore Chicken

Cut chicken in pieces for serving; sprinkle with salt and pepper, dip
in egg, and crumbs taken from the center of the loaf; arrange in baking
dish, baste with melted butter, and cook in hot oven twenty to thirty
minutes.

Arrange on a hot platter; garnish with thin slices of crisp bacon,
parsley and Cream Sauce.


Chicken fried in Batter

Cut chicken in pieces for serving, cover with Fritter Batter, and cook
in deep fat. Drain on brown paper. In order that chicken in batter be
cooked sufficiently, the bird must be young and tender.

Cold chicken meat may be dipped in the same batter and fried.


Creole Chicken

Cut a chicken in pieces for serving; season with salt and pepper. Melt
four tablespoons butter, add one fourth cup finely chopped onion,
chicken, and sauté until golden brown. Remove chicken; add four
tablespoons flour, two cups chicken stock, two cups stewed tomato, one
red pepper finely chopped, one half cup celery, and salt to taste.
Replace chicken in sauce, and simmer until tender.

Arrange on dish; surround with sauce; garnish with cooked macaroni and
parsley.


Chicken Fricassee

Cut chicken in pieces for serving, season with salt and pepper, brown
in butter or pork fat. When golden brown cover with boiling water; add
six cloves, a bit of bay leaf, a sprig of parsley, and simmer until
tender.

Melt four tablespoons butter, add four tablespoons flour, and two and
one half cups water in which chicken was cooked. Cook ten minutes; add
one cup cream or two egg yolks.

Arrange chicken on platter, pour sauce around, and garnish with toast
and parsley.

If a brown sauce is preferred, brown the butter and brown the flour,
adding one more tablespoon.


Chicken Pie

Cut a chicken in pieces for serving. Melt four tablespoons butter or
use the same quantity of pork fat. Add one fourth cup onion, a sprig of
parsley, bit of bay leaf, four cloves and one tablespoon salt.

Put in chicken and cover with boiling water; cook until tender. Arrange
chicken in baking dish; cover with strained and thickened stock. Cover
whole dish with mashed potato or pastry crust. Bake until potato is
brown or crust is done.


Old-fashioned English Chicken Pie

Cover chicken, cut in pieces for serving, with boiling water, add two
sprigs of thyme, one sprig of marjoram, bit of bay leaf, two sprigs
parsley, tied in a bag. Simmer gently until tender.

One half hour before chicken is done, add one half pound bacon cut in
small pieces.

Arrange on the bottom of baking dish slices of hard-cooked eggs, cover
with sautéd mushrooms, then a layer of chicken meat, and continue until
dish is filled. Add three cups of sauce made from the liquor in the pan
and thickened with two tablespoons butter and four tablespoons flour
cooked together; reheat in oven, and garnish with pastry points cut in
the shape of triangles, and parsley, and serve.


Roast Boned Chicken

Bone according to direction for boning chicken. Stuff until plump with
forcemeat, sew, press body into natural shape, truss, sprinkle with
salt and pepper, dredge with flour, and follow directions for Roast
Chicken, allowing twenty minutes for each pound.


Roast Chicken

Remove pinfeathers, singe, take out tendons, draw skin back from neck,
cut off neck close to body, cut out oil bag. Make an incision between
the legs, running from the breastbone down, and through this opening
draw the entrails.

If care is taken, all of the internal organs can be removed at once by
separating the membrane inclosing the organs from the body.

Draw windpipe and crop through the neck opening. Never make an incision
in the breast.

Wash inside of bird with cloth wrung out of cold water, removing all
clots of blood. Wipe, stuff, sew up openings, truss, sprinkle with salt
and pepper, dredge with flour, place on rack in dripping pan, and cook
fifteen minutes in very hot oven. Then dredge pan with flour, reduce
heat, and baste every ten minutes until chicken is done, turning often.

Allow fifteen minutes to the pound for roasting.


Roast Capon

Prepare the same as Roast Chicken, allowing twelve minutes to the pound
for roasting.


Stuffing for Roast Chicken

    2 cups soft bread crumbs
    ¼ cup melted butter
    1 tablespoon poultry seasoning
    few drops onion juice
    salt and pepper
    1 teaspoon chopped parsley
    hot water

Mix ingredients in order given. If a moist stuffing is desired, add hot
water until of the right consistency; but many prefer a dry stuffing.
For a stronger flavor of onion, cook one tablespoon chopped onion in
butter and add to crumbs.


Chestnut Stuffing

Press meat from one quart boiled chestnuts through purée sieve. Moisten
with butter, and season with salt and pepper.


Oyster Stuffing

    2 cups cracker crumbs
    1 tablespoon chopped onion
    1 pint oysters
    ¼ cup butter
    1 tablespoon salt
    1 teaspoon pepper
    1 tablespoon chopped celery
    ⅓ cup boiling water or hot milk

Parboil oysters, dip in melted butter, add remaining ingredients, and
use for stuffing chicken, turkey, or goose.


Potato Stuffing

    2 cups hot mashed potato
    ¼ cup salt pork cubes
    2 tablespoons onion
    1 teaspoon poultry seasoning
    salt and pepper
    1 cup cooked sausages cut in pieces

Cook the onion and the pork until yellow; add remaining ingredients.
Use for stuffing chicken, turkey and goose.


Roast Green Goose

A green goose should never be more than four months old. Dress same
as chicken. If strong, wash out with soapsuds, and carefully rinse in
several waters.

Stuff, truss, sew, flatten the breastbone, and roast the same as
chicken. Allow eighteen minutes to the pound for roasting.

If the goose is more than four months old, it is better to braise than
roast it. But if roasted, allow twenty-five minutes to the pound.


Roast Tame Duck

Prepare same as chicken; stuff with chopped celery. Allow ten minutes
to the pound for duckling and twenty for an old duck.


Roast Turkey

Dress, clean, and stuff turkey and follow directions for Roast Chicken.
Some prefer to rub the surface of the turkey with butter and flour
creamed together instead of dredging with flour.


English Roast Turkey

STUFFING

Melt two tablespoons butter, add one tablespoon chopped onion, three
cups soft bread crumbs, chopped liver and heart, one teaspoon salt, one
teaspoon poultry seasoning, one tablespoon chopped pickles, and one
quarter teaspoon pepper.

Prepare turkey for roasting; stuff, sew, truss. Bake in hot oven,
allowing fifteen minutes to the pound. Baste frequently. Dredge and
season twice during cooking.


Boned Turkey

Boned Turkey is prepared in the same way as Boned Chicken.


GAME


_WILD DUCK_


Roasted Canvasback or Redhead

The heads of wild duck are usually left on when cooked. Make a slit
in front of the wishbone. Clean the bird; remove entrails, crop and
windpipe; draw the head through the neck opening. Truss, sprinkle with
salt and pepper inside and outside. Bake in a very hot oven eighteen
to twenty minutes, basting with hot water during cooking. If the strong
flavor of wild duck is objectionable, cook an onion or an apple in the
cavity, removing it before serving.

Serve with the wild duck, fried crescents of rice or hominy and Currant
Jelly.

Ruddy Duck, Butterballs, Bluebills, Broadbills, Teals, Coot, Grouse,
Partridge, Prairie Chicken, Quail, Woodcock, Reedbirds and Pheasants
are roasted in the same way as Wild Duck, or are broiled the same
as Broiled Chicken. The small birds are usually served on pieces of
buttered toast and garnished with water cress, parsley and a highly
seasoned sauce.


Potted Pigeon

Truss four pigeons, tie two slices of bacon around each pigeon. Put one
cup each of carrot and onion, cut in dice, in the bottom of a stewpan;
place pigeons on vegetables; add two cups water or stock, cover, and
cook in oven until pigeons are tender. One half hour before serving add
one teaspoon salt. Serve on buttered toast.


Roast Venison

Lard a saddle of venison, sprinkle with salt and pepper, dredge with
flour. Place in dripping pan and baste with melted butter. Allow ten
minutes to the pound for roasting. Serve with Madeira or Currant Jelly
Sauce.


Venison Steak or Chops

Broiled or pan-broiled same as beefsteak or lamb chops, and serve with
some acid sauce.



CHAPTER V

VEGETABLES


ALL green vegetables should be washed in cold water and cooked in
boiling water. Salt may be added first or last according to preference.
Allow one tablespoon salt to each quart of water.

The time required for cooking depends upon the age and freshness of the
vegetables.


Time Table for boiling Vegetables

    Artichokes                    45 to 60 minutes
    Asparagus, young              15 to 20 minutes
    Asparagus, old                30 to 50 minutes
    Beans, fresh                  1 to 2 hours
    Beans, dried                  2 to 4 hours
    Beets, young                  60 minutes
    Beets, old                    3 to 5 hours
    Brussels sprouts              15 to 20 minutes
    Cabbage, young                30 minutes
    Cabbage, old                  2 to 3 hours
    Carrots, young                30 minutes
    Carrots, old                  1 to 2 hours
    Cauliflower                   30 to 60 minutes
    Corn                          5 to 20 minutes
    Dandelions                    2 to 3 hours
    Onions                        60 to 90 minutes
    Parsnips                      1 to 2 hours
    Peas                          20 to 40 minutes
    Potatoes                      30 minutes
    Salsify                       30 to 60 minutes
    Squash, summer                20 to 60 minutes
    Squash, winter                60 to 90 minutes
    Spinach and other greens      20 to 60 minutes
    Sweet potatoes                30 to 60 minutes
    Turnips                       40 to 60 minutes


Globe Artichokes

Soak in cold water. Remove lower leaves and cut ends of others. Cook in
boiling salted water forty-five minutes or until the leaves pull out.
Drain. Serve with Béchamel or Hollandaise Sauce or with Drawn Butter.


Scalloped Globe Artichokes

    2 cups chopped artichokes
    2 cups White Sauce
    1 cup buttered crumbs

Arrange in a scallop dish and bake until crumbs are brown.


Jerusalem Artichokes

Wash and scrub. Cook in boiling salted water. Serve with melted butter
or White Sauce. They may be marinated with French Dressing and served
cold.


Asparagus

Wash stalks, snap off all white tough part. Tie in bunch. Cook in deep
kettle of boiling salted water. Stand bunch upright for the first ten
minutes. Cook twenty to thirty minutes. Drain. Serve on buttered toast,
spread with butter, and sprinkle with salt and pepper. White Sauce or
Hollandaise may be served.

The asparagus may be broken in inch pieces, cooked until tender, mixed
with White Sauce, and served on toast.


Shelled Beans

Cook in boiling water until tender. Add salt after the first hour. Time
of cooking depends upon age of beans. Drain. Serve with butter or cream
or White Sauce. Lima, kidney, or agricultural beans may be cooked in
this way.


String Beans

Remove all strings. Cut in inch pieces. Wash, cook in boiling water
fifteen minutes. Add salt and cook until tender. Drain, add butter,
salt and pepper. A piece of salt pork cooked with beans is considered
by many an improvement.


Brussels Sprouts and Cabbage

Remove outside leaves and soak in cold water for half an hour. Drain.
Cook in boiling salted water until tender, changing the water at least
once during cooking. Serve Brussels sprouts whole with butter and salt
or with White Sauce. Chop the cabbage when cooked, season with salt,
pepper and butter, reheat and serve, or mix one cup cabbage with one
cup White Sauce, cover with buttered crumbs and bake until brown.


Kohl Slaw

Shred cabbage finely. Soak in acidulated water. Drain, and cover with
Cream Dressing. Serve very cold.


Beets

Scrub beets, but do not break skin. Cook in boiling water—young beets
about an hour, old beets until tender. Slip skins off as soon as taken
from stove. Serve hot with butter, salt and pepper. Serve cold beets
for garnishing Potato Salad.


Carrots

Wash, scrub, and scrape. Cook in boiling salted water. Drain, cut in
slices, and serve with White Sauce; or they may be cut lengthwise and
sautéd in butter.


Cauliflower

Cut stalk close to flower, remove green leaves and soak in cold salted
water one hour. Cook in cheese cloth bag thirty to forty minutes.
Remove from bag and serve with Hollandaise or White Sauce, or scalloped
with White Sauce and crumbs.


Celery

Celery is usually eaten raw as a relish. Or it may be scraped, cut
in inch pieces, cooked until tender, and served in a White Sauce, or
drained and fried in deep fat. It may also be scalloped with chopped
red pepper, White Sauce and crumbs.


Cucumbers

Generally served sliced thinly and eaten raw. But if too old to serve
in this way, they may be pared, cut in quarters, boiled, drained,
mashed, and seasoned with salt and pepper.

Or they may be cut in quarters, dipped in batter, and fried in deep fat.


Corn

Remove husks and silk. Cook in a small amount of water from five to
twenty minutes. Cover while cooking with the inside green husks. Serve
on the cob; or cut from the cob and serve with salt, pepper and butter.

Corn may be made into fritters (see receipt) or mixed with beans for
succotash. Also served as pudding mixed with eggs and milk.


Greens

Beet tops, dandelions, spinach, Swiss chard, young cabbage sprouts,
cowslips, may all be prepared in the same way. Wash in many waters
until all grit and sand are removed. Cook in boiling salted water until
tender. Drain, chop, and serve with butter and salt. Lettuce may also
be cooked and served in this way. Garnish greens with hard-cooked eggs.


Egg Plant

Cut in slices one half inch thick. Remove skin, sprinkle with salt,
pile slices one on another, cover with plate and weight, let stand over
night. Drain, wash in cold water. Dry, dip in crumbs, egg and crumbs,
or in batter, and fry in deep fat.


Lentils

Soak over night and cook in boiling water until tender. Mash, season
with salt, pepper and butter, and serve; or make in balls and sauté in
butter.


Okra

Wash, cut off ends of pods, cover with boiling salted water, and cook
until tender. Season with butter, salt and pepper. Okra is more often
stewed or scalloped with tomato than served plain.


Onions

Peel, cover with boiling salted water. Change water every ten minutes
until tender. Drain, and add milk to cover. Reheat, season with butter,
salt and pepper; or serve with White Sauce; or scallop with White Sauce
and crumbs; or stuff. When boiled, remove hearts, and fill the space
with finely chopped peppers. Surround with White Sauce. Bake, and baste
with butter.


Salsify, or Oyster Plant

Scrape, wash, and cook until tender. Drain, mash, season, and sauté in
butter; or cut in inch lengths, dip in Fritter Batter, and fry in deep
fat.


Parsnips

Wash, scrape, and cook in boiling salted water until tender. Cut in
halves, spread with salt and butter, and serve hot; or mash, season,
and sauté in butter.


Stuffed Peppers

See receipts under head of Vegetable Entrées.


Boiled Macaroni

Break in inch pieces and wash. Cook in boiling salted water until
tender. Drain, season with salt, pepper and butter, and serve hot.


Macaroni with Sauce

Prepare as for Boiled Macaroni. Drain, and reheat in Cream Sauce,
Tomato Sauce, or Béchamel Sauce.


Baked Macaroni

Prepare boiled macaroni. Drain, arrange in layers in a buttered baking
dish with White Sauce and cheese. Cover with buttered crumbs, and bake
until crumbs are brown.


Macaroni Baked with Tomatoes

Arrange layers of cooked macaroni, stewed and seasoned tomato, and
chopped green pepper. Dot each layer with butter. Cover all with
buttered cracker crumbs. Bake in hot oven.


Boiled Rice

Wash one cup rice and drain. Fill a four-quart saucepan one half full
of boiling salted water. Place on hottest part of range. When boiling
rapidly, sprinkle in the rice slowly, not to stop the boiling. Cook
until tender, adding more water if needed. Drain in a colander, and
place in the open oven to dry.

Rice cooked in this way will have every grain separate.


Summer Squash

Wash and cut in quarters. Cook in boiling salted water until tender.
Drain in cheese cloth. Add butter, salt and pepper. Reheat and serve.


Winter Squash

Cut squash, remove seeds, and steam or boil until soft. Remove squash
from shell. Add butter, salt and pepper. Reheat and serve.


Baked Squash

Cut in pieces for serving. Remove seeds and stringy portion, brush with
molasses, season with salt and pepper. Bake until soft, add butter, and
serve in shell.


Broiled Tomatoes

Cut tomatoes in halves. Sprinkle each half with salt, pepper and fine
bread crumbs, and broil five minutes. Slip on to hot platter, dot with
butter, place in the oven for five minutes. Serve hot.


Fried Tomatoes

Cut tomatoes in quarters lengthwise; season with salt and pepper, dip
in batter, and fry in deep fat.


Sautéd Tomatoes

Slice tomatoes; season with salt and pepper. Dip in crumbs, egg and
crumbs, and sauté in hot frying pan. Serve on hot buttered toast.


Scalloped Tomatoes

Arrange in layers canned tomatoes and bread cut in cubes, sprinkle each
layer with salt and pepper, dot with butter. Bake one half hour. For
variety rub dish with onion before putting in tomato.


Stuffed Tomato

Cut a thin slice from smooth end of tomatoes. Scoop out pulp, mix with
an equal quantity of cold cooked rice, macaroni, or bread crumbs. Add
salt, pepper, butter and a few drops of onion juice. Refill tomato
shells, cover with tops, and bake one half hour.


Peas

Cook peas in boiling water. Use just enough water to keep them from
burning. Add salt fifteen minutes before taking them from the fire.
Season with butter and pepper.

Peas may be used for croquettes or may be used with White Sauce and
served in Croustade Cases.

Equal quantities of chopped carrots and peas served together are
delicious.


Turnips in White Sauce

Wash and pare; cut in pieces. Cook, mash, and season; or cut in cubes,
cook in boiling salted water until tender, and serve in White Sauce.


Boiled Potatoes

Potatoes may be boiled with skins on, or may be pared and boiled in
salted water. Old potatoes should be soaked in cold water at least an
hour. Potatoes should be boiled gently and not furiously.

When tender, drain thoroughly, dry on back of range. Shake saucepan,
cover with coarse towel until ready to serve.

Serve in open vegetable dish, never in a closed one.


Mashed Potatoes

Cook potatoes in boiling salted water. Drain, mash. To each cup of
mashed potato, allow one tablespoon butter, one half teaspoon salt, one
eighth teaspoon pepper, and hot milk to make of creamy consistency.
Beat with a fork until light.


Potato Balls

Add to one pint hot mashed potatoes, one eighth teaspoon celery salt,
one teaspoon chopped parsley, salt, pepper, and butter to taste, and
enough hot milk to make of consistency to shape. Form into smooth round
balls, bake in hot buttered pan; or sauté in butter; or fry in deep
fat. Or they may be sautéd in sausage fat, which gives an appetizing
flavor.


Creamed Potatoes

Cut two cups cold boiled potatoes in very thin slices, or in cubes. Add
one cup White Sauce. Season highly and reheat in double boiler. Serve
in hot dish sprinkled with finely chopped parsley.


Stewed Potatoes

Mix two cups potato cubes with two tablespoons butter, two cups milk,
salt and pepper.

Dredge with two tablespoons flour and cook twenty minutes in double
boiler.


Scalloped Potatoes

Mix two cups potato cubes with two cups White Sauce, cover with
buttered bread crumbs, and bake thirty minutes in hot oven. A few drops
onion juice may be added.


Lyonnaise Potatoes

Melt two tablespoons butter. Add one tablespoon finely chopped onion.
When onion is yellow, add two cups potato cubes. Season with salt and
pepper, cook until potatoes are heated through, and sprinkle with
finely chopped parsley, and serve.


French Fried Potatoes

Pare small raw potatoes, divide in halves, and cut each half in three
pieces; cover with boiling water and let stand three minutes. Drain
dry between cloths, and cook in frying basket in hot fat ten minutes.
Drain, sprinkle with salt, and serve.


Potato Chips

Slice raw potatoes, cover with cold water, and let soak over night.
Drain dry between towels and fry in frying basket in hot fat about ten
minutes. Drain and sprinkle with salt. Care must be used when lowering
the basket into the hot fat, as the potatoes contain so much water it
causes violent ebullition.


Potato Puff

Prepare two cups hot mashed potato. Add one half cup milk, two
well-beaten yolks, two tablespoons butter. Salt and pepper to taste.
Beat well; add beaten whites of two eggs. Pile lightly in buttered
baking dish and bake until puffed and brown.


Hashed Brown Potatoes

Sprinkle two cups cold boiled potato cubes with salt and pepper. Melt
one tablespoon butter; add one tablespoon flour and one half cup brown
stock. Cook five minutes; add potato cubes; cook ten minutes, stirring,
without breaking potatoes. Melt one tablespoon butter in another frying
pan. When brown, turn in potatoes, spread evenly, and cook ten minutes;
fold like an omelet, and serve hot.


Stuffed Potatoes

Bake six potatoes. When done, cut a lengthwise slice; scoop out the
potato with a spoon. Mash; add one tablespoon butter, salt, pepper,
one half cup milk, and two egg-whites beaten stiff. Refill skins with
this mixture. Pile lightly, do not smooth, and bake until potatoes are
puffed and brown.


French Potato Balls

Cut two cups of potato balls with French potato cutter. Parboil ten
minutes, drain, and fry in deep fat.


Potatoes à la Maître d’Hôtel

Cook two cups potato balls in boiling water until tender. Drain, and
serve with Maître d’Hôtel Butter.


Italian Potatoes

Mix two cups hot mashed potatoes, one teaspoon onion juice, one
tablespoon finely chopped parsley, one egg yolk well beaten, four
stiffly beaten whites, one half cup grated cheese, and salt and pepper
to taste. Pile lightly in baking dish and bake until brown.


Franconia Potatoes

Pare six medium-sized potatoes; parboil five minutes. Place on grate
under roast beef. Baste with beef fat, and bake from twenty to thirty
minutes, turning often.


Baked Potatoes

Wash and scrub six potatoes of uniform size. Place in dripping pan,
and bake in hot oven forty-five minutes to one hour, turning when half
done. Pierce with skewer, and serve immediately.


Browned Sweet Potatoes

Cut cold boiled sweet potatoes in lengthwise slices, sprinkle with salt
and pepper. Brush with butter and sprinkle with brown sugar. Brown in
hot oven.


Southern Sweet Potatoes

Cut cold boiled sweet potatoes in lengthwise slices. Arrange in layers
in buttered baking dish. Cover each layer with brown sugar, dot with
butter, sprinkle with salt and pepper, add one cup boiling water, and
bake in hot oven.


Stewed Tomatoes

Wipe one quart tomatoes, plunge into boiling water, let stand two
minutes, remove skins. Cut in pieces. Cook slowly twenty to thirty
minutes. Season with butter, salt and pepper and cook five minutes
longer. A few drops of onion juice and one half cup crackers, added
when the seasonings are put in, give a variety.



CHAPTER VI

CEREALS


Suggestions for Cooking Cereals

MIX the cereal very gradually with the amount of boiling salted water,
and cook in double boiler until done. To hasten the cooking, cook in
single boiler or saucepan for the first part of the time, stirring
constantly to keep grain from sticking.

As a rule, cook steam-cooked cereals twice the time given on the
package.

Coarse cereals, like rice and hominy, should be cooked in a large
quantity of water, and stirred as little as possible.

Fine cereals, like wheatena, wheat germ, and others, are more easily
kept from lumping by first mixing them with a small amount of cold
water, and then adding to the boiling water.


Rolled Oats

    1 cup rolled oats
    1-¾ cups boiling water
    1 teaspoon salt

Mix all ingredients, and cook in double boiler thirty minutes to one
hour.


Old-fashioned Oatmeal

    1 cup oatmeal
    4 cups boiling water
    1½ teaspoons salt

Mix ingredients, and cook in double boiler six to eight hours.


Boiled Hominy No. 1

    1 cup hominy (fine)
    4 cups boiling water
    1½ teaspoons salt

Cook all ingredients, stirring occasionally, for one hour.


Boiled Hominy No. 2

    1 cup coarse hominy
    8 cups boiling water
    2 teaspoons salt

Mix ingredients and cook six to eight hours, or, instead of boiling,
cook in double boiler all day.


Cracked Wheat

    1 cup wheat
    5 cups boiling water
    1½ teaspoons salt

Mix ingredients and cook in double boiler from three to five hours.


Prepared Cereals

The receipts given on the packages for all prepared cereals may be
followed, doubling the amount of time given.


Boiled Rice No. 2

    1 cup rice
    2½ cups boiling water
    1 teaspoon salt

Salt water, add rice a few grains at a time, so as not to stop the
boiling, boil rapidly one half hour. When grains are tender, drain in
colander, and pour boiling water over rice to wash starch from grains.
Serve immediately.


Steamed Rice

    1 cup rice
    2½ cups boiling water
    1 teaspoon salt

Place rice in earthen dish, add salt and boiling water, and steam two
to three hours. Cooked in this way, every grain should be separate.


Corn Meal Mush

    1 cup corn meal
    4 cups boiling water
    1½ teaspoons salt

Salt water, add corn meal, a little at a time, until all is used, boil
five minutes, and cook in double boiler three hours.


Sautéd or Fried Corn Meal Mush

    1 cup corn meal
    ½ cup white flour
    4 cups boiling water
    2 teaspoons salt

Cook in the same way as Corn Meal Mush, pour while hot into greased
bread pan or baking powder box. When cold, slice and sauté in pork fat,
first on one side and then on the other; or fry in deep fat.



CHAPTER VII

EGGS


A FRESH egg sinks when immersed in water. A stale egg, owing to
evaporation which has taken place through the pores of the shell,
floats.


Soft-cooked Eggs No. 1

Place eggs in saucepan, cover with boiling water, and let them stand in
saucepan on the back of the range three minutes; in this way the white
and the yolk are slightly coagulated.


Soft-cooked Eggs No. 2

Fill saucepan one half full of boiling water; when boiling violently,
place eggs in gently with a tablespoon; when water bubbles, remove
saucepan from fire and let the eggs remain in water five minutes. Eggs
cooked in this way have the albumen delicately hardened throughout.


Soft-cooked Eggs No. 3

Place eggs in saucepan, cover with cold water, bring to the boiling
point, when they will be soft-cooked.


Hard-cooked Eggs

Cover eggs with boiling water and cook below the boiling point for
forty minutes. Remove from pan, cover with cold water, and wipe before
serving.


Baked Eggs

Butter baking dish or platter, or individual ramekin dishes. Break
each egg into a cup and drop into baking dish, sprinkle with salt and
pepper, and bake in a moderate oven—five minutes for soft-cooked and
ten for hard-cooked. Eggs are more delicately cooked if dish is placed
in a pan of hot water in the oven, and water kept below the boiling
point during cooking.

Chopped red or green pepper sprinkled over top of baked eggs is
delicious.


Poached Eggs

Break eggs in cup; butter muffin rings. Place in shallow pan and cover
with boiling water. Allow two teaspoons of salt to each pint of water.
Drop eggs into rings, and cook from five to eight minutes, keeping
water below the boiling point during cooking.

Remove the eggs on a buttered skimmer or pancake turner, and place on
a round of buttered toast, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and garnish
with parsley.


Fluffed Eggs

Beat the white until stiff; add a few grains of salt; place in a
buttered ramekin dish or saucer; put a piece of butter in center of
white, and place unbroken yolk on top. Set the egg dish in pan of
boiling water; cover and cook three minutes. Serve immediately.


Poached Eggs à la Française

Fill a saucepan three fourths full of boiling water; add salt and
vinegar, stir the boiling water vigorously with a spoon. Break egg in
cup and drop deftly into eddy formed by swift stirring of water. When
white is firm, remove with buttered skimmer, trim, and serve.


Poached Egg in Tomato

Cut a piece from the stem end of a tomato; remove pulp; set in ramekin
dish; sprinkle with salt and pepper, drop egg into tomato cup; cover
with buttered paper. Set in a pan of water and bake in a moderate oven
until firm.


Scrambled Eggs No. 1

    4 eggs
    4 tablespoons milk or cream
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    ⅛ teaspoon pepper
    1 teaspoon chopped parsley
    2 tablespoons butter

Beat egg slightly, enough to blend yolks and whites; add seasonings,
parsley and milk. Melt butter in frying pan, add egg mixture, and
cook slowly, lifting carefully with a spoon to keep mixture uniformly
delicate.


Scrambled Eggs No. 2

Prepare the same as Scrambled Eggs No. 1, beating yolks and whites
separately. Many persons have better success scrambling eggs in a
double boiler instead of in a frying pan.

Scrambled eggs can be varied in appearance and flavor by adding various
chopped meats, condiments, vegetables, cheese, or mushrooms.


Fried Eggs

Melt butter, bacon fat or pork fat in frying pan; when it bubbles, turn
in egg, which has been previously broken into a cup; when white is set,
baste with liquid fat. If desired hard, turn and cook on both sides.


Omelet

    2 eggs
    2 tablespoons hot water or hot milk
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    1 tablespoon butter

Beat eggs well; add salt and milk. Melt butter in frying pan; add egg
mixture; shake pan vigorously until egg begins to brown on under side;
then let it stand until golden brown, on part of range where it will
not burn. If moist on top, place in oven to dry. Separate omelet from
sides of pan with knife, and beginning at side near the handle, roll
omelet slowly and carefully into the shape of a jelly roll; turn on to
a hot platter, garnish, and serve.

Omelets may be varied in the following ways:—

_Bacon Omelet_, by adding finely chopped cooked bacon before folding.

_Cheese Omelet_, by adding grated cheese before folding.

_Creamed Salt Fish Omelet_, by combining creamed salt fish and finely
chopped red pepper, and adding to omelet before folding.

_Kidney Omelet_, by adding stewed kidneys, highly seasoned.

_Mushroom Omelet_, by adding mushrooms.

And continuing through a multiplicity of combinations.


Foamy Omelet

Same ingredients as for first omelet, beating yolks and whites
separately and combining ingredients in a way to produce a foamy
appearance before pouring into omelet pan.


Creamy Omelet

    4 eggs
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    ½ cup milk
    ⅛ teaspoon pepper
    2 tablespoons flour
    1 tablespoon butter

Melt butter; add flour, milk, and yolks of eggs, beaten until
lemon-colored and thick. Beat whites until stiff, cut, and fold into
first mixture; add seasonings; pour into buttered pan, and cook as
first omelet. Turn on to a hot platter; garnish with White Sauce, and
parsley.

    NOTE.—For a sweet omelet add one fourth cup sugar to
    the yolks of eggs of above omelet.


Goldenrod Eggs

    6 slices butter toast
    6 hard-cooked eggs
    2 cups White Sauce
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    few grains cayenne
    ⅛ teaspoon pepper

Remove shell from eggs; chop whites finely; add to White Sauce. Press
yolks through sieve and add seasonings. Pour White Sauce over toast
arranged on a platter, and garnish with yolks of eggs and parsley.

This dish may be very attractively arranged by placing spoonfuls of
finely chopped ham around the toast.


Stuffed Eggs

    6 eggs hard-cooked
    l cup White Sauce
    1 tablespoon chopped red pepper
    ½ cup finely minced chicken or other meat
    salt, pepper, Worcestershire sauce

Cut eggs in halves lengthwise, remove yolks, and mash. Add meat and
seasonings; moisten with White Sauce; press in shape of ball and return
to white. These eggs may be placed in a dish, covered with White Sauce
and buttered crumbs, and baked; or covered with a small square of
paraffine paper daintily twisted at the ends, for a picnic dish.


French Omelet

    2 eggs
    2 tablespoons hot water
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    few grains cayenne
    1 tablespoon butter

Melt butter in frying pan, add well-beaten eggs, to which seasonings
and hot water have been added. Cook on cool portion of range, lifting
mixture as for Scrambled Eggs. When creamy, pour into a hot buttered
frying pan, brown delicately, fold, and serve. Garnish with parsley.


German Omelet

    2 eggs
    1 yolk
    ¼ cup cream
    2 tablespoons flour
    salt, pepper, nutmeg
    ¼ cup finely chopped chives
    2 tablespoons butter
    1 tablespoon finely chopped red pepper

Mix eggs, flour, seasonings; add cream, and beat all five minutes.
Melt butter, pour in egg mixture, and cook until delicately browned
underneath. Turn, fold, and serve.


Spanish Omelet

Use receipt for French Omelet, and garnish with Spanish Sauce.


Spanish Sauce

Sauté two tablespoons each of chopped onion, green pepper, a clove of
garlic, in four tablespoons butter until yellow; add one cup of tomato.

Season with salt, pepper and cayenne, and cook until thick. One half
cup mushrooms sautéd with onions is an improvement.



CHAPTER VIII

SAUCES FOR MEAT AND VEGETABLES


White Sauce

    2 tablespoons butter
    2 tablespoons flour
    1 cup milk or white stock
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    few grains cayenne
    ¼ teaspoon pepper

Melt butter, add flour, seasonings and liquid. Stir until the boiling
point is reached. Boil five minutes, beating constantly.


Brown Sauce

    3 tablespoons butter
    4 tablespoons flour
    1 cup milk or brown stock
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    few grains pepper

Melt the butter and cook until brown, add flour and seasonings, and
stir until brown. Add liquid, little at a time, and boil five minutes,
stirring all of the time.


Allemande Sauce

Use same ingredients as for Velouté Sauce, adding the yolks of two eggs
and one teaspoon chopped parsley. Cook one minute.


Béchamel Sauce

    2 tablespoons butter
    2 tablespoons flour
    1 teaspoon chopped onion
    1 teaspoon chopped carrot
    bit of bay leaf
    ½ teaspoon salt
    ¼ teaspoon pepper
    1 cup white stock

Sauté vegetables in butter. Remove vegetables, add flour and remaining
ingredients, boil two minutes, and simmer ten minutes.

A richer sauce is made by adding one half cup cream.


Béarnaise Sauce

    4 egg yolks
    ½ teaspoon salt
    cayenne
    4 tablespoons oil or butter
    1 tablespoon tarragon vinegar
    1 tablespoon hot water
    1 teaspoon chopped parsley

Mix yolks and water; add butter and set in a dish of hot water; stir
constantly until mixture thickens; add seasonings and serve immediately.


Tomato Béarnaise Sauce

To Béarnaise Sauce add one fourth cup tomato purée.

Both Béarnaise and Tomato Béarnaise Sauces must be cooked at a low
temperature, otherwise the mixture will not be smooth. The sauce should
be creamy and of the consistency of Mayonnaise Dressing.


Bread Sauce

    2 tablespoons butter
    ½ cup bread crumbs
    2 tablespoons chopped onion
    3 cloves
    bit of bay leaf
    sprig of parsley
    ½ teaspoon salt
    ¼ teaspoon pepper
    1-¾ cups milk
    bit of mace

Scald milk with seasonings, cook twenty minutes, strain; add crumbs and
butter, cook twenty minutes, and serve with game.


Browned Bread Sauce

Use same rule as for Bread Sauce, adding one cup crumbs, which have
been sautéd a light brown in butter.


Black Butter Sauce

    4 tablespoons butter
    few grains cayenne
    1 tablespoon parsley
    2 tablespoons vinegar

Brown butter, add remaining ingredients. Heat and serve.


Caper Sauce

    2 tablespoons butter
    4 tablespoons flour
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    few drops onion juice
    few grains cayenne
    1½ cups boiling water
    ¼ cup capers
    1 tablespoon butter

Melt the two tablespoons butter, add flour, seasonings, and water. Cook
ten minutes; add capers and just before serving a tablespoon butter.


Celery Sauce

Use receipt for White Sauce, using instead of one cup of milk, one half
cup of milk and one half cup of water in which celery was cooked.

Add just before serving two cups of chopped celery which has been
boiled until tender.


Champagne Sauce

Add to Brown Sauce, one half cup of champagne and two tablespoons
finely chopped pimentoes.


Chestnut Sauce

    2 tablespoons butter
    2 tablespoons flour
    1 cup stock
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    ¼ teaspoon paprika
    1 cup mashed chestnuts

Melt butter; add flour and seasonings. When smooth, add stock; boil
five minutes; add chestnuts; reheat and serve.


Currant Jelly Sauce

To Brown Sauce add one half cup currant jelly, one teaspoon lemon juice
and a few drops onion juice. Boil five minutes and serve.


Curry Sauce

Add to White Sauce one tablespoon curry and a few drops of onion juice.
There is less liability of the curry lumping if blended with the flour
before adding to butter.


Cucumber Sauce

Grate two cucumbers to pulp; add one teaspoon salt, one fourth teaspoon
pepper, few grains cayenne, few drops onion juice, and two tablespoons
vinegar.


Egg Sauce

To White Sauce add two hard-cooked eggs finely chopped.


Yellow Egg Sauce

To White Sauce add few drops of onion juice and the yolks of three
eggs; salt and pepper if necessary.


Espagnole Sauce

Melt two tablespoons butter; add two tablespoons each of onion, celery,
ham, red pepper and parsley, three tablespoons flour, one half teaspoon
salt, few grains cayenne and two cups white stock. Cook one hour.
Strain, serve.


Hollandaise Sauce No. 1

    4 egg yolks
    ½ cup butter
    ½ teaspoon salt
    ¼ teaspoon pepper
    few grains cayenne
    ½ cup cold water
    2 tablespoons lemon juice

Put all ingredients, except the lemon juice, into a saucepan; set
saucepan into a larger one of hot water. Beat constantly until mixture
thickens, keeping water below the boiling point all the time. Add lemon
juice and serve immediately.


Hollandaise Sauce No. 2

    ½ cup butter
    1 tablespoon lemon juice
    4 egg yolks
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    ¼ teaspoon paprika
    few grains cayenne

Cream butter; add lemon juice, yolks of eggs, one by one. When well
blended add seasonings and cook over boiling water, just long enough to
thoroughly heat the mixture. Should the mixture become overcooked, add
two teaspoons cold water and beat vigorously.


Horse-radish Sauce

    ¼ cup freshly grated horse-radish
    ¼ cup soft bread crumbs
    ½ teaspoon salt
    1 cup White Sauce
    ¼ teaspoon paprika
    2 tablespoons lemon juice
    1 tablespoon vinegar

Mix horse-radish, bread crumbs, salt, paprika and White Sauce. When
hot, add lemon juice and vinegar.


Horse-radish Hollandaise

To Hollandaise Sauce add a few drops of onion juice and five
tablespoons grated horse-radish.


Lobster Sauce

To White Sauce add one half tablespoon lemon juice, one cup chopped
lobster meat, and the dried and pounded lobster coral.


Lobster Hollandaise

To Hollandaise Sauce add few gratings of nutmeg, one cup chopped
lobster meat, and the dried and pounded coral.


Madeira Sauce

    1 cup Brown Sauce
    1 teaspoon kitchen bouquet
    1 tablespoon chopped celery
    1 tablespoon chopped pimento
    4 tablespoons Madeira
    few grains cayenne

Combine all ingredients, except Madeira; simmer one half hour. Add
Madeira and serve.


Maître d’Hôtel Sauce

    3 tablespoons butter
    3 tablespoons lemon juice
    3 tablespoons parsley
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    ¼ teaspoon paprika
    cayenne

Cream the butter and add remaining ingredients.


Milanaise Sauce

    3 tablespoons butter
    3 tablespoons chopped mushrooms
    1 teaspoon anchovy paste
    salt
    1 tablespoon capers
    3 tablespoons flour
    1½ cups stock
    cayenne
    2 tablespoons wine

Cook mushrooms, capers and anchovy in butter five minutes. Add flour,
stock, seasonings, and simmer one half hour. Add wine and serve.


Mint Sauce

    1 bunch mint
    2 tablespoons sugar
    1 tablespoon lemon juice
    1 cup vinegar

Wash mint, remove leaves, and chop; add remaining ingredients; let it
stand one half hour. Serve hot or cold.


Mustard Sauce

    1 tablespoon butter
    2 tablespoons flour
    1 tablespoon French mustard
    1 tablespoon vinegar
    1 teaspoon salt
    ½ teaspoon sugar
    few grains cayenne
    1 cup stock

Melt butter; add flour, mustard, salt, sugar and cayenne. When well
blended, add stock, simmer twenty minutes, add vinegar, and serve.


Mushroom Sauce No. 1

    1 cup Brown Sauce
    ½ cup canned mushrooms
    1 egg yolk
    1 tablespoon butter
    1 teaspoon kitchen bouquet
    salt, pepper, cayenne

Chop mushrooms, sauté in butter, add egg yolk and kitchen bouquet; when
well blended add Brown Sauce. Reheat and serve, seasoning if necessary.


Mushroom Sauce No. 2

    1 cup White Sauce
    1 cup fresh mushrooms
    1 tablespoon mushroom catsup
    1 tablespoon butter
    1 teaspoon lemon juice
    1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
    ¼ teaspoon paprika
    1 tablespoon wine

Chop mushrooms and sauté in butter; add to White Sauce; cook ten
minutes. Add remaining ingredients and serve.


Olive Sauce

To Brown Sauce add one teaspoon chopped onion and one half cup stoned,
chopped and boiled olives.


Onion Sauce

To one cup White Sauce add one half cup cream and one cup boiled
onions, finely chopped. Simmer twenty minutes.


Orange Sauce

    2 tablespoons butter
    4 tablespoons flour
    1 teaspoon mustard
    ½ teaspoon salt
    ⅓ cup Port wine
    4 tablespoons Currant Jelly
    1 cup stock
    juice and grated rind of two oranges

Melt butter; add flour, mustard, salt, stock, cook ten minutes; add
Currant Jelly, cook five minutes; add orange juice, rind, and wine.
Serve when hot.


Orange Hollandaise

To Hollandaise Sauce add juice and rind of one orange and few grains of
cayenne.


Oyster Sauce

    2 tablespoons butter
    4 tablespoons flour
    1½ cups oyster liquor
    1 cup oysters
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    few grains cayenne

Parboil oysters; drain and reserve liquor. Make a White Sauce with
butter, flour, seasonings and oyster liquor; add chopped oysters and
serve. Should there not be sufficient oyster liquor make up amount with
milk.


Pepper Sauce

To Brown Sauce add two tablespoons chopped pepper, one tablespoon
chopped onion, or a clove of garlic, one teaspoon parsley, one teaspoon
Kitchen Bouquet. Simmer one half hour, strain and serve.


Piquante Sauce

    3 tablespoons butter
    4 tablespoons flour
    ½ teaspoon salt
    1½ cups Brown Stock
    ¼ teaspoon pepper
    1 tablespoon chopped chives
    1 tablespoon chopped olives
    1 tablespoon chopped pepper
    1 tablespoon chopped pickle
    1 tablespoon capers
    2 tablespoons vinegar

Brown the butter; add the flour; when browned, add stock. Cook chives,
capers, pickles, olives and pepper in vinegar five minutes. Add to
sauce and simmer twenty minutes.


Poulette Sauce

To White Sauce add one half cup cream; when boiling pour on to two egg
yolks slightly beaten, cook one minute; add one tablespoon butter, one
tablespoon chopped parsley, and two tablespoons lemon juice.


Port Sauce

To Brown Sauce add two tablespoons butter in which have been cooked one
tablespoon onion, one tablespoon Worcestershire Sauce, and one half cup
Port wine.


Ravigote Sauce

Melt four tablespoons butter; add one half cup onion. Add to one cup of
Béchamel Sauce, with one tablespoon each of minced and pounded chives,
tarragon, parsley and thyme. Strain and serve after reheating.


Sorrel Sauce

To Hollandaise Sauce add one cup washed and chopped sorrel.


Shrimp Sauce

    ½ cup butter
    ¼ cup flour
    1½ cups hot water
    1 teaspoon salt
    ⅛ teaspoon pepper
    2 egg yolks
    ½ cup shrimps

Melt butter; add flour. When well blended, add hot water, cook thirty
minutes; add seasonings and pour on to the slightly beaten yolks of
eggs; add shrimps broken in pieces and serve.


Sauce Suprême

To White Sauce made with white stock, add one half cup of cream, two
tablespoons butter, one teaspoon lemon juice. Cook twenty minutes and
add one fourth cup wine.


Soubise Sauce

To Hollandaise Sauce add one cup finely chopped cooked and seasoned
onion.


Sauce Tartare

To one cup of Mayonnaise Dressing add one tablespoon each of finely
chopped parsley, finely chopped olives, finely chopped pickle, and one
teaspoon finely chopped chives.


Tomato Sauce

    4 tablespoons butter
    2 tablespoons onion
    2 tablespoons carrot
    4 tablespoons flour
    1 tablespoon parsley
    ½ teaspoon salt
    1 cup stock
    1 cup tomato

Melt butter; add onion, carrot and parsley. Cook five minutes. Strain.
To butter add flour; when well blended add stock and tomato. Simmer one
half hour. Serve.


Tomato Cream Sauce

    1 cup White Sauce
    1 tablespoon butter
    1 tablespoon chopped celery
    1 tablespoon chopped onion
    1 tablespoon Kitchen Bouquet
    1 teaspoon Worcestershire Sauce
    ½ teaspoon lemon juice
    1 cup tomatoes
    ¼ teaspoon soda

Melt butter; add celery and onion, cook five minutes; add tomatoes;
cook ten minutes. Strain; add soda. To White Sauce add Kitchen Bouquet
and Worcestershire Sauce; cook five minutes.

Combine Tomato Sauce and White Sauce; add lemon juice and serve.


Trianon Sauce

To Hollandaise Sauce add one half cup sautéd mushrooms and two
tablespoons wine.


Velouté Sauce

    4 tablespoons butter
    4 tablespoons flour
    ½ teaspoon salt
    nutmeg
    1 cup white stock
    ½ cup cream
    ½ cup mushrooms

Melt butter; add mushrooms, flour, salt, nutmeg and white stock; simmer
ten minutes. Add cream and cook in double boiler one half hour. Just
before serving add one tablespoon butter.


Vinaigrette Sauce

    ⅓ cup olive oil
    1 tablespoon chopped pickles
    1 tablespoon chopped pepper
    1 tablespoon chopped parsley
    ½ teaspoon paprika
    1 teaspoon salt
    few grains cayenne
    ¼ cup vinegar

Mix ingredients in order given, stir well and serve cold.



CHAPTER IX

ENTRÉES


Chicken Forcemeat

    1 cup cooked chicken
    salt, pepper
    lemon juice, onion juice
    ½ cup soft bread crumbs
    ½ cup hot milk
    2 eggs
    1 teaspoon chopped parsley

Chop meat and press through a sieve. Soak bread in milk; add it with
remaining ingredients to chicken; season highly and use as a filling
in fontage cups, or shape in balls and poach in hot water, or shape in
balls, roll in flour, and sauté.


Tomato Forcemeat

    1 tomato finely chopped
    1 pimento finely chopped
    1 cup raw fish finely chopped
    2 tablespoons butter
    1 tablespoon flour
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    1 tablespoon chopped onion

Melt butter; add onion, cook three minutes; add remaining ingredients,
cook ten minutes. Use as filling for fish sandwiches, or spread over
fish chops, or poach and serve with White Sauce.


Aspic Jelly

    2 quarts consommé
    1 tablespoon lemon juice
    2 tablespoons granulated gelatine
    ½ cup hot water

Boil consommé with lemon juice until reduced to one quart. Season well
and clear. Soak gelatine in two tablespoons cold water and dissolve in
hot water, add to clear consommé, strain, and use as a mold for fish,
meats and salads. It is very necessary that the consommé be highly
seasoned, as the success of the aspic depends on the flavor.


Quick Aspic Jelly

A quick and satisfactory aspic is made by dissolving three tablespoons
Liebig’s beef extract in one quart boiling water, seasoning well with
lemon juice, onion juice, sherry wine, salt and pepper. Clear; add two
tablespoons dissolved gelatine, and use the same as Aspic Jelly.


Chicken Soufflé

    1½ cups chicken
    ½ cup mushrooms
    2 tablespoons butter
    4 tablespoons flour
    ½ cup bread crumbs
    3 egg yolks
    ½ cup chicken stock
    ½ cup cream
    salt and cayenne
    1 teaspoon parsley
    3 egg whites
    ¼ cup sherry

Melt butter; add flour, seasonings, stock, cream, chicken, mushrooms,
bread crumbs; cook ten minutes; add egg yolks and cut and fold in
whites beaten until stiff, and the sherry. Bake in buttered baking dish
forty minutes. Serve immediately with or without Mushroom Sauce.


Chicken Timbales

    2 cups raw chicken meat
    ¼ cup bread crumbs—soft
    1 cup beaten cream
    ½ teaspoon salt
    few grains cayenne
    4 egg whites beaten until stiff

Chop meat and press through sieve; add remaining ingredients and fill
buttered timbale molds which have been previously sprinkled with finely
chopped pickles or olives. Bake in pan of hot water twenty minutes.
Remove and serve with Hollandaise Sauce or Parmesan Sauce.


Chicken Mousse

    1 cup chicken stock
    ½ teaspoon salt
    paprika and celery salt
    1 cup cold cooked chicken
    2 teaspoons granulated gelatine
    2 tablespoons cold water
    1 cup beaten cream
    1 tablespoon chopped olives
    2 egg whites

Heat chicken stock; add seasoning, gelatine which has been soaked in
cold water. When dissolved, add chicken finely chopped, beaten cream;
beat well; cut and fold in the beaten whites; pour into buttered molds
and chill for two or three hours. Serve as a salad with Mayonnaise.


Lobster Mousse

Lobster Mousse may be prepared in the same way as Chicken Mousse,
substituting lobster meat for chicken.


Fish Timbales

    1 cup raw fish
    ¼ cup almonds
    1 teaspoon salt
    few drops onion juice
    few grains cayenne
    1 cup whipped cream
    4 egg whites
    1 tablespoon lemon juice

Chop fish and press through a sieve; add onion juice, lemon juice, salt
and pepper. When well mixed add whipped cream, almonds finely chopped,
and egg whites beaten to a stiff froth.

Fill buttered timbale molds with this mixture, set in pan of hot water,
and bake ten to fifteen minutes. Serve hot with Cucumber or Tomato
Sauce, or cold, with Mayonnaise Dressing.


Imperial Fish Timbales

    1 cup cooked fish
    2 tablespoons butter
    2 tablespoons flour
    ¾ cup milk
    3 egg yolks
    1 teaspoon salt
    few grains cayenne
    1 tablespoon lemon juice
    1 teaspoon parsley
    3 egg whites

Melt butter; add flour, milk, seasonings and parsley; cook five
minutes. Add fish, boil two minutes; add egg yolks. Cool. Fold in
stiffly beaten whites. Fill molds with this mixture. Set in a pan of
hot water and bake twenty minutes.

Remove from mold and serve at once with Lobster, Shrimp, or Hollandaise
Sauce.


Lobster Timbales

Follow receipt for Fish Timbales, substituting one cup of lobster meat
for fish and adding one half cup mushrooms finely chopped. Cook same as
Fish Timbales. Serve with Béchamel Sauce, garnish each timbale with a
sprig of parsley, and sprinkle coral pressed through a sieve over all.


Chicken Livers in Fontage Cups

    1 cup chickens’ livers
    ¼ cup salt pork cubes
    ½ cup chicken stock
    2 tablespoons flour
    ½ cup mushrooms

Chop livers; sauté pork cubes; add livers, flour, stock and mushrooms.
Cook five minutes, season to taste, and serve in fontage cups.


Mock Terrapin in Fontage Cups

    1 cup chickens’ livers
    ½ cup cooked rice
    2 hard-cooked eggs
    1 teaspoon parsley chopped
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    cayenne and nutmeg
    1 tablespoon butter
    2 tablespoons flour
    ¼ cup cream

Melt butter; add flour, seasonings, cream, livers, and eggs finely
chopped; cook five minutes; add rice; reheat and serve in fontage cups.


Sweetbreads and Mushrooms in Fontage Cups

    2 cups cooked sweetbreads
    ½ cup mushrooms
    1 tablespoon oil
    ½ tablespoon vinegar
    2 tablespoons butter
    3 tablespoons flour
    ¾ cup cream
    salt, pepper, cayenne

Melt butter; add flour, seasonings and cream; cook five minutes. Cover
sweetbreads and mushrooms with oil and vinegar, and let stand twenty
minutes, drain, add to sauce, reheat, and serve in fontage cups.


Sweetbreads and Chicken in Fontage Cups

Substitute one half cup cold cooked chicken cut in small pieces for the
one half cup of mushrooms, and proceed as for Sweetbreads and Mushrooms
in Fontage Cups.


Creamed Oysters and Celery in Fontage Cups

    1 pint oysters
    2 tablespoons butter
    1 tablespoon lemon juice
    2 tablespoons flour
    2 eggs
    ½ cup cream
    salt and pepper
    2 tablespoons wine
    1 cup chopped celery

Melt butter, add oysters and cook one minute. Remove oysters, add
remaining ingredients except wine, cook until thick, add oysters and
wine, and serve in fontage cups.


Creamed Lobster in Fontage Cups

    2 cups lobster meat
    2 tablespoons butter
    1 tablespoon grated onion
    ¼ cup cream
    2 tablespoons flour
    ½ cup chicken stock
    1 tablespoon lemon juice
    1 egg yolk
    salt and cayenne

Melt butter; add onion, flour, stock and lemon juice; cook five
minutes; season with salt and pepper; add cream, in which yolk of egg
has been beaten, and lobster meat. When hot, serve in fontage cups.


Creamed Crabs in Fontage Cups

Substitute two cups crab meat cut in fine pieces for lobster meat and
proceed as for Creamed Lobster.


Creamed Shrimps in Fontage Cups

Substitute two cups shrimps broken in small pieces for lobster meat,
and follow rule for Creamed Lobster.


Shad Roe Croquettes

    2 cups cooked shad roe
    2 egg yolks
    1 tablespoon parsley
    1 cup Croquette Sauce
    salt, pepper, cayenne
    lemon juice

Cut shad roe in small pieces; add seasonings, sauce and yolks of eggs.
Shape; dip in crumbs, egg and crumbs; fry.


Lobster Croquettes

    2 cups chopped lobster meat
    salt, pepper and cayenne
    ¼ teaspoon nutmeg
    1 tablespoon lemon juice
    1 tablespoon parsley
    2 hard-cooked egg yolks
    1 cup Croquette Sauce

Mix ingredients in order given; shape in croquette or chop form; dip in
crumbs, egg and crumbs. Fry in deep fat. If in chop form, make incision
and insert small lobster claw.


Meat, Rice and Tomato Croquettes

    1 cup chopped meat
    4 cups hot rice
    1 cup Croquette Sauce made with tomato instead of milk
    salt, pepper and cayenne
    lemon juice
    onion juice

Mix ingredients in order given; shape; dip in crumbs, egg and crumbs;
fry in deep fat.


Fontage Cups or Timbale Cases

    ½ cup flour
    ½ teaspoon salt
    1 tablespoon olive oil
    1 egg yolk
    cayenne
    ⅓ cup milk

Mix ingredients in order given until smooth, strain, and let stand over
night in a warm place. Heat fontage iron in hot fat, drain, dip in
batter, place in hot fat, and fry until a delicate brown. Remove from
iron, invert, and drain.

These cups are used for all kinds of creamed mixtures and forcemeats,
and are used instead of patty shells and croustades.


Sauce for Croquette Mixtures

    3 tablespoons butter
    5 tablespoons flour
    1 cup stock or milk
    salt and pepper
    celery salt
    lemon juice
    few drops onion juice

Melt butter; add flour, seasonings and milk. Cook until thick. This
sauce is sufficient to thicken two cups of meat, for all kinds of
croquettes. It may be varied by adding two egg yolks or one egg.


Chicken Croquettes

    2 cups chicken meat
    salt, pepper, lemon juice
    1 cup Croquette Sauce
    onion juice

Cut meat in small pieces; add seasonings and Croquette Sauce. Shape,
dip in crumbs, egg and crumbs, and fry in deep fat. These croquettes
may be varied by adding one fourth cup of chopped mushrooms, ham,
sweetbreads, or truffles. More or less sauce is required according to
the dryness of chicken.


Sweetbread and Mushroom Croquettes

    1 cup mushrooms cut in small pieces
    salt and pepper
    1 cup cold cooked sweetbreads cut in dice
    lemon juice and onion juice
    1 cup Croquette Sauce

Sauté mushrooms in butter; add sweetbread, seasonings, sauce. Shape,
dip in crumbs, egg and crumbs, and fry.


Fish Croquettes

    2 cups cold cooked fish
    salt and pepper
    lemon juice and onion juice
    1 cup Croquette Sauce
    1 tablespoon chopped parsley

Mix all ingredients; add more lemon juice if needed. Shape, dip in
crumbs, egg and crumbs, fry in deep fat.

One cup tomato may be substituted for the one cup milk or stock in
Croquette Sauce.


Rolled Fillets of Flounder with Béchamel Sauce

    2 flounders
    2 tablespoons butter
    1 tablespoon finely chopped parsley
    1 tablespoon lemon juice
    salt, pepper and cayenne
    ½ cup cream
    4 hard-cooked eggs
    4 lemons

Make eight fillets from the flounder. Melt butter; add lemon juice and
parsley. Dip fillets in this mixture; roll and skewer fillets; put in
baking dish; sprinkle with salt, pepper and cayenne. Cover with cream
and cook in oven until tender. Arrange on platter, pour around the
fillets Béchamel sauce, and garnish with lemon basket in the center,
filled with sauce, yolks of eggs pressed through ricer and whites cut
in shape of petals.


Curried Lobster in Rice Timbales

    2 cups lobster meat
    2 tablespoons butter
    2 tablespoons flour
    1 tablespoon chopped onion
    1 tablespoon curry
    1 cup cream or stock
    3 egg yolks
    salt, paprika and cayenne

Melt butter; add onion; when yellow add flour, curry and cream. Cook
five minutes. Season; add egg yolks and lobster meat. Sprinkle with
finely powdered coral if there is any. Fill Rice Timbale Cases, reheat,
and serve.


Rice Timbale Cases

    1 cup rice
    salt, pepper and cayenne
    lemon juice, onion juice
    4 cups milk

Wash rice; add seasonings and milk. Cook in double boiler until milk is
absorbed and rice is tender.

Fill timbale molds, press rice in firmly, cool, scoop out center, and
fill with any creamed mixture.


Creamed Salmon in Rice Timbales

Use rule for Curried Lobster, substituting two cups flaked salmon for
lobster meat, and one half cup olives finely chopped for curry. Line
one large mold with cooked rice, fill with creamed salmon, cover top
with rice, and steam one half hour. Serve, garnish with individual Rice
Timbales, parsley, and Tomato Cream Sauce.


Chicken in Aspic

    1 cooked, boned chicken
    2 quarts Aspic Jelly
    2 hard-cooked eggs
    parsley

Select a mold large enough to hold chicken, cover bottom of mold with
Aspic Jelly, and set on ice to harden. Cut hard-cooked white of eggs in
slices, cut yolk in slices, and stamp out small rounds with a vegetable
cutter. Cut white of egg slices to resemble petals. Arrange on top of
the hardened jelly in the form of daisies, taking up each piece on a
needle and dipping in liquid jelly before placing. Cover with jelly
mixture, adding by spoonfuls to avoid disturbing the design.

When hard place chicken on jelly, breast downward, cover with liquid
jelly, and set away to harden.

The sides may be decorated in the same way as the bottom if more
elaboration is desired.

Unmold, place on bed of parsley or lettuce, and garnish with pimentoes
or olives.


Quail in Aspic—Pheasant in Aspic—Partridge in Aspic—Tongue in
Aspic—Oysters in Aspic—Lobster in Aspic—Shrimp in Aspic—Chicken Breasts
in Aspic—Tomatoes in Aspic—Cucumbers in Aspic—Eggs in Aspic—Aspic of
Pâté de Foie Gras

Cover bottom of mold with Aspic Jelly; decorate with truffles cut in
fancy shapes. Cover this with liquid aspic; when hard place roasted
quail or any of above on jelly, cover with liquid jelly and chill.
Decorate sides of top layer with hard-cooked white of egg cut in
crescents. Unmold, garnish with cress, and serve with Mayonnaise
Dressing.


Scalloped Veal

Chop two cups of cold cooked veal; add one fourth teaspoon salt, one
fourth teaspoon onion juice, and one teaspoon lemon juice. Mix one half
cup finely chopped cooked ham, one fourth teaspoon mustard, few grains
cayenne, two tablespoons cracker crumbs, and moisten with white stock.
Sauté one fourth cup cracker crumbs in one fourth cup butter; add to
chopped veal and moisten with white stock.

Line a mold with slices of hard-cooked eggs, fill with alternate layers
of ham mixture and veal. Pack tightly, cover with buttered paper, and
steam one hour. Cool and serve in thin slices.

The success of this dish depends on careful seasoning, and more may be
needed than is given in the receipt.


Veal Loaf

Chop two pounds of lean veal and one fourth pound salt pork; add one
cup cracker crumbs, three beaten eggs, one teaspoon salt, few grains
cayenne, one teaspoon onion juice, and one tablespoon lemon juice.

Moisten with well-flavored beef or veal stock. Press in buttered bread
pan, cover. Baste occasionally during baking. Bake one hour.


Veal Croquettes

Cut one pint cooked veal in small pieces; add one tablespoon salt,
one quarter teaspoon pepper, one tablespoon lemon juice. Melt three
tablespoons butter; add two tablespoons finely minced onion, three
tablespoons flour, and three fourths cup milk or veal stock. Boil five
minutes. Add two eggs well beaten. Stir constantly until thick. Mix
with veal mixture and cool. Shape, allowing a rounding tablespoonful
for each croquette. Dip in crumbs, egg and crumbs, and fry in deep
fat. Serve with or without White Sauce.


Fried Calf’s Liver

Cut three onions in pieces; sauté in four tablespoons butter; cover
with one cup white stock; add one half teaspoon salt, one teaspoon
chopped parsley, one teaspoon lemon juice. Cook one half hour.

Cut liver in one half inch slices; sauté in four tablespoons butter;
add sauce; cook five minutes.

Serve; garnish with parsley and slices of lemon.


Boiled Tongue

Wash and clean the tongue, cover with boiling water; add one fourth cup
each of carrot, turnip and onion, a bouquet of sweet herbs, four cloves
and two peppercorns. Simmer until tongue is tender. Cool in kettle,
remove the skin, brush with melted butter, cover with buttered bread
crumbs after placing in dripping pan.

Bake twenty minutes, basting often with chicken stock or Port wine.
Cool, cut in thin slices, and garnish with slices of buttered toast
sprinkled with finely chopped pimolas.


Broiled Pig’s Feet

Boil the feet until tender, cut in halves, brush with melted butter,
sprinkle with salt and pepper, and cover with buttered bread crumbs.
Broil over a clear fire and serve with Piquante Sauce.


Veal Roll

Remove the bone from a shoulder of veal, brush with melted butter, and
stuff with sautéd mushrooms or sweetbreads. Cover bone broken in pieces
with cold water; add one fourth cup each of carrot and onion, a bit
of bay leaf, sprig of parsley, four cloves, and six peppercorns. Add
stuffed and rolled veal, and simmer until tender. Cover with slices of
bacon; bake in a hot oven, basting often. Serve with Olive Sauce.


Marrow Bones with Tenderloin Steak

Cut the bones four inches long; cover each end with a round of dough to
keep in the marrow.

Tie the bones in a cloth, cover with boiling water, and boil one hour.
Remove cloth and paste, and serve on or around tenderloin steak; or
the marrow may be removed from bone when cooked, and spread on slices
of hot buttered toast. Cayenne and salt are always served with marrow
bones.


Deviled Mignons of Beef

Cut tenderloin steak three fourths inch thick. Cut and roll in rounds,
broil over clear fire five minutes.

Mix one tablespoon mustard, one tablespoon Worcestershire Sauce, and
two tablespoons chopped pimento. Spread on beef, dip in fine bread
crumbs, and broil until crumbs are brown. Serve with Béarnaise Sauce.


Kidneys en Brochette

Cut some lambs’ kidneys in quarter-inch slices. Season with salt and
pepper, dip in olive oil. Arrange on a skewer with alternating slices
of bacon.

Dip in oil, in bread crumbs, and broil over a clear fire, or sauté in
butter. Serve with Piquante Sauce.


Kidneys with Oysters

Remove skin from four lambs’ kidneys. Cut in two lengthwise. Cook two
tablespoons chopped onion, one shallot finely chopped, four tablespoons
butter, one fourth teaspoon salt, and a few grains cayenne together
five minutes. Add one cup tomato. When hot, add one cup oysters. Keep
hot while broiling kidneys. Arrange kidneys on platter and pour sauce
over them.


Crême Frite

    1 pint milk
    ½ cup sugar
    3 tablespoons cornstarch
    5 egg yolks
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    1-inch piece stick cinnamon
    4 teaspoons butter
    1 teaspoon vanilla
    few gratings lemon rind

Mix yolks of eggs and sugar; moisten the cornstarch with small
amount of cold milk, scald the remainder; add cornstarch mixture to
scalded milk; cook twenty minutes, add egg mixture, butter, salt and
seasonings, cook one minute. Pour into shallow buttered dish. Cool; cut
in squares or diamonds; dip in crumbs, egg and crumbs; fry in deep fat.


Calf’s Heart Stuffed

Wash heart; fill with chicken stuffing; sprinkle with salt and pepper;
dredge with flour. Place on rack in dripping pan and cook in hot oven
from two to three hours, basting while cooking, with beef stock, pork
fat, hot water, or butter.

Serve with Tomato Sauce or on a bed of boiled onions.


Haricot of Ox Tails

Cut three ox tails in four-inch pieces; add one half cup carrot, one
half cup onion, and four tablespoons butter. Cook ten minutes; add four
tablespoons flour and four cups water or stock. Cook one hour; season
with salt and pepper. Serve vegetables in the center and ox tails
around the edge; garnish with potato balls and parsley.


Salmi of Game

Cut the meat from cold cooked game. Break the bones and cover with
cold water. Sauté two tablespoons onions in four tablespoons butter
and brown; add one tablespoon Worcestershire Sauce and four cups of
the liquor in which the bones have been cooked. Season with salt and
pepper, color a delicate brown with Kitchen Bouquet, add two cups cold
game, simmer ten minutes.

Serve on slices of fried bread and garnish with a potato border and
parsley.


Curry of Game

Prepare the same as Salmi of Game, adding one tablespoon curry powder.
Serve in rice border.


Roll Croustades

Bake bread dough in muffin pans; when cold cut off tops, remove soft
portion leaving shell. Butter inside and out, and brown in the oven.
Fill with any creamed mixture.


Broiled Honeycomb Tripe

Wash tripe and cut in pieces for serving. Cover with boiling water and
cook until tender. Drain, wipe, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and
broil over a clear fire. Serve with Maître d’Hôtel Butter.


Tripe Ragoût

Wash one pound of tripe and cut in two-inch strips for serving. Sauté
in two tablespoons butter, two tablespoons onion, add tripe, cook ten
minutes, add one cup each of tomato and celery cut into inch pieces,
and simmer until all are tender. Serve, garnish with toast points.


Lyonnaise Tripe

Cook two tablespoons onion in two tablespoons butter. Add two cups
cooked tripe cut in small strips; cook ten minutes. Serve on buttered
toast; sprinkle with salt and pepper, dot with butter and garnish with
finely chopped parsley.


Tripe in Batter

Cut cooked tripe in three-inch strips. Soak ten minutes in olive oil.
Drain, sprinkle with salt and pepper, dip in Fritter Batter, and fry in
deep fat.


Baked Sweetbreads

Soak sweetbreads in cold water; lard; place on slices of salt pork in
dripping pan; cover with milk or stock; cook until tender and serve
with Tomato Sauce.


Baked Fillets of Sweetbreads

Prepare six fillets; sprinkle with salt and pepper and dredge with
flour. Arrange on slices of bacon; dot with butter; baste with cream
while baking in a hot oven. Serve with Béchamel Sauce.


Braised Sweetbreads

Arrange in the bottom of a buttered baking dish one fourth cup each
of chopped carrot, celery, onions and salt pork. Place parboiled
sweetbreads on top of vegetables; cover with stock and bake slowly
three quarters of an hour in tightly covered dish. Remove vegetables to
serving dish and serve sweetbreads on top of them.


Calf’s Brains in Batter

Parboil brains; cut in two-inch pieces. Cover with French Dressing.
Let them stand one hour. Drain, dip in Fritter Batter, fry in hot fat.
Serve with Tomato Sauce.


Scalloped Brains

Parboil brains; sprinkle with salt, pepper and lemon juice. Cut in inch
pieces. Arrange in layers in buttered baking dish, alternating with
Tomato Sauce. Cover with buttered and seasoned cracker crumbs and serve
with chopped pickles.


Brains Breaded

Parboil brains and cook in muslin bag in boiling acidulated water one
half hour. Drain. Cool and cut into four-inch pieces. Sprinkle with
salt, pepper and lemon juice, dip in crumbs, egg and crumbs, and fry in
hot fat. Serve with Piquante or Hollandaise Sauce.


Frogs’ Legs

Skin the frogs’ legs, sprinkle with salt and pepper, dip in butter,
then in flour, and fry in hot fat. Serve with Sauce Tartare.


Frogs’ Legs à la Béchamel

Remove skin from legs, season with salt and pepper, melt four
tablespoons butter, add frogs’ legs and one half cup mushrooms, and
sauté. Serve on slices of buttered toast with Béchamel Sauce.


Frogs’ Legs à l’Allemande

Remove skins from frogs’ legs, season with salt, pepper and lemon
juice, and cook in butter five minutes. Add one cup white stock, and
simmer until tender. Serve on hot buttered toast with Allemande Sauce.


Oyster Crabs

Melt two tablespoons butter; add one tablespoon lemon juice, one fourth
teaspoon salt, few grains cayenne, two tablespoons chopped pimolas. Add
one cup crabs and let simmer ten minutes. Serve in croustades.


Oyster Crabs with Poached Eggs

Cook oyster crabs in butter. Cut bread in slices, shape with doughnut
cutter, toast, butter, and place in buttered ramekin dishes, fill the
rings with cooked crabs, break an egg on top of each, sprinkle with
grated cheese, and bake ten to twelve minutes.


Liver Loaf

Parboil four slices of calf’s liver, remove skin, chop, and press
through a sieve. To each cup of liver add one fourth cup soft bread
crumbs, one tablespoon butter, one teaspoon salt, one half teaspoon
paprika, few grains cayenne, and two eggs. Mix well, pour into a
buttered mold, place in a pan of hot water, and bake one hour. Serve
hot with Vinaigrette Sauce, or it may be served cold as a salad.


Mock Pâté de Foie Gras

Use the cooked liver loaf mixture. Mash, add butter to make of
consistency to spread, arrange on rounds of buttered toast, and garnish
with yolks of hard-cooked eggs pressed through a ricer, and slices of
pimolas.


Croustades

Cut crusts from a brick loaf of bread. Scoop out center of loaf,
leaving walls an inch thick on all sides. Brush with melted butter, and
brown in oven; or, omit butter and fry in deep fat. Brush with white of
egg slightly beaten, and fill with any creamed mixture. Set on a bed of
parsley and garnish with toast points.

Small croustades may be made in the same way, by using thick slices of
bread.


Chicken Rissoles

    1 cup chicken forcemeat
    12 pimolas, finely chopped
    salt, pepper and onion juice
    12 rounds of puff paste

Mix forcemeat, chopped pimolas, salt, pepper and onion juice. Put a
teaspoon of this mixture in the center of each puff paste round; brush
the edges with water; fold edges together, making a half round; press
edges together firmly; dip in crumbs, egg and crumbs, and fry in deep
fat.


Oyster Rissoles

Prepare the same as Chicken Rissoles, and add one cup chopped cooked
oysters.


Sweetbread Rissoles

Use one half rule for Chicken Rissoles. Add one cup sweetbreads cooked
and cut in pieces, and one fourth cup chopped pimentoes.


Sardine Rissoles

Use one half rule of Chicken Rissoles. Add twelve boned sardines cut in
pieces and two tablespoons lemon juice.


Veal Rissoles

Use rule for Chicken Forcemeat, substituting veal for chicken, and
proceed as for Chicken Rissoles.


Lamb Rissoles

Use rule for Chicken Forcemeat. Add one fourth cup lamb and one fourth
cup ham, each finely chopped, and proceed as with Chicken Rissoles.


Cheese Rissoles

    ¾ cup grated cheese
    1 tablespoon flour
    2 egg whites
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    cayenne
    cracker crumbs

Beat whites until stiff, add other ingredients, put a teaspoon of this
mixture on rounds of pastry; and proceed as for Chicken Rissoles.


Mushroom Rissoles

Place a teaspoon of creamed mushrooms in the center of a round of
pastry; proceed as for Chicken Rissoles or instead of frying bake in a
quick oven.


Lobster Rissoles

Place a teaspoon of creamed lobster in the center of each round of
pastry, and proceed as for Chicken Rissoles, baking in a quick oven
instead of frying, if desired.


Bouchées à la Macedoine

Mix one fourth cup cold cooked chicken, one fourth cup mushrooms and
one fourth cup cheese. Add one fourth cup White Sauce, season with
salt, paprika and lemon juice. Fill Bouchées and serve garnished with
parsley.


Chicken Pâtés

    1 cup cooked chicken
    2 tablespoons butter
    2 tablespoons flour
    ½ cup cream
    ¼ cup chicken stock
    1 tablespoon lemon juice
    few drops onion juice
    1 tablespoon Madeira wine
    salt and cayenne

Melt butter, add flour, onion juice, lemon juice, salt and cayenne;
when well blended add cream and chicken stock. Boil one minute, add
chicken, when heated through add Madeira and serve in hot pâté shells.

The wine may be omitted, in which case add one teaspoon Worcestershire
Sauce.


Oyster Pâtés

Substitute two cups small oysters for one cup chicken meat and follow
the receipt for Chicken Pâtés.


Baked Chicken

    6 chicken legs
    2 tablespoons lemon juice
    2 tablespoons butter
    1 tablespoon chopped onion
    1 tablespoon carrot
    ½ cup forcemeat
    1 pint stock
    ½ tablespoon salt
    2 egg yolks
    2 tablespoons flour

Melt butter; add vegetables; cook ten minutes. Remove vegetables; add
forcemeat, stock, salt and flour; cook until stiff; add yolks of eggs
and lemon juice.

Spread this mixture on the chicken legs. Dip in crumbs, egg and crumbs,
place in baking dish, and cook in hot oven until chicken is tender,
basting with cream. Serve around slices of tomato garnished with
Mayonnaise.


Chicken Suprême

    3 chicken breasts
    1 can mushrooms
    1 pint consommé
    2 cups forcemeat
    6 slices cooked tongue
    ½ cup butter
    1 tablespoon salt
    1 cup Croquette Sauce
    6 truffles

Divide each chicken breast into four fillets, separating the large
fillet from the small fillet; brush large fillet with butter; spread
with forcemeat; cover with small fillet; score small fillet diagonally;
insert thin slices of truffles in each gash. Cut slices of tongue half
an inch larger than large fillet and place in baking dish with fillet
on each piece.

Mix Croquette Sauce, consommé, chopped mushrooms, and cook ten minutes,
add more seasoning if required, and pour around cooked fillets.

The fillets may be steamed until tender or cooked in the oven and
basted with cream.


Chop Suey

(We include Chop Suey as a novelty and not because we especially like
it.)

    1 lb. water chestnuts cut thin
    2 lb. bean sprouts
    1 cup celery cut in small pieces
    ½ cup chopped onion
    6 mushrooms chopped
    1 chicken cut in pieces for serving
    1 teaspoon gee yow

Put two tablespoons peanut oil in a frying pan, add the chestnuts,
celery, onion, mushrooms and chicken; cook until tender,—when about
half done add bean sprouts and cook all until tender.

Mix two tablespoons oil and two tablespoons flour, add one cup liquid,
stock or water, season with salt and pepper and the gee yow, a Chinese
Sauce which can be purchased from any Chinese dealer together with the
water chestnuts and bean sprouts.

Arrange chicken and vegetables in the center of platter; pour the sauce
over these and serve.


VEGETABLE ENTRÉES


Artichokes with Hollandaise Sauce

Artichokes may be procured both canned and fresh.

If canned, drain, wash in cold water, drain again, then let them stand
in French Dressing for one half hour. Drain, dip in crumbs, egg and
crumbs, and fry in deep fat, or dip in Fritter Batter and sauté in pork
fat or butter. Serve with Hollandaise Sauce.


Asparagus served in Croustades

Cut asparagus in inch pieces and boil according to rule for Boiled
Asparagus, drain, add one cup Thick Cream Sauce, and serve in bread
croustades.


Cauliflower au Gratin

Boil one cauliflower until tender. Separate flowerets and chop tough
parts. Arrange in buttered shells, or ramekins with White Sauce,
sprinkle with grated cheese, cover with buttered and seasoned crumbs,
and brown in a quick oven.


Celery au Jus

Remove the tops from two bunches of celery, leaving the bunch about six
inches long. Wash, trim, and scrape root to a point. Cook in salted
boiling acidulated water five minutes. Drain. Melt three tablespoons
butter; add three tablespoons flour and a cup and a half of water in
which celery was cooked. Season with salt, pepper and a few drops of
Worcestershire Sauce; add cooked celery and simmer thirty minutes.

Arrange celery in center of hot dish, strain sauce over it, and garnish
with finely chopped pimento.


Chestnut Croquettes

    1 cup chestnut purée
    2 tablespoons sugar sirup
    yolks of 2 eggs
    1 tablespoon lemon juice
    ¼ teaspoon salt

Mix ingredients in order given. Shape, dip in crumbs, egg and crumbs;
fry in deep fat, drain and serve.


Scalloped Cucumbers

Wash, pare, and cut into cubes three large cucumbers.

Arrange a layer in the bottom of a buttered baking dish. Sprinkle
with salt and pepper and with one teaspoon finely chopped onion, and
continue thus until dish is filled, then add one cup milk or chicken
stock, cover with buttered and seasoned crumbs, and bake in hot oven
until brown.


Béchamel Cucumbers

Pare four cucumbers, parboil four minutes, drain and let them stand in
ice water one half hour. Cut in thin slices, cover with Béchamel Sauce,
cook until tender, and serve on buttered triangles of toasted bread.
Garnish with olive in center of each triangle and toast points.


Banana fried in Crumbs

Remove skin from six bananas, cut in halves lengthwise and crosswise.
Sprinkle with salt and pepper and lemon juice, dip in flour, egg and
crumbs, and fry in deep fat. Drain on brown paper, serve on folded
napkin. Garnish with lemon and parsley. Serve with or without Lemon or
Sherry Sauce.


Carrot Fritters

Wash four carrots, scrape, cut in three inch pieces, cook in saucepan
with two slices onion and a very small amount of water. When tender,
drain, dip in crumbs, egg and crumbs, and fry in deep fat.


Farina Balls or Hominy Crescents

    ½ cup farina or hominy
    ½ cup milk
    1½ cups chicken stock
    1 teaspoon salt
    ¼ teaspoon paprika
    few drops onion juice
    one egg

Mix milk and chicken stock, add farina or hominy, and cook in double
boiler forty minutes. Add remaining ingredients, cool, shape in balls
or crescents, dip in crumbs, egg and crumbs. Fry in deep fat.

Serve as an entrée with a sweet sauce or as a garnish with game.


Macaroni Timbales

Boil twelve sticks of macaroni in salted water until tender, cut
in rings. Line thickly buttered timbale molds with macaroni rings.
Fill center with creamed macaroni, creamed fish, or Welsh rarebit
mixture. Cover with macaroni rings. Set molds in a pan of hot water
and bake twenty minutes. Remove from molds and serve with Béchamel,
Allemande, or Hollandaise Sauce as an entrée; or line a large mold and
fill with creamed mushrooms, creamed sweetbreads, creamed chicken,
veal or turkey, adding several beaten eggs to give the mixture right
consistency.

Prepared in this way it may be served for luncheon.


Cheese Cakes

    1 cup cottage cheese
    ½ cup sugar
    3 tablespoons butter
    1 teaspoon salt
    3 eggs
    rind and juice of one lemon
    ½ cup raisins
    ½ cup citron

Mix the above ingredients and beat until smooth. Line patty tins with
pastry, fill with cheese mixture. Bake in a moderate oven twenty
minutes.


Fritter Batter

    1 cup flour
    2 teaspoons baking powder
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    ¼ cup milk
    2 eggs
    1 tablespoon lemon juice

Sift flour, baking powder and salt; add well-beaten eggs, lemon juice
and milk. Beat well, strain if lumpy, and leave standing several hours,
over night if possible.

This receipt may be used for cooked parsnips, carrots, cauliflower, raw
corn and nearly all fruits.

Dip prepared vegetables or fruits in the batter, drain whole vegetables
and fruits on a fork, fry in deep fat, and drain on brown paper. Mix
small or chopped vegetables or fruit with the batter and drop in
spoonfuls into hot fat.


Corn Oysters

    2 cups green corn pulp
    2 eggs
    pepper and cayenne
    1 tablespoon butter, melted
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    flour

Cut the corn through the kernel with a sharp knife and remove pulp;
add remaining ingredients with enough flour to shape into small cakes.
Sauté in butter or pork fat or fry in deep fat.


Green Pea Timbales

Press one pint cooked peas through a sieve; add four tablespoons milk
or soup stock, few drops of onion juice, salt, pepper, cayenne, and
the whites of three eggs, beaten until stiff. Press into buttered
timbale molds, set in a pan of hot water, and bake in a slow oven until
firm. Unmold, serve on hot platter. Garnish with a piece of parsley on
the top of each timbale and Béchamel Sauce.


Egg Plant baked in Shell

Boil four egg plants twenty minutes. Cut in halves lengthwise. Scoop
out center. Drain in cheese cloth. Mix one half cup bread crumbs, one
quarter cup minced chicken, one quarter cup egg plant, two tablespoons
butter, salt, paprika, and cayenne, and one egg.

Fill egg plant shells with this mixture, cover with buttered and
seasoned crumbs, and bake in a slow oven about one hour.


Broiled Mushrooms

Wash, scrub, sprinkle with salt and pepper, twelve large fresh
mushrooms. Broil over a clear fire. Place on twelve rounds of bread
toasted on one side. Sauté in two tablespoons butter, one cup chopped
mushrooms; season with salt and pepper and add one fourth cup heavy
cream. Reheat and pour over mushrooms on toast.


Baked Mushrooms

Wash, scrub, sprinkle with salt and pepper, twelve large fresh
mushrooms. Remove stems, sauté in butter, add one cup chicken stock or
cream, simmer fifteen minutes. Place on rounds of bread, on a buttered
platter; cover and cook in oven fifteen minutes, basting once during
cooking with melted butter. A few gratings of nutmeg is considered by
many an improvement.


Mushrooms with Oysters

Wash, scrub, and remove stems of twelve large fresh mushrooms. Sauté in
butter five minutes. Place on rounds of buttered toast, gills upward;
sprinkle with salt and pepper, dot with butter. Decorate each with an
oyster and sprinkle with buttered crumbs. Bake fifteen minutes in a hot
oven, basting every five minutes with hot butter.


Deviled Mushrooms

Mix one teaspoon mustard, few grains cayenne, one teaspoon
Worcestershire Sauce, and half teaspoon paprika.

Cover broiled mushrooms with this mixture and serve on slices of toast.


Scalloped Mushrooms

Wash, scrub, and peel one pound of fresh mushrooms. Sauté in butter.
Arrange in layers with White Sauce in buttered baking dish; when filled
cover with cubes of bread which have been dipped in butter. Brown in
the oven and serve.


Mushrooms with Tomatoes

Wash, scrub, and peel one half pound of fresh mushrooms. Break in small
pieces and sauté in butter. Wash and remove skins from six tomatoes.

Slice tomatoes and arrange in layers with sautéd mushrooms in buttered
baking dish or in ramekins. Cover with Tomato Sauce, well seasoned with
onion. When dish is filled sprinkle with buttered cracker crumbs and
bake until crumbs are brown.


Mushroom Potpourri

Cut in slices one lamb’s kidney. Sauté in melted butter. Remove
from butter, and sauté twelve mushrooms, cleaned and cut in slices.
Melt two tablespoons butter; add two tablespoons floor, one and one
half cups tomato, few drops onion juice, one and one half teaspoons
Worcestershire Sauce, one half teaspoon salt, and few grains pepper.
Cook ten minutes; add mushrooms and kidney, and cook until kidney is
tender.

Serve in center of hot platter, and garnish with hot cooked rice or
with macaroni with Cream Sauce.

Sweetbreads, chicken, or veal may be substituted for kidney, but make a
much more expensive dish.


Baked Onions in Ramekins

Peel and parboil twelve medium-sized onions; drain; chop. Melt two
tablespoons butter; add two tablespoons flour, one fourth teaspoon
salt, one and one quarter cups cream, or chicken stock, four
tablespoons soft bread crumbs, one tablespoon finely chopped parsley.
Boil five minutes; add one egg well beaten and the chopped onion. Cool
slightly; add the beaten whites of two eggs; add more seasoning if
needed and bake in buttered ramekin dishes twenty minutes in a moderate
oven. Serve immediately.


Potato Croquettes

Mix two cups hot mashed potato, two tablespoons butter, one teaspoon
salt, one fourth teaspoon paprika, few grains of cayenne and celery
salt, two teaspoons chopped parsley, few drops onion juice. Beat well;
add two egg yolks; form into croquettes; dip in flour, egg and crumbs;
fry in deep fat; drain on brown paper and serve.

These croquettes may be formed in the shape of a ball, then shaped like
a cup, and filled with any creamed mixture; cover the top of cup with
mashed potato. Dip in crumbs, egg and crumbs, fry in deep fat. These
are known as Surprise Croquettes.


Stuffed Peppers

Cut the tops from eight red or green peppers; remove seeds; cover
with boiling water; leave standing five minutes. Fill with any of
the following stuffings. Cover with buttered bread crumbs, arrange in
baking dish, and bake one half hour.


Tomato Stuffing for Peppers

Mix one cup tomato pulp drained from juice, one half cup bread crumbs,
and one cup stock; add two tablespoons flour and two tablespoons butter
which have been cooked together. Season with salt, cayenne, paprika and
onion juice.


Chicken Stuffing for Peppers

Chicken Stuffing prepared in the same way as Tomato Stuffing,
substituting chicken for tomato.


Rice or Macaroni Stuffing for Peppers

Cook one cup rice or macaroni in chicken stock until tender; add one
fourth cup onion finely chopped, two tablespoons red pepper finely
chopped, two tablespoons melted butter, four tablespoons finely chopped
mushrooms. Season with salt and pepper. In filling add more chicken
stock or hot water if necessary.


Rice Croquettes

Cook one cup of rice in two cups of water or chicken stock in a double
boiler until tender, and the liquid is absorbed. Season with salt,
pepper and onion juice; add four tablespoons butter and two egg yolks.

Cool, form in croquettes, dip in crumbs, egg and crumbs, and fry in
deep fat.


Rice and Tomato Croquettes

Cook two tablespoons chopped onion in two tablespoons butter five
minutes; add one tablespoon red pepper, sprig parsley, four cloves, and
one and one half cups tomato; cook five minutes. Add one cup water or
chicken stock, pour into double boiler, add one half cup washed rice,
and cook until rice is tender and liquid absorbed. Season with salt,
pepper and paprika; add two egg yolks and four tablespoons grated
cheese.

Shape, dip in crumbs, egg and crumbs, and fry in deep fat.


Rice and Cheese Croquettes

    1 cup rice
    4 cups milk
    1 cup cheese
    salt and pepper
    1 egg
    1 cup thick White Sauce

Cook rice in milk; when milk is absorbed add cheese, seasonings, and
egg, and enough sauce to make of the consistency to shape. Shape, dip
in crumbs, egg and crumbs, and fry in deep fat.


Sweet Rice Croquettes

Cook one cup rice in two cups milk in double boiler, until liquid is
absorbed and rice is tender; add one fourth cup sugar and one half
teaspoon salt. Cool, add two egg yolks, shape in form of nests, dip in
crumbs, egg and crumbs, and fry in deep fat, hollow downward. Drain on
brown paper; fill nests with cubes of jelly.


Turkish Pilaf

Cook one cup rice with one cup each of stock and tomato; when tender
sauté in four tablespoons butter, season with salt and paprika. Serve
hot on buttered toast.


Tomato Croquettes

Mix two cups tomato, four cloves, two slices onion, two peppercorns,
one half teaspoon salt and one fourth teaspoon paprika. Cook ten
minutes and press through a sieve. Melt three tablespoons butter;
add one fourth cup cornstarch and strained tomato mixture; boil ten
minutes. Cool slightly, add one egg, pour into buttered pan, chill, cut
in squares, dip in crumbs, egg and crumbs, fry in deep fat. Drain on
brown paper. Serve.


Macaroni Croquettes

    1 cup cooked macaroni
    4 tablespoons butter
    4 tablespoons flour
    ¾ cup milk or stock
    few drops onion juice
    salt and pepper
    ½ cup cheese

Melt butter; add flour and cheese; when well blended add milk, onion
juice, and seasonings. Cool, add macaroni; shape, dip in crumbs, egg
and crumbs, and fry in deep fat.


Corn Pudding

    4 cups corn (fresh)
    2 cups milk
    salt
    3 eggs
    ½ cup butter
    pepper

Beat yolks; add corn, milk, butter, salt and pepper. Pour into a
buttered baking dish; add beaten whites and bake in moderate oven one
hour.


Nut Loaf

    2 cups soft bread crumbs
    1 cup chopped nut meats
    ⅓ cup melted butter
    ½ cup hot water or stock
    1½ teaspoons salt
    ¼ teaspoon pepper
    ½ teaspoon Worcestershire Sauce
    few drops onion juice
    1 egg

Mix all ingredients; taste, add more seasoning if needed, shape in a
bread pan and bake one hour in a moderate oven, covering with a tin
cover for the first half of the time. Baste three times during the
cooking with melted butter. Remove from pan and serve with Brown Sauce
to which one fourth cup chopped nuts have been added.



CHAPTER X

BREAD


Yeast

    6 pared potatoes
    ¼ cup hops
    2 quarts water
    ½ cup sugar
    ¼ cup salt
    1 cup yeast, or 1 yeast cake

Boil water and hops five minutes. Strain; add grated potatoes; boil
five minutes; add sugar and salt; when lukewarm add yeast or yeast cake
which has been dissolved in one fourth cup lukewarm water; let rise
for six hours; pour into scalded stone jug; cork tightly; keep in cool
place.


Milk Bread

    2 cups scalded milk
    1 tablespoon lard
    1 tablespoon butter
    2 teaspoons salt
    ½ cup yeast, or ½ yeast cake
    6 cups flour
    1 tablespoon sugar

Put butter, lard, sugar and salt in mixing bowl. Add scalded milk.
Dissolve yeast cake in one fourth cup lukewarm water. Add to milk
mixture when lukewarm. Add flour, knead until smooth. Cover tightly and
let rise until double its bulk, in temperature of sixty-eight degrees.

Knead; shape into loaves or biscuit; let rise in pans until double its
bulk. Bake in hot oven: biscuit twenty to thirty minutes, loaves sixty
minutes. This bread may be made without kneading by omitting one cup
flour and beating ten minutes.


Water Bread

Substitute water for milk in Milk Bread.


Milk and Water Bread

Use one cup water and one cup milk, and proceed as for Milk Bread.


Salt Rising Bread

    1 cup scalded milk
    1 teaspoon sugar
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    3 cups white flour
    1 cup scalded milk
    entire wheat flour to knead

Mix one cup milk, sugar and salt, and one cup of flour; beat well and
let rise over night. In the morning beat, add other two cups of flour,
the other cup of milk, cover, let rise again. When light, add the
entire wheat to knead, shape in loaves, let rise in pans and bake.


Graham Bread

    2 cups milk scalded
    ⅓ cup of molasses
    2 teaspoons salt
    ¼ yeast cake
    ¼ cup lukewarm water
    2 cups white flour
    4 cups graham flour

Mix milk, molasses and salt. When lukewarm add dissolved yeast cake,
sifted white and graham flour. Beat well.

Let rise until almost double its bulk, beat again, place in buttered
bread pans or shape in biscuit, let rise, and bake in an oven which is
a little cooler than for white bread,—loaves one and one quarter hours
and biscuit thirty minutes.


Entire Wheat Bread

    2 cups scalded milk
    ⅓ cup sugar, or
    ½ cup molasses
    ¼ yeast cake
    ¼ cup lukewarm water
    1½ teaspoons salt
    5 cups sifted entire wheat

Mix milk, sugar or molasses, and salt. When lukewarm add dissolved
yeast and flour. Beat well, let rise until double its bulk, beat, let
rise in buttered bread pans until double its bulk, and bake one hour in
moderately hot oven, or bake in gem pans thirty minutes.


Rye Bread

    2 cups scalded milk
    2 tablespoons butter
    1 tablespoon sugar
    3 cups flour
    2 teaspoons salt
    ½ yeast cake
    ¾ cup lukewarm water
    3 cups rye

Put butter, sugar and salt in mixing bowl; add scalded milk; when
lukewarm, add dissolved yeast cake and white flour.

Let rise until of spongy consistency; add rye flour and knead. Let rise
again, shape into loaves or rolls. Rise again and bake the same as
Graham Bread.


Gluten Bread

    2 cups boiling water
    2 cups scalded milk
    2 teaspoons butter
    2 teaspoons salt
    1 egg
    ¼ yeast cake
    ¼ cup warm water
    3 cups gluten

Mix water, milk, salt and butter. When lukewarm, add dissolved yeast
cake, egg well beaten, and gluten. Let rise, when spongy beat well,
add enough more gluten to shape. Knead, let rise, shape in loaves, let
rise, and bake one hour.


Date Bread

Add one cup chopped dates to Graham or Entire Wheat Bread.


Walnut or Filbert Bread

Add two cups chopped nuts to Graham or Entire Wheat Bread, just before
putting into pans.


Brown Bread

    1 cup corn meal
    1 cup graham flour
    1 cup rye flour
    1½ teaspoons salt
    ½ cup molasses
    2 cups sour milk
    1½ teaspoons soda

Sift the soda through a very fine sieve, add to dry ingredients and
sift again. Add molasses and sour milk, beat well. Pour into buttered
molds and steam three hours. If a hard crust is desired, remove bread
from molds and bake fifteen minutes.


Raised Brown Bread

    2 cups corn meal
    ¼ yeast cake
    2 cups rye
    ½ cup molasses
    1 teaspoon salt
    ⅛ teaspoon soda
    ¼ cup lukewarm water
    2 cups boiling water

Pour boiling water on corn meal. When lukewarm add dissolved yeast cake
and remaining ingredients. Beat well, let it rise over night, beat and
pour into a buttered brown-bread tin. Bake in moderate oven from one
and one half to two hours.


Sweet Milk Brown Bread

    1 cup flour
    1 cup graham flour
    1 cup entire wheat flour
    1½ teaspoons salt
    ¾ cup molasses
    1-¾ cups milk
    ¾ teaspoon soda

Sift the soda through a very fine sieve, add to dry ingredients and
sift again. Add molasses and milk, beat well. Pour into buttered mold
and steam three hours.


Buns

    4 cups flour
    1 cup milk
    ⅓ cup sugar
    ⅓ cup butter
    1 teaspoon salt
    ½ yeast cake
    ¼ cup lukewarm water
    3 eggs

Mix salt, sugar, butter and milk. When lukewarm, add dissolved
yeast cake, yolks well beaten, whites well beaten and flour. Knead
thoroughly; let rise over night; knead, roll into flat cake, fold in
three pieces. Knead and fold in this way four separate times. Add one
cup cleaned currants. Cut off small pieces, shape into rolls, and brush
with butter; let rise. Bake in a moderate oven thirty minutes; brush
with molasses or sugar dissolved in milk; return to the oven to dry.


Brioche

    4 cups flour
    1 teaspoon salt
    2 tablespoons sugar
    ½ cup butter
    1 yeast cake
    ¼ cup lukewarm water
    8 eggs
    1 cup milk

Scald milk; when lukewarm add dissolved yeast cake; add remaining
ingredients and beat well for one half hour. Let rise to double its
bulk; cut down; keep in ice box over night; in the morning, shape.

For Coffee Cakes, make into biscuit, then into finger shapes, twist
ends in opposite directions, shape in crescents, let rise in pan. Bake
in moderate oven. Brush with confectioners’ sugar dissolved in boiling
water.

This mixture may be used for Buns.


Parker House Rolls

    2 cups scalded milk
    ½ yeast cake
    ¼ cup lukewarm water
    ¼ cup butter melted
    2 tablespoons sugar
    1 teaspoon salt
    flour

Mix scalded milk, when cool, with dissolved yeast cake. Add two cups
flour; beat thoroughly and let rise.

When spongy add remaining ingredients and flour to knead. Knead; let
rise; when double its bulk, shape into balls; lay on buttered sheet;
cover with dripping pan. When risen to double their bulk, press with
floured handle of wooden spoon almost dividing the biscuit. Brush one
half with butter; press the two halves together; place on buttered tin;
let rise. Bake when light ten to fifteen minutes.


Braids

Use Parker House Roll mixture; make in small balls; roll balls into
long sticks; fasten three ends together and braid. Cut braids into
four-inch lengths; let rise; bake. When done, brush with melted butter.


Crescents

Shape Parker House Roll mixture into balls then into sticks. Roll
sticks in shape of crescents, let rise, and bake.


Bread Sticks

    1 cup scalded milk
    1 tablespoon sugar
    ¼ cup butter
    1 teaspoon salt
    ½ yeast cake
    ¼ cup lukewarm water
    1 egg white
    3 to 4 cups flour

Mix butter, sugar, salt and milk. When dissolved, add yeast cake, white
of egg well beaten, and enough flour to knead. Let rise to double its
bulk, knead, shape, let rise again, and bake in hot oven.


Swedish Rolls

    2 cups milk
    ½ yeast cake
    ¼ cup lukewarm water
    4 eggs
    ¼ cup butter
    2 teaspoons salt
    ½ cup sugar
    1 cup currants
    3 tablespoons cinnamon
    flour to knead
    ½ cup chopped citron

Melt butter in scalded milk; when lukewarm, add dissolved yeast, salt,
eggs well beaten and flour to knead. Let rise; roll into a sheet; brush
with melted butter; dredge with cinnamon and sugar; sprinkle with
citron and currants; roll like jelly roll; cut in one half inch slices;
place on buttered sheet; let rise. Bake one half hour.


Raised Muffins

    2 cups milk
    ¼ cup melted butter
    ¼ cup sugar
    2 eggs
    1 teaspoon salt
    ½ yeast cake
    1 cup lukewarm water
    3 to 4 cups flour

Mix milk, butter, sugar and salt; when lukewarm, add dissolved yeast
and enough flour to make a drop batter. Let rise over night. In morning
add eggs, yolks and whites beaten separately. Place buttered muffin
rings on buttered griddle or dripping pan; fill rings two thirds full,
and cook on griddle on top of stove or in dripping pan in oven.


Oatmeal Muffins

    1 cup scalded milk
    1 cup cold cooked oatmeal
    ¼ cup sugar or
    ¼ cup molasses
    ½ teaspoon salt
    ½ yeast cake
    ¼ cup lukewarm water
    2 to 3 cups flour

Mix oatmeal, scalded milk, sugar and salt. When lukewarm, add dissolved
yeast cake. Add flour to make a stiff batter; beat five minutes. Let
rise over night. Beat and fill buttered gem pans, one half full; let
rise; and bake in moderate oven one half hour.


Bran Muffins

    1-¾ cups bran
    ¼ cup white flour
    1 cup milk
    2 tablespoons molasses
    1 egg
    3 teaspoons baking powder
    1 tablespoon butter
    ¼ teaspoon salt

Mix dry ingredients; add egg well beaten, molasses, milk and melted
butter; beat well and bake in buttered gem pan twenty to thirty minutes
in moderate oven.


Rusk

To one half the rule for Milk Bread, add two eggs well beaten. Shape in
small balls; place close together in baking pan; let rise until very
light; brush with sugar dissolved in water; sprinkle with sugar. Bake.

Rusks must be very light before being baked.


Zweibach

Cut rusks into slices one half inch thick. Dry in oven until a golden
brown.


Pulled Bread

Remove the crust from a loaf of bread and tear the crumb in pieces.
Place in oven and dry until crisp all through.


Five-hour Bread

Use any of the receipts for bread, using one yeast cake instead of
amount of yeast given. The bread should be made and baked in five
hours’ time.


Squash Bread

Add one cup stewed and sifted squash to Milk Bread.


Baking Powder Biscuit

    2 cups sifted flour
    2 tablespoons butter or
    2 tablespoons lard or
    1 tablespoon butter and 1 tablespoon lard
    1 teaspoon salt
    4 teaspoons baking powder
    ¾ to 1 cup milk or
    half milk and half water

Mix and sift the dry ingredients. Add shortening and chop with knife
until mealy. Add milk gradually until a soft spongy dough. Turn on to
a floured board; toss with knife until whole surface is floured; pat
lightly with rolling pin until one half inch thick. Cut in rounds and
bake immediately on buttered sheet in quick oven, about twelve minutes.


Drop Biscuit

Use receipt for Baking Powder Biscuit, using enough milk to make a drop
batter.

Drop into buttered muffin pans and bake in hot oven.


Fruit Biscuit

Roll Baking Powder Biscuit mixture to one fourth inch; brush with
melted butter; sprinkle with cinnamon and sugar and chopped raisins and
citron.

Roll like a jelly roll; cut in one half inch pieces; place on buttered
tin; brush with melted butter; sprinkle with brown sugar. Bake in hot
oven.


Egg Muffins

    2 cups flour
    1 teaspoon salt
    3 teaspoons baking power
    1 cup milk
    2 eggs
    3 tablespoons melted butter

Mix and sift the dry ingredients. Add beaten yolks, butter and milk.
Beat well; cut and fold in the stiffly beaten whites. Turn into gem
pans; bake in hot oven ten to fifteen minutes. Three tablespoons sugar
may be added if desired.


Sally Lunn

Use receipt for Egg Muffins, using three eggs instead of two, and bake
in cake pan instead of muffin pan.


Berry Muffins

    ½ cup butter
    1 cup sugar
    1 egg
    2 cups flour
    4 teaspoons baking powder
    1 cup milk
    1 cup berries
    ¼ teaspoon salt

Cream butter; add sugar, yolk well beaten, flour mixed and sifted with
dry ingredients, milk, white of egg beaten until stiff, and berries.
Bake in buttered muffin pans or in buttered cake pan.


Dutch Apple Cake

Use rule for Egg Muffins. Spread mixture one half inch thick on
buttered pans. Lay apples cut into eighths in two rows on top of dough.
Sprinkle with sugar; bake in hot oven thirty minutes. Serve with Lemon
Sauce or as a tea cake.


Corn Muffins

    1 cup corn meal
    1 cup flour
    ¼ cup sugar
    1 cup milk
    ¼ cup butter
    4 teaspoons baking powder
    ½ teaspoon salt
    2 eggs

Cream butter; add sugar, yolks well beaten, flour mixed and sifted with
corn meal, baking powder and salt, milk and beaten whites. Bake in
buttered muffin tins twenty-five minutes in hot oven.

A very good muffin may be made by using only two tablespoons butter and
one egg.


Entire Wheat or Graham Muffins

    1 cup entire wheat or graham flour
    1 cup white flour
    2 tablespoons sugar, or
    2 tablespoons molasses
    ½ teaspoon salt
    4 teaspoons baking powder
    1 egg
    1¼ cups milk
    4 tablespoons melted butter

Mix and sift dry ingredients, and combine in order given. Bake in hot
muffin pans twenty to twenty-five minutes.


Rye Muffins

    1 cup rye flour
    1 cup white flour
    1 teaspoon salt
    4 teaspoons baking powder
    ¼ cup sugar
    1 cup milk
    1 egg

Mix and sift dry ingredients; add remaining ingredients; beat well.
Bake in hot gem pans twenty to thirty minutes.


Hominy and Corn Muffins

    ¼ cup corn meal
    1 cup scalded milk
    ¼ cup sugar
    4 teaspoons baking powder
    ¼ cup hominy
    1 teaspoon salt
    2 tablespoons butter
    ½ cup boiling water
    2 eggs

Cook hominy, salt, butter and boiling water twenty minutes. Cool. Scald
corn meal with hot milk, add sugar and hominy, yolks of eggs; beat
well; add baking powder and beaten whites of eggs. Bake in hot buttered
gem pans twenty to thirty minutes.


Rice and Corn Muffins

    1 cup corn meal
    1 cup cold cooked rice
    1 teaspoon salt
    2 teaspoons baking powder
    ¼ cup milk
    1 egg
    2 tablespoons melted butter

Mix corn meal, salt and baking powder; add rice and work with fingers
until well blended. Add egg well beaten, milk and butter. Beat well.
Pour into hot buttered gem pans, and bake one half hour.


Spider Corn Cake

    ½ cup corn meal
    ½ cup flour
    ¼ cup sugar
    ½ cup sour cream
    1 teaspoon salt
    ½ teaspoon soda
    2 eggs
    ¾ cup sweet milk

Mix and sift dry ingredients twice; add well-beaten egg and cream; beat
well. Butter an agate pan; heat very hot; pour in mixture; pour milk on
top. Bake thirty minutes.


Popovers

    1 cup flour
    1 cup milk
    ⅛ teaspoon salt
    1 egg

Mix all ingredients and beat five minutes. Pour into hissing hot
buttered gem pans and bake in hot oven twenty minutes.


Fried Rye Muffins

    ¾ cup rye meal
    ¾ cup flour
    ½ cup milk
    2 eggs
    3 teaspoons baking powder
    ½ teaspoon salt
    ¼ cup molasses

Mix and sift dry ingredients; add remaining ingredients; beat well.
Drop from a spoon into hot fat. Fry like doughnuts.


Oat Muffins

    1 cup warm oatmeal
    1 cup flour
    ¼ cup sugar
    4 teaspoons baking powder
    1 teaspoon salt
    ⅓ cup milk
    1 egg
    1 to 4 tablespoons melted butter

Mix flour, sugar, baking powder, salt; add oatmeal and work until well
mixed. Add remaining ingredients. Beat well. Bake in hot buttered gem
pans twenty minutes.


SHORTCAKES


Shortcake

    2 cups flour
    ½ teaspoon salt
    3 teaspoons baking powder
    3 tablespoons butter
    3 tablespoons lard
    1 cup milk

Mix and sift the dry ingredients. Add butter and lard and chop until
thoroughly blended. Add milk. When thoroughly mixed, divide in halves;
put each half into a round, buttered cake tin. Flour hand and pat to
fit the tin. Bake ten to twelve minutes in hot oven. Separate the upper
portions from the lower portions of each cake with a fork—never cut
with a knife. Spread with butter, fill with filling, and arrange in
layers, with filling between.


Orange Shortcake

Peel oranges, cut in slices. Sweeten to taste and use for filling for
shortcake.


Peach Shortcake

Peel, cut in slices, and sweeten three cups of peaches. Add two
tablespoons lemon juice, spread between layers of shortcake. Garnish
top layer with peaches and beaten cream.


Strawberry Shortcake

Hull, cut in pieces, and sweeten two boxes of strawberries. Let them
stand several hours. Arrange between layers of shortcake and garnish
top with whole strawberries and beaten and sweetened cream.

Raspberry, Blackberry, and Pineapple shortcake may be made in a similar
way.


GRIDDLE CAKES


Sour Milk Griddle Cakes

    2 cups flour
    1 teaspoon salt
    2 tablespoons sugar
    1 teaspoon soda
    2 cups sour milk
    2 eggs

Mix in order given, beat well. Heat a griddle; when hissing hot, grease
with piece of salt pork on end of fork. Drop a tablespoon of batter
from tip end of spoon on hot griddle. When full of bubbles, turn; when
cooked on both sides, serve on hot plate.

If sour milk is very rich, the eggs may be omitted.


Graham Griddle Cakes

    1 cup graham
    ½ cup flour
    1 tablespoon sugar
    2 teaspoons baking powder
    2 eggs
    1¼ cups milk
    1 teaspoon salt

Scald milk, and pour on to graham flour. When cold, add remaining
ingredients; beat well and cook as Griddle Cakes.


Bread Griddle Cakes

    2 cups soft bread crumbs
    2 cups scalded milk
    1 teaspoon salt
    1 cup flour
    2 eggs
    2 teaspoons baking powder

Pour milk on to bread crumbs and let stand several hours. Add dry
ingredients, mixed and sifted, yolks and whites beaten separately, and
cook as Griddle Cakes.


Rice Griddle Cakes

    1 cup cooked rice
    1 cup milk scalded
    1½ cups flour
    2 eggs
    1 teaspoon salt
    1 tablespoon sugar
    1 tablespoon melted butter
    1 cup milk
    2 teaspoons baking powder

Pour scalded milk on to rice; let stand over night. Add dry
ingredients, eggs well beaten, and last of all, cold milk. Beat well
and cook as Griddle Cakes.


Hominy Griddle Cakes

Substitute hominy for boiled rice, and cook as Rice Griddle Cakes.


Sweet Milk Griddle Cakes

    1½ cups flour or entire wheat
    2 teaspoons baking powder
    1 teaspoon salt
    1 cup milk
    1 egg
    2 tablespoons melted butter

Mix and sift dry ingredients, add yolks well beaten, milk, whites well
beaten, and melted butter. Cook as Griddle Cakes.


Buckwheat Cakes

    2 cups buckwheat
    ½ cup corn meal or white flour
    1 teaspoon salt
    ¼ cup molasses
    ½ yeast cake
    ¼ cup lukewarm water
    2 cups warm water
    1 teaspoon soda

Mix buckwheat, corn meal, and salt; add dissolved yeast cake, molasses
and water; beat well. Let rise over night. In the morning beat, add
soda, beat, and fry.

A pitcher is the most convenient dish for raising these cakes.


Flannel Cakes

    1½ cups Indian meal
    1½ cups flour
    1 teaspoon salt
    2 tablespoons sugar
    4 tablespoons butter
    ½ yeast cake dissolved in one quarter cup lukewarm water
    3 cups scalded milk

Scald meal with milk; add butter, and when lukewarm, add remaining
ingredients; let mixture rise over night. In the morning cook as
Griddle Cakes.


Waffles

    2 cups flour
    2 teaspoons baking powder
    1 teaspoon salt
    3 tablespoons melted butter
    1⅓ cups milk
    3 eggs

Sift dry ingredients; add yolks well beaten, milk, butter and stiffly
beaten whites. Beat well and cook on hot waffle iron. The waffle iron
should be heated fifteen or twenty minutes before using and greased
thoroughly with salt pork fat.


New England Fried Bread

    2 cups raised bread dough
    1 teaspoon cinnamon

Roll dough to one half inch in thickness, sprinkle with cinnamon, cut
in diamonds; raise; fry in deep fat; serve with sirup.


German Pancakes

    4 eggs
    4 tablespoons flour
    ⅛ teaspoon salt
    4 tablespoons milk

Beat yolks until lemon colored and thick; add flour and salt. Cut and
fold into this mixture, the beaten whites. Add milk; pour into greased
baking dish. Bake in moderate oven, twenty to thirty minutes. Serve
immediately.


FRITTERS


Batter for Fruit Fritters

    1 cup flour
    2 tablespoons sugar
    ½ teaspoon salt
    grated rind 1 lemon
    2 eggs
    ½ cup milk

Mix and sift the dry ingredients; add beaten yolks, lemon rind, and
milk. Beat, cut and fold in the beaten whites of eggs and use for all
kinds of fruits.


Apple Fritters

Core and pare apples, cut in round slices. For each eight apples, mix
one fourth cup sugar and four tablespoons lemon juice. Let apples stand
in this mixture for one hour; dip in Fritter Batter; fry in hot fat;
drain on brown paper. Sprinkle with sugar.


Banana Fritters

Remove skins from four bananas. Cut each one in four equal parts.
Sprinkle with four tablespoons sugar, four tablespoons lemon juice, or
wine, and let stand one hour. Dip in Fritter Batter; fry in deep fat;
drain on brown paper. Serve.


Orange, Peach, and Pear Fritters

Are all made in the same way as Banana Fritters.


Cumquat Fritters

Wash cumquats; cut in halves; let stand in Fritter Batter one hour; fry
in deep fat; drain on brown paper.


Corn Fritters

    1 cup corn
    1 cup flour
    2 teaspoons salt
    few grains cayenne
    1 egg
    ½ cup milk
    1 tablespoon olive oil

Beat egg; add remaining ingredients. Drop by spoonfuls into deep fat.
Fry six to eight minutes. Drain and serve hot. Canned corn may be used
if fresh corn is not available.


Cauliflower Fritters

Separate the flowerets of cold, cooked cauliflower. Sprinkle with salt
and pepper; dip in olive oil, then in Fritter Batter; fry in deep fat.


Celery, Parsnip, and Salsify Fritters

Cut cold, cooked vegetables in small pieces. Prepare the same as
Cauliflower Fritters.


Tomato Fritters

    3 cups tomatoes
    bit of bay leaf
    4 tablespoons butter
    4 cloves
    3 tablespoons chopped onion
    2 tablespoons chopped red pepper
    ½ cup cornstarch
    1 egg
    1 teaspoon salt

Melt butter; add onion and pepper, cook five minutes, add cornstarch,
tomatoes, cloves, bay leaf and salt. Cook until thick. Strain. Add
beaten egg. Cool in buttered tin. Cut in any shape desired. Dip in
crumbs, egg and crumbs, and fry in deep fat.


Shell Fritters

    2 cups flour
    1 cup water
    ½ cup sugar
    ½ cup butter
    ½ teaspoon salt
    grated rind and juice 1 lemon
    5 eggs
    1 tablespoon flavoring

Mix butter, fruit juice, rind and water; boil two minutes. Add sugar
and flour. Beat until mixture leaves sides of pan. Cool. Add eggs,
one at a time, and beat five minutes between each addition. Drop by
spoonfuls into hot fat and fry ten to twelve minutes. Drain on brown
paper, sprinkle with sugar, and serve with Chocolate, Caramel, Orange,
or Wine Sauce.



CHAPTER XI

SALADS


SALAD DRESSING


Mayonnaise Dressing No. 1

SUCCESS in making a Mayonnaise Dressing generally depends upon all the
ingredients being of the same temperature.

    2 egg yolks
    1 teaspoon salt
    ¼ teaspoon cayenne
    1 teaspoon mustard
    1 tablespoon vinegar
    1 tablespoon lemon juice
    1 cup olive oil
    ¼ teaspoon paprika

Mix salt, cayenne, mustard and paprika. Beat yolks well, and add to
seasonings; beat until mixture is thick, adding olive oil, drop by
drop, for the first four tablespoons, then more rapidly until oil is
used, thinning as needed with lemon juice and vinegar.


Mayonnaise Dressing No. 2

    yolks of two hard-cooked eggs
    1 teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon mustard
    1½ cups olive oil
    ¼ teaspoon paprika
    few grains cayenne
    1 tablespoon vinegar
    1 tablespoon lemon juice
    1 raw egg yolk

Mash hard-cooked yolks; add raw yolk, salt, mustard, paprika and
cayenne. Stir until well blended; beat while adding four tablespoons
oil, drop by drop, then the remainder by teaspoonfuls, thinning by
adding lemon juice and vinegar as the mixture becomes too thick to
handle.


Mayonnaise Dressing No. 3

Use same ingredients as Mayonnaise Dressing No. 2, omitting yolk of raw
egg, and using one whole egg.


Mayonnaise Cream Dressing

Add one half cup cream beaten until stiff to Mayonnaise Dressing No. 1.


Butter Salad Dressing

    ¼ cup butter
    2 tablespoons flour
    2 teaspoons salt
    2 teaspoons mustard
    few grains cayenne
    1 cup milk
    ½ cup vinegar
    3 eggs

Melt butter; add flour, mustard, salt, cayenne and milk. Cook in double
boiler five minutes. Pour on to the beaten eggs; add vinegar, and cook
in double boiler until mixture thickens.


French Dressing No. 1

    1½ teaspoons salt
    ⅛ teaspoon pepper
    few grains cayenne
    ⅛ teaspoon paprika
    6 tablespoons oil
    3 tablespoons vinegar

Rub bowl with onion; mix salt, pepper, cayenne; add paprika, oil and
vinegar. Stir with a piece of ice.


French Dressing No. 2

    ½ teaspoon mustard
    1 teaspoon salt
    ¼ teaspoon paprika
    few grains cayenne
    ½ teaspoon finely minced onion
    6 tablespoons oil
    2 tablespoons vinegar

Mix onion, salt, mustard, paprika and cayenne. Mash until of a creamy
consistency; add oil and vinegar alternately, beating all the time.


French Dressing No. 3

    1 teaspoon mustard
    1 teaspoon salt
    ¼ teaspoon paprika
    few grains cayenne
    3 tablespoons lemon juice
    6 tablespoons oil

Mix the dry ingredients; add lemon juice and oil alternately, and beat
until quite thick.


Cream Dressing

    3 egg yolks hard cooked
    1 teaspoon salt
    ⅛ teaspoon cayenne
    1 teaspoon mustard
    2 tablespoons vinegar
    1½ cups thick cream

Mash the yolks; add salt, vinegar and mustard. Beat the cream until
stiff; add the beaten cream, little at a time, to the egg mixture; when
stiff, add cayenne.


Boiled Dressing

    3 tablespoons butter
    1 teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon mustard
    ½ teaspoon paprika
    1 cup milk
    3 egg yolks
    ¼ cup hot vinegar

Cream butter; add seasonings and hot milk; pour on to the egg yolks.
Cook in double boiler until thick; add vinegar, strain, and serve.


Boiled Cream Dressing

    ¼ cup butter
    1 teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon mustard
    1 teaspoon paprika
    3 egg yolks
    2 tablespoons flour
    ¼ cup vinegar
    1 cup cream

Melt butter; add flour, seasonings, egg and vinegar; cook until thick;
add beaten cream. Beat well, chill, and serve.


Boiled Salad Dressing

    3 eggs
    1 tablespoon oil
    1 tablespoon salt
    ½ tablespoon mustard
    1¼ cups milk
    ¾ cup vinegar

Beat eggs slightly; add gradually oil, salt and mustard; when smooth,
add vinegar, then milk. Cook in double boiler, stirring constantly
until mixture thickens.


Horse-radish Cream Dressing

    4 tablespoons grated horse-radish
    1 teaspoon salt
    2 tablespoons vinegar
    ¼ teaspoon paprika
    few grains cayenne
    ¼ cup cream

Beat cream until stiff; add remaining ingredients and serve.


Horse-radish Cream Dressing No. 2

    ¼ cup grated horse-radish
    2 tablespoons lemon juice
    2 tablespoons vinegar
    1 teaspoon Worcestershire Sauce
    1 teaspoon salt
    ½ teaspoon mustard
    ½ teaspoon paprika
    1 cup cream

Beat cream until stiff. Add remaining ingredients, and serve.


SALADS


Aspic Jelly Salad

Serve small molds of Aspic Jelly on crisp lettuce leaves. Garnish
with curled celery; marinate with French Dressing, and garnish with
Mayonnaise Dressing.


Butter Bean Salad

    2 cups cold butter beans
    French Dressing
    Cream Dressing
    2 hard-cooked eggs
    parsley
    few drops onion juice

Cover beans with French Dressing and let stand one half hour. Drain,
sprinkle with onion juice, mix with Cream Dressing. Arrange on serving
dish and garnish with slices of hard-cooked eggs, cut lengthwise, and
parsley.


Beet Salad

    6 cooked beets
    parsley
    French Dressing
    4 hard-cooked eggs

Cut beets in cubes; marinate with French Dressing; let stand one hour.
Chop the whites of the eggs until fine; press yolks through a sieve.
Arrange beets on salad dish in a mound. Garnish base of mound with
alternating rows of white and yolk of egg, and parsley.


Lima Bean Salad

Prepare, dress, and garnish the same as Butter Bean Salad.


Celery Salad

Wash, scrape, and cut in small pieces, one bunch of celery, using the
top leaves and upper part of stalks for garnishing. Cut the stalks in
two-inch pieces and curl both ends. Mix the celery with Mayonnaise
Dressing; let it stand in the ice chest one half hour. Garnish with
Mayonnaise, curled celery, and celery leaves.


Cabbage Salad No. 1

Mix one cup and a half of cabbage and one cup and a half of celery; add
one tablespoon chopped onion, one teaspoon Worcestershire Sauce, and
one cup Boiled Dressing. Chill and serve.


Cabbage Salad No. 2

Remove the center from a heavy white cabbage, leaving a shell. Shred
center and mix with Cream Dressing or Mayonnaise. Chill, fill cabbage
shell, arrange on a thick bed of parsley, and garnish top of shell with
a border of parsley.


Cauliflower Salad

Marinate one cup cold boiled cauliflower with a French Dressing. Drain,
add boiled dressing. Chill. Serve on bed of water cress and sprinkle
with grated Edam cheese.


Cherry Salad

Remove stones from two cups cherries. To cherries add one cup chopped
English walnuts, one cup chopped celery, and three fourths cup
Mayonnaise. Chill, arrange in lettuce nests, and garnish with one whole
cherry on top of each nest.


Cheese Salad No. 1

Mix two cream cheeses with one cup walnut meat. Moisten with cream;
shape into balls. Chill. Marinate two heads of lettuce; arrange in
nests; place five balls in each nest; sprinkle with finely chopped and
dried parsley. Pass French Dressing with this salad.


Cheese Salad No. 2

Mix two cream cheeses with one half cup chopped pimento. Season with
salt and cayenne; moisten with cream. Line a shallow baking pan with
paraffine paper; press cheese mixture in this pan to the depth of one
inch; cover with paraffine paper, and put under pressure, on ice. When
thoroughly chilled, cut in squares; arrange on lettuce leaves; garnish
with strips of pimento, radiating from the center. Pass French Dressing
with this salad.


Chestnut Salad No. 1

Cut two cups of boiled chestnuts in small pieces. Add two cups
oranges, cut in small pieces, one tablespoon lemon juice, and one cup
Mayonnaise. Chill, serve on lettuce, and garnish with grated orange
rind.


Chestnut Salad No. 2

Mix two cups boiled chestnuts, one cup celery, and one half cup sour
cherries, with one cup Cream Dressing. Chill and serve on water cress.
Garnish with cherries, walnuts and dressing.


Chicken Salad No. 1

Mix two cups chicken meat cut in small pieces, two cups celery, also
cut in small pieces. Marinate with French Dressing. Chill. Arrange in
salad bowl. Mask with Mayonnaise and decorate with hard-cooked eggs,
cut in slices, capers, and Mayonnaise pressed through a pastry bag and
tube.


Chicken Salad No. 2

Mix one cup each, cold cooked chicken cut in pieces, cucumber cut in
cubes, and celery cut in pieces. Marinate with French Dressing. Chill,
drain, mix with one half cup Mayonnaise. Arrange in salad bowl; garnish
with pimolas, yolks of eggs put through a strainer, whites of eggs
chopped fine, Mayonnaise and curled celery.


Chiffonade Salad

Cut celery into one-inch pieces, and pieces into straws, until one cup
is obtained. Remove the pulp from grapefruit, making one cup. Remove
the skin, and slice four medium-sized tomatoes. Break chicory leaves
into pieces for serving. Marinate all separately with French Dressing.
Arrange in separate mounds on a serving dish. Garnish each with chopped
chives, green peppers cut in strips, and parsley. Pass French and
Mayonnaise Dressing.


Chicory Salad

Separate leaves; marinate with French Dressing. Serve crisp and cold.


Cucumber Salad No. 1

Cut four cucumbers in strips, lengthwise, then in half-inch pieces. Add
one cup sweetbreads cooked, and cut in small pieces. Mix with Cream
Dressing, chill, and serve on crisp lettuce.


Cucumber Salad No. 2

Cut six small cucumbers in slices, not quite severing them. Cover with
French Dressing, chill, and serve one to each person.


Cucumber Salad No. 3

Mix one cup each of cucumber cut in cubes, cooked oysters cut in
pieces, and celery cut in pieces. Add one cup Cream Dressing. Chill.
Arrange on lettuce leaves in salad bowl.


Crab Salad

Marinate two cups crab meat with French Dressing. Drain; add one half
cup Mayonnaise Dressing; arrange in crab shells. Chill. Garnish with
pimolas and Mayonnaise Dressing.


Egg Salad No. 1

Cut six hard-cooked eggs in slices, crosswise. Cut twelve radishes in
crosswise slices. Marinate each, and arrange in layers on a bed of
lettuce. Garnish with Cream Dressing and radish roses.


Egg Salad No. 2

Cut six eggs in halves, lengthwise; remove yolks; add an equal amount
of cold cooked ham, chopped; moisten with Cream Dressing, return
to whites, and serve on a bed of water cress, chicory, or shredded
lettuce. Pass Cream Dressing with this salad.


Egg Salad No. 3

Remove the yolks from six hard-cooked eggs, leaving the whites in
rings. Mash yolks; add an equal amount of cold cooked veal or lamb, cut
in small pieces. Moisten with French Dressing; add one teaspoon chopped
chives; shape into balls, and arrange on bed of lettuce. Garnish with
white egg rings.


Endive Salad

Marinate leaves of endive with French Dressing. Chill one hour, and
serve crisp. Sprinkle with chopped chives.


Escarole Salad

Prepare the same as Endive Salad, and sprinkle with finely chopped
green peppers.


Lettuce Salad No. 1

Separate the leaves from two heavy heads of lettuce. Wash, drain,
chill; marinate with French Dressing. Chill; replace in former shape,
making one head out of the two, having all green leaves on the outside.


Lettuce Salad No. 2

Remove leaves from lettuce. Wash, drain and dry. Place leaves together,
roll, and cut in narrow ribbons. Marinate with French Dressing. Arrange
in nests, with a tablespoon of Mayonnaise in each nest.


Lobster Salad No. 1

Marinate four cups lobster in French Dressing. Chill, drain, mix with
one cup Mayonnaise Dressing, and arrange on white lettuce leaves.
Garnish with Mayonnaise and pounded lobster coral.


Lobster Salad No. 2

Mix two cups lobster meat with four hard-cooked eggs, chopped fine.
Marinate with French Dressing. Drain; add Mayonnaise; serve on lettuce;
garnish with chopped olives and sprinkle with finely chopped chives.


Lobster Salad No. 3

Mix equal parts of cucumbers cut in cubes, lobster cut in pieces,
tomatoes cut in pieces, with Mayonnaise Dressing. Chill; arrange
on lettuce leaves; garnish with alternate slices of tomatoes and
cucumbers; and Mayonnaise Dressing put through the pastry bag and tube.


Macedoine Salad

One cup each of string beans, green peas, carrots and celery. Sprinkle
with salt and cayenne, and marinate with French Dressing. Chill one
hour. Arrange in mounds on salad dish, and separate mounds with cold
cooked cauliflower which has been separated and marinated.

Any combination of cold cooked vegetables may be prepared in the same
way.


Onion Salad

Peel six Bermuda onions. Slice, and let them stand one hour in ice
water. Drain, sprinkle with sugar, and marinate with French Dressing.
Serve ice cold on cress.


Potato Salad No. 1

Cut raw potatoes in balls with French vegetable cutter. Cook three
cups of these balls with one sliced onion in boiling salted water
until tender. Chill, marinate with French Dressing, cover with boiled
dressing, arrange on salad dish. Sprinkle with chopped chives, and
garnish with a daisy made of hard-cooked eggs, cut lengthwise.


Potato Salad No. 2

Marinate one cup each of cold cooked potatoes, cut in dice, cold cooked
turnip, also cut in dice, and cold cooked beets, finely chopped.
Arrange in salad dish, separating each vegetable with small leaves of
parsley.


Rice and Vegetable Salad

Mix one cup each of celery, carrots and rice. Marinate all separately
with French Dressing. Arrange on lettuce leaves in shape of a mound,
having rice at the bottom and carrots at the top. Garnish with
spoonfuls of Mayonnaise on the lettuce.


Sardine Salad

Remove bones from one dozen sardines; mix four hard-cooked eggs finely
chopped, twelve pimolas finely chopped, and three pickles finely
chopped. Marinate with a French Dressing. Serve sardines on lettuce and
dot over them spoonfuls of the egg mixture.


Salmon Salad No. 1

Prepare the same as Lobster Salad No. 1.


Salmon Salad No. 2

Prepare and serve the same as Lobster Salad No. 2.


Salmon Salad No. 3

Mix two cups cold cooked salmon with enough Mayonnaise Dressing to make
it creamy. Pack in timbale molds, chill; remove from molds. Serve on
lettuce, and garnish with marinated slices of cucumber and Mayonnaise
Dressing.


Scallop Salad

Mix two cups of cold cooked scallops cut in small pieces, one cup of
celery cut in shreds, with Mayonnaise Dressing. Chill one hour. Serve
in nests of lettuce. Garnish with Mayonnaise, chopped olives and
chopped chives.


Shad Roe Salad

Marinate two cups each of cucumber and cooked shad roe. Chill one
hour; add one half cup Mayonnaise. Arrange in salad bowl; garnish with
marinated slices of cucumber and crisp lettuce leaves. Sprinkle the
slices of cucumber with chopped chives.


Shrimp Salad

Marinate two cups of shrimps with French Dressing. Add one half cup
each of olives and pimentoes. Chill one hour. Drain; add one half cup
of Mayonnaise Dressing; serve on lettuce and garnish with whole shrimps.


Spinach Salad

Mix two cups cold, cooked, and seasoned spinach, with four hard-cooked
eggs, finely chopped. Press into timbale molds; chill; remove; arrange
in nests of lettuce; cover with French Dressing. Garnish top and edge
of salad with egg, arranged like daisies. Pass Cream or Mayonnaise
Dressing with this salad.


Sweetbread Salad

Marinate one cup each of cold cooked sweetbreads, celery and cucumbers.
Chill one hour. Drain; mix with Mayonnaise; serve on lettuce, and
garnish with pimento.


Sweetbread and Cucumber Salad

Mix two cups sweetbreads and two cups cucumbers cut in small pieces,
with Mayonnaise Dressing; add one teaspoon gelatine, which has been
dissolved in water. Press in timbale molds. Chill; remove from molds,
and serve in individual nests of lettuce. Garnish with Mayonnaise
Dressing and chopped parsley.


Stuffed Tomato Salad No. 1

    2 cups chicken stock
    1½ tablespoons gelatine
    ¼ cup chopped chicken
    ¼ cup chopped ham
    2 chopped pickles
    2 chopped pimentoes
    1 tablespoon lemon juice
    1 tablespoon chopped parsley
    6 tomatoes

Heat chicken stock; season highly; dissolve gelatine in stock; add
chicken, ham, pickles, pimentoes, lemon juice and parsley. Remove a
slice from the top of each tomato, scoop out the pulp, fill the shells
with the chicken jelly. Chill and serve on crisp lettuce leaves.


Stuffed Tomato Salad No. 2

Remove the skin from eight tomatoes; scoop out the inside. Chill
shells. Drain pulp; add equal quantity of celery, shrimps and cucumber,
mixed with Mayonnaise Dressing. Refill shells; serve on cress, and
garnish with Mayonnaise Dressing.


Tomato and Nut Salad

Remove the skin from eight tomatoes; scoop out the inside; mix the
drained pulp with equal amount of chopped walnuts and one fourth cup
chopped green peppers. Add Mayonnaise Dressing or Cream Dressing.
Refill tomato shells; serve in lettuce nests, and garnish with
Mayonnaise Dressing.


French Fruit Salad

Remove the skin and seeds from one cup of white grapes. Cut three
bananas in cubes and cover immediately with lemon juice. Remove the
skin and white from six oranges and cut in small pieces. Mix with
Mayonnaise Dressing; arrange in nests of white lettuce leaves, or serve
in halves of oranges. Garnish with Mayonnaise Dressing.


Martin Salad

Cook a two-pound slice of halibut with one onion cut in slices, four
slices of carrot, two tablespoons vinegar, six cloves, bit of bay leaf,
and four peppercorns, in water to cover, until tender. Chill, and
marinate with French Dressing. Cook four cups potato balls in boiling
salted water, with two slices onion and four cloves. When done, drain
and cover with hot salad dressing. Marinate two cups each of French
peas and flageolettes with a French Dressing. Cut three tomatoes in
slices, and marinate with French Dressing.

When all these ingredients are thoroughly chilled, rub the salad
dish with onion; lay slice of halibut in center; garnish with Cream
Mayonnaise; arrange potatoes at either end of slice, and sprinkle
with finely chopped parsley. Arrange a mound each of flageolettes and
peas on either side of halibut; cover halibut with slices of tomato
overlapping each other; garnish with the heart leaves of lettuce,
arranged at intervals around the dish. Pass Mayonnaise Cream Dressing.


Vegetable Salad

Mix one cup cold cooked potatoes, one cup Tomato Jelly cut in cubes,
and one cup cold cooked peas. Marinate with French Dressing; arrange on
a salad dish; mask with Mayonnaise or Cream Dressing, and garnish with
slices of tomato around the edge, and mounds of peas alternating with
mounds of chopped pimolas.


Vegetable Oyster or Salsify Salad

Mix two cups cold cooked salsify, cut in small pieces, with a French
Dressing; let it stand one hour. Rub salad bowl with clove of garlic.
Arrange bed of cress in salad bowl; cover with two tablespoons Cream
Dressing. Cover with drained salsify, and cover whole with Cream
Dressing. Garnish with radish roses.


Waldorf Salad

Mix one cup each of small pieces of celery, apple cut in balls, and
English walnuts broken in small pieces. Add one teaspoon salt, two
tablespoons orange juice, and the grated rind of one orange. Add one
cup Mayonnaise Dressing. Serve in lettuce nests or in apple cups, made
by scooping out the pulp. Garnish with Mayonnaise Dressing and pieces
of the apple skin cut in fancy shapes.


Apple Salad

Scoop out the center of eight red apples with a vegetable scoop. Mix
with equal parts of finely chopped celery and Boiled Dressing. Fill
apple shells and serve on bed of curled celery.


Grape Fruit Salad No. 1

Mix equal quantities of grape fruit and English walnut meats, with one
half cup Mayonnaise Dressing. Serve in grape fruit cups in lettuce
nests.


Grape Fruit Salad No. 2

Shred four green peppers, two red peppers, and two grape fruit. Mix
with one cup chopped celery and one cup Cream Dressing. Serve on
marinated water cress and garnish with stars of red and green peppers.


Sweet Grape Fruit Salad

Use same ingredients as for Grape Fruit Salad, substituting Wine
Dressing for Mayonnaise Dressing.


Orange Salad

Marinate eight oranges cut in slices with French Dressing. Season
highly with cayenne. Serve on water cress.


Orange Salad No. 2

Cut thin round slices of orange without removing skin; arrange in
layers in salad bowl. Serve on bed of water cress, and marinate with
French Dressing.


Orange Salad No. 3

Cut six oranges in halves, take out the pulp, and remove veins and
sections. To the pulp add one fourth cup powdered sugar, one fourth cup
chopped mint, and two tablespoons each of wine, lemon juice and orange
juice. Serve in champagne glasses, and garnish with one red cherry and
a bit of angelica.


Pineapple Salad

Shred one pineapple; add same amount of white grapes, skinned and
seeded, equal amount of celery cut in small pieces, and one half cup
castana nuts shredded finely. Moisten with Cream Mayonnaise. Serve on
lettuce leaves and garnish with red cherries.


Sweet Fruit Salad

Use same ingredients as for Pineapple Salad, substituting a Wine
Dressing for Cream Mayonnaise Dressing.


Tomato Jelly

    2 cups tomatoes
    4 peppercorns
    2 cloves
    1 slice of onion
    1 teaspoon Worcestershire Sauce
    ½ teaspoon salt
    ½ teaspoon paprika
    2 teaspoons gelatine
    ½ cup cold water

Soak gelatine in cold water. Cook the remaining ingredients fifteen
minutes, strain, add gelatine, when dissolved pour into individual
molds or into a border mold. When cold, turn out and garnish with
Mayonnaise Dressing or Celery Salad.



CHAPTER XII

SANDWICHES


THE best sandwiches are made from bread which is fine grained and one
day old.

Always cream the butter for buttering the bread.

Spread the loaf with butter before cutting the slice from the loaf. Cut
each slice as thin as possible. After cutting, spread the slice with
the sandwich mixture, and cover with another slice. Press the slices
together firmly; cut off all crust and cut in rounds, triangles, or any
shape desired.

Keep sandwiches wrapped in a cheese cloth which has been thoroughly
dampened with cold water, and pack in a closed box until ready to use.


Anchovy Sandwiches

Remove the bones from one dozen anchovies; add the yolks of three
hard-cooked eggs, and pound to a paste.

Mix two tablespoons Parmesan cheese with a few grains of cayenne; add
to anchovy mixture, with enough cream to make of the consistency to
spread.

Use for a filling between slices of buttered white bread.


Caviare Sandwiches

Mix three tablespoons lemon juice, three tablespoons olive oil, and one
quarter pound Russian caviare. Beat until creamy. Spread between thin
slices of bread.


Celery Sandwiches

Mix one cup finely shredded celery, one fourth cup finely chopped nuts,
and one fourth cup chopped olives. Moisten with Mayonnaise and spread
between thin slices of brown bread.


Cheese Sandwiches No. 1

Mix one cream cheese with an equal amount of chopped walnuts; add a few
grains of cayenne, season with salt, and moisten with cream. Use for a
filling for graham sandwiches.


Cheese Sandwiches No. 2

Pound one quarter pound American cheese with two tablespoons butter,
a few grains cayenne, and one teaspoon mustard; moisten with tarragon
vinegar, and spread between thin slices of white bread.


Cheese Sandwiches No. 3

Mix one cream cheese with an equal amount of chopped pimolas; season
with salt and cayenne, and moisten with cream or Mayonnaise.

Use for a filling for white or brown bread sandwiches.


Chicken Sandwiches No. 1

Mix one cup chopped chicken with one fourth cup Mayonnaise. Spread
between thin slices of buttered bread.


Chicken Sandwiches No. 2

Mix one cup chopped chicken with one cup chopped almonds; moisten with
cream; season with salt and paprika. Use for filling for entire wheat
bread sandwiches.


Cucumber Sandwiches

Slice one cucumber; marinate with French Dressing. Sprinkle thin slices
of white bread with cayenne; spread with marinated cucumbers, and cover
with white bread cut in thin slices.


Egg Sandwiches

Chop two hard-cooked eggs; add olive oil and seasonings until of the
consistency to spread. Use for a filling for graham bread sandwiches.


Lobster Salad Sandwiches

Mix one cup chopped lobster meat with Mayonnaise. Marinate crisp
lettuce leaves. Arrange drained leaves on thin slices of bread; cover
with lobster, and cover lobster with bread; sprinkle dried lobster
coral on top of each sandwich. Prepare just before serving; if allowed
to stand they will be unsatisfactory.


Favorite Sandwiches

Cream two tablespoons butter, add one half cup grated American cheese,
two tablespoons anchovy essence, one fourth teaspoon each of paprika
and mustard, and one half cup finely chopped olives. Season with salt
and spread between thin slices of bread.


Club Sandwiches

Marinate crisp lettuce leaves. Butter thin slices of bread; arrange
on bread one lettuce leaf, on leaf a thin slice of tongue spread with
Mayonnaise, on top of this a slice of tomato spread with Mayonnaise,
and cover with a thin slice of buttered bread.


Sardine Sandwiches

Mix twelve boned and skinned sardines, one tablespoon chopped pimolas
and one tablespoon lemon juice. Use for filling between buttered slices
of white bread.


Ham Sandwiches

Mix one cup chopped ham, one teaspoon vinegar, one teaspoon French
mustard, one teaspoon horse-radish and one tablespoon olive oil. Spread
between buttered slices of white bread.


Tomato and Horse-radish Sandwiches

Mix one quarter cup mayonnaise with one quarter cup horse-radish.
Sprinkle slices of tomato with salt. Spread thin slices of bread with
horse-radish mixture, and put sliced tomato between.


Nasturtium Sandwiches

Spread thin slices of white bread with Mayonnaise; use the petals of
nasturtium flowers for filling, allowing some of the petals to come
beyond the edge of the bread.


Jelly Sandwiches

Spread buttered bread with jelly and sprinkle jelly with chopped nuts.
Cover with buttered bread, and shape.


Ginger Sandwiches

Use finely chopped Canton ginger for a filling for graham bread
sandwiches.


Orange Sandwiches

Use orange marmalade for a filling for white or whole wheat bread
sandwiches.


Striped Bread Sandwiches

Make an equal number of white bread and brown bread sandwiches; place
sandwiches together in alternating colors. Wrap in damp cheese cloth
and press over night. Cut in thin slices, then in strips.

When cut, these sandwiches give the appearance of marbled bread.


Fig Sandwiches

Stew figs, season with wine and lemon juice, and use for a filling for
white or graham bread sandwiches.


Nut Sandwiches

Mix one cup each of chopped peanuts and walnuts with two tablespoons
Mayonnaise Dressing. Spread between buttered slices of brown bread.


Chocolate Sandwich No. 1

Melt two ounces Lowney’s Premium Chocolate. Add two tablespoons hot
cream (or hot milk), two tablespoons wine (or one teaspoon vanilla),
and enough confectioner’s sugar to make of the consistency to spread.
Use for a filling between crackers, or thin slices of bread or cake.
Finely chopped nuts slightly salted may be added to the chocolate
mixture.


Chocolate Sandwich No. 2

Cut stale bread in thin slices, cut slices in fancy shapes, butter each
slice and spread with Chocolate Mixture.


Chocolate Mixture

Melt one fourth cup Lowney’s Premium Chocolate, add two tablespoons
sugar, two tablespoons hot water, cook over hot water five minutes, add
one teaspoon butter and one half teaspoon vanilla.


Chocolate Sandwich No. 3

Spread Chocolate Mixture on saltine crackers, sprinkle with chopped
walnuts and cover with saltine crackers.


Lettuce, Water Cress, Sardine, Shrimp and Oyster Sandwiches

Lettuce, water cress, sardines, shrimp and oysters may be mixed with
French Dressing or Mayonnaise, and used for filling for sandwiches.



CHAPTER XIII

DESSERTS


COLD DESSERTS


Chocolate Blanc Mange No. 1

    2 tablespoons gelatine
    ¼ cup cold water
    4 ounces Lowney’s Premium Chocolate
    2 cups scalded milk
    1 cup sugar
    3 eggs
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon vanilla

Soak the gelatine in cold water; mix sugar, chocolate and eggs; add
scalded milk, and cook in double boiler until a coating is formed on a
spoon; add to soaked gelatine; when dissolved, add salt and vanilla;
pour into mold and chill. Serve with sugar and cream, beaten cream, or
Soft Custard.


Chocolate Blanc Mange No. 2

    ½ cup Irish moss
    3 cups cold water
    4 cups cold milk
    2 squares Lowney’s Premium Chocolate
    ¾ cup sugar
    ¼ cup boiling water

Soak Irish moss in cold water twenty minutes; drain, and pick over.
Put milk in double boiler; add moss, and cook without stirring thirty
minutes. Melt chocolate; add sugar and water; boil two minutes; add to
first mixture. Strain, mold, chill, and serve with sugar and cream.


Chocolate Mold

    4 tablespoons cornstarch
    ¼ cup cold milk
    2 cups scalded milk
    ¼ cup sugar
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    ½ teaspoon vanilla
    ½ cup blanched almonds
    3 ounces Lowney’s Premium Chocolate, melted with 2 tablespoons sugar
    3 egg whites

Mix cornstarch with cold milk; add sugar, salt, scalded milk, and the
melted chocolate, mixed with two tablespoons sugar. Cook in double
boiler twenty minutes, stirring constantly. Cool slightly, cut, and
fold in the well-beaten egg whites, keeping the mixture as fluffy as
possible. Add vanilla. Decorate the bottom and sides of an oval mold
with halves of almonds arranged in the shape of daisies. Pour in the
cornstarch mixture, chill, remove from mold, and garnish with candied
cherries and beaten cream, sweetened and flavored.

A more fancy dish is obtained by making double the receipt and putting
the chocolate into half the mixture, keeping the other half white. Mold
the white in small glasses or timbale molds and arrange around the oval
mold. Garnish each small mold with half cherry, and the spaces between
with cream forced through the pastry bag. See colored illustration,
Plate I, opposite.

[Illustration: CHOCOLATE MOLD

Plate I. For Receipt see page 204]

[Illustration: CHOCOLATE CHARLOTTE RUSSE

Plate II. For Receipt see page 204]


Chocolate Charlotte Russe

    1 pint cream whipped until stiff
    ¾ cup powdered sugar
    2 ounces Lowney’s Premium Chocolate or
    ¼ cup Lowney’s Cocoa
    3 egg whites
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon vanilla or
    1 tablespoon brandy
    sponge cake or macaroons

Melt the chocolate over hot water, or mix the cocoa with one quarter
cup hot water; add sugar, cream whipped until stiff, whites of eggs
beaten until stiff, salt and flavoring. Line a mold with lady
fingers or sponge cake; fill with cream mixture, and chill at least one
hour. This mixture may be molded in individual molds; then one half
hour will be sufficient to chill it. See colored illustration, Plate
II, opposite.

[Illustration: CHOCOLATE BAVARIAN CREAM

Plate III. For Receipt see page 205]

[Illustration: CHOCOLATE TRIFLE

Plate IV. For Receipt see page 205]


Chocolate Bavarian Cream

    2 ounces Lowney’s Premium Chocolate
    ½ cup sugar
    4 egg yolks
    ¼ cup cold water
    2 cups milk
    2 tablespoons granulated gelatine
    2 cups cream
    ¼ teaspoon salt

Melt chocolate; add sugar, eggs and milk; cook in double boiler until
mixture thickens; soak gelatine in cold water; dissolve in egg mixture,
strain, cool, and when beginning to harden, fold in whip from two cups
of cream. Pour into mold to harden. Unmold and garnish with beaten
cream and cherries. See colored illustration, Plate III, opposite.


Chocolate Trifle

    3 squares Lowney’s Premium Chocolate
    ⅔ cup powdered sugar
    ¼ cup boiling water
    1 teaspoon vanilla
    1½ tablespoons granulated gelatine
    ¼ cup cold water
    ½ cup scalded milk
    whip from 3 cups cream

Melt chocolate; add sugar and water; cook until smooth. Soak gelatine
in cold water; dissolve in boiling water; add chocolate mixture. Chill
partially; add vanilla, and whip from cream. Mold, chill, and serve,
garnished with beaten cream and cherries. See colored illustration,
Plate IV, opposite.


Chocolate Cream Custard

    1 cup sugar
    4 eggs
    3 cups scalded milk
    ½ teaspoon vanilla
    2 ounces Lowney’s Premium Chocolate
    ½ teaspoon salt

Melt sugar in clean omelet pan; when golden brown, add to scalded milk;
when dissolved pour on to eggs, which have been slightly beaten, add
salt, vanilla, and chocolate which has been melted over hot water.

Strain into individual molds. Set in a pan of hot water and bake in a
moderate oven until firm. Chill; unmold, and serve with Chocolate Sauce
or Caramel Sauce.


Cocoa Cream

    2 cups light cream
    2 tablespoons granulated gelatine
    ¼ cup cold water
    2 egg yolks
    2 egg whites
    ½ cup cocoa
    ¼ inch stick cinnamon
    1 teaspoon vanilla
    1 cup heavy cream
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    ½ cup sugar

Mix cocoa, sugar, yolks of eggs; add light cream and cinnamon, and cook
in double boiler until mixture begins to thicken. Add to gelatine which
has been soaked in cold water, and stir until dissolved.

Add salt, vanilla, and whites of eggs beaten until stiff; when well
blended, add heavy cream beaten until thick with Dover egg beater.
Mold, chill; and serve with cream.


Cocoa Almond Cream

Use receipt for Cocoa Cream and add one cup blanched, chopped, and
browned almonds just before molding.


Cocoa Tutti-frutti Cream

Use receipt for Cocoa Cream. Add one half cup macaroons which have
been dried in the oven and pounded, and one cup candied cherries cut
in small pieces; or one half dozen marshmallows and one half dozen
raisins, and one tablespoon each of citron and candied cherries,
chopped fine, may be added just before molding.


Chestnuts with Chocolate Cream

    1 cup mashed chestnuts
    4 tablespoons powdered sugar
    ⅛ teaspoon salt
    4 tablespoons cream
    3 tablespoons sherry wine
    1 cup heavy cream
    3 tablespoons powdered sugar
    1 teaspoon vanilla or
    2 tablespoons maraschino
    4 tablespoons Lowney’s Premium Chocolate, melted


Chestnut Mixture

Boil one quart French chestnuts; remove shells, press through potato
ricer; add sugar, salt, cream and flavoring.

Fill individual molds with this mixture. Chill. Remove from molds and
serve around the Chocolate Cream Mixture.


Chocolate Cream Mixture

Beat the one cup heavy cream in above receipt; add powdered sugar,
chocolate and flavoring. Arrange in the shape of a pyramid; garnish
with candied cherries and angelica, cut in small pieces.


Cocoanut Molds with Chocolate Sauce

    2 cups milk
    3 tablespoons cornstarch mixed with
    3 tablespoons cold milk
    ¼ cup powdered sugar
    ⅛ teaspoon salt
    ¾ cup shredded cocoanut
    3 egg whites

Mix cornstarch with three tablespoons cold milk; add salt, sugar
and two cups milk. Cook in double boiler twenty minutes, stirring
constantly. Add cocoanut and cut and fold in the whites of eggs, beaten
until stiff. Turn into molds, chill, and serve with Chocolate Sauce.


Chocolate Sauce

    1 cup milk
    2 egg yolks
    ¼ cup sugar
    ⅛ teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon butter
    2 ounces Lowney’s Premium Chocolate or
    ¼ cup Lowney’s Cocoa

Cook all ingredients in double boiler, stirring constantly until the
spoon is coated. Serve hot or cold.


Chocolate Raspberry Meringue

    3 egg whites
    1 cup powdered sugar
    4 tablespoons raspberry jam
    2 squares Lowney’s Premium Chocolate, melted
    1 tablespoon lemon juice

Beat the whites of eggs until stiff, using fork or flat beater; add
remaining ingredients very slowly, and beat constantly.

Serve with beaten cream, flavored with wine or vanilla. The above
mixture may be taken up in spoonfuls and poached in hot water, or may
be used for éclairs, cream puffs, or cream pie, or served plain in
frappé glasses.


Chocolate Junket

    1 ounce Lowney’s Premium Chocolate
    3 tablespoons boiling water
    1 junket tablet
    1 quart milk
    1 tablespoon wine or brandy
    ¼ cup powdered sugar

Melt chocolate; add boiling water. Crush junket tablet; dissolve in one
tablespoon cold water. Scald milk; add sugar, flavoring; when cool, add
dissolved junket tablet and melted chocolate; pour into serving cups;
let stand in warm place until of consistency of jelly, then chill.
Serve with sugar and cream.


Cocoa Froth

    1½ tablespoons granulated gelatine
    ¼ cup cold water
    ¾ cup boiling water
    ¼ cup Lowney’s Cocoa
    1 cup sugar
    grated rind and juice of 1 lemon
    4 egg whites
    ⅛ teaspoon salt

Soak gelatine in cold water; add boiling water. Mix cocoa, sugar, lemon
juice and rind; add gelatine mixture; strain into a cold bowl. When
mixture thickens, beat until frothy; add well-beaten whites, and beat
until mixture will stand alone. Drop spoonfuls on serving dish and
garnish with Vanilla Custard.


Soft Custard

    2 cups milk
    4 egg yolks
    ⅓ cup sugar
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    ½ teaspoon vanilla

Scald the milk in double boiler. Mix eggs, sugar and salt; add scalded
milk to them; return to double boiler, and cook until mixture thickens
and is of a smooth and creamy consistency.

Strain into a cold dish and flavor when cold. Should the custard begin
to curdle, set immediately into a dish of cold water and beat briskly
with a wire whisk or egg beater.

Soft custard may be made with whole eggs, but it is not so velvety.


Arrowroot Custard

    2 cups milk
    2 tablespoons arrowroot
    ½ teaspoon vanilla
    2 egg yolks
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    ¼ cup sugar

Scald milk; mix arrowroot and sugar; add to scalded milk, and cook ten
minutes. Beat egg yolks slightly; add salt; pour milk mixture on to
eggs; return to double boiler; stir constantly until thickened.

Cool, flavor, and serve in custard cups.


Banana Custard

Arrange slices of bananas in bottom of serving dish, sprinkle with
lemon juice, and cover with Soft Custard.


Fruit Custard

Prepare the same as Banana Custard, using one fruit or a combination of
fruits.


Strawberry Custard

Use receipt for Soft Custard. When cold, add one cup of crushed and
sweetened strawberries. Serve ice-cold and garnish with Strawberry
Meringue.


Coffee Custard

Use rule for Soft Custard, adding one fourth cup ground coffee to milk
before scalding.


Soft Caramel Custard

Use receipt for Soft Custard, adding one half cup caramelized sugar to
milk before scalding.


Baked Vanilla Custard

    3 cups milk
    5 eggs
    ⅓ cup sugar
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    ½ teaspoon vanilla

Scald milk and add to eggs, sugar and salt, mixed together. Strain, add
vanilla, and bake in one large buttered mold, or small ones, set in a
pan of hot water, in a slow oven. Should the water boil during baking,
the custard will be of a porous consistency. To test the custard thrust
a silver knife through the center. When it comes out clean the custard
is done.


Baked Sherry Custard

Use rule for Baked Vanilla Custard, flavoring with one tablespoon
sherry wine.

All other flavored custards may be made the same way, by substituting
special flavorings.


Baked Caramel Custard No. 1

    1 cup sugar
    4 egg yolks
    2 cups milk
    1 teaspoon vanilla
    ¼ cup sugar
    ¼ teaspoon salt

Caramelize the one cup of sugar. When a delicate brown color, pour into
a well-buttered charlotte russe mold or into individual cups; set away
to cool.

Scald milk; mix eggs, one fourth cup of sugar, and salt, add milk;
strain into mold on to cold caramel; add seasoning and bake the same as
Baked Vanilla Custard. Unmold and serve with Caramel Sauce.


Baked Caramel Custard No. 2

    3 cups milk
    ¾ cup sugar
    ½ teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon vanilla
    4 eggs

Scald milk; caramelize sugar and add to scalded milk. Beat eggs
slightly, add salt, milk mixture and flavoring. Strain into buttered
dish and bake like Baked Vanilla Custard. Unmold and serve with Caramel
Sauce.

This rule may be made with three eggs, but will be less rich and will
break when unmolded.


Floating Island

Follow rule for Soft Custard; flavor with lemon juice, and garnish with
a meringue made of the whites of four eggs, four tablespoons powdered
sugar, and one teaspoon vanilla, beaten until stiff.

The meringue may be first poached in water in spoonfuls, then dropped
on top of custard; or may be placed there without being poached, and
teaspoons of Currant Jelly placed on top of each island.


Strawberry Floating Island

Make the same as Floating Island and add to the meringue the sweetened
juice of two cups of strawberries.


Irish Moss Blanc Mange

    4 cups milk
    2 tablespoons sugar
    ½ teaspoon salt
    ¼ cup Irish moss
    1 teaspoon vanilla

Soak the moss; tie in cheese cloth, and cook in milk in double boiler
thirty minutes without stirring. Remove moss without pressing bag; add
other ingredients, strain into wet molds, chill, and serve.


Chocolate Irish Moss Blanc Mange

See Chocolate Blanc Mange No. 2.


Coffee Irish Moss Blanc Mange

Use receipt for Irish Moss Blanc Mange, and flavor with two teaspoons
coffee extract.


Cornstarch Pudding No. 1

    2 cups milk
    4 tablespoons cornstarch
    3 tablespoons sugar
    3 egg whites
    ½ teaspoon vanilla

Mix cornstarch and sugar; scald milk, add to cornstarch, stir
constantly until it thickens; cook one half hour, stirring
occasionally. Add the beaten egg whites, beat well, flavor, and mold.
Chill and serve.


Cornstarch Pudding No. 2

Follow receipt for Cornstarch Pudding No. 1, substituting three egg
yolks for three egg whites.


Fruit Cornstarch Pudding

Add one cup of any kind of cooked fruit to Cornstarch Pudding No. 1
just before molding.


Cocoanut Cornstarch Mold

Add one cup of shredded cocoanut to Cornstarch Pudding No. 1, and serve
with Custard Sauce.


Pineapple Cornstarch Mold

Add one can pineapple to Cornstarch Pudding No. 1, and serve with
Custard Sauce.


Tapioca Cream

    3 tablespoons pearl tapioca
    2 cups milk
    2 egg yolks
    ½ cup sugar
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    2 egg whites
    ½ teaspoon vanilla

Soak the tapioca in milk one hour, cook in double boiler one half hour.
Mix egg yolks, salt and sugar; add tapioca mixture, and cook until
mixture thickens. Cool slightly, add stiffly beaten whites. Cool,
flavor, and serve.


Tapioca Pudding

Cover one cup pearl tapioca with boiling water. Cook in boiling water
until transparent. Add three tablespoons sugar, the juice and grated
rind of one lemon. Serve cold with sugar and cream.


Apple Tapioca No. 1

    ½ cup pearl tapioca
    4 cups boiling water
    ½ teaspoon salt
    8 apples
    ½ cup sugar
    grated rind and juice of one lemon

Cook the tapioca in boiling water until transparent; add one half
teaspoon salt and lemon rind.

Core and pare apples, arrange in baking dish, fill cavities with sugar
and lemon juice, cover with tapioca, and bake until apples are tender,
adding one teaspoon butter before taking from oven.


Apple Tapioca No. 2

Use rule for Apple Tapioca No. 1, arranging tapioca and apples cut in
slices, in layers.


Apple Sago

Use rule for Apple Tapioca No. 1, substituting one half cup sago for
tapioca.


Danish Pudding

    ½ cup tapioca
    3 cups boiling water
    ½ teaspoon salt
    1 tablespoon lemon juice
    ½ cup sugar
    1 tumbler Currant Jelly

Soak tapioca in water several hours, and cook in same water until
transparent. Add remaining ingredients. Mold, chill, and serve.


Sponge Cocoanut Pudding

Season Soft Custard with two tablespoons wine. Arrange in layers one
dozen macaroons, one dozen lady fingers and one dozen cocoanut cakes.

Cover with Soft Custard and sprinkle with grated cocoanut.


Apple Meringue

    8 apples
    3 egg yolks
    ¼ cup sugar
    ½ teaspoon salt
    2 cups milk
    1 teaspoon vanilla

Core apples and bake until tender. Make a custard of the remaining
ingredients; pour over baked apples. Cover with meringue made of the
whites of the eggs and three tablespoons powdered sugar.


Chestnut Cream

    2 cups shelled chestnuts
    grated rind and juice of one lemon
    Soft Custard
    ½ cup cream

Boil chestnuts; press through strainer; add lemon juice, rind and
custard. Turn into frappé glasses; cover with whipped cream sweetened
and flavored.


Lemon Jelly No. 1

    2 tablespoons granulated gelatine
    ⅓ cup cold water
    2¼ cups boiling water
    1 cup sugar
    ½ cup lemon juice

Soak gelatine in cold water, add boiling water; when dissolved, add
sugar and lemon juice. Mold and chill.


Lemon Jelly No. 2

    2 tablespoons granulated gelatine
    ⅓ cup cold water
    2 cups boiling water
    1 cup sugar
    1 cup lemon juice
    grated rind of one half lemon

Soak the gelatine in cold water; add boiling water and lemon rind;
let it stand ten minutes. Strain; add sugar and lemon juice. Mold in
shallow dish. When hard, cut in squares and serve with boiled custard.


Grape Fruit Jelly

    2 tablespoons granulated gelatine
    ⅓ cup cold water
    2 cups boiling water
    2 tablespoons lemon juice
    1 cup grape fruit juice
    1¼ cups sugar

Soak gelatine in cold water; add boiling water, fruit juice, sugar, and
strain. Mold, chill, and serve.


Orange Jelly

Make the same as Grape Fruit Jelly, substituting orange for grape fruit
juice.


Macedoine of Oranges

Use rule for Orange Jelly. Cover the bottom of a charlotte russe mold
with jelly. Chill, decorate with sections of oranges, add another layer
of jelly, decorate the sides as well as bottom, and so continue until
dish is filled.


Wine Jelly

    2 tablespoons gelatine
    ⅓ cup cold water
    1 cup boiling water
    1 cup wine (cooking Madeira or Sherry)
    ½ cup lemon juice
    ½ cup orange juice
    1 cup sugar

Prepare as for Lemon Jelly. Chill and serve.


Sauterne Jelly

    2 tablespoons gelatine
    ⅓ cup cold water
    1 cup boiling water
    ¼ cup lemon juice
    1½ cups sauterne
    1¼ cups sugar
    green coloring

Soak gelatine in cold water, add a small amount of coloring to boiling
water, pour on to soaked gelatine, add sugar and fruit juice. Strain,
if the liquid is satisfactory color; if not deep enough, add more
coloring matter before straining. Mold, chill, and serve.


Russian Jelly

    2 tablespoons gelatine
    ⅓ cup cold water
    1 cup sugar
    1 tablespoon wine
    2 cups boiling water
    ½ cup orange juice
    ½ cup grape juice
    3 egg whites

Soak gelatine in cold water. Boil sugar and boiling water ten minutes.
Add soaked gelatine and fruit juice. Strain, add egg whites, and beat
with Dover egg beater until cold. Serve with beaten cream, sweetened
and flavored.


Orange Trifle

    2 tablespoons gelatine
    ¼ cup cold water
    ½ cup boiling water
    1¼ cups sugar
    1¼ cups orange juice
    ¼ cup lemon juice
    grated rind of one orange
    whip from 2½ cups cream

Soak gelatine in cold water; dissolve in boiling water. Add sugar,
fruit rind, and juice, and the whip from cream. Decorate a melon mold
with sections of oranges. Pour in trifle mixture. Chill, cool, remove
from mold, garnish with orange jelly and beaten and sweetened cream.


Peach Gâteau

Scoop out center of a round sponge cake; fill with fresh peaches,
sweetened and cut in pieces. Cover with beaten and sweetened cream,
put on with a pastry bag and tube. Garnish with small pieces of peaches.


Syllabub

    2 cups cream
    2 tablespoons lemon juice
    1 cup sugar
    1 cup sherry
    ⅛ teaspoon cinnamon
    grated rind of one lemon

Whip cream; mix other ingredients, add whip, and serve in frappé
glasses. Garnish with small bits of red cherries.


Strawberry Syllabub

    2 cups cream
    1½ cups strawberry juice
    1 cup sugar
    ¼ cup lemon juice
    whites of two eggs

Mix sugar and fruit juice. Add beaten whites and cream. Continue
beating until stiff. Arrange sliced strawberries in the bottom
of frappé glasses, add cream mixture, and garnish with slices of
strawberries on top.


Prune Jelly

    1 cup prunes
    ½ box gelatine
    ⅓ cup cold water
    2 tablespoons lemon juice
    2 tablespoons sherry
    2 cups boiling water
    1 cup sugar
    ½ cup walnuts

Cook prunes and remove stones. Soak gelatine in cold water. Add boiling
water. Strain; add lemon juice, sherry and sugar. Pour into a mold.
When mixture begins to harden, add prunes cut in pieces and walnuts
broken in pieces. Stir occasionally to keep fruit from settling. Mold,
chill, and serve with Soft Custard.


Fruit Jelly Macedoine

Use Wine, Orange, or Lemon Jelly. Pour jelly in mold to depth of
one half inch. Decorate bottom of mold with a slice of banana, and
radiating from it halves of blanched almonds. Cover with jelly, and
arrange in alternating layers, English walnuts, candied fruits, figs
and jelly. Chill; serve and garnish with whipped cream.


Bavarian Cream

    2 tablespoons granulated gelatine
    ⅓ cup cold water
    ¼ cup hot cream
    2 cups cream
    ½ cup sugar
    1 teaspoon vanilla

Soak the gelatine in cold water; dissolve in hot cream; add sugar. When
the mixture begins to thicken add the whip from one pint of cream. Cut
and fold in this cream; do not stir. When nearly stiff enough to drop,
mold.


Coffee Bavarian Cream

Use rule for Bavarian Cream, substituting one fourth cup strong boiling
coffee for one fourth cup cream.


Strawberry Bavarian Cream

    2 tablespoons granulated gelatine
    ½ cup cold water
    ½ cup boiling water
    1 pint fresh strawberry juice
    24 whole strawberries
    whip from one pint of cream
    ½ cup sugar

Soak gelatine in cold water, dissolve in boiling water. Add fruit juice
and sugar; stir until mixture begins to thicken. Cut and fold in the
whip from the cream.

Line a mold with halves of strawberries; pour in cream mixture. Chill;
garnish with beaten cream and strawberries, and serve.


Raspberry Bavarian

Prepare the same as Strawberry Bavarian, adding two tablespoons lemon
juice, and substituting raspberry juice for strawberry juice.


Pineapple Bavarian

Prepare the same as Strawberry Bavarian, and substitute one can grated
pineapple for strawberry juice.


Peach or Apricot Bavarian

Use rule for Strawberry Bavarian, using one pint crushed peaches or
apricots for strawberry juice, and garnish with halves of peaches or
apricots.


Chocolate Bavarian

For Chocolate Bavarian see special receipts for Lowney’s Chocolate, p.
205.


Banana Bavarian

    2 tablespoons granulated gelatine
    ¼ cup cold water
    ½ cup boiling water
    4 bananas
    2 tablespoons orange juice
    ½ cup sugar
    whip from two cups cream

Mash the bananas. Soak gelatine in cold water; dissolve in boiling
water; add sugar, banana pulp and orange juice. When mixture begins
to thicken, cut and fold in the whip from the cream. Mold, chill, and
garnish with beaten cream, bananas and cherries.


Ginger Bavarian

Use rule for Banana Bavarian, substituting one cup preserved ginger,
and adding one quarter cup sherry wine.


Italian Cream

    2 cups milk
    3 egg yolks
    ¼ cup sugar
    2 tablespoons granulated gelatine
    few grains salt
    ¼ cup cold water
    3 egg whites

Soak gelatine in cold water; scald milk; mix yolks and sugar, add milk
and salt; cook until mixture begins to thicken; add soaked gelatine,
chill, and as mixture thickens add the beaten whites of eggs. Mold,
chill, and serve. Any flavorings used for Bavarians may be used for
Italian Creams.


Almond Italian Cream

To Italian Cream add one cup almonds which have been blanched, chopped,
and browned and two tablespoons lemon juice.


Caramel Italian Cream

To Italian Cream add one cup caramelized sugar to custard before adding
gelatine.


Maple Italian Cream

Add one cup maple sugar to hot custard in Italian Cream before adding
gelatine.


Bavarian Macedoine

Line a mold with Strawberry Bavarian, one inch thick, set another mold
on top of this Bavarian and pour in Strawberry Bavarian to the top
of the mold. Chill. When hardened, remove second mold and fill with
alternate layers beaten cream, chopped nuts and chopped fruit.


Ribbon Bavarian

Use rule for Plain Bavarian, and divide into three parts before adding
the cream.

Into one third stir one quarter cup strawberry juice and color pink;
into another third add two tablespoons chopped almonds and color green;
flavor the other third with vanilla.

Add one third of the whipped cream to each of these thirds and arrange
in layers in charlotte russe molds. Chill and garnish with beaten
cream, strawberries and nuts.

One must work quickly to keep the gelatine mixture from hardening.
Should it harden before it can be used, set the dish containing the
gelatine mixture into a pan of hot water and stir until liquefied.


Rice Bavarian

    3 cups milk
    ½ cup rice
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    ½ cup sugar
    1 tablespoon gelatine
    ¼ cup cold water
    3 tablespoons sherry wine
    1 cup cream
    ¼ cup boiling water

Cook rice in milk in double boiler until rice is tender, and milk is
absorbed. Add sugar, salt, and gelatine which has been soaked in cold
water and dissolved in hot water. Add flavoring, cool slightly, and add
whipped cream. Mold, chill, and garnish with Wine or Orange Jelly cut
in cubes.


Diplomatic Pudding

Line a mold with Lemon Jelly to the depth of one inch. Place a smaller
mold on top of jelly and surround smaller mold with Lemon Jelly. When
jelly is hard, remove, mold and fill with any flavored Bavarian Cream.


Banana Cantaloupe

    2 tablespoons granulated gelatine
    ¼ cup cold water
    3 egg whites
    ¼ cup lemon juice
    1 cup scalded cream
    1 cup sugar
    6 bananas
    whip from 2 cups cream
    lady fingers

Soak gelatine in cold water; dissolve in hot cream. Add sugar, whites
of eggs beaten until stiff, mashed bananas and lemon juice. Chill; as
it begins to thicken, fold in the whipped cream. Line a melon mold with
lady fingers, add cream mixture, chill, and serve. Garnish with cream
beaten and flavored, cherries and angelica.


Date Whip

    1 cup stoned and chopped dates
    ½ cup boiling water
    1 tablespoon lemon juice
    3 egg whites
    ⅓ cup sugar
    ½ teaspoon salt

Cook dates in boiling water until tender; press through a sieve. Beat
whites until stiff; add sugar, lemon juice and salt. Carefully fold in
the date pulp, pile lightly on a buttered baking dish, and bake thirty
minutes in a moderate oven. Serve with Soft Custard or with whipped
cream.


Prune Soufflé

Substitute two cups prunes, for dates, in Date Whip, and follow rule
for Date Whip.


Strawberry Whip

    2 cups strawberries
    1 cup powdered sugar
    2 egg whites
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    1 tablespoon lemon juice

Crush the berries; add sugar and lemon juice. Beat eggs until stiff,
and continue beating while adding strawberry mixture. Serve with Soft
Custard or beaten cream.


Vanilla Charlotte Russe No. 1

    2 cups cream
    ⅔ cup powdered sugar
    3 egg whites
    1 teaspoon vanilla

Beat cream until stiff; add sugar, flavoring, and egg whites, beaten
until stiff. Line a mold with slices of sponge cake or lady fingers;
fill with mixture. Chill and serve.


Caramel Charlotte Russe

Use rule for Vanilla Charlotte Russe No. 1, substituting one cup
caramelized sugar for the powdered sugar.


French Charlotte Russe

Add to Vanilla Charlotte Russe No. 1 one dozen marshmallows finely
chopped, one dozen almonds blanched and chopped, six walnuts chopped,
two tablespoons candied cherries finely chopped, and one tablespoon
brandy.


Strawberry Charlotte Russe

Crush two cups strawberries, add one cup sugar, and add to Vanilla
Charlotte Russe No. 1.


Apple Rice

    8 apples
    ½ glass Crab Apple Jelly
    ½ cup seeded raisins
    2 tablespoons butter
    1 cup hot cooked rice
    2 cups milk
    3 egg yolks
    1 tablespoon lemon juice

Pare and core the apples. Arrange in baking dish, fill apples with
jelly, and surround with rice, mixed with hot milk, egg yolks, butter,
raisins and flavoring. Cook in oven until apples are tender. Remove
from oven and cover with a meringue. Serve hot or cold.


Imperial Chocolate Pudding

    4 tablespoons cornstarch
    2 cups milk
    ¼ cup sugar
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    2 squares Lowney’s Premium Chocolate
    2 tablespoons hot water
    whites of 2 eggs
    ¼ teaspoon vanilla

Mix cornstarch, sugar, salt and milk; melt chocolate; add water,
cornstarch mixture, and cook in double boiler thirty minutes; cool; add
well-beaten egg whites, flavoring, and mold. Chill and serve with sugar
and cream.


Junket

    1 quart milk
    1 junket tablet
    ¼ cup sugar
    2 tablespoons wine, or
    1 teaspoon vanilla
    ⅛ teaspoon salt

Dissolve junket tablet in cold water. Heat the milk until lukewarm; add
junket tablet, sugar and flavoring; fill frappé glasses, let stand in
warm room until set; then chill and serve.


Roman Pudding

    1 tablespoon gelatine
    1 tablespoon cold water
    ¼ cup boiling water
    ¼ cup powdered sugar
    3 cups cream
    ¼ cup Madeira wine
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    1 can preserved figs
    1 cup beaten cream

Soak gelatine in cold water; dissolve in boiling water; add wine and
sugar. Stir until mixture thickens. Carefully fold in the whip from
cream. Mold, chill, and serve with figs and beaten cream.


Snow Pudding

    2 tablespoons granulated gelatine
    2 tablespoons cold water
    ½ cup boiling water
    1 cup sugar
    ⅓ cup lemon juice
    3 egg whites

Soak the gelatine in cold water; dissolve in boiling water; add sugar
and lemon juice. Stir till mixture thickens, then add the beaten whites
of eggs and continue beating until stiff enough to drop. Mold, chill,
and serve with Custard Sauce.


Compote of Figs

    1 pound pulled figs
    2 cups water
    ¼ cup sugar
    4 tablespoons lemon juice
    1 cup cream
    ¼ cup powdered sugar

Soak figs in water, then press into shape. Mix sugar and water, boil
until sirupy, add lemon juice. Arrange figs on serving dish; cover
with sirup; garnish with sweetened cream, beaten until stiff, pressed
through pastry bag and tube.


Pineapple Pudding

    pulp from one pineapple
    1 cup sugar
    4 eggs
    ½ teaspoon salt

Mix sugar, eggs and pineapple; bake in slow oven until set. Unmold,
garnish with beaten cream, the leaves of the pineapple and cherries.


HOT DESSERTS


Duchess Pudding

    1 cup scalded milk
    ¾ cup soft bread crumbs
    ½ cup grated cocoanut
    2 egg yolks
    ½ cup cocoa
    ½ cup sugar
    1 teaspoon lemon juice
    2 egg whites
    ¼ teaspoon salt

Soak bread in scalded milk until soft. Add cocoanut, sugar, cocoa,
lemon juice and salt; beat well; add yolks of eggs slightly beaten, and
cut and fold in the well-beaten whites. Turn into well-buttered pudding
dish and bake in a moderate oven 30 minutes. Serve hot or cold.


Quince Pudding

    6 quinces
    1 cup sugar
    ¼ cup lemon juice
    5 egg yolks
    1 cup cream
    3 egg whites

Wash quinces, cut in quarters, remove seeds and chop; add lemon juice.
Beat yolks of eggs; add sugar and cream; when blended, add beaten
whites and quince mixture. Pour into buttered pudding dish and bake
until firm. Serve hot or cold.


Peach Pudding

    1 cup flour
    2 cups fine bread crumbs
    ½ cup chopped nuts
    3 eggs
    2 tablespoons lemon juice
    1 cup sugar
    2 cups peaches
    ¼ teaspoon salt

Mix all ingredients, beat well, pour into buttered dish, and steam two
hours. Serve with cream.


Baked Chocolate Soufflé

    2 tablespoons butter
    2 tablespoons flour
    ¾ cup milk
    ½ cup sugar
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    2 tablespoons hot water
    3 squares Lowney’s Premium Chocolate
    yolks of 3 eggs
    whites of 3 eggs
    1 teaspoon vanilla

Melt butter; add flour; when smooth, add milk; cook five minutes; add
sugar and salt. Melt chocolate; add hot water and flour mixture; cook
five minutes; cool; add yolks of eggs beaten well; cut and fold in
the well-beaten whites. Flavor; bake in a buttered baking dish in a
moderate oven twenty to thirty minutes. Serve immediately with sugar
and cream, or beaten cream, or butter and sugar sauce.


Chocolate Bread Pudding

    ¾ cup bread crumbs
    2 cups scalded milk
    3 squares Lowney’s Premium Chocolate melted
    2 eggs
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    ½ teaspoon vanilla
    ¼ cup cold milk
    ¾ cup sugar

Mix all ingredients in the order given. Pour into a buttered baking
dish, set into a pan of hot water, and bake one hour in a moderate
oven; stir twice during the baking to keep chocolate from rising to the
top.


Chocolate Raisin Pudding

    1½ cups fine cracker crumbs
    2½ cups milk
    ⅓ cup molasses
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    1 egg
    1 cup seeded raisins
    ½ cup cocoa, or
    2 squares Lowney’s Premium Chocolate melted

Soak cracker crumbs in milk, add remaining ingredients, turn into a
buttered pudding dish, and steam four hours. Serve either hot or cold
with Cream Sauce.

[Illustration: CHOCOLATE NUT PUDDING

Plate V. For Receipt see page 227]

[Illustration: CHOCOLATE AND RICE PUDDING

Plate VI. For Receipt see page 227]


Chocolate Balls

    ⅓ cup butter
    1 cup sugar
    ½ cup milk
    2 squares Lowney’s Premium Chocolate grated
    2¼ cups flour
    3 teaspoons baking powder
    4 egg whites
    ¼ teaspoon salt

Cream butter; add chocolate and sugar, flour in which baking powder
and salt have been sifted, and milk; beat well, cut and fold in beaten
whites of eggs. Pour into individual molds or popover cups and steam
forty minutes. Serve with Chocolate Sauce.


Chocolate Nut Pudding

    1 cup soft bread crumbs
    2 cups scalded milk
    1 cup chopped nuts
    ½ teaspoon salt
    2 egg yolks
    ¾ cup sugar
    juice and grated rind of 1 lemon
    2 egg whites beaten until stiff
    2 squares Lowney’s Premium Chocolate melted

Mix first seven ingredients; when well blended, cut and fold in the
whites of eggs; pour into individual molds, and bake twenty to thirty
minutes. Serve hot with Cream or Fruit Sauce. See colored illustration,
Plate V, opposite p. 226.

[Illustration: COCOA FRUIT PUDDING

Plate VII. For Receipt see page 228]

[Illustration: CHOCOLATE CREAM PIE

Plate VIII. For Receipt see page 252]


Chocolate and Rice Pudding

    4 tablespoons rice
    2 cups milk
    1 teaspoon salt
    2 tablespoons butter
    1 teaspoon vanilla
    ½ cup beaten cream
    ½ cup sugar
    ¼ cup Lowney’s Always Ready Chocolate Powder, or
    2 squares Lowney’s Premium Chocolate
    ¾ cup seeded raisins
    2 egg whites

Soak rice in milk one half hour; add salt and cook in double boiler
until rice is tender. Mix butter, sugar, chocolate, raisins and
vanilla; add cooked rice, cream and beaten whites. Fill buttered baking
dish, cover with a meringue, brown in a moderate oven, and serve either
hot or cold.

Milk may be substituted for the beaten cream if a less rich pudding is
desired. See colored illustration, Plate VI, opposite p. 226.


Cocoa Fruit Pudding

    ½ cup Lowney’s Cocoa
    ⅔ cup beef suet
    1 cup figs finely chopped
    2¼ cups soft bread crumbs
    1 cup brown sugar
    2 eggs
    ⅓ cup milk
    ½ teaspoon salt

Chop suet, figs and bread crumbs in meat chopper. Add remaining
ingredients, and steam three hours. Serve with Hot Chocolate Sauce,
or cream sweetened and flavored. See colored illustration, Plate VII,
opposite p. 227.


Steamed Chocolate Nut Pudding

    2 tablespoons sugar
    ½ cup flour
    4 tablespoons Lowney’s Premium Chocolate grated
    ½ cup milk
    5 egg yolks
    ½ cup sugar
    1 cup finely chopped nuts
    5 egg whites
    1 tablespoon butter
    ¼ teaspoon salt

Mix first five ingredients and boil two minutes. Beat yolks of eggs
until lemon-colored and thick; add sugar, beat five minutes; add nuts,
then add to chocolate mixture. When well blended, cut and fold in the
whites of eggs beaten until stiff. Pour into buttered mold and steam
one and one half hours. Remove from mold and serve with Hard Sauce.


Steamed Chocolate Pudding

    2 tablespoons butter
    ¼ cup flour
    ¼ cup Lowney’s Always Ready Chocolate Powder
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    ½ cup milk
    5 egg yolks
    ¾ cup sugar
    ½ cup finely chopped almonds
    5 egg whites

Melt butter; add flour, chocolate, salt and milk; cook five minutes.
Beat egg yolks until lemon-colored and thick; add sugar and almonds;
when well blended, add chocolate mixture, and cut and fold in the
beaten whites. Pour into a buttered mold, and steam one hour. Serve
immediately with sugar and cream.


Baked Apple Dumpling

    2 cups flour
    2 tablespoons lard
    2 tablespoons butter
    ½ teaspoon baking powder
    1 teaspoon salt
    ¼ cup sugar
    ¼ cup water
    8 apples cored
    cinnamon and nutmeg

Sift flour, baking powder and salt; work in lard and butter; when well
mixed, add water. Cut paste in eight rounds, place apple in center of
round, fill cavity with sugar and flavoring. Draw paste around apple;
place in baking pan rough side down. Bake forty-five minutes. Serve
with Lemon or Molasses Sauce.


Apple Sponge

    ¼ cup sugar
    ¼ cup milk
    2 eggs
    1 cup flour
    2 teaspoons baking powder
    5 sliced apples
    ½ teaspoon salt

Beat eggs; add sugar, flour in which baking powder has been sifted, and
milk. Beat well; add apples; pour into buttered baking dish and bake in
a moderate oven one hour. Serve with Italian Sauce.


Baked Apples No. 1.

Remove the core from eight apples of uniform size. Place in baking
dish, add one fourth cup water, and baste frequently, during baking,
with sugar and water.


Baked Apples No. 2

Core eight apples, arrange in baking dish, fill cavities with butter
and sugar, bake until tender, basting with sugar and water. When done,
arrange in serving dish; sprinkle with granulated sugar.


Apple Flame

    8 apples
    2 cups sugar
    1 cup water
    raspberry jam
    rum or brandy
    1 cup beaten cream

Pare and core the apples; boil sugar and water together ten minutes;
arrange apples in buttered baking dish two inches apart; add sirup;
cover and bake until apples are tender. Be careful to preserve shape of
apples.

Remove from dish; boil sirup until thick; fill cavities with jam, pour
sirup around them, and just before sending to table pour over them
brandy or rum. Light and serve.


Apple Flamingo

    8 apples (red)
    2 cups sugar
    1 cup water
    1 cup cream
    2 tablespoons lemon juice
    2 tablespoons orange juice
    grated rind one half lemon
    grated rind one half orange

Wipe apples; arrange in baking dish; add sugar and water, and cook
until tender, turning so that all sides may be evenly cooked. Be sure
and preserve the shape.

Remove skin in a way to leave bright coloring on the apple.

Boil sirup until thick, add fruit juice and rind, pour around apples,
and garnish with beaten cream.


Apple Soufflé

    3 cups quartered apples
    2 tablespoons butter
    ¾ cup sugar
    3 egg yolks
    6 egg whites
    nutmeg and lemon juice

Steam apples; add butter, sugar, yolks of eggs and flavoring. Cool, cut
and fold in beaten whites, turn into buttered pudding dish, and bake
forty-five minutes in a moderate oven. Serve with sugar and cream.


Scalloped Apple

    1 cup sugar
    ½ teaspoon cinnamon
    2 tablespoons lemon juice
    grated rind of one lemon
    ½ cup butter
    1½ cups bread crumbs from center of loaf
    4 cups sliced apples
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    ½ cup water

Arrange crumbs and apples in layers, in a buttered pudding dish, having
crumbs on the top layer. Sprinkle each layer with sugar and cinnamon
and dot with butter; add lemon juice, lemon rind and water, just before
sprinkling on the last layer. Bake in slow oven one hour.


Apple Dumpling

    4 cups sliced apples
    ½ cup water
    2 cups flour
    4 teaspoons baking powder
    ½ teaspoon salt
    ½ cup sugar
    1 cup milk
    few gratings lemon rind

Mix and sift dry ingredients except sugar. Add milk. Fill a buttered
pudding dish with apples, add sugar, water, lemon rind, cover with
flour mixture, and steam one and one half hours. Serve with Lemon Sauce.


Apple Nests

    8 apples
    2 tablespoons flour
    1 teaspoon salt
    2 cups milk
    3 egg yolks
    3 egg whites

Arrange cored and pared apples in a buttered baking dish. Mix sugar,
flour, milk; add yolks of eggs; when well blended, the well-beaten
whites. Pour this mixture over apples and bake in a moderate oven until
apples are tender.


Brown Betty

Prepare the same as Scalloped Apple, adding one half teaspoon cloves,
one half teaspoon allspice, one half cup molasses, and one cup raisins
seeded and chopped. Bake in slow oven one hour.


Apple Charlotte

    8 slices of bread
    ½ cup butter
    6 apples
    1 cup sugar
    1 tablespoon lemon juice
    ¼ cup chopped almonds
    1 tablespoon butter

Dip bread in melted butter; butter mold; cut bread into strips an inch
wide and the height of the mold. Line bottom and sides of mold with
bread. Pare and cut up apples; add sugar, water and lemon juice; cook
until apples are soft. Add chopped almonds, one tablespoon butter; pour
into lined mold, cover with slices of buttered bread, and bake thirty
minutes. Serve with Lemon Sauce or Hard Sauce.


Apples on a Bed of Rice

    1 cup cooked rice
    8 apples
    2 cups sugar
    1 cup water
    2 tablespoons lemon juice
    strawberry jam

Press rice into charlotte russe mold; reheat in steamer. Pare and core
apples; cook in sirup made of sugar and water until tender. Remove
apples; boil sirup until thick; unmold rice; arrange apples around
rice, fill cavities in apples with jam, and pour sauce around them.


Oranges on a Bed of Rice

Prepare in the same way as Apples on a Bed of Rice, except quarter
oranges and omit jam.


Apple Batter Pudding

    1 cup milk
    1 cup flour
    2 eggs
    2 tablespoons butter
    1 teaspoon salt
    2 cups quartered apples
    2 tablespoons lemon juice
    ¼ cup sugar

Mix sugar, salt, flour, eggs and milk. When smooth, add apples; pour
into buttered baking dish, and bake in a moderate oven one hour. Serve
immediately with Wine Sauce.


Peach Batter Pudding

Follow the rule for making Apple Batter Pudding, substituting peaches
for the apples.


College Pudding

    ½ cup butter
    1½ cups sugar
    4 eggs
    ½ cup strained Apple Sauce
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    rind and juice of one lemon

Mix ingredients in order given. Line a pudding dish with Plain Paste,
fill with apple mixture, and bake forty-five minutes in a moderate
oven. Serve with butter and sugar.


Apple Indian

    2 cups quartered apples
    ½ cup molasses
    ½ cup brown sugar
    4 cups milk
    ¼ cup Indian meal
    2 tablespoons butter
    1 teaspoon salt
    cinnamon and nutmeg

Scald milk; pour on to Indian meal; add remaining ingredients; pour
into buttered baking dish, and cook in slow oven four hours, keeping
dish covered until the last hour, stirring occasionally.


Stewed Apples

Pare and core eight apples. Arrange in baking dish; fill cavities with
Apple Jelly and chopped raisins. Cook until tender, basting with hot
water, sugar and lemon juice. Ten minutes before removing from oven,
spear all over with slivers of blanched almonds.


Vanilla Soufflé

    ¼ cup butter
    ⅓ cup flour
    1 cup milk
    4 eggs
    ½ cup sugar
    1 teaspoon vanilla
    ¼ teaspoon salt

Make a white sauce with flour, butter, salt and milk. Beat yolks of
eggs; add sugar and white sauce. Cut and fold in the well-beaten
whites. Bake in individual ramekin dishes in a moderate oven, twenty to
thirty minutes. Serve immediately with Orange or Sherry Sauce.


Orange Soufflé

    3 egg yolks
    3 egg whites
    3 tablespoons powdered sugar
    rind of one half orange
    1 tablespoon orange juice
    ½ tablespoon lemon juice
    ¼ teaspoon salt

Beat yolks until lemon-colored and thick. Add sugar, fruit juice and
rind. Carefully fold in beaten whites. Pour into buttered dish, and
bake fifteen to twenty minutes in moderate oven. Serve with Strawberry
Sauce.


Bread Pudding

    2 cups bread crumbs
    4 cups milk
    3 eggs
    ½ cup sugar
    1 teaspoon salt
    2 tablespoons butter
    cinnamon and nutmeg

Soak bread in milk; add beaten eggs and remaining ingredients. Bake one
hour. Serve with hard sauce.


Bread Queen

Use rule for Bread Pudding, using whites of four eggs for meringue, and
the yolks in the pudding instead of the three eggs. Before spreading on
meringue, cover pudding with a layer of jam. Brown meringue slightly in
the oven, and serve pudding hot or cold with cream.


Cracker Queen

Substitute one and one half cups cracker crumbs for bread crumbs in
Bread Pudding, and add one cup seeded raisins cut in small pieces. Bake
the same as Bread Pudding.


Buttered Bread Pudding

Butter twelve slices of bread; arrange in baking dish. Cover with four
cups milk, four slightly beaten eggs, three fourths cup sugar, one half
teaspoon salt, and the grated rind and juice of one lemon. Bake one and
one half hours in slow oven. Serve with Hard Sauce.


Cocoanut Pudding

Use rule for Buttered Bread Pudding, sprinkle each bread layer with
shredded cocoanut and chopped and seeded raisins. Serve with hard sauce.


Steamed Blueberry Dumpling

    4 cups blueberries
    2 cups sugar
    1 teaspoon vinegar
    1 tablespoon butter
    2 cups flour
    4 teaspoons baking powder
    1 teaspoon salt
    ¾ cup milk

Mix flour, baking powder and salt; add butter, mix until mealy; add
milk. Put sugar, berries and vinegar in bottom of buttered baking dish.
Cover with flour mixture and steam forty-five minutes. Serve in dish in
which it is cooked.


Raspberry Dumpling

Prepare in the same way as Steamed Blueberry Dumpling, using four cups
of raspberries instead of blueberries.


Blackberry Dumpling

Substitute blackberries for blueberries, and proceed as for Steamed
Blueberry Dumpling.


Cherry Duff

Substitute two quarts cherries, in rule for making Blueberry Dumpling.


Peach Duff

Use rule for Blueberry Dumpling, substituting one quart peaches for
blueberries.


Fruit Snowballs

Use receipt for making Snow Puffs. When done, sprinkle with powdered
sugar and garnish with Cherry Sauce.


Steamed Rice Pudding

    1 cup rice
    1½ teaspoons salt
    8 cups cold water

Cook in steamer until water is absorbed and each kernel is separated.
The time depends upon the age of the rice.


Caramel Rice Pudding

    1 cup rice
    6 cups milk
    1 teaspoon salt
    2 eggs
    1 cup sugar
    grated rind of one half orange

Cook rice in milk, in double boiler, two hours; then add salt, eggs
slightly beaten, and orange rind. Caramelize the sugar. When a golden
brown liquid, pour into a hot pudding mold, coating the whole inner
surface. Add rice mixture, cover and cook in oven in a pan of water
twenty minutes. Remove from oven, let stand five minutes, turn on
serving dish, and serve with Soft Custard.


Snow Puffs

    ½ cup butter
    1 cup sugar
    ½ cup milk
    2½ cups flour
    3 teaspoons baking powder
    4 egg whites
    ½ teaspoon salt

Cream butter; add sugar, flour, baking powder and salt alternately
with milk. Beat well; add the stiffly beaten whites; steam forty-five
minutes in buttered popover cups. Serve with Strawberry Sauce.


Blueberry Puffs

Use rule for Snow Puffs and serve surrounded by a sauce made by cooking
two cups blueberries and one cup sugar together twenty minutes.


Cottage Pudding

    1 cup sugar
    ¼ cup butter
    2 eggs
    1 cup milk
    2 cups flour
    3 teaspoons baking powder
    ¼ teaspoon salt

Cream butter and sugar together; add yolks of eggs beaten until thick,
flour in which baking powder and salt have been sifted, alternately
with milk; beat well and add the well-beaten whites. Pour into a
well-buttered pudding dish. Bake forty-five minutes. Serve with Lemon,
Vanilla, or Wine Sauce.


Steamed Cottage Pudding

Prepare the same as Cottage Pudding. Pour into buttered mold; steam one
and one half hours. Serve with Lemon or Strawberry Sauce.


Indian Pudding, Steamed

    1 cup corn meal
    ⅓ cup sour milk
    ½ cup molasses
    ⅓ cup chopped suet
    1 teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon soda
    few grains ginger

Mix soda with sour milk, add other ingredients, pour into buttered
mold, and steam four hours. Serve with Molasses Sauce.


Baked Indian Pudding

    6 cups milk
    ¼ cup corn meal
    ¼ cup molasses
    1 tablespoon butter
    ½ teaspoon salt
    few grains ginger

Scald one pint of milk with corn meal and cook twenty minutes; add
remaining milk and rest of ingredients. Pour into deep earthen dish
and bake, set in a pan of hot water, in a slow oven, four hours. The
afternoon fire is the one best suited for cooking this pudding.


Indian Rice Pudding

    4 cups milk
    ¼ cup rice
    ½ cup molasses
    2 tablespoons butter
    ½ teaspoon ginger
    ¼ teaspoon salt

Mix ingredients in the order given, pour into deep baking dish, set in
a pan of hot water, and bake two hours. Stir once during cooking.


Indian Rice with Apples

To Indian Rice Pudding, add two cups pared and quartered apples.


Indian Tapioca Pudding

    ½ cup pearl tapioca
    6 cups scalded milk
    ¼ cup Indian meal
    1 cup molasses
    ¼ cup butter
    2 teaspoons salt
    2 cups cold milk

Soak tapioca in cold water over night. Cook Indian meal and scalded
milk in double boiler twenty minutes; add tapioca, molasses, butter,
salt. Pour into buttered baking dish; cook two hours in slow oven.

At the end of the first hour, add the cold milk. Serve hot with butter
or cream.


Rice Pudding

    ½ cup rice
    1 teaspoon salt
    ½ teaspoon nutmeg
    4 tablespoons sugar
    ½ cup seeded raisins
    4 cups hot milk
    2 cups cold milk

Mix first six ingredients; pour into buttered pudding dish; cook in a
slow oven two hours, stirring occasionally the first hour. At the end
of two hours add the cold milk and cook half an hour longer.

Serve with sugar and cream.


Christmas Plum Pudding

    2 cups soft bread crumbs
    2 cups chopped suet
    1 cup chopped raisins
    1 cup chopped citron
    1 cup cleaned currants
    1 teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon nutmeg
    6 eggs
    ½ cup brandy
    ½ tablespoon lemon rind

Mix ingredients; pour into buttered mold; cover and steam four hours;
bake in oven one half hour. Serve with Wine Sauce.


Graham Plum Pudding

    1½ cups graham flour
    1 cup molasses
    ½ cup milk
    1 cup seeded raisins
    1 teaspoon cinnamon
    ½ teaspoon cloves
    1 egg
    ½ teaspoon soda
    2 tablespoons butter

Beat egg; add liquids, flour in which soda has been sifted, fruit,
spices and melted butter. Pour into buttered baking powder tins and
steam four hours. Serve with Brown Sugar Sauce.


Steamed Fig Pudding

    1 cup chopped figs
    ½ cup chopped suet
    3 eggs
    2¼ cups soft bread crumbs
    ⅓ cup milk
    1 cup brown sugar
    1 teaspoon salt

Cover bread crumbs with milk. Chop figs and suet together, add other
ingredients, pour in buttered melon mold and steam from three and one
half to four hours. Serve with Stirling Sauce.


Date Pudding

Use rule for Fig Pudding, adding one cup each chopped dates and
shredded almonds, and omit figs.


Roly Poly Pudding

Roll pastry or a baking-powder biscuit dough very thin, about one
eighth of an inch in thickness, spread with jam, blackberry, black
currant, or raspberry. Roll like a jelly roll, press, and close the
ends as tight as possible. Tie in a floured cloth, and cook in boiling
water two hours, or steam in steamer one hour. Remove from cloth and
serve on hot platter with Foamy Sauce.


Cream Croquettes

    2 cups milk scalded
    4 tablespoons cornstarch
    ¼ cup cold milk
    ¾ cup sugar
    2 eggs
    ½ cup chopped almonds
    1 teaspoon vanilla

Mix cornstarch and cold milk, add hot milk, and cook in double boiler
until mixture thickens. Add eggs well beaten, sugar, almonds and
vanilla. Cook two minutes. Pour into shallow pan; chill; cut into
squares or rounds; dip in crumbs, egg and crumbs, fry in hot fat. Drain
on brown paper, roll in powdered sugar, and serve. Serve with Lemon
Sauce.


English Pudding

    ½ cup butter
    1 cup seeded raisins
    1 cup molasses
    ¾ cup milk
    1 teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon soda
    ½ teaspoon cloves
    ½ teaspoon cinnamon
    ½ teaspoon mace
    3-¾ cups flour

Cream butter; add remaining ingredients; pour into buttered mold; steam
four hours. Serve with Brandy Sauce or Foamy Sauce.


PUDDING SAUCES


Apricot Sauce

    ½ cup apricot jam, or
    1 cup apricot juice
    ½ cup sugar
    ½ cup water
    1 teaspoon cornstarch
    1 tablespoon lemon juice
    few grains salt

Boil all ingredients ten minutes.


Apple Sauce

    1 cup chopped apple
    1 tablespoon arrowroot
    few grains salt
    ½ cup cold water
    few grains cinnamon
    1 tablespoon lemon juice
    grated rind of ½ lemon

Cook all together ten minutes. Strain, add more lemon juice if needed.


Banana Sauce

    1 cup water
    ½ cup sugar
    3 banana pulps
    3 tablespoons lemon juice
    2 eggs
    few grains salt

Boil sugar and water ten minutes. Mix remaining ingredients and pour
hot sirup on to them. Beat well and serve hot.


Creamy Sauce

    ⅓ cup butter
    ⅓ cup powdered sugar
    2 tablespoons cream
    2 tablespoons wine

Mix butter and sugar until creamy, add wine and cream. Cook over hot
water until liquefied.


Cream Sauce

    1 cup powdered sugar
    1 egg
    2 cups cream
    1 teaspoon vanilla

Mix egg yolk and sugar; add white of egg beaten until stiff, flavoring,
and just before sending to the table the beaten cream. Serve cold.


Cream Brandy Sauce

    1 cup water
    1 cup sugar
    ⅓ cup cream
    3 egg yolks
    2 tablespoons brandy
    few orange rind gratings
    few grains salt

Cook sugar and water ten minutes; beat yolks; add cream, brandy, salt,
orange rind gratings. Add sugar and water slowly and beat until mixture
thickens.


Cream Sherry Sauce

    3 tablespoons butter
    ⅓ cup sugar
    2 egg yolks
    ⅔ cup cream
    3 tablespoons sherry
    few grains salt

Mix butter, sugar, yolks and cream; cook in double boiler until mixture
thickens; add wine, and serve.


Caramel Sauce

    1 cup sugar
    1 cup boiling water

Caramelize sugar in clean saucepan. When a light brown color, add
water, and simmer fifteen minutes.


Cherry Sauce

    1½ cups cherries
    1 cup claret
    ½ cup sugar
    ½ glass Currant Jelly
    juice and rind of ½ lemon
    1 inch stick cinnamon

Remove stones from cherries and cook all ingredients together until
sirupy. Strain and serve.


Claret Sauce

    1 cup sugar
    1 cup water
    1 cup claret

Boil sugar and water until sirupy, add claret, and serve hot or cold.


Coffee Sauce

    ½ cup sugar
    2 eggs
    ¾ cup black coffee
    ½ cup cream
    few grains salt

Mix eggs, sugar, salt, and coffee, and cook in double boiler until
mixture thickens. Chill; add beaten cream and serve cold.


Currant Sauce

    1 cup sugar
    ⅓ cup water
    1 cup currant juice
    2 tablespoons lemon juice

Boil sugar and water until sirupy; add currant juice and lemon juice.
Serve hot or cold.


Currant Jelly Sauce

    1 cup sugar
    ¼ cup water
    1 inch piece stick cinnamon
    ½ cup currant jelly

Boil sugar, water and cinnamon until sirupy. Remove cinnamon; add
jelly; when melted, strain and serve.


Custard Sauce

    2 cups milk
    3 egg yolks
    1 teaspoon butter
    ⅓ cup sugar
    2 egg whites
    1 teaspoon vanilla
    few grains salt

Make a custard of milk, egg yolks, sugar and salt; when thick, add
butter, flavoring and beaten whites. Serve cold.


Foamy Sauce No. 1

    1 cup sugar
    3 egg whites
    1 cup milk
    rind and juice of 1 lemon

Heat the milk. Beat egg whites until stiff; add sugar, continue
beating; add milk and flavoring, continue beating. Serve when foamy.


Foamy Sauce No. 2

    ½ cup butter
    1 cup powdered sugar
    1 egg yolk
    2 tablespoons wine
    2 egg whites

Cream butter; add sugar, yolk of egg and wine. Cook over hot water
until hot. Remove from fire and add beaten whites of eggs.


Foamy Sauce No. 3

    3 egg whites
    ½ cup powdered sugar
    rind of ½ lemon
    1 cup boiling water
    1 teaspoon flavoring

Beat whites until stiff; add sugar and flavoring and continue beating,
adding hot water very gradually. Serve hot or cold.


Fruit Sauce No. 1

    1 cup sugar
    1 cup water
    ½ cup fruit juice
    2 tablespoons arrowroot

Mix arrowroot, sugar and water; boil ten minutes, stirring constantly.
Add fruit juice and cook until sirupy, and serve hot.


Fruit Sauce No. 2

    1 cup sugar
    ½ cup water
    1 cup pulp and juice of fruit
    1 tablespoon lemon juice

Boil sugar and water until sirupy. Add lemon and fruit juice and pulp.
Serve hot without straining.


Grape Sauce

    1 cup sugar
    ⅓ cup water
    1 cup grape juice
    1 tablespoon orange or lemon juice

Boil all together until sirupy. Serve hot or cold.


Hard Sauce No. 1

    ½ cup butter
    1 cup powdered sugar
    wine, brandy, or vanilla
    1 teaspoon hot water

Cream butter; add sugar by the teaspoon, and beat until light and
creamy. Flavor and serve.


Hard Sauce No. 2

    ½ cup butter
    1 cup powdered sugar
    1 teaspoon vanilla
    1 tablespoon brandy
    ¼ cup beaten cream

Cream butter; add sugar and cream alternately, flavoring, and serve
very cold.


Stirling Sauce

    ½ cup butter
    1 cup powdered sugar
    3 tablespoons milk
    2 tablespoons wine

Mix sugar, wine and milk, and warm in double boiler or over hot water.
Add to creamed butter slowly. Do not permit the sugar mixture to become
hot, only warm.


Kirsch Sauce

Use rule for Stirling Sauce, substituting one fourth cup kirsch for
wine.


Lemon Sauce

    2 teaspoons arrowroot or cornstarch
    2 cups water
    1 cup sugar
    grated rind and juice one lemon
    1½ tablespoons butter

Mix arrowroot or cornstarch with sugar. Add boiling water and cook
twenty minutes. Add flavoring and butter. Serve hot.


Maple Sauce

    2 egg yolks
    ½ cup maple sirup
    ½ cup beaten cream
    few grains salt

Beat yolks until thick; add maple sirup and cook until it thickens. Add
beaten cream, salt. Chill and serve.


Maraschino Sauce

    1 cup sugar
    1 tablespoon arrowroot
    2 cups boiling water
    2 tablespoons maraschino

Mix sugar, arrowroot and boiling water; boil ten minutes. Add
maraschino. Chill and serve.


Orange Sauce No. 1

    grated rind, juice and pulp of 3 oranges
    ⅓ cup powdered sugar
    3 egg whites
    1 tablespoon lemon juice

Beat whites until stiff; add remaining ingredients. Serve cold.


Orange Sauce No. 2

Make the same as Lemon Sauce, substituting the juice and rind of two
oranges for lemon.


Rum Sauce

    ½ cup powdered sugar
    2 egg yolks
    2 egg whites
    3 tablespoons rum
    ½ cup beaten cream

Mix sugar, yolks of eggs and rum, then the stiffly beaten whites. Cook
until thick; add the beaten cream. Chill and serve.


Sabayon Sauce No. 1

    4 egg yolks
    ¼ cup wine
    4 tablespoons powdered sugar
    1 tablespoon lemon juice

Mix all ingredients and, just before serving, cook over hot water until
it begins to thicken.


Sabayon Sauce No. 2

    1 whole egg
    2 egg yolks
    ½ cup sugar
    ½ cup sherry
    1 tablespoon lemon juice

Mix all ingredients and cook over hot water, stirring constantly until
mixture thickens.


Strawberry Sauce

    ½ cup butter
    1 cup powdered sugar
    1 cup strawberries
    1 beaten egg white

Cream butter; add sugar, egg white; beat well; add strawberries crushed
to a pulp. Serve.


Vanilla Sauce

    ½ cup butter
    1 cup powdered sugar
    1 cup cream
    1 tablespoon vanilla

Cream butter; add sugar, beaten cream and flavoring. Heat over hot
water until all is liquid. Serve hot.


Brown Sugar Sauce

    ⅓ cup butter
    1 cup brown sugar
    2 teaspoons vanilla
    ⅓ cup cream

Mix cream and brown sugar, and add to creamed butter very gradually.
When of creamy consistency, add flavoring.


Italian Sauce

    2 tablespoons butter
    ¾ cup powdered sugar
    2 teaspoons cornstarch
    ½ cup candied cherries
    3 egg yolks
    juice and rind of 1 lemon
    ½ cup boiling water
    ½ cup angelica cut in pieces

Cream butter; add sugar and cornstarch, yolks of eggs well beaten, and
boiling water; boil three minutes; add remaining ingredients and serve.


Chocolate Sauce

    2 ounces Lowney’s Premium Chocolate
    1 cup sugar
    ½ cup water
    2 tablespoons butter
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon vanilla

Cook all the ingredients except vanilla twelve minutes; add vanilla,
and serve hot. This sauce is especially good served with Vanilla Ice
Cream, but is good with any gelatine dessert.


Orange Chocolate Sauce

    4 tablespoons Lowney’s Premium Chocolate grated
    3 tablespoons butter
    3 egg yolks
    4 tablespoons sugar
    ¼ cup rich milk
    ⅓ cup orange juice
    grated rind of 1 orange

Melt chocolate in top of double boiler; add butter, stir until well
mixed; add egg yolks, one at a time, sugar, and milk. Cook until
thickened, add orange juice and rind, and serve at once.


Chocolate Cream Sauce

    ¾ cup powdered sugar
    1 cup cream
    ¼ cup Lowney’s Premium Chocolate grated
    ⅛ teaspoon salt
    4 tablespoons hot water
    1 egg white
    1 teaspoon almond extract, or
    1 tablespoon cordial

Melt chocolate; add sugar and boiling water; cook until glossy. Cool.
Beat cream until stiff; add chocolate mixture gradually; cut and fold
in beaten white. Flavor and serve. One half cup Lowney’s Cocoa may be
substituted for the chocolate.


PASTRY


Rule for lining Plate and making Cover for Pie with Two Crusts

Roll the paste one quarter inch thick. Cut paste an eighth of an inch
larger than plate. Cut strips three quarters inch wide for a rim. Cut
upper crust at least one eighth inch larger than plate. Arrange lower
crust on plate, wet edges with cold water, lay strips of paste or rim
on this, taking care to lap and seal the ends with cold water. Fill the
pie with whatever material is to be used. Cut little slits in center of
upper crust. Lay on pie; wet edges of rim. Have all edges even, leaving
fullness in center to allow for shrinking. Press edges lightly but
firmly.


Rule for making a Pie with Under Crust only

Roll paste one eighth inch thick. Cut one inch larger than plate.
Spread on plate; fold edge under, making paste the size of plate. This
edge may be fluted or plain. Chill before filling.


Rule for Baking Pies

Perforated tin pie plates secure a well-baked under crust. Place pie
in hot oven at first, reducing heat after crust becomes hardened. Turn
frequently while baking, and bake until a golden brown—about forty-five
minutes.


Chopped Paste

    1½ cups flour
    4 tablespoons lard
    4 tablespoons butter
    ½ teaspoon salt
    cold water

Sift salt and flour; add lard and butter when thoroughly chilled. Chop
until like meal; add cold water to make a stiff dough. Chill; roll on
a floured cloth or molding board into a rectangular shape; fold ends
towards center, double, turn halfway round, and roll again.

This paste is a superior one. Chill before rolling for pies.


Plain Paste

Use same rule as for Chopped Paste. Chop lard into sifted flour; when
thoroughly mixed, add salt and water to form dough. Chill; roll in
rectangular piece; place butter which has previously been shaped,
flattened, and chilled on middle of one side of paste; fold over other
side, press edges together, and fold one end under and one end over
butter, making six layers. Roll again into rectangle; fold in same way,
and so continue three times. If butter begins to soften, roll paste
in cheese cloth and place on ice until hard enough to roll easily. Be
careful not to wet the cheese cloth.


Puff Paste

    1 pound butter
    1 pound flour
    cold water

Shape and flatten butter into a round cake. Chill. Sift flour several
times; add cold water to form a dough a little stiffer than for baking
powder biscuit. Chill. Place butter in same way as directed in Plain
Paste and roll paste seven times. Chill if necessary between each
rolling.


Apple Pie No. 1

Use either Puff or Plain Paste. For filling for a medium-sized pie tin,
use three cups pared and sliced apples, one half cup sugar, one eighth
teaspoon salt, one tablespoon butter, one fourth teaspoon cinnamon, one
tablespoon lemon juice, and grated rind of one half lemon.


Apple Pie No. 2

Use either Puff or Plain Paste. For filling use rule for Apple Sauce,
and season to taste.


Blueberry Pie

Line a deep perforated tin with Plain or Chopped Paste; brush with
water or white of egg. Fill with floured blueberries; add sugar,
butter, salt and vinegar. Allow one cup of sugar to three cups of
berries, one tablespoon butter, one eighth teaspoon salt, and one half
teaspoon vinegar. Cover with crust and bake.


Blackberry Pie

Use rule for Blueberry Pie, omitting flour and vinegar.


Cranberry Pie

Use Plain or Chopped Paste. Fill with two cups cranberries, one and
one half cups sugar, one quarter cup water, and one tablespoon butter.
Cover with upper crust or a lattice of paste strips; or bake without
any upper crust. Decorate when done with pastry baked in fancy shapes.


Cranberry Pie No. 2

Use Plain Paste. For filling, mix one and one quarter cups chopped
cranberries, one half cup chopped raisins, one cup sugar, one quarter
cup water, and one tablespoon butter.

This is sometimes called Mock Cherry Pie.


Currant Pie

Use Plain Paste. For filling, mix two cups cleaned, fresh currants, two
cups sugar, two tablespoons flour, two eggs, and one eighth teaspoon
salt.

Bake with two crusts; or omit upper crust and cover with meringue when
cooked.


Custard Pie

Use Plain or Chopped Paste. For filling, mix three eggs, one fourth cup
sugar, one eighth teaspoon salt, one eighth teaspoon nutmeg, and two
cups milk. Bake in slow oven.


Citron Pie

Use Plain or Chopped Paste. For filling, mix two cups seeded raisins
chopped, two cups citron chopped, one and one half cups sugar, grated
rind of one lemon, four tablespoons lemon juice, one eighth teaspoon
salt.


Cocoanut Pie

Line a plate with Plain Paste; fill with following mixture: two cups
milk, three egg yolks, one half cup sugar, two tablespoons cornstarch,
one cup grated cocoanut, one fourth teaspoon salt, grated rind and
juice of one lemon, and one tablespoon butter.


Date Pie

Use Plain Paste. Add one and one half cups of dates, which have been
cooked in boiling water until tender and pressed through a sieve, to
Custard Pie filling.


Lemon Pie No. 1

Use Plain Paste. For filling, mix two tablespoons cornstarch, one cup
sugar, and one half cup boiling water, boil five minutes, add one
tablespoon butter, juice and rind of one lemon, and two eggs well
beaten.


Lemon Pie No. 2

Use Plain Paste. For filling, mix one cup sugar, yolks of four eggs,
one eighth teaspoon salt, one cup milk, grated rind and juice of one
lemon, and the whites of four eggs beaten until stiff. Cover with
meringue when done.


Mince Pie

Use Plain Paste for under crust, fill with mince-meat, cover with Puff
Paste.


Peach Pie

Use Plain or Chopped Paste. For filling use two cups peaches, cut into
eighths, one cup sugar, one tablespoon butter, one eighth teaspoon
salt, and two tablespoons water.


Plum Pie

Use Plain or Chopped Paste. Remove stones from two cups plums; add one
half cup sugar; dredge with flour; add two tablespoons lemon juice and
one tablespoon butter.


Prune Pie

Substitute prunes for plums and follow rule for Plum Pie.


Pumpkin Pie

Line pie plate with Plain Paste. For filling, mix one and one half cups
stewed and strained pumpkin, one and one half cups milk, one egg, three
fourths cup brown sugar, one tablespoon butter, one half teaspoon each
of salt and ginger, and one teaspoon cinnamon.


Chocolate Cream Pie

    2 squares Lowney’s Premium Chocolate or
    ½ cup of Lowney’s Cocoa
    ¼ cup cornstarch
    2 cups milk
    2 egg whites
    ½ cup sugar
    3 egg yolks
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    1 tablespoon vanilla

Melt two squares Lowney’s Chocolate or one half cup Lowney’s Cocoa,
add sugar, cornstarch, egg yolks, salt and milk. Cook in double boiler
till thick, stirring constantly; flavor with vanilla. Pour into a baked
pie crust shell, cover with a meringue made by beating egg whites till
stiff and adding two tablespoons sugar; brown in oven and serve cold.
See colored illustration, Plate VIII, opposite p. 227.


Rhubarb Pie

Use Plain Paste. For filling, mix two cups rhubarb cut in inch pieces,
one cup sugar, two tablespoons each of butter and flour, one egg, one
eighth teaspoon salt, and one teaspoon lemon juice.


Squash Pie

Use Chopped Paste. For filling, mix one cup stewed and strained squash,
one half cup sugar, one half teaspoon salt, two eggs, one half teaspoon
cinnamon, one fourth teaspoon nutmeg, and one half cup milk.

A very good pie may be made by using one and one half cups of the
squash left from dinner, sweetening and seasoning it without adding
eggs.


Mince Pie Filling

    3 lbs. lean beef finely chopped
    2 lbs. suet finely chopped
    3 qts. apples finely chopped
    3 lbs. raisins seeded and chopped
    2 lbs. currants
    3 lbs. citron cut in small pieces
    ½ cup candied orange peel chopped
    ½ cup candied lemon peel chopped
    ½ cup lemon juice
    ¼ cup orange juice
    2 tablespoons salt
    4 cups sugar
    1 cup coffee
    2 cups cider
    1 teaspoon cloves
    1 teaspoon allspice
    2 teaspoons cinnamon
    3 cups brandy
    1 cup sherry
    1 cup Currant Jelly

Mix all ingredients except brandy and sherry, and cook two hours; add
liquor; let stand in crock for a week before using.


Vol-au-vent No. 1

Roll Puff Paste one half inch thick. Cut out in desired shape, wet
edges, and place one inch rim on wet edge. Prick several times in
center that paste may rise evenly. Chill. Cut cover the size of space
inside the rim. Decorate top of cover with paste circles, crescents,
or diamonds, always wetting under surface with cold water before
arranging. Chill before baking.


Pâté Shells

Roll Puff Paste one third inch thick; shape with round cutter; cut
rings from one half the rounds. Place rings on rounds, using cold water
to hold them together. Chill until stiff before baking.


Bouchées

Roll Puff Paste one fourth inch thick. Cut with small round cutter;
make impression on round with smaller round cutter. Chill until stiff
before baking.


Tarts

Roll Puff Paste a little less than one fourth inch in thickness. Cut in
rounds, squares, or diamonds; put on rim, wetting edges. Chill and bake.


Vol-au-vent No. 2

Cover the outside of a charlotte russe mold with Puff Paste, cut one
fourth inch thick. Prick surface of paste, chill, and bake. Cut a cover
for vol-au-vent to fit mold; prick, chill, and bake. Remove vol-au-vent
from mold immediately after baking.


Rule for Baking Puff Paste

Always chill Puff Paste before baking. Place in very hot oven; protect
upper surface of paste, if necessary, at first.

Pâtés should be baked in twenty-four minutes; after the first fifteen,
decrease heat.

Vol-au-vent should bake forty-five minutes to one hour, and should be
turned frequently. Remove soft inside portion as soon as taken from
oven. Tarts and bouchées should be baked the same as pâtés.


Frangipane Tartlets

Cover fluted patty tins with Puff Paste. Make covers a little larger
than patty tins. Bake in a hot oven. Fill with Frangipane Cream. Cover
with meringue, and decorate with cherries, angelica, and blanched and
browned almonds.


Frangipane Cream

Mix two tablespoons flour, one fourth cup powdered sugar, and one
fourth cup cream until smooth. Cook ten minutes, stirring constantly;
add four egg yolks, one tablespoon each of sherry, lemon juice, lemon
rind, and chopped citron. Cook in double boiler until mixture thickens.


Almond Sticks

Roll Puff Paste one eighth inch thick. Brush with white of egg,
sprinkle with shredded almonds and powdered sugar. Cut in strips one
half inch wide and three inches long. Bake in a quick oven.


Cheese Straws

Roll Puff Paste—trimmings will do for this purpose—one eighth inch
thick. Sprinkle with salt, cayenne pepper, and grated cheese. To keep
these ingredients on the paste, pat and fold in three layers. Roll
again, spread, fold, and roll as before. Cut in strips half inch wide
and five inches long. Bake in a quick oven.


Banbury Tarts

Make tarts and fill with the following cooked mixture: mix for filling,
one cup seeded and chopped raisins, one cup sugar, three tablespoons
cracker crumbs, one egg, one tablespoon butter, one eighth teaspoon
salt, juice and rind of one lemon.


Banbury Squares

Roll Chopped Paste one fourth inch thick; cut in three inch squares.
Put one and one half teaspoons Banbury mixture on one side of square,
wet edges, fold to make a triangle, prick, and bake.


Apple Tarts

Fill tarts with Apple Sauce to which has been added one tablespoon
butter.


Cranberry Tarts

Fill tarts with cranberry filling used for Cranberry Pie.


Lemon Tarts

Fill tarts with Lemon Cream used for Lemon Pie, cooked in double boiler
until thick.


Peach Tarts

Cook two cups peaches cut in eighths, one cup sugar, one tablespoon
lemon juice, one tablespoon butter, and a few grains salt, until
peaches are tender. Cool and fill tarts.


Pineapple Tarts

Cook one cup grated pineapple, one fourth cup sugar, two egg yolks,
grated rind and juice of one lemon, and few grains of salt, until
thick. Chill and fill tarts.


Gooseberry Tart

For this tart cover the outside of a round agate-ware baking dish with
Chopped Paste. Chill, bake. For filling, mix four cups gooseberries,
one cup sugar, few gratings lemon rind, few gratings nutmeg. Stew
until gooseberries are tender; add two tablespoons butter. Use hot or
cold in paste shell. Serve with cream or Soft Custard.


Lemon Crisps

Cut Puff Paste in strips four inches long, one inch wide, and one
fourth inch in thickness. Chill and bake. Arrange in pairs with Lemon
Filling between.


Orange Crisps

Prepare the same as Lemon Crisps, using Orange Filling.


Chantilly Tarts

Fill tarts with Strawberry Jam; serve with whipped cream.


Crisp à la Russe

Roll Puff Paste one eighth inch thick. Cut in strips two inches wide
and four inches long. Spread one half with jam or jelly, fold over
other half, press edges together, bake in hot oven. Brush with white of
egg, sprinkle with almonds. Brown in oven.



CHAPTER XIV

CAKE AND COOKIES; FROSTINGS AND FILLINGS


Suggestions for making and baking Cake

1st. Get all materials needed together.

2d. Attend to fire, making sure, if it is a coal fire, that there is
sufficient coal to last through the baking.

3d. Measure all ingredients with same cup, dry ones first.

4th. Mix and sift all dry ingredients except sugar; if soda is used,
sift through a very fine sieve before sifting with other ingredients.


Mixing Butter Cakes

_Cream Butter._—Cream butter, that is, beat it with a spoon until it
is of a creamy consistency; then add sugar very gradually; when well
blended, add yolks of eggs which have been beaten with a Dover egg
beater until lemon-colored and thick.

When the ingredients are thoroughly incorporated, add sifted dry
ingredients alternately with the milk. When all milk and flour have
been used, beat well; then cut and fold in the stiffly beaten whites
of eggs. Pour into buttered and papered pan, having mixture a little
higher on the sides than in the middle.

_Cutting and Folding._—Cut through and through the mixture with a knife
or side of a wooden spoon, fold by turning the spoon completely over,
thereby blending the materials without breaking the air bubbles. Never
stir or beat after cutting and folding.


Mixing Sponge Cake

Beat yolks of eggs until lemon-colored and thick; add sugar and
continue beating; add flour; when well blended, cut and fold in the
stiffly beaten whites of eggs. Pour into buttered and papered pan; bake
in a round pan with a tube in the center.


Baking Cake

For baking both sponge and butter cakes divide the time into quarters.
The first quarter, the cake should rise; the second quarter, form a
crust and begin to brown; third quarter, continue browning; and fourth
quarter, finish browning and shrink from the pan. When baked, this
may be determined by pressing crust with the finger; if a depression
is left the cake is not done; if the cake springs back and leaves no
depression, it is done. Take from oven, invert on a cake cooler, remove
paper, turn right-side up and cool. When cold, frost.


Time for baking Cake

Thin cakes and individual cakes require from twelve to fifteen minutes
to bake; loaf cakes from thirty to sixty minutes according to size.

If the cake rises unevenly, the mixture is too thick or the oven is too
hot.

If the oven seems too hot, when the cake is ready for the oven, put the
cake in the oven, but do not close the oven door for the first five or
ten minutes of baking.


To grease Tins

Warm pans slightly; brush with melted lard, suet, or clarified butter;
cover bottom of pan only with tissue paper, then grease the paper.

Lard or suet is less apt to brown than butter, but many object to
their use; if so, clarify the butter, by melting butter, letting stand
until salt has settled to the bottom, then pouring off the liquid
butter.


CAKE


Plain Chocolate Cake

    ½ cup butter
    1½ cups sugar
    2 cups flour
    3 teaspoons baking powder
    4 ounces Lowney’s Premium Chocolate
    5 tablespoons boiling water
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    ½ cup milk
    1 teaspoon vanilla
    4 eggs

Cream the butter; add the sugar very gradually, yolks of eggs well
beaten, flour in which the baking powder and salt have been sifted,
milk, and chocolate mixed with water. Beat well; add beaten whites,
pour into buttered pans, and bake forty to fifty minutes in a moderate
oven. This cake may be baked in small cakes by omitting one fourth cup
flour.


Chocolate Cake No. 2

    4 ounces Lowney’s Premium Chocolate
    1½ cups sugar
    ½ cup butter
    ½ cup milk
    2 cups flour
    3 eggs
    2 teaspoons baking powder
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    3 tablespoons boiling water

Melt chocolate, add boiling water, and cook over hot water until
smooth. Cream butter; add sugar gradually; when of a creamy
consistency, add chocolate mixture, yolks of eggs well beaten, flour in
which salt and baking powder have been sifted, and milk. Beat well; cut
and fold in well-beaten whites; add flavoring. Pour into buttered pans
and bake in a moderate oven thirty or forty minutes. Frost with White
or Chocolate Frosting.

This mixture may be used for layer cakes by omitting one fourth cup
flour and baking in layer cake pans.


Chocolate Raisin Cake

    1 cup butter
    1½ cups sugar
    ¾ cup milk
    5 egg yolks
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    2 tablespoons sherry or brandy
    2 squares Lowney’s Premium Chocolate, grated
    ½ teaspoon cinnamon
    2 cups seeded raisins
    3½ cups flour
    3 teaspoons baking powder
    5 egg whites

Cream butter; add sugar gradually, grated chocolate, raisins, cinnamon,
baking powder and salt sifted with flour, milk. Beat well; add
flavoring and well-beaten whites of eggs. Bake in deep buttered pans,
forty minutes. This amount will make two loaves. The wine or brandy may
be omitted, in which case, use one cup of milk instead of three fourths
cup.


Chocolate Pound Cake

    1 cup butter
    1 cup sugar
    5 egg yolks
    5 egg whites
    ½ teaspoon salt
    ¼ cup Lowney’s Premium Chocolate, grated
    2 cups flour
    ¼ cup brandy
    1 cup citron cut in small pieces

Cream butter; add sugar gradually, yolks of eggs beaten until thick and
lemon-colored, flour, citron, salt. Beat well; cut and fold in whites
of eggs beaten until stiff. Pour into buttered pans and bake one hour
in a moderate oven. This cake may be baked in a buttered dripping pan
and when cold cut into fancy shapes and iced.


Devil’s Food

    ¾ cup butter
    2 cups sugar
    4 eggs
    1 cup milk
    8 tablespoons chocolate
    2¼ cups flour
    1 teaspoon cinnamon
    ¼ teaspoon clove
    4 teaspoons baking powder
    ⅛ teaspoon salt

Cream the butter, add the sugar, the chocolate melted, eggs well
beaten, flour sifted with baking powder, salt and spices, and the
milk. Beat well, and bake in angel cake pan. Frost with Chocolate or
Marshmallow Frosting.


Cocoa Cake

    ½ cup butter
    1½ cups sugar
    4 eggs
    ½ cup Lowney’s Cocoa
    ½ cup milk
    1½ cups flour
    2 teaspoons baking powder
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon vanilla

Mix in the order given and beat well for five minutes. Bake in buttered
pan thirty to forty minutes in moderate oven.

[Illustration: WALNUT CHOCOLATE CAKE

Plate IX. For Receipt see page 262]

[Illustration: CHOCOLATE SPONGE CAKE

Plate X. For Receipt see page 262]


Walnut Chocolate Cake

    ¼ cup Lowney’s Always Ready Chocolate Powder
    ½ cup butter
    1½ cups flour
    ½ cup milk
    1 cup walnut meats
    1 cup sugar
    2 egg yolks
    2½ teaspoons baking powder
    2 tablespoons hot water
    1 teaspoon vanilla
    salt

Cream butter; add sugar, yolks of eggs well beaten and flour in which
baking powder has been sifted, milk, and chocolate which has been
moistened with hot water; beat well and add walnut meats. Bake in
buttered jelly cake pans about twenty minutes.

Spread one cake with one half cup of Lowney’s Sweet Chocolate Powder
moistened with one fourth cup boiling water and flavored with one
teaspoon vanilla. Sprinkle with broken walnuts, cover with other cake,
and ice with White Frosting. See colored illustration, Plate IX,
opposite.


Chocolate Sponge Cake

    ¼ cup Lowney’s Always Ready Chocolate Powder
    yolks of 3 eggs
    ¼ cup sugar
    whites of 3 eggs
    2 tablespoons hot water
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    ¼ cup pastry flour
    1 teaspoon vanilla

Beat yolks until lemon-colored and thick; add sugar and continue
beating. Mix chocolate with water, add to sugar mixture; cut and fold
in flour, salt and beaten whites. Flavor and bake in buttered pan in
a moderate oven three quarters of an hour. See colored illustration,
Plate X, opposite p. 262.

[Illustration: COCOA PARFAIT

Plate XI. For Receipt see page 302]

[Illustration: COCOA FRAPPÉ

Plate XII. For Receipt see page 295]


Chocolate Nut Cakes

    4 squares Lowney’s Premium Chocolate, grated
    1½ cups sugar
    3 teaspoons baking powder
    1 cup nut meats broken in pieces
    2¼ cups flour
    ½ cup milk
    8 egg whites
    1 teaspoon vanilla
    salt
    ¾ cup butter

Cream butter; add sugar, flour in which baking powder has been sifted,
and milk, and beat well; add whites of eggs beaten stiff and nut meats;
then add chocolate and vanilla. Pour into buttered gem pans and bake in
hot oven twenty-five minutes.


Simple Butter Cake

    ½ cup butter
    2 cups sugar
    4 egg yolks
    1 cup milk
    3 cups flour
    4 teaspoons baking powder
    4 egg whites
    1 teaspoon flavoring
    ¼ teaspoon salt

Follow directions for making Butter Cake, and bake in a loaf in a
moderate oven forty minutes, or in rounds twenty minutes.


Currant Cake

Add one cup currants to Simple Butter Cake. Bake in loaves or rounds.


Layer Cake

Bake Simple Butter Cake in four square shallow pans. Fill with Lemon
Cream, Cocoanut Cream, Chocolate Cream, or Jelly.


Gold Cake

    ¾ cup butter
    1½ cups sugar
    8 egg yolks
    1 egg
    2¼ cups flour
    4 teaspoons baking powder
    1½ cups milk
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon lemon extract, or
    1 teaspoon orange extract

Follow directions for Butter Cake, and bake in loaves or rounds.


Silver Cake

    ¾ cup butter
    2 cups sugar
    2 cups pastry flour
    4 teaspoons baking powder
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    ½ cup milk
    8 egg whites
    1 teaspoon almond extract

Follow directions for mixing Butter Cake. Bake in loaves or rounds in
moderate oven.


Nut Cake

Add one cup chopped walnuts to Silver Cake mixture, and flavor with
vanilla instead of almond.


Orange Cake

    ¼ cup butter
    1 cup sugar
    2 egg yolks
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    1½ cups flour
    2 teaspoons baking powder
    ½ cup milk
    2 egg whites
    1 tablespoon orange extract

Mix as Butter Cake, and bake in two-layer cake pans twenty minutes.
Cool, fill with Orange Filling, and cover with Orange Frosting.


Cream Pie

Use rule for Orange Cake. Fill with Cream Filling, and sprinkle top
with powdered sugar.


Spice Cake

    ½ cup butter
    1½ cups brown sugar
    2 eggs
    ½ cup milk
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    2 cups flour
    3 teaspoons baking powder
    1 teaspoon cinnamon
    ½ teaspoon nutmeg
    ⅛ teaspoon clove

Mix and sift dry ingredients, add butter, sugar, eggs and milk, and
beat until smooth. Bake in a moderate oven forty minutes. One cup
chopped raisins, or one cup chopped dates may be added to this cake.


Marble Cake

    ½ cup butter
    1 cup sugar
    2 egg yolks
    ½ cup milk
    2 egg whites
    ½ teaspoon cinnamon
    ½ teaspoon nutmeg
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    1-¾ cups of flour
    3 teaspoons baking powder
    1 tablespoon molasses

Cream butter; add sugar, yolks of eggs beaten until thick, flour in
which baking powder has been sifted, alternately with milk and egg
whites, beaten until stiff. To one third of this mixture add the
spices. Pour into pan the light and dark mixtures irregularly.


Jelly Roll

    3 egg yolks
    1½ cups sugar
    ½ cup water
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    2 cups pastry flour
    2 teaspoons baking powder
    3 egg whites
    1 teaspoon vanilla

Sift baking powder and salt with flour, and follow directions for
making Sponge Cake. Pour into medium-sized buttered dripping pan to
depth of one half inch. Bake in a moderate oven ten to twelve minutes;
turn on to a wet cheese cloth sprinkled with confectioner’s sugar. Cut
off edges of cake, spread with warm Jelly, and roll. Work quickly.


Pound Cake

    1 pound butter
    1 pound sugar
    10 eggs
    1 pound flour
    ¼ cup wine
    ¼ cup brandy
    few gratings nutmeg

Cream butter; add flour. When well blended, add yolks of eggs beaten
until thick, then sugar with nutmeg, whites of eggs beaten until stiff,
and wine and brandy. Bake in loaves or small cakes.


Fruit Cake

    1 pound sugar (brown)
    1 pound butter
    12 eggs
    1 pound flour
    ½ teaspoon cloves
    1 teaspoon each nutmeg and mace
    2 teaspoons cinnamon
    2 cups raisins
    4 cups currants
    4 cups chopped almonds
    4 cups chopped citron
    juice and rind of 1 lemon
    ¼ cup brandy

Cream butter; add sugar, eggs well beaten, and remaining ingredients.
Pour into buttered and papered pans. Steam three hours and bake two
hours.


Raised Fruit Cake

    4 cups flour
    1 cup butter
    1¼ cups sugar
    ½ cup milk
    1 teaspoon salt
    ½ yeast cake dissolved in one half cup water
    2 eggs
    ¼ cup wine
    2 cups seeded raisins
    1 cup citron

Mix all ingredients except eggs and fruit. Raise over night. In the
morning add eggs and fruit; cover and raise again; pour into buttered
and papered pans; let it rise one hour. Bake in moderate oven one and
one half to two hours.


Imperial Cake

    ¾ cup butter
    1½ cups sugar
    3 egg yolks
    2½ cups flour
    3 teaspoons baking powder
    ¼ cup milk
    2 cups seeded raisins
    1½ cups currants
    1 cup citron
    ½ cup candied orange peel
    ¼ cup brandy
    3 egg whites
    ½ teaspoon salt

Mix as Butter Cake, adding fruit last. Bake in buttered and papered
pans in a moderate oven one hour.


Fig Cake

Use rule for Orange Cake. Bake in layers. Fill with Fig Filling, and
sprinkle with confectioner’s sugar.


Marshmallow Cake

Bake Silver Cake in layers. Fill and frost with Marshmallow Frosting.


Chocolate Marshmallow Cake

Add four squares melted chocolate to Silver Cake. Bake in layers, and
fill and cover with Marshmallow Frosting.


Mocha Cake

Use rule for Hot Water Sponge Cake. Bake in layers. Cool; cut in
rounds; arrange in three layers, with confectioner’s frosting between;
spread sides and top with Mocha Frosting; sprinkle sides with cocoanut,
and garnish top with Mocha Frosting put through pastry bag.

If a coffee cake is preferred, substitute hot coffee for hot water in
Hot Water Sponge Cake.


Plain Sponge Cake No. 1

    8 eggs
    ½ weight of eggs in flour
    weight of eggs in sugar
    3 tablespoons lemon juice

Beat yolks ten minutes; add sugar; beat five minutes; add lemon juice
and flour; when well blended, add stiffly beaten whites, cutting and
folding them in.

Pour into angel cake pan and bake in a moderate oven one hour.


Plain Sponge Cake No. 2

    1 cup powdered sugar
    ¾ cup flour
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    grated rind ½ lemon
    1 tablespoon lemon juice
    4 eggs

Beat yolks until lemon-colored and thick; add sugar, rind and juice of
lemon. Cut and fold in the well-beaten whites, also the sifted flour.
When thoroughly blended, pour into buttered and papered pan and bake
thirty to forty minutes.


Hot Water Sponge Cake

    3 egg yolks
    1 cup sugar
    1 cup flour
    1 tablespoon lemon juice
    1 teaspoon baking powder
    2 tablespoons hot water
    3 egg whites
    ¼ teaspoon salt

Beat egg yolks until lemon-colored and thick; add sugar and continue
beating. Add flour, mixed and sifted with baking powder and salt, hot
water, and whites of eggs beaten until stiff, with lemon juice added.


Simple Chocolate Cake

    3 eggs
    ½ cup sugar
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    ¼ cup Lowney’s Cocoa
    ½ teaspoon vanilla
    grated rind and juice of ½ lemon
    1 tablespoon flour
    ½ teaspoon cinnamon
    ½ teaspoon baking powder
    ¼ teaspoon clove

Mix cocoa, spice, flour, baking powder, and salt; beat the yolks of
eggs until lemon-colored and thick; add sugar and beat well; add lemon
juice and rind; when well blended, add chocolate mixture and the
beaten whites of eggs. Bake in buttered shallow pans twenty minutes
in a moderate oven. When cool put together with Chocolate Frosting or
Currant Jelly or White Mountain Cream.


Cold Water Sponge Cake

    6 eggs
    3 cups sugar
    grated rind and juice of ½ lemon
    ¾ cup cold water
    3 cups flour
    3 teaspoons baking powder
    ½ teaspoon salt

Beat yolks of eggs until lemon-colored and thick; add sugar, rind and
juice of lemon, water, flour in which salt and baking powder has been
sifted. When well blended, cut and fold in the beaten whites of eggs.
Bake in two pans thirty to forty minutes.


Cream Sponge Cake

    1 cup sugar
    ½ cup water
    5 egg yolks
    grated rind and juice 1 lemon
    1⅛ cups flour
    5 egg whites

Cook water and sugar until it threads. Beat egg yolks until
lemon-colored and thick. Add sugar sirup, lemon juice and rind, and
beat until mixture is cold. Cut and fold in the beaten whites and
flour. Bake in an angel cake pan forty to fifty minutes.


True Sponge Cake

    6 eggs
    1 cup sugar
    1 cup flour
    juice and rind 1 lemon
    ⅛ teaspoon salt

Follow directions for making Sponge Cake. Bake in a deep pan forty to
sixty minutes.


Angel Cake

    1 cup granulated sugar
    1 cup egg whites
    1 cup flour
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon cream of tartar
    1 teaspoon vanilla

Beat egg whites on platter with wire beater. When foamy, add cream of
tartar; when stiff, add sugar gradually. Sift flour four times with
salt. Cut and fold into egg mixture. Add vanilla, bake one hour in
moderate oven in angel cake pan. Invert pan on cake cooler and allow
it to drop out itself. If too brown, wrap in wet cheese cloth for ten
minutes; then brown may be easily removed.


Sunshine Cake

    1 cup sugar
    5 egg yolks
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    ¾ cup flour
    ½ teaspoon cream of tartar
    6 egg whites
    1½ tablespoons orange juice
    1 teaspoon lemon juice

Beat yolks until lemon-colored and thick; add sugar and flavoring and
continue beating. Mix and sift flour and cream of tartar four times.
Cut and fold in stiffly beaten whites, alternately with flour. Bake in
an angel cake pan one hour in a moderate oven.


Chocolate Cake

    ½ cup butter
    1 cup sugar
    3 eggs
    ½ cup milk
    2 cups flour
    3 teaspoons baking powder
    4 ounces chocolate, melted
    1 teaspoon vanilla

Follow rule for mixing Butter Cake and bake in loaf or rounds in
moderate oven.


Almond Cake

Use rule for Silver Cake. Bake in shallow pan; sprinkle with powdered
sugar and chopped almonds. Bake twenty to thirty minutes in moderate
oven.


Bride’s Cake

Use rule for Silver Cake and bake in angel cake pan forty to sixty
minutes.


Lemon Queens

    ½ cup butter
    1 cup sugar
    1 cup flour
    2 teaspoons baking powder
    4 egg yolks
    grated rind 1 lemon
    2 tablespoons lemon juice
    4 egg whites

Make as Butter Cake and bake in buttered lemon queen pans twenty to
thirty minutes.


Cream Puffs

    1 cup boiling water
    ½ cup butter
    1-¾ cups flour
    5 eggs
    1 tablespoon sugar
    ¼ teaspoon salt

Boil sugar, water and butter one minute; add flour all at once. Beat
until mixture leaves side of the pan in a mass, add eggs, one at a
time, beating thoroughly. When all eggs are used, beat five minutes;
drop from tip of tablespoon on to a buttered sheet and bake one half
hour in quick oven. Fill with Cream Filling, Strawberry Filling,
Chocolate Filling, or Whipped Cream.


Éclairs

Use rule for Cream Puffs. Put mixture in pastry bag or shape in strips
three and one half inches long and one inch wide, on buttered sheet.
Bake twenty to thirty minutes in quick oven.

Fill with Cream, Chocolate, Coffee, or Strawberry Filling, and brush
tops with melted Fondant, Chocolate Frosting, or Confectioner’s
Frosting.


Lady Fingers

    6 eggs
    ¾ cup powdered sugar
    1 cup flour
    grated rind 1 lemon
    ⅛ teaspoon salt
    powdered sugar
    1 tablespoon lemon juice

Beat yolks until lemon-colored and thick; add sugar and continue
beating. Add lemon rind and the egg whites, beaten to a stiff froth.
Cut and fold in the flour and salt. Shape on buttered sheet, using
tablespoon or pastry bag and tube, four inches long and one inch wide.
Sprinkle thickly with powdered sugar.

Bake twelve minutes in a moderately hot oven.


Sponge Drops

Use rule for Lady Fingers. Drop from a tablespoon in rounds the size
of a silver dollar on buttered sheet. Sprinkle with powdered sugar and
bake as Lady Fingers.


Sugar Cookies

    ½ cup butter
    1 cup sugar
    1 tablespoon milk
    flavoring
    2 eggs
    2 teaspoons baking powder
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    2 cups flour

Cream butter; add sugar, yolks well beaten, flour, baking powder, and
salt, milk, and whites beaten to a stiff froth, and enough more flour
to make of consistency to roll. Cut off a small piece of dough, roll on
floured board, sprinkle with granulated sugar, shape with cooky cutter,
and bake ten minutes. Save all trimmings until the last. Do not mix
trimmings with fresh dough.


Soft Sugar Cookies

    1 cup butter
    2 cups sugar
    2 eggs
    ⅛ teaspoon salt
    1 cup milk
    4 cups flour
    3 teaspoons baking powder
    1 teaspoon lemon extract

Cream the butter, add sugar, and when creamy the remaining ingredients.
Chill. Roll, cut in rounds and bake in a quick oven.


Sand Cookies

    ½ cup butter
    1 cup sugar
    1 egg
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    2 cups flour
    2 teaspoons baking powder
    2 teaspoons cinnamon mixed with
    4 tablespoons sugar
    ½ cup blanched almonds

Mix as sugar cookies; roll; shape with doughnut cutter; brush with
water or white of egg; sprinkle with cinnamon mixture. Decorate with
halves of almonds. Bake in a quick oven.


Nut Cookies

    ¼ cup butter
    ½ cup sugar
    2 eggs
    2 teaspoons baking powder
    ½ teaspoon salt
    1 cup flour
    ¼ cup milk
    1 cup chopped nut meats
    flavoring

Mix like Sugar Cookies. Add nuts; drop from a teaspoon on to buttered
sheet. Decorate with halves of nuts. Bake in quick oven.


Almond Cookies

    ½ cup butter
    ½ cup sugar
    1 cup chopped almonds
    1 teaspoon cinnamon
    3 egg yolks
    1½ cups flour
    2 teaspoons baking powder
    ½ teaspoon vanilla

Mix in the order given. Chill, roll, brush with white of egg, sprinkle
with granulated sugar, cut, and bake in a quick oven.


Bangor Brownies

    ¼ cup butter
    1 cup brown sugar
    1 egg
    3 squares chocolate
    ½ to ¾ cup flour
    1 cup nut meats
    ¼ teaspoon salt

Put all ingredients in bowl and beat until well mixed. Spread evenly in
buttered baking pan. Bake and cut in strips.


Creoles

    3 eggs
    1½ cups brown sugar
    ¾ cup of flour
    ½ teaspoon salt
    1½ cups pecan nut meats
    few grains cayenne

Mix all ingredients in bowl; beat well. Fill small buttered fluted tins
one half full. Decorate with pecans. Bake twelve to fifteen minutes.


Hermits

    ¾ cup butter
    1 cup brown sugar
    2 eggs
    ¾ teaspoon soda
    1 tablespoon hot water
    2½ cups flour
    ½ teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon cinnamon
    ¼ teaspoon each, clove, mace and nutmeg
    1 cup raisins

Mix ingredients in order given. Roll mixture one quarter inch thick.
Shape with cooky cutter. Put one raisin in center of each round. Bake
in moderate oven twelve to fifteen minutes.


Chocolate Wafers

    ½ cup butter
    1 cup sugar
    2 eggs
    1 teaspoon vanilla
    1¼ cups flour
    ⅛ teaspoon salt
    4 tablespoons Lowney’s Premium Chocolate, melted

Mix in the order given. Beat well. Pour into buttered pans in thin
layers. Bake in quick oven six to eight minutes. Cut in long narrow
strips while hot, and serve cold.


Wafers

    ½ cup butter
    1 cup powdered sugar
    ½ cup milk
    1-¾ cups flour
    1 teaspoon vanilla
    ⅛ teaspoon salt

Cream the butter and add other ingredients. Spread on inverted buttered
tins. Bake in quick oven, cut in squares, and roll. If this is done on
top of the range, there will be less danger of the wafers breaking.


Nut Wafers

Sprinkle finely chopped nuts on the wafers just before baking.

[Illustration: CHOCOLATE JUMBLES

Plate XIII. For Receipt see page 275]

[Illustration: CHOCOLATE WALNUT WAFERS

Plate XIV. For Receipt see page 275]

[Illustration: LOWNEY’S CHOCOLATE HERMITS

Plate XV. For Receipt see page 275]

[Illustration: CHOCOLATE SWEDISH MERINGUES

Plate XVI. For Receipt see page 276]


Chocolate Jumbles

    ½ cup butter
    1 cup sugar
    2 squares Lowney’s Premium Chocolate, grated
    2 eggs
    2 teaspoons baking powder
    2 cups flour and enough more flour to roll out.
    1 tablespoon milk

Mix in the order given, toss on to a floured board, and roll to an inch
in thickness. Cut out with a doughnut cutter. Just before putting into
the oven, dust over with granulated sugar and bake ten minutes. See
colored illustration, Plate XIII, opposite p. 274.


Chocolate Walnut Wafers

    ¼ cup butter
    ½ cup powdered sugar
    2 squares Lowney’s Premium Chocolate, grated
    ¼ cup milk
    1 cup flour
    ½ teaspoon vanilla
    1 cup chopped walnuts
    ½ teaspoon salt

Cream butter; add dry ingredients, milk and flavoring. Spread on
inverted pans which have been well buttered. Sprinkle with chopped
nuts. Bake in moderate oven. Crease immediately on removing from oven.
See colored illustration, Plate XIV, opposite p. 274.


Lowney’s Chocolate Hermits

    ½ cup butter
    ⅔ cup sugar
    2 eggs
    ½ cup raisins seeded
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    2 teaspoons baking powder
    2 cups flour
    ¼ cup Lowney’s Always Ready Chocolate Powder
    2 tablespoons hot water
    1 teaspoon cinnamon

Cream butter; add sugar, eggs, raisins, flour in which baking powder
has been sifted, chocolate melted in water, salt and cinnamon. Drop
from a teaspoon on to a buttered baking sheet, put a raisin in the
center of each hermit, and bake in a moderate oven. See colored
illustration, Plate XV, opposite p. 275.


Chocolate Swedish Meringues

    5 egg whites
    ½ teaspoon cream of tartar
    1 cup sugar
    ¼ cup Lowney’s Cocoa
    ½ cup flour
    ½ teaspoon vanilla

Beat the whites of eggs until foamy; add cream of tartar, sugar and
cocoa. Continue beating until spoon will stand up in mixture; add
vanilla and fold in the flour. Bake in buttered shallow pans in a
moderate oven about twenty minutes. Put cakes together with following
filling, and decorate top with filling and candied fruit and nuts.


FILLING

Melt one half pound marshmallows. Cook one cup sugar and one third cup
boiling water until, when dropped from tip of a spoon, a thread is
formed. Pour slowly on to melted marshmallows, add one half teaspoon
vanilla, and beat until thick enough to spread. Put between and on top
of cakes. Sprinkle with chopped nuts, raisins, cherries and angelica.
This may be made in one large cake or cut in small ones the shape of
dominoes and decorated in the same way. See colored illustration, Plate
XVI, opposite p. 275.


Cornucopias

Shape Wafers as soon as taken from the oven. Fill with Whipped Cream,
or Cream Fillings of various flavors.


Chocolate Dominoes

    ½ cup chopped walnut meats
    ½ cup chopped figs
    ½ cup almond paste
    grated rind of orange
    2 squares Lowney’s Premium Chocolate, melted
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    orange juice
    sugar

Mix the ingredients with enough orange juice to make the mixture of
the consistency to spread. Knead on a sugared board. Cut in shape of
dominoes, coat with melted chocolate, and decorate with pieces of
almonds.


Chocolate Angelettes

    4 egg whites
    ½ teaspoon cream of tartar
    ½ cup sugar
    ⅛ teaspoon salt
    4 tablespoons Lowney’s Always Ready Chocolate Powder
    ¼ cup flour
    1 teaspoon vanilla
    confectioner’s sugar

Beat whites; add cream of tartar and sugar, and continue beating. Cut
and fold in salt, chocolate, flour. Flavor and drop by spoonfuls on
to a buttered sheet; sprinkle with confectioner’s sugar and bake in a
moderate oven.


Chocolate Cookies

    ½ cup butter
    1 cup sugar
    1 egg
    3 squares Lowney’s Premium Chocolate
    2 cups flour
    2 teaspoons baking powder
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    4 tablespoons milk

Cream butter; add remaining ingredients. Chill, roll, and shape. Bake
in a moderate oven.


Chocolate Macaroons

    ½ pound almond paste
    ⅜ pound powdered sugar
    3 egg whites
    2 squares Lowney’s Premium Chocolate
    ⅛ teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon vanilla

Mix almond paste and sugar, until the mixture feels like meal; add
whites of eggs, one at a time, and work with a spatula until there are
no lumps; add chocolate, salt and vanilla. Drop from a teaspoon on to
a buttered paper; bake twenty to thirty minutes in a slow oven. Remove
from paper as soon as cooked. If baked in a quick oven, they will not
be a success.


Cocoa Cocoanut Cookies

    3 eggs
    1 cup sugar
    ½ cup heavy cream
    ½ cup shredded cocoanut
    ¼ cup Lowney’s Always Ready Chocolate Powder
    2½ cups flour
    2 teaspoons baking powder
    1 teaspoon salt

Mix ingredients in order given. Chill, roll ¼ inch thick, and shape
with cooky cutter. Bake in moderate oven.


Lowney’s Brownies

    ½ cup butter
    1 cup sugar
    2 squares Lowney’s Premium Chocolate
    2 eggs
    ½ cup nut meats
    ½ cup flour
    ¼ teaspoon salt

Cream butter, add remaining ingredients, spread on buttered sheets, and
bake ten to fifteen minutes. Cut in squares as soon as taken from oven.


Mushroom Meringue

Make a round of meringue mixture size of a quarter. Shape stems by
drawing mixture upward. Sprinkle tops with cocoa. Bake in moderate
oven. Remove from paper and press stems into bottom of rounds to
resemble mushrooms.


Macaroons

    1 cup almond paste
    1 cup powdered sugar
    3 egg whites
    ¼ teaspoon almond extract

Mix almond paste and sugar until like meal. Add one egg white at a time
and mix thoroughly. When well blended, shape on buttered paper in small
rounds. Bake on inverted dripping pan in a very slow oven. Remove from
paper immediately.


Doughnuts

    1¼ cups sugar
    2 egg yolks
    1 egg
    1 teaspoon salt
    1 cup milk
    4½ cups flour
    1 teaspoon soda
    2 teaspoons cream of tartar
    few gratings of nutmeg

Beat eggs; add sugar, dry ingredients sifted, and milk. Beat well. Add
flour to make a soft dough. Chill over night if possible.

Roll to one inch thickness; cut with doughnut cutter; fry in hot fat,
turning often. Drain on brown paper.


Crullers

Add to doughnut mixture two tablespoons butter. Roll one quarter inch
thick. Cut in pieces four inches long and two inches wide. Make two
slits in each, twist slightly, and fry in hot fat.


Hard Gingerbread

    1½ cups butter
    2½ cups sugar
    6 eggs
    1 teaspoon soda
    ¼ cup milk
    3 teaspoons ginger
    8 cups flour

Cream butter; add remaining ingredients. Spread quarter inch thick on
buttered inverted dripping pan. Roll with creased rolling pin. Bake in
quick oven. Cut in squares. Cool and keep in air-tight receptacles.


Molasses Drops

    ⅓ cup butter
    ⅓ cup boiling water
    ⅔ cup molasses
    1 teaspoon soda
    ½ teaspoon salt
    1 tablespoon ginger
    1 teaspoon cinnamon
    flour

Pour boiling water over butter; add remaining ingredients, using
sufficient flour to make a drop batter. Drop from tablespoon on to
buttered tin. Bake in moderate oven fifteen minutes.


New York Gingerbread

    ¾ cup butter
    1½ cups flour
    5 eggs
    1-¾ cups powdered sugar
    1 tablespoon yellow ginger
    1 teaspoon baking powder
    ¼ teaspoon salt

Cream butter; add flour. Add remaining ingredients and beat ten
minutes. Bake in buttered bread pan forty-five to sixty minutes.


Meringues

    1 cup egg whites
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    1 cup fine granulated sugar
    ½ teaspoon vanilla

Add salt to eggs; beat until very stiff. Add two tablespoons sugar,
beat five minutes. So continue until half the sugar is used. When very
stiff, cut and fold in the remaining sugar. Drop by spoonfuls on to
wet paper on inverted dripping pan. Bake in slow oven thirty minutes.
Remove from paper; take out uncooked portion; dry in oven. Cool and
fill with Whipped Cream or Ice Cream. Arrange in pairs.


Chocolate Meringues

Substitute one half cup Lowney’s Premium Chocolate for the one half cup
cocoanut in the receipt for Cocoanut Meringues.


Chocolate Cocoanut Meringues

Add one half cup Lowney’s Premium Chocolate to the receipt for Cocoanut
Meringues.


Cocoanut Meringues

    4 egg whites
    1 cup powdered sugar
    ⅛ teaspoon salt
    ½ cup cocoanut
    ½ teaspoon vanilla

Beat the whites until dry, add sugar, and continue beating. Cut and
fold in remaining ingredients. Shape, using pastry bag and tube. Bake
in a very moderate oven.


Superior Gingerbread

    ⅓ cup butter
    1 cup molasses
    1 cup boiling water
    1 egg
    1 teaspoon grated orange peel
    3 cups flour
    1½ teaspoons soda
    ½ teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon ginger
    1 teaspoon cinnamon

Mix ingredients in order given. Beat well and bake in loaf thirty
minutes, or in muffin pans twenty minutes.


Sour Milk Gingerbread

    1 cup molasses
    1 cup sour milk
    2 cups flour
    1 egg
    2 teaspoons ginger
    2 teaspoons soda
    ½ teaspoon salt

Mix and sift dry ingredients; add remaining ingredients, beat well,
pour into buttered pan, and bake twenty to thirty minutes.


Hot Water Gingerbread

    1 cup molasses
    2 cups flour
    1 teaspoon soda
    1 tablespoon ginger
    2 to 4 tablespoons butter or beef suet
    ½ cup boiling water
    ½ teaspoon salt
    ⅛ teaspoon cinnamon

Mix and sift dry ingredients; add remaining ingredients. Bake twenty to
thirty minutes.


Rochester Gingerbread

    ½ cup beef drippings
    ½ cup brown sugar
    1 cup sour milk
    1 cup molasses
    2 eggs
    3 cups flour
    1 teaspoon soda
    2 teaspoons ginger

Melt the beef drippings, add remaining ingredients, beat well, and bake
in deep bread pans in a moderate oven.


Ginger Snaps

    1 cup molasses
    ¼ to ½ cup butter, suet, or chicken fat
    3 cups flour
    ½ teaspoon soda
    1 tablespoon ginger
    2 teaspoons salt

Boil shortening and molasses two minutes. Add remaining ingredients,
mixed and sifted. Beat well; chill over night. Roll very thin. Shape
with knife or cutter. Bake on buttered pan in quick oven eight to ten
minutes.


FROSTINGS


Cocoa Frosting No. 1

    1 cup confectioners sugar
    1 egg white
    1 teaspoon flavoring
    ¼ cup Lowney’s Cocoa
    1 tablespoon cream or milk
    1 teaspoon butter

Beat white of egg, sugar and cocoa for five minutes. Add flavoring,
milk and melted butter. Spread on cake when cool.


Cocoa Frosting No. 2

    1 cup confectioner’s sugar
    4 tablespoons strong coffee
    ¼ cup Lowney’s Cocoa
    ⅛ teaspoon salt

Mix cocoa and sugar; add hot coffee. Stir over fire five minutes. Add
salt and spread on cake.


Rich Chocolate Frosting

    2 ounces Lowney’s Premium Chocolate
    ½ cup sugar
    2 teaspoons butter
    ¼ cup milk
    1 teaspoon sherry wine, or
    ½ teaspoon vanilla

Mix chocolate, add other ingredients, and cook until, when dropped in
water, a soft ball is formed.


Chocolate Frosting

    2 ounces Lowney’s Premium Chocolate
    ½ cup cream
    1 teaspoon melted butter
    1 egg yolk
    2 cups confectioner’s sugar
    ½ teaspoon vanilla

Melt chocolate, add other ingredients, and spread on cake. One cup
chopped walnuts makes a chocolate walnut frosting.

    NOTE.—Confectioner’s sugar varies in thickening
    properties. Should this frosting be too thick, dilute
    with a small quantity of hot water or milk.


Boiled Frosting No. 1

    1 cup sugar
    ⅓ cup hot water
    1 teaspoon lemon juice
    1 egg white
    ⅛ teaspoon cream of tartar
    1 teaspoon vanilla

Boil sugar and water until it threads; pour on to the beaten egg white,
pouring in a steady stream and very slowly, adding, while beating,
cream of tartar, lemon juice and vanilla; stir until thick. Spread on
cold cake.


Boiled Frosting No. 2

    1 cup sugar
    ⅓ cup water
    2 egg whites
    1 tablespoon lemon juice
    1 teaspoon vanilla

Follow rule for cooking Boiled Frosting No. 1.


Confectioner’s Frosting No. 1

    1 cup confectioner’s sugar
    1 egg white
    1 teaspoon flavoring extract
    ½ teaspoon lemon juice

Mix ingredients and beat until thick.


Confectioner’s Frosting No. 2

Same ingredients as Confectioner’s Frosting No. 1, omitting vanilla,
and flavoring with strawberry, raspberry, or orange juice.


Confectioner’s Frosting No. 3

    3 tablespoons milk, cream, or boiling water
    confectioner’s sugar
    flavoring extract
    1 teaspoon lemon juice

Add sufficient sugar to liquid to make of consistency to spread; add
flavoring and use.


Caramel Frosting No. 1

    1 cup brown sugar
    ⅓ cup cream
    few grains salt
    3 tablespoons caramelized sugar

Boil sugar and cream till it begins to thread; add caramelized sugar
and spread.


Caramel Frosting No. 2

    2 cups brown sugar
    1 cup thin cream
    1 tablespoon butter
    few drops vanilla

Mix ingredients except vanilla, and boil without stirring until a soft
ball can be formed; add vanilla. Beat until creamy. Spread.


Chocolate Frostings

See p. 282.


Coffee Frosting

    Confectioner’s Frosting No. 1
    2 tablespoons black coffee

Follow directions for Confectioner’s Frosting No. 1.


Fudge Frosting

    2 tablespoons butter
    1 cup sugar
    2 squares Lowney’s chocolate
    1 teaspoon vanilla
    ⅓ cup milk

Cook sugar, milk and chocolate six minutes; add butter; cook six
minutes; add vanilla, and beat until of consistency to spread.


Fudge Nut Frosting

Add one cup shredded nuts to Fudge Frosting, just before removing from
fire.


Gelatine Frosting

    1 teaspoon granulated gelatine
    1 tablespoon cold water
    ¼ cup boiling water
    confectioner’s sugar
    1 teaspoon vanilla

Soak gelatine in cold water; add boiling water, stir until dissolved;
add sugar until of consistency to spread. Flavor and use.


Cocoanut Frosting

Use rule for Fudge Frosting; add one cup shredded cocoanut.


Maple Frosting

    1 cup maple sugar
    1 cup boiling water
    1 egg white
    ⅛ teaspoon cream of tartar

Boil sugar, water and cream of tartar until thread is formed. Pour
on to the beaten white, and continue beating until of consistency to
spread.


Marshmallow Frosting

    1 cup sugar
    ⅛ cup hot water
    ½ pound marshmallows
    white of one egg
    1 teaspoon vanilla

Melt marshmallows in double boiler. Cook sugar and water until thread
is formed. Pour on to the beaten white. Add melted marshmallows,
flavoring, and beat until of consistency to spread.


Marshmallow Nut Frosting

Add one cup shredded walnuts or castañas to Marshmallow Frosting.


Tutti-frutti Frosting

Add one cup mixed candied fruit and nuts to Marshmallow Frosting.


Orange Frosting

    confectioner’s sugar
    4 tablespoons orange juice
    2 egg yolks
    grated rind one orange
    1 teaspoon lemon juice

Soak rind in fruit juice one half hour; strain; add remaining
ingredients until of consistency to spread.


Nougat Frosting

    1 cup chopped almonds
    4 tablespoons sugar
    1 cup sugar
    ⅓ cup boiling water
    2 egg whites

Brown almonds in oven. Caramelize four tablespoons sugar, add almonds,
cool, and pound. Boil sugar and water until it threads, add almond
powder, pour on to the beaten whites, and beat until thick enough to
spread.


Fig Frosting

To Confectioner’s Frosting No. 1 add one cup figs which have been
boiled in one half cup water until tender, and chopped until fine.


Wine Frosting

To Boiled Frosting No. 2 add one tablespoon Madeira or sherry wine, and
omit vanilla.


Fondant

    3 cups sugar
    1½ cups water
    ¼ teaspoon cream of tartar
    flavoring

Boil sugar and water until a soft ball can be formed. Wash sides of
saucepan with moist cheese cloth, as fast as the sugar crystallizes.
Pour on to marble. When it begins to harden, work with a spatula until
creamy. Chill, flavor, melt, and use for frosting.


Ornamental Frosting

    4 egg whites
    2 tablespoons lemon juice
    confectioner’s sugar
    flavoring

To egg whites add three tablespoons sugar. Beat five minutes, add
sugar in small quantities, beating five minutes between each addition.
Continue thus until frosting is stiff enough to spread. Use pastry bag
and tube to decorate cake with this frosting.


Brown Sugar Frosting

    1 cup brown sugar
    ⅓ cup water
    2 egg whites
    1 tablespoon lemon juice
    1 teaspoon vanilla

Make the same as Boiled Frosting.


Marshmallow Frosting No. 2

    Boiled Frosting
    ½ pound marshmallows

Heat marshmallows in oven; when puffed arrange on top of cake and pour
Boiled Frosting over them.


Mocha Frosting

    ½ cup butter
    1¼ cups confectioner’s sugar
    ¼ cup flour
    1 cup granulated sugar
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    2 eggs
    1½ cups scalded milk
    ¼ cup strong coffee
    2 squares Lowney’s Premium Chocolate (melted)
    1 teaspoon vanilla

Cream butter; add confectioner’s sugar. Beat eggs; add granulated
sugar, flour, salt, milk, coffee and chocolate. Cook in double boiler
ten minutes; cool, flavor, and add to creamed butter. Use for filling
and frosting for mocha cakes.


FILLINGS


Rich Chocolate Filling

    5 egg yolks
    ½ cup sugar
    2 tablespoons cornstarch
    2 cups milk
    3 ounces Lowney’s Premium Chocolate
    2 tablespoons boiling water
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon vanilla

Melt chocolate; add hot water. Mix sugar and cornstarch, add yolks
of eggs and milk, and cook in double boiler until mixture thickens,
stirring constantly. Add flavoring, salt, and chocolate mixture.


Simple Chocolate Filling

    4 ounces Lowney’s Premium Chocolate
    3 tablespoons milk
    ¾ cup sugar
    2 teaspoons butter
    1 egg
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon vanilla, or
    1 tablespoon wine

Melt chocolate, add remaining ingredients except flavoring, and cook
in double boiler until it thickens, stirring constantly. Cool and add
flavoring.

One cup chopped nuts or one cup shredded cocoanut or one cup mixed
fruit may be added to this filling.


Cocoa Nougat Filling

    1 cup sugar
    ⅓ cup water
    ⅛ teaspoon cream of tartar
    1 teaspoon flavoring
    ⅛ teaspoon salt
    1 egg white
    1 cup nut meats, cut very fine
    ¼ cup Lowney’s Cocoa
    3 tablespoons powdered sugar
    1 egg yolk
    ½ cup heavy cream

Mix nut meats, egg yolk and powdered sugar; add cream beaten until
stiff. Boil sugar and hot water until a thread is formed. Pour sugar
mixture on to slightly beaten white of egg; add cream of tartar and
flavoring, and beat until thick enough to spread. Add nut mixture, beat
well, and spread over cakes.

    NOTE.—If this mixture becomes too thick, it may be
    thinned by adding a small quantity of hot water.


Caramel Filling

    1 cup cream
    ¾ cup sugar
    2 tablespoons butter
    6 tablespoons caramelized sugar
    1 teaspoon vanilla

Cook butter, sugar and cream together until it threads. Add caramelized
sugar and flavoring. Cool and fill.


Cocoanut Filling

    1 cup milk
    1 tablespoon butter
    2 egg yolks
    1 cup powdered sugar
    2 tablespoons cornstarch
    1 cup grated cocoanut
    juice and rind 1 lemon

Mix cornstarch, sugar and egg yolks; add milk, butter, and cook twenty
minutes, stirring occasionally; add lemon rind, juice and cocoanut.


Coffee Filling

Use rule for Cocoanut Filling, substituting one half cup black coffee
for cocoanut, omitting lemon, and cooking after addition of coffee
until mixture thickens.


Cream Filling

    1 cup sugar
    ¼ cup cornstarch
    1 tablespoon butter
    2 eggs
    1½ cups milk
    ⅛ teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon flavoring

Mix cornstarch, sugar and eggs; add milk and butter; cook in double
boiler twenty minutes, stirring constantly. Cool, add salt, flavoring,
and spread between cakes.


Curaçoa Filling

Use rule for Cream Filling, adding one tablespoon orange curaçoa.


Date Filling

    2 cups dates
    ½ cup beaten cream
    2 tablespoons lemon juice
    ½ cup powdered sugar

Remove stones and cut dates in small pieces; add remaining ingredients
and spread between cakes.


Fig Filling

    2 cups figs, chopped
    ½ cup sugar
    ⅓ cup boiling water
    2 tablespoons lemon juice
    1 tablespoon butter
    few grains salt

Cook ingredients in double boiler until of consistency to spread.


Date and Almond Filling

    1 cup sugar
    ⅓ cup thin cream
    2 egg whites
    1 cup chopped dates
    ½ cup chopped almonds

Boil sugar and cream until it threads. Pour on to the whites of eggs;
add chopped dates and almonds. Cool and use for filling.


Maple Filling

    1 cup maple sirup
    1 egg white
    ½ cup beaten cream
    few grains salt

Boil sirup until it threads; pour on to the beaten white; add cream,
salt, and beat until thick enough to spread.


Marshmallow Filling

    ½ pound marshmallows
    1 egg white

Melt marshmallows in top of double boiler; when liquefied, pour on to
the beaten white, beat until thick.


Lemon Filling

    2 egg whites
    1 cup powdered sugar
    2 teaspoons gelatine
    2 tablespoons boiling water
    1 teaspoon cold water
    2 tablespoons lemon juice
    grated rind 1 lemon

Cover gelatine with cold water; dissolve in boiling water; add to
beaten whites with sugar, rind and juice.


Nougat Filling

    Boiled frosting
    1 egg
    1 cup chopped nut meats
    ¼ cup powdered sugar
    ¼ cup cream

Beat egg; add powdered sugar, beaten cream and nut meats; add mixture
to Boiled Frosting. Beat until thick enough to spread.


Nut and Raisin Filling

    1 cup raisins
    1 cup chopped nuts
    1 egg white
    2 tablespoons lemon juice
    ½ teaspoon salt
    ½ cup powdered sugar

Seed raisins and chop until fine; add chopped nuts. Beat egg until
stiff; add sugar, nuts, raisins and lemon juice.


Orange Filling

    Cream Filling
    juice and rind 1 orange
    1 tablespoon lemon juice
    1 teaspoon butter
    ½ cup orange pulp

Mix fruit juice and grated rind, butter, Cream Filling and orange pulp.
Spread on cake.


Fudge Filling

    2 cups sugar
    2 cups rich milk
    4 squares chocolate
    4 tablespoons butter
    1 teaspoon vanilla

Mix all ingredients and let stand on back of range until mixture
liquefies. Boil until a soft ball is formed. Beat until creamy. Spread
between cakes.


Nut Fudge Filling

Add one cup chopped nuts to Fudge Filling.


Tutti-frutti Fudge Filling

Add one and one half cups chopped nuts and candied fruits to Fudge
Filling.


Marshmallow Fudge Filling

Melt one half pound marshmallows in double boiler and add to Fudge
Filling.


Peach Filling

    1 cup beaten cream
    1 cup powdered sugar
    1 cup peach pulp
    2 tablespoons lemon juice
    few grains salt

Mix ingredients, spread between cake.


Pineapple Filling

    1 cup grated pineapple
    1 tablespoon orange rind
    2 tablespoons lemon juice
    sugar

Mix pineapple, fruit juice and rind, and enough confectioner’s sugar to
make of consistency to spread.



CHAPTER XV

FROZEN DISHES


FROZEN DESSERTS


Directions for Freezing

SELECT a reliable freezer and one which runs easily. Keep the gearing
well oiled.

Adjust the freezing can in the freezer, making sure that all parts fit
and that the crank turns readily. Place ice in bag made of ticking
or strong sacking, and with a wooden mallet, pound until very fine.
Surround the freezing can with ice and rock salt, using three measures
of ice and one of salt, for ice cream and sherbets; two measures of ice
and one of salt for sorbets, frappés, etc.; equal measures of ice and
of salt for molding and for freezing mousses, bombes, and parfaits.

For freezing ice cream, when the freezing can is cold, pour in mixture
to be frozen, let stand five minutes, then turn the crank slowly for
eight or ten minutes, then more rapidly until mixture is frozen. Remove
dasher, scrape cream from sides of freezing can to the middle and press
down so as to have the cream one solid mass; let stand to season, or if
to be molded, pack in the mold.

A one-pound baking powder can makes an excellent mold if one has no
brick mold.


Directions for Molding

Have the mold chilled; press the frozen mixture well into the sides
and bottom of mold, packing solidly until overflowing; put on cover,
making sure that it fits securely; if in doubt, brush with lard or
butter. Tie on cover and immerse in ice and salt, using equal parts of
each; let stand one to three hours, depending upon degree of hardness
desired. Mousses and parfaits are put directly into the mold, filled to
overflowing, covered according to directions, and allowed to stand from
four to six hours in ice and salt.

Frozen desserts are divided into:—

Philadelphia ice cream, which is cream sweetened, flavored, and stirred
in freezer while freezing; plain ice cream, a custard of different
degrees of richness, with or without cream, and stirred while freezing.

Mousses, parfaits and biscuits are made with and without eggs, with
beaten or whipped cream, and frozen without stirring.

Water ices are divided into sherbets, frappés, and punch, all stirred
while freezing.

Bombes are combinations of ice cream and sherbet, or sherbet and
charlotte russe mixture.


Chocolate Fig Ice Cream

    4 ounces Lowney’s Premium Chocolate
    4 cups cream
    ¾ cup sugar
    1 tablespoon vanilla
    ½ teaspoon salt
    1½ cups finely chopped figs

Melt chocolate, add sugar and one half cup cream, cook until smooth,
add remaining ingredients, and freeze, stirring occasionally while
freezing to keep figs from settling to the bottom.

    NOTE.—If figs are soaked in wine, the flavor of the
    cream is much better, and there is less liability of
    the figs being lumpy.


Chocolate Philadelphia Ice Cream

    2 ounces Lowney’s Premium Chocolate, or
    ½ cup Lowney’s Cocoa
    ¼ cup hot water
    1 cup sugar
    4 cups light cream
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon vanilla

Melt chocolate, add remaining ingredients, and freeze.


Chocolate Junket Ice Cream

    4 squares Lowney’s Premium Chocolate
    2 cups cream
    3 cups milk
    1 junket tablet
    1 tablespoon cold water
    1 tablespoon vanilla
    1¼ cups sugar

Scald milk; add melted chocolate and sugar; cook three minutes; cool.
When lukewarm, add junket tablet which has been dissolved in cold
water. Add cream and freeze.

Two squares of chocolate give a very delicately flavored cream.


Cocoa Frappé

    4 cups milk
    3 squares Lowney’s Premium Chocolate, or
    ½ cup Lowney’s Cocoa
    ½ cup sugar
    ½ tablespoon arrowroot
    1 teaspoon vanilla
    1 tablespoon sherry wine
    ⅛ teaspoon salt
    1 inch stick cinnamon

Mix chocolate, cinnamon, sugar, salt, arrowroot; add milk; cook ten
minutes; add vanilla, sherry, and freeze. Serve in frappé glasses, and
garnish with cream flavored and beaten, and candied cherries.

Three cups of milk and one cup strong coffee may be used instead of all
milk. See colored illustration, Plate XII, opposite p. 263.


Chocolate Ice Cream No. 1

    4 cups cream
    6 egg yolks
    1½ cups sugar
    4 ounces Lowney’s Premium Chocolate
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon vanilla

Scald one cup of cream; add to melted chocolate and cook three minutes,
or until mixture is smooth and glossy; add sugar, salt, vanilla, and
the remaining three cups of cream which has been beaten stiff. When
well blended, add beaten yolks of eggs. Freeze.


Chocolate Ice Cream No. 2

    2 ounces Lowney’s Premium Chocolate
    2 tablespoons sugar
    2 tablespoons hot water
    1 pint cream
    2 eggs
    ½ cup flour
    2 cups milk
    1 cup sugar
    ¼ teaspoon salt

Beat eggs; add flour, one cup sugar, and milk; cook in double boiler
twenty minutes. Melt chocolate; add sugar, boiling water; cook until
glossy, then add to egg mixture; cool; add cream, salt, and freeze.


French Ice Cream

    2 cups milk
    2 cups cream
    1 cup sugar
    4 to 6 egg yolks
    1 tablespoon vanilla
    ¼ teaspoon salt

Make a soft custard of milk, sugar and yolks of eggs. When cool, add
cream whipped, salt and flavoring. Freeze.


Philadelphia Ice Cream

    4 cups light cream, or
    3 cups heavy cream and one cup milk
    1 cup sugar
    1 tablespoon flavoring
    ¼ teaspoon salt

Mix the ingredients and freeze without cooking.


Brown Bread Ice Cream

Add to French Ice Cream one cup brown bread crumbs dried. Freeze.


Banana Ice Cream

Add the pulp of four bananas and two tablespoons lemon juice to
Philadelphia Ice Cream. Freeze.


Cocoa Nut Ice Cream

    2 eggs
    1¼ cups sugar
    ½ cup flour
    2 cups milk
    ½ cup Lowney’s Cocoa
    ½ teaspoon salt
    1 cup walnuts
    2 cups cream

Mix cocoa, flour, sugar and salt; add eggs slightly beaten. When well
blended, add scalded milk. Cook in double boiler, stirring constantly,
twenty minutes. Add nuts finely chopped, flavoring and cream. Freeze.


Burnt Almond Ice Cream

Blanch and chop one cup almonds. Caramelize four tablespoons sugar; add
chopped almonds. When cold, pound to a powder. Add to French Ice Cream
with one teaspoon almond extract. Freeze.


Caramel Ice Cream

Add to French Ice Cream, one cup of caramelized sugar. Cool and freeze.


Coffee Ice Cream

Add one cup black coffee to French or Philadelphia Ice Cream. Freeze.


Ginger Ice Cream

Add one cup preserved ginger chopped fine, two tablespoons lemon juice,
and three tablespoons ginger sirup to Philadelphia or French Ice Cream.
Freeze.


Macaroon Ice Cream

Add one cup dried and pounded macaroons to French or Philadelphia Ice
Cream; flavor with one half teaspoon almond extract, one tablespoon
sherry, and one half teaspoon vanilla. Freeze.


Cocoa Ice Cream

    2 cups milk
    1 cup sugar
    1 tablespoon cornstarch or arrowroot
    4 egg yolks
    2 cups cream, or
    2 cups milk and
    2 tablespoons butter
    ¼ to ½ cup Lowney’s Cocoa
    1 teaspoon vanilla
    ¼ teaspoon salt

Mix cocoa, sugar and cornstarch or arrowroot; add scalded milk, and
cook twenty minutes in double boiler. Beat eggs; add cream, or milk and
butter; pour on to this mixture, cornstarch mixture. Add vanilla and
freeze.

One cup raspberry juice added just before freezing gives a pleasant
variety. See colored illustration, Plate XVII, opposite.

[Illustration: COCOA ICE CREAM

Plate XVII. For Receipt see page 298]

[Illustration: CHOCOLATE MOUSSE

Plate XVIII. For Receipt see page 298]


Chocolate Mousse No. 1

    3 ounces Lowney’s Premium Chocolate
    1½ cups sugar
    1 cup thin cream
    ¼ cup cold water
    1 teaspoon vanilla
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    whip from 3 cups cream
    1 tablespoon granulated gelatine

Melt chocolate; add sugar and one cup cream; boil one minute. Mix
gelatine with cold water, add to boiling mixture; when cool, add
flavoring, salt and whip from cream. Pour into mold, pack in equal
parts of ice and salt, let stand four hours. See colored illustration,
Plate XVIII, opposite.


Frozen Chocolate

    4 squares Lowney’s Premium Chocolate
    ⅓ cup sugar
    1 cup boiling water
    3 cups scalded milk
    ½ teaspoon vanilla
    ¼ teaspoon salt

Melt chocolate; add sugar, salt and boiling water; cook five minutes;
add scalded milk and flavoring; when cool, freeze. Serve with cream
sweetened and flavored, either plain or whipped.

[Illustration: FROZEN CHOCOLATE SOUFFLÉ

Plate XIX. For Receipt see page 299]

[Illustration: VANILLA ICE CREAM WITH CHOCOLATE SAUCE

Plate XX. For Receipt see pages 247 and 299]


Frozen Chocolate Soufflé

    2 egg yolks
    rind and juice of 1 lemon
    4 tablespoons sherry wine
    ½ cup sugar
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    2 egg whites
    2 ounces Lowney’s Premium Chocolate, melted
    ½ cup cream

Cook first five ingredients until mixture thickens; add beaten whites,
chocolate, and cream beaten until thick. Pour into serving dish, and
pack in equal parts of ice and salt. Let stand three hours.

A very good way is to put serving dish in lard pail, then surround pail
with equal parts of ice and salt.

See colored illustration, Plate XIX, opposite.


Plain Ice Cream

    4 cups milk
    1 cup sugar
    3 eggs
    1 tablespoon vanilla
    ⅛ teaspoon salt

Prepare as for Soft Custard.

This is the simplest and cheapest ice cream made. One pint of cream
added is an improvement.

Freeze according to directions for freezing. See colored illustration,
Plate XX, opposite.


Cocoa Macaroon Ice Cream

Make a cream the same as for Cocoa Nut Cream, except omit the nuts.
Brown in the oven two dozen macaroons. Crumb in meat chopper; add
macaroon crumbs and ¼ cup sherry to cream mixture. Freeze.


Cocoa Cocoanut Cream

Make a cream the same as for Cocoa Nut Cream, except omit the nuts, and
add one cup of shredded cocoanut and the rind and juice of one lemon.
Freeze.


Maple Ice Cream

Add one cup maple sirup to French or Philadelphia Ice Cream. Freeze and
serve with Maple Sauce.


Nougat Ice Cream

Add one half cup each of chopped walnuts, almonds, and filberts, to
French or Philadelphia Ice Cream. Flavor with one teaspoon vanilla and
one teaspoon almond. Freeze.


Orange Ice Cream

Add one cup orange juice and one half cup orange pulp to Philadelphia
Ice Cream. Flavor with one teaspoon vanilla and one tablespoon lemon
juice. Freeze.


Peach Ice Cream

Add two cups stewed and strained peaches to Philadelphia Ice Cream.
Flavor with one teaspoon lemon juice. Freeze.


Pineapple Ice Cream

Add two cups pineapple juice and pulp to French or Philadelphia Ice
Cream. Freeze.


Pistachio Ice Cream

Mix one half cup Pistachio nuts chopped fine, and one cup almonds
chopped fine with Philadelphia Ice Cream. Color a delicate green and
flavor with one teaspoon almond. Freeze.


Plum Pudding Ice Cream

To Philadelphia Ice Cream add one cup dried and pounded Plum Pudding.
Flavor with one tablespoon brandy. Freeze.


Strawberry Ice Cream

Add two cups strawberry juice and pulp to Philadelphia Ice Cream.
Freeze, and serve with Strawberry Sauce.


Wine Ice Cream

Add two tablespoons sherry or Madeira to Philadelphia Ice Cream. Freeze.


Coffee Mousse

    1 pint cream
    ½ cup powdered sugar
    1 cup black coffee
    ¼ teaspoon salt

Whip the cream, add sugar and coffee, turn mixture into a mold, pack in
ice and salt, and let stand five hours.


Chocolate Mousse No. 2

Substitute four ounces melted chocolate for coffee in Coffee Mousse,
pour into mold, pack in ice and salt, and let stand four hours.


Strawberry Mousse

Substitute two cups mashed berries for coffee, and proceed as for
Coffee Mousse.


Fruit Mousses

Mix two cups of any fruit pulp, with powdered sugar to sweeten, with
the whip from one pint cream. A small amount of lemon juice brings out
the flavor of other fruits. Mold. Pack and let stand in ice and salt
four hours.


Silver Parfait

    1 cup sugar
    1 cup water
    3 egg whites
    1 pint cream
    flavoring

Boil sugar and water until it threads. Pour on to the beaten whites of
eggs, add the whip from cream, flavoring, pack in ice and salt, and let
stand four hours.


Cocoa Parfait

    1 cup sugar
    ½ cup boiling water
    4 tablespoons Lowney’s Cocoa
    4 egg yolks
    2 teaspoons vanilla
    2 cups cream
    ¼ teaspoon salt

Boil sugar and water together ten minutes; pour sirup on to cocoa which
has been beaten with the egg yolks; cook over hot water until of the
consistency of soft custard. Beat until cold; add the cream which has
been beaten until stiff, vanilla, and salt. Turn into mold, cover, and
pack in equal measures of finely crushed ice and rock salt. Let stand
four hours. Remove from mold and garnish with cream, sweetened and
flavored, and press through the pastry bag.

The parfait may be served in champagne glasses and garnished with
beaten cream and candied cherries. See colored illustration, Plate XI,
p. 263.


Golden Parfait

    1 cup sugar
    ½ cup water
    6 egg yolks
    1 pint cream

Cook sugar and water five minutes. Pour slowly on to the beaten egg
yolks, add whip from cream, turn into mold and pack in ice and salt,
and let stand four hours.


Café Parfait

Add one fourth cup black coffee to Golden Parfait and freeze as Golden
Parfait.


Maple Parfait

Substitute maple sirup for boiled sugar and water in Golden Parfait.
Mold, pack in ice and salt four hours, and serve with chopped browned
almonds.


Nesselrode Pudding

To Golden Parfait add one cup boiled chestnuts mashed, one cup candied
fruit soaked in wine, one cup chopped pineapple. Flavor with one
teaspoon vanilla, one tablespoon sherry. Freeze, pack, mold, and serve
with Rum Sauce.


Biscuit Tortoni

Mix one cup pounded macaroons, two tablespoons sherry, two tablespoons
caramelized sugar pounded, with Golden Parfait. Pack in paper boxes,
pack boxes in pail, and pack pail in equal parts ice and salt, for four
hours. Serve in boxes, sprinkle with brown chopped almonds.


Biscuit Glacé

Add two tablespoons maraschino, two tablespoons sherry, to Golden
Parfait. Fill paper boxes, pack boxes in pail, pack pail in ice and
salt, and let stand in ice and salt four hours.


Soufflé Glacé

    1 cup cream
    1 tablespoon grated lemon rind
    4 eggs
    1 cup sugar
    ½ cup wine
    1 tablespoon lemon juice
    ⅛ teaspoon salt

Mix yolks of eggs, lemon juice, rind, sugar and salt. Cook until thick.
Cool; add beaten whites and cream beaten until stiff. Add wine, fill
paper cases, pack cases in pail, and pack pail in ice and salt four
hours.


Plain Water Ice

    2 cups water
    1 cup sugar
    4 egg whites
    flavoring

Boil sugar and water; beat until cold. Add egg whites beaten until
stiff and flavoring. Freeze.


Lemon Water Ice

Add the grated rind of one lemon and the juice of three lemons to Water
Ice. Freeze.


Orange Water Ice

Add rind of one orange, one half cup orange juice, two tablespoons
lemon juice, to Plain Water Ice.


Pineapple Water Ice

Add two cups pineapple chopped and pressed through a sieve, with two
tablespoons lemon juice, to Plain Water Ice.


Lemon Sherbet

The same as Water Ice, omitting the whites of eggs. All fruit sherbets
made in the same way.


Strawberry Bombe Glacé

Line a mold with Strawberry Ice Cream, fill with Pineapple Water Ice.
Pack in ice and salt four hours. Serve with Strawberry Sauce.


Raspberry Bombe Glacé

Line a mold with Raspberry Water Ice. Fill with Vanilla Ice Cream, or
whipped cream sweetened and flavored. Pack in ice and salt four hours.


Sultana Roll

Line sultana roll molds, or one-pound baking powder boxes, with
Pistachio Ice Cream. Sprinkle with candied fruit which has been soaked
in brandy over night, and fill with Vanilla Ice Cream or with Silver
Parfait, or beaten cream sweetened and flavored. Pack in ice and salt
four hours. Serve with Claret Sauce.


Lalla Rookh

Use rule for Philadelphia Ice Cream. When frozen add one cup Jamaica
rum. Serve in glasses.


Café Frappé

    3 cups coffee
    1 cup sugar
    1 cup cream
    ¼ teaspoon salt

Freeze to consistency of mush. Serve in frappé glasses with whipped
cream on top.


Orange Frappé

    1 cup sugar
    2 cups water
    1 cup orange juice
    pulp of four oranges
    4 tablespoons lemon juice

Boil sugar and water five minutes, add other ingredients, and freeze to
a mush. Serve with orange sirup and sprinkle with candied orange peel,
finely chopped.


Grape Frappé

Substitute one cup grape juice for orange juice, and freeze to a mush.



CHAPTER XVI

BEVERAGES


French Chocolate

    2 squares Lowney’s Premium Chocolate
    ½ cup boiling water
    ⅛ teaspoon salt
    3 cups milk scalded
    ¼ cup ground coffee
    2 tablespoons sugar
    2 tablespoons brandy

Melt two squares Lowney’s Premium Chocolate, add sugar and boiling
water, boil two minutes. Scald the milk with coffee, strain, and add to
chocolate with salt and brandy. Beat with Dover egg beater and serve
with beaten cream.


Plain Chocolate

    2 squares Lowney’s Premium Chocolate
    4 tablespoons sugar
    3 cups scalded milk
    1 cup boiling water
    salt

Melt two squares Lowney’s Premium Chocolate, add sugar, salt and
boiling water; boil two minutes, add scalded milk and beat with Dover
egg beater to prevent scum from forming. Serve very hot.


Emergency Chocolate

    2 teaspoons Lowney’s Always Ready Chocolate Powder
    ¼ cup boiling water
    1 cup scalded milk
    salt

Mix two teaspoons Lowney’s Always Ready Chocolate Powder with boiling
water; boil three minutes, stirring all the time; add scalded milk and
cook in double boiler ten minutes; add a few grains of salt and more
sugar if needed; beat and serve. This may be made without cooking so
long.


Condensed Milk Chocolate

    3 squares Lowney’s Premium Chocolate
    4 tablespoons sugar
    3 cups boiling water
    ½ can condensed milk
    ⅛ teaspoon salt

Melt chocolate; add sugar, salt, and boiling water in which has been
mixed the condensed milk. Boil five minutes. If condensed milk has been
sweetened, omit sugar.


Cocoa for Fifty People

    1½ cups Lowney’s Cocoa
    1 quart cold water
    2 quarts boiling water
    6 quarts scalded milk
    ¾ cup sugar
    2 teaspoons salt

Mix cocoa, sugar and salt. Add cold water, then boiling water, boil
five minutes, add to scalded milk. Beat well with Dover egg beater and
serve.


Chocolate for Fifty People

    1 pound Lowney’s Chocolate
    2 quarts boiling water
    ¾ pound sugar
    6 quarts scalded milk
    ½ tablespoon salt
    1 tablespoon vanilla

Melt chocolate over hot water, add sugar and water, boil ten minutes.
Add salt and scalded milk, beat well. Add vanilla and serve with
whipped cream.


Brandy Cocoa

    4 tablespoons Lowney’s Breakfast Cocoa
    4 tablespoons sugar
    1 tablespoon brandy
    ¼ cup boiling water
    4 cups scalded milk
    ⅛ teaspoon salt

Mix four tablespoons Lowney’s Breakfast Cocoa, four tablespoons sugar,
and one fourth cup boiling water; when smooth, add four cups scalded
milk and cook in double boiler twenty minutes; add one tablespoon
brandy and salt; beat and serve; garnish with beaten cream.


Breakfast Cocoa

    2 tablespoons Lowney’s Breakfast Cocoa
    2 cups milk
    2 tablespoons sugar
    2 cups boiling water
    ⅛ teaspoon salt

Mix two tablespoons Lowney’s Breakfast Cocoa, two tablespoons sugar,
one eighth teaspoon salt; add two cups boiling water gradually; when
smooth, boil five minutes; add two cups scalded milk, beat with a Dover
egg beater until frothy.


Breakfast Cocoa with Condensed Milk

    4 tablespoons Lowney’s Breakfast Cocoa
    2½ cups boiling water
    ½ cup condensed milk
    few grains salt

Mix four tablespoons Lowney’s Breakfast Cocoa with one cup boiling
water; boil two minutes; add one and one half cups boiling water which
has been mixed with one half cup condensed milk and a few grains salt;
bring to the boiling point and serve with or without whipped cream.

If condensed milk has not been sweetened, add two tablespoons of sugar
to the cocoa.


Tea

    freshly boiled water
    1 teaspoon tea for each cup

Scald an agate-ware teapot; put in as many teaspoons tea as cups
required. Cover with as many cups of boiling water as there are
teaspoons of tea. Serve immediately.


Russian Tea

Prepare tea, serving a thin slice of lemon and sugar with each cup.


Tea Punch

Prepare tea as for Russian Tea and serve with a thin slice of lemon and
lump sugar soaked in brandy.


Iced Tea

Make tea. Serve in glasses with crushed ice, with one tablespoon lemon
juice in each glass.


Boiled Coffee No. 1

    1 cup freshly ground coffee
    1 whole egg or one egg white
    1 cup cold water
    6 cups boiling water

Mix coffee, egg and one half cup cold water, add boiling water, boil
hard five minutes. Set on back part of range, add other half cup of
cold water, let stand five minutes, and serve with hot milk, cream and
sugar.


Coffee No. 2

Use rule for Boiled Coffee, using six cups cold water instead of
boiling water.


Coffee No. 3

    1 cup coffee
    6 cups cold water

Put coffee in cheese cloth bag. Tie, allowing room for coffee to swell.
Place in scalded coffee pot, cover with cold water, and boil ten
minutes. Remove bag, let stand two minutes on back of range, and serve
with hot milk, sugar and cream.


French Coffee

    1 cup very finely ground or powdered coffee
    6 cups boiling water

Place coffee in strainer, add boiling water gradually, and refilter, if
liked very strong.


Iced Coffee

Add hot milk to black coffee, flavor with vanilla, and sweeten to
taste. Chill; serve in glasses with a tablespoon of chopped ice in each
glass.


Black Coffee

Allow two tablespoons of coffee for each cup of boiling water. Always
make in French coffee pot.


After Dinner Coffee

    1 cup coffee
    ½ ounce chicory
    1 egg slightly beaten
    4 cups boiling water
    ¼ cup cold water

Mix coffee, chicory, egg and cold water, add boiling water and boil
five minutes; let stand five minutes on back of range where it will
keep hot. Serve without sugar or cream.

These same ingredients may be used in the French coffee pot, and the
liquid may be poured through the coffee until the required strength is
obtained.


FRUIT BEVERAGES


Claret Cup

    1 pint claret
    1 cup curaçoa
    1 cup soda water
    1 cup sherry
    1 slice cucumber
    juice of one orange
    sugar to taste


Champagne Cup

    2 cups champagne
    2 cups soda water
    1 bunch mint
    1 cup sherry
    juice and rind one orange
    2 cups Apollinaris
    ice
    1 tablespoon powdered sugar
    1 slice cucumber
    juice of one half lemon


Cider Cup

    2 cups cider
    1 cup sherry
    ½ cup brandy
    large piece ice
    rind of one lemon
    1 slice cucumber
    few gratings nutmeg
    sugar


Lemonade

Boil two cups of sugar and four cups water until a rich sirup is
formed. Add one cup lemon juice. Dilute with ice water.


Orangeade

    2 cups sugar
    2 cups water
    ⅓ cup lemon juice
    ⅔ cup orange juice
    2 oranges sliced

Make the same as Lemonade.


Fruit Punch

Sufficient to serve twenty-five persons.

    4 cups sugar
    8 cups water
    2 quarts Apollinaris
    1 pineapple shredded
    1 cup fruit juice
    1 box strawberries hulled and cut in pieces
    4 bananas cut in slices
    juice of 6 oranges
    juice of 3 lemons

Boil sugar and water five minutes; add fruit, ice, Apollinaris, and
water to make the punch right strength. One cup maraschino cherries may
be added.


Currant Punch

    4 cups currant juice
    4 cups sugar
    12 cups water
    6 lemons
    6 oranges
    2 cups tea

Boil sugar and water five minutes; add tea, juice, lemons and oranges
sliced, and a large piece of ice.


Milk Punch

    1 cup milk
    1 teaspoon sugar
    4 teaspoons of sherry, brandy or Madeira
    few gratings nutmeg

Put two lumps of ice in glass; add sugar, milk and wine; shake, strain,
and add nutmeg.


Mint Julep No. 1

    1 bunch mint
    2 cups ice water
    juice lemons
    2 cups sugar
    4 cups water

Chop mint; add ice water; let stand over night. Boil sugar and water;
chill; add lemon juice and mint water. Serve with crushed ice; garnish
with mint leaves.


Mint Julep No. 2

Put three sprigs mint with one half teaspoon orange bitters in a glass;
add one sherry glass Vermouth and one half cup whisky; shake well;
add one half cup crushed ice, stir to crush the mint. Add two slices
orange, two or three strawberries, and a few sprigs of mint. Add more
ice and serve when the outside of the glass is frosted.


Mulled Wine

    2 cups water
    16 cloves
    3 eggs
    2 tablespoons sugar
    2 cups wine
    1 tablespoon lemon juice

Boil cloves and water ten minutes. Beat yolks and sugar together; add
water, wine, lemon juice, and stiffly beaten whites. Serve hot.



CHAPTER XVII

FRUITS AND NUTS AND CANDY


Fruits and Nuts

FRUIT is especially wholesome, although not nutritious. The best time
to eat fruit is in the morning. Most fruits are improved in flavor by
being chilled.

A dish of different fruits attractively arranged makes a very
acceptable center piece.


To prepare Fruit for the Table

Apples should be washed and wiped dry. Berries should be looked over
very carefully, and, if dirty, washed by putting in a colander and
allowing cold water to run gently over them, or place the colander in
a bowl of cold water and raise up and down several times, then drain
thoroughly and chill before serving.

Cherries should be looked over, and served with their stems on.

Bananas should be wiped and chilled.

Currants should be washed and drained, and served on the stem.

Figs, if the dried ones, should be washed, drained, and chilled.

Grape fruit should be cut in halves, the pulp loosened from the skin,
and the pith cut out, then chilled; it may be served plain, or sugar
and wine may be poured over it just before chilling. Serve one half
grape fruit to each person.

Grapes should be washed if dirty, but the bloom is then lost; if
picked on one’s own vines, it may not be necessary to wash them; but
when bought in the market, it is better to wash and drain, and chill
them.

Peaches and plums should be wiped with a soft cloth, and chilled before
serving.

Quinces are never served raw.

Strawberries are often served with their hulls on around a mound of
sugar; but if they are to be served with sugar and cream, of course
they must be hulled and chilled.

Oranges may be chilled and served in the natural state; or prepared the
same as grape fruit, and one half served to each person; or peeled and
the sections almost, but not quite, separated; or the orange may be cut
in the shape of a basket, the pulp removed, the membrane cut off, and
the basket refilled with the pulp, which may be sweetened or not.

Pineapples may be served in various ways; perhaps the most popular way
is to cut off a slice from the top of the pineapple, then scoop out the
center with a fork, and return pulp to pineapple, put on cover, chill,
and serve.

Pineapples may be cut in slices, the outer skin be removed, and the
tough pith taken out, then serve one or two slices to each person.

If the pineapples are not fully ripe, it is better to remove the skin,
pull the pulp in pieces with a fork, then cover with sugar, and chill
over night.

Pears should be carefully wiped and chilled before serving.

Melons should be thoroughly chilled. Cantaloupes should be cut in
halves, have the seeds removed, and be served one half to a person.
Watermelons should be cut in halves, then each half cut in pie-shaped
pieces; serve one piece to a person.

Nuts are ordinarily served only at dinner. Hard-shelled nuts should be
cracked, served in the shell, or without the shell.

Almonds are cracked, and a portion of the shell discarded, or they may
be blanched and salted, and served with the bonbons.

Pecans, filberts, peanuts and walnuts are treated in the same way as
almonds.

Castañas or Brazilian nuts are cracked and served in the shell.


CANDY


Butter Scotch No. 1

    3 cups brown sugar
    ¾ cup water
    2 tablespoons butter
    ⅛ teaspoon soda
    1 teaspoon flavoring
    few grains salt

Boil all ingredients until a thread is formed when dropped from a
spoon. Pour into hot buttered pans, crease, and let stand until hard.


Butter Scotch No. 2

    1 cup brown sugar
    1 cup molasses
    ⅓ cup butter
    ⅛ teaspoon soda
    1 tablespoon vinegar
    few grains salt

Cook in the same way as Butter Scotch No. 1.


Butter Taffy

    1 cup molasses
    1 cup sugar
    ⅔ cup butter
    ⅔ cup milk
    1 tablespoon vanilla
    few grains salt

Cook all ingredients until brittle when tried in cold water. Pour into
hot buttered pans, crease, and cool.


Cream Candy

    2 cups sugar
    1 cup water
    1 teaspoon cream of tartar
    1 teaspoon vanilla

Cook sugar, water and cream of tartar until brittle when tried in cold
water; add vanilla; pour on to greased platter or marble. Pull as soon
as it can be handled.


Cocoanut Candy

    2 cups sugar
    ½ cup cream
    2 tablespoons butter
    1 cup cocoanut

Cook sugar and cream twelve minutes; add butter and cocoanut. Pour into
greased pans, crease, and cool.


Buttercups

    2 cups molasses
    2 tablespoons butter
    1 cup brown sugar
    ½ cup boiling water

Cook all ingredients until brittle when tried in cold water. Pour on to
hot buttered platter; pull when cool enough to handle; shape in a sheet
two inches wide, cover with a layer of fondant, then with a layer of
molasses candy, press together and cut in inch pieces.


Molasses Candy

    2 cups molasses
    2 cups brown sugar
    ⅓ cup vinegar
    1 cup water
    2 tablespoons butter
    salt

Boil ingredients until brittle when tried in cold water. Pour into hot
buttered pan; pull when cool enough to handle.


Maple Sugar Candy

    1 cup maple sugar
    ½ cup water
    1 tablespoon butter
    salt
    flavoring

Boil until brittle, pour into greased pan, crease, and cool. One cup
nut meats may be added just before pouring into pans.


Peanut Brittle

    2 cups sugar
    2 cups shelled peanuts

Melt sugar; when a golden brown, add chopped nuts; pour into hot
buttered pan, crease, and cool.



CHAPTER XVIII

PRESERVING


CANNING AND PRESERVING

CANNED fruits are now more popular with most people than preserved
fruits.

The expense in preparing them is less, and the natural flavor is
retained.

To prepare fruit for canning, look over carefully, reject imperfect
fruit, and be sure that the fruit is clean.

The fruit may be cooked in a saucepan with just enough sugar to make it
palatable and water to keep the fruit from burning, and transferred to
sterile jars; or it may be put into sterile jars in the first place,
and cooked by steam,—the latter method preserves the color and flavor
better.

_To sterilize jars_, put jars into cold water, bring water to the
boiling point, and boil ten minutes; fill jars with cooked fruit, and
pour in sirup to overflowing; adjust rubbers and covers. Invert and let
stand on folded cloth until cold; if there are no air bubbles, place
jars in a cool dark closet to keep. If air bubbles are present, take
off cover, reheat, and add more hot sirup and proceed as before.


Canned Apples

    4 pounds apples
    1 pound sugar
    2 pints water
    juice and rind of 2 lemons

Pare and core the apples; cover with cold water. Boil sugar and water
five minutes; add apples and simmer until tender; add lemon juice and
rind; place apples in sterilized jars; fill to overflowing with sirup;
adjust rubbers and covers; set in a cool place until cool then keep in
dark dry closet.


Canned Apples and Pineapple

    4 pounds apples
    4 pounds pineapple
    2 pounds sugar
    2 pints water
    rind of 4 lemons

Pare, core, and cut the apples in rings. Cut pineapple in slices,
remove skin and eyes, and cut pulp into squares, being careful to
reject the core. Boil sugar and water five minutes; add pineapple; cook
until tender; then cook apples until tender; add lemon rind; fill jars
which have been sterilized with apple and pineapple, adjust rings, fill
jars with sirup, adjust covers, seal.


Canned Blackberries

    4 quarts blackberries
    2 pints sugar

Place sugar and berries in preserving kettle, let stand several hours,
then cook slowly until the boiling point is reached; boil five minutes;
fill sterilized jars and seal.


Canned Blueberries

Blueberries are canned the same as Blackberries, allowing one half cup
water for every four pounds of blueberries.


Canned Cherries

    4 pounds cherries
    1 to 2 pounds sugar

Stone the cherries or not as preferred. Place sugar and cherries
in preserving kettle, let stand two hours. Cook until tender, fill
sterilized jars, and seal.


Canned Currants

    4 pounds currants
    4 pounds sugar

Wash, stem, and cover currants with sugar; let stand in preserving
kettle over night. Cook slowly until boiling point is reached, skim,
fill sterilized jars, and seal.


Canned Gooseberries

    4 pounds gooseberries
    2 pounds sugar

Stem and wash gooseberries, cover with sugar, and let stand over night;
if green, add one quarter cup water; bring quickly to boiling point,
fill jars, and seal.


Canned Huckleberries

Huckleberries are canned in the same way as Blackberries.


Canned Peaches

    4 pounds peaches
    2 pounds sugar
    1 pint water

Pare peaches and cook in sugar and water, either whole or in halves,
until tender. Arrange in jars, fill with sirup, and seal.

Pears, pineapples, and plums are canned in the same way as peaches.


Canned Quinces

    4 pounds quinces
    2 pounds sugar
    1 pint water

Cook sugar and water until sirupy. Pare and quarter quinces; let stand
in cold water. Cook in boiling water until tender, then cook in sugar
and water sirup five minutes. Arrange quinces in jars, fill with sirup,
and seal.


Canned Quinces and Apples

    4 pounds quinces
    2 pounds apples
    2 pounds sugar
    1 quart water

Pare and quarter quinces and apples, let stand in cold water to prevent
discoloration. Cook in boiling water until tender, then simmer in sugar
and water sirup ten minutes. Arrange fruit in jars, fill with sirup,
and seal.


Canned Raspberries

    4 pounds raspberries
    2 pounds sugar

Arrange berries and sugar in alternate layers in glass jars; set jars
on trivet in large boiler two thirds full of water; cover and cook
until the water in boiler boils vigorously. Remove jar; if berries have
settled, refill from another jar, and seal.


Canned Strawberries

Prepare in the same way as Canned Raspberries.


Canned Beans

Prepare string beans as for boiling. Cook in water one half hour. Fill
sterilized jars with beans, adjust rubbers, fill with cold water, and
put on covers. Arrange on rack in boiler, fill boiler two thirds full
with water, cover boiler, and boil hard two hours. Seal and remove jars.


Canned Corn

Cut fresh young corn from the cob. Pack sterilized jars to overflowing
with corn. Seal, set on trivet in boiler, surround with cold water, and
boil five or six hours, having boiler covered all of the time. Keep in
dark, cool place.


Canned Peas

Cook shelled peas in boiling water one half hour. Fill sterilized jars
with cooked peas, then pour in cold water until jar will hold no more.
Set jars on trivet in boiler, surround jars with cold water, cover
boiler, and boil four hours. Seal, and keep in cool place.


Canned Tomatoes

Remove skins from tomatoes; boil hard twenty minutes; fill sterilized
jars, being careful to keep seeds away from rubbers. Seal, and keep in
cool place.


Preserving

Equal weights or amounts of fruit and sugar are used in preserving.

Select perfect fruit, weigh or measure absolutely accurately, and
always cook the fruit long enough to kill all life,—small fruits, one
hour, and large fruits until thoroughly tender.


Preserved Apples

    4 pounds apples
    3 cups water
    4 pounds sugar
    rind and juice of 6 lemons

Wash, pare, and quarter apples; keep in water until ready to use. Cook
sugar and water five minutes; add apples, cook until tender; add lemon
juice and rind. Fill jars with apples, then with sirup, and seal.


Preserved Crab Apples

    4 pounds crab apples
    4 cups water
    4 pounds sugar
    juice of 4 lemons

Wash crab apples, and cook in sugar and water sirup until tender; add
lemon juice, fill jars with fruit, then with sirup, and seal.

The fruit is much more attractive if the skin is left on, but may be
removed if preferred.


Preserved Blackberries

    4 pounds blackberries
    4 pounds sugar

Look over berries and wash. Cover with sugar and let stand two hours.
Simmer until the boiling point is reached, boil one minute; cool, bring
to the boiling point again, boil one minute; fill jars first with
fruit, then with juice, and seal.

Preserved strawberries, raspberries, thimbleberries, and gooseberries
are prepared in the same way.


Preserved Cherries

    4 pounds cherries
    4 pounds sugar

Wash cherries; remove stems and stones. Cover cherries with sugar, let
stand two hours; then set on stove, and bring slowly to the boiling
point; cook until cherries are tender. Fill jars first with cherries,
then with sirup; seal.

Preserved currants and huckleberries are prepared in the same way.


Preserved Citron

    4 pounds citron
    4 pounds sugar
    4 cups water

Wash citron, cut in halves, remove seeds; cut each half into eighths,
cover with salt, then with water; let stand over night, then drain.
Cover with cold water, let stand over night. Drain, remove skin, and
cook in sirup of sugar and water until citron is tender. Remove each
piece carefully to a platter. When cool, fill jars with citron, and
then with boiling sirup. Seal.

If the citron lacks flavor, the juice and rind of four lemons and a
small piece of ginger root may be boiled with the sirup.

If the citron is placed in the jars while it is hot, the pieces will
not keep their shape.


Preserved Peaches

    4 pounds peaches
    4 pounds sugar

Pare, cut in halves, and take out stones. Arrange peaches and sugar
in layers in preserving kettle; let stand over night. In morning
simmer until peaches are tender; fill jars with fruit, boil sirup five
minutes, fill jars with sirup, and seal.


Preserved Pineapple

Prepare in the same way as Preserved Peaches.


Preserved Pears

    4 pounds pears
    4 pounds sugar
    2 cups water

Wash, pare, and cut pears in halves. Put in cold water. Make a syrup of
sugar and water; cook only enough pears to fill a jar at a time; when
tender fill jars with fruit, then with sirup, and seal.


Preserved Apricots

Prepare in the same way as Preserved Pears.


Preserved Plums

    4 pounds plums
    4 pounds sugar
    damsons or green gages or blue plums

Pick over and prick plums. Arrange alternate layers of plums and sugar
in bowl, let stand over night; in the morning drain off sirup, boil,
and skim; add plums and cook until tender. Cool plums on platter, fill
jars with plums, then with boiling sirup, and seal.


Preserved Quinces

    4 pounds quinces
    4 pounds sugar
    boiling water

Wash, wipe, pare, core, and cut quinces in quarters. Put in preserving
kettle, cover with boiling water. Simmer until tender. Cool on
platters. Mix sugar with one pint of water in which quinces have been
cooked; boil ten minutes. Add quinces a few at a time, cover kettle,
and cook slowly until quinces are of a rich red color. Fill jars with
quinces, then with boiling sirup, and seal.

One half quinces and one half apples may be used in this receipt.


Preserved Green Tomatoes

    4 quarts green tomatoes
    4 lemons
    4 pounds sugar
    1 inch ginger root
    ½ cup cold water

Wash tomatoes and cut in slices; add sliced lemons, sugar, water and
ginger root. Simmer two hours, cool, then simmer two hours more. Pour
into jars and seal.


Preserved Ripe Tomatoes

Prepare in same manner as Preserved Green Tomatoes, except that the
tomatoes must have skins removed before slicing them.


Brandied Peaches

    4 pounds peaches
    2 cups water
    4 pounds sugar
    2 cups brandy

Cut peaches in halves, remove stones, and cook in sugar and water sirup
five minutes; take out, remove skins, and cook again in sirup five
minutes. Remove kettle from range, and let peaches stand in sirup over
night. In morning reheat, pack peaches in jars, and fill jars with an
equal quantity of sirup and brandy. Seal.


Brandied Plums

Prepare in the same manner as Brandied Peaches, but prick plums with
knitting needle several times before cooking.


Peach Butter

    1 peck peaches
    2 quarts cider boiled
    2 tablespoons lemon juice
    sugar

Pare and cut peaches in small pieces; add cider and lemon juice, boil
until thick, stirring constantly; add sugar, if not sufficiently sweet.
Fill jars and seal.


Grape Butter

    4 pounds grapes
    4 pounds sugar
    3 cups vinegar
    2 teaspoons each of cloves, nutmeg, cinnamon, and allspice

Cook all together until thick; press through a sieve to remove seeds.
Fill glasses and seal.


Tutti-frutti

    1 pound orange pulp
    1 pound red currants
    1 pound red cherries
    1 pound bananas
    1 pound pineapple
    1 pound apples
    1 pound raspberries
    1 pound pears
    1 pound plums
    1 pound peaches
    1 pound strawberries
    1 pint alcohol
    11 pounds sugar

Put the orange pulp into an earthen crock; add one pound sugar, and
two tablespoons alcohol; add this same amount of sugar and alcohol
every time a pound of fruit is added. Keep covered with a cloth and
tight-fitting cover.


Apple or Crab Apple Jelly

Wash and wipe fruit. Remove stems; cut in pieces, put in preserving
kettle, nearly cover with cold water; cook very slowly until apples are
tender. Pour into jelly bag and drain thoroughly, but do not squeeze.
Measure juice, allow one pound of sugar to every pint of juice. Boil
juice twenty minutes; add sugar which has been heated on a platter in
the oven; stir until sugar is dissolved; boil five minutes or until it
jellies. Skim when necessary. Have jelly glasses standing in hot water;
pour jelly into them; let stand until hard and cover first with paper
or melted paraffine and the tin cover, or paste white paper over the
glass. Keep all jellies in cool, dry, dark place.

A rose geranium leaf cooked with the apples gives a pleasant flavor.


Blackberry Jelly

Mash blackberries and squeeze in jelly bag. Measure juice, allowing one
pound of sugar to each pint of juice. Follow directions for Apple Jelly.

Damson, strawberry, cherry, and raspberry jellies are made in the same
way.


Cranberry Jelly

    4 cups cranberries
    3 cups sugar
    ½ cup cold water

Wash cranberries, mash, add water, and boil twenty minutes. Press
through sieve, add sugar, and cook three minutes. Pour into glass and
cover.


Cucumber Jelly

    6 cucumbers
    1 quart water
    1 ounce gelatine
    1 small onion
    salt and pepper
    1 tablespoon vinegar

Pare the cucumbers and cut in small pieces. Peel the onion and slice.
Cover onion and cucumber with cold water and cook until tender. Press
through a sieve, add the gelatine and seasonings. Chill, and serve with
Mayonnaise Dressing.


Currant Jelly

Wash and drain currants thoroughly. Do not remove stems. Mash a few in
the bottom of the kettle. Cook until the juice seems to be extracted
from the currants, and the currants look white. Press through a coarse
colander, then drip through a jelly bag, but do not squeeze.

Allow one pound of sugar for each pint of juice. Boil juice twenty
minutes. Add hot sugar and boil hard three minutes; skim when
necessary. Strain into hot glasses; let stand till stiff. Cover.


Currant and Raspberry Jelly

Use equal parts of currants and raspberries, and proceed as for Currant
Jelly.


Barberry Jelly

Use two quarts of apples for every four quarts of barberries and just
enough water to keep berries from burning. Follow directions for
Currant Jelly.


Wild Grape Jelly

    1 peck grapes
    1 quart vinegar
    4 sour apples
    4 tablespoons whole cloves
    ¼ cup stick cinnamon
    brown sugar

Remove stems from grapes, wash and crush, put in preserve kettle, add
all ingredients, except sugar. Cook until mixture begins to look white.
Strain through jelly bag. Measure juice, allow one pint of sugar for
every pint of juice. Cook juice twenty minutes, add sugar, boil three
minutes. Pour into glasses, cover when cold.


Grape Jelly

Remove stems from grapes. Mash; boil twenty minutes; strain, but do not
squeeze; proceed as for Currant Jelly. Half ripe and half green grapes
make the best jelly.


Mint Jelly

Follow receipt for Apple Jelly. Allow four sprigs of mint for every
four quarts of fruit. When the juice has cooked twenty minutes, color
with leaf green, add sugar, and proceed as with Apple Jelly.


Quince Jelly

Wipe and cut quinces in thin slices, and follow directions for Apple
Jelly.

A delicious jelly is made by using one half quinces and one half Porter
apples.


Apple Ginger

    4 pounds sour apples
    4 lemons
    2 pounds sugar
    1 ounce white ginger root

Pare, core, and chop apples; wash, remove seeds, and chop lemons;
add sugar and ginger root, and cook very slowly six hours. Pour into
glasses and cover.


Chipped Pears

    4 pounds pears
    ½ pound Canton ginger
    2 pounds sugar
    4 lemons

Pare, core, and chip pears; wash lemons, remove seeds, and chop; add
chopped ginger and sugar; cook very slowly four hours. Pour into
glasses and cover.


Currant and Raspberry Preserve

    4 pounds currants
    4 pounds sugar
    4 pounds raspberries

Remove stems from currants, mash, cook thirty minutes, and strain in
jelly bag. Cook sugar and juice ten minutes, add raspberries, bring to
the boiling point, fill jars first with berries, then with juice, and
seal.


Apple Marmalade

Apples with considerable flavor are best for marmalade. Wash, core, and
cut apples in slices; put in kettle, add enough water to keep apples
from burning. Cook slowly until mushy, press through a sieve, add equal
amounts of sugar and apples, and flavor with orange or lemon juice.
Cook until water is evaporated; fill glasses, and cover.

All fruits may be made into marmalades by following the above
directions. If the fruit lacks flavor, lemon juice, lemon rind, or
ginger root may be cooked with the fruit.


Orange Marmalade No. 1

    4 pounds oranges
    4 pounds sugar
    boiling water

Peel oranges, cut peel in quarters, cover with boiling water, and cook
until tender. Drain, scrape to remove white, and cut scraped peel in
shreds. Slice oranges, rejecting seeds and stringy portions; add sugar,
cook slowly forty minutes; add rind, cook two hours. Pour into jars or
glasses. Seal, and keep in cool place.


Orange Marmalade No. 2

    4 pounds oranges
    6 pounds sugar
    6 lemons

Slice oranges and lemons in very thin slices, reject seeds, cover with
sugar, and cook slowly until of a thick consistency, about two hours.
Pour into jars or glasses. Seal, and keep in cool place.


Orange and Rhubarb Marmalade No. 1

    5 pounds oranges
    5 pounds rhubarb
    5 pounds sugar
    5 lemons
    1 quart cold water

Wash oranges and lemons and slice in thin slices, remove seeds. Cover
with cold water, and let stand two hours. Add rhubarb cut in one half
inch pieces; cook one hour; add sugar and simmer three hours. Fill
glasses, seal, and keep in cool place.


Orange and Rhubarb Marmalade No. 2

    5 pounds oranges
    5 pounds rhubarb
    5 pounds sugar
    5 lemons

Remove skin from oranges and cook in boiling water until soft; drain;
scrape off white part and cut peel in strips. Cut oranges and lemons
in slices, remove pith and seeds. Cut rhubarb in inch pieces. Cook
oranges, lemons, and rhubarb one hour; add sugar and peel and simmer
two hours. Pour into glasses and cover when cold.


Grape Fruit Marmalade No. 1

    4 pounds grape fruit
    4 pounds sugar

Wash grape fruit, slice thinly, remove seeds and pulpy portion, add
sugar, and cook slowly two or three hours. Pour into glasses and cover.


Grape Fruit Marmalade No. 2

    6 grape fruits
    4 lemons
    4 quarts water
    10 pounds sugar

Wash the fruit and cut in thin slices, removing the seeds and as much
of the white skin as possible. Cover with water and let stand over
night. Cook slowly two hours; add sugar and simmer until thick. Fill
glasses, seal, and keep in cool place.


Peach Marmalade

    4 pounds peaches
    4 pounds sugar
    juice 2 lemons

Wipe and cut peaches in halves, remove stones, cut peaches in pieces;
add sugar and cook slowly two hours; add lemon juice. Pour into glasses
and cover.

Quince, apricot, plum, and prune marmalade may be made like Peach
Marmalade.


Blackberry Jam

    4 pounds blackberries
    2 pounds sugar

Wash and pick over blackberries, heat, then press through a sieve. To
this purée add sugar and boil one half hour. Pour into glasses and
cover.


Black, Red, or White Currant Jam

    4 pounds currants
    4 pounds sugar

Stem currants, crush slightly; add sugar, let stand over night; in the
morning cook slowly one half hour, stirring often. Turn into glasses
and cover.


Green or Ripe Grape Jam

Wash and stem grapes. Separate skins from pulp. Cook skins until
tender, press through a sieve. Cook pulps ten minutes, press through a
sieve. Combine purées; add one pound of sugar to every quart of purée;
boil one half hour, stirring often. Pour into glasses and cover.


Raspberry or Strawberry Jam

    4 pounds raspberries or strawberries
    2½ pounds sugar

Mash berries; add sugar; cook thirty minutes, stirring very often. Pour
into glasses and cover.


Green Tomato Jam

    4 pounds green tomatoes
    4 pounds loaf sugar
    1 cup water
    2 ounces preserved ginger

Wash tomatoes and cut in pieces; add remaining ingredients and cook
until clear, about two hours. Strain through coarse strainer to remove
seeds. Fill sterilized jars and seal.


Spiced Currants

    4 pounds currants
    2 tablespoons cinnamon
    2 tablespoons clove
    2 pounds brown sugar
    1 teaspoon salt
    1 cup vinegar

Remove stems and wash currants, add remaining ingredients, and boil
twenty minutes. Keep in stone jar.


Spiced Gooseberries

    4 pints gooseberries
    1 cup vinegar
    2 sticks cinnamon
    12 cloves
    3 pounds brown sugar
    1 teaspoon salt
    ⅛ teaspoon cayenne
    1 tablespoon lemon juice
    ½ ounce ginger root

Tie spices in bag. Cook vinegar and sugar five minutes. Add spice and
remaining ingredients, cook slowly one hour. Keep in stone jar.


Spiced Peaches

    4 pounds peaches
    1 cup vinegar
    1 tablespoon cinnamon
    1 tablespoon clove
    3 pounds brown sugar
    1 teaspoon ginger
    1 teaspoon salt
    ⅛ teaspoon cayenne pepper

Boil sugar and vinegar. Scald peaches, remove skins, and cook in sirup.
Tie spices in bag and cook with peaches. When peaches are tender,
pour into stone jars, reheat sirup every day for a week, pouring when
boiling over peaches.

All kinds of small fruits may be spiced in this manner.


Sweet Tomato Pickle

    4 quarts green tomatoes
    4 sliced onions
    ½ cup salt
    1 tablespoon each of clove, mustard and cinnamon
    4 cups water
    2 pounds brown sugar
    2 cups vinegar
    ¼ teaspoon cayenne

Slice tomatoes, add onions and salt, and let stand twelve hours. Drain,
add water and two cups vinegar, and boil one half hour. Drain; to
tomatoes add remaining ingredients, and cook one half hour. Keep in
stone jar in cool, dry place.


PICKLES

Sweet pickles are prepared from every fruit that can be preserved.
Spices are generally tied in a muslin bag and kept in the pickle jar,
and the sirup is rich in order to preserve the pickle. Sour pickles
should always be cooked in granite or agate-ware kettles, and if
desired green, put on to cook in cold vinegar and brought gradually to
the boiling point. Alum added to the pickles keeps them crisp.


Sweet Pickled Watermelon

    4 cups vinegar
    8 pounds sugar
    4 tablespoons cinnamon sticks
    4 tablespoons cloves (whole)
    watermelon

Cut skin from watermelon; cut rind into small pieces about two inches
square; cover with water and cook until tender. Boil sugar and vinegar
ten minutes; add spices tied in a bag, simmer until sirupy, about two
hours; add melon and simmer one hour. Fill jars and seal.


Sweet Pickled Pears

    6 pounds pears
    3 pounds sugar
    2 cups vinegar
    4 tablespoons cloves (whole)
    ¼ cup mixed spices

Wash pears, but do not pare. Stick the cloves into the pears. Make a
sirup of sugar and vinegar; add spices, when boiling, add a few pears
at a time and cook until tender. Fill jars and seal.


Sweet Pickled Cantaloupe

Prepare in the same way as Sweet Pickled Watermelon, substituting
cantaloupe.


Sweet Cucumber Pickle

Soak the cucumbers in a brine for two weeks; drain, and slice
lengthwise. Cook in a sirup made by cooking six pounds sugar and four
quarts of vinegar; boil twenty minutes. Keep in tightly covered crock.


Pickled Cucumbers No. 1

    100 small cucumbers
    2 pints salt
    1 quart small peppers
    8 quarts water

Boil water and salt together; pour over cucumbers and peppers. Let
stand over night; in the morning drain. Make a new brine, using same
proportion; repeat this process twice, then drain and wash cucumbers
and peppers in cold water. Place cucumbers and peppers in crock; cover
with boiling vinegar.

Twelve whole cloves and twelve peppercorns may be tied in a bag and
kept in the pickle jar.


Pickled Cabbage

    4 quarts chopped cabbage
    2 cups chopped onion
    1 cup chopped peppers
    salt

Arrange cabbage, onion, and peppers in layers in an earthen crock;
cover each layer with salt. Let stand over night; in the morning drain;
then arrange cabbage, onion, and peppers in layers, with cloves and
mustard seeds. Cover with cider vinegar; let stand twenty-four hours.


Pickled Cabbage and Celery

    2 quarts chopped cabbage
    1 cup sugar
    ¼ cup celery seed
    2 quarts chopped celery
    ¼ cup salt
    ¼ cup mustard seed
    3 quarts vinegar

Cook all ingredients until cabbage is tender. Keep in stone crock.


Pickled Cucumbers No. 2

    100 cucumbers sliced
    30 small onions sliced
    salt
    olive oil
    vinegar
    mustard seed

Arrange cucumbers and salt in layers and let stand over night. Arrange
onions and salt in layers and let stand over night. In the morning
drain; put a layer of cucumbers in an earthen crock, cover with olive
oil and mustard, then a layer of onions, and so continue until all are
used. Cover whole with cider vinegar; let stand covered closely for two
months, when it is ready for use.


Pickled Tomatoes

    2 quarts chopped tomato
    2 cups chopped horse-radish
    2 cups chopped celery
    ½ cup salt
    1 tablespoon clove
    1 cup chopped onion
    ½ cup chopped peppers
    ½ cup mustard seed
    ½ cup brown sugar
    1 tablespoon cinnamon
    4 cups vinegar

Mix all ingredients; stir every morning for a week. Keep in a cool,
dark place.


Mustard Pickle

    4 cups vinegar
    ¼ pound mustard seed
    ¼ pound horse-radish
    ½ pound mustard
    1 cup brown sugar
    1 cup chopped green pepper
    2 tablespoons turmeric
    1 pint button onions
    4 cups sliced cucumbers
    4 cups sliced green tomatoes
    4 cups cauliflower flowerets
    2 tablespoons celery seed

Boil vinegar, spices, and sugar five minutes, add remaining
ingredients, and simmer until thick. Keep in crock in cool place.


Chow Chow

    1 medium-sized cauliflower
    12 green peppers
    12 cucumbers (small)
    2 cups small onions
    2 cups salt
    4 cups vinegar
    1 teaspoon cayenne
    2 quarts boiling water
    3 tablespoons mustard

Peel onions and cook twenty minutes. Drain and cool. Arrange
cauliflower, broken in small pieces, cucumbers, peppers and onions in
kettle. Cover with brine made of salt and water. Let stand two days.
Drain thoroughly, then cover with vinegar, cayenne and mustard. Boil
slowly one hour. Keep in Mason or Lightning jars.


Piccalilli

    4 dozen small cucumbers
    3 quarts small green string beans
    4 red peppers
    4 green peppers
    ¼ cup mustard seed
    2 heads cabbage
    2 heads cauliflower
    1 teaspoon ginger
    1 teaspoon pepper
    1 teaspoon mace
    vinegar

Tie spices in a muslin bag. Chop the vegetables, cover with salt and
water, let stand over night. Drain thoroughly, cover with hot vinegar,
add spice bag, and let stand until the next morning. Reheat vinegar and
pour over pickles; do this for three days, then keep in earthen crock
tightly covered.


Pickled Walnuts

Run a needle through soft walnuts; cover with strong brine of salt and
water; let stand in brine for a week, draining off brine every day,
and covering with fresh brine. Then drain and wash walnuts, cover with
vinegar, boil ten minutes, add a bag of spices, cover closely, and keep
in cool place three weeks.

For bag of spices, mix four tablespoons each of whole cloves,
peppercorns, mace, celery and mustard seed.


Chili Sauce

    2 dozen tomatoes finely chopped
    1 dozen onions finely chopped
    1 dozen red peppers finely chopped
    1 cup brown sugar
    3 cups cider vinegar
    ¼ cup salt

Mix all ingredients, add more salt if needed, and boil slowly until
thick. Keep in air-tight jars.


Chutney

    4 cups sliced sour apples
    8 cups chopped green tomatoes
    4 cups chopped raisins
    1 shallot chopped
    ¼ cup salt
    2 onions chopped
    4 cups brown sugar
    1 quart vinegar
    1 inch ginger root
    1 teaspoon cayenne

Mix all ingredients and cook gently all day. Cool; then boil hard five
minutes, stirring constantly. Fill sterilized jars and seal.


Tomato Ketchup No. 1

    24 ripe tomatoes
    6 onions peeled
    6 green peppers
    ¼ cup salt
    ¼ cup brown sugar
    2 tablespoons ginger
    2 tablespoons cinnamon
    2 tablespoons mustard
    6 cups vinegar

Peel tomatoes, and cook all ingredients six hours, stirring often. Pour
into sterilized bottles and seal.


Tomato Ketchup No. 2

    ½ bushel tomatoes
    2 tablespoons mustard
    2 tablespoons ginger
    1 tablespoon cloves
    1 tablespoon allspice
    2 tablespoons pepper
    3 quarts vinegar
    2 cups alcohol
    3 cups brown sugar
    1 cup salt
    2 lemons finely chopped
    cayenne pepper

Cook tomatoes one hour; press through a sieve; add all ingredients,
except alcohol, and cook until thick; boil one minute; add alcohol, and
bottle. The cooking will take six or eight hours; stir occasionally to
keep from burning.


Mushroom Ketchup

Arrange layers of mushrooms and salt in preserving kettle; let stand
on back of stove for twelve hours. Press through a sieve. Measure. For
each quart of mushroom liquor add one pint vinegar, one tablespoon
salt, two tablespoons each of cloves, allspice, mace, and mustard seed.
Boil until thick, then bottle.


Cucumber Ketchup

    3 large cucumbers
    1 large onion
    2 tablespoons grated horse-radish
    2 tablespoons salt
    2 cups vinegar
    2 tablespoons pepper
    1 teaspoon paprika

Grate cucumber and onion, add remaining ingredients, boil five minutes,
bottle, and seal.


Rhubarb Wine

    8 pounds rhubarb
    grated rind of 4 lemons
    8 quarts water
    6 pounds sugar

Chop the rhubarb; add lemon rind and water; let stand three days.
Strain, add sugar, pour into crock, cover with muslin, let stand for
two weeks. Cover tightly, at the end of a month it will be ready to
bottle.


Grape Juice

    6 pounds grapes
    3 cups cold water

Wash and mash grapes; add water and boil ten minutes; strain. For every
quart of juice add two cups sugar. Boil sugar and juice eight minutes,
bottle and seal while hot.


Red Pepper Relish

    8 quarts red pepper
    2 quarts vinegar
    4 pounds brown sugar
    1 teaspoon salt

Remove seeds from peppers; cut peppers in narrow strips, using
scissors. Cover with boiling water, keep on back of range ten minutes,
but do not boil. Drain, cover with ice water, and let stand ten
minutes. Repeat this process twice. Boil sugar, vinegar and salt twenty
minutes. Drain peppers, pack sterilized jars with peppers, add sirup to
fill jars. Seal and keep in cold place.



CHAPTER XIX

CHAFING DISH DELICACIES


THE chafing dish is composed of the blazer and hot water pan, set in
a standard with a small lamp underneath. Some lamps have an electric
attachment, but alcohol is the fuel most used. The best alcohol is the
most satisfactory, although many use wood alcohol.

Every kind of dish which is usually prepared in a saucepan or double
boiler can be made in the chafing dish, but ordinarily oyster,
mushroom, fish, egg, and cheese dishes are the ones most popular.

When preparing for a chafing dish supper, arrange the chafing dish on
a tray, have the lamp filled, and matches at hand. A wooden spoon or
regular chafing dish spoon and a wire whisk are convenient and really
necessary utensils. It is well to have all the ingredients measured and
neatly arranged on a tray. If butter is to be used, butter balls, each
representing a tablespoon, are a convenient and attractive way in which
to serve it.

If toast is to be used, have the bread cut in small rounds or triangles
and toasted a golden brown. It should be kept hot until ready to be
used.

Light the lamp and have the water boiling before the supper is
announced, then the compounding of the dish may be done quickly.


Salted Almonds

Heat one tablespoon olive oil in chafing dish; add one cup blanched and
dried almonds. Stir until evenly colored. Drain and sprinkle with salt.


Deviled Almonds

Melt one tablespoon butter in chafing dish. Add one tablespoon chopped
red pepper, one tablespoon onion, one half teaspoon salt, and one cup
blanched almonds. Cook until almonds are brown.


Deviled Beef

Melt two tablespoons butter, add two tablespoons green pepper, one
tablespoon onion, one teaspoon each of salt and lemon juice, one
tablespoon flour. Spread on rounds of cold roast beef and sauté in
butter; or add one half cup tomato and reheat beef in sauce.


Bacon and Chicken Livers

Cut six chicken livers in slices, sprinkle with salt and pepper. Add an
equal amount of sliced bacon. Cook together until livers are tender.
Add two tablespoons flour, one half teaspoon salt, one cup stock or
tomato. Season with Worcestershire and serve hot on toast.


Bacon and Mushrooms

Wrap eight mushrooms in eight slices of bacon. Cook in chafing dish
until mushrooms are tender. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and serve.


Chicken Livers with Mushrooms

Make a Brown Sauce; add two cups sliced cooked livers and one cup
chopped mushrooms. Reheat and serve on toast. Two tablespoons wine may
be added.


Deviled Bananas

Melt one tablespoon butter, add one tablespoon chopped red pepper,
two teaspoons chopped pickles, one teaspoon Worcestershire sauce, one
fourth teaspoon salt. Add four bananas cut in four equal parts. Cook
five minutes.


Frizzled Beef

Melt one tablespoon butter, add one tablespoon flour and one half pound
dried beef. Cook five minutes, add one half cup stock, few drops onion
juice, one half teaspoon Worcestershire Sauce, two eggs well beaten.
Cook two minutes and serve.


Beef with Currant Jelly Sauce

Make Brown Sauce; add one cup Currant Jelly and twelve thin slices rare
roast beef. Cook until hot and serve.


Cheese Dreams

Cut twelve thin slices of bread and remove crusts. Cut in halves, cover
with a thin slice of American cheese, sprinkle with salt, paprika and
cayenne; cover with another slice of bread and sauté on both sides in
butter. These are more easily prepared small than large.


Cheese Custard

Melt two tablespoons butter; add one teaspoon each of salt, mustard and
paprika. Add two cups cheese, one half cup soft bread crumbs, and one
cup milk. Cook five minutes. Add two eggs well beaten; when thoroughly
blended, pour on to bread toasted on one side.


Cheese Omelet

Melt one tablespoon butter; add four eggs slightly beaten, four
tablespoons milk, one half teaspoon salt, one cup grated cheese. Cook
like a French Omelet over hot water. Serve with or without Tomato Sauce.


Welsh Rarebit

Melt one teaspoon butter, add one teaspoon each of salt, mustard and
paprika; add two cups American cheese. When melted, add one half cup
cream or ale. Stir vigorously until smooth, and pour over hot buttered
crackers or toast.


Cheese and Tomato Rarebit

Melt one tablespoon butter; add three sliced tomatoes, one half cup
milk, one teaspoon salt, two cups cheese. Stir continually until cheese
is melted. Add three eggs well beaten. When hot, serve on hot buttered
toast.


Cheese with Red Peppers

Melt two tablespoons butter, add four tablespoons chopped pepper, one
half tablespoon chopped onion, one fourth cup grated cheese, one fourth
cup cream, four eggs slightly beaten. Cook until well blended and serve
on buttered slices of toast.


Chicken à la Crême

Make a White Sauce; add one and one half cups chicken meat, cut in
cubes, one half cup mushrooms, cut in slices, and one red pepper,
finely chopped. Add more seasoning if required and serve on hot toast.

Turkey, veal, lamb, or game may be served in this way.


Chicken and Mushrooms à la Crême

Melt two tablespoons butter; add two tablespoons flour, one cup cream,
one half teaspoon salt. Add one cup each of cold cooked chicken, cut in
pieces, and cooked mushrooms, also cut in pieces.

Serve very hot on buttered toast. A few drops of Tabasco may be added.


Curried Chicken

Add one tablespoon curry powder to Chicken à la Crême.


Chicken with Hard-cooked Eggs

Cut four hard-cooked eggs in slices, add to two cups creamed chicken
with two tablespoons sherry.


Béchamel Eggs

Two cups Béchamel Sauce, mixed with four hard-cooked eggs, cut in
slices; one half cup sautéd mushrooms. Cook all together five minutes;
serve on hot toast.


Creamed Eggs

Melt two tablespoons butter; add two tablespoons flour, one fourth
teaspoon salt, few grains cayenne, one cup cream. Cook until thick, add
two egg yolks and six hard-cooked eggs, cut in pieces, and serve hot on
toast.


Scrambled Eggs and Tomato

Melt two tablespoons butter; add one tablespoon each of chopped pepper
and onion, one cup cooked tomato, one half teaspoon salt. When hot, add
four eggs slightly beaten; when scrambled, serve on toast.


Poached Eggs on Toast

May be prepared in chafing dish.


Creamed Lobster

Melt two tablespoons butter; add one fourth teaspoon salt, few grains
cayenne, two tablespoons flour, one cup cream, few gratings nutmeg.
Cook ten minutes, add meat from a two-pound lobster cut in small
pieces, the grated coral, and one tablespoon butter. One teaspoon
Worcestershire and one teaspoon mustard may be added.


Lobster à la Newburg

Melt two tablespoons butter; add one tablespoon flour, one teaspoon
salt, few grains cayenne, one cup cream. Cook five minutes; add three
egg yolks well beaten, the meat from a two-pound lobster, and just
before serving, two tablespoons each of sherry and brandy.


Lobster with Pimolas

Mix one cup Brown Sauce, one cup sliced pimolas, two hard-cooked eggs
cut in slices, one fourth teaspoon salt, few gratings nutmeg, and two
tablespoons sautéd mushrooms, with two cups lobster meat. Serve when
hot with slices of brown bread toast.


Lobster with Mushrooms

Melt three tablespoons butter; add one cup fresh mushrooms, cut in
slices, few drops onion juice, two tablespoons flour, one cup cream
or Chicken Stock; meat from a two-pound lobster and salt, pepper, and
cayenne to taste. Serve when hot.


Lamb Terrapin

Mix two cups cold cooked lamb, cut in small pieces, two hard-cooked
eggs, chopped fine, two tablespoons olive oil. Let stand two minutes.
Melt two tablespoons butter; add two tablespoons flour, one teaspoon
mustard, one teaspoon Worcestershire Sauce, and one cup Lamb Stock, or
milk. Cook five minutes. Add lamb and eggs and serve on graham toast.


Sautéd Oysters

Season four dozen large oysters with salt, pepper, onion juice and
lemon juice. Dip in crumbs, egg and crumbs, and sauté in butter.


Fricassee of Oysters and Mushrooms

Melt two tablespoons butter; add one tablespoon flour, one half finely
chopped onion, one cup mushrooms, broken in small pieces, one cup
Chicken Stock or one cup oyster liquor. Cook five minutes and add two
cups oysters drained from their liquor. Reheat; season with salt,
pepper, cayenne and Worcestershire Sauce. Serve with Brown Bread
Sandwiches.


Celeried Oysters

Melt two tablespoons butter; add two cups each of celery and oysters.
Season with salt, cayenne and lemon juice. Serve hot with crisp toast.


Shrimps and Tomatoes

Melt two tablespoons butter; add one can tomatoes; simmer until of
purée consistency. Season highly with salt, pepper and onion juice. Add
two cups shrimps which have been marinated in French Dressing for one
hour. When hot, serve on hot buttered toast.


Sweetbreads with Bacon

Cut cooked sweetbreads in inch pieces. Sprinkle with salt, cayenne,
lemon juice and onion juice. Wrap in slices of bacon. Skewer, sauté in
butter. Serve with Brown Sauce, and garnish with finely chopped celery.


Calves’ Brains à la Béchamel

Cut two cups cooked brains in small pieces. Marinate with French
Dressing. Melt two tablespoons butter; add four tablespoons chopped
peppers, one half cup chopped mushrooms, few drops onion juice, two
tablespoons flour, and one cup Chicken Stock. Cook five minutes; add
brains; season with salt, cayenne, Tabasco and Worcestershire.


Buttered Tomatoes

Melt one half cup butter; sprinkle six sliced tomatoes with salt and
pepper; put in chafing dish; cover and cook twenty minutes. Serve on
toast.


Venison with Currant Jelly

Melt two tablespoons butter; add one quarter teaspoon salt, few grains
cayenne, one tablespoon lemon juice, one cup Currant Jelly, one half
cup sherry; cook five minutes. Keep hot while cooking slice of venison
steak in chafing dish eight minutes. Serve sauce with venison.


Venison Stew

Cut one slice venison steak in inch pieces. Cover with Chicken or Veal
Stock; simmer until tender, about fifteen minutes; season with salt and
pepper; add one cup Currant Jelly and serve.


Sautéd Bananas

Peel and cut four bananas in four pieces; melt two tablespoons butter,
add two tablespoons sugar, and one half cup sherry; when hot, add
bananas, and cook until bananas are hot and tender.


Hot Fruit Salad

Melt two tablespoons butter; add four tablespoons sugar, one quarter
cup water, and one quarter cup lemon juice; add two cups mixed fruit,
apples, bananas, figs and cherries; when hot, serve with cream
sweetened and beaten until stiff.


Peach Canapé

Melt two tablespoons butter; add two cups peaches with skin and stones
removed; cook ten minutes; add sugar and lemon juice, and serve on
slices of sautéd bread or Sponge Cake; garnish with cream.


Pineapple Canapé

Substitute two cups shredded pineapple for peaches, and follow
directions for Peach Canapé.



CHAPTER XX

COOKERY FOR THE SICK AND CONVALESCENT


The preparation of food for the sick and convalescent person is even
more important than the preparation for the strong and well. Certain
points should always be considered. The food should be freshly
prepared, daintily served, and if possible different dishes for each
meal.

The arrangement of the tray is often of great importance. Select
attractive dishes and arrange them so that the patient can reach them
without trouble. Serve everything which should be hot, very hot, and
cold dishes, ice cold.


Apple Water

    1 large juicy apple
    2 cups water
    sugar

Wash, pare, core, and cut apple into pieces; add water and simmer until
tender; strain, add sugar to water, cook five minutes, chill, and
serve. If apple is not tart, a small amount of lemon juice may be added
to give a more agreeable flavor.

Pears, peaches, plums, figs, prunes, raisins, and rhubarb may be used
in the same way.


Barley Water

    2 cups boiling water
    ½ tablespoon prepared barley
    salt
    sugar

Mix barley with a small amount of cold water, add to boiling water, and
simmer twenty minutes. Season with salt and sugar. Lemon juice may be
added if desired.


Cinnamon Water

    ½ ounce stick cinnamon
    2 cups boiling water

Break cinnamon in small pieces, add water, and boil twenty minutes.
Strain and serve hot or cold.


Currant Water

    2 tablespoons Currant Jelly
    1 cup boiling water

Mix jelly and water, strain, chill, and serve.

Cranberry, strawberry, raspberry, blackberry, and plum water may be
prepared in the same way.


Distilled Water

This may be prepared at home by attaching one end of a curved tube to
the spout of the teakettle, and having the other end placed in a jar.
The jar should be placed in a kettle of cold water. This condensed
steam is distilled water.


Flaxseed Tea

    ½ cup flaxseed
    salt
    4 cups boiling water
    sugar
    lemon juice

Boil flaxseed and water one hour, strain, sweeten, and flavor. Serve
hot or cold.


Grape Water

    2 cups grapes
    1½ cups boiling water

Wash grapes, mash, add water, simmer ten minutes, strain, chill, and
serve.


Lemonade

    2 tablespoons lemon juice
    2 tablespoons Sugar Sirup
    1 cup cold water

Mix ingredients, add crushed ice, and serve ice-cold with straws.


Oatmeal Water

    4 tablespoons fine oatmeal
    4 cups boiling water
    salt

Boil all ingredients twenty minutes, strain, cool, add water to make of
pleasant consistency.


Tamarind Water

    1 tablespoon tamarinds
    1 cup boiling water

Let tamarinds stand in water one half hour, strain, chill, and serve.


Toast Water

Dry and brown in the oven very thin slices of white or graham bread,
break into small pieces, cover with boiling water; when cold, strain
and season with salt.


Sugar Sirup

    1 cup sugar
    ½ cup boiling water

Boil two minutes, keep in preserve jar, and use when needed.


Irish Moss Lemonade

    4 tablespoons Irish Moss
    2 cups cold water
    3 tablespoons lemon juice
    Sugar Sirup

Pick over and soak moss in cold water to cover for one half hour;
drain, cover with two cups cold water, and cook ten minutes; strain,
add lemon juice and Sugar Sirup to taste.


Milk Punch

    ¾ cup fresh milk
    salt
    2 tablespoons brandy or whisky
    nutmeg
    sugar

Sweeten milk to taste, add salt and liquor, and pour from one tumbler
to another until frothy.


Egg and Milk Punch

    1 egg
    ¾ cup milk
    1 tablespoon whisky or brandy
    2 teaspoons sugar

Beat yolk; add milk, liquor and sugar, pour into glass; add well-beaten
white of egg, stir lightly, and serve.


Eggnog

    1 egg
    1 teaspoon sugar
    salt
    2 tablespoons wine, whisky or brandy
    1 cup cream

Beat white of egg until stiff; add beaten cream and liquor, then
well-beaten yolk mixed with sugar and salt.

Milk or hot water may be substituted for the cream, and the yolk
and white may be beaten together just slightly if a foamy eggnog is
disliked.


Koumiss

Heat four cups milk; cool; when lukewarm, add one fourth yeast cake
dissolved in one fourth cup lukewarm water, and two tablespoons
sugar. Pour into bottles with patent stoppers, fill two thirds full,
cork tightly. Shake; let stand in kitchen six hours, then on ice for
twenty-four hours; serve ice cold.


Egg Cordial

    1 egg white
    1 tablespoon brandy or wine
    1 teaspoon sugar
    few grains salt
    2 tablespoons cream

Beat white until frothy; add cream and continue beating; add remaining
ingredients and serve immediately.


Orange Egg Cordial

Prepare as Egg Cordial, omitting wine and cream, and using the juice of
one orange.


Albuminized Milk

    1 egg white
    ½ cup milk
    salt

Beat white until frothy; add salt and milk, and continue beating;
strain and serve.


Egg and Lemon

    1 egg
    salt
    3 tablespoons lemon juice
    1 teaspoon sugar

Beat egg, add remaining ingredients, and serve cold.


Wine Whey

    2 cups milk
    ½ cup wine

Scald milk; add wine; let stand until curds separate from whey. Strain
and serve hot or cold. Lemon or Vinegar Whey may be prepared in the
same way; allow one tablespoon vinegar or two tablespoons lemon juice.


Barley Gruel

    1 tablespoon barley flour
    ¼ cup cold water
    ½ cup boiling water
    ½ cup milk
    salt

Mix barley with cold water and salt; add boiling water and cook in
double boiler one half hour; add milk and cook ten minutes more; if too
thick, thin with hot milk or cream.


Entire Wheat Gruel

    ¼ cup entire wheat
    ½ cup cold water
    3 cups water (hot)
    salt

Mix wheat and cold water, add boiling water and salt, and cook in
double boiler one to two hours. Milk may be substituted for water.


Cracker Gruel

    2 tablespoons cracker crumbs
    1 cup milk
    ¼ teaspoon salt

Mix crumbs and milk and cook in double boiler twenty minutes; add salt
and serve.

Dried bread crumbs may be substituted for cracker crumbs.


Corn Meal Gruel

    2 tablespoons corn meal
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    ½ cup milk
    2 cups boiling water

Mix corn meal, salt and milk; add boiling water and cook in double
boiler two hours.


Flour Gruel

    2 tablespoons flour
    ¼ cup cold water
    2 cups scalded milk
    ¼ teaspoon salt

Mix flour with cold water, add scalded milk and salt. Cook in a double
boiler thirty minutes, stirring often.


Flour Ball for Flour Gruel

Knead two cups flour into a ball, adding water to form a stiff dough.
Tie ball in a linen cloth and boil in deep saucepan ten to twelve
hours, keeping the cloth covered with boiling water all of the time.
Dry in cloth, remove cloth, and dry ball in oven. This will keep for
years. Scrape two tablespoons from the ball; add one fourth cup cold
water and two cups scalded milk; cook in double boiler ten minutes, add
salt, and serve.


Oatmeal Gruel

    2 tablespoons oatmeal
    2 cups boiling water
    ¼ cup cold water
    ⅛ teaspoon salt

Mix oatmeal with cold water; add salt and boiling water, and cook two
hours, or better still over night, in double boiler. Strain and serve;
thin with hot water or milk if not of the desired consistency.


Oatmeal Caudle

Add one egg yolk and one tablespoon brandy or sherry to Oatmeal Gruel.


Rice Gruel

    2 tablespoons ground rice
    ¼ cup cold water
    2 cups milk
    ¼ teaspoon salt

Mix rice and cold water; add scalded milk and cook in double boiler two
hours, stirring occasionally. Strain, add salt, and serve.


Dry Toast

Cut stale bread in one quarter inch slices; remove crust or not as
preferred. Dry in oven; place on toaster and toast over clear fire,
first on one side and then on the other, having both sides a golden
brown. Arrange in toast rack or cover with napkin.


Buttered Toast

Prepare bread as for Dry Toast, and spread with butter as soon as taken
from toaster.


Water Toast

Prepare bread as for Dry Toast, dip in hot salted water, drain, and
spread with butter.


Milk Toast

    3 cups scalded milk
    3 tablespoons butter
    ¼ cup cold milk
    3 tablespoons flour
    ½ teaspoon salt
    toasted bread

Toast bread according to receipt for Dry Toast. Mix flour and cold
milk; add to scalded milk and cook in double boiler twenty minutes,
stirring constantly at first; add salt and butter; dip toast in sauce;
serve in hot dish; add remaining sauce.


Cream Toast

Prepare in the same way as Milk Toast, substituting cream for milk.


Brown Bread Toast

Cut brown bread in thin slices; dry in oven, then toast; butter each
slice, and cover with scalded milk.


Pulled Bread

Remove the crust from fresh bread and tear the center in small pieces.
Dry in slow oven; the center of biscuits may be prepared in the same
way.


Bread and Butter Sandwiches

Cut bread in thin slices; remove crusts; spread with creamed butter;
put two slices together; cut in desired shapes. Arrange on fancy plate.


Raw Beef Sandwiches

Cut bread in thin slices; remove crusts; shape and spread with raw
beef. Serve as soon as made.


To scrape Raw Beef

Buy bottom or top of round of beef; wipe, then scrape with a teaspoon;
there should be nothing but fiber left when all meat is scraped.


Fig Sandwiches

Fill bread and butter sandwiches with stewed figs.


Beef Juice

Buy one half pound from top of round; wipe, and set in oven five
minutes; cut in thin slices, squeeze, using meat press or lemon
squeezer. Serve in warm, not hot cups, with salt or not.


Beef Tea

Wipe one half pound of round steak; remove all fat; cut in small
pieces; add one cup cold water; place in preserve jar, cover, and let
stand ten minutes; place jar on trivet in saucepan surrounded with cold
water. Heat gradually on back of range; keep water just simmering for
one hour. Strain, add salt, and serve in hot cup.


Beef Essence

Wipe one half pound round steak; remove fat; chop very fine; place in
fruit jar; cover, place jar on trivet, surround with cold water, and
keep water just bubbling for one and a half hours. Strain, press meat
to extract all juice, season, serve in hot cup.


Frozen Beef Tea

Prepare Beef Tea, pour into glass, surrounded with ice and salt, and
freeze, turning glass often, and scraping the frozen part into the
liquid.


Scraped Beef Balls

Prepare scraped beef according to rule. Season; shape in round balls
about the size of marbles; cook in hissing hot frying pan; keep pan
constantly in motion, and cook balls two minutes. Serve on small strips
of toasted bread; garnish with parsley.


Mutton Broth

Wipe two pounds neck of mutton; remove all fat and cut off skin; cut
meat in small pieces. Put meat and bones in kettle; add four cups cold
water, and simmer gently several hours; add salt to taste. Strain, let
stand over night to cool; in the morning remove fat, reheat, and serve
with two tablespoons cooked rice in broth.


Chicken Broth

Cut up a three-pound fowl; remove skin and all fat. Put in soup kettle;
add ten cups cold water, and simmer until meat falls from bones.
Strain; let stand over night to cool; remove fat; reheat, season with
salt, and serve with Boiled Rice or Croûtons.


Clam Broth

Wash one dozen clams, put in kettle, cover, and cook until shells open.
Strain clam liquor through cheese cloth and serve very hot.


Rennet Custard

    4 cups milk
    1 tablespoon liquid rennet
    1 tablespoon brandy
    few grains salt
    4 tablespoons sugar

Mix sugar, brandy and salt. Heat milk until lukewarm; add rennet and
other ingredients; pour into serving dish and let stand until a firm
curd is formed, then chill. Serve with cream and sugar.


Calf’s Foot Jelly

    1 calf’s foot
    4 cups cold water
    ½ cup sherry
    ½ cup lemon juice
    ½ cup sugar
    3 egg whites

Cook the calf’s foot in cold water, slowly, for four hours. Skim often
while cooking. Strain; let stand over night. Remove fat; add whites of
eggs slightly beaten, and bring slowly to the boiling point, stirring
all of the time; boil one minute, strain through cheese cloth, add
remaining ingredients, and pour into molds. Chill and serve.


Strawberry Whip

    2 egg whites
    ½ cup powdered sugar
    1 cup strawberries
    1 tablespoon lemon juice

Hull and wash the strawberries, add sugar and lemon juice. Beat the
whites of eggs until stiff, add other ingredients, and serve ice-cold
in frappé glasses.


Arrowroot Blanc Mange

    2 tablespoons arrowroot
    few grains of salt
    2 tablespoons sugar
    1⅓ cups milk
    flavoring

Mix arrowroot, salt and sugar; add milk, a little at a time, until the
mixture is smooth, then add the remainder, and cook in double boiler
one half hour, stirring all the time. Add flavoring, pour into molds,
and serve with Soft Custard or cream.


Stewed Prunes

Wash prunes; soak over night in water to cover; cook slowly, in same
water, until tender. A small amount of sugar and lemon juice may be
added if desired.


Stewed Figs

Wash figs; cut in pieces; for each cup of figs add one quarter cup cold
water, simmer one hour; add sugar and lemon juice if allowed.


Oatmeal Wafers

    1 cup flour
    ½ cup fine oatmeal
    ⅓ cup rolled oats
    4 tablespoons sugar
    2 tablespoons butter
    ½ teaspoon salt
    ⅓ cup hot milk
    1 teaspoon lemon juice

Mix butter and milk; when cool, add remaining ingredients. Roll very
thin, shape in squares, and bake in a slow oven.



CHAPTER XXI

CREOLE DISHES


Hoe Cake

    1 cup white corn meal
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    ¼ cup boiling water
    milk
    1 teaspoon baking powder

Mix salt and corn meal, add boiling water, let stand ten minutes. Add
baking powder and sufficient milk to make a stiff batter. Grease a
griddle; when hot, drop the mixture by spoonfuls on to it. When brown
put a piece of butter on top of each cake and turn.


Corn Pone

    2 cups coarse corn meal
    water to make a soft dough
    1 teaspoon salt

Butter pan; sprinkle with dry meal. Mix corn meal, salt, and water.
Heat pan, pour in pone mixture, and bake in hot oven.


Virginia Waffles

    1 cup white corn meal
    2 cups boiling water
    1 cup milk
    2½ cups flour
    2 eggs
    1 teaspoon salt
    ¼ cup melted butter
    ¼ cup sugar
    3 teaspoons baking powder

Cook meal in boiling water twenty minutes. Mix and sift dry ingredients
and add alternately with milk. Add eggs well beaten, and melted butter.
Cook as waffles.


Virginia Spoon Bread

    1 cup cooked hominy
    4 tablespoons lard
    1 cup cream
    4 eggs
    2 cups corn meal
    4 teaspoons baking powder
    1 tablespoon melted butter
    ¼ teaspoon salt

Mix the lard with the hot hominy; when cool, add cream, eggs well
beaten, corn meal mixed and sifted with baking powder, melted butter,
and salt. Bake in buttered agate-ware pan thirty to forty minutes.


Gumbo

    1 fowl
    ½ cup salt pork fat
    1 sliced onion
    salt
    2 cups strained tomatoes
    12 okra pods sliced
    1 teaspoon sassafras powder
    cayenne

Dress the fowl and cut in pieces for serving. Pour pork fat into frying
pan, when hot add onion, seasoned fowl, and cook until fowl is brown
and tender; add remaining ingredients and cook one hour.


Oyster and Clam Chowder

    4 cups clams
    ½ cup onion
    2 cups potatoes
    3 cups tomatoes
    salt, cayenne
    4 cups oysters
    2 tablespoons butter
    2 tablespoons flour
    ½ cup salt pork fat
    Worcestershire Sauce
    1 cup water

Parboil potatoes. Remove heads from clams. Put pork fat in kettle, add
onion, soft part of clams, potatoes, tomatoes, and water. Cook slowly
one hour. Melt butter, add flour, and add to clam mixture. Cook five
minutes, add seasonings and oysters; serve as soon as oysters are
heated through.


Crab Bisque

    4 boiled crabs
    3 cups milk
    ½ cup chopped onion
    2 tablespoons flour
    1 green pepper chopped
    2 tomatoes
    4 tablespoons butter
    salt, pepper and cayenne
    ½ cup croûtons

Melt butter; add onion and pepper, and cook five minutes; add flour;
when well blended add tomatoes cut in pieces; cook two minutes; add
scalded milk and crab meat; cook until heated through, season, pour
over croûtons, and serve.


Chicken Okra Soup

    2 tablespoons raw ham
    4 tablespoons onion
    ½ cup raw chicken
    2 tablespoons red pepper
    salt
    6 cups consommé
    6 okra pods
    2 cups tomato
    2 cups oysters
    pepper

Chop ham, onion, chicken and red pepper, and sauté; add consommé and
cook one hour. Slice okra, add with tomato to consommé, cook one half
hour. Add oysters, cook until edges shrivel, season and serve.


Stewed Terrapin

Cut terrapin meat in dice, cover with cold water, and cook slowly
one half hour. Mix the yolk of one hard-cooked egg with one teaspoon
butter, add one fourth cup cream, season with salt, nutmeg, paprika;
add terrapin meat, cook five minutes; add one tablespoon sherry, and
serve on toast.

This amount is right for one terrapin.


Jugged Hare

Dress a hare. Disjoint, season with salt and pepper, and dredge with
flour. Cook one quarter cup salt pork cubes in a frying pan, add hare,
and cook until brown. Arrange layers of hare, chopped onion, and salt
pork cubes in deep baking dish; add one cup each of stock or water and
stewed tomato. Cook in slow oven three hours.

Remove hare, strain liquor, and thicken with two tablespoons each of
butter and flour cooked together; add one half cup sherry and pour
around hare. Garnish with Boiled Rice and serve.


Lamb, Creole Style

    2 cups cold cooked lamb
    ¼ cup chopped pepper
    2 tablespoons chopped onion
    ½ teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon horse-radish
    ¼ cup butter
    ¼ cup flour
    1 cup Brown Stock
    1 cup tomato purée
    1 teaspoon lemon juice

Melt butter; add pepper and onion, cook five minutes; add flour; when
blended, add stock and tomato; when mixture boils, add remaining
ingredients; when meat is heated through, serve on a hot platter and
garnish with Boiled Rice.


Chicken Tamales

    3 cups chicken meat
    6 red peppers
    ¼ cup chopped onion
    ½ cup vinegar
    1 cup bread crumbs
    1 cup tomatoes
    10 olives chopped
    1 egg

Chop the chicken meat. Chop peppers and onion and soak in vinegar one
hour. Drain, add remaining ingredients. Shape like croquettes. Roll in
corn meal and wrap in corn husks. Tie the ends to keep the mixture in.
Steam three hours. Dry in oven ten minutes.


Stuffed Squash

Cut a summer squash in halves. Scoop out pulp, strain in cheese cloth.
To the pulp add an equal amount of cracker crumbs and twice as much
chopped ham or veal or shrimps. For four cups of the above mixture, add
the following: Melt two tablespoons butter, add two tablespoons finely
chopped pepper, one tomato cut in pieces, and one beaten egg. Add the
squash mixture, and cook ten minutes. Fill squash shells and bake ten
minutes.


Sweet Potato Pone

    4 cups hot mashed sweet potato
    1 cup hot milk
    2 tablespoons ginger
    1 cup butter
    1 cup sugar
    1 orange rind and juice
    ¼ teaspoon salt

Cream the butter, add sugar; when creamy add remaining ingredients,
beat well, pour into a buttered pan, and bake one hour in a moderate
oven.


Maryland Artichokes

    4 tablespoons butter
    ¼ cup bread crumbs
    2 cups cooked artichokes
    few drops onion juice
    1 teaspoon chopped parsley
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    1 cup milk
    few grains cayenne

Melt butter, add remaining ingredients, cook ten minutes, and serve on
hot buttered toast.


Crabs, Creole Style

    6 crabs
    2 tablespoons butter
    2 tablespoons chopped onion
    2 tablespoons flour
    2 cups tomato
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    ⅛ teaspoon pepper
    few grains red pepper

Boil the crabs, remove the meat. Melt butter, add onion and cook until
yellow; add flour; when smooth add tomatoes. Cook ten minutes; add
seasonings and crab meat. Serve on slices of hot buttered toast and
garnish with strips of red pepper.


Alabama Salad

    2 onions
    4 cucumbers
    ¾ cup sour cream
    ¼ cup vinegar

Chop onions very fine. Pare and slice cucumbers, sprinkle with salt,
cover with ice water and let stand one hour. Drain, add onions,
sprinkle with cayenne, and dress with cream and vinegar mixed together.
Serve on lettuce leaves.


Orange Salad

    6 oranges
    6 tablespoons olive oil
    3 tablespoons tarragon vinegar
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    ½ cup port wine
    1 teaspoon sugar
    2 heads lettuce

Peel the oranges, and remove as much of the white skin as possible.
Slice in very thin slices. Mix olive oil, vinegar, and salt. Pour over
oranges; let stand one half hour. Remove oranges, and pour over them
wine and sugar. Let stand in refrigerator one hour. Serve on shredded
lettuce. This salad is especially good to serve with game.


Southern Potato Salad

Cut six potatoes into uniform cubes. Cover cubes with boiling water;
add two slices onion, one and one half teaspoons salt, and cook until
potatoes are tender. Drain, cover with French Dressing when cool, chill
and serve on shredded lettuce.


Southern Salad

    1 cup cold ham
    1 cup cold chicken
    1 cup cold potatoes
    1 tablespoon onion
    1 cup celery
    ½ cup red or green pepper
    ½ cup French Dressing

Mix all the ingredients and marinate with French Dressing. Drain,
arrange on crisp lettuce leaves and garnish with Mayonnaise Dressing.


Louisiana Chow Chow

    2 cauliflowers
    8 green tomatoes
    2 cups small cucumbers
    1 cup button onions
    4 red peppers
    1 teaspoon whole cloves
    1 teaspoon celery seeds
    1 teaspoon mustard seeds
    4 green peppers
    2 cups sliced cabbage
    4 large cucumbers
    4 quarts vinegar
    2 tablespoons horse-radish
    1 cup salt
    1 cup granulated sugar
    2 quarts boiling water

Peel onions and cook in boiling water ten minutes. Drain. Boil salt
and water five minutes; add the vegetables, and let stand twenty-four
hours. Drain. Put in preserving kettle; add remaining ingredients, and
simmer two hours. Put into sterilized jars and seal.


Lady Baltimore Cake

    1 cup butter
    2 cups sugar
    8 egg yolks
    1 whole egg
    ⅛ teaspoon salt
    3-¾ cups flour
    4 teaspoons baking powder
    ¾ cup milk
    8 egg whites
    1 teaspoon vanilla or almond

Cream butter; add sugar. Beat yolks and whole egg; add salt, and add
to sugar mixture. Mix and sift flour and baking powder, and add to egg
mixture alternately with milk. Beat whites until stiff; add flavoring;
add to egg mixture. Bake in buttered layer cake pans twenty minutes.
Fill with Baltimore Filling, and frost with Boiled Frosting.


Baltimore Filling

    2 cups sugar
    ⅓ cup boiling water
    1 cup chopped walnuts
    2 egg whites
    1 tablespoon lemon juice
    1 cup chopped cherries

Boil sugar and water until a thread is formed. Pour on to the beaten
whites; add lemon juice, and beat until creamy; add nuts and cherries
and use for filling.


Virginia Fruit Cake

    ½ cup butter
    ¾ cup sugar
    3 eggs
    1 cup flour
    1 teaspoon baking powder
    1 teaspoon nutmeg
    1 tablespoon lemon juice
    1 cup currants
    1 cup raisins
    ½ cup citron
    1 teaspoon cinnamon
    ½ teaspoon cloves
    2 tablespoons brandy
    ½ tablespoon grated lemon rind

Cream butter, add sugar; when creamy add eggs well beaten, and
remaining ingredients. Bake in an angel cake pan about two hours.


Orange Cakes

    ½ cup butter
    ¾ cup sugar
    ½ cup milk
    2¼ cups flour
    4 teaspoons baking powder
    2 eggs
    ½ cup candied orange peel

Cream butter; add sugar, flour in which baking powder has been sifted,
alternately with milk; beat well, add well-beaten eggs and finely
chopped orange peel. Drop from a teaspoon on to a buttered sheet; bake
in a quick oven.


Maryland Cookies

    2 cups flour
    ½ cup brown sugar
    ¾ cup butter
    ¼ cup Lowney’s Cocoa
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    ½ teaspoon vanilla

Mix and sift flour, sugar and cocoa; add butter, chop until well
blended. Roll very thin, sprinkle with granulated sugar, cut with cooky
cutter, bake on a buttered sheet in a moderate oven.


Baltimore Cookies

    ½ cup beef suet
    ½ cup molasses
    ⅞ cup flour
    1 cup brown sugar
    1 tablespoon ginger
    1 tablespoon chopped orange peel
    ½ teaspoon salt

Heat molasses and suet; when well mixed add remaining ingredients. Drop
from a teaspoon on to a buttered sheet; bake in a slow oven.


Cocoa Macaroons

    2 eggs
    1 cup flour
    ½ cup sugar
    ¼ cup Lowney’s Cocoa
    ½ cup finely chopped almonds
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon baking powder
    1 teaspoon lemon juice

Mix and sift dry ingredients; add eggs well beaten and lemon juice.
Roll in small marbles, dip in cinnamon and sugar. Bake on a sheet in a
quick oven.


Pecan Pralines

    2 cups brown sugar
    ¼ cup boiling water
    1 cup pecan nut meats
    2 tablespoons butter

Boil sugar and water together, add nuts and butter; cook five minutes,
remove from stove, beat one minute, then drop by spoonfuls on to a
buttered pan.


Maple Cocoanut Pralines

    2 cups maple sugar
    ½ cup cream
    1 cup cocoanut
    2 tablespoons butter

Mix all ingredients and boil until the whole mixture is a mass of
bubbles. Pour on to a buttered platter or marble slab and mark when
cool.


Baltimore Cup

    1 pineapple cut in cubes
    3 oranges sliced
    4 peaches cut in pieces
    ¼ cup lemon juice
    2 tablespoons cordial or sherry
    sugar

Mix the ingredients, sweeten to taste, and chill. Serve Raspberry
Sherbet in bottom of champagne glasses, pour over sherbet fruit
mixture, garnish with raspberries.


Chocolate and Fruit Macedoine

Arrange chilled shredded pineapple, bananas cut in cubes, and preserved
peaches or pears in champagne glasses, sprinkle with lemon juice, pour
over whole Chocolate Sauce, and garnish with beaten cream, angelica and
candied cherries.


Chocolate Junket

    2 cups milk
    ½ cup sugar
    ⅓ cup boiling water
    ¼ cup grated chocolate
    few grains of salt
    1 junket tablet
    1 cup chopped walnuts
    1 tablespoon sherry wine

Scald milk, cool slightly, add sugar, water and chocolate; when
thoroughly dissolved add crushed junket tablet, salt and wine. Turn
into serving dish, keep in warm place until thick, then chill. Garnish
with beaten cream and chopped nuts.


Chocolate Pudding

    ¼ cup butter
    1 cup sugar
    1 egg
    ¾ cup milk
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    2 cups flour
    4 teaspoons baking powder
    3 squares Lowney’s Premium Chocolate
    ½ teaspoon vanilla

Melt butter, add remaining ingredients, except chocolate; when
thoroughly mixed add melted chocolate. Pour into buttered individual
molds. Cover and steam one and one half hours. Serve with Cream Sauce.


Mississippi Custard

    4 cups milk
    6 eggs
    ½ cup sugar
    ½ teaspoon salt
    ¼ cup sherry wine
    1 tablespoon lemon juice

Beat yolks of eggs, add sugar and salt. Scald the milk, pour on to egg
mixture, cook in double boiler until mixture thickens. Beat whites of
eggs until stiff; place in purée sieve. Pour over them one quart of
boiling water to which has been added the lemon juice. Arrange the
custard and whites of eggs in layers in serving dish, sprinkling each
layer with sherry wine. Have the whites of eggs on the top layer,
dredge with granulated sugar, chill and serve.


Orange Pudding

    2 cups scalded milk
    1 cup soft bread crumbs
    4 eggs
    1 tablespoon lemon juice
    ½ cup sugar
    ½ cup orange juice
    grated rind of 1 orange
    ¼ cup chopped almonds
    ½ teaspoon salt

Pour milk over bread crumbs. Beat eggs, add other ingredients. When
blended add bread and milk mixture. Steam in individual molds or one
half pound baking powder boxes three fourths of an hour. Remove to
serving dish; garnish with slices of orange and Hard Sauce served in
Orange Baskets.


Georgia Cream

    1 pint Lemon Jelly
    2 cups milk
    4 eggs
    1 cup sugar
    2 ounces gelatine
    ¼ cup candied cherries
    ¼ cup candied pineapple
    ¼ cup blanched almonds

Line a mold with Lemon Jelly. Make a custard with milk, eggs and sugar;
add gelatine, and stir until mixture begins to thicken, then add fruit
and nuts. Pour this mixture into the center of the mold, leaving the
Lemon Jelly border. Chill, and serve with sweetened cream.


Orange Roly Poly

    2 cups flour
    2 tablespoons lard
    1 teaspoon salt
    4 teaspoons baking powder
    ¾ cup milk
    3 oranges cut in slices
    ½ cup sugar
    2 tablespoons chopped orange peel

Mix flour, salt and baking powder, add lard, and chop until fine like
meal; add milk, shape in oblong piece spread with oranges and orange
peel, and sprinkle with sugar. Roll like a jelly roll, pinch the edges
together. Place on plate in steamer and steam one and one half hours.
Serve with Orange Sauce.


Chestnut Cream

    ½ pound chestnuts
    1½ cups milk
    ½ cup sugar
    3 egg yolks
    1 tablespoon granulated gelatine
    ¼ cup cold water
    1 tablespoon sherry wine

Shell the chestnuts, boil and mash. Scald milk; add sugar and eggs, and
cook until of a creamy consistency. Mix gelatine and cold water. Add to
custard mixture. When well blended add chestnuts and flavoring. Pour
into mold, chill, serve garnished with beaten cream.


Pineapple Sponge

    2 cups grated pineapple
    1 cup sugar
    1½ tablespoons gelatine
    ¾ cup cold water
    3 tablespoons lemon juice
    3 egg whites
    grated rind of 1 lemon
    few grains of salt

Mix pineapple, sugar, and one half cup water. Cook twenty minutes; add
gelatine which has been soaked in one quarter cup water. Strain, set
on ice to chill. When it begins to thicken add seasonings and beaten
whites. Beat until stiff. Mold, chill and serve.



CHAPTER XXII

ECONOMICAL RECEIPTS


Baked Beans

    4 cups beans
    ½ pound salt pork
    1 tablespoon salt
    4 tablespoons sugar or
    4 tablespoons molasses
    ½ tablespoon mustard

Soak beans over night, drain, cover with cold water and simmer until
tender when pierced with a darning needle. Drain, pour one half of
beans into bean pot; add salt, sweetening and mustard. Place salt pork
which has been scored on top of beans, cover with remaining beans and
cover whole with boiling water.

Cover bean pot and bake in a slow oven eight hours. Uncover the last
hour of cooking.

Many people cook one small onion with the beans. To score pork, cut the
pork rind into small squares.


Oatmeal Muffins No. 2

    1 cup milk
    1 cup uncooked oatmeal
    2 tablespoons lard or suet
    ¼ cup lukewarm water
    ½ cup molasses
    2 to 3 cups entire wheat flour
    ½ yeast cake
    1 teaspoon salt

Scald milk; add oatmeal and shortening; let stand until cool. Dissolve
yeast in lukewarm water, add molasses, combine mixtures, add entire
wheat and salt, knead, let rise, knead, shape, let rise, and bake.


Oatmeal Wafers No. 2

    1 cup rolled oats
    1 egg
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    1 tablespoon butter
    ½ cup sugar

Beat egg, add remaining ingredients, drop from a teaspoon on to a
buttered sheet. Bake in a moderate oven.


Flaked Rice Macaroons

Substitute one and one half cups flaked rice for the rolled oats, and
follow the directions for Oatmeal Wafers.


Boiled Kale

Remove leaves, reject stalks, wash in several waters. Cook in boiling
salted water. Drain, season, and serve like spinach.


German Cabbage

    1 small red cabbage
    ¼ cup bacon fat
    1 tablespoon chopped onion
    ½ teaspoon salt
    few grains cayenne
    few grains nutmeg
    ¼ cup vinegar
    2 teaspoons brown sugar

Chop cabbage and soak in cold water. Melt bacon fat, add onion, cook
five minutes; add cabbage, salt, cayenne and nutmeg, cook until cabbage
is tender. It should steam, and no water should be added. Add sugar and
vinegar, cook five minutes, and serve.


Vegetable Croquettes

    1 cup cooked rice
    2 cups baked beans
    ½ cup mashed potato
    salt and pepper
    few drops onion juice
    1 tablespoon butter
    2 tablespoons flour
    ½ cup tomato

Melt butter, add flour; when blended, add tomato, cook five minutes,
add remaining ingredients, chill, shape, and fry.


Salt Mackerel

    1 salt mackerel
    2 tablespoons butter
    1 cup milk
    ⅛ teaspoon pepper
    1 tablespoon flour

Soak the mackerel over night in cold water to cover. In the morning
drain, wash, rinse in cold water, and place flesh side up in dripping
pan.

Cover with milk, and cook in a moderate oven about twenty minutes. Melt
butter, add flour; when well blended, mix with milk in pan, and cook
five minutes. Serve on hot platter and pour sauce over fish, sprinkle
with pepper.


Fish Balls

    1 cup raw salt codfish
    2¼ cups potato cubes
    1 egg
    ¼ teaspoon pepper
    ⅛ teaspoon salt
    1 tablespoon butter

Shred the codfish and press into the cup, put the potatoes in a
saucepan, add fish, and cover with boiling water. Cook until potatoes
are tender but not mushy. Drain in a colander, mash thoroughly. Add
salt, pepper and butter, beat with a fork until light and fluffy,
add egg well beaten and beat again. Shape into balls or drop from a
tablespoon. Fry in deep fat, drain on brown paper, serve hot.


Salt Fish Cakes

    2 cups salt codfish
    2 cups hot mashed potato
    1 tablespoon butter
    ¼ cup milk
    ⅛ teaspoon pepper
    ¼ teaspoon salt

Soak the fish one or two hours. Drain, cover with cold water, and
simmer until fish is tender. Drain and chop. Add mashed potato and
seasonings, beat well, shape into round flat cakes, and sauté in hot
pork fat. Serve on hot platter and garnish with crisp cubes of fat salt
pork.


Fresh Fish Cakes

Substitute two cups of cooked fresh fish for the salt codfish, and
proceed as for Salt Fish Cakes.


Salt Fish Soufflé

    2 cups cooked salt fish
    2 cups mashed potatoes
    4 eggs
    4 tablespoons butter
    ¾ cup cream or rich milk
    salt and pepper

Mix fish and potatoes and beat well, add cream and seasonings. Beat
yolks of eggs until lemon-colored and thick, add to fish mixture, when
thoroughly blended add stiffly beaten whites, carefully cutting and
folding them in. Pour into a buttered baking dish, bake in a moderate
oven about thirty minutes.


Codfish Omelet

    2 eggs
    1 cup codfish
    1 tablespoon butter
    2 tablespoons flour
    ¼ cup milk

Melt butter, add flour, when blended add scalded milk and codfish, cook
two minutes. Beat yolks of eggs until lemon-colored and thick; add fish
mixture. Beat whites until stiff, cut and fold beaten whites into fish
mixture. Cook like Foamy Omelet.


Fish Pudding

    2 cups cooked fish
    ½ cup thick White Sauce
    salt
    few drops onion juice
    2 eggs
    pepper

Press the fish through a purée sieve, season, add White Sauce, and beat
well. Beat yolks of eggs until lemon-colored and thick, add to fish
mixture. Cut and fold in the stiffly beaten whites of eggs, and bake in
moderate oven twenty minutes.


Smoked Herring

Cover herring with boiling water. Let stand twenty minutes. Drain,
skin, and broil over a clear fire ten minutes, or bake in oven fifteen
minutes. Spread with butter and serve hot.


Corned Beef Hash No. 2

    2 cups corned beef
    2 cups chopped potatoes
    1 cup chopped beets
    1 slice chopped onion
    1 teaspoon salt
    ¼ cup milk or hot water

Mix all the ingredients. Grease an iron frying pan, heat, add hash,
spread evenly, cover, and cook slowly one hour. Fold, turn, and serve.


Vegetable Hash

    ½ cup chopped carrots
    1 cup chopped potatoes
    ½ cup chopped turnips
    few drops onion juice
    2 cups chopped cabbage
    1 cup chopped beets
    2 tablespoons beef fat
    ¼ cup milk or hot water
    salt and pepper

Melt the fat in an iron frying pan; when hissing hot, pour in the above
ingredients, spread evenly, cover, and cook slowly one half hour. Fold,
turn, and serve.


Lamb Stew

    2 pounds breast of lamb
    2 cups boiling water
    2 cups potato cubes
    2 tablespoons butter or pork fat
    ½ cup sliced onion
    2 tablespoons rice
    1 cup strained tomato
    salt and pepper

Brown the onions in hot fat, cut meat in two-inch pieces, add to
onions, cover with hot water, and simmer two hours. Parboil potatoes.
Add rice when meat has cooked one hour. Add parboiled potatoes one half
hour before serving. Add tomato ten minutes before serving. Season
with salt and pepper. The tomato may be omitted and one cup of water
substituted.


Scalloped Mutton

    2 cups Tomato Sauce
    1 cup cooked macaroni
    2 cups mutton cut in cubes
    1 cup cracker crumbs
    ⅓ cup melted butter
    salt and pepper

Arrange the macaroni, mutton, and Tomato Sauce in layers, sprinkle each
layer with salt and pepper, cover the top with the cracker crumbs which
have been mixed with the butter, bake until the crumbs are brown.


Barbecued Lamb

    1 forequarter of lamb
    2 cups water
    1 tablespoon salt
    ¼ cup vinegar
    1 teaspoon Kitchen Bouquet
    1 teaspoon Worcestershire Sauce

Remove the bones from the lamb and tie in a roll. Place lamb on trivet
in dripping pan, and pour the remaining ingredients over it. Cook in
moderate oven, baste every ten minutes. Allow twenty minutes to the
pound for cooking.

Serve with Tomato Sauce.


Veal Balls

    2 cups chopped raw veal
    ½ cup chopped raw salt pork
    1 cup cracker crumbs
    ½ cup water or stock
    1 tablespoon vinegar
    1½ teaspoons salt
    1 tablespoon flour
    1 egg
    few drops onion juice

Mix the ingredients and shape into balls. Sauté in salt pork fat. Cover
with Curry Sauce and cook in oven one hour. Serve on a bed of rice or
macaroni.


Stewed Kidneys on Toast

    2 lambs’ kidneys
    2 cups water
    2 slices onion
    4 slices toast
    2 teaspoons salt
    ½ teaspoon pepper
    2 tablespoons butter
    2 tablespoons flour

Remove thin skin from kidneys and cut in small pieces; soak in cold
water to cover for one hour. Drain, add two cups water and onion, and
simmer until kidneys are tender. Melt butter, add flour and seasonings,
and thicken water in which kidneys were cooked; cook five minutes.
Arrange kidneys on toast, and strain sauce over them. Serve immediately.


Stewed Heart

    2 hearts
    2 tablespoons pork fat
    2 tablespoons chopped onion
    3 cups cold water
    salt and pepper
    flour

Wash the hearts (calves’ or lambs’ hearts are the most tender).
Sprinkle with salt and pepper and dredge with flour. Sauté in pork fat,
adding onion when half sautéd. Cover with water and cook in covered
dish in a slow oven for about three hours, adding more water if needed.
Arrange hearts on platter, strain gravy over them, and garnish with
toast points.


Calf’s Heart Stuffed

Wash the heart, stuff-with Cracker Stuffing. Sew. Arrange one half cup
each of onions and carrots in the bottom of a baking dish, place the
heart on this bed. Sprinkle with salt and pepper, dredge with flour,
and bake two hours. Baste often with pork fat. Remove from pan and make
a brown gravy, using three tablespoons of the fat from the pan, adding
three tablespoons flour and one and one half cups boiling water. Serve
gravy around heart.


Liver Loaf

    1 calf’s liver
    ½ cup bread crumbs
    ½ teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon Kitchen Bouquet
    1 tablespoon vinegar
    4 slices salt pork chopped
    2 tablespoons chopped onion
    1 cup water or stock
    few grains of cayenne
    few gratings of nutmeg

Wash the liver and chop, cook in boiling water five minutes, drain, add
bread crumbs and chop, add remaining ingredients, and press into bread
pan. Cover, and bake one hour in slow oven.


Nut Loaf

    2 cups soft bread crumbs
    1 cup milk
    2 cups chopped nuts
    ½ teaspoon salt
    1 egg
    1 teaspoon Kitchen Bouquet
    ⅛ teaspoon pepper
    1 tablespoon butter or bacon fat

Soak the crumbs in milk until soft, add remaining ingredients. Pour
into bread pan, baste with water, butter, or pork fat, and bake one
hour. Serve hot or cold with Tomato Sauce.


Mutton Pot Roast

Wipe, roll, and skewer the forequarter of mutton from which the bones
have been removed. Brown in a small amount of fat in a hot frying pan.
Parboil four potatoes. Drain. Put a layer of potatoes in deep pudding
dish, cover with a layer of sliced onions, sprinkle with flour, salt,
and pepper. Put the meat on the vegetables and add one cup water or
stock. Cover and cook in a slow oven three hours. Add more liquid if
needed, but if the oven is right, no more should be necessary.


Sautéd Salt Pork

Cut salt pork in one fourth inch slices, cover with boiling water, and
cook five minutes. Drain, arrange in frying pan, and cook slowly for
five minutes, then more rapidly until crisp and brown on both sides.


Salt Pork in Batter

Cut salt pork in thin slices, cover with boiling water, and cook five
minutes. Drain and sauté, or dip in Fritter Batter, and sauté in pork
fat or fry in deep fat.


Broiled Kidneys

    2 kidneys
    4 tablespoons cracker crumbs
    2 tablespoons butter melted
    salt, pepper and lemon juice

Remove the thin skin from the kidneys, and cut in one fourth inch
slices. Wash, soak in acidulated water one half hour. Drain, season,
dip in butter, then in crumbs, and broil five minutes. Serve on hot
platter with Maître d’Hôtel Butter.


Pot Roast

Season a solid piece of beef, either the round or vein, with salt and
pepper. Dredge with flour. Brown in a frying pan with a small amount
of fat. Place in kettle, add one cup boiling water, cover closely, and
cook in slow oven until meat is tender. If the water cooks away, add
just enough to keep the meat from burning. Serve hot with Brown Gravy
or Tomato Sauce.


Cottage Pie

    1 cup chopped meat
    1 cup hot water or gravy
    2 cups hot mashed potato
    ½ teaspoon salt
    ½ cup hot milk
    1 tablespoon butter
    few grains celery salt
    ⅛ teaspoon pepper

Put meat in casserole, add salt and pepper to taste, and the hot water.
Mix the remaining ingredients with the mashed potato, and spread on top
of meat; bake in hot oven until potato is brown.


Rice with Cheese

    2 cups steamed rice
    2 tablespoons butter
    ½ teaspoon salt
    ½ cup grated cheese
    few grains cayenne
    milk

Arrange rice and cheese in alternate layers in buttered baking dish,
add remaining ingredients, allowing sufficient milk to moisten. Cover
with buttered cracker crumbs. Bake until crumbs are brown.


Cottage Cheese

Pour sour milk into a cheese cloth. When all of the whey has drained
through, season the curd with salt, add a very small amount of butter
or cream, and form into balls. Chill and serve. If the curd is not
thick, it may be necessary to heat the sour milk, but heat is apt to
make the curd tough.


Cranberry Sauce

    2 cups sugar
    1 cup cranberry juice
    1 tablespoon butter
    2 tablespoons lemon juice

Boil sugar and juice seven minutes, add butter, and serve.


Sour Cream Gingerbread

    1 egg
    ½ cup molasses
    ½ cup sugar
    ¾ cup sour cream
    2 teaspoons soda
    3 teaspoons ginger
    2 teaspoons cinnamon
    ½ teaspoon salt
    2 cups flour

Mix and sift the dry ingredients three times. Beat egg, add cream,
molasses, and remaining ingredients, and beat until smooth. Pour into
buttered pan and bake in moderate oven twenty to thirty minutes.


Peach Tapioca

    1 cup evaporated peaches
    1 cup sugar
    1 cup tapioca
    2 cups boiling water
    1 tablespoon lemon juice
    ½ teaspoon salt

Cover peaches with cold water and soak over night. Cover tapioca with
cold water and soak two hours. Drain tapioca, add boiling water and
salt, and cook in double boiler until transparent. Drain peaches, add
sugar, and cook in double boiler until tender; add lemon juice. Put
peaches in bottom of baking dish, pour over tapioca mixture, and bake
twenty minutes. Serve hot or cold with sugar and cream.


Apricot Tapioca

Prepare the same as Peach Tapioca, substituting one cup apricots for
the peaches.


Rhubarb and Raisin Pudding

    2 cups bread crumbs
    2 cups rhubarb
    ¼ cup chopped lemon peel
    ¼ cup raisins
    ¼ cup sugar
    1 tablespoon lemon juice

Arrange ingredients in layers, having crumbs on top layer. Dot over
with butter. Cover and cook one hour.


Gooseberry Trifle

    2 cups green gooseberries
    1 cup sugar
    ½ cup pearl tapioca
    2 cups boiling water
    1 tablespoon lemon juice

Soak tapioca over night. Cook in boiling water until transparent. Cook
gooseberries and sugar together until soft; add lemon juice. Combine
mixtures and serve cold.


Cranberry Puffs

    2 cups cranberries
    2 cups flour
    4 tablespoons shortening
    2 eggs
    1 cup milk
    4 teaspoons baking powder
    1 teaspoon salt

Mix and sift dry ingredients, add shortening, and chop until mealy; add
well-beaten eggs and cranberries. Pour into popover bowls and steam one
and one half hours. Serve with Cranberry Sauce.


Tapioca and Prune Pudding

    8 tablespoons tapioca
    3 cups water
    ½ teaspoon salt
    grated rind and juice of ½ lemon
    1 cup prunes
    ⅓ cup sugar

Soak tapioca over night. Cook in double boiler until transparent. Soak
prunes over night. Drain, add one cup water, and simmer until tender.
Remove stones and cut prunes in pieces. Add seasonings to tapioca.
Arrange tapioca and prunes in layers in a buttered pudding dish. Cover,
bake in a moderate oven one half hour. Serve with sugar and milk.


Rhubarb Pudding

    8 slices bread
    4 tablespoons butter
    2 cups rhubarb
    2 cups sugar

Butter the bread, arrange buttered bread, rhubarb cut in small pieces,
and sugar in layers in buttered baking dish. Steam one hour and bake
uncovered one half hour.


Apple Compote with Rice

    3½ cups sugar
    2½ cups water
    6 apples
    4 slices of lemon
    2 cups cooked rice

Cook sugar and water together ten minutes. Pare, core, and cut apples
in thick round slices. Add lemon slices to sirup, and cook apples, a
few slices at a time, until all are cooked. Arrange rice in bottom of
serving dish. Arrange slices of apple overlapping each other, on top of
rice. Boil the sirup until thick, and pour over apples. Cool and serve.
Pears, peaches, or oranges may be substituted for apples.


Cocoanut Custard

    2 cups milk
    1 teaspoon cornstarch
    ⅛ teaspoon salt
    1 egg
    ¼ cup sugar
    1 cup cocoanut

Scald milk, add cornstarch which has been mixed with a small amount of
cold milk, cook ten minutes. Mix other ingredients, add to cornstarch
mixture, cook one minute. Pour into serving dish. Chill and serve.

       *       *       *       *       *

_We also call attention to the following economical dishes given
elsewhere in the book and to be found in the Index._


Soups

    Bean Soup
    Baked Bean Soup
    Cabbage Soup
    Sorrel Soup
    Rice Soup
    Onion Soup
    Pea Soup
    Spinach Soup
    Potato Soup
    Tomato Soup
    Vegetable Soup
    Black Bean Purée
    Split Pea Purée
    Lentil Purée
    Potato Chowder
    Corn Chowder
    Salt Codfish Chowder


Meats

    Braised Beef
    Spiced Beef
    Stewed Beef
    Pot Roast
    Beef Ragoût
    Hamburg Steak
    Pork Chops
    Fried Calf’s Liver
    Broiled Pig’s Feet
    Calf’s Heart stuffed


Miscellaneous

    Corn Meal Mush
    Goldenrod Eggs
    Rice Croquettes
    Turkish Pilaf


Salads

    Lima Bean Salad
    Cabbage Salad
    Onion Salad
    Potato Salad
    Rice and Vegetable Salad
    Apple Salad
    Vegetable Salad


Desserts

    Blanc Mange
    Chocolate Blanc Mange
    Irish Moss Blanc Mange
    Chocolate Irish Moss Blanc Mange
    Cornstarch Pudding
    Tapioca Pudding
    Apple Tapioca
    Apple Sago
    Danish Pudding
    Chocolate Bread Pudding
    Baked Apple Dumpling
    Scalloped Apple
    Apple Dumpling
    Brown Betty
    Apple Charlotte
    Apples on a Bed of Rice
    Apple Indian
    Indian Pudding Steamed
    Indian Rice Pudding
    Indian Tapioca
    Rice Pudding
    Sour Milk Gingerbread
    Hot Water Gingerbread



BIBLIOGRAPHY


  =A. B. Z. of our own Nutrition=                HORACE FLETCHER
  =A Cook Book for Nurses=                       SARAH C. HILL
  =Bacteria Yeasts and Molds in the Home=        H. W. CONN
  =Boston Cook Book=                             MARY J. LINCOLN
  =Boston Cooking School Cook Book=              FANNIE M. FARMER
  =Canning and Preserving=                       S. T. RORER
  =Century Cook Book=                            MARY RONALD
  =Cereals in America=                           T. F. HUNT
  =Chemistry of Cookery=                         MATTIEU WILLIAMS
  =Chemistry and Economy of Food=                ATWATER
  =Cost of Food=                                 RICHARDS
  =Cost of Living=                               RICHARDS
  =Dainty Breakfasts=                            PHYLLIS BROWNE
  =Dietetic Value of Bread=                      GOODFELLOW
  =Elements of the Theory and Practice of
      Cookery=                                   WILLIAMS & FISHER
  =Fish as Food=                                 U. S. DEPARTMENT OF
                                                     AGRICULTURE
  =Food and its Functions=                       JAMES KNIGHT
  =Foods and their Adulterations=                WILEY
  =Food and the Principles of Dietetics=         R. HUTCHISON
  =Food Products of the World=                   MARY E. GREEN, M.D.
  =Handbook of Invalid Cooking=                  MARY A. BOLAND
  =Home Science Cook Book=                       ANNA BARROWS AND MARY
                                                     J. LINCOLN
  =Hostess of To-day=                            L. H. LARNED
  =How to Cook for the Sick and Convalescent=    H. V. SACHSE
  =I Go A-marketing=                             “HENRIETTA”
  =Luncheons=                                    MARY RONALD
  =Made Over Dishes=                             MRS. RORER
  =Marion Harland’s Complete Cook Book=          MARION HARLAND
  =Practical Cooking and Serving=                JANET MCK. HILL
  =Salads, Sandwiches, and Chafing Dish
      Dainties=                                  JANET MCK. HILL
  =Vegetarian Cookery=                           A. G. PAYNE
  =Young Housekeeper=                            MARIA PARLOA



GLOSSARY


=Anchovy=—A fish caught in the Mediterranean.

=Anchovy Essence=—Consists of pounded anchovies cooked with water,
vinegar, spices, and mushrooms.

=Angelica=—A plant, the stalks of which are preserved, used for
decorating.

=Appetizers=—Cold hors d’œuvres, side dishes, served preliminary to the
dinner, supposed to create an appetite for something more substantial.

=Aspic=—Savory jelly.

=Au=, =Aux=—To or with.

=Baba Cakes=—Sweet Cakes raised with yeast.

=Bain-marie=—A double boiler.

=Bisque=—A paste or purée.

=Blanch=—To scald.

=Bombe=—Ices in a mold, an outside coating of one kind, a filling of
another.

=Bouchée=—Mouthful.

=Bouillon=—Beef broth.

=Brioche=—A bread made rich with eggs.

=Brochette=—A skewer.

=Canapé=—Pieces of toast or bread, spread with some mixture.

=Caviare=—Salted and smoked sturgeon roe.

=Curaçoa=—A cordial.

=Cutlets=—Steaks of veal, lamb, mutton, or pork.

=Entrée=—A made dish served as a course or between courses.

=Foie-gras=—Fat liver; especially the liver of fat geese.

=Fondue=—Cheese and eggs cooked together.

=Fondant=—Cooked and beaten sugar, ready to flavor and mold for centers
of bonbons.

=Française=—In French style.

=Frappé=—Half frozen.

=Fricassee=—Originally meat fried and served with a sauce.

=Gherkins=—Small cucumbers.

=Giblets=—The neck, liver, gizzard, and heart of poultry or game.

=Glacé=—Glossed over.

=Hors d’œuvres=—Side dishes.

=Italienne=—In Italian style.

=Jardinière=—Mixed vegetables.

=Koumiss=—Fermented milk.

=Macedoine=—A mixture of several fruits or vegetables.

=Marinade=—A pickle composed of vinegar, oil, salt, and pepper.

=To Marinate=—To pickle in a French Dressing.

=Marrons=—Chestnuts.

=Mayonnaise=—Salad sauce.

=Meringue=—Mixture of sugar and white of egg beaten together.

=Mignon=—Small.

=Mousse=—Moss, froth, something light and spongy.

=Mulligatawny=—Curry soup.

=Noir=—Black.

=Papillote=—Paper.

=Parfait=—Perfect.

=Pâté=—Paste.

=Pilaf=—Turkish dish of rice and tomatoes.

=Potage=—Soup.

=Printanière (à la)=—With young spring vegetables.

=Purée=—Ingredients rubbed through a sieve.

=Ragoût=—A highly seasoned fish or meat dish.

=Rissoles=—Something crisp.

=Riz=—Rice.

=Roux=—Butter and flour mixed and used for thickening.

=Sabayon=—A custard flavored with wine.

=Salamander=—An iron, similar to a large poker, used for browning
surfaces, which cannot be placed in the oven.

=Salmi=—A rich stew, generally of game.

=Scones=—Scotch name for baking powder biscuit.

=Sippett=—Small cubes of fried bread.

=Sorbet=—Frozen punch.

=Soufflé=—A puff, something light and fluffy.

=Syllabub=—Old English name for whipped and flavored cream.



INDEX



[Illustration:

_Registered._

“NAME ON EVERY PIECE”

LOWNEY’S

CHOCOLATE BONBONS]


Are known and sold almost everywhere. The reason they have the largest
sales in the world is that they are superfine goods at reasonable
prices. They are made of Mother Nature’s own fruits and saps and
nuts—_pure_.

Owing to their purity you can eat them freely and still be happy. They
are safe for children.

The dinner table is not complete without a dish of bonbons to decorate
it, and to enjoy at dessert.

    LOWNEY’S BONBONS ARE UNIFORM, DELICIOUS, PURE



INDEX


    Accessories for Soup, 42.

    Alabama Salad, 364.

    Albuminized Milk, 353.

    Almond, Cake, 270.
      Cookies, 273.
      Sticks, 255.

    Almonds, 315.
      Deviled, 341.
      Salted, 340.

    Anchovy Canapés, 37.
      Sandwiches, 197.

    Angel Cake, 269.

    Angelettes, Chocolate, 277.

    Apple, Batter Pudding, 232.
      Charlotte, 232.
      Compote with Rice, 383.
      Dumpling, 231.
      Dumpling, Baked, 229.
      Flame, 230.
      Flamingo, 230.
      Fritters, 179.
      Ginger, 329.
      Indian Pudding, 233.
      Jelly, 326.
      Marmalade, 329.
      Meringue, 214.
      Nests, 231.
      Pie, 249.
      Rice Pudding, 223.
      Sago, 213.
      Sauce, 241.
      Scalloped, 231.
      Soufflé, 230.
      Sponge, 229.
      Tapioca, 213.
      Tarts, 256.
      Water, 349.

    Apples, 313.
      and Pineapples, Canned, 319.
      Baked, 229.
      Canned, 318.
      on a Bed of Rice, 232.
      Preserved, 322.
      Stewed, 223.

    Apricot, Marmalade, 330.
      Sauce, 240.
      Tapioca, 381.

    Apricots, Preserved, 324.

    Arrowroot, Blanc Mange, 359.
      Custard, 209.

    Artichoke Soup, 47.

    Artichokes, Globe, 104.
      Jerusalem, 104.
      Maryland, 364.
      Scalloped Globe, 104.
      with Hollandaise Sauce, 154.

    Asparagus, 104.
      in Croustades, 154.
      Soup, 47.

    Aspic, Jelly, 134.
      Jelly, Quick, 135.
      of Pâté de Foie Gras, 142.


    Bacon, and Chicken Livers, 341.
      and Mushrooms, 341.
      Broiled, 95.
      Canapés, 38.
      Cooked in the oven, 95.
      Omelet, 121.

    Baking Powder Biscuit, 171.

    Baltimore, Cookies, 367.
      Cup, 368.
      Filling, 366.

    Banana, Custard, 209.
      Fried in Crumbs, 155.
      Fritters, 179.
      Ice Cream, 296.
      Sauce, 241.

    Bananas, 313.
      Deviled, 341.
      Sautéd, 347.

    Banbury, Squares, 256.
      Tarts, 255.

    Bangor Brownies, 273.

    Barberry Jelly, 328.

    Barley, Gruel, 353.
      Water, 349.

    Batter, for Fruit Fritters, 157, 178.
      Peach, 233.

    Beans, Agricultural, 104.
      Baked, 372.
      Canned, 321.
      Kidney, 104.
      Lima, 104.
      Shelled, 104.
      String, 105.

    Bean Soup, 47.

    Beef, 19-23, 82.
      Balls, Scraped, 357.
      Boiled, 82.
      Braised, 83.
      Corned, 84.
      Deviled, 341.
      Essence, 357.
      Fillet of, 83.
      Fillet of, Broiled, 84.
      Fillet of, Sautéd, 84.
      Fillets of, Broiled, with Oysters, 84.
      Frizzled, 342.
      Juice, 356.
      Mignons of, Deviled, 145.
      Ragoût, 86.
      Roast, 85.
      Raw, Sandwiches, 356.
      Steak, Broiled, 87.
      Steak, Smothered in Onions, 87.
      Spiced, 86.
      Stewed, 86.
      Tea, 357.
      Tea, Frozen, 357.
      to Scrape, 356.
      with Currant Jelly Sauce, 342.

    Beets, 105.

    Beet Tops, 106.

    Berries, 313.

    Berry Muffins, 172.

    Beverages, 306.

    Birds, Boning, 11.

    Biscuit, Baking Powder, 171.
      Drop, 172.
      Fruit, 172.
      Glacé, 303.
      Tortoni, 303.

    Bisque, Clam, 59, 60.
      Crab, 361.
      Lobster, 59.
      Oyster, 60.
      Oyster, à la Reine, 60.
      of Shrimps, Bretonne, 60.

    Blackberries, Canned, 319.
      Preserved, 322.

    Blackberry, Dumpling, 235.
      Jam, 331.
      Jelly, 327.
      Pie, 250.
      Shortcake, 176.

    Black Currant Jam, 332.

    Blanc Mange, Arrowroot, 359.
      Chocolate, 203.
      Chocolate Irish Moss, 212.
      Coffee Irish Moss, 212.
      Irish Moss, 211.

    Blueberries, Canned, 319.

    Blueberry, Pie, 250.
      Pudding, Steamed, 235.
      Puffs, 236.

    Bluefish, Baked, 71.

    Bombe Glacé, Raspberry, 304.
      Strawberry, 304.

    Bouchées, 254.
      à la Macedoine, 152.

    Bouillon, 61.

    Braids, 169.

    Brains, Breaded, 149.
      Scalloped, 148.

    Brandy Cocoa, 307.

    Brazilian Nuts, 315.

    Bread and Butter Sandwich, 356.

    Bread, Brown, 167.
      Date, 166.
      Entire Wheat, 165.
      Filbert, 166.
      Five Hour, 171.
      Gluten, 166.
      Graham, 165.
      Griddle Cakes, 176.
      Hard Ginger, 279.
      Milk, 164.
      Milk and Water, 165.
      New England Fried, 178.
      Pudding, 234.
      Pudding, Buttered, 235.
      Pulled, 171, 356.
      Raised Brown, 167.
      Rye, 166.
      Salt Rising, 165.
      Squash, 171.
      Sticks, 169.
      Sweet Milk Brown, 167.
      Toast Brown, 356.
      Virginia Spoon, 361.
      Walnut, 166.
      Water, 165.

    Breakfast Cocoa, 308.

    Bride’s Cake, 270.

    Brioche, 168.

    Broth, Chicken, 358.
      Clam, 358.
      Mutton, 357.

    Brown Betty, 231.

    Brown Bread, Ice Cream, 296.
      Toast, 356.

    Brownies, Bangor, 261.
      Lowney’s, 278.

    Brown Soup Stock, 61.

    Brown Sugar Frosting, 287.

    Brussels Sprouts, 105.

    Buckwheat Cakes, 177.

    Buns, 167.

    Burnt Almond Ice Cream, 297.

    Butter, Cake, Simple, 263.
      Clarifying Melted, 12.
      Creaming, 14.

    Buttercups, 316.

    Butter Scotch, 315.
      Taffy, 315.


    Cabbage, 103, 105.
      and Celery, Pickled, 335.
      German, 373.
      Pickled, 335.
      Soup, 48.
      Sprouts, Young, 106.

    Café, Frappé, 305.
      Parfait, 302.

    Cake, Almond, 270.
      Angel, 269.
      Bride’s, 270.
      Chocolate, 260, 270.
      Chocolate Marshmallow, 267.
      Chocolate Pound, 261.
      Chocolate Raisin, 261.
      Chocolate Sponge, 262.
      Cocoa, 262.
      Cold Water Sponge, 268.
      Cream Sponge, 269.
      Currant, 263.
      Dutch Apple, 173.
      Fig, 267.
      Fruit, 266.
      Gold, 264.
      Hoe, 360.
      Hot Water Sponge, 268.
      Imperial, 266.
      Lady Baltimore, 366.
      Layer, 263.
      Marble, 265.
      Marshmallow, 267.
      Mocha, 267.
      Nut, 264.
      Orange, 264.
      Plain Chocolate, 260.
      Plain Sponge, 267.
      Pound, 265.
      Raised Fruit, 266.
      Silver, 264.
      Simple Butter, 263.
      Simple Chocolate, 268.
      Spice, 264.
      Sunshine, 270.
      True Sponge, 269.
      Virginia Fruit, 366.
      Walnut Chocolate, 262.

    Cakes, Cheese, 156.
      Chocolate Nut, 263.
      Fish, Fresh, 374.
      Fish, Salt, 374.
      Flannel, 168.
      Orange, 367.

    Calf’s, Brains à la Béchamel, 346.
      Brains in Batter, 148.
      Foot Jelly, 358.
      Heart, Stuffed, 146.
      Liver, Fried, 144.

    Canapé, Peach, 347.
      Pineapple, 348.

    Canapés, 37.
      Anchovy, 37.
      Bacon, 38.
      Caviare, 37.
      Cheese, 37.
      Crab, 38.
      Ham, 38.
      Lobster, 38.
      Nut and Olive, 39.
      Salmon, 38.
      Sardine, 39.
      Tomato and Cucumber, 39.
      Tongue, 39.

    Candy, 315.
      Cocoanut, 316.
      Cream, 315.
      Maple Sugar, 316.
      Molasses, 316.

    Cantaloupe, Banana, 221.
      Sweet Pickled, 334.

    Cantaloupes, 314.

    Capon, Roast, 99.

    Caramel, Custard, Baked, 210, 211.
      Custard, Soft, 210.
      Filling, 288.
      Frosting, 284.
      Ice Cream, 297.
      Rice Pudding, 236.
      Sauce, 242.

    Caramelizing, 14.

    Carrot Fritters, 156.

    Carrots, 105.
      Sautéd, 105.
      with White Sauce, 105.

    Castañas, 315.

    Caudle, Oatmeal, 355.

    Cauliflower, 105.
      au gratin, 154.
      Fritters, 180.
      Scalloped, 105, 106.
      with White Sauce, 105, 106.

    Caviare Sandwiches, 197.

    Caviare, Canapés, 37.
      Sandwiches, 197.

    Celery, 106.
      au jus, 154.
      Fried, 106.
      Fritters, 180.
      Sandwiches, 198.
      Scalloped, 106.
      with White Sauce, 106.

    Cereals, Suggestions for Cooking, 115-117.

    Champagne Cup, 310.

    Chantilly Tarts, 257.

    Charlotte, Apple, 232.

    Charlotte Russe, Caramel, 222.
      Chocolate, 204.
      French, 222.
      Strawberry, 223.
      Vanilla, 222.

    Cheese, and Tomato Rarebit, 343.
      Balls, 43.
      Cakes, 157.
      Canapés, 37.
      Cottage, 380.
      Crackers, 42.
      Custard, 342.
      Dreams, 342.
      Omelet, 342.
      Rice with, 380.
      Rissoles, 151.
      Sandwiches, 198.
      Straws, 255.
      with Red Peppers, 343.

    Cherries, 313.
      Canned, 319.
      Preserved, 323.

    Cherry, Duff, 235.
      Jelly, 327.
      Sauce, 242.

    Chestnut, Cream, 214, 371.
      Mixture, 207.
      Soup, 50.
      Stuffing, 100.

    Chestnuts with Chocolate Cream, 207.

    Chicken, and Mushrooms à la Crême, 343.
      Baked, 152.
      Baltimore, 97.
      Boiled, 95.
      Braised, 95.
      Breasts in Aspic, 142.
      Broiled, 96.
      Broth, 358.
      Consommé, 63.
      Consommé with Custard, 64.
      Consommé with Macaroni, 64.
      Creole, 97.
      Croquettes, 140.
      Curried, 343.
      Forcemeat, 134.
      Fricassee, 97.
      Fried, 96.
      Fried in Batter, 97.
      Gumbo Soup, 65.
      in Aspic, 142.
      Livers in Fontage Cups, 137.
      Livers with Mushrooms, 341.
      Mousse, 135.
      Pâtés, 152.
      Pie, 98.
      Pie, Old-fashioned English, 98.
      Quenelles, 45.
      Rissoles, 150.
      Roast, 99.
      Roast, Boned, 98.
      Sandwiches, 198.
      Sautéd, 96.
      Soufflé, 135.
      Stock, 65.
      Stuffing for Peppers, 161.
      Stuffing for Roast, 99.
      Suprême, 153.
      Tamales, 363.
      Timbales, 135.
      with Hard Cooked Eggs, 344.

    Chili Sauce, 337.

    Chipped Pears, 329.

    Chocolate, 306.
      and Rice Pudding, 227.
      Angelettes, 277.
      Balls, 226.
      Bavarian Cream, 205.
      Blanc Mange, 203.
      Bread Pudding, 226.
      Cake, 260, 270.
      Cake, Plain, 260.
      Cake, Simple, 268.
      Cake, Walnut, 262.
      Charlotte Russe, 204.
      Condensed Milk, 307.
      Cookies, 277.
      Cream, 207.
      Cream Custard, 205.
      Cream Mixture, 207.
      Cream Pie, 252.
      Cream Sauce, 247.
      Dominoes, 276.
      Emergency, 306.
      Fig Ice Cream, 294.
      Filling, Rich, 287.
      Filling, Simple, 288.
      for Fifty People, 307.
      French, 306.
      Frosting, 283.
      Frosting, Rich, 282.
      Frozen, 298.
      Hermits, Lowney’s, 275.
      Ice Cream, 295, 296.
      Jumbles, 275.
      Junket, 208, 369.
      Junket Ice Cream, 295.
      Macaroons, 277.
      Marshmallow Cake, 267.
      Mixture, 201.
      Mold, 204.
      Mousse, 298, 301.
      Nut Cake, 263.
      Nut Pudding, 227.
      Nut Pudding, Steamed, 215.
      Philadelphia Ice Cream, 295.
      Plain, 306.
      Pound Cake, 261.
      Pudding, Imperial, 223.
      Pudding, Steamed, 228.
      Raisin Cake, 261.
      Raisin Pudding, 214.
      Raspberry Meringue, 208.
      Sandwich, 201, 202.
      Sauce, 207.
      Soufflé, Baked, 225.
      Soufflé, Frozen, 299.
      Sponge Cake, 262.
      Swedish Meringues, 276.
      Trifle, 205.
      Wafers, 274.
      Walnut Wafers, 275.

    Chop Suey, 153.

    Chops, Baked, Soubise, 92.
      Broiled French, 93.
      Broiled Loin, 93.
      Lamb, Breaded, 91.
      Lamb or Mutton, 92.
      Lamb, stuffed, 92.
      Lamb, with Soubise Sauce, 92.
      Pan-broiled, 93.
      Pork, Baked, 94.
      Pork, Broiled, 94.
      Pork, Sautéd, 94.
      Veal, 90.
      Venison, 102.

    Chow Chow, 336.
      Louisiana, 365.

    Chowder, Clam, 57.
      Corn, 56.
      Crab, 58.
      Fish, 57.
      Lobster, 58.
      New England, 57.
      Oyster and Clam, 361.
      Potato, 56.
      Salt Cod Fish, 58.
      Shrimp, 58.

    Christmas Plum Pudding, 239.

    Chutney, 338.

    Cider Cup, 310.

    Cinnamon Water, 350.

    Citron, Pie, 251.
      Preserved, 323.

    Clam, Bisque, 59, 60.
      Broth, 358.
      Chowder, 57.
      Cocktail, 40.
      Fritters, 78.

    Clams, on the Half Shell, 40.
      Steamed, 77.

    Claret, Cup, 310.
      Sauce, 242.

    Club Sandwiches, 199.

    Cocktail, Clam, 40.
      Lobster, 40.
      Oyster, 40.

    Cocoa, 307, 308.
      Almond Cream, 206.
      Brandy, 307.
      Breakfast, 308.
      Cake, 262.
      Cocoanut Cookies, 278.
      Cocoanut Cream, 299.
      Cream, 206.
      for Fifty People, 307.
      Frappé, 295.
      Frosting, 282.
      Froth, 208.
      Fruit Pudding, 228.
      Ice Cream, 298.
      Macaroon Ice Cream, 299.
      Macaroons, 367.
      Nougat Filling, 288.
      Tutti-frutti Cream, 206.
      Nut Ice Cream, 297.

    Cocoanut, Candy, 316.
      Cornstarch Mold, 212.
      Custard, 383.
      Filling, 289.
      Frosting, 285.
      Molds with Chocolate Sauce, 207.
      Pie, 251.

    Cod Fish, Omelet, 375.
      Salt, Chowder, 58.

    Coffee, After Dinner, 310.
      Black, 310.
      Boiled, 309.
      Custard, 210.
      Filling, 289.
      French, 309.
      Frosting, 284.
      Ice Cream, 297.
      Iced, 309.
      Mousse, 301.
      Sauce, 242.

    College Pudding, 233.

    Compote, Apple with Rice, 383.
      of Figs, 224.

    Consommé, 62.
      à l’Italienne, 63.
      au Riz, 63.
      Chicken, 63.
      Chicken, with Custard, 64.
      Chicken, with Macaroni, 64.
      Claret, 62.
      Swiss, 63.
      Vegetable, 62.
      with Barley, 62.
      with Eggs, 62.

    Cookies, Almond, 273.
      Baltimore, 367.
      Chocolate, 277.
      Cocoa Cocoanut, 278.
      Maryland, 367.
      Nut, 273.
      Sand, 272.
      Soft Sugar, 272.
      Sugar, 272.

    Cordial, Egg, 352.
    Orange Egg, 352.

    Corn, 106.
      Cake, Spider, 174.
      Canned, 321.
      Chowder, 56.
      Fritters, 179.
      Muffins, 173.
      Oysters, 157.
      Soup, 50.

    Corn Meal, Gruel, 354.
      Mush, 117.
      Mush, Fried, 117.
      Mush, Sautéd, 117.
      Pone, 360.

    Cornstarch Mold, Cocoanut, 212.
      Fruit, 212.
      Pineapple, 212.
      Pudding, 212.

    Cornucopias, 276.

    Cottage, Cheese, 380.
      Pie, 380.
      Pudding, 238.
      Pudding, Steamed, 238.

    Cowslips, 106.

    Crab Apple Jelly, 326.

    Crab Apples, Preserved, 322.

    Crab, Bisque, 59, 361.
      Canapés, 38.
      Chowder, 58.
      Gumbo Soup, 66.

    Crabs, Creole Style, 364.
      Deviled, 80.
      Fried Soft-shelled, 81.
      in Fontage Cups, Creamed, 138.
      in Red Peppers, 80.

    Cracker Gruel, 354.

    Crackers, Browned, 42.
      Cheese, 42.

    Cranberry, Jelly, 327.
      Pie, 250.
      Puffs, 382.
      Sauce, 381.
      Tarts, 256.

    Cream, Almond Italian, 220.
      Banana Bavarian, 219.
      Bavarian, 218.
      Bavarian Ribbon, 220.
      Brandy Sauce, 241.
      Candy, 315.
      Caramel Italian, 220.
      Chestnut, 371.
      Chocolate, 207.
      Chocolate Bavarian, 219.
      Cocoa, 206.
      Cocoa Almond, 206.
      Cocoa Cocoanut, 299.
      Cocoa Tutti-frutti, 206.
      Coffee Bavarian, 218.
      Filling, 289.
      Frangipane, 255.
      Ginger Bavarian, 219.
      Georgia, 370.
      Italian, 219.
      Maple Italian, 220.
      Peach or Apricot, 219.
      Pie, 264.
      Pineapple Bavarian, 218.
      Puffs, 271.
      Raspberry Bavarian, 218.
      Rice Bavarian, 221.
      Sauce, 241.
      Sherry Sauce, 242.
      Strawberry Bavarian, 218.
      Toast, 356.

    Creamed Eggs, 344.

    Creamy Sauce, 241.

    Crême Frite, 146.

    Creoles, 273.

    Crescents, 169.

    Crisps, 42.
      à la Russe, 257.
      Lemon, 257.
      Orange, 257.

    Croquettes, 13.
      Chestnut, 155.
      Chicken, 140.
      Cream, 240.
      Finnan Haddie, 74.
      Fish, 140.
      Lobster, 139.
      Macaroni, 163.
      Meat, Rice, and Tomato, 139.
      Potato, 160.
      Rice, 161.
      Rice and Cheese, 162.
      Rice and Tomato, 161.
      Sauce for, 140.
      Shad Roe, 139.
      Surprise, 160.
      Sweetbread and Mushroom, 140.
      Sweet Rice, 162.
      Tomato, 162.
      Veal, 143.
      Vegetable, 373.

    Croustades, 150.
     Roll, 147.

    Croûtons, 42.

    Crown Roast, 91.

    Crullers, 279.

    Crumbing, 10.

    Cucumber, Jelly, 327.
      Ketchup, 339.
      Pickled, 335.
      Pickle, Sweet, 334.
      Sandwiches, 198.
      Soup, 50.

    Cucumbers, 106.
      Béchamel, 155.
      Boiled, 106.
      Fried, 106.
      in Aspic, 142.
      Scalloped, 155.

    Cumquat Fritters, 179.

    Cup, Baltimore, 368.
      Champagne, 310.
      Cider, 310.
      Claret, 310.

    Curaçoa Filling, 289.

    Currant, and Raspberry Jelly, 328.
      and Raspberry Preserve, 329.
      Cake, 263.
      Jelly, 327.
      Jelly Sauce, 126.
      Pie, 250.
      Punch, 311.
      Sauce, 242.
      Water, 350.

    Currants, 313.
      Canned, 319.
      Preserved, 329.
      Spiced, 332.

    Curried Chicken, 343.

    Curry of Game, 147.

    Custard, Arrowroot, 209.
      Banana, 209.
      Caramel, Baked, 210, 211.
      Cheese, 342.
      Chocolate Cream, 205.
      Cocoanut, 383.
      Coffee, 210.
      Fruit, 209.
      Mississippi, 369.
      Pie, 250.
      Rennet, 358.
      Sauce, 243.
      Sherry, Baked, 210.
      Soft, 209.
      Soft Caramel, 210.
      Strawberry, 209.
      Vanilla, Baked, 210.

    Cutlets, Veal, 89.

    Cutting and Folding, 14.


    Damson Jelly, 327.

    Dandelions, 103, 106.

    Danish Pudding, 214.

    Date, and Almond Filling, 280.
      Bread, 166.
      Filling, 289.
      Pie, 251.
      Pudding, 239.
      Whip, 221.

    Desserts, Cold, 203.
      Hot, 225.
      Frozen, 293.

    Devil’s Food, 261.

    Dinners, 25-30.

    Dominoes, 276.

    Doughnuts, 279.

    Dressing, Boiled, 183.
      Boiled Cream, 183.
      Boiled Salad, 183.
      Butter Salad, 182.
      Cream, 183.
      French, 182.
      Horse-radish Cream, 183, 184.
      Mayonnaise, 181, 182.
      Mayonnaise Cream, 182.

    Drops, Molasses, 279.
      Sponge, 272.

    Duchesse Pudding, 225.

    Duck, Roast Tame, 101.
      Wild, 101.

    Dumpling, Apple, 229.
      Blackberry, 235.
      Blueberry, Steamed, 235.
      Raspberry, 235.

    Dutch Apple Cake, 173.


    Éclairs, 271.

    Egg, and Crumbing, 10.
      and Lemon, 353.
      and Milk Punch, 352.
      Balls, 43.
      Cordial, 352.
      Muffins, 172.
      Sandwiches, 199.

    Eggnog, 352.

    Egg Plant, 107.
      Baked in Shell, 158.
      Fried, 107.

    Eggs, 118-123.
      and Tomatoes, Scrambled, 344.
      Baked, 118.
      Béchamel, 344.
      Creamed, 344.
      Fluffed, 119.
      Fried, 120.
      Goldenrod, 122.
      Hard Cooked, 118.
      in Aspic, 142.
      on Toast, Poached, 344.
      Poached, 119.
      Poached à la Française, 119.
      Poached in Tomato, 119.
      Scrambled, 120.
      Soft Cooked, 118.
      Stuffed, 122.

    English Pudding, 240.

    Entire Wheat, Bread, 165.
      Gruel, 353.
      Muffins, 173.

    Entrées, Vegetable, 154.

    Essence, Beef, 357.


    Farina Balls, 156.

    Fat, Clarifying, 11.

    Favorite Sandwiches, 199.

    Fig, Cake, 267.
      Filling, 289.
      Frosting, 286.
      Pudding, Steamed, 239.
      Sandwiches, 201, 356.

    Figs, 313.
      Compote of, 224.
      Stewed, 359.

    Filbert Bread, 166.

    Filberts, 315.

    Fillet, of Beef, 83.
      of Beef, Broiled, 84.
      of Beef, Broiled with Oysters, 84.
      of Beef, Sautéd, 84.
      of Flounder, Rolled, 141.
      of Halibut, Baked, 72.
      of Sole, Fried, 73.
      of Sweetbread, Baked, 148.

    Fillets, Fish, 69.
      of Fish, Deviled, 73.

    Filling, Baltimore, 366.
      Caramel, 288.
      Cocoa Nougat, 288.
      Cocoanut, 289.
      Coffee, 289.
      Cream, 289.
      Curaçoa, 289.
      Date, 289.
      Date and Almond, 290.
      Fig, 289.
      Fudge, 291.
      Lemon, 290.
      Maple, 290.
      Marshmallow, 290.
      Marshmallow Fudge, 291.
      Mince Pie, 241.
      Nougat, 290.
      Nut and Raisin, 291.
      Nut Fudge, 291.
      Orange, 291.
      Peach, 292.
      Pineapple, 292.
      Rich Chocolate, 287.
      Simple Chocolate, 288.
      Tutti-frutti Fudge, 291.

    Fingers, Lady, 271.

    Finnan Haddie, Baked, 73.
      Croquettes, 74.

    Fish and Oysters, Scalloped, 75.

    Fish, Baked, 71.
      Balls, 374.
      Boiled, 69.
      Boning, 11.
      Broiled, 70.
      Chowder, 57.
      Croquettes, 140.
      Fillets, 69.
      Fillets of, Deviled, 73.
      Forcemeat, 69.
      Fried, 70.
      Garnishings, 69.
      Pudding, 375.
      Quenelles, 45.
      Sautéd, 73.
      Steamed, 70.
      Stock, 69.
      Timbales, 136.

    Flame, Apple, 230.

    Flamingo, Apple, 230.

    Flannel Cakes, 178.

    Flaxseed Tea, 350.

    Floating Island, 211.
      Strawberry, 211.

    Flounder, Fillet of, Rolled, 141.

    Flour, Ball, 354.
      Gruel, 354.

    Food, Devil’s, 261.

    Fondant Frosting, 286.

    Fontage Cups, 139.
      Mock Terrapin in, 137.

    Frappé, Café, 305.
      Cocoa, 295.
      Grape, 305.
      Orange, 305.

    Freezing, Directions for, 293.

    French Chocolate, 306.
      Coffee, 309.
      Ice Cream, 296.

    Fresh Fish Cakes, 374.

    Fricassee, of Oysters and Mushrooms, 346.
      of Veal, 88.

    Fritter, Batter, 157, 178.
      Beans, 44.

    Fritters, Apple, 179.
      Banana, 179.
      Carrot, 156.
      Cauliflower, 180.
      Celery, 180.
      Corn, 179.
      Cumquat, 179.
      Orange, 179.
      Parsnip, 180.
      Peach, 179.
      Pear, 179.
      Salsify, 180.
      Shell, 180.
      Tomato, 180.

    Frogs’ legs, 149.
      à la Béchamel, 149.
      à l’Allemande, 149.

    Frosting, Boiled, 283.
      Brown Sugar, 287.
      Caramel, 284.
      Chocolate, 283.
      Cocoa, 282.
      Cocoanut, 285.
      Coffee, 284.
      Confectioner’s, 283, 284.
      Creasing, 14.
      Fig, 236.
      Fondant, 286.
      Fudge, 284.
      Fudge Nut, 284.
      Gelatine, 285.
      Maple, 295.
      Marshmallow, 285, 287.
      Marshmallow Nut, 285.
      Mocha, 287.
      Nougat, 286.
      Orange, 285.
      Ornamental, 286.
      Rich Chocolate, 282.
      Tutti-frutti, 285.
      Wine, 286.

    Froth, Cocoa, 208.

    Fruit, Beverages, 310.
      Biscuit, 172.
      Cake, 266.
      Cake, Raised, 266.
      Custard, 209.
      Mousses, 301.
      Punch, 311.
      Salad, Hot, 347.
      Sauce, 244.
      Snowballs, 236.

    Fruits and Nuts, 313.

    Fudge Filling, 291.
      Frosting, 284.
      Nut Frosting, 284.


    Game, 101.
      Curry of, 147.
      Salmi of, 146.

    Garnishings for Fish, 69.
      for Soup, 43.

    Gâteau, Peach, 216.

    Gelatine Frosting, 285.

    Georgia Cream, 370.

    German Cabbage, 373.

    Gingerbread, Hard, 279.
      Hot Water, 281.
      New York, 279.
      Rochester, 281.
      Sour Cream, 381.
      Sour Milk, 281.
      Superior, 281.

    Ginger Ice Cream, 297.
      Sandwiches, 200.
      Snaps, 282.

    Glacé, Soufflé, 303.
      Raspberry Bombe, 304.
      Strawberry Bombe, 304.

    Gluten Bread, 166.

    Gold Cake, 263.

    Golden Parfait, 301.

    Gooseberries, Canned, 320.
      Preserved, 322.
      Spiced, 333.

    Gooseberry, Tarts, 256.
      Trifle, 382.

    Goose, Roast Green, 100.

    Graham, Bread, 165.
      Griddle Cakes, 176.
      Muffins, 173.
      Plum Pudding, 239.

    Grape, Butter, 326.
      Frappé, 305.
      Jam, 328.
      Jelly, 328.
      Jelly, Wild, 328.
      Juice, 339.
      Sauce, 244.
      Water, 350.

    Grape Fruit, 313.
      Marmalade, 331.

    Grapes, 313.

    Green Grape Jam, 332.

    Greens, 106.

    Green Tomatoes, Preserved, 325.

    Green Turtle Soup, 67.

    Griddle Cakes, Bread, 176.
      Graham, 176.
      Hominy, 177.
      Rice, 177.
      Sour Milk, 176.
      Sweet Milk, 177.

    Gruel, Barley, 353.
      Corn Meal, 354.
      Cracker, 354.
      Entire Wheat, 353.
      Flour, 354.
      Oatmeal, 354.
      Rice, 355.

    Gumbo, 361.


    Haddock, Baked, 72.

    Halibut, Fillet of, Baked, 72.

    Ham, Boiled, 94.
      Broiled, 94.
      Sandwiches, 200.

    Hamburg Steak à la Tartare, 87.

    Ham Canapés, 38.

    Hare, Jugged, 362.

    Haricot of Ox Tails, 146.

    Hash, Corned Beef, 84.
      No. 2, 376.
      Vegetable, 376.

    Heart, Calf’s, Stuffed, 378.
      Stewed, 378.

    Hermits, 274.
      Lowney’s Chocolate, 275.

    Herring, Smoked, 375.

    Hoe Cake, 360.

    Hominy, and Corn Muffins, 174.
      Boiled, 116.
      Crescents, 156.
      Griddle Cakes, 177.

    Huckleberries, Canned, 320.
      Preserved, 309.


    Ice, Plain Water, 303.

    Ice Cream, Banana, 296.
      Brown Bread, 296.
      Burnt Almond, 297.
      Caramel, 297.
      Chocolate, 295, 296.
      Chocolate Fig, 294.
      Chocolate Junket, 295.
      Chocolate Philadelphia, 295.
      Cocoa, 298.
      Cocoa Macaroon, 299.
      Cocoa Nut, 297.
      Coffee, 297.
      French, 296.
      Ginger, 297.
      Macaroon, 297.
      Maple, 300.
      Nougat, 300.
      Orange, 300.
      Peach, 300.
      Philadelphia, 296.
      Pineapple, 300.
      Pistachio, 300.
      Plain, 299.
      Plum Pudding, 300.
      Strawberry, 300.
      Wine, 301.

    Imperial Cake, 266.

    Indian Pudding, Baked, 238.
      Steamed, 238.

    Indian Rice Pudding, 237.
      with Apples, 237.

    Indian Tapioca Pudding, 237.

    Irish Moss Lemonade, 351.

    Italian Sauce, 247.


    Jam, Blackberry, 331.
      Black Currant, 332.
      Green Grape, 332.
      Green Tomato, 332.
      Raspberry, 332.
      Red or White Currant, 332.
      Ripe Grape, 332.
      Strawberry, 332.

    Jelly, Apple, 326.
      Aspic, 134.
      Barberry, 328.
      Blackberry, 327.
      Calf’s Foot, 358.
      Cherry, 313.
      Crab Apple, 326.
      Cranberry, 327.
      Cucumber, 327.
      Currant, 327.
      Currant and Raspberry, 328.
      Damson, 327.
      Fruit, Macedoine, 217.
      Grape, 328.
      Grape Fruit, 215.
      Lemon, 214, 215.
      Mint, 328.
      Orange, 215.
      Prune, 217.
      Quick Aspic, 135.
      Quince, 329.
      Raspberry, 327.
      Roll, 265.
      Russian, 216.
      Sandwiches, 200.
      Sauterne, 216.
      Strawberry, 332.
      Tomato, 196.
      Wild Grape, 328.
      Wine, 215.

    Juice, Grape, 339.

    Jumbles, Chocolate, 275.

    Junket, 223.
      Chocolate, 208, 369.


    Kale, Boiled, 373.

    Ketchup, Cucumber, 339.
      Mushroom, 338.
      Tomato, 338.

    Kidney Bean Soup, 48.

    Kidney Omelet, 121.

    Kidneys, Broiled, 379.
      en Brochette, 145.
      Stewed on Toast, 377.
      with Oysters, 145.

    Kirsch Sauce, 245.

    Kohl Slaw, 105.

    Koumiss, 352.


    Lady Fingers, 271.

    Lady Baltimore Cake, 366.

    Lalla Rookh, 305.

    Lamb, Barbecued, 377.
      Breaded, 91.
      Creole Style, 363.
      Stew, 376.
      Stuffed, 92.
      with Soubise Sauce, 92.

    Lamb and Mutton, 23.

    Lamb or Mutton Chops, 92.

    Lamb, Rissoles, 151.
      Terrapin, 345.

    Larding, 12.

    Layer Cake, 263.

    Lemonade, 311, 350.
      Irish Moss, 351.

    Lemon Crisps, 257.
      Filling, 290.
      Pie, 251.
      Queens, 270.
      Sauce, 245.
      Sherbet, 304.
      Tarts, 256.
      Water Ice, 304.
      Whey, 353.

    Lentil, Cakes, Sautéd, 107.
      Purée, 56.

    Lentils, 107.
      Mashed, 107.

    Lettuce, Boiled, 106.
      Sandwiches, 202.

    Lima Beans, 104.

    Liver, Calf’s, Fried, 144.
      Loaf, 150, 378.

    Loaf, Nut, 379.

    Lobster, à la Newburg, 345.
      Bisque, 59.
      Broiled Live, 80.
      Canapés, 38.
      Chowder, 58.
      Creamed, 79, 344.
      Croquettes, 139.
      Curried, 81.
      Curried in Rice Timbales, 141.
      Deviled, 79.
      How to open a, 79.
      in Aspic, 142.
      in Fontage Cups, Creamed, 138.
      in Red Peppers, 81.
      Mousse, 136.
      Rissoles, 152.
      Salad Sandwiches, 199.
      Scalloped, 79.
      Suprême, 81.
      Timbales, 137.
      with Mushrooms, 345.
      with Pimolas, 345.

    Loin of Veal à la Jardinière, 89.

    Louisiana Chow Chow, 365.

    Lowney’s Brownies, 278.

    Luncheons, 30, 31.


    Macaroni, Baked, 108.
      Baked with Tomatoes, 108.
      Boiled, 108.
      Timbales, 156.
      with Sauce, 108.

    Macaroon Ice Cream, 297.

    Macaroons, 278.
      Chocolate, 277.
      Cocoa, 367.
      Flaked Rice, 373.

    Macedoine, Bavarian, 220.
      Chocolate and Fruit, 368.
      Fruit Jelly, 205.
      of Oranges, 215.

    Mackerel, Broiled, 70.
      Salt, 373.

    Maple, Cocoanut Pralines, 368.
      Filling, 280.
      Frosting, 285.
      Ice Cream, 300.
      Parfait, 302.
      Sauce, 232.
      Sugar Candy, 316.

    Maraschino Sauce, 233.

    Marble Cake, 265.

    Marmalade, Apple, 329.
      Apricot, 316.
      Grape Fruit, 331.
      Orange, 330.
      Orange and Rhubarb, 330.
      Peach, 331.
      Plum, 330.
      Prune, 330.
      Quince, 330.

    Marrow, Balls, 43.
      Bones, with Tenderloin Steak, 145.

    Marshmallow, Cake, 267.
      Filling, 290.
      Frosting, 285.
      Fudge Filling, 291.
      Nut Frosting, 285.

    Maryland Cookies, 367.

    Mayonnaise, Dressing, 181, 182.
      Cream Dressing, 182.

    Measures, Table of, 33.

    Meat, Boning, 11.
      Rice, and Tomato Croquettes, 139.

    Meats, 82.

    Melons, 314.

    Menu for a Formal Dinner, 29.

    Meringue, Chocolate Raspberry, 208.
      Mushroom, 278.

    Meringues, 280.
      Chocolate, 280.
      Chocolate Cocoanut, 280.
      Chocolate Swedish, 276.
      Cocoanut, 280.

    Milk, Albuminized, 353.
      and Water Bread, 165.
      Bread, 164.
      Punch, 311, 351.
      Toast, 355.

    Mince, Pie, 251.
      Filling, 253.

    Mint, Jelly, 328.
      Julep, 312.

    Mississippi Custard, 369.

    Mocha, Cake, 267.
      Frosting, 287.

    Mock Turtle Soup, 67.

    Molasses, Candy, 316.
      Drops, 279.

    Mold, Chocolate, 204.

    Molding, Directions for, 294.

    Mousse, Chicken, 135.
      Chocolate, 298, 301.
      Coffee, 301.
      Lobster, 136.
      Strawberry, 301.

    Mousses, Fruit, 301.

    Muffins, Berry, 172.
      Bran, 170.
      Corn, 173.
      Egg, 172.
      Entire Wheat, 173.
      Fried Rye, 175.
      Graham, 173.
      Hominy and Corn, 174.
      Oat, 175.
      Oatmeal, 170, 372.
      Raised, 170.
      Rice and Corn, 174.
      Rye, 173.

    Mulled Wine, 312.

    Mulligatawny Soup, 66.

    Mush, Corn Meal, 117.

    Mushroom, Ketchup, 338.
      Meringue, 278.
      Mixture, 92.
      Omelet, 121.
      Potpourri, 159.
      Rissoles, 151.
      Soup, 65.

    Mushrooms, Baked, 158.
      Broiled, 158.
      Deviled, 159.
      Scalloped, 159.
      with Oysters, 158.
      with Tomatoes, 159.

    Mustard Pickle, 336.

    Mutton, 16.
      Boiled, 90.
      Braised, 91.
      Broth, 357.
      Crown Roast, 91.
      Pot Roast, 379.
      Ragoût of, 91.
      Roast, 90.
      Saddle of, Roast, 91.
      Scalloped, 376.


    Nasturtium Sandwiches, 200.

    Nesselrode Pudding, 303.

    Nests, Apple, 231.

    New England Chowder, 57.

    New York Gingerbread, 279.

    Noodle Balls, 44.

    Noodles, 44.

    Nougat Filling, 290.
      Frosting, 286.
      Ice Cream, 300.

    Nut and Olive Canapés, 39.

    Nut and Raisin Filling, 291.

    Nut, Cake, 264.
      Cake, Chocolate, 263.
      Cookies, 273.
      Fudge Filling, 291.
      Loaf, 163, 379.
      Sandwiches, 201.
      Wafers, 274.


    Oatmeal Caudle, 355.
      Gruel, 354.
      Muffins, 170, 372.
      Old-fashioned, 115.
      Wafers, 359, 372.
      Water, 351.

    Oat Muffins, 175.

    Oats, Rolled, 115.

    Okra, 107.
      Scalloped, 107.
      Stewed, 107.

    Omelet, 120.
      Bacon, 121.
      Cheese, 121, 342.
      Codfish, 375.
      Creamed Salt Fish, 121.
      Creamy, 121.
      Foamy, 121.
      French, 122.
      German, 123.
      Kidney, 121.
      Mushroom, 121.
      Spanish, 123.

    Onion Soup, 51.

    Onions, 107.
      Baked, 107, 160.
      in White Sauce, 107.
      Scalloped, 107.
      Stuffed, 107.

    Orangeade, 311.

    Orange, and Rhubarb Marmalade, 330.
      Cake, 264.
      Cakes, 367.
      Chocolate Sauce, 247.
      Crisps, 257.
      Egg Cordial, 352.
      Filling, 291.
      Frappé, 305.
      Fritters, 179.
      Frosting, 285.
      Ice Cream, 300.
      Marmalade, 330.
      Pudding, 370.
      Roly Poly, 370.
      Salad, 195, 365.
      Sandwiches, 200.
      Sauce, 130, 245.
      Shortcake, 175.
      Soufflé, 234.
      Trifle, 216.
      Water Ice, 304.

    Oranges, 314.
      on a Bed of Rice, 232.

    Ox-tail Soup, 68.

    Ox Tails, Haricot of, 146.

    Oyster and Clam Chowder, 361.
      Bisque, 60.
      Bisque à la Reine, 60.
      Cocktail, 40.
      Crabs, 149.

    Oyster, Crabs with Poached Eggs, 149.
      Gumbo Soup, 66.
      Pâtés, 152.
      Rissoles, 151.
      Sandwiches, 202.
      Stew, 75.
      Stuffing, 72.

    Oyster Plant, see Salsify, 107.

    Oysters, and Celery, Creamed in Fontage Cups, 138.
      and Fish, Scalloped, 75.
      and Mushrooms, Fricassee of, 346.
      Broiled, 76.
      Celeried, 346.
      Fried, 77.
      in Aspic, 142.
      on the Half Shell, 40.
      Panned, 76.
      Sautéd, 76, 345.
      Scalloped, 75.
      Spindled, 76.
      Suprême, 77.


    Pancakes, German, 178.

    Parfait, Café, 302.
      Cocoa, 302.
      Golden, 302.
      Maple, 302.
      Silver, 301.

    Parker House Rolls, 168.

    Parsnip Fritters, 180.

    Parsnips, 107.
      Sautéd, 107.

    Partridge in Aspic, 142.

    Paste, Chopped, 248.
      Plain, 249.
      Puff, 249, 254.

    Pastry, 248.

    Pâté de Foie Gras, Mock, 150.

    Pâté Shells, 254.

    Pâtés, Chicken, 152.
      Oyster, 152.

    Peach, Batter Pudding, 233.
      Butter, 325.
      Canapé, 347.
      Duff, 235.
      Filling, 292.
      Fritters, 179.
      Gâteau, 216.
      Ice Cream, 300.
      Marmalade, 331.
      Pie, 252.
      Shortcake, 176.

    Peach, Tapioca, 381.
      Tarts, 256.

    Peaches, 314.
      Brandied, 325.
      Canned, 320.
      Preserved, 323.
      Spiced, 333.

    Peanut, Brittle, 317.
      Soup, 65.

    Peanuts, 314.

    Pear Fritters, 179.

    Pears, 314.
      Canned, 320.
      Chipped, 329.
      Preserved, 324.
      Sweet Pickled, 334.

    Pea Soup, 51.

    Peas, 103, 110.
      Canned, 321.

    Pecan Pralines, 368.

    Pecans, 301.

    Peppers, Stuffed, 108, 160.

    Pheasant in Aspic, 142.

    Philadelphia Ice Cream, 296.

    Piccalilli, 337.

    Pickle, Mustard, 336.
      Sweet Cucumber, 334.
      Sweet Tomato, 333.

    Pie, Apple, 249.
      Blackberry, 250.
      Blueberry, 250.
      Chicken, Old-fashioned English, 98.
      Chocolate Cream, 252.
      Citron, 251.
      Cocoanut, 251.
      Cottage, 380.
      Cranberry, 250.
      Cream, 264.
      Currant, 250.
      Custard, 250.
      Date, 251.
      Lemon, 251.
      Mince, 251.
      Peach, 252.
      Plum, 252.
      Prune, 252.
      Pumpkin, 252.
      Rhubarb, 253.
      Squash, 253.

    Pig, Roast Little, 93.

    Pigeon, Potted, 102.

    Pig’s Feet, Broiled, 144.

    Pilaf, Turkish, 162.

    Pineapple, Canapé, 348.
      Cornstarch Mold, 212.
      Filling, 292.
      Ice Cream, 300.
      Pudding, 224.
      Shortcake, 176.
      Sponge, 371.
      Tarts, 256.
      Water Ice, 304.

    Pineapples, 314.
      Canned, 320.
      Preserved, 324.

    Pistachio Ice Cream, 300.

    Plum, Marmalade, 330.
      Pie, 252.
      Pudding, Christmas, 239.
      Pudding Ice Cream, 300.

    Plums, 314.
      Brandied, 325.
      Canned, 320.
      Preserved, 324.

    Poaching, 14.

    Pone, Corn, 360.
      Sweet Potato, 364.

    Popovers, 174.

    Pork, 24, 93.
      Chops, Baked, 94.
      Chops, Broiled, 94.
      Chops, Sautéd, 94.
      Roast, 93.
      Salt, in Batter, 379.
      Sautéd, Salt, 379.

    Potato, à la Maître d’Hôtel, 113.
      Balls, 111.
      Balls, French, 113.
      Chips, 112.
      Chowder, 56.
      Croquettes, 160.
      Hashed Brown, 112.
      Puff, 112.
      Soup, 53.
      Stuffing, 100.

    Potatoes, Baked, 113.
      Boiled, 110.
      Browned Sweet, 113.
      Creamed, 111.
      Franconia, 113.
      French Fried, 112.
      Hashed Brown, 112.
      Italian, 113.
      Lyonnaise, 111.
      Mashed, 110.
      Scalloped, 111.

    Potatoes, Southern Sweet, 114.
      Stewed, 111.
      Stuffed, 112.

    Pot Roast, 86, 380.
      Mutton, 379.

    Poultry, 17, 95.

    Pound Cake, 265.

    Pralines, Maple Cocoanut, 368.
      Pecan, 368.

    Preserve, Currant and Raspberry, 329.
      Tutti-frutti, 326.

    Prune, Marmalade, 330.
      Pie, 252.
      Soufflé, 222.

    Prunes, Stewed, 359.

    Pudding, Apple Batter, 232.
      Apple Indian, 233.
      Apple Rice, 233.
      Baked Indian, 238.
      Bread, 234.
      Bread Queen, 234.
      Buttered Bread, 235.
      Caramel Rice, 236.
      Chocolate, 369.
      Chocolate and Rice, 227.
      Chocolate Bread, 226.
      Chocolate Nut, 227.
      Chocolate Nut, Steamed, 228.
      Chocolate Raisin, 226.
      Christmas Plum, 239.
      Cocoa Fruit, 228.
      Cocoanut, 235.
      College, 233.
      Corn, 163.
      Cornstarch, 212.
      Cottage, 238.
      Cracker Queen, 234.
      Danish, 214.
      Date, 239.
      Diplomatic, 221.
      Duchesse, 225.
      English, 240.
      Fish, 375.
      Fruit Cornstarch, 212.
      Graham Plum, 239.
      Imperial Chocolate, 223.
      Indian Rice, 237.
      Indian, Steamed, 238.
      Indian Tapioca, 237.
      Nesselrode, 303.
      Orange, 370.
      Peach, 225.
      Peach Batter, 233.
      Pineapple, 224.
      Quince, 225.
      Rhubarb, 383.
      Rhubarb and Raisin, 382.
      Rice, 237.
      Rice, Steamed, 236.
      Roly Poly, 239.
      Roly Poly Orange, 370.
      Roman, 224.
      Snow, 224.
      Sponge Cocoanut, 214.
      Steamed Chocolate, 228.
      Steamed Cottage, 238.
      Steamed Fig, 239.
      Tapioca, 213.
      Tapioca and Prunes, 382.
      Yorkshire, 85.

    Puffs, Blueberry, 236.
      Cranberry, 382.
      Cream, 271.
      Snow, 236.

    Pumpkin Pie, 252.

    Punch, Currant, 311.
      Egg and Milk, 352.
      Fruit, 311.
      Milk, 311, 351.
      Tea, 308.

    Purée, Black Bean, 55.


    Quail in Aspic, 142.

    Queen Pudding, Bread, 234.
      Cracker, 234.

    Queens, Lemon, 270.

    Quenelles, Chicken, 45.
      Fish, 45.

    Quince, Jelly, 329.
      Marmalade, 330.

    Quinces, 314.
      and Apples, Canned, 320.
      Canned, 320.
      Preserved, 324.


    Ragoût of Mutton, 91.

    Rarebit, Cheese and Tomato, 343.
      Welsh, 342.

    Raspberries, Canned, 321.
      Preserved, 308.
      Bombe Glacé, 304.
      Dumpling, 235.
      Jam, 332.
      Jelly, 327.
      Shortcake, 176.

    Red or White Currant Jam, 332.

    Red Pepper Relish, 339.

    Refrigerator, Caring for, 13.

    Rennet Custard, 358.

    Rhubarb Pie, 253.
      Wine, 339.

    Rice, and Corn Muffins, 174.
      and Tomato Croquettes, 161.
      Balls, 43.
      Boiled, 108, 116.
      Croquettes, 161.
      Croquettes, Sweet, 162.
      Griddle Cakes, 177.
      Gruel, 355.
      or Macaroni Stuffing for Peppers, 161.
      Pudding, 237.
      Pudding, Steamed, 236.
      Soup, 51.
      Steamed, 116.
      Timbale Cases, 141.
      with Cheese, 380.

    Rissoles, Cheese, 151.
      Chicken, 150.
      Lamb, 151.
      Lobster, 152.
      Mushroom, 151.
      Oyster, 151.
      Sardine, 151.
      Sweetbread, 151.
      Veal, 151.

    Roll, Jelly, 265.
      Sultana, 304.

    Rolled Oats, 115.

    Rolls, Parker House, 168.
      Swedish, 169.

    Roly Poly Pudding, 239.

    Roman Pudding, 224.

    Rum Sauce, 245.

    Rusk, 171.

    Russian Tea, 308.

    Rye Bread, 166.
      Muffins, 173.
      Muffins, Fried, 175.


    Sabayon Sauce, 246.

    Salad, Alabama, 364.
      Apple, 194.
      Aspic Jelly, 184.
      Beet, 184.
      Butter Bean, 184.
      Cabbage, 185.
      Cauliflower, 185.
      Celery, 185.
      Cheese, 185, 186.
      Cherry, 185.
      Chestnut, 186.
      Chicken, 186, 187.
      Chicory, 187.
      Chiffonade, 187.
      Crab, 188.
      Cucumber, 187.
      Egg, 188.
      Endive, 188.
      Escarole, 188.
      French Fruit, 193.
      Grape Fruit, 195.
      Hot Fruit, 347.
      Lettuce, 188, 189.
      Lima Bean, 184.
      Lobster, 189.
      Macedoine, 189.
      Martin, 193.
      Onion, 190.
      Orange, 195, 365.
      Pineapple, 195.
      Potato, 190.
      Rice and Vegetable, 190.
      Salmon, 191.
      Sardine, 190.
      Scallop, 191.
      Shad Roe, 191.
      Shrimp, 191.
      Southern, 365.
      Southern Potato, 365.
      Spinach, 191.
      Stuffed Tomato, 192.
      Sweetbread, 192.
      Sweetbread and Cucumber, 192.
      Sweet Fruit, 196.
      Sweet Grape Fruit, 195.
      Tomato and Nut, 193.
      Vegetable, 194.
      Vegetable Oyster or Salsify, 194.
      Waldorf, 194.

    Sally Lunn, 172.

    Salmi of Game, 146.

    Salmon Canapés, 38.
      Creamed in Rice Timbales, 141.
      Steamed, 70.

    Salsify, 103, 107.
      Fried, 107.
      Fritters, 180.
      Sautéd, 107.

    Salt Fish Cakes, 374.

    Salt Fish Soufflé, 375.

    Sand Cookies, 272.

    Sandwiches, 197.
      Anchovy, 197.
      Bread and Butter, 356.
      Caviare, 197.
      Celery, 198.
      Cheese, 198.
      Chicken, 198.
      Chocolate, 201, 202.
      Club, 199.
      Cucumber, 199.
      Egg, 199.
      Favorite, 199.
      Fig, 201, 356.
      Ginger, 200.
      Ham, 200.
      Jelly, 200.
      Lettuce, 202.
      Lobster Salad, 199.
      Nasturtium, 200.
      Nut, 201.
      Orange, 200.
      Oyster, 202.
      Raw Beef, 356.
      Sardine, 200.
      Shrimp, 202.
      Striped Bread, 201.
      Tomato and Horse-radish, 200.
      Water Cress, 202.

    Sardine, Canapés, 39.
      Rissoles, 151.
      Sandwiches, 200.

    Sauce, Allemande, 124.
      Apple, 241.
      Apricot, 240.
      Banana, 241.
      Béarnaise, 125.
      Béchamel, 124.
      Black Butter, 125.
      Bread, 125.
      Brown, 124.
      Browned Bread, 125.
      Brown Sugar, 246.
      Caper, 126.
      Caramel, 242.
      Celery, 126.
      Champagne, 126.
      Cherry, 242.
      Chestnut, 126.
      Chili, 337.
      Chocolate, 247.
      Chocolate Cream, 247.
      Claret, 242.
      Coffee, 242.
      Cranberry, 381.
      Cream, 241.
      Cream Brandy, 241.
      Cream Sherry, 242.
      Creamy, 241.
      Cucumber, 127.
      Currant, 242.
      Currant Jelly, 126, 243.
      Curry, 126.
      Custard, 243.
      Egg, 127.
      Espagnole, 127.
      Foamy, 243.
      for Croquettes, 140.
      Fruit, 244.
      Grape, 244.
      Hard, 244.
      Hollandaise, 127.
      Horse-radish, 128.
      Horse-radish, Hollandaise, 128.
      Italian, 247.
      Kirsch, 245.
      Lemon, 245.
      Lobster, 128.
      Lobster Hollandaise, 128.
      Madeira, 128.
      Maître d’Hôtel, 128.
      Maple, 245.
      Maraschino, 245.
      Milanaise, 129.
      Mint, 129.
      Mushroom, 129.
      Mustard, 129.
      Olive, 130.
      Onion, 130.
      Orange, 130, 245.
      Orange Chocolate, 247.
      Orange Hollandaise, 130.
      Oyster, 130.
      Pepper, 131.
      Piquante, 131.
      Port, 131.
      Poulette, 131.
      Ravigote, 131.
      Rum, 245.
      Sabayon, 246.
      Shrimp, 132.
      Sorrel, 132.
      Soubise, 92, 132.
      Spanish, 123.
      Stirling, 244.
      Strawberry, 246.
      Suprême, 132.
      Tartare, 132.
      Tomato, 132.
      Tomato Béarnaise, 125.
      Tomato Cream, 133.
      Trianon, 133.
      Vanilla, 246.
      Velouté, 133.
      Vinaigrette, 133.
      White, 124.
      Yellow Egg, 127.

    Sausages, 95.

    Scallops, Fried, 78.
      Fried in Batter, 78.
      Scalloped, 78.

    Shad, Planked, 74.
      Roe Croquettes, 139.

    Shell Fish, 75.

    Shell Fritters, 180.

    Shells, Pâté, 254.

    Sherbet, Lemon, 304.

    Sherry Custard, Baked, 210.

    Shortcake, 175.
      Blackberry, 176.
      Orange, 175.
      Peach, 176.
      Pineapple, 176.
      Raspberry, 176.
      Strawberry, 176.

    Shrimp, Chowder, 58.
      Cocktail, 40.
      in Aspic, 142.
      Sandwiches, 202.

    Shrimps, and Crabs, 80.
      and Tomatoes, 346.
      Bisque of, Bretonne, 60.
      in Fontage Cups, Creamed, 138.

    Silver, Cake, 264.
      Parfait, 301.

    Sirup, Sugar, 351.

    Smelts, Fried, 70.

    Snowballs, Fruit, 236.

    Snow, Pudding, 224.
      Puffs, 236.

    Sole, Fillets of, Fried, 73.

    Sorrel Soup, 52.

    Soufflé, Apple, 233.
      Baked Chocolate, 225.
      Chicken, 135.
      Frozen Chocolate, 299.
      Glacé, 303.
      Orange, 234.
      Salt Fish, 375.
      Vanilla, 234.

    Soup, Accessories, 42.
      Artichoke, 47.
      Asparagus, 47.
      Baked Bean, 48.
      Bean, 47.
      Black Bean Purée, 55.
      Cabbage, 48.
      Carrot, 49.
      Cauliflower, 49.
      Celery, 49.
      Chestnut, 50.
      Chicken Gumbo, 65.
      Chicken Okra, 362.
      Corn, 50.
      Crab Bisque, 361.
      Crab Gumbo, 66.
      Cream, 45.
      Cucumber, 50.
      Garnishings, 43.
      Green Turtle, 67.
      Gumbo, 361.
      Kidney Bean, 48.
      Lentil Purée, 56.
      Mock Turtle, 67.
      Mulligatawny, 66.
      Mushroom, 65.
      Onion, 51.
      Ox-tail, 68.
      Oyster Gumbo, 66.
      Pea, 51.
      Peanut, 65.
      Potato, 53.
      Rice, 51.
      Sorrel, 52.
      Spinach, 52.
      Split Pea, 55.
      Squash, 52.
      St. Germain, 61.
      Stock, 46.
      Stock, Brown, 61.
      Stock, White, 64.
      Terrapin, 67.
      Tomato, 53.
      Tomato Bisque, 53.
      Tomato Cream, 53.
      Tomato with Stock, 54.
      Turnip, 54.
      Vegetable, 55.
      Water Cress, 54.
      White, 65.

    Soups, 45.
      stock, 46.

    Southern Potato Salad, 365.

    Southern Salad, 365.

    Spice Cake, 267.

    Spiced Currants, 332.

    Spiced Gooseberries, 333.

    Spiced Peaches, 333.

    Spinach, 97, 100.
      Soup, 47.

    Sponge, Apple, 216.
      Cocoanut Pudding, 202.
      Drops, 272.
      Pineapple, 371.

    Sponge Cake, Cold Water, 268.
      Cream, 269.
      Hot Water, 268.
      Plain, 267.
      True, 269.

    Sprouts, Young Cabbage, 106.

    Squares, Banbury, 256.

    Squash, Baked, 109.
      Bread, 171.
      Pie, 253.
      Soup, 52.
      Stuffed, 363.
      Summer, 108.
      Winter, 109.

    Steak, Beef, Broiled, 87.
      Hamburg, à la Tartare, 87.
      Smothered in Onions, 87.
      Venison, 102.

    Sterilizing Jars, 318.

    Stew, Lamb, 106.
      Venison, 347.

    St. Germain Soup, 61.

    Sticks, Almond, 255.
      Bread, 169.

    Stirling Sauce, 244.

    Stock, Brown, 61.
      Chicken, 65.
      Fish, 69.
      White Soup, 64.

    Strawberries, 314.
      Canned, 321.
      Preserved, 322.

    Strawberry, Bombe Glacé, 304.
      Custard, 209.
      Ice Cream, 300.
      Jam, 332.
      Jelly, 327.
      Mousse, 301.
      Sauce, 246.
      Shortcake, 167.
      Whip, 222, 359.

    Straws, Cheese, 255.

    Stuffing, 101.
      Chestnut, 100.
      Chicken, 99.
      Chicken for Peppers, 161.
      Oyster, 100.
      Potato, 100.
      Rice or Macaroni for Peppers, 161.
      Tomato for Peppers, 151.

    Succotash, 106.

    Suet, trying out, 12.

    Sugar, Cookies, 272.
      Sauce, Brown, 246.
      Sirup, 351.

    Sultana Roll, 304.

    Summer Squash, 108.

    Sunshine Cake, 270.

    Surprise Croquettes, 160.

    Swedish, Meringues, Chocolate, 276.
      Rolls, 169.

    Sweetbread and Mushroom Croquettes, 140.
      Rissoles, 151.

    Sweetbreads, 13.
      and Chicken in Fontage Cups, 138.
      and Mushrooms in Fontage Cups, 137.
      Baked, 148.
      Braised, 148.
      Fillets of, Baked, 148.
      with Bacon, 346.

    Sweet Potato Pone, 364.

    Swiss, Chard, 106.
      Consommé, 63.

    Syllabub, 217.
      Strawberry, 217.


    Taffy, Butter, 315.

    Tamales, Chicken, 363.

    Tamarind Water, 351.

    Tapioca, Apricot, 381.
      Cream, 213.
      Peach, 381.
      Pudding, 213.

    Tartlets, Frangipane, 255.

    Tarts, 254.
      Apple, 256.
      Banbury, 255.
      Chantilly, 257.
      Cranberry, 256.
      Gooseberry, 256.
      Lemon, 256.
      Peach, 256.
      Pineapple, 256.

    Tea, 308.
      Beef, 357.
      Beef, Frozen, 357.
      Flaxseed, 350.
      Iced, 309.
      Punch, 308.
      Russian, 308.

    Terrapin, Lamb, 345.
      Mock, in Fontage Cups, 137.
      Soup, 67.
      Stewed, 362.

    Thimbleberries, Preserved, 322.

    Timbale Cases, 139.
      Rice, 141.

    Timbales, Chicken, 135.
      Fish, 136.
      Green Pea, 157.
      Imperial Fish, 136.
      Lobster, 137.
      Macaroni, 156.

    Toast, Brown Bread, 356.
      Buttered, 355.
      Cream, 356.
      Dry, 355.
      Milk, 355.
      Water, 355.

    Tomato, and Cucumber Canapés, 39.
      and Horse-radish Sandwiches, 200.
      Bisque Soup, 53.
      Croquettes, 162.
      Forcemeat, 134.
      Fritters, 180.
      Ketchup, 338.
      Pickle, Sweet, 333.
      Soup, 53.
      Stuffing for Peppers, 151.
      with Stock Soup, 54.

    Tomatoes, Broiled, 109.
      Buttered, 347.
      Canned, 321.
      Fried, 109.
      in Aspic, 142.
      Pickled, 335.
      Preserved Green, 325.
      Preserved Ripe, 325.
      Sautéd, 109.
      Scalloped, 109.
      Stewed, 114.
      Stuffed, 109.

    Tongue, Boiled, 144.
      Canapés, 39.
      in Aspic, 142.

    Tortoni Biscuit, 303.

    Trifle, Chocolate, 205.
      Gooseberry, 382.
      Orange, 216.

    Tripe, Broiled Honeycomb, 147.
      in Batter, 148.
      Lyonnaise, 147.
      Ragoût, 147.

    Trout, Sautéd, 73.

    Turkey, Boned, 101.
      English Roast, 101.
      Roast, 101.

    Turkish Pilaf, 162.

    Turnips, 103.
      in White Sauce, 110.

    Turnip Soup, 54.

    Tutti-frutti, Frosting, 282.
      Fudge Filling, 291.
      Preserve, 326.


    Vanilla, Custard, Baked, 210.
      Sauce, 246.
      Soufflé, 233, 234.

    Veal, 23, 88.
      Balls, 377.
      Braised, 90.
      Chops, 90.
      Croquettes, 143.
      Cutlets, 89.
      Fricassee, 88.
      Loaf, 143.
      Loin of, à la Jardinière, 89.
      Rissoles, 151.
      Roast, 88.
      Roll, 144.
      Scalloped, 143.
      Stuffed, Roast, 88.

    Vegetable, Consommé, 62.
      Croquettes, 373.
      Cubes, 44.
      Entrées, 154.
      Hash, 376.
      Soup, 55.

    Vegetables, 103.

    Venison, Chops, 102.
      Roast, 102.
      Steak,102.
      Stew, 347.
      with Currant Jelly, 347.

    Virginia Fruit Cake, 366.

    Virginia Spoon Bread, 361.

    Vol-au-vent, 253, 254.


    Wafers, 274.
      Chocolate, 274.
      Chocolate Walnut, 275.
      Nut, 274.
      Oatmeal, 359, 372.

    Waffles, 178.
      Virginia, 360.

    Walnut, Bread, 166.
      Chocolate Cake, 262.

    Walnuts, 315.
      Pickled, 337.

    Water, Apple, 349.
      Barley, 349.
      Bread, 165.
      Cinnamon, 350.
      Currant, 350.
      Distilled, 350.
      Grape, 350.
      Oatmeal, 351.
      Tamarind, 351.
      Toast, 351.

    Water Cress, Sandwiches, 202.
      Soup, 54.

    Water Ice, Lemon, 304.
      Orange, 304.
      Pineapple, 304.
      Plain, 303.

    Watermelon, 314.
      Sweet Pickled, 334.

    Weights, 33.

    Welsh Rarebit, 342.

    Wheat, Cracked, 116.

    Whey, Lemon, 353.
      Wine, 353.

    Whip, Strawberry, 222, 359.

    Whitebait, Fried, 74.

    White Soup Stock, 64.

    Wine, Frosting, 286.
      Ice Cream, 301.
      Mulled, 312.
      Rhubarb, 339.
      Whey, 353.

    Winter Squash, 109.


    Yeast, 164.

    Yorkshire Pudding, 85.


    Zweibach, 171.



READ THIS

HOW TO USE A COOK BOOK


=Read it thoroughly=, especially the introductions to chapters and the
whole of Part I, where the sections on Marketing, Methods of Cooking,
and Just How will be helpful to everybody and the other sections useful
for special purposes. It is important to know the difference between
frying and sautéing and between boiling and simmering; how to clarify
fat; how to egg and crumb, and many other things that are treated in
Part I and cannot be repeated in the receipts.

At the beginning of the chapter on Cereals, for instance, will be found
general directions for their preparation for which there is no room
in each receipt, and the same is true of the section on Pastry under
Desserts and the chapters on Meats, Fish, Vegetables, Sandwiches,
Frozen Desserts, etc.

Don’t confine your use of a cook book to merely consulting an
individual receipt as it is wanted.

=The Index= is a valuable part of the book and use of it should be made
always to save searching. Most receipts are entered there twice. For
instance, Green Turtle Soup will be found under “Soups” and also under
“Green” and Dutch Apple Cake will be found under “Cakes” and under
“Dutch.”

=The Glossary=, page 387, will give definitions of most of the French
words and technical terms used in the book.

=The Bibliography=, page 385, will furnish the names of thirty or more
books that will be useful to those who want a small library on culinary
science. Or any one of them can be ordered of the nearest bookseller
if the title and author’s name is furnished. Lowney’s Cook Book is the
only book on sale by The Walter M. Lowney Company.

=Follow the Receipts exactly.= Every rule in Lowney’s Cook Book has
been tried at least twice for this book in order to insure accuracy
of measurements. You will get the best results by using the materials
carefully measured just as prescribed in the receipts. The table of
weights and measures on page 33 will be helpful. The only possible
excuse for departing from the quantities called for is where you
suspect your materials to be of less strength than pure materials
should be.

The rules for length of time in cooking should also be carefully
observed.

Some kitchens do not contain all the condiments, etc., called for
in the book. We can only say that you will not be able to get such
delicious, satisfying results without them; but you may get fair
results, especially if you use good judgment and have cultivated your
skill in making dishes taste right. But nothing will take the place of
the spice bag in making soups or of proper seasoning in a host of other
dishes.



THE GROWTH AND PREPARATION OF COCOA


COCOA and chocolate are the roasted and ground product of the beans
of a delicate tropical tree, usually grown in the shade of larger and
hardier trees and known as “Theobroma Cacao.” This name was given to
it by the distinguished botanist, Linnæus, out of compliment to its
delicious flavor and nutritious qualities,—the word meaning “the food
of the gods.” The beans are obtained from large pods shaped somewhat
like cucumbers, which grow on the trunk and lower branches of this tree.

Cocoa has nothing whatever to do with the cocoanut, the fruit of
a variety of palm tree; nor with coca, a nerve tonic derived from
a variety of South American flax; nor with cocaine, a dangerous
anæsthetic.

Cocoa differs from chocolate only because a portion of the cocoa butter
has been pressed out of cocoa; whereas chocolate retains the full
amount of this remarkable vegetable fat, which is extremely nutritious
and has the quality of never becoming rancid. To the latter fact cocoa
butter owes its popularity as a cosmetic.

Chocolate had been known to the Aztecs and had been a favorite drink
with them—and especially with their king, Montezuma—long before the
conquest of Mexico by Cortez, who was the first to introduce it into
Europe.

The Spaniards, desiring to keep a good thing to themselves, were
very secretive about the new beverage and its preparation, and this
attitude accounts for the remarkable slowness with which it became
known to Northern Europe. Moreover, its price was almost prohibitive
in those days. It took two centuries for it to become really known in
London, and it is only in modern times that cultivation and improved
methods have brought it into general consumption at a low price. When
we consider its nutritive value as a food in addition to its delicious
flavor as a beverage, cocoa is the cheapest beverage there is.
Chocolate has several times the value of beef per pound and the same is
true in only a slightly less degree of cocoa; and cocoa has the added
advantage of being so very digestible that it is suited for the use of
children and invalids.

After the pods containing the beans are collected, they are cut open,
and the beans—some twenty-five or more to each pod—are scooped out,
together with a small amount of the pulp surrounding them and are very
slightly fermented in tanks or pits. This process of fermentation
largely determines the flavor and their selling value.

After being dried thoroughly in the sun they are packed in bags and
shipped to the northern markets. Some of the highest quality of beans
come from Venezuela, Trinidad and Ecuador, but they are cultivated also
in many of the West India islands, in tropical South America, the west
coast of Africa, Ceylon, Java, and even in some of the islands of the
Pacific.

The process of manufacture begins with roasting the beans to just the
right degree to produce the best flavor, after blending the different
varieties so as to insure a fullness and richness of taste. These two
processes are most important in determining the quality of cocoa. The
roasted beans are placed in a crusher and the shells are winnowed out,
leaving the nibs. The shells are either thrown away, as we treat them,
or are sold for a trifle to make a beverage which distantly resembles
cocoa at a great cost of fuel.

The nibs are ground in large mills and immediately turn to a heavy
liquid like molasses, owing to 50% of the beans being vegetable fat.
In making cocoa, this liquid is poured into hydraulic presses and a
considerable part of the cocoa butter pressed out. The dry cakes of
powder remaining are pulverized, bolted and packed in cans for sale.

To make chocolate, the liquid above mentioned is molded in pans without
abstraction of any cocoa butter and without the addition of any flavor
or sugar. These cakes are the “Premium Chocolate” used in cooking,
which used to be known as “Bitter Chocolate” because of its being
unsweetened.

Milk Chocolate and Vanilla Sweet Chocolate, for eating purposes,
are sweetened before being molded, and in the case of Lowney’s Milk
Chocolate, has the richest cream from our own blooded Jersey cows added
to it. The Vanilla Sweet Chocolate is sweetened and flavored with
vanilla beans of the best quality, which we buy and grind ourselves.

The growth of the consumption of cocoa in its powdered form of recent
years has been remarkable. It is superseding the old method of boiling
for hours the cracked cocoa nibs at a great cost of fuel and with far
less satisfactory results both as to flavor and as to the nutritive
qualities of the cocoa.

Cocoa and chocolate differ from tea and coffee because they hold in
solution one of the most nutritious foods known to man; whereas tea and
coffee are simply infusions, that is to say, hot water plus the flavor,
and have no nutritive value whatever except so far as they are mixed
with sugar and cream.

Moreover, besides being a food, cocoa and chocolate differ from tea and
coffee in giving the least possible stimulus, if any, to the nerves,
and consequently are followed by the slightest, if any, reaction.
Theobromin, the alkaloid which forms the essential flavor of cocoa and
chocolate, although very similar chemically to the alkaloids, thein and
caffeine, which are the natural flavoring elements of tea and coffee,
differs from them in not being an excitant to the nerves.

You should remember in using cocoa and chocolate as beverages that they
are strong foods and consequently just so much less other food should
be taken when cocoa is used rather than other beverages. Otherwise, a
case of overeating may ensue without your knowing what the matter is.

Many persons use hot beverages for two chief purposes: _first_, to
wash their food down and save themselves the trouble of thorough
mastication; and _second_, to get something hot into the stomach
and revive the nerves. Such persons should remember that cocoa and
chocolate are like soups in their nutritive value and not to be used
like water, tea, or coffee.

Cocoa or chocolate with bread would be a sufficiently nutritive diet
to prolong life indefinitely. In fact one woman in Martinique lived
on chocolate exclusively for many years. This was possible because
it contains all of the elements necessary to sustain human life.
Under these circumstances, we urge that cocoa and chocolate shall be
considered and treated as foods, as well as most delicious drinks.

For those who care for a scientific analysis of the cocoa bean, we will
add the approximate figures of one chemist:

    Water                                3%
    Protein                             15%
    Fat                                 50%
    Starch                              13%
    Other non-nitrogenous matter       11½%
    Woody fiber                          3%
    Ash                                  4%

Based on such analyses as these, food experts accord to chocolate and
cocoa a very high food value as producers of energy and heat. The
ratio of fat and protein is so fortunately balanced to the needs of
the human system that all experts agree on its being one of the most
nutritious of known foods, and it is on this fact that we base our
claim that it is cheap as a beverage, as well as most delicious. It
has a fine delicate flavor of the tropics of which one never tires and
is wholesome, strengthening, and harmless. It is especially suited to
children, for whom it should be the only hot beverage provided.



SIMPLE MENUS FOR ONE WEEK


SUNDAY

    BREAKFAST
    Grape Fruit
    Fish Balls
    Broiled Bacon
    Parker House Rolls
    Coffee or Cocoa

    SUPPER
    Lobster with Mushrooms
    Parker House Rolls
    Italian Cream
    Chocolate Walnut Cake, (see Plate IX)
    Tea or Cocoa

    DINNER
    Bouillon
    Crisp Crackers
    Roast Chicken
    Italian Potatoes
    Boiled Squash
    Cranberry Sauce
    Lettuce Salad
    Vanilla Ice Cream with Chocolate Sauce (see Plate XX)
    Black Coffee


MONDAY

    BREAKFAST
    Oranges
    Oatmeal
    Ham and Eggs
    Creamed Potatoes
    Rye Muffins
    Coffee or Cocoa

    LUNCHEON
    Cold Sliced Chicken
    Cheese Custard
    Bread and Butter
    Peach Preserve
    Cookies

    DINNER
    Corn Chowder
    Broiled Steak
    Horse-radish Cream Dressing
    Baked Potatoes
    Scalloped Tomatoes
    Celery Salad
    Brown Betty
    Coffee


TUESDAY

    BREAKFAST
    Bananas
    Cream of Wheat
    Broiled Halibut
    French Fried Potatoes
    Corn Cake
    Coffee or Cocoa

    LUNCHEON
    Pea Soup
    Omelet with Spanish Sauce
    Graham Bread
    Hot Chocolate with Whipped Cream
    Sponge Drops (see p. 272)

    DINNER
    Vegetable Soup
    Roast Lamb
    Roast White Potatoes
    Scalloped Onions
    Currant Jelly
    Apple Salad
    Squash Pie
    Coffee


WEDNESDAY

    BREAKFAST
    Stewed Prunes
    Wheatena
    Creamed Eggs
    Popovers
    Coffee or Cocoa

    LUNCHEON
    Vegetable Consommé
    Lamb Stew
    Creamed Potatoes
    Hot Biscuits
    Baked Vanilla Custard
    Chocolate Cookies

    DINNER
    Ox-tail Soup
    Roast Beef
    Fried Parsnips
    Franconia Sweet Potatoes
    Lettuce Salad
    Macedoine of Fruit (see p. 215)
    Lady Fingers
    Coffee


THURSDAY

    BREAKFAST
    Oranges
    Oatmeal
    Salt Fish Soufflé
    Baked Potatoes
    Raised Muffins
    Coffee or Cocoa

    LUNCHEON
    Black Bean Purée
    Cold Roast Beef
    Rice Croquettes
    Tapioca Pudding

    DINNER
    Rice Soup
    Roast Goose
    Apple Sauce
    Baked Macaroni
    Banana Fritters
    Potato Balls
    Lettuce Salad
    Orange Water Ice
    Angel Cake
    Coffee


FRIDAY

    BREAKFAST
    Grape Fruit
    Wheat Germ
    Broiled French Chops
    Lyonnaise Potatoes
    Egg Muffins
    Coffee or Cocoa

    LUNCHEON
    Scalloped Oysters
    Kohl Slaw
    Baking Powder Biscuits
    Apple Compote with Rice

    DINNER
    Tomato Bisque
    Boiled Halibut
    Egg Sauce
    Potatoes à la Maître d’Hôtel
    Peas
    Cheese Salad
    Chocolate Bread Pudding


SATURDAY

    BREAKFAST
    Bananas
    Shredded Wheat
    Fried Calf’s Liver
    Baked Sweet Potatoes Rolls
    Coffee or Cocoa

    LUNCHEON
    Split Pea Soup
    Croûtons
    Goose Salad
    (See receipt for Chicken Salad)
    Rolls
    Wine Jelly
    Sponge Drops

    DINNER
    Spinach Soup
    Breaded Lamb Chops with Tomato Sauce
    Mashed Potatoes
    Turnips in White Sauce
    Chocolate Bavarian Cream
    Coffee



[Illustration: LOWNEY’S MILK CHOCOLATE]


=Lowney’s Milk Chocolate= is a delicious confection and a most
nourishing food. It is made of pure chocolate, the finest cream from
our own herd of blooded Jersey cows, and pure vanilla, sweetened with
the best granulated sugar, powdered in our own factory.


IT IS GOOD FOR SCHOOL LUNCHES, PICNICS, AND AFTER MEALS



[Illustration: LOWNEY’S Vanilla Sweet CHOCOLATE]


=The Reason= this chocolate has a more refined flavor than others, is
owing to the quality of the cocoa beans and the costly vanilla beans
used. Price is a secondary consideration in buying the materials for
this eating chocolate. The main thing is to make it perfect. Each
of the materials is used as Mother Nature grew them. There is no
“treatment” nor adulteration of any kind whatever.

    THAT IS WHY THE LOWNEY PRODUCTS
    ARE SO DIGESTIBLE



[Illustration: LOWNEY’S SWEET COCOA POWDER]


=Lowney’s “Always Ready” Sweet Cocoa Powder= has a rich chocolate
flavor—especially when boiled five minutes—for drinking, and besides
makes the simplest and best icing for cake, by simply pouring hot water
over it. It is delicious as flavoring for ice cream.

    IF YOUR DEALER DOES NOT KEEP IT, ASK
    HIM TO GET IT FOR YOU



[Illustration: LOWNEY’S Premium Chocolate]


=Lowney’s Premium Chocolate= goes further than other cooking
chocolates, because it is absolutely pure, and is made of the choicest
and highest-priced cocoa beans, especially selected and blended. It is
what used to be called “bitter chocolate,” because it is unsweetened.
It is very economical to use in cooking, because every atom of it is
the choicest chocolate,—no adulteration in Lowney’s.


    INSIST ON HAVING LOWNEY’S PREMIUM CHOCOLATE

    THE DEALER CAN GET IT EASILY IF YOU INSIST



[Illustration: LOWNEY’S BREAKFAST COCOA]

LOWNEY’S COCOA

    REG. U. S. PAT. OFF.


Is made from the choicest cocoa beans—the highest priced—ground very
fine, with a part of the cocoa butter pressed out to make it more
digestible. Every atom of it is cocoa. It contains not one particle of
adulterant, substitute, coloring matter, or chemical.

Lowney’s Cocoa has a perfect natural flavor.

    COCOA SHOULD BE BOILED FROM THREE TO FIVE MINUTES,
    BUT THE MILK SHOULD NOT BE BOILED



KNOWLEDGE OF FOOD

is the foundation of housekeeping


Good food means health

Variety in food induces appetite and good digestion

Pure food should be insisted on. It goes further, nourishes more, and
saves doctors’ bills

You can eat freely of Lowney’s Chocolate Bonbons, because they are pure

Lowney’s Cocoa is _all cocoa_

The Lowney Products are all _wholesome_ as well as delicious

       *       *       *       *       *

Transcriber’s Notes:

Obvious punctuation errors repaired. Six blank pages one presumes for
recipes and notes of the book’s owner, were originally located after
page 422.

Page 21, “a là” changed to “à la” (beef à la mode)

Page 29, “Maitre” changed to “Maître” (Maître d’hôtel Butter)

Page 54, “hops” changed to “chops” (Cook chops in hissing)

Page 231, “cup” changed to “cups” (cups bread crumbs)

Page 310, “coffe” changed to “coffee” (1 cup coffee)

Page 311, Orangeade recipe, the amount of orange juice required was
missing its measurement. After consulting an earlier edition of this
cookbook, ⅔ was added before “orange juice” for this recipe.

Page 349, “tablespo” changed to “tablespoon” (tablespoon prepared
barley)

Page 390, “Bombé” changed to “Bombe” (Bombe Glacé, Raspberry)

Page 392, “Carrott” changed to “Carrot” (Carrot Fritters)

Page 399, “232” changed to “332” (Green Tomato, 332)

Page 416, “caffein” changed to “caffiene” (and caffeine, which)

Page 420, “d’Hotel” changed to “d’Hôtel” (la Maître d’Hôtel)





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