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Title: A Book of Simples
Author: Lewer, H. W.
Language: English
As this book started as an ASCII text book there are no pictures available.
Copyright Status: Not copyrighted in the United States. If you live elsewhere check the laws of your country before downloading this ebook. See comments about copyright issues at end of book.

*** Start of this Doctrine Publishing Corporation Digital Book "A Book of Simples" ***

This book is indexed by ISYS Web Indexing system to allow the reader find any word or number within the document.



Transcriber’s Notes:

Punctuation is highly variable and sometimes non-existent by modern
standards, in particular full stops are often followed by lower case
and commas by upper case. Spelling is also highly variable. Both remain
unchanged apart from the following self-evident errors.

In Simple:
50  ‘liquor’ was ‘liqour’
77  ‘warm’ them was ‘warn’ them
131 the ‘rest’ of the Sugar was the ‘re’ of the Sugar
190 take out your ‘oynions’ was ‘onyons’
327 ‘alabaster’ was ‘alablaster’
498 sickness or ‘surffit’ was sickness or ‘fursit’

Italics are represented thus _italic_.



                          A BOOK OF SIMPLES



[Illustration: REDUCED FACSIMILE OF A PAGE OF ORIGINAL MS.]



                               A BOOK OF
                                SIMPLES

                         [Illustration: Leaf]

               “_Delirious persons here a cure may find,
              To stem the phrensy and to calm the mind!_”

                       [Illustration: Colophon]

                           SECOND IMPRESSION

                                LONDON
                   SAMPSON LOW, MARSTON AND CO. LTD.
                      100, SOUTHWARK STREET, S.E.


                       [Illustration: Colophon]

              CHISWICK PRESS: CHARLES WHITTINGHAM AND CO.
                  TOOKS COURT, CHANCERY LANE, LONDON.



_INTRODUCTION_


_The original of this little book was found in the library of a
distinguished Essex antiquary: the document has unfortunately no
history, but from its appearance and comprehensive character it must
have been the still-room book of some manor house or homestead of
standing._

_The manuscript is a folio composed entirely of vellum, bound in
green, with a conventional design in gold: the binding of this book
is a reduced facsimile of the original. The writing is in the hand
of several persons: the spelling and absence of punctuation are
here reproduced in all their original quaintness. The book has been
submitted to experts, who are of opinion that it covers a period of
some fifty years, terminating about the middle of the eighteenth
century._

_The condition of many of the rural districts of England in the
eighteenth century and the almost impassable state of the roads are
brought home to us by a writer in “The Gentleman’s Magazine” (1757),
in the following description: “It took my horse up to the belly the
second step he took on the road, and had I not dismounted and clambered
up some bushes I had been lodged there for a season.” The isolation of
the country in those days is almost inconceivable; the difficulties
of travel were immense, and a survival of feudal legislation tied the
labourer to the soil. Thus we may look upon the manor or farmhouse,
with its retainers, as a detached social unit, and, in a sparsely
populated country, almost a state in itself._

_It is not difficult to form a picture of the lady of the house: amid
her other duties she dispensed doles and charity to the poor around
her. Through her knowledge of simples she was also “simpler” of all the
ills that flesh is heir to, not only in the case of man, but also of
beast. The wisdom and observation of a long procession of forebears are
summed up in the recipes gathered in this book._

    Herbs, too, she knew, and well of each could speak,
    That in her garden sip’d the silvery dew;
    Where no vain flower disclos’d a gaudy streak;
    But herbs for use, and physic, not a few,
    Of grey renown within those borders grew;
    The tufted basil, pun-provoking thyme,
    Fresh balm, and mary-gold of cheerful hue;
    The lowly gill, that never dares to climb;

           *       *       *       *       *

    And lavender, whose spikes of azure bloom
    Shall be ere-while in arid bundles bound
    To lurk amidst the labours of her loom,
    And crown her kerchiefs clean, with mickle rare perfume.

_In these days, when the good manager is scarce, it is perhaps
difficult to realize or appreciate that domestic œconomy was once
practised as a science, founded upon the older herbalists, housewives’
tales and oral tradition, the whole administered by rule of thumb. As
will be seen, the domestic pharmacopoeia had not yet emerged from the
seventeenth century. The astrological atmosphere of Culpepper, who
warns us that he “who would know the operation of the herbs must look
up to the stars astrologically,” and the writings of Parkinson, clearly
show the influence of that period. The predominance of the healing
properties of herbs is still more apparent in this book; there is not a
single remedy or simple in which their virtues are not set forth._

_In my lady’s garden, set within its red-brick walls, grew Camomile,
Basil, Cardons, Angelica, Sweet Chevril, Tansy, Saffron, Elecampane,
Hyssop, Thyme, Marjoram, Purslane, Sage, Rosemary, Rue, Pennyroyal,
Borage, Liquorice, Horehound and many other plants. With these herbs
were cultivated Gillyflower, Pansy, Pinks, Bergamot, Southernwood, Bay,
Roses, Jasmine, Lavender and divers sweet-scented plants for the making
of simples, perfumes, and “sweete waters.”_

_The housewife, before entering on her duties, must have served an
apprenticeship; doubtless it formed the serious business of her life.
How many women nowadays follow the example of their ancestors? The
easy access of the doctor, the facilities of communication, the quack
remedies obtained from the neighbouring chymist, have superseded the
old-fashioned simples._

_The old herb garden is a wilderness, and even the names of its
occupants have almost passed away. Perchance this little book may help
us to picture it at its prime, with all its old-world atmosphere, and
haunting memories of much that is still precious. It may also bring
back the sweet mingled scent of the herb garden, the “murmuring of
innumerable bees,” the shimmering of the sun on sheltered pleasaunce
and well-trimmed hedge of yew, creating an image delightful to recall._

_Although many herbals and culinary manuscripts and books date back
to a much earlier period, as may be seen in the bibliography, yet
they are now scarce and difficult to obtain. This particular example
is interesting because of the magic of its herb-lore and the added
charm of the making of conserves and perfumes and the preserving of
viands. Moreover, it has that personal touch wanting in so many books
of a similar nature. One may note the words at the end of some of the
simples, “Probatum,” or “Probatum est.” What a world of meaning and
satisfaction they imply!_

_I am indebted to Miss I. L. Gould and Miss B. M. Gould for the long
labour and perseverance they have bestowed in decyphering the faded
script, and to Mr. J. Manning Watts for his researches into the
virtues and properties formerly attributed to these herbs, and for his
investigation into the proper spelling of their names, which appear in
the manuscript according to the light of nature._

_It will be observed that the items in the Index are not always in
strict alphabetical order. This will not, however, seriously interfere
with reference to any recipe, and it has therefore been thought better
to retain them as originally compiled._

  _H. W. LEWER._

  _11th August, 1908._



A BOOK OF SIMPLES


1. _The Wood-street Cake._

Take a quarter of a peck of y^e finest flower, mingle into it a little
salt & some beaten Cloves Mace & Nutmegs, a pound and halfe of Currance
wash’d and dry’d, & a pound of Raisins of y^e Sun ston’d and shred,
then straine in about a pinte of Ale yeast, and put in y^e yolkes of
10 eggs beaten with Rose water, put in a pint of Cream with 3 quarters
of a pound of Butter melted in it. mingle all these well together, and
knead it, cover it with a clothe and let it stand about an hour before
y^e fire to rise, then mould it up and beat it out thinn in y^e edges
and thick in y^e middle, then prick it or cut it w^{th} a knife, and
set it in y^e oven, when it is almost bak’d take it out and ice it on
y^e top w^{th} Rose water & sugar and sett it in y^e oven againe ’till
’tis enough, putt some musk or Ambergreese dissolv’d in y^e Rose water.


2. _Pectorals for a Colde or Consumption._

Take one pound of brown Sugar Candy, one Ounce of Juice of Lycorisse,
dissolve y^e lycorisse in 3 spoonfulls of Hysop water, put to these a
drachm of Orrice a drachm of Enul-campane, halfe a drachm of Gum dragon
being all made into fine powder, muske a graine then take a drachm of
oyle of Anniseeds, worke it well together with your hand and make it up
into pectorals of what bigness you please, lay them on a dish to dry
before y^e fire or in an oven after drawn bread, and keep them dry.


3. _The Plague Water._

Take Rue, Agrimony, Celandine, Sage, Wormewood, Balme, Feaverfue,
Mugwort, Tormentil, Marygold flowers, Cowslip flowers, Pansie flowers
leaves and all, Carduus, Angelicoe, Dragons, Pimpernel, Rosemary,
Scordium, Purple wort, Burnet, Enul campane roots, of each of these
halfe a pound shred small, then take Anniseeds, Carraway, Coriander,
Cardamome, of each of these two ounces bruis’d, bruise alsoe your Enul
campane roots, then steep all these in an earthen pott in two quarts
of white wine and a gallon of y^e best Canary, mixing them well in
y^e liquor, so let it stand till y^e next day, then distill it in an
ordinary still close stop’d, still it as soon as you can keeping it
close stop’d whilst it steeps and whilst you still it, stirring it when
you put it into y^e still, soe keep it for your use.

Y^e Lady Downs adds wood Sorril a good quantity roots of Indian Sneake
weed 2 pound burdock roots 1 lb.


4. _A very excellent Receipt against Convulsions which cur’d one had 9
Fitts a Day._

Take Race oynions and black pepper of each a little quantity stamp’d
pretty small and lay it to y^e soals of y^e feet keep it on 7 houres,
whilst y^e party is in y^e fitt force them not to take any thing
inwardly but anoynt y^e wrists on y^e inside, y^e palmes of y^e hands,
y^e Temples and y^e nostrills (if it be a childe) with Methridate (if
not) with oyle or spirit of Amber, between y^e fitts let it drinke
black cherrey water sweetned with syrrop of Cloves & syrrop of Pyonies
for a weeks time after y^e fitts first and last let them ware a
necklace of single pyonie roots alwayes about theire neck, avoid giving
syrrop of Violets if you fear fitts, but syrrop of Roses and Succory is
good to be given together when costive this may be given to children
of any age.


5. _To make Ebulum Drinke._

Put one peck of Elder berries to the quantity of halfe a hogshead of
Ale 2 penny worth of Ginger sliced 2 nutmegs and a penny worth of
Cloves & mace bruise all your Spices boyle all together with the berrys
till they breake, then strain them through a Straining Sive and when
tis coole as your usuall wort put barm to it as to beer, there must
some hops be boyl’d in it. And when fitt to bottle, bottle it with a
lumpe of loave Sugar it will drink much y^e more Lively. it is good for
y^e Spleen or Dropsy.


6. _To make Vinegar._

Take Sower grapes pound them and press them through a hair bag as you
do Sider. & to every 4 Gallons put as much Allom as a walnut then boyle
it well and Scumme it as the Scumme riseth as clean as possible then
Coole it and when through coole put it into a vessel and when Stale use
of it and it will be very good vinegar.


7. _To make Goosbery or Currant Wine._

Take 2 Gallons of Spring water Set it over the fire boyle it a little
then put 4 pound of powder Sugar let it boyle and Scume it well take
it off and Strain it and when it is as coole as wort put 2 spoonfulls
of barm to it let it worke a little then to every gallon of water put
5 quarts of Goosberys or currants first hand pick’t and bruised put
it in a little barrell & stir it once a day & keep it close Stopt let
it stand 3 or 4 days and when you once begin to See it Sink Strain it
through a jelly bag and put it in the Cask being waished out with the
Same liquor Stop it up very close & when you think it may be fine draw
it off into bottles.


8. _To make Methegline._

Take 12 quarts of honey to 12 gallons and a pottle of water and a
fagott of these following herbs Sweet bryer Sweet marjerrom, rosemary
and muskecouise of each a small handfull and boyle them in the water
and honey all the time it boyles and that must be a full hour, keep
scumming of it clean, then take a bag of these following Spices
nutmegs, Cloves mace and cinament, a quarter of an ounce of each but
most of nutmegs tie them up in a bag with a bullet in it that may cause
it to Sink into the middle of your liquor as it boyles, and let it
boyle above a quarter of an hour, then take it off and take out the
herbs and Spices and Set Some a cooling, and when as coole as wort put
in about half a pint of Ale barm, and when coole enough and that it
hath got a good head tun it up as you do Ale, or other liquors, and
when it hath done workeing hang in again the Same bag of Spices you
took out into your barrell Stope it up till it be clear and then bottle
it up.


9. _A Plaister for ye Spleen to be made in May._

Take mellilot and cammomile of each 3 handfulls, passley and plantin
of each one handfull, and stamp them together, a pound of Sweet mutton
Sewet, 12 ounces of virgins wax, 3 pound of rozin, a pint of white
wine, Shred the wax and Sewet and beat the rozin put all together in
an earthen pot and let it stand over the fire till it be all melt’d
together, and then take it off and cover it close let it stand 1 day
in cellar then Sett it over the fire and let it boyle halfe an hour,
then take it off and strain it into 2 dishes puting some water into the
bottom of the dishes, and when tis cold you must fold it up close in
oyl’d paper it will keep four or five years. you must use this when
you feel the pain on the left Side, and cut a piece of Sheepskin the
breadth of your hand or more and about a quarter of a yard long and
make it hollow in ye middle of the uper Side as the Spleen lyes and
prick it full of holes on the fleshy side of y^e leather, Spread it
thin and Lay it to your left Side where you feel your pain and when it
will stick no longer you may make a fresh one if need require this use
allways when you feel your pain & you Shall never be troubled with the
Spleen & it will prevent many other diseases that may come by reason of
y^e Spleen.


10. _To make Aquamirabilis the Lady Atkinses way._

Take Cardimum, cubibs, mellilot flowers, gallingall nutmegs; ginger
mace and Cloves of each a dram all these must be bruised and infused
one night in 3 pints of white wine one pint of aquavite one pint of
the juice of salendine the next day distil them in a close Still
twill run a pottle keep the first quart by it Selfe you must put to
the whole three quarters of a pound of white Sugar candy beaten very
finely. Divide it between 2 glasses and let the mirabilis drop into the
Sugar candy and it will dissolve when you put all these things into
your close Still put in a little bag of Saffron put to y^e infusion a
handfull of y^e tops of rosemary flowers w^{ch} will give it a delicate
taste.


11. _To make Small Wine otherwise called Solerion. You may do Rasberry
this way._

Take 2 gallons of Spring water set it over the fire and let it boyle
well, take a pound of reasons of the Sun Slit them open but not Stone
them and take a pound of white Sugar and when the water is boyl’d put
the Sugar & reasons to it, either in a Steene or Caske put y^e juice of
3 lemons and the rine of one thin pared Stiring it once a day keeping
it close Stopped let it Stand 3 nights and 2 days. let it run through a
jelly bag. bottle it up and in 8 or 9 days ’twill be fit to drink.


12. _To make Wigs._

Take half a peck of flower, 2 ounces of carraway and anyseeds then take
a pint of yest the yolkes of 3 eggs a little Salt one nutmeg half a
pound of Sugar beat the Sugar and nutmegs bruise the Seeds take a quart
of milk Scaulding hot but not to boyle then put into your milk half a
pound of butter, & break another half pound of butter into the flower
if you please put in 6 or 7 spoonfulls of Sack and as much rosewater
w^{th} your other things then put in your milk by degrees mix it
together well but knead it not at all then pull it in little bitts 2 or
3 times then mix it up again and mak them up in wigs lying will make
them heavy. half an hour will bake them.


13. _For the Giddiness in the Head._

Take an ounce of comming Seed and Steep it in white wine all night
as much wine as will cover it and then you must dry it in an oven
after the bread is drawn and dry with it an ounce of Juniper berrys
& a handfull or rue then you must beat all these together to a fine
powder and when you use it take as much of the powder as will lay on a
Sixpence in a Spoonfull of honey well mixed together or in a Spoonfull
of Sugar and take it dry.


14. _How to Stue a Rump of Beef._

Take the rump of beef and Stuff him with parsley and broad time & about
half a nutmeg with a little beef Sewet then put him in your pan with
as much water as will cover him & so lett him stew with whole pepper,
Cloves and mace of each a little quantity till he is tender then you
must take him out & stick him w^{th} cloves then stew him again with 3
pints of the first liquor and 2 quarts of claret, then you must Scrape
in 2 nutmegs 4 anchovise the bottoms of 4 hartichokes a little shellot
half a lemon a few pickled oysters, half a score of turnips cut in half
quarters & fry them in Sweet butter till they be tender then put in
some Sasages: for herbs lettice and spinnage and green beets of each
half a handfull boyle them in a Skillet of water so drop them out & put
them in the stewing; if your Soope be not thick enough then thicken it
w^{th} crums of brown bread.


15. _To make Almond Cakes._

Take one pound of Almonds blancht in cold water beat them in Rose water
take a pound of double refined Sugar beaten and Searcht, 8 spoonsfull
of fine flower 8 new laid eggs both whites and yolkes Some Corriander
Seed prepared, butter your plats and Shake some double refined Sugar on
them.


16. _To make Biskit._

Take 2 pound of fine Sugar beaten and searched then to a pound and a
half of it put a pound of the finest wheat flower, take 8 eggs and
beat them with 2 spoonfulls of Rose water, mingle your flower and eggs
together, then take an ounce of anyseeds being a quarter of an hour
in white wine and as you beat your biskit put in your Seeds and when
the biskit begins to look white put In your plats & Shake Some double
refined Sugar on them.


17. _To Bake a Rump of Beef._

Take a rump of beef and bone it Season it with pepper and salt put it
into a pan and then put to it a little quantity of claret & ale enough
to cover it about 8 anchovies 2 handfulls of capers 6 hole oynions, 3
or 4 branches of Sage, time and winter Savory, 3 or 4 heads of Shollot
a little quantity of Iamakoe pepper whole, lay the bones on the top of
the beef and cover it close with paste and lett it Stand in the oven
six hours the oven being very hot.


18. _The Black Seare Cloth._

Take half a pound of the best virgins wax and half a pint of oyle of
roses and half a pint of oyle of olive melt them altogether let them
coole in a pan till it be half cold then take half a pound of the
finest white lead you can get, pound it as fine as possibly you can put
this into the oyle and put it over a fire of coles and let it boyle
half an hour then take 2 ounces of mastick 2 ounces of frankincense 2
ounces of mirrh 2 ounces of Gum oblibanum beat them into fine powder
then put it in and let it boyle half an hour more, then take a quarter
of an ounce of camphir and put it in and Stir it till it be black then
take it from the fire and dipe your cloth or make it up in roles for
your use.


19. _To make Lemon or Orange Water._

Take the peels of 8 lemons or oranges and pare of the white very clean
from them then put them into a quart of brandy, then take one pound of
double refined Sugar or other loafe Sugar and put it into a quart of
water and let it stand 24 hours then mix the water and brandy together
and strain them through a double flanin bag so bottle it up for use.
Some steep y^e peel 3 days before and after y^e water is added sweeten
it with white Sugar Candy & hang a grain of musk & ambergreese in the
glass.


20. _Cowslip Wine aproved._

Take 3 gallons of fair water put to it the best of powder Sugar or Loaf
Sugar 6 pound boyle it together half an hour or better, and as the
Scumme riseth take it off then pour it forth and set it a cooleing
and when ’tis almost cold take a spoonfull or better of good barm beat
it well together with 12 spoonfulls of Sirrup of cittorn or lemons
then put it some of the liquor being almost cold let it stand a while
to rise put in a Gallon of cowslip flowers bruised in a marble morter
into the other liquor the while then put it altogether brewing it up
and down with a dish then let it stand in an earthen pot close covered
with a cloth, to worke 2 or 3 days then strain it forth and put it into
a runlet that will just hold it and when it worketh not over Stop it
close and 3 or 4 weeks after bottle it putting into each bottle a knob
of Loaf Sugar it must not be dranke in a month twill keep good a year.


21. _For the Worms._

Take an orange cut off the top press out the juice as near as you can
then put into it half a spoonfull of oyle of bays of the juice of rue
and wormwood of each half a spoonfull powder of 4 or 5 lupins dry’d
with as much treacle as will fill an ordinary thimble then stop the
hole with the piece you cut off tye it up close and fast that nothing
get out or in, then Seeth it well and when it is cold anoynt the
navell, nostrells, pulses and temples of the party therewith troubled
with the Stuff it paseth all other medecins for y^e worms what ever.


22. _For a Cold._

Take a quarter of a pint of horehound water a quarter of a pint of
coltsfoot water a pound of reasons of the Sun Stoned pound the reasons
very well then mingle these together then set them on the fire boyle
them like marmolet then take it off and put it into 2 ounces of honey
and one spoonfull mustard then set it on the fire & let it simer a
while then put it into a pot and take as much as y^e quantity of a
walnut first in ye morning & last at night.


23. _To make Fruit Biskit._

Take the pulp of any fruit to 4 ounces of pulp take 6 ounces of double
refined Sugar beaten and searched heat your pulp scalding hot and Sugar
scalding hot into 2 several dishes when they are scalding hot pour
your Sugar into your pulp and mix them and have ready whites of eggs
beat into a froth and to such a proportion of pulp and sugar put in 2
spoonfulls of the froth a little musk and amber if you please then beat
these in a silver or earthen bason with a Spoon for an hour or two the
longer the better dry them in paper coffins of a pretty thickness; dry
them either in a stove or coole oven.


24. _For Mother Fitts._

Take a pottle of ale and boyle in it 2 handfulls of red Sage and Scumme
off the froth and when it hath boyled one hour take it off the fire and
Strain it hard out that the strength of the Sage may remain in it and
while it is hot put into it half a pint of dragon water and as much
treacle Seane as will make it sweet to your tast, and drink of it warm
first in the morning and last at night a good draught or at any other
time you feel a fit coming.


25. _To preserve Green Aples._

Take the greenest small aples about St James tide and set on a Skillet
of water on ye fire till it be ready to boyle then take it off and
put it into your aples covering them close till they will peel and
against they are peeled have a skillet of hot water ready to put them
in so cover them close and let them Stand on a few embers till they be
very green then take them out and take to the weight of the aples the
weight and quarter of sugar then take of the water they were green’d
in as much as you think will boyle them and make Sirrup for them & 3
quarters of the Sugar and boyle it up and scumme it then put in the
apples and let them boyle till they be half done then set them by till
the next day then take them out again & boyle the sirrup with the rest
of the Sugar then put them in again and boyle it softly till they be
done keep them covered in y^e sirrup & waters.


26. _Mrs. Thorps for the Mother Fitts._

Take the juice of Tansie and drink it with beer it hath done much good
but hurtfull if with child.


27. _To make a Calves Head Hashe._

After you have boyled the calves head take out all the bones from it
when it is cold you must cut the meat in thin slices and put in a stew
pan with some strong broth and white wine and oyster liquor and a few
of all manner of sweet herbs 4 or 5 shellots and let it stew on a
charcoale fire and when it is almost enough put 2 or 3 anchovies minced
and yolks of 3 or 4 eggs well beaten with a little white wine and a
piece of butter and shake it well together on a quick and put it in a
dish on sippets and lay over it 5 or 6 sheeps tongues boyled peel’d
and slit in halfs and as many veal sweetbreads & a few thin slices of
bacon & a few bay leaves in yolks of eggs fry y^e brown in butter and
lay them on your hashe & bacon & lay leavs on the brim of ye Dish and
Garnish it with slices of Lemon and Send it up.


28. _To make Forced Meat._

Take a leg of veal or Lamb and mince it small with the same quantity
of beef sewit and after sweet herbs then put to it a little grat’d
bread and the yolks of 2 or 3 eggs then season it with pepper and Salt
cloves mace and nutmegs, and make them in balls you may fry boyle or
butter them.


29. _For a Cold._

Take half a pound of reasons of the Sun Stoned and 1 ounce of liquorish
and 1 ounce of Elicompane made into fine powder beat your reasons
then pour in them till they come to a conserve adding thereto 2 or 3
spoonfulls of Red rose water if a thick ruehm lessen your quantity of
Elicompane & take of this morning noon & night. Probatum.


30. _To make a Frigacy of Chicken._

Break the bones of the chicken and cut them in quarters and season them
with cloves mace and nutmegs and salt with a little pepper and a few
sweet herbs and put it in a stew pan with some broth or gravie a little
white wine and strong ale a little oyster liquor and a few oysters cut
in pieces and let it stew on a quicke fire and when it is almost enough
put in 2 or 3 shallots minced small and 2 or 3 anchovise minced the
yolks of 2 or 3 eggs well beaten with a little white wine and a piece
of butter and Shake it well together and put it in a dish on sippets.


31. _For any Cough old or fresh._

TAKE a quartor of a pound of blew currans an ounce of Anyseeds and a
penny worth of liquorish makeing it and your seeds first into powder
then beat your currans to a kind of a conserve strewing in your powder
as you beat them then take of the best maiden honey you can gett
putting thereof as much as will moisten all this seting it on the fire
let it simer a while but not to long lest it be clammy so take from the
fire and keep it for your use. take it as oft as you please upon the
poynt of a knife the quantity of a nutmeg.


32. _For a Cold._

Take a pint of virgins honey set it on the fire and put a good
spoonfull of liquorish anyseeds elecampane all this being first beaten
in fine powders, let it simer a little then take it from the fire
and put it up in a pot for your use. eat of it as oft’ as you please
especially going to bed makeing up 3 pills as big as a small nut
rowling them up in powder of liquorish or Sugar candie.


33. _For a Cough._

Take 4 quarts of Spring water 2 ounces of green liquorish sliced 2
ounces of powder of brimstone 1 ounce of coliander seed bruised and
soak’d in vinegar a little then pour out the vinegar from it boyle all
the other things together until it be half boyled away then put in the
coliander seed when it is off y^e fire. Soe let it stand close covered
and drink of it 7 or 8 spoonfulls in a morning fasting fast an hour
after it and drink it till you have taken it all.


34. _For a Cough._

Take an ounce of conserve of red roses the quantity of an nutmeg of
dyascordieum and one spoonfull of the Sirrup of poppies 3 drops and
but 3 drops of y^e spirit of vitterill then mix all these very well
together and take of this in the morning fasting and fast 2 hours after
it and last at night the quantity of a nutmeg at a time. Probatum.


35. _For the Rickets._

Take 2 quarts of Isope water, take of liverwort maidenhair Hissop
Speedwell Strawberry leaves violet leaves of each a handfull, 3 leaves
of harts-tongue better than half a pound of raisons of the Sun 6 figs
boyle all this till it come to a quart then strain it and boyle it
again with 2 penny worth of saffron 2 ounces of brown Sugar Candie a
piece of Gold a stone of Amber boyle it every 2 or 3 days or ’twill be
soure and so keep it a fortnight give 3 spoonfulls at a time morning
and evening & when the child will take it you must give it twice or
thrice ere the child will be well if you give it in the fall or winter
you must give it once in the spring after.


36. _For Children that have Wormes._

Take spermint and rue a like quantity to make a bundle you can hold in
the hollow of your hand and boyle it in new milk and a spoonfull of
wormseed after your herbs have boyled a while put in your seeds and
y^n boyle it a walme or 2 then give the child as much as it will drink
first in the morning fasting an hour after it if costive Sweeten it
with honey give this full & changes of y^e moon.


37. _A Small but very effectuall Cordial Powder._

Take tormentil scabious Bittony pimpernel of each one handfull and
Shread them and steep them in a pottle of sack till the vertue be out
of the herbs then strain it out from y^e herbs haveing a pound of the
best Bole Armeniack in very fine powder finely searched then put your
powder into a deep earthen bason and wet your powder with your strain’d
liquor every day till it be throughly moistned as thick as a pulp or
conserve till often weting hath dranke up all your liquor Seting it in
the Sun every day oft stiring it and when all your wine is dryed up
make it up into cakes add 12 penny worth of saffron to it before you
wet it finely powdered dry your cakes in the Sun & then keep them for
your use. Scrape and give to a man as much as will lye on a shilling
to a woman less to a child less. In cardus or dragon or Small cordial
water it will cause sweting tis good against heats and colds sickness
thence or pains in the limbs or heart or Stomake or for a woman lying
in child bed takeing cold and causeing stoppages, ’twill drive out
small pox or meazels or any heaviness at the heart.


38. _A Stronger Cordial Powder._

Take a pint of white wine and a pint of sack to these following
herbs scabious cardus bittony egremony of each a little handfull and
tormentil roots you may add any cordial flowers rosemary or what you
please Shread your herbs and Steep them till the vertue of the herbs be
soaked into the wine then take half a pound of Bole-Armeniack in fine
powder and 2 ounces and a half and a dram of the black tips of crabs
claws in powder and an ounce of hearts horn in fine powder and mingle
all your powders and put them into a deep earthen Bason as the former
and moisten them every day with your liquor seting it in the Sun and
when you put in the last wine liquor often Stiring it every day at last
add to it half of metriedate half an ounce of Diascordium half an ounce
of Venice treacle and a dram of saffron finely powdered and mingle it
all very well together then make it up into little balls throughly
drying them Keeping them so for your use. give of this as the former to
a man as much as will lay on a shilling to a woman as much as will lay
on a Sixpence to a child as much as will lay on a groat, ’tis good for
any weakness, heaviness at heart, or to cause sleep weomen in child bed
or as the former.


39. _For the Balsame._

Take one pound of the best venice turpentine and 3 pints of Sallet oyle
of the best bees wax half a pound one ounce of red sanders in very fine
powder half a pint of red rose water and one pint of malligoe sack
first beat your turpentine in the red rose water till it be white
next beat your Sack and Sallet oyle well together then cut your wax in
small pieces then take a clean brass pan or kittle let your kittle be
twice as big as to hold the quantity of your ingredients then Set it on
a clear charcole fire then first put in your wax and let it melt then
take it off and let it coole a little then put in your rose water and
turpentine then your sack and Sallet oyle, as fast as you can, then let
these boyle softly together a while always stiring it then take it off
the fire and let it stand till it be cold then scrape off the filth
from the bottom of the cake, then clean your pan and melt it again and
let it simmer a while over the fire again, then take it from the fire
and put in your Sanders by degrees keeping it still stiring untill your
Sanders be all in then pour it into a well Glazed strong earthen pot
and keep it stiring till it be quite cold then cover it up very close
with ledd, that no air may get into it, and bury it in a garden deep
in the ground and so let it stand a year round bean blowen time is the
best to make it in.


_The Vertues of it followeth_:

It is good to prevent the plague by anointing the lips and nostrells
therewith tis good for deafness being spert’d into the ears with a
serenge, tis good to heal any wound, inward or outward, inwardly by
the Serenge outward by being pour’d warme into the wound aplying fine
lint dip’d into the same balsame being melted laid upon the mouth of
the wound, it commonly cures in 7 times dressing provided that no other
thing either before or while thats useing be applied thereto, so that
if brains, heart guts or liver be not toucht it will save life, its
good for scaulds or burns either by fire or water, and healeth without
skare. helping the Siatica or any other each proceeding from A cold
cause, in what joynt soever, it is a present remedy for one that is
poisoned by takeing presently the quantity of a quarter of an ounce. it
is good for any swelling anointing the bunches thereof with it warm it
helpeth the stinging of adders snakes and all such venomous creatures
being dranke in warm milk and applied to the place stung it is good for
the infected of the measells or plague, takeing a quarter of an ounce 4
mornings together and swet upon it: it is good inward or outward it is
good for sore brests, being applied hot if broken, otherwise not, and
in case it must be broke this will do it but it must be used ten days
together although it seem worse yet use it: provided it be not a cancer
it must be drest twice a day cheaft gently in with a warme hand keeping
the first cloth to it but if it be broke and run much put a little
piece of cloth over those holes that may be shift’d to keep them from
stikking but not els; it helpeth the wind collicke or stitch in the
side being applied warm a good quantity plaister ways for 4 mornings
together; it helpeth the piles anointing them therewith.


40. _To pot Venison to keep all the year._

Take your venison and where it is lean slit it, and then take a bunch
of feathers and a porranger with clarret wine in it and dip your
feathers in it and waish the slits then put in some of your seasoning
and take y^e fat of bacon and cut it as thin as a treble paper and
put it in the slits so doing in all leane places of it then place it
in your pot and bake it up very well, put in more seasoning if you
please after placed in the pot & when you take it out of the oven press
out all the liquor as dry as you well can into a skillet and put in
a faggot of herbs as bays rosemary marjerrom to your liquor in the
skillet then take a stick of wood and measure y^e depth of it and make
a notch in the stick that you may know when tis boyled just half away
then take out the herbs and pour the liquor on your venison in your pot
as hot as you can and keep it in and when tis almost cold then melt up
your butter, to cover it up, but let not your butter be to hot lest
it melt your jelly on your venison, but let your butter be onely warm
enough to pour out to cover up your venison and it will keep thus a
year round and not taint but eat moist and sweet to the last. but if
your butter be strong after long keeping then a day or 2 before you
intend to spend it Set it in an oven but warm enough to melt off your
stale butter and pour away your stale butter from it and pour on fresh
butter upon it and you shall not know it from new baked venison.


41. _To make Cowslip Wine._

Take five gallons of Spring water put it into an earthen pot put to it
a bushell of pickt cowslips flowers and to them 20 pound of malligoe
raisons waished and shred stir them altogether, keep it close cover’d
with a sheet and blanket, let it stand as y^e fire may come to it, but
not to hot, keep it 9 days often stiring it in a day then Strain it
through a hair sive put it in a runlet it will be ready to drink in 14
days.


42. _Another Cowslip Wine._

Take 6 gallons of water and 12 pound of powder Sugar and the whites of
12 eggs well beaten, mix all these together and set it over the fire,
stiring it first then let it boyle one quarter of an hour then take
a bushell of cowslip flowers then bruise them in a stone morter then
scumme the liquor and put it to y^e cowslip; cover it and put 2 lemons
rine and all cut very thin, put as much of ale barme as will make it
worke then tun it up into a runlet and put into it 2 quarts of rennish
wine, and when it hath done workeing stop it up a fortnight, y^{n}
bottle it with a knob of Sugar in each bottle.


43. _To make the Eye Water._

Take Eyebright and Sallendine and brown fennell of each two handfulls
you must chop these herbs take a pint of urin made by a vergine and a
pint of red rose water and still it in a cold still tis good to put
back y^e rume in y^e eyes or to take away any spot in the eye you
must take and drop half a dozen drops into the eye untill it run out at
y^e other corner this do every night for 3 nights let it rest a week
and then if need require you may dress it again it will keep a year
very well.


44. _For the Rickets._

Make a Sack posset boyle in it harts horn Ivery and rosemary and give
it the child now and then, also take a quart of wort put into it a
handfull of maiden hair one handfull of liverwort that grows on the
banks half a pound of raisons of the Sun Stoned boyle all together to
the wasting of one quarter put into it a penny worth of red Sanders,
Strain it and put to it 2 ounces of red sugar candie boyle it a little
again give the child 3 spoonsfulls of it at night and 3 spoonfulls
every morning.


45. _An Ointment for the Rickets._

Take lavender rosemary pennyroyal featherfew and camamile of each a
like quantity cut and bruise them and then boyle them in a sufficient
quantity of butter and make it into an ointment, mix it in a little
neats foot oyle wherewith anoint the child’s wrists and ancles every
morning and night also the right side under ye short ribs.


46. _To Kill a Canker._

Take 2 spoonfulls of honey and one spoonfull of treacle and half as
much rock allum as the quantity of a wallnut beat to fine powder and
boyle these together over a cheafen dish of coles till it be pretty
thick then take it off and let it coole then anoint the cankers with a
cloth tyed upon a stick the oftner you anoint it the better twill be
you must keep stiring it as long as it doth boyle, it will be like a
sirrup when tis cold.


47. _For any Aguish or Hectick Feavour in Children when they grow Weak
and Forsake their Meat._

Take 2 penny worth of the sneezing powder root and pound it small then
pound 3 ounces of curants unwaish’d only pickt clean from stones, then
mingle these together and lay it to the handwrists, then cut a small
orange in halfs & put one half to each of the handwrists then bind it
on 4 days and if the party mend not in that time take it off and put on
fresh in the like manner and keep it on as long a time.


48. _To make Orange Cakes._

Take your oranges and chip them then quarter them and cut out the meat
and then take the rines and boyle them till they be very tender then
take them and dry them in a napking and shred them very small then
strain in your juice through a piece of tifany then take the weight in
sugar and set your sugar on the fire and put in as much water as will
wet it to a paste then you must boyle it to a Sugar again then take it
off the fire and put in your meat stir it in then put by all your fire
and set it upon y^e hot hearth to dry turning it, it must not boyle
then put it out into sweet meat glasses till it be pretty stiff then
put it upon your sheet of glass and set it in a stove the stove must
be warm you must keep a moderate heat in it and so dry them up.


49. _A Perfumed Water._

Take a gallon of Spring water a handfull of lavender flowers and as
many pinks 3 handfulls of damaske roses as much sweet marjerum the
peels of 6 oranges 12 cloves bruise all these and put to them one ounce
of orrise powder 4 ounces of benjamin powdered put all in a rose stille
and draw off the first quart by its self and then a pint you may draw
after another water from the lees which will serve for present use but
not keep put into your quart bottle 12 penny worth of muske and into
your pint bottle six pennyworth tyed up in a piece of sersnet and a
little ginger sliced very thin about as much as will lay on a half
crown, 2 or 3 spoonfulls will sweeten a bason of water, Stop it close.


50. _To make Mumme according to the Direction recorded in the Town
House of Brumswick._

Take a vessel containing 63 gallons the water must be first boyled to
y^e consumption of a 3^d part at least let it then be brew’d according
to the act with 7 bushells of wheat malt one bushel of oat malt and
one bushel of ground beans and when it is tunn’d let not the hogshead
be to much filled at first, when it begins to work put to it of the
inner rine of firr trees 3 pounds of y^e tops of firs and birtch of
each one pound of cardus benedictus dryed 3 good handfulls of the
flowers of rosasolis 2 good handfulls, of burnet, betony marjorum
avens pennyroyall, elderflowers, wild time, of each a handfull and
a half, seeds of cardomum bruised 3 ounces, bay berries bruis’d one
ounce put the seeds in y^e vessel when the liquor hath wrought a while
with the herbs alone and after they are aded let the liquor worke over
the vessel as little as may be, fill it up to the top, and when ’tis
to be stop’d up, put into the vessel ten new laid eggs ye shells not
broken nor crackt then stop it very carefully and at 2 years end drink
of it, if it be transported by sea tis better. Dr Egidius Hofman adds
water creases brooke lime and wild parsley, 6 handfulls of horsraddish
scraped in every hogshead, and it was observed that the mumme in w^{ch}
y^e horsraddish was put did drink with more quickness then that which
had none.


51. _Quince Wine._

Grate your quinces and strain them in a corse strainer and strain your
juice through a flanin to every gallon of juice take a pound of fine
sugar Stir it untill your sugar be melt’d then put it into a barrel and
bottle it after 24 hours.


52. _Captain Greens Powder for to make Water for Sore Eyes and Sores,
the Powder to be Calcinde._

Take 4 ounces of vitriol and one ounce of camphire after it is finely
beaten with an almond shake it lightly into a black earthen pot well
glazed, then shake the vitriol after it is finely beaten and search’d
and shake it in lightly upon the top of the camphire and set it in a
deep chafing dish and keep as soft a fire as can be possible about
it and let it stand there till it be first dissolved to a water and
then to a hard stone you must take care it do not smoke for y^t will
spoil the camphire as soon as the camphire is melt’d that the vitriol
is sunke down then cover it with a paper and a saucer upon that with
a weight, and continue to keep a soft fire under it till it be turn’d
to a stone and then take off the pot and let it alone till the next
day and then you must break the pot to gett it out, and when out you
must beat and search it very fine, and when it is as fine as you can
possible make it then bake 4 ounces of bole armeniack and beat again
with it till they be well mingled together, then weigh it into half
ounces, and every half ounce will make a quart of water, an ale quart
for eyes and a wine quart for sores the bole Armeniack must be finely
beaten and search’d before it is mingl’d with the other.


53. _To make Sirrop of Lemons._

Pare your lemons that no white be seen then slice them and take out
ye seeds and take the same weight in double refined sugar well beaten
and fasten a stronge thread net over a Silver bason or earthen bason
then lay on some of your Sliced lemons cover them with Sugar then more
lemons so do till all be on, then Set it in a cool Seller for 3 or
4 days then pour it in a stone pot let it stand warme 24 hours then
Scumme it and put it up. you may put more Sugar if you please.


54. _To make Sirrop of Clove-Gilly flowers or any other flowers but
Violets._

Clip the whites from the flowers bruise them a little in a stone
morter then take y^e weight of your flowers in fine beaten sugar, take
a silver or stone pot put a laying of flowers then of sugar do this
till all be in then close y^e pot and in boyling water keep it still
seething for 4 or 5 hours then straine it and set it by the fire till
y^e scumme rise take that off when cold then bottle it, you may put
the flowers in sack or french wine and let them lye 9 or 10 days close
stop’t then strain it and bottle, it will be very pleasant and Cordial,
if you make your sirrop by infusion tis best to do it either with
pinke, balme, or burrage water which you must warme a little and pour
on your flowers as much as will cover them, let it stand 12 hours then
strain it and put in fresh flowers so do 4 or 5 times then to every
pint of liquor take a pound and half of Sugar finely beaten, put it in
a Stone pot set it to y^e fire in a Skillet of water till the sugar be
all melt’d then scumme it and keep it for use.


55. _To make small Mead._

Take 10 quarts of water to one quart of honey first boyle your water
and in it a handfull of herbs made into a bundle such as you best like,
as rosemary balme, Sweet marjerum and the like Scumme your water very
well and when boyled half an hour or more take out the herbs, then put
in your quart of honey to your ten quarts of water and boyle it near an
hour scumming it all the while it boyls, pour it then into some coolers
and when as cool as wort put in some ale yest, if but 10 quarts of
liquor then 2 spoonfulls of yest is enough, if more you must proportion
your yest to it, let it stand in the cooler till it be white all over
then tun it up into a good vessel that hath had sack or white wine in
it and when it hath done workeing Stop it very close and let it stand
in the barrel a week or 10 Days then draw it into bottles keeping it
close Stop’d and in a months time you may drink of it keep it as coole
as you can.


56. _A brewed Drink for Rickets._

Take tamariske and the inner barke of a young ash not 20 years old
and agrimony Speedwell Succory coltsfoot cliders maiden hair ceterach
otherwise called Spleenwort and cowslips of jerusalem of each of
these a handfull and boyle it in 5 gallons of middle beer an hour and
half and bruise the bark and boyle it an hour before the other things
be put in that so it may have an hours more boyleing than y^e herbs
than strain it and worke it as other Drink and tun it as soon as it
is tuned up put into it the juice of 4 handfulls of scurvy grass
and 2 handfulls of water cresses, then take a handfull and a half of
liverwort and as much harts tongue very clean pickt and bruised and put
it into a thin linnen bag and a little stone or bullet to sinke it, &
hang it in the drink about the middle of the vessel and at five days
old let the child drink of it all times if you can you must put into it
a handfull of osmund royal roots or osmund fearn roots called fox fern
roots for it hath these 3 names and 2 handfulls of Scurvy grass roots.


57. _The Soveraign Balsame._

Take Venice turpentine one pound, oyle of olives 3 pints, balsame of
perrue half an ounce, oyle of St Johns wort one ounce, red Sanders one
ounce, yellow wax half a pound Sack 6 spoonfulls, cut the wax in thin
slices put it over the fire in a clean Skillet, when it is thoroughly
melt’d put in the turpentine when it is first waished in red rose water
3 times Stir them very well till they boyle then take it off the fire
and let it cool till the next day then take it out of the Skillet again
and cut it into thin slices to get out the water then put in the oyle
of olives the Sack and the oyle of St Johns wort with the red Sanders
and balsame and stir them till they incorporate, then boyle it a pace
then take it off the fire and stir it for 2 hours to thicken it, then
let it cool puting it into small pots, it will keep twenty years.


58. _To make Biskit._

Take one pound and a quarter of fine sugar one pound of eggs one lb of
flower, beat your eggs and as the froth riseth scumme it off & mix it
w^{th} the flower and Sugar till all the eggs be in them beat it very
well and let it stand by a fire half an hour then butter your plats and
set them in a pretty warme oven.


59. _To make Cakes of Quinces red._

Take barberrys and infuse them and when they are very soft take them
and stamp them with a spoon and strain them, then have some quinces
ready scaulded and pared then take the pulp of the quinces and mix it
with the barberrys then take the weight of it in Sugar and wet it with
water then set it over the fire and let it boyle till it be Sugar again
then put in your quinces and stir it over the fire till the sugar be
all melt’d but not let it boyle then drop it on glass plats.


60. _To make clear Cakes of Quinces._

Take quinces and pare them and cut them into water then set them over
the fire and let them boyle very fast till the quinces be very tender
then strain the jelly and take the weight of it in Sugar and wet it in
water set it on the fire and let it boyle to sugar again then put in
the jelly and set it over the fire and stir it till all the sugar be
melt’d but it must not boyle then put them in glasses.


61. _To make Orange Cakes._

Scrape your oranges with a piece of glass till all the deep colour be
off, y^n take the peel off and rub it with salt and lay it in water a
little while then take it out and dry it in a cloth then cut all the
white from it and put the yellow peel into water to wash the salt well
from it then boyle it tender in 2 waters when it is tender you must dry
it very well in a cloth and shred it as small as you can, then take the
juice and meat of your oranges and put to the shred peel but be sure
that there be no seeds nor strings in it, it must be very well broken
with a spoon then you must take the weight of your oranges in double
refined Sugar, melt your Sugar with fair water and set it on the fire
and let it boyle and scumme it well and when it begins to candie put
in your orange and let it stand on the fire stiring it till the Sugar
be melt’d it must not boyle, then put it in cake glasses and Set it in
a warme stove and when you find it candied at top and jelly’d turn it
on plates and so keep it turning as you see it candie till its dry.


62. _To make Apricock Cakes._

Take a pound of sugar and boyle it almost to a candie height then put
a pound of Apricocks sliced very thin but not pared into it stir them
about and let them stand on a soft fire till the sugar be melt’d then
put them in cake glasses and set them in a stove & when they begin to
dry turn them out on glasses.


63. _To make Sirrop of Violets._

Take half a pound of pickt violets and put a pint of water boyling hot
to them cover them close and let it stand one day then strain it out
and to a pint of the liquor put 2 pound and quarter of Sugar and set it
into a kettle of boyleing water and let the Sugar dissolve and scumme
it well when its scaulding hot its enough and when cold bottle it.


64. _To dry Cherrys._

Stone 6 pound of cherrys and put one pound of Sugar to them and let
them boyle as quick as you can till they look clear then let them lay
in ye sirrop 3 days then lay them on sives and set them in an oven
after bread is baked 2 or 3 times turning them.


65. _To make Apricock Marmelade or Cakes._

Take your Apricocks, pare, stone, and quarter them then take the weight
of them in Sugar and put half of it to the Apricocks and set them on
the fire and keep them Stiring lest they burn and when they are tender
take them off and mash them small then take the other half of Sugar and
melt it with water and let it boyle a little then take it off and put
in the Apricocks and stir it well together and put it in your glasses
and in 2 days turn out your cakes on glasses to dry.


66. _To make White Quince Marmelade very good._

Take a pound of quince and a pound and quarter of Sugar wet your Sugar
pretty thin with water then put to it half a pint of stronge jelly made
with the cores of quinces, pare your quinces and core them & quarter
them and put them into your sugar and jelly, set it on a very quick
fire and let it boyle as fast as possible it can and Stir it all the
time you must keep out a little of the Sugar to Strew over it when its
almost boyl’d, and when its enough and taken off y^e fire Stir into it
3 spoonfulls of y^e juice of lemons.


67. _To make a very good Posset._

Take 3 pints of cream and boyle it with cinnamon and mace and one
nutmeg quartered take a pint of Sack and the yolkes of 18 eggs beaten
put your Sack and eggs and about three quarters of a pound of sugar
altogether into a bason set it on a chafen dish of coles and keep it
Stiring till its ready to boyle then take it off and set your Bason
on the ground and take your cream boyling hot only first take out the
whole spice then pour the cream into the bason holding your skillet as
high from the bason as you can that it may froth with the pouring then
stir the posset a little and set it on the coles again, close cover’d
about half a quarter of an hour then strew on some Sugar & serve it in.
if you make it with milk you may put in half the whites of the eggs
takeing out the treds and beat your eggs very well.


68. _To make an Orange Pudding._

Take 12 eggs throw away half the whites beat them very well and then
put into them a little salt and 3 quarters of a pound of Sugar and 3
quarters of a pound of butter melt’d and the yellow rine of 3 oranges
grated, make some good puff paste and cover your dish and pour in the
pudding and cover it over with more paste 3 quarters of an hour will
bake it, then eat it with orange. To make your paste to cover your
pudding take 3 quarters of a pound of butter to one pound of flower
breake your butter into the flower and temper it with warme water make
it pretty stiff and rowle it quick.


69. _To preserve Damsens._

Take a pint of jelly of Damsens and let it boyle a pretty while then
put to it a pound of Sugar and let it boyle together a little while,
Scumme it very well and let it stand till its almost cold then put into
it a pound of damsens and let them just boyle up & let them stand till
y^e next day then boyle them up again then put them into glasses.


70. _To preserve Rasberrys._

Take rasberrys and currants and put some water to them and set them
on the fire and let them boyle then strain them and take a pint of
that jelly and a pound of Sugar and let it boyle till the Scumme be
all risen then put in a pound of fair rasberrys and let them boyle as
fast as they can, till they are clear, then take them up & put them in
glasses and strain the jelly to them.


71. _To dry Apricocks._

Take a pound of sugar and wet it with a quarter of a pint of water and
let it boyle and Scumme it well then put into it a pound of apricocks
pared and stoned let them boyle a little then let them stand till the
next day y^n boyle them up again so do 4 or 5 times till they look very
clear then put them a runing from the Sirrop and lay them on glasses
to dry and set them in a Stove turning them and 3 or 4 days after sift
fine Sugar all over them and turn them every day till they are dry you
may make chips this same way.


72. _To make Rasberry Cakes._

Take your rasberrys and infuse them in a stone jug and when they are
tender mash them small and take the weight of them in Sugar put the
Sugar into a preserveing pan put as much fair water to it as will melt
it and let it boyle to a candie hight then put in your rasberrys take
it off ye fire and Stir it well and put it in your glasses and in 2
days turn it on glass plats.


73. _To make Sirrop of Clove Gilly Flowers or Violets._

Take to a pound of flowers 2 pound of Sugar then put your flowers and
Sugar into a Stone jug a laying of flowers and one of Sugar till they
are all in then set it in water over the fire to infuse and stop it in
close when the Sugar is dissolved it is enough then strain it out and
set it over the fire in a Skillet till it be ready to boyle then scumme
it clean and when cold bottle it.


74. _To preserve Rasberrys._

Take rasberrys and infuse them to make your jelly then take your
fairest rasberrys and put into the jelly and take the weight in Sugar
and as much water as will melt it Set it on the fire and let it boyle
and Scumme it well then put in the jelly and rasberrys and let it boyle
a pace till they are enough then put them in your glasses but let the
jelly boyle a little longer then put it to them.


75. _To dry Peaches._

Pare and scauld your fruit very tender then take the stones out of them
and lay them on a cloth to dry then take the weight of them in Sugar
and boyle it to a candie hight and put your fruit in it and let it
stand till the Sugar be melt’d and the next morning warm them and so do
in the afternoon do so 3 days but never let them boyle So lay them on
glasses to dry.


76. _To make Paste of Peaches._

Scauld them very tender and mash them through a Sive and put as much
of the juice of Spinage to it as will colour it green then dry it over
coles and boyle the weight of it in Sugar to a candie hight and put in
your pulp and stir it well together but not let it boyle then drop it
on glasses to dry.


77. _To dry Apricocks or Chips._

Pare and stone your Apricocks and lay them in your preserveing pan with
some Sugar strow’d over them then take the weight of them in Sugar and
wet it and boyle it to a candie hight and pour it to the apricocks and
let them boyle till they look clear then take them off and let them
stand till the next day then warm them and so do twice, and then lay
them on a Sieve that the Sirrop may run from them, then lay them on
glasses to dry in a Stove.


78. _To make very good Red Quince Marmalade._

Take 4 pound of raw quince 4 pounds of Sugar, 3 pints of water boyle
your sugar and water together and scumme it well then put in the quince
and let it boyle softly till its of a pretty good colour, then let it
boyle a pace uncover’d and then put into it a pint of strong jelly made
with the cores of the quinces and some pipens when you put in the jelly
put in half a pound more of Sugar and let it boyle a pace till it
jellys w^{ch} it will do in a little above a quarter of an hour.


79. _How to preserve Red Quince._

Pare your quinces and core them then take the weight of them in Sugar
and to every pound of Sugar you must put a pint of water and set your
quince sugar and water over a gentle fire and let it boyle very softly
and keep it close cover’d, and w^n it is 3 parts boyled you may put to
3 pound of quince and as much Sugar one pound of Sugar and a pint of
strong jelly then make it boyle a pretty pace till tis almost enough,
and when it is of a good colour tender and clear let it boyle as fast
as you can a little while uncover’d then put it into glasses, you must
make your jelly with the cores and pareings of your quince and some
pippins boyled in as much water as will cover them, you must keep 2 or
3 spoonfulls of your Sugar to Strew on your quince when it is almost
boyled to clear it.


80. _To preserve Ripe Plummes in Jelly White._

Take your plummes and weigh them take their weight in Sugar put your
Sugar into your preserveing pan and as you pare your plummes rowl them
in the Sugar and when they are all pared set them on the fire and let
them boyle stiring them often and when you find them tender take them
off and put them into glasses one by one; and for To make the jelly you
must take some plummes and pare them and put them into a tankard and
Set your tankard into a Skillet of water and let it boyle till they
are very soft then let the jelly run through a Strainer and take the
weight of it in Sugar put your Sugar into a preserveing pan, and put
as much fair water to it as will but melt it then set it on the fire
and when it boyles up put in your jelly and just let it boyle up then
take it off and fill up your glasses if you will have them red you must
pare them. The pulp of the plummes you make your jelly with will make
marmelade takeing the weight of it in Sugar put your Sugar into your
preserveing pan and melt it with fair water and set it on the fire and
when it boyles put in the pulp and let it boyle a little then put it in
your glasses.


 81. _To make Clear Cakes of either White Plummes, Red Plummes,
 Damsens, Grapes, Rasberrys, Currants, or Cherrys._

Take your fruit and pare them and put them into a tankard and Set in a
Skillet of boyling water and let it boyle till they are very soft then
let your jelly run from them through a strainer then take the weight
of the jelly in Sugar and put it into a preserveing pan and put as
much fair water to it as will just melt it then set it on the fire and
let it boyle to a candie hight which it will soon do then put in your
jelly, and Stir it, not leting it boyle but take it off and put it into
your cake glasses and set them in a stove and in 2 or 3 days turn them
out of your glasses on pieces of glass and keep them turning once a day
till they are dry enough to put on paper.


82. _To make White Marmelade of Quinces or Pippins._

Take your quinces and pare them and cut them in pieces and take the
weight of it in Sugar and put your Sugar and quinces into your pan and
set it on the fire keeping it stiring and breaking the quinces with a
ladle all y^e while it boyles and let it boyle as fast as you can &
when the quinces is very soft take it off and put it in glasses.


83. _To make Almond Cream._

Take a quart of cream and boyle it with nutmeg and mace and take a
quarter of a pound of almonds blanch them in cold water and beat them
very well in a stone morter with Sack and rose water and let it boyle
till it is as thick as you will have it then Strain it through a corse
Strainer being well boyled then sweeten it with Sugar to your taste and
put in half a spoonfull of rose water and as much Sack.


84. _To make an Almond Pudding._

Take a quart of cream and 2 manshets grated half a pound of Almonds
blanch’d and beaten very finely with rose water then take a little
nutmeg and mace shred small take the yolkes of 6 eggs and some Sugar
tie it up in thick cloth and boyle it and Serve it with butter and Sack.


85. _To make a Quakeing Pudding._

Take 5 spoonfulls of flour and 9 eggs leave out 3 of the whites a pint
and half of cream not to good, a spoonfull of Sugar and nutmeg take
orange lemon citron mince it small and put to it tie it up in a thick
cloth and when tis boyled put Sack and Sugar and butter.


86. _To make a Carraway Cake._

Take 4 pound of flour 10 eggs but 5 whites a pint of ale yest and half
a pint of cream a quarter of a pint of Sack or rose water half a pound
of carraway cumfets half a pound of sugar half a pound of butter some
saffron half an ounce of nutmeg of mace and cinnamon let your flour be
dry’d very well then mix it with Sugar carrawayes and Spice beat your
eggs very well & yest and Sack together let your cream boyle and melt
your butter in it then temper your cake let it stand half an hour to
rise bake it in a paper coffin.


87. _To make a very good Cake._

Take 6 pound of flower 3 pound of currants 2 pound of reason of the Sun
Stoned one pound of almonds blancht and well beaten 20 eggs half the
whites one quart of cream 2 pound of butter ½ a pound of loaf Sugar
2 ounces of mace nutmegs and cinnamon half a pint of Sack beat your
almonds with rose water and a quart of ale yest let your flour be dry’d
and currants then put them together with the spices and reasons minced
Small beat your Sack and eggs and yest all together let your cream
boyle then melt your butter in it and stir it very well together then
put your flour in the middle of the Ewer and put the yest on one side
and the cream on the other Side and mix all together very well then put
in your almonds and mix them very well together and set it by the fire
and when the oven is hot put it into a paper coffin and bake it.


88. _To make Marmelade of Oranges._

Take of the fairest oranges and pare them very thin and put them into
fair water and shift them 3 times a day for 3 days together then boyle
them in cloths till they be very soft then take your oranges and cut
them small and take out the core and take to a pound of orange one
pound of Sugar take a pint of the Fairest pippin water let it be very
clear one pound of Sugar more then mix your pippin water to y^e 2 pound
of Sugar then boyle it and scumme it and put in your cut orange to it
and boyle it till it jellies, and squeeze a little lemon into it and
put it into glasses.


89. _To preserve Pippins._

Take a pound of Sugar to a pound of apples and boyle your Sugar to a
Sirrop then pare your aples and cut them in halfs and cut out the cores
and bruise them and put them into the Sirrop as you do them then put
them on a very quick fire and when you see them begin to clear put into
it a pint & half of apple jelly and a little renish wine and the juice
of 2 or 3 oranges and have some orange peel boyled very tender and cut
into long shreds and when you think they are enough put them into your
glasses with some orange peel under and at top and Sirrop.


90. _To make Small Meade._

Take 30 Ale pints of fair water one pound of reasons of the Sun Stoned
4 pints of virgin honey put your honey into the water and boyle it till
the 3^d part be boyled away as soon as the Scumme riseth take it off
and put in your raisons then let it stand in vessels till it be cold
then worke it up with yest and when it hath wrought in the vessel Stir
up the yest and that together and so tun it up if you please 2 or 3
days after it is tunned draw it out and put it into bottles and after 6
days twill be fit to drink.


91. _To make Sugar Cakes._

Take 2 pound of flour and one of butter half a pound of Sugar one ounce
of carraway Seeds a little mace Shred a little Sack and a little rose
water worke these into a paste and make your cakes thin and cut them
round with glass.


92. _To make Little Cakes._

Take a quarter of a pound of double refined Sugar beat it very fine
then about the quantity of rasberrys, strained and then shake in the
Sugar by degrees keeping it beating a hour together and have the white
of an egg beaten to froth then put in 4 or 5 drops as you beat the
Sugar and rasberrys drop them on papers then put them into an oven that
is a little warm then put them in your stove you may do Goosberrys thus
but have a care to beat them one way or they will be heavy.


93. _To make Cherry Water._

Take 4 pound of cherrys 5 pints of claret wine, half a handfull of the
tops of rosemary 2 ounces of cinnamon bruised 2 handfulls of balme 2
nutmegs sliced Stone the cherrys let them Stand close cover’d in an
earthen pot all night then Still it in an ordinary Still and mix it
with Sirrop of Gilly flowers 4 ounces of white Sugar candie put into
the receiver and let it drop upon it and so keep it for your use keep
a quart bottle of the Strongest by itselfe and draw of the rest as
long as you like the taste it causeth Sleep tis most excellent for y^e
passion of the heart, tis a good restorative water twill ease one out
of a Sound.


94. _Almond Puddings._

A pound of Almonds blancht and beat very fine with rose water to such a
proportion take 4 penny white loafs grated very fine put it in a bowle
and with it 2 pound of beef Suet Shred very Small and mingle it with
the bread pour upon it one quart of boyleing cream Stir it together and
cover it close down and let it stand an hour then put in your almonds
and mingle them together and season them together with Salt and nutmeg
cinnamon & Sugar to your taste 8 eggs leaveing out ye whites mingle
them all together you may add a little Sack if you please, if you find
your pudding to thick add cream if to thin add grated bread if not fat
enough add more Sewit.


95. _Quince Cream._

Coddle your quinces scrape them and when they be cold sweeten them
Sweeten your cream and boyle it and when cold put them together.


96. _My Lady Ingrams Cream._

Take 2 gallons of new milk 3 pints of cream half a pound of Almonds
beaten very fine so put it in and stir it altogether and Set it in a
broad pan over the fire when tis ready to boyle take it off and let it
stand a day and a night you must sweeten it with Sugar at first then
take the glass you mean to put it into you must cut your cream as broad
& put the rest in the bottom.


97. _To make Pyramid Cream._

First wash one ounce of Icsinglass and lay it 2 days in rosewater then
beat a pound of Almonds with a spoonfull of rosewater Strain them with
a quart of cream or new milk then put in your Icsinglass and sweeten
with Sugar to your taste then boyle it on the fire till a drop will
stand then put it in a dish and stir it till tis cold then put it in
glasses and put it in a dish you Serve it up in and put cream to be 4
inches above the cream.


98. _To make Gimboles._

Take 6 eggs and put away 3 of the whites beat them an hour together
with rosewater put to this a quarter of a pint of cream half a pound of
Sugar and as much flower as will make it up in a paste as you rowle it
into weaks then put in some corriander and carraway Seeds then when you
have made them into what faishon you think fit butter your plats & so
bake them, let not your oven be to hot to colour them.


99. _Biskit Approvea._

Take a pound of fine Sugar beaten and searched one pound of flower 4
grains of Amber grease 3 grains of musk grind them with Sugar mingle
them with the flour and Sugar altogether you must dry your flour then
take 8 new laid eggs whites and yolks beat them in a stone morter with
a wooden pessle for the space of an hour put your Sugar and flour in
by little and little till it be all in then beat it for y^e space of 2
hours together you must not let it stand still at no time for the good
beating makes it white and light then put in 2 spoonfulls of anyseeds
and Stir them together then let your plat be buttered very thin then
warm your plats and dish it as fast as you can then have your oven
ready not very hot and put them in presently Sifting Sugar over them,
when baked enough then take them out & pare y^e bottoms of them and lay
them upon paper to dry & harden you must take them off y^e plats while
warme.


100. _Sugar Cakes._

Take 2 pound of flour dryed & searched one pound of loaf Sugar dryed
and Searched one pound of butter, 6 eggs leaveing out the whites then
beat them very well & take a little cream & make it into paste then
rowle it & flat it as you will have it & then cut it round w^{th} a
glass and bake then in a cool oven you must wash y^e butter with a
little rose water & see you dry it out.


101. _To make Jelly._

Take 4 calves feet and when they be blanched put them into a pot with a
gallon of fair water and let them boyle till they be consumed to half
Scumming it as it riseth very well then strain it through a coulender
into a dish and let it Stand till the next day and through cold Slice
it through in great pieces taking the top and bottom as thin as you
can and make of the rest putting it into a clean Skillet then take a
pint of Sack or white wine and put to it and the whites of 6 eggs very
well beaten to a froth one nutmeg 2 races of ginger both sliced one
Sprig of rosemary and a little Salt and half a pound of Sugar and you
must Sharpen it with a little lemon and a little vergis if it be sack
then set all these in Skillet on a gentle fire Stiring it till tis
ready to boyle & let it boyle a quarter of an hour without Stiring and
Strain it through a jelly bag of cotton and put a lemon peel into it &
let it run through of itself and keep it for your use.


102. _To preserve Green Walnuts._

Take green walnuts of bigest Size you can get and of the bigest kind
about a week after mid-summer put them in a bag and boyle them in a
great kittle of water till they be tender then peel off ye outward
skin that looks black and put into every second a clove put them into
somewhat more then the weight of powder Sugar and cover them in the dry
Sugar and let them lay a day or 2 then boyle them up 2 or walms on a
gentle fire. probatum.


103. _To make Cheesecakes._

Set your best milk which is Strokeing and put in as much runnet as you
think fit and when tis come brake it not but in a cloth and put it in
a vate and set a light press upon it and let it Stand cut your curd in
pieces and put it in a morter and grind and beat your curd put in the
quantity of half a pound of butter to as much curd as a little thin
cheese vate will hold when tis well beaten together put in a pound and
half of currants and Some cloves and mace and Some rosewater with the
eggs you must take 6 yolks and 2 whites and beat them well together
with rosewater and put in a pint of cream and a quarter of a pound of
sugar when you have prepared the coffins fill them not to full and see
you then put them in and when they are risen draw them out and then
mix them together some butter melted and some Sugar rosewater, take a
feather and wash them with it. your paste you must make as you do for
tarts.


104. _To Preserve Green Apricocks._

Take apricocks when the stones are firm in them and to every pound of
apricocks a pound of sugar pare them very thin slit them up the sceame
as you pare them put them into cold water else they will lose their
colour, being pared put them into a Skillet of cold water and set
them on a fire close cover’d till your water be scaulding hot and let
them stand till they are pretty cold then Set them on the fire again
till the water be Scaulding hot then take them off till the water be
Somewhat cold let the water be never more then scaulding hot and a
little colder after by degrees till they be as green and as tender as
you will have them then take them out of the water and lay them in
a dish and strew some of your weigh’d sugar on them else they will
presently loose their colour then put your Sugar into your preserveing
pan and to every pound of Sugar take a quarter of a pint of the same
water as the apricocks was boyled in then melt your sugar and put in
your apricocks and after a little boyling they will stone then put
them into the Sirrop again and being boyled a while take them out y^e
Sirrop and lay them in a broad silver dish and boyle the Sirrop to what
hight you please if you boyle it to little it will not keep you may if
you please put to these a grain or 2 of musk and Ambergrease pour the
Sirrop while it is hot on the apricocks so let them stand till y^e next
day then put them up into glasses.


105. _To Preserve Goosberrys._

Gather the fairest round goosberrys when they are at their full bigness
& before they begin to be soft when they are new gather’d cut off the
black tops and stone them strewing fine Sugar upon them as you Stone
them then to 3 quarters of a pound of stoned goosberrys take a pound
of double refined Sugar finely beaten and lay half of it in the bottom
of your pan then lay in your goosberrys one by one all over upon the
Sugar, then put in y^e rest of your Sugar but keep a Spoonfull or more
of it to Strew upon it in the boyleing then Stamp a few goosberrys the
black being taken off and Strain the juice out of them and of that
juice put in 12 Spoonfulls to this proportion drop it out of the Spoon
all over the Sugar and goosberrys then set them on a very quick fire to
boyle as fast as you can to boyle up to the top of the pan then take
them off and shake the pan and strew on some of the Sugar and presently
set it on the fire again to boyle up then take it off and shake it and
set it on again to boyle fast and when you see the goosberrys look
very clear take them off and when they are a little cold put them up
in glasses take them up with Sirrop for if you take them without the
Sirrop they will not be plump then put them up but let them not be
covered till they are cold you must try to see whether the Sirrop will
jelly before you put them up.


106. _To Preserve Sweet Lemons or Oranges._

Take your oranges and pare them very thin and lay them all night in
cold water then boyle them half an hour and put them into cold water
y^n make holes on the top where the stalk growes and take out the seeds
as clean as you can and let them lay in that water till the next day
then boyle them again almost half an hour then take them up and Set
them upon a double cloth and cover them with a cloth till they be
almost cold then weigh them and take to every pound of orange a pound
and half of Sugar and to every pound of Sugar a wine pint and half of
water boyle your sirrop and strain it and when it is almost cold put in
your oranges and boyle them with a soft fire till they look clear and
the Sirrop of a good hight about a fortnight or 3 weeks after take your
Sirrop from your oranges and boyle it again and when it is cold put
your oranges in it and keep it in glasses. y^e great red oranges will
do best this way.


107. _To make Black Puddings._

To make 3 dozen of puddings take a quarter of a peck of grots and 2
quarts of milk boyle it and then put in your grots and stire them close
and let them stand all night and in the morning take 2 handfulls of
sweet herbs Shred small, and one pint of blood 3 pounds of Suit Shred
Small put all these things to your grots and season it with a little
cloves & mace one nutmeg pepper & one ounce of annyseeds and Salt 6
eggs whites and all.


108. _To make White Puddings._

To make 3 dozen take a quart of Stired grotts one penny loafe grated 6
eggs yolkes and whites beat with rose water half a pound of Sugar and a
pound of currants, half a pint of cream mix all these things with your
grots and season it with cinnamon.


109. _To make a Posset._

Take a quart of cream and half a nutmeg quarter it then take a stick
of cinnamon and a quarter of a pound of Sugar and then set it on the
fire and keeping it stiring always one way and let it boyle together a
quarter of an hour then take 6 eggs puting away the whit’s then beat
them very well and put them into the cream still constantly stiring it
and so soon as it boyles take it off the fire and let it coole a little
it must cool but a little then take a quarter of a pint of Sack made
very hot in a bason then take your cream and stand upon a stoole as
high as you can & pour your cream into your bason very softly as high
as you can pour it right then set it to the fire till it be ready to be
eaten this will be all curd & no drink.


110. _To make a Sullibub._

To every quart of cream take about 3 quarters of a pint of Sack boyle
the cream and make the Sack almost as sweet as a Sirrop then set it
on the fire and make it reasonable hot and when the cream is a little
cooled with a wooden Spring draw up the cream and so squirt it in till
the pot be full if you make it in the morning very early twill be ready
to eat y^t afternoon. Some boyle a blade of mace in the cream.


111. _To make a Snow to put on the Sullibub._

Take a pint of cream and the whites of 4 or 5 eggs and a little rose
water Sweeten this with Sugar beat this with a stick which must be
cloven in 5 or 6 parts beat it till you find it begin to rise in
bubbles with a spoon take off those and lay them in a dish so beat till
you have all that will rise y^n when your sullibubs is ready to be used
lay on the upermost of the snow and heap it high.


112. _To make Clouted Cream._

Take the top of your milk after it has stood one hour and make it
scaulding hot let it not boyle then put it into an earthen pan then
leave it half an hour to make it froth as much as you can then set
it into the oven as soon as bread is drawn out of it let it stand
in 7 or 8 hours then take it out gently and let it stand at lest 24
hours before you use it make a bottom to it with Sweet cream boyle it
and boyle large mace with it y^n beat the yolks of 2 or 3 eggs with
a little rose water then take the cream from the fire and put 2 or 3
Spoonfulls of it to the eggs then Stir them together and put them into
a posnet to cream then Set it over the fire & let it boyle one walme
then take it off and sweeten it with Sugar if you should put the eggs
into it whilst it is over the fire it will be apt to curdle Stir it
all the while it stands on the fire after the eggs are put in when
it’s Sweeten’d let it stand being Stir’d with a Spoon till it be paste
creaming at top when it is cold take off the top of the baked cream
with a Skimer and lay it upon the other Scrape Sugar on it and so serve
it the baked cream will be near an inch thick if it stand 2 or 3 days.


113. _The Red Surfet Water for any Surfet._

Take a gallon of the best aquavite a pint of the best damaske rose
water a pound of white Sugar candy put all these into a large stone
jug to steep a day and a night then put in half a pint of poppy water
distilled as you do your rose water with a pound and half of raisons of
the Sun Stoned with half a pound of dates the Stones taken out and the
white skins, and then slice them very thin then take of mace cinnamon
and anyseeds of each an ounce of cloves bruised half an ounce liquorish
scraped and sliced a quarter of a pound, your anyseeds must be rubed
and dusted then put all these into your aquavite after all these things
have steeped 4 days put into it 6 good handfulls of red poppie leaves
it is the red single poppies that growes amongst the corn and if the
colour be not red enough put in more leaves & after 10 days let it
run through a jelly bag and put it into your glass and so stop it
very close and put in to your glass to it 2 pounds of your smooth musk
carraway comsets, and so keep it for your use, the Spice and Seeds must
be bruised if you do not squeeze those things when you strain it you
may put it into the jug again w^{th} a gallon more of aquavite and half
a pint of poppie water and a pound of Sugar candie more, Stir it every
day twice or thrice for ten days together and keep it close stoped and
then you may mix some of that smaller with the first which was the
strongest of all. This water is good for any surfet what so ever by any
accident and they may give 2 or 3 Spoonfulls last at night and if the
Surfet be dangerous give it once in 6 or 8 hours for 3 several times or
in necessity oftner.


114. _To make French Bread._

Take to a peck of flour 2 ounces of salt and a pint or more of very
good ale yest and knead it up as other bread with warm water as light
as possible then let it lye half an hour to rise then cut it to the
bigness you will have every loafe, which is about y^e bigness of a
penny loafe and make them up very lightly not moulding it at all and
put them into dishes flouring the dishes first with flour and cut off
that may be on the top to much then cover them up close again and let
them stand and rise again till they have risen their full which you may
know by the flour on the top which will begin to be crakling on the top
then haveing your oven ready hot and pretty quick turn them out of the
dishes upon a peele flour’d ready and so set them in as fast as you can
never pricking or cuting them round, Set the oven led up close but not
Stop it approved of your dough must be as light as any cake bread so
some flour will require more yest and water than other this is left to
y^e bakers discretion.


115. _To Dry Apricocks._

Take a pound of Apricocks 3 quarters of a pound of double refined
Sugar pare the apricocks very thin and slit them in the Seame of the
apricocks then forth the stones then strew the silver bason or deep
dish you boyle them in with the lesser half of the Sugar being finely
beaten and searched then set the apricocks in the bason or dish that
end downward which grew in the stalk with them. Strew the rest of the
Sugar upon them and cover y^m and let them stand one night or one day
while it be dissolved then let it boyle for one quarter of an hour upon
a quick fire before they be half boyled turn them with a spoon when
boyled let them stand 2 days in the Sirrop before you take them forth
so dip them in the Same then lay them on tin plates in the Sun and turn
y^m every morning.


116. _To make Plumme Gimbols._

Take your plummes when full ripe and put them in a porringer and set
them over the fire and stir them continually with a Spoon and when they
begins to brake and be soft take them out and pick off all their skins
stalks and stones very clean when you have done so sett them on the
fire again still stirring till such time all the moisture be almost
dryed up and the plum stuff be pretty stiff then take it off the fire
so let it stand till it cold then take double refined Sugar and put to
the plumme stuff and take as much Sugar as will make it paste and rowle
it and worke it together and let it be as thick as paste then rowle it
in works as you do gimbols in what faishon you please you need not oven
them they will be dry of themselves.


117. _To dry Cherrys Red._

Take to 3 pound of cherrys being through ripe and Stoned weigh them and
to your 3 pound take a pound of the best hard Sugar beat it and put it
into your preserving pan and put better than half a pint of water to
it and with your hand stir it all together then put in your cherrys and
Stir them in your water and Sugar and cover them and make them boyle
as fast as possibly you can Scumme them and when they be a little soft
take them off the fire and pour them Sirrop and all into a gally pot
then cover them and so let them stand 24 hours then pour them into a
Sive and let ye Sirrop run from them and then lay them on glass plates
as close as you can one by one or upon a clean sive dry them ether in
the Sun, Stove or oven when one side is pretty dry flat them and turn
them and when through dry box them very close and let no air come to
them they must be turned twice a day till through dry and on fresh
things.


118. _To make Bean Cakes._

Lay in water half an hour before you use them half a pound of almonds
then blanch and slit them very thin as possible you may the long way of
the almonds then take half a pound of Sugar finely beaten and search’d
and mingle with the almonds that are well dry’d from y^e water then
take the whites of 2 eggs with butter and wet the sugar and almonds
wherewith but not to much for they may be soon over wet then take of
your fine wafer sheets that are made for bottom and cut out into round
cases and so spread your almonds in little ruffles cakes the almonds
being set with a bodkin edge long you must mingle also some cardimum
or caraway seeds either will do well with Sugar y^n put them on warm
plates set them in a quick oven but not over hot neither must they stay
to long for looseing their colour you must beat your eggs with a little
rosewater.


119. _The Cabbidge Cream._

Take 6 gallons of new milk and let it be ready to boyle then put in
one porringer full of cold cream and stir it well about fill then 18
broad flat pans when tis cold take off the cream and lay it round in
a dish like a cabbidge and sprinkle a little rose water and a little
Sugar well beaten and sifted then Scauld your milk again and put y^e
same quantity of cream you did before till it be like a little cabbidge
the last cream that you take off the Scauled milk lay plain upon the
cabbidge but put no cold cream to it y^n strew some rosewater upon it.


120. _To make Paste of Apricocks._

Take apricocks before they be quite ripe and after you have coddled
them then pare them let them not be to soft then they will not be so
troublesome to pare then beat them very small in a morter then put them
in a dish and Set them on a fire never leting them to be any hotter
than you can indure your finger at the bottom of the dish never to
boyle for if they should be to hot it would spoile the colour of your
pulp and so let them stand on the fire till they be pretty dry which
will be till the Sugar is boyled up to Sugar and that very high to dry
Sugar again you must take to 4 pound of Sugar 4 pound of apricocks
after you have coddled stoned and pared them and when it be so take
it off and put it into your pulp till it be cold and when it is well
mingled then set it on the fire again in a dish or bason that it was in
before upon a chaffen dish of coales and not to be any hotter than it
was before in the drying before the Sugar was in it and then you shall
see it will thicken and come to a paste, then take your moulds and put
in them and so let them stand to dry either in the sun or in a stove
and when they be half dry cut them on y^e edges and take your moulds
off it must be very thick paste before you put it into your moulds or
it will run about do what you can it will run a little. after the same
manner you may make paste of coddleings only when they are coddled peel
them and put them in hot water to green if one water will not do put in
more till they are green then cover them close till they are green. you
must dip your Sugar in water.


121. _Angelicoe Cakes._

Put your angelicoe in hot water and so let it green boyle your Sugar to
candie hight chop your angelicoe small and so stir it together drop it
into cakes & so put it in a stove.


122. _To make a Lemon Cream._

Take your best cream and boyle it well and when it is ready take it off
put in the yolkes of 2 eggs well beaten and let it have a boyle the
Sugar must be boyled in the cream before the eggs be in y^n have in
readiness the juice of 2 lemons in a dish and when your cream is pretty
cold Stir the juice of lemon and Sugar and keep it well Stiring till
tis almost cold then put it into a dish for your use.


123. _A Clouted Cream._

Take 2 gallons of new milk and put into 5 or 6 pans and let it stand
all night and next day upon a charcole fire set the pans gentlely on
the fire and as it creams take it off and lay it in your dish and as
you lay it in Strew on a little fine Sugar and when you have taken all
the cream put to it a little cold cream & so use it.


124. _To pickle Mushroms._

Gather them early in a morning about the bigness of a walnut let them
be fresh and red underneath and of one nights growth blanch them of
the outside and pare them within with some part of the stalks if it
be tender and then Strew them into a pan of fair water and a small
quantity of salt shift them so 3 times and then take them out of the
water and put them into a skillet w^{th} as much fair water as will
cover them a little Salt a faggot of herbs and an oynion and when
they do begin to boyle besure to Scumme it very carefully and put 3
spoonfulls of white wine vinegar and when they are so done strain them
let them stand till they be cold make them a pickle 2 parts white wine
it Self and the other part elder vinegar and put them all into a glass
or pot and put the pickle to them, with a little long pepper a few
cloves one or two nutmegs quarter’d a little mace a little Salt, and
besure to Stop them up very close that no air may enter.


125. _To preserve White Quinces whole._

Take a handfull of the kernells that will jelly and put them in a
little Spring water over night then take your quinces that are of a
greenish colour and doth cut tender as any apple core it very well with
a Scoop and pare it and put it into a Skillet that will hold but one
at once take as much double refined Sugar as the weight of the quince
and as much water as will cover the quince Set y^e same water and Sugar
over the fire keeping it boyling as fast as may be and when you see it
to be clear and tender take it up and put it into your glass or pot
crushing it flat down with the back of a Spoon then put into the Sirrop
6 spoonfulls of pippin liquor and 2 Spoonfulls of the jelly from the
kernells then set it on the fire Stiring it still and when it boyles
Scumme it clean and then put in your quinces again and let it boyle 6
walms keeping it still Shaking lest it burn so then take it up and put
it into your glass again you must be sure to have Sirrop enough for
ever and anone there will rise a coat upon it y^t must be taken off and
fresh Sirrop put in.


126. _To preserve Goosberrys._

Take as much double refined sugar as y^e goosberrys weigh unpicked and
unstoned and to a pound of Sugar take half a pint of water and when
your goosberrys are clean pickt and stoned set your Sugar and water
over the fire and make your Sirrop and when it is clean scummed put in
your goosberrys and let them boyle as fast as possibly you can till
they clear and the sirrop thick enough which will be in less than a
quarter of an hour.


127. _To make Jelly._

Take a nuckell of veal cut off the fat and skin 2 calves feet very
white lay the veal and feet in warm water to soak out the blood shift
it into fresh water till all the blood be out then set it to boyle in
3 gallons of Spring water boyleing it continually till it come to a
pottle or 3 pints then if you will have it white put in a pint of white
wine, if red put in red wine, and boyle it a quarter of an hour then
take it and strain it and when tis cold take off all the fat and leave
the dross in the bottom and to every quart of clear broth take cinnamon
and nutmegs of each an ounce half an ounce of ginger sliced break your
cinnamon in pieces and quarter your nutmegs, then take 2 spoonfulls of
corriander seed half a pound of Sugar 6 Spoonfulls of rosewater put
all these into a new pipkine w^{th} the whites of 8 new laid eggs well
beaten stir all these very well together and set them over boyling them
a quarter of an hour & stiring them all the while then pour it into
your bagg with 2 handfulls of rosemary in the bottom of ye bag run it
through y^e bag twice or thrice.


128. _To preserve Rasberrys._

Take the juice of rasberrys and make your Sirrop of it to a pound of
rasberrys take a pound of sugar and put half the Sugar to ye juice and
let it boyle, the put in the rasberrys and let them boyle as fast as
they can take them off and Shake them oft put in y^n then rest of the
Sugar by degrees as they boyle but touch them not, when they are enough
the stones will look clear So you may do currants or cherrys.


129. _To preserve Oranges._

Lay your oranges in water all night then pare off the rine as thin as
may be then make a round hole that your finger may go in and take out
all the seeds and set them on the fire & let them boyle half an hour or
better then take them out and put them into cold water till the next
morning then looke that all the seeds be out and boyle them in a fresh
water as before and lay them in cold water again & the next morning
boyle them till they be very tender that a small bennet will go through
them, then set them with the holes downward on a clean cloth to drain 3
or 4 times double then to every pound of orange take a pound and half
of Sugar and to every pound of Sugar a pint of water make your Sirrop
and clear it and strain it then put in your oranges letting them boyle
moderately till they be clear, turning them often, then take them up
and when they be cold put them into a gallypot or glass & when they
have lain a fortnight in the Sirrop take them up & boyle the Sirrop
again.


130. _To souce Pigg._

Cut your pigg into 4 collers of a Side take 12 cloves 4 leaves of large
mace 2 nutmegs Shred thin strew all these on the collers with a little
salt rowle them up hard and bind them close and boyle them 4 hours and
when tis almost boyled put in a faggot of Sweet herbs and half a pint
of vinegar.


131. _To preserve Apricocks._

Take a pound of Sugar and a pound of apricocks Stone them and pare them
very thin let the Sugar be beaten very fine lay the apricocks in 3
parts of the Sugar all night the next morning boyle them in their own
Sirrop and when you have Scummed them cast in the rest of the Sugar in
the boyling & when they are enough and Scummed put in your ambergrease
& take y^m up.


132. _A Sweet Bag._

TAKE half a pound of benjamin and half a pound of Storacks half a pound
of orris an ounce of cloves and a few orange peels dryed a little sweet
marjerrum dryed beat all these pretty gross and take half a bushel of
damask roses, and a gentle fire under a Still fill the Still w^{th}
roses just damp them then take them out and put them into a large dish
and pull them all to pieces while they be hot Strew these powders being
mixt on the roses work all these together so that the powder may stick
on the roses do thus till all the roses be done then take a great
preserveing glass or 2 that will more than hold it and lay in a lay of
roses and strew in some powder so do till all be in the glasses then
bind it up close with a double white paper and leather on the top then
set it as hot as you can in the Sun every day Shake the glasses very
well if you find it do cake in the middle put your hand in the glasses
and stir it very well and when tis very dry put some amber grease
pounded & some civet rub it about the leaves what quantity you please
so you may keep it in bags as long as you please.


133. _To coller Beef._

Bone the beef and rub the inside of it with Saltpeeter a handfull and
salt it with as much bag Salt as will season it then lay it in pump
water 4 days then let it hang to run dry then season it with cloves
mace nutmegs, marjerom persly time, Seewory Sage, Shred small then
rowle it upward and bind it very hard with broad inkle and bake it in a
pot filled half full of water w^n tis baked take it out of the liquor
and keep it dry.


134. _Cherry Wine._

24 Pound of cherrys stalk’d and stoned and prest in a pot and so stand
30 hours or more then put all in a cotton bag strain it in an earthen
pan and one pound of Loafe Sugar in 24 hours twill run out six quarts
then vessel it for a month then bottle it, lay down the bottles in a
fortnight it may be drank.


135. _Little Cakes to be baked in Pans._

Take a pound of flour and dry it well and a pound of loafe Sugar beaten
and dryed search them both and mingle them together a pound of sweet
butter and wash it in rose water and worke it very much with your hand
and strew in a little of the flour and Sugar still workeing it till tis
half in then put in 6 eggs but 4 whites and so by degrees worke in the
rest when the oven is sweeping put in four spoonfulls of rose water a
little beaten mace a pound of currants your pans must be ready buttered
then fill them half full and search some double refined Sugar on them
bake them half an hour this proportion will fill 2 dozen of pans.


136. _To make a Carrot Pudding._

Take the crum of a 2 penny loaf and grate it and half as much grated
carrot and 6 eggs but 4 whites and some Sugar and half a nutmeg a
little salt mix it with a pint & half of cream and you must put it
into the oven, melt a quarter of a pound or better of fresh butter put
a little rose water 2 or 3 spoonfulls of Sack then put it into the oven
in a dish and let it stand half an hour the oven must not be to hot
Stop it a little.


137. _A Cream._

Take a quart of cream then put in 6 yolkes of eggs and three whites
well beaten then set them over the fire and stir it ye while then put
in some canded eringo root, candid oringe peel cut them very thin then
put in some preserv’d plums and rasberrys & jelly of pippins stir it
well together and put it in your dish and w^n tis cold lay it over with
apricock jelly and jelly of currants and quinces jelly also cut in
pretty fancys.


138. _To make a Flesh Cheese._

Take 2 oxe cheeks beat the bones very well & those that are not fit to
bake take out season it with cloves and mace jemacoe pepper and salt
as you see fit put it into a pot and put to it a pound and half of
beef suit & a pint of claret a faggot of Sweet herbs & an oynion bake
it throughly then take out all the bones and beat the meat in a morter
very well and pour away the gravey and let it be cold and take off the
fat then put the gravey to the meat again and put it in a Stewing pan
over a charcole fire stew it till it be thick & put it in a little
cheese vate scaulding hot with a cloth as another cheese and tuck it in
well turn it 3 times before it is cold and press it very well then take
it out & put it on a board till it be cold it will not keep long.


139. _A Cordiall Organy Water._

Take half a pint of Sack and 3 pints of the juice of organy some
cloves a little saffron let these infuse all night on embers & bruise
a handfull of organy and put thereto & still it in a plain Still tis
good for the Spleen y^e Stomack or mother you may still barm thus.


140. _To Salt Hams or Tongues._

Take such a quantity of water as will cover them & put in as much bay
salt & salt peeter 2 parts of the former and one of the latter as will
make a brine strong enough to bare an egg up the breadth of a 6 pence
when it is all dissolved over the fire then boyle it till you have
scumm’d it clean & when it is cold put in your ham or tongues & let
them lye in it a fortnight then smoake them in chimney a fortnight
longer.


141. _Dr. Moors admired Pills._

Take alloes mirrh and saffron of each 2 drams into fine powder salt of
wormwood and cream of tartar of each ½ a dram mingle all these well
together and the Sirrop of sharp citterns make it into a mass for pills
adding a drop of oyle of rosemary and when you go to bed at night take
3 pills & 3 in the morning and posset drink in ye workeing.


142. _To make Almond Puddings._

Take one pound of almonds beat very small with rose water one pound of
the best beef sewit Shred very small & the marrow of one bone cut very
thin after it has been soaked to fetch out the redness & a quarter of a
penny loaf grated boyle in a quart of cream half an ounce of mace then
take ye yolkes of 8 eggs and the whites of 4 & whip them well mix these
altogether with a little Salt and almost a pound of Sugar. the guts
must be stript very thin and renced in rosewater.


143. _To make Sawcidges._

Take 2 pound of porke or veale and one of beef sewit, mince it as small
as possible and put to it a handfull of chopt sage & a quarter of a
penny loafe grat’d & almost a quarter of an ounce of pepper one nutmeg
with cloves enough to make it a quarter of an ounce & almost double to
the quantity of Spice in Salt mix all these very well together with ye
yolk of one egg & rowle them up of a convenient length they must be
fry’d very quick.


144. _To make Whipt Sullibubs._

Take a pint of white wine and 2 or 3 Spoonfulls of Sack and slice part
of a lemon into it and let it stand one hour Sweeten it and put to it
a quart of sweet cream whip it and when the froth rises put it into
glasses.


145. _To make a Cordiall Water._

Take the leaves of mint balme wild time marjorum meadsweet the roots of
avens of each 2 handfulls and half the flowers of cowslips, rosemary,
red roses, marigolds rosasolis, burrage bugglase gilly flowers harts
ease sunflowers, of each one handfull Cinnamon and lemon peel of each
half an ounce infuse all these in 3 quarts of aquavite in a cold Still
stopt for 2 days and nights then draw it off with a gentle fire if
you please put into your receiver musk & ambergrease of each 3 grains
tyed up in a thin bag w^{th} your Saffron paste your Still close with
rye dough you may draw as much in quantity as your aquavite put into
it 2 pound and half of double refined Sugar stiring it often that it
may not Candie. Because the flowers & roots & herbs are not to be had
at one time you must as you gather them bruise y^m gently in a stone
mortar putting to 3 handfulls of flowers herbs or roots one handfull of
baysalt mix them well together tye them up very close in an earthen
pot well glazed the best time of gathering the herbs is mint & marjerom
in may balme in April meadsweet & rosasolis in June Avens in July
Sunflower in august.


146. _To Candie Angelicoe Stalks._

Take young tender stalkes slit them and bruise them at one end that you
may string them then boyle them in water till they will peel and when
peeled put them into other scaulding water covering them close let them
stand awhile over embers to green them wash them in cold water lay them
on a dish and Strow some Sugar on them & set them on coles to dry then
take near their weight in Sugar and boyle it to a candie hight then
put in your stalks they will make your Sirrop thin but boyle them till
they grow stiff & shine and your Sirrop is almost to Sugar again then
lay them flat on a plate & set them before the fire to dry seting them
sometimes on a chaffendish of embers.


147. _To Pickle Kidneybeans._

Take 2 parts vinegar and one water and put salt enough to make it bear
an egg then boyle it, and when cold put in your beans, being first
strung they will keep best in glass being close cover’d for use take as
many to spend in 2 or 3 weeks & put them in a pipkin with half water
and half vinegar and a little salt Stop them close and set them over
a gentle fire till they be green and tender so keep them in that till
used.


148. _To Pickle Turneps._

Pare them and cut them in thin slices and lay them in a gallypot
strewing betwixt each row grosse pepper and a little beaten mace when
they are all in pour as much vinegar as will cover them in 3 or 4 weeks
you may use it.


149. _To Pickle Oysters._

To one hundred of oysters take a quart of white wine and all the oyster
liquor strain it and boyle it and scumme it very well then put in a
spoonfull of whole pepper & 4 or 5 Heads of large mace boyle them an
hour and when cold put it up.


150. _To Pickle Broom Buds._

Pick your buds whilst they are green before they are yellow at the tops
and make a brine strong enough to bare an egg boyle it and when it is
cold put in your buds for a month or 6 weeks then green them puting in
the bottom of the Skillet nut leaves then pour in Spring water and put
in the buds and lay more leaves upon them set them on a gentle fire and
when tis almost scaulding hot pour that away and put in more cold water
so do 9 or 10 times till they are very green pot them up in vinegar and
keep them for your use.


151. _To make Rasberry or Currant Wine._

To a quart of water take a pound of Sugar and 3 pound of rasberrys
bruise them in a stone morter and put them into your water and Sugar
and let it stand 24 hours stiring 3 or 4 times then strain it through a
hair Sive or canvas bag then tun it and stop it close in 3 or 4 weeks
it will be fit to bottle it will keep a year you may make Goosberry
wine this way.


152. _To make Lemon Cream._

Pare 6 lemons very thin and put the parings into a quart of water & let
them lye in it 24 hours then squeeze the juice of ye 6 lemons into ye
water and sweeten it with double refined Sugar & put to it 3 spoonfulls
of orange flower water then take the yolks of 4 eggs & the whites of
10 and beat them well and strain them into your water & set it in coles
continually stiring it till it is thick enough but let it not boyle.


153. _To make Almond Cream._

Blanch half a pound of almonds and beat them very small putting orange
flower or rose water to them put to that 7 eggs well beaten then take
a quart of cream and pour part of it to your almonds & strain it then
pound your almonds again and put the remaining part of your cream to
them do so again then set them on coles and keep stiring it till tis
thick enough sweeten it it must not boyle stir it till it be cold.


154. _To make Snow._

Whip the whites of 3 eggs very well and sweeten a quart of cream and
put to them then whip it together then put to it 3 quarters of a pint
of white wine and as much Sack continue whiping it till it is very
light & as it rises take it off & lay it on what you please.


155. _Sirrop of Buckthorn Berrys._

Take 2 quarts of the juice of the berrys and boyle it in a pipkin
to one quart put to it 2 pounds of white Sugar clarifye it with the
whites of 2 eggs beaten to a froth strain it through a cotton bag then
boyle it to a Sirrop with a little cinnamon mace and Shred nutmeg put
in a bag and wroung now and then when it is cold bottle it up for
use. In all Hydropicall and Scorbutical Distempers 3 spoonfulls is a
resolveable dose & a proper medecin taken in white wine.


156. _To pot Beefe._

Take 6 pound of lean beef without skin or sinews and one pound & half
of fat bacon slice both thin and pound it in a stone morter and season
it with a quarter & half of an ounce of cloves and as much pepper and
a good nutmeg & as much Salt as Spice mix it very well and when it is
baked pour y^e gravey from it press it abroad in a pot when it is cold
cover it with butter melt’d it will keep half a year if not cut you may
do fat beef thus only leave out the bacon.


157. _To make a Cake._

Take 5 pound of flour & dry it well and 5 pound of currants and one
of chopt raisons and mix with the flour then take half an ounce of
cinnamon a good nutmeg half a quarter of an ounce of mace & one pound
of Sugar and a little Salt and mix with it near the fire then take
almost a quart of cream and melt it in a pound and half of good butter
make 2 holes in the flour and put this into one then beat 16 eggs but
half the whites and strain them with a pint and half of good ale yest
put to it Sack and rosewater a quarter of a pint of each mix it and
put it into ye other hole of your flour, and let it stand against the
fire to warme then mix it near the fire and cover it with a hot cloth
for a quarter of an hour to rise then strow in a quarter of a pound of
carraway comfets let it take ye air as little as possible ye oven must
be hot an hour will bake it.


158. _To make Jelly of Currants or any other suteable fruit._

Strip your currants into an earthen pot & set it into a kittle of water
let it boyle till they are broken then strain out the jelly from them
and the weight of it in loafe Sugar put the Sugar in your preserving
pan with water enough to melt it, then put in your jelly let it boyle &
scumme it as the scumme riseth till it comes to a thick jelly but not
hard you must stop ye pot very close that the water get not into it.


159. _For the Yellow or Black Jaundise._

Make a wine pint of clear white wine posset drink without curd then
take half a quarter of an ounce of the oldest castle Soape you can get
scrape it thin and put it into as much of the posset drink very hot to
desolve the castle Soape as the party can well drink at a draft drink
it as warme as you can going to bed and in the morning fasting the
remainder of ye posset drink fast at least one hour after it thus do 3
nights and mornings and y^n but once in a year unless occasion be to
take it oftner & t’will cure them.


160. _For Deafness by reason of a Cold._

Take a drop or 2 of the oyle of rue heat it and drop it into ye ears
and be sure to keep the head warme.


161. _To take away the Felme out of the Eyes._

Take a new laid egg and make a little hole in the top or one end and
take out the yolke and white of it and put in fair running water or
red rose water or fennell water a white copperice bruised and as much
comeing seed as you can hold between a finger and thumb and put them
all into ye egg shell and put y^e shell upon some coles & let them
boyle a little & let it stand till tis cold & nights and mornings drop
a drop or 2 into the eye & close the eyeled upon it and in a little
time twill cure them.


162. _For a Swelling in any part._

Take a quart of ale or stronge beer growns mallows sage and elder
leaves & stamp them small and lin-seed beaten small and sheeps sewit or
sallet oyle and oatmeale and boyle them together till it is as thick as
to make a poultess then lay it to the place swellen as hot as it can be
endured & it is a speedy remedy.


163. _For a Purge._

Take a quarter of an ounce carocostinum with half a pint of white wine
being steep’d in it all night the next morning drink it blood warme
it will give 6 or 8 stools or this take ruebarbe w^{th} red currants
beaten together.


164. _To Harden sore Nipples._

Take borace a quarter of an ounce and beat it small and in it a little
more than half a pint of milk then put it over the fire and when it is
dissolved and almost ready to boyle then take it off the fire and put
in a little allom in powder put in little more than will make it turn
into small curds that it looks pretty white then strain it through a
cloth from y^e curds and keep it for your use you cannot err in putting
in ye borace for the more you put in ye more healing your way of useing
it is to bathe your nipples as hot as you can suffer it mornings and
nights and lay a cloth wet in it 2 or 3 times double upon the nipples
being first singed you must bathe them a quarter of an hour at a time
and lay on the wet cloth as hot as you can suffer it.


165. _For the Biting of a Mad Dog._

Take filings or scrapeings of pewter Garlick and venice treacle beat
them together very well in a morter till they come to be like a poultis
lay it on y^e bitten place. Moulins Re:^{ct}.


166. _For a Child troubled with man wormes which often occasions
Convulsions._

Take notice when you fear fits to lick in a morning fasting the childs
forehead if it taste salt then it hath man wormes then anoint the
navell and stomach with oyle of wormwood 3 days before and 3 days after
the full of the moon then make 2 playsters of Galbanum & lay one to the
stomach and the other to the navell if it should have convulsion fitts
give it 3 drops of juice of rue 3 times just before ye fit comes and to
sweeten the mouth give it what you please.


167. _Another aproved for Convulsion Fitts._

Take a good sound nutmeg the same weight in cloves and likewise of mace
breake these spices very small and boyle them in a quarter of a pint of
strong aquavite till it comes to the consistence of methridate Spread
half of this on a scarlet cloth & apply it to y^e Stomach this usually
cures at once but never fails at twice when a fitts comeing.


168. _Cracknell Paste._

One pound of flour one pound of fine Sugar 2 yolkes and one white of
an egg half a quarter of a pound of butter 2 spoonfulls of rose water
colliander seed prepared make it up with thick cream.


169. _Jumble Paste._

2 pound of flour half a pound of Sugar the yolkes of 7 eggs colliander
seeds prepared make it up with thick cream.


170. _Dr. Burgesses Re:^{ct} against Ye Scurvy._

Take a quarter of a pound of Gwacombewood and boyle it in a pottle of
fair water till it comes to a quarter take thereof a mouthfull rowling
it to and fro a little time then put it out and presently take another
mouthfull & swallow it then take another & rowle it on your mouth a
quarter of an hour do thus 12 times a day.


171. _For the Stone._

Take 3 quarts of white wine and 2 ounces of beaten annyseeds 2 ounces
of liquorish a good handfull of burdock roots all these you must boyle
in y^e white wine till one half be consumed & so take it as often as
your stomach will digest it taking nothing between.


172. _Pills to kill Wormes and Open Obstructions._

Take one ounce of alloes washt clean in damask rose water half an ounce
of mirrhe half an ounce of saffron & a dram of rubarb make them into a
mass with Sirrop of lemons, and 3 of them take when you see occasion
about y^e bigness of a small pease at night going to bed.


173. _For a Rupture._

Take Snails & dry them well & beat them to powder & drink ye powder in
drink.


174. _For the Megrime in the Head._

Take goates dung and mix it with vinegar of squils and anoint the head
and temples therewith, or this, frankinsence mirrh and an egg beat them
together & apply it to the head and temples.


175. _For the Dropsey._

Take green broom 3 handfulls and burn it to ashes and steep it in a
pottle of white wine all night then strain it and drink a wineglass
of it every morning then afterwards take a greater quantity of green
broomes 2 gallons of sweet wort & boyle it and put it into a runlet
w^{th} elecampane or liquorish.


176. _Against the Plague._

Take a handfull of elder leaves and a handfull of rue & as much brown
Sage a handfull of wormewood & a handfull of brier leaves steep them in
strong beer or white wine 2 quarts take 2 spoonfulls at a time morning
and evening & walk half an hour after it.


177. _Dr. Smiths Rare Re^{ct} for Y^e Itch._

Take of the oyle of roses or the best oyle of olives an ounce & half
rock allome, flour of brimstone salt of prunella of each 2 scruples,
Roman vitriol a scruple let all these be finely powder’d & well mixt
with ye oyle then add to all these as many drops of oyle of Rhodium
as will give it a sweet smell. anoint herewith ye wrists and joints
affected. Tis an excellent good one.


178. _Aquamirabilis._

Take mellilot, cubibs, gallingall, mace, Ginger cloves beat all these
to fine powder steep them all night in 3 pints of the best white wine
one pint of aquavite & half a pint of the juice of Sallendine being
paste all night & still it off next morning with a soft fire.


179. _For a Sore Mouth or Throat._

Take a quart of milk and put into it a good handfull of woodbine leaves
and a handfull of brier leaves a handfull of collenbine leaves and
boyle all these till half be consumed when it is almost enough pound 3
or 4 almonds and put into it and a good spoonfull of honey of roses &
when tis enough strain it & drink it as hot as you can.


180. _For the Yellow Jaundise._

Take horehound 2 ounces hops one ounce egrimony bugloss roots
elecampane roots of each half a dram lignum alloes a dram & half boyle
all these in 3 pints of white wine to the consumption of a 3^d part
when it is cold but the liquor from the herbs without straining it but
if the party be feavorish then boyle the herbs in half hyssop water &
half white wine & do as you did before take 5 spoonfulls of this drink
Sweetened with fine Sugar every morning fasting 2 hours after it & as
much every night y^e last thing going to bed.


181. _Dr. Burgesses Receipt against Y^e Plague._

Take 3 pints of the best muskadine or malmesey boyle therein rue and
Sage of each one handfull untill a pint be consumed then strain out the
herbs hard then set the liquor on the fire again and put thereto long
pepper ginger cutcheneale or grains of each an ounce a quarter of an
ounce of nutmegs all beaten to poweder let all these boyle together a
little then take it off the fire and put therein an ounce of the best
methridate 2 ounces of y^e best treacle and a quarter of a pint of
angellicoe water keep this and your life above all worldly Treasures
take it always warme morning and evening a spoonfull at a time but
if infect’d 2 spoonfulls this is good against the plague y^e sweting
disease, the smallpox, measells surfets all pestilent distempers and
feavours used as followeth take a spoonfull of it when you first fall
sick & swet 3 hours in bed after it & then carefully taken out of it if
they are dry they must drink posset drink with marygolds boyled in it &
drink nothing but caudles & warme drink at other times.


182. _A Cordiall Water of Dr. Stevens._

Take ginger cloves mace cinnamon nutmegs gallingall grains, fennell
seed annyseeds carraway seeds groomwell seeds of each a dram liquorish
4 ounces avens cammomile, pellitory of the wall balme red roses garden
time rosemary lavender flowers wild marjerom basill mints sage penny
royall of each a handfull beat y^e spices very well shred the herbs and
steep them in a gallon of claret wine 24 hours then still it in a glass
still or Limbeck.


183. _For the Sinking of the Pallet._

Take a dryed walnut and pound the same and pour therein as much
aquavite as you make a little pap thereof and spred it on a little
cloth or tow and aply it to the crown of the patient bind the same
stiffly thereon and it imediately aweighteth the pallet but if it were
descended exceedingly then add as much frankinsence as the walnut.


184. _For an Ache or Bruise._

Take one pound of Sage one pound of rue half a pound of wormwood half a
pound of bay leaves cut them small and beat them in a morter then take
3 pounds of Sheep sewit ran from the caul mince it small & put it in a
morter to the herbs beat them together till the sewit be not seen and
till the herbs be all of one colour then take it out of the morter and
put it into a bason put into it a pottle of sallet oyle and work it
with your hands into the herbs till it be all of one softness then put
it into an earthen pot & cover it close so keep it 8 days then take it
and seeth it in a brass pot till the strength of the herbs be boyled
out then strain it through a canvas cloth and put it into a clean
earthen pot and anoint the pain therewith evening and morning laying
thereto a warme linnen cloth.


185. _A Poultise for the Kings Evil._

Take a bushel of foxglove flowers the green pluckt from them and stamp
them as small as possibly you can and put them into pipkin never used
before and put them to 3 pound of butter never salt’d before and boyle
them together a full hour and if they are boyl’d to dry put more butter
to them y^n let it stand till tis cold & keep it for use.


186. _The Imperiall Water._

Take bittony scabious pimpernell, dragons, Tormentill roots & all
burnet leaves and knots of each 4 handfulls pick your herbs & wash or
scrape your roots lay them on a clean table 3 days to wither then chop
the herbs and roots together and put them in a clean earthen pan then
put as much whitwine to it as will throughly wet the herbs & let it
stand 24 hours close covered then distill it in an ordinary still to
this water put a peck of burrage or buglos flowers 2 ounces of good
methridate or Treacle and 3 penny worth of turmerick roots a quarter of
a pound of liquorish a handfull of anyseeds a little saffron 4 ounces
of hartshorne let it infuse 24 hours then distill it again & as much
loafe Sugar into y^e glass to sweeten it to your taste.


187. _The Palsey Water._

Take sage rosemary bittony flowers of each half a handfull burrage and
burglass flowers and flowers of lilly of the valley of each a handfull
steep these in spirit of wine muskadine or aquavite each one in their
seasons till all may be had then put to them balme motherwort sage
leaves, leaves of orange trees and the flowers if to be gott of each
one ounce put them into the rest and as many Lavender flowers stript
from the stalks as will fill a gallon glass steep all these 6 weeks
or 2 months then distill them in a Limbeck then put into y^e water
citheron peels dry’d & piony seeds of each 6 drams of cinnamon half
an ounce nutmegs and mace cardimums cubibs and yellow sanders of each
half an ounce lignum alloes one dram make all these into powder and put
them into the distilled water and put to them Jubebs new and good half
a pound, the stones taken out & cut small close the vessel very well
with a double bladder let them disgest 6 weeks then strain these hard
with a press & filterate the liquor and put thereunto prepared perl
Smaragdis musk saffron of each 10 grains of ambergrease one scruple red
roses well dry’d red and yellow sanders of each 1 ounce hang these in a
sarsnet bag in y^e water stop it close.


188. _The Vertues of the Palsey Water._

It is of exceeding vertue in all sounding fits in weakness of heart
decay of spirrits it restores speech in apoplexies and palseys helps
all pains of y^e joints occasioned by cold, and bruises outwardly
bathed and cloths dipt in it and laid to the place it Strengtheneth
all animall and natural spirits & cleareth the externall sences,
Strengtheneth the memory restoreth lost appetite helpeth all weakness
of the Stomach being both taken inwardly and bathed outwardly it
taketh away the giddiness of the head, it helpeth the hearing, makes a
pleasant breath restores the lost speech helpeth all cold, distempers
of liver and the begining dropsey helps all cold diseases of the
mother. in Sum none can express the vertues of this water. Take bread
crums and Sugar of each a like quantity wet it very well with this
water, takeing it in the morning fasting & as much at night going to
bed if need is but if a fit of the dead palsey or apoplexie you must
give as much every hour to restore speech.


189. _To make Veale Collops Jn^o Raisyes way._

Take fat and leane veale sliced thin & well beaten with the back of a
knife then lard them if you please put 2 anchoves, nutmeg grated some
pepper & salt into the frying pan with your meat then frye it very
leasurely in fresh butter else it will turn to oyle, when it is enough
pour away the butter then take 6 yolks of eggs well beat with a little
vinegar then have some fresh butter ready drawn up to pour into your
eggs this being done pour it all into your frying pan upon your meat
and so shake and toss and mingle it well together then put it into your
dish squeezing in some juice of lemon & lay some slices over it & serve
it in to be eaten while hot besure to fry the meat very leasurely else
it will be hard.


190. _John Raysies Beefe Collops._

Take fat and lean beefe slice it thin with your minceing knife chop
it tender take an oynion and quarter it and some sweet herbs shred,
fry your meat with the gravie that comes out of it and half a pound of
fresh butter then pour off that gravie from it and let it stew in a
dish for sauce then take another half pound to frye up your meat then
take the meat clean out of the last butter and take out your oynions
season it with some nutmegs & salt before you put in the sauce to ye
meat then put in the sauce & serve it up with lemon as the foregoing
was & to be eaten hot.


191. _The Lady Buttons Melancholy Water._

Take of wall Jilly flowers 4 handfulls, of rosemary flowers 3 handfulls
of Damaske Rose leaves & cowslip flowers a like quantity of burrage
& bugglos flowers of each 2 handfulls a like quantity of primroses
and clove Jilly flowers balme leaves and pinks of each 6 handfulls,
of marygolds 2 handfulls of cinnamon grossly beaten half an ounce 2
nutmegs 3 pennyworth of english saffron 2 orange peels 4 ounces of blew
figs Steep them in Sack enough to cover them, and as you add flowers
add Sack when you have gotten them all together distill them in a cold
still & cover them in the still with Sack & when all is drawn off you
must put into your water before you use it 6 ounces of white Sugar
Candie, it must be stilled with a soft fire or your water will be y^e
smaller it is good for any heaviness of spirits & may be given to
weomen in travell.


192. _The Purge for Winde._

Take a Dram of rubarbe and half as much Sena (if easy to worke)
otherwise as much of the one as the other half a spoonfull of sweet
fennell seed the length of one little finger in liquorish tosed abroad
a pint of white wine as much water infuse it altogether & take half
a pint & dissolve in it an ounce of manna, & drink it when you have
strain’d it from the dregs, drink a small half pint & when it Grumbles
about half an hour after take another half pint before you take any
posset drink when it works you may drink posset as with other phisick &
eat chick or hen for dinner if you like Sirrop of roses better you may
exchange the manna for it and when you expect wormes change y^e fennell
seeds for worme seed keep warme in the taking.


193. _A purge for Spleen and Winde._

Take a quart of Sider put to it 2 ounces of the roots of pollipodiume
of the oake, one ounce of feynae, one ounce of anyseeds let all these
boyle gently together till half be consumed then strain it well out put
to a pint a pound of sugar then put into a thin bag these spices one
sliced nutmeg the like quantity of cloves and mace & a less quantity of
mace & cinnamon & 4 pennyworth of saffron then let it stand simmering
over ye fire 3 hours till it become a sirrop of w^{ch} you must take
a large spoonfull in a quarter of pint of posset drink & drink posset
drink in ye workeing.


194. _To make a Pretious Ointment for y^e Eyes._

Take 4 ounces of may butter 2 ounces of vergins wax 2 scruples of Putty
fully prepared 2 scruples of camphirr 4 spoonfulls of red or white rose
water, melt the butter and wax & then put in all the materialls and
besure to keep stirring it till it be quite cold when there is occasion
to use it take a little of it & put it in the palme of your hand & when
softned with your finger anoint ye outside of your eyes & temples last
at night and wash them with white rose water next morning.


195. _To make Currant Wine._

Let your fruit be very ripe and gather’d on a dry day and to every
3 pound of currants good weight with their stalks and stems on take
one quart of water and one pound of sugar then put your water to your
fruit and with your hand squeeze them through a hair sive then put your
sugar to your juice & when it is well mingled together and the sugar
dissolved then put it into a dry Sweet vessel fill your vessel quite
full & let it worke a week & then stop it up and not tap it under 10
weeks then draw it out of the vessel as you drink or bottle it which
you please.


196. _Mrs. Herbert a Midwife her Receipt against Miscarrying._

Take oake buds before full blown and still them in a cold still 3 times
over put on your first water on fresh buds next water on ye 3^d fresh
buds w^{ch} will then be strong enough so keeping for use and let the
woman that doubts miscarriage if at any certain time let her begin to
drink this water a month before her usiall time of miscarrying and so
drink it 2 months together about 5 spoonfulls every morning fasting an
hour after it at any time of the day and then rest but on any fright or
Longing or any other occasion whilst with child so as may give a fear
of miscarrying this water may be taken at any time of the day again &
thus distilled twill hold its vertues very effectually 2 years.


197. _Mr John Ashfields Re^{ct} against a Cold._

An ounce of conserve of red roses of dyascordium the quantity of a
nutmeg one spoonfull of the Sirrop of poppeys and 3 drops of the
Spirrit of vitriol all these well mixt and take morn: & evening the
quantity of a nutmeg fast 2 hours after it.


198. _The Black Plaister good for Sprains Aches Wens Sores new or old._

Take 3 quarters of a pound and better of pale yellow vergins wax and
a pint of Sallet oyle mingle both these together the wax being sliced
thin in a fair brass bason or pan then take half a pound of the best
white ledd in fine powder then take the oyle and the wax from the fire
and let it coole a little then put in ye ledd leasurely and stir them
together then set it over the fire and boyle it half an hour then take
it from the fire and to it put 2 ounces of frankinsence and 2 ounces
of mastick both finely powdered 2 ounces of mirrh 2 ounces of obliven
in fine powder set your pan into another for fear it should run over
when all the ingredients are in Stir it till it hath done rising, set
it on the fire and let it boyle half an hour more, keep stirring it all
the time then take it from the fire and put in 4 ounces of Camphire in
powder then set it on again & boyle it till tis black then make it up
in rowles oyleing your hands y^e older the better.


199. _To make Sack thin when it is Ropy._

Take to 20 gallons of sack 1 pound & half burnt allome 2 spoonfulls of
baysalt beat all this together half an hour & then put it into your
vessel & so let it stand a week before you perse it.


200. _Against the Stone in y^e Kidneys or Bladder._

Take oyle refined and mix with it Sugar and juice of Lemons it is said
to dissolve the stone in the bladder to my Lord Savill.


201. _Dr. Butlers Powder against the Stone._

Take nutmeg and sugar refined well beaten and mixt together so take a
spoonfull of it every morning in a little quantity of white wine.


202. _For the Goute._

Take raisons of the Sun beaten to a conserve & spread upon white soft
leather laying it to y^e greenest place fresh and fresh as you find it
dry but it need not till it be quite dry. probatum.


203. _For a Sore Throat._

Gargle it well when you go to bed with allome posset drink and if
very sore towards a quincey then lay y^e curds warme to your Throat.
Probatum.


204. _For a Cold._

Take a pint of milk boyle in it a large onion and at night when you go
to bed take out your onion put thereto 2 or 3 spoonfulls of rosewater
sweeten it either with Sugar or honey of roses & so drink it warme in
your bed 3 nights together forbareing your supper those nights you take
it. probatum.


205. _For the Piles inwardly._

Take pilewort leaves and roots with the flowers of Elder buds the like
quantity chopp them small and boyle them in hogs Lard till it looks
green over a gentle fire then strain it and put in fresh herbs so do
till it is of a very deep green strain it and keep it for your use take
some mutton sewit & mix with the ointment and make it into suppositors.


206. _A Glister for the Piles inwardly._

Make water into a warme pot & put it into a glister bag take it
presently before it be cold you take one of these glisters every other
day and when you do not you must use the suppositer but if you are in
great pain you may use them at any time for they do not worke if you
boyle pilewort in broth or grewell it will do much good, if the pain be
violent take 2 quarts of scumme milk put in a good many turnips sliced
and a great deal of the inner rine of Elder boyle them together 2 hours
and pour it into a close stool boyleing hot and set over it as hot as
you can possibly endure it this cures ye pain be it never so violent if
often bath’d with it & twice a day apply’d hot to ye place.


207. _How to dry Flowers._

Take single pinks and take ye leaves out of ye husks and cut y^m
somewhat Long leaving some of ye white to ye leaves then put them into
a flat glass wherein you have mingled half a spoonfull of Aquafortis
with 12 spoonfulls of water and when the leaves have layne in the water
half an hour or more take them out one by one and lay them on a paper
y^e right side down not to touch one another and after an hour or 2
when the water is well dryed up (as it will if the paper be laide on
a woollen cloth) then strow them over with fine dry sand till they be
all cover’d so let them lye a fortnight in a place where the sun comes
in, in which time they will be dry and stiff then take them off the
fire one by one shaking off the sand and wipe them between your fingers
lay them in boxes till the winter each colour by themselves and then
bind them up together by the white part of the leafe that remains till
they be of what bigness you please and so put them into the green husk
which must be kept for them, pickt early in the year they will keep the
better takeing the natural flowers out of them, rowle a little piece of
paper up and fill the husk with it lay them also in sand till they be
dry use no water to them when you put your flowers into the husk fasten
them with a private stick by ye green silk you bind them up withall
with a fine needle at the bottom of the husk. So many severall colours
as you have must be put in severall glasses of water or the colours
will not be perfect, Rose buds are only laid in water 2 or 3 hours
and laid out on a woolen cloth to dry without sand, for marygolds,
primroses, or larke heels or the like are only in sand without water.
Experience must be ye best M^{rs} to teach this art.


208. _An Aprov’d Diet Drink to be taken every Spring and Fall from the
First of September to the 1^{st} of October & from y^e 1^{st} of April
to the Last._

Take 4 gallons of the strongest wort boyle it to 3 gallons tun it up
with good store of barm that it may work well then make a Canvase
bag with a heazel stick thrust through it and so fasten the bag to
the stick that it may not go within 3 inches of the bottom of the
barrell nor float on the top put these following ingredients into the
bag 6 ounces of scena 6 ounces of polipodium of the oake 7 ounces of
bayberrys huld 2 ounces of anyseeds 3 ounces of aishen keys bruised 2
ounces of sarsafrage wood, 2 ounces of saldonella, 2 drams of rubarb,
let all these be grossly powdered except the scena, and when it hath
done workeing stop it up close leaving some barm on the top in 3 or 4
days you may drink of it half a pint in the morning and 3 quarters of a
pint in the evening, drink a draught of brothe an hour before dinner &
when you go to bed keep yourselfe warme dureing the time y^e more you
exercise your body ye more twill work. Probatum est.


209. _For Proud Flesh._

Take half a pound of Sheeps Sewit finely shred and melt it then strain
it and put half a pound of rozin finely beaten when the rozin is melted
put in 3 penny worth of turpentine and boyle it a little together
Keep stiring it; then pour it into cold water and keep beating of it
(changeing y^e water) till tis white.


210. _To dry a Hamm the best Way._

Lay your ham before a Good fire turning it sometimes till it is very
hot then pound 2 penny worth of Salt peeter very small & rub on it &
cover it over and under with half a peck of bay salt which has been
heat very hot in a frying pan till it has almost done snappering & pour
it hot on the ham when the ham is hot let it Lye in the saltpeeter a
fortnight y^n smoke it.


211. _To wash Poynt or any Sort of Lace._

MAKE you a board of well seasoned Dry Deale, of 3 boards in bredth well
Poynted, and as long as anything you desine to wash on it naile or
brace on a flaxen Cloth very tight sew your poynt and lace by the purl
and footing very streight on the cloth, then sew or pin very streight
over it a thin canvas or bolter cloth, Soap it all over & pounce it
w^{th} a brush and warme water (but gently) till your Ladders come
clean y^n rince it well and starch it (with white starch of a thickness
just to Jelly when it is cold) with a spunge but leave not much on
it you must dry it quick (if you cannot abroad) by the fire for fear
the board should stain when it is very dry pull off your upper cloth
hastily to raise a nap on it, then rip it off. Grey lace must be
stiffned with Iceingglass which has been asoke over night & boyle thin.


212. _A Diet Drink for the Kings Evil._

Take a handfull of egrimony one handfull of wood Bittony 2 ounces of
Lignum vite; 2 ounces of scena 2 ounces of Sarsaparella, 2 penny worth
of sarsafras, half an ounce of rubarb 2 penny worth of Hermidatis,
Pethimony and Stigados of each one penny worth fennell seeds and
Annyseeds of each one ounce, a pound of raisons of the Sun, 2 pound
of English liquorish, wash the herbs, Stone the raisons, Scrape and
slice the rest and bruise the seeds and put them into 2 gallons of fair
conduit water and let it simmer half a day till it comes to one gallon,
Strain it and when cold bottle it stoping it close and when you use
it your Diet must be only dry bread & raisons of the Sun and mutton
roasted dry without basting. Drink mornings & afternoons & at night
about a Dozen spoonfulls at a time. Probatum est.


213. _To make Counterfeit Nants Wine._

Take 12 pounds of malliga raisons and steep them in 8 gallons of water
about 10 days then barrell up the liquor and put to it a gallon of
the juice of elder berrys set it in some warme place that it may work
and when tis fine bottle it up and drink it half a year old half the
quantity of fresh reasons put to the first & half the quantity of juice
will make a smaller sort of wine and may be drank in a little time.


214. _A Varnish for Deal Floor’d Rooms._

Take Indian red a quarter of a pound half a pound of yellow oaker let
them be ground by a grinder of colours as for painting, put these
together and mix them thin with linseed oyle and put some drying oyle
into it wash the rooms with a cloth.


215. _To make an Oatmeal Pudding very good._

Take a pint of great oatmeal set it on the fire in a pint and half of
good milk or cream 3 spoonfulls of rose water a large flake of mace
when tis well boyled put it into an earthen pan and let stand all
night next day put to it 2 eggs a pound of beef sewit a little canded
citheron & orange peel (if you like it) sweeten it to your taste and
put to it a cold custard made as followeth Take a pint of sweet cream,
boyle it with mace put to it ye yolks of 6 eggs & 2 whites stir it till
it be cold add a little more rosewater put some bits of marrow on top
and let it stand a little in a moderate oven so Serve it in.


216. _For Mother Fitts in a Woman._

Get the after birth of a woman with her first child take off the string
then put it into a pot with 3 nutmegs shaved thin a pinte of white wine
a handfull of sweet time put these into an oven to dry it till it will
powder and search it through a fine sive. Give as much every morning
and night as will lye on a 6 pence in a Spoonfull or 2 of Sack take it
Spring and fall for 3 changes of the moon 3 days before the new moon &
3 days after & 3 days before the full.


217. _The Milk Water._

Balme spearmints, wormwood, of each 6 handfulls 12 handfulls of cardus
all Shred lay these all night to steep in 6 quarts of new milk and the
next morning draw it off. Ye Lady Downs adds angelicoe & to every
still full an ounce of liquorish & sweet fennell seeds.


218. _For Deafness._

Put ground Ivy one leafe into each ear rowle it up but not too hard put
it in fresh morning and evenings.


219. _A Water for any Sore or Sore Eyes._

Take 2 ounces of allume one ounce of white copperis, half an ounce of
baysalt, boyle these in 2 quarts of runing water till half be wasted
and when tis cold put into the bottle with it one penny worth of
camphire then stop it close and twill keep 7 years.


220. _For Convultion Fits._

Take single piony roots take of the out side and cut them as thin as
Groats Dry them on a sheet of paper in a fire pan, pound and search
them fine and give to a child as much as will lay on a silver 2 pence
in a spoonfull of small beer and give another after it give this twice
a day, 3 days after the change and full of the moon, and if continue
make a Issue in the arme if the convultion be in the head Take a grain
of musk divide it into 2 parts put it into a little linnet and tye
it up in fine rags and put them into the ears and let it stay there
a month. Take featherfew and wormwood of each a like quantity stamp
them and take the juice put to it a little Crab vinegar and shave in a
little assafetita wet 2 pieces of old cloth in this and put them over
ye ears & let them come out over ye face to reach the nose that the
child may always smell it.


221. _Another for Convultions._

Take a Cat of a quarter old or younger (for a boy a She cat for a Girl
a he cat) cut off the head and hold the head in one hand and the body
in the other over a bason that you may catch the blood that comes out
of both parts, then take the breast milk of a healthy woman (if for a
boy a girls milk and if for a girl a boys milk) then take a little of
the blood alone and anoint the stomach with it, then put 2 spoonfulls
of ye milk and mix it well with the rest of the blood, then set it on a
Chaffendish of coals till tis warme then take it off and strain it and
give the child as much as it will drink and fast an hour after it give
this but once and that as soon as a fit is past let the child have a
little assafetita ty’d in a rag & hung about the neck, dip it in Crab
vinegar often.


222. _The Water for the Fits._

Take rue feverfew wormwood of each a like quantity and now & then when
fainty or in a fitt sweeten it with Sirrop of Jilly flowrs give 2 or 3
spoonfulls.


223. _For very strong Fitts or Fitts in Great People._

Take the outlandish single piony roots and cut off y^e outside of them
then slice them as thin as possible and dry them just enough to be
made into fine powder give to a child as much as will lye on a 2 pence
and to a great body twice as much 3 days before the full and 3 days
after the same time before and after the change in a spoonfull of black
cherry water and at any time if the fits be strong you may give it
after the fit is just over and give 2 spoonfulls of the water after it.


224. _Another for Convultions if that should faile._

Take the missleto that grows on an oake (if you can get outlandish
tis the best) the leaves of it you must dry on a sheet of paper make
it into very fine powder and give it by the former method but you may
change the black cherry water and give it in water from green missleto
if you can get it. besure let not those y^t are troubled with fits eat
anything hot that is made of flour as pudding or hot bread nor any
thing of that kind. Let them drink almond drink to a quart of water put
a quarter of a pound of blancht almonds stamp them very fine then pour
ye water upon them, then pound them again then strain y^e water through
them again do so 3 or 4 times till all the goodness is gone then set
it on the fire and let it boyle a little then sweeten it to your taste
(you must scumme it) Take 3 or 4 spoonfulls at a time they may eat eggs
or pottatoes or any such light food. Let them eat also as followeth
Steep a good handfull of great oatmeal (just bruised) in a quart of
water the next morning strain it out and boyle it to a jelly.


225. _For Cankers in Man Woman or Child._

Take a new laid egg break the little end pour out all the inside pull
out the bottom skin and turn the egg down to let out all ye water then
take half the yolke of the egg one spoonfull of honey if for a child 5
tops but for a great body 7 buds of Southernwood shred as small as you
can, grate in as much ginger as will lye on a groate beat all these
together till they look whitish then boyle it in y^e egshell set in the
embers stiring it with a flat scuve and when the Southernwood turns
brown then strow in as much common allom as the bigness of a hazle nut
pounded fine let it boyle a little longer then take it off and let it
coole. put it cold into the mouth if in the throat swallow a little
(but dont rub the mouth) y^e 1^{st} thing in ye morning fast almost an
hour after it.


226. _To draw up the Pallet._

Take aquavite q^{rt} white 2 spoonfulls thicken it with grated nutmeg
and put some of it pretty thick just on the close of the head behind
& wind the locks round a bodkin over it to keep it fast on (and not
remove in 2 or 3 days) & strike up the head and temples with it if the
pallet be inflamed bleed in the arme.


227. _A Water for Fits._

Vervain feverfew wormwood of each a like quantity distill it and take 3
or 4 spoonfulls at a time sweeten’d with Sirrop of Cloves.


228. _For a Purge that works upward._

Take 12 bay leaves and rist them a little lemon peel a few cloves a
little sliced nutmegs boyle these in vinegar and let the person hold
his mouth open over the steem of it this will stop any vomiting.


229. _A strong Vomit for the Falling Sickness._

Take fox glove leaves and ye leaves of oake fern of each a handfull
boyle them in a quart of ale divide it into 3 parts and take it 3
mornings as vomits are ordered.


230. _A Pomatum for the Face._

Take 2 ounces of the oyle of benn half an ounce of Spermacitty 1 ounce
of Deers sewit if you use all Spermacitty you must have an ounce & half.


231. _A Pectoral Drink for a Cough._

Take 2 quarts of middle beer maiden hair hisop and rosemary of each a
handfull half a pound of sliced landfiggs a pennyworth of annyseeds
bruised and a pennyworth of liquorish sliced boyle these together
till it comes to a quart then strain it and sweeten it with an ounce
of white Sugar Candie take 4 spoonfulls in the morning and as much at
night shaking the bottle before you pour it out.


232. _To make Black Cherry Brandy._

Take a dozen pound of cherrys pickt from the stalks and bruised put
a gallon and half of brandy 3 quarters of a pound of double refined
Sugar, cloves, mace and cinnamon of each a pennyworth 1 nutmeg sliced
put it into a great glass or runlet and let it stand close stopt 3
weeks then draw it off as much as will run clear if you please put up
more brandy to ye rest according to your judgement and stop it up close
again.


233. _For a Looseness in a Lyeing Inn._

Take 3 nutmegs and grate them and an ounce of loafe Sugar put these
into a quart of Spring water and boyle it to a pint and give 2 or 3
spoonfulls at a time.


234. _For the Palsey and Giddiness in the Head._

Make conserve of Rosemary flowers Bittony flowers Sage flowers
severally begin with the rosemary Take the bigness of a large nutmeg
at a time last at night and first in the morning for 3 days y^n rest 3
days and do ye like by the bittony then rest 3 days again and in like
manner take the Sage and so go round again as often as is occasion for
it with these or at any other time drink some of Dr Stephens water to
be found at ye 182 Rect.


235. _For the Wind in the Blader._

Take 9 bees pound them and put them to a quarter of a pint of ale
stir it well together and strain it sweeten it with honey give it the
afflicted persons to drink they must till it has work’d.


236. _An Ointment for the Gout or any Swelling._

Take cammomile tops and liverwort (after the woollyness is cropt off)
of each a good handfull wash them clean and dry them in a cloth mince
and bruise them then boyle them in a pipkin or bellskillet in a quart
of sweet cream till it comes to butter then strain out ye herbs and
keep it in a pot close cover’d anoint any place that is afflicted this
must be made in ye month of may.


237. _A Stagg Powder for Fainty or Hot Bloomes & Tremblings at Heart._

Take the grissle or bone that grows in the heart of a Stag dry it on
paper then powder and search it fine and take as much of it as will lye
on a 3 pence in half a wine glass of Sack 3 mornings fasting, fast an
hour after it.


238. _For Deafness._

Take the Ivy that have white strings in it and pound it put some of it
into the ear and let it lay there all night.


239. _For an Imposthume or Gathering._

Take half a pint of Sallet oyle and a good handfull of cammomile pound
it and put it into the oyle in an earthen pot and set it in a oven or
the chimney corner and let it stand there 48 hours then strain it out
and anoint the place that is swelled keep it in a bottle close stopt
if any inward imposthume take venice treacle methridate and leafe gold
mixt together take y^e quantity of a small nutmeg ye last thing at
night for 4 or 5 nights together.


240. _For a Sore Throat._

Take tops of rosemary fennell sage marygolds with the black middles
sinkfoins of each a like quantity a good handfull altogether. a little
cammomile boyle it in a quart of ale till tis very strong of the herbs
then strain it and sweeten with honey or Sugar, you may boyle a piece
of gold or a gold Ring if you please in it.


241. _For the Stone Collick, or Gravell in ye Kidneys._

Take a quart of white wine or renish and burn it, take mouse-ear
pellitory of the wall, and nettle tops with the seeds and a few Juniper
berrys boyle these in Spring water till all the vertue is out then
strain it and put the water to the wine and bottle it up, drink a wine
glass (sweetened with Sirrop of elder berrys and De-althea & horse
raddish and squeez in some juice of lemon) once a day. Approved D^r May.


242. _For ye Same when ye Person is much weakened by pain. Dr May._

Conserve of roses purslane water, plantain water of each 2 ounces,
Sugar of roses one ounce, Red correll, blood stone, bole-armeniack,
Brasigelata of each half a dram, troses of amber one scruple, oyle of
vitriol 5 drops whites of eggs beat to water sirrop of yarrow, Comfry,
Shepard pouch, Bittony of each an ounce all mixt.


243. _To make a Fume to fetch up the Mouth._

Take rosemary fennell sage, marrygolds, Cammomile and balme and
sinkfoin a few cloves bruised, and the rine of a lemon boyle all these
in milk and water when tis very strong put it into a close mugg and
put a cloth over the head and put a gold ring between the teeth to
keep the mouth open and if the throat be very bad throw little bits of
butter into the mouth then hold the mugg with the stuff as hot as you
can suffer under your mouth and hold it till cold and try to sleep; and
besure to keep the head warme after it.


244. _For Scalds Burns or Childblains._

Take half a pound of deers or mutton sewit pick it clean and melt it
Take a handfull of the Ivy with white streaks pick it clean and shred
it small and take one spoonfull of goose dung set it on the fire and
boyle it till the leaf will break Dry and crimp them then strain it and
keep it for use in a gallypot.


245. _A Poultise for Burns or Scaulds._

Take half a pint of milk 2 spoonfulls of grat’d white bread take
Singreen and cut off the red edge and pound it and take 2 spoonfulls
of the juice and put into ye milk and bread and a spoonfull of damask
rose leaves shred mixt and let it boyle altogether very well to the
thickness of a poultise then take it off the fire & put into it a
spoonfull of civill or Sallet oyle. this poultise must be laid upon ye
foregoing ointment till ye flesh is grown even & then leave off this
poultise and use only y^e ointment to skin it.

If the sinews are injured take Snails with their house & prick them
whence will come a water with which anoint y^e wound with a feather
before you lay on the poultise, change y^e poultice twice a day.

If any watery humour feeds ye wound then make a plaister with y^e white
of an egg wheat flour bole-armeniack & vinegar and lay it above the
wound.

To bring the skin to the couler again Take a handfull of parsley roots
washt & scraped very clean & shred very small boyle them in half a pint
of cream and anoint therewith.

If the Scauld or burn is on the head when the wound is well anoint it
with honey to make ye hair grow again.


246. _To make Pidgeons increase._

Take 2 gallons of water in a pot or kittle and hang it over the fire,
and put in half a peck of Salt, one peck of fetches 2 pound of comming
seed and 3 ounces of annyseeds let these continue over the fire till
the begin to boyle, then strain the seeds from the liquor and dissolve
in the liquor 2 ounces of Assafetita, and pour in 3 ounces of oyle
of Spike and a pint of aquavite w^{th} this liquor wash your dove
or pigion holes and cast y^e seeds on a table in the house for the
pidgeons to feed on you may use this immediately after they have done
breeding & a month before they begin to breed.


247. _For the Palsey._

Take half a handfull of Bittony and boyle it in a pint of milk wrist
the herb before you put it in that it may be very strong of it, then
turn it with beer and drink a draught of it sometimes and take rosemary
and bittony of each a like quantity still them and put 2 spoonfulls
of the water in a glass of beer and drink it every morning fasting or
sometimes give as much powder of bittony dryed and searched as will
lye on a groat in a glass of canary, or a draught of y^e forementioned
liquor.


248. _To keep the Skin from breaking where y^e Dead Palsey is._

Take 2 quarts of cream and one pound of mutton sewit pickt clean and
shred small, boyle these together to an oyle anoint a cloth with it &
lay on Searcloth-wise if it be on a part convenient, but if the whole
side is dead, you must have enough dipt to Lay on.


249. _To draw out Fire when tis just burnt._

At first lay on Guzzle Dirt let it lay on an hour then wash it off, cut
the blister and lay on a plaister made with a spoonfull of honey and
the quantity of a small nutmeg of black soap mixt well together, let it
Lay on 12 hours & then lay on the poultise at y^e 245 Receit.


250. _For the Stone._

Distill 3 pints of white wine, 4 pound of onions 2 pound of Sugar.


251. _For the biteing of a Madd Dog._

Take primrose leaves and roots box leaves and pennyroyall of each a
like quantity and half as much rue cut small put them into a quarter of
a pint of warm milk, give it to dogs, Sheep, or Cows.


252. _For a Poisoned Dog._

Take half an ounce of long pepper half an ounce of madder an ounce of
white Elebore pounded very small together put a 3^d part of it into
a pint of warme milk and Give at once as much of the powder of white
Elebore as will lye on a 6 pence in half a pint of cow hot milk it is a
preservative for dogs, pigs, or Cows, or any beast bit with a mad dog.


253. _To Rost a Leg of Mutton._

Take a leg of mutton cut out all the inside and (leave the skin whole)
chop it small with sewit and some bacon cut in long slips, season it
w^{th} Salt and nutmeg Cloves and mace, Sweet marjorum & time mincet
very small put your meat into your leg of mutton again so rost it make
some of it into balls & sawcidges, take a loine of mutton half rosted,
cut it in steaks and stew it in water put in some wine and the gravey,
season it high with pepper and salt, put in an onion and a bundle of
sweet herbs a little Shallot a spoonfull or 2 of vinegar, Some orange
and lemon some brown buds & pickled mushrooms Take up your meat thicken
it with the yolk of an egg or 2 put in a little Sweet butter & some
Capers so dish it puting the leg of mutton in the middle of the haish.


254. _To make an Orange Pudding._

Take half a pound of almonds blancht beat them in a morter with a
little rosewater Take a quart of cream and 3 quarters of a pound of
Sugar, and the yolks of 10 eggs 3 quarters of a pound of butter, the
yellow rines of 3 oranges mince’t small, mix all these together lay
very good puff past in the bottom of the dish and cover over the
pudding w^{th} the same 3 quarters of an hour will bake it. Some add
muske or Ambergreese.


255. _To make a Tansie._

Take 16 eggs and but 6 whites beat them very well put into them some
Sugar and Sack, then beat them again then put a pint of cream boyling
Coulour it with the juice of Spinnage, green wheat, or prime rose
leaves mix it well and sweeten it to your taste so let it stand till
you frye it when first course is served in then frye it with sweet
butter, it must be stir’d and fry’d very tender, & when enough dish it
Strew on Sugar & Garnish it with orange or lemon.


256. _Sauce for Boyled Fish as follows._

Take Sampire and capers a like quantity and a little scalded parsley
and mince it all together, mix it with white wine wherein anchovise has
been dissolved, a piece of butter a little nutmeg & a blade or 2 of
mace Scauld it together pour it on the fish & Garnish it with lemon and
barberrys.


257. _To make a Quakeing Pudding._

Take a pint of cream boyle a nutmeg cut in pieces in it and a good
quantity of mace, 8 eggs and 4 whites beat them and then mix them with
the cream with a spoonfull of grated bread or biskit & a spoonfull of
fine flour a little salt, a quarter of a pound of Sugar, stir it well
together till tis of the thickness of batter take a thick bag and
wet it and rub it with flour tye it up round and put it into a pot of
boyleing water & turn it up and down at the 1^{st} boyling that it may
not settle thicker in one place than another so let it boyle an hour
the Sause is white wine butter and Sugar & nutmeg.


258. _Pickle for Brawn to last a Quarter of a Year._

Take 9 gallons of water 2 handfulls of baysalt, or other salt an ounce
of cloves and mace, white pepper of each an ounce & of Jamaico pepper,
put it all in whole boyle it an hour boyle it in a quart of milk Scumme
it clean as it boyles, leave the spice in the bottom for the liquor to
feed on & keep it sweet let it stand to cool till the next day and when
cold put in y^e brawn let it stand in a cool place.


259. _To stew Eels._

Cut them into pieces as long as your finger put them into a flagon
without water season them with pepper and salt and nutmeg and large
mace a bundle of sweet herbs & an onion or 2 set the flagon in a
Skillet of water over the fire so let it stue shake the flagon
sometimes softly when they are half stew’d put in a spoonfull or 2 of
white wine, Sider or vinegar & when ready put a good piece of butter
into them and shake them in ye flagon then dish them upon sippets you
may put in shrimps & oysters if you like it.


260. _To bake a Bullocks Head._

Breake all the bones when it is slit then season it well w^{th} pepper
and Salt put it into a pot with some water (& a faget of herbs if you
please) and bake it with houshold bread while it is hot take out all
the bones & place it very close in a small earthen pot that is very
deep, and pour in some of the liquor on it (whilst hot) press it close
and when cold take it out & serve it at 2^d course with mustard and
sugar Garnish it w^{th} lawrell leaves & curles of the Vine.


261. _A Goosberry Fool._

Take a pint of Gooseberrys boyle them and strain them take the yolks of
6 eggs beat them and put them together a little mace sweeten it w^{th}
Sugar to your taste Stir it over the fire till tis thick enough.


262. _To dress Soales a fine way._

Take a large pair of Soales and flay them on both sides lay them in a
Stow pan with some butter, claret wine and anchovise, Stew them close
cover’d and serve them to table with orange or lemon.


263. _A Pasty Crust._

A peck of flour 4 pound of butter and 8 eggs and whites. Rub the butter
in breake in the eggs and mix it with cold water.


264. _Puff Paste._

Take a quart of flour and 2 eggs mix it with cold water then rowl in a
pound of butter and strew flour between, beat it with a rowling pin &
rowle it 3 or 4 times over.


265. _Sauce for Boyled Mutton._

Put a good handfull of capers into near a pint of claret wine and some
nutmeg let it stew on coles & stir in some butter.


266. _Sauce for Rost Shoulder of Mutton._

Beat the yolks of 2 or 3 eggs very well, put into them a quarter of
a pint of white wine, a whole onion a blade of mace a little salt,
stir these over a chaffendish of coles till tis pretty thick save the
gravey of the mutton & put into it a little Samphire and capers, let it
not boyle after ye capers are in, take out the onion and pour the sauce
on the mutton and serve it in.


267. _A White Pot._

Take a quart of new milk boyle in it a nutmeg quarter’d and cinnamon
take out the whole spice and put in some slicet manchet and cover it
close till tis cold then breake the bread with a Spoon put in some eggs
sugar & salt and a piece of butter, the oven must be no hotter than for
a custard, or you may bake it on a chaffendish of coles leaveing embers
on an iron plate on y^e top.


268. _A Sauce for all Stew’d Meats._

Take all sorts of sweet herbs some onions Shred them all together small
Set it on the fire in a Skillet of water and vargise and salt and mace
when it is boyled almost away put the yolks of raw eggs and thicken it
over the fire and keep stiring then stir in a good piece of butter this
sauce is proper (also) for mutton, lamb, the head and purtenances, or
veal rost’d or boyled.


269. _To make Almond Puddings._

Wash half a pound of almonds in 2 or 3 waters then blanch them in cold
water in which they have lain in all night then beat them very small
puting now and then a Spoonfull of rosewater to keep them from oyling,
then put them into a quart of sweet cream and the yolks of 12 eggs well
beaten, 3 quarters of a pound of Sugar and as much butter the rine of 2
lemons pared very thin and mincet very small stir all these together &
bake it under puff paste or you may beat the butter with the almonds.


270. _To make Puddings 4 in a Dish._

Take a quart of good sweet cream & make pap with it & fine flour pour
it forth and stir in 6 eggs sweeten it with Sugar and a little Salt
some grated nutmeg, a little mace, some rosewater, a little grat’d
bread, couler one of the puddings with spinnage and put currants in
another, & 2 plain, put them in wooden dishes being first butter’d and
tye a flour’d cloth over them put them into boyling water and let them
boyle an hour stick them (when they are dish’t) the green one with
rosemary leaves thick the plain ones w^{th} blancht almonds & that with
fruit with canded orange peel, y^e sauce butter and sugar and Sack & a
little nutmeg you may put in some rosemary if you please.


271. _To stew Pidgeons._

Take them and cut them in halfs and season them with pepper and salt
put the gibblets in the stewing, fry 6 or 7 rashers of bacon & put into
ye stewing liquor and all stew them in Sider ale and water a bundle or
sweet herbs 2 onions a piece of butter and serve it up.


272. _To Boyle a Powder’d Haunch of Venison._

Boyle it with a piece of beef when tis half boyled stuf it with time,
marjerome, Savory, and Pennyroyall mincet small with a little sewit
then boyle it till tis ready then lay in boyled turneps in the dish cut
in round slices then lay in the venison and strew it with pepper.


273. _To Rost a Carpe._

Open and wash it clean, Strip time parsley, sweet marjerom of each
half a handfull mince them and incorporate them in half a pound or 3
quarters of butter mould it up and put it in the carps belly & sew it
up but first season the belly with pepper salt and mace and a little
ginger bind him on with pack thread fast to the spit, baste it first
with butter afterwards with his own driping very often, when you feel
it tender under the skin it is enough for sauce take the driping of him
& y^e herbs out of his belly and 3 or 4 spoonfulls of white wine boyle
it together and serve it up.


274. _A Chicken Pye w^{th} Sweet Seasoning._

Take half an ounce of cloves mace nutmeg, a little pepper a small
quantity of Sugar, 2 ounces of Suckets and marrow, dates lemon peel
grapes or green goosberrys according to ye season of the year so bake
them and when it comes out the oven cut open the lid and pour in a
caudle made with half a pint of white wine a piece of butter the yolks
of 2 or 3 eggs stir’d over the fire till tis thick.


275. _To coller Eels._

Skin the eels and cut them open take out the back bone Take nutmeg
cloves & mace beaten & some salt and strew along ye eel & lay another
eel upon that, then strew more & lay on another then rowle it up round
like a coller of brawn tye it in a clean cloth boyle it till it be
tender in water and salt and a little vinegar keep it in the same
liquor a week.


276. _To pickle Trouts or Salmon._

Draw them at the gills, wash them clean and dry them in a cloth then
lay them in a dish at length & pour vinegar all over them then strow
salt over them (not to much) let them stand in that pickle an hour or 2
then take water enough to make a pickle to cover them and put into it a
reasonable quantity of ginger, pepper cloves and mace, with a bundle of
sweet herbs let it boyle half an hour then put in your fish vinegar &
salt altogether so let it boyle till tis enough, if the pickle be not
sharpe enough add more vinegar, and make it to your taste as soon as
tis ready take out the fish & when the pickle is cold pour it on them,
this way will make them eat good and firme and look very well when they
are in season.


277. _A Lumber Pye._

When you have any cold veale Turkey Capon or rabbit a small quantity
will serve mince it very small. put about twice as much sewit minced
fine grate a penny loafe & put into it mince a few sweet herbs as
marjorum, penny royall, Spinnage &c., season it with nutmegs Sugar
cinnamon a little Salt, rose water a little verjuice 5 or 6 eggs some
currants worke it up altogether between your hand then put it into the
pye, and put upon the meat marrow dates, lemon and orange peels canded
and citheron and Suckets slicet lemon and some barberrys when it is
baket fill it up with a good liquor made of half a pint of vergise the
juice of a lemon butter and sugar and thicken’d with eggs like Caudle
y^e bread will soake a great deal.


278. _To make Spanish Biskits._

Take the yolks of 10 eggs and the whites of 5 and a pound of sift’d
loafe Sugar half a spoonfull of orange flower water beat all these
together 3 quarters of an hour then shake in 12 ounces of fine flour
and beat it a quarter of an hour more, have the pans ready butter’d &
almost fill them let not the oven be to hot very little will bake them
and slide them out before the pans are cold.


279. _To pot Hare._

First take all the meat clean from the bones and beat it very well as
to draw out all the sinews and strings then season it with cloves mace
and white pepper pounded very fine there must be as much again pepper
as other spices then mixt it with a sufficient quantity of salt, season
the meat and work it in your hands then have ready some thin slices
of fat bacon free from rasty and take a narrow high crutch and put a
little butter in the bottom of the pan then a laying of slices of bacon
then a laying of hare then bacon, so do till all is in the pot, lay
good store of butter upon top and paste it very close let it be close
stopt in the oven 3 hours, then press it into your other pot with the
back of a spoon very Close puting over it 6 spoonfulls of the butter
it was baked in. So let it stand till the next morning then fill it up
with the same butter if that be not enough add more the pot must be
dry’d at y^e fire.


280. _To wash Gloves._

Take yolkes of eggs and wheat flour and rub over the gloves like soap
then take a hard brush and warme water and lay them on a board and
scowre them well then take whiteing and water and mix it as thick as
batter and dip your gloves in it and when they are half dry draw them
on your hands and when they are dry beat out the dust and Gum them with
gum dragon with a spunge the gum must be steep’d with cold water the
Coulours are Spanish brown oaker, umber and red ledd.


281. _Eye Water._

Red rose water and white rose water of each a penny worth, 2 penny
worth of powder of Putty a quarter as much white Sugar candy shake it
altogether in a bottle & drop it into y^e eyes night and mornings.


282. _A Rich Cordiall._

Two pound of double refined Sugar a quart of fountain water 3 quarts of
the best brandy a drame of oyle of cloves, an ounce & half of spirit of
Saffron, 6 grains of musk, saffron 2 scruples ambergreese 2 grains put
the water and Sugar over the fire till well dissolved and scummed then
strain it into a gallon glass with the brandy mix the other ingredients
in a stone morter very well tye up the Saffron in one little bag and
the musk in another and let them hang into the cordial, which will be
of an amber Coulour.


283. _The Lady Ashfields Angellot Cheese._

Take 4 quarts of milk warme from the cow, Stroakings is bests, or 2
quarts of cream, a quarter of a pint of runnet or a little more, & when
it is all together stir it well and let it stand till tis come very
hard then take it up without breaking of it and put it into your vate
very softly when it is all in let it stand till night if made in the
morning then put a little salt at each end and so turn it twice a day
salting it every time you turn it for a week or ten days then slip it
out of the vate and pin a cloth about it till its coat be hardned when
hardned wipe off the salt and butter them to keep.


284. _Angellot Cheese._

To a gallon of new milk 2 quarts of sweet cream 2 or 3 spoonfulls of
quick runnet Stir it well together, let the curd when come into y^e
vate without breaking it will be all day filling, when in the vate let
it stand 2 or 3 days turning it twice a day salting it at each end
lightly and 2 hours after wipe off the salt with a dry cloth slip them
out w^{th}out breaking if tender bind them in cloths you must have your
milk only warm from the cow your cream cold run it in a paile just
washt with hot water turn not the vate till the next morning, if you
leave any salt on twill corrupt the cheese let them dry in a wet cloth
chang’d every morning when they are very hard spred sweet butter over
them, keep them in sweet wheat straw change them once a week.


285. _A Thick Cheese._

Take 18 gallons of new milk 2 or 3 quarts of cream put a pint of good
quick runnet when it is come gether it together with your hands drain
out all the whey and wash it with warme water not to hot cut the curd
very small and strewing it about a pint of salt strewing it in as you
cut it then strain away the water then put it into your vates thin ones
first to press out the water well then put the curd out into your thick
vate besure to fill it full that it press close let it stand in the
press 2 days and 2 nights, when well press’d rub salt on the outside as
on other cheeses, when hard if any chink be in them rub them with fresh
sweet butter keep them in a dry place a year old you may eat them.


286. _Almond Butter._

Take a dish of butter boyle 2 eggs rare put the yolkes to the butter
take 30 blancht almonds beaten fine with rose water or orange flower
water Stir them in the butter strain them through a Cloth with a fit
quantity of Sugar.


287. _To Fat Poultrey._

For pullets or Capons take barley meale 3 parts and figg dust of oats
one part and make crams of it in paste feeding them twice or thrice
a day & for drink let it not be water, but broken beer mixt with the
powd^r of chalke and sowe up their vent holes with a needle & thread
this fats them in 14 days therefore kill them or they will die w^{th}
fat.


288. _S^r William Buttons for those w^{ch} make Bloody Water._

Take of red single holliehocks leaves and still them in a rose or
ordinary still (the leaves of the flower) and of this water drink 4 or
5 spoonfulls then take of conserve of white lyllies, made of the leaves
of the water lillies the quantity of a walnut a week or 10 days as you
shall find good in it more or fewer days by him Probatum.


289. _A Purge of the Lady Binions._

Take 3 drams of rubarbe and put in it a quarter of a pint of white wine
seting it a stoop 12 hours then take it out of the embers in w^{ch} you
must set it to steep and let it cool a little then put to it one ounce
of Sirrop of roses if easie to worke if hard one ounce and half and
drink of it blood warme & when it works take a drink of posset drink
between every workeing.


290. _Another of hers for the Green Sickness._

Take one pound of capers 1 pound of the best currants you can get boyle
them in a quart & half of strong ale till half be consumed and take of
this a spoonfull of each, capers, currants, & liquor & stir after it.


291. _Mr. Walldrons ye Surgeons Cure for Green Wounds._

Roman vitriol apply’d not to the wound but to the blood of the wound
wiped on a clean linnen cloth then put your vitriol on the blood ye
last is best and when heal’d by this applications, bind your cloth
(wrap’d up as w^n you dress’d y^e blood) to a stone & thrown into some
well or deep water, then shall ye wound no more trouble you.


292. _Mrs. Hellen Parrys Receipte for a Cold._

Take ye fairest orange you can get rost it at ye fire then put thereto
a pretty quantity of Sallet oyle sweeten it with Sugar candie or Sugar
drinking it 1^{st} in ye morning & last at night.


293. _An Electuary for the Green Sickness or Pain in ye Stomach._

Take half an ounce of rubarbe slice it and beat it very well, then take
a quarter of a pound of blew currants wash them & dry them very well
in a course cloth then beat them also very well, then take 2 penny
worth of english saffron dry it and rubed very small then mix all these
together & beat it till it comes to a conserve, so puting it in your
gallypot & keep it for your use taking of it the quantity of a walnut 4
or 5 mornings together fasting eat not in 2 hours after it but walk on
it add wormseed & liquorish in powders.


294. _To Recover or Strengthen a Weak Eye Sight._

Take of cloves nutmegs, Grains of each half an ounce of english Saffron
2 penny worth of eye-bright leaves dryed in the Sun a handfull make
all these into fine powder then take 8 or 9 raisons of y^e Sun, stone
them, then put into every of them as much of the powder as will lye on
a penny eating them in a morning fasting not eating an hour after.


295. _Mr Gaskins Cordial Powder._

Take seed pearle, redd coral, crabs eyes harts horne white amber of
each a like quantity being all finely beaten and searcht, then take of
the powder of the black tips of crabs claws as much of all the rest of
the powders as finely beaten and searcht then mix all these very well
together & make it up into balls with jelly of harts horne, wherein
you must infuse a little saffron so leting them lye untill they be dry
which powder being finely scrap’d may be taken 10 grains in a spoonfull
of oraggons water washing it down with another Spoonfull of the same
water but to a young child seaven grains are sufficient.

The vertues are many as followeth, first to prevent Smallpox and put
for the disease it recovereth a Consumption if constantly taken a good
space. it is most excellent in all violent feavors burnings and against
all sorts of poyson it serveth to extirpate and master the venome of
ye pestilence when no bexra lemia Sigillata Beazers Stone or unicorns
home though taken in a double proportion can match or shew its Selfe
equivalent it is very good for the passions of the heart and for that
most Singular probatum it also helpeth ye quotidian & double tertian
agues the quartain I cannot much commend it for only it comforts the
spirits and mittigates the fits but for all other agues very good being
taken in time it preventeth a man from all diseases and infections and
continues their health and viggour working without any viollence to
nature and in agues without any sensible motion for it provoketh not to
purge or vomit nor give any offence at all to ye herb smell or stomach.


296. _The Lady Marquese Heartfords Re^{ct} for all Agues._

Take halfe a pint of white wine and the quantity of a walnut of London
or other treacle put them both together into a porringer and stir it
till it tis dissolved then put them into a half pint pot and cover it
close seting it in embers that may but keep it warme the space of 5
hours then when you go to take it oft opening the Lidd let it first
simber a quarter of an hour upon a very gentle fire then take it off
the fire and stir it a little then cover it & take it blood warme when
you go to bed the night before your fit comes for your supper you may
eat some light spoon meat it will cause you to sweat all night but must
not be taken till after the 3d fit. probatum.


297. _An Excellent Powder to Cure a Defective Memorie Gidieness in ye
Head or any other Distemper in the Brain._

Take 3 ounces of seana leaves zedoane commine parsley and dill seeds
of each one ounce ginger half an ounce cloves nutmegs gallingall
pimpernell roots sage rue vallerian Annyseeds of each a quarter of
an ounce pound all these small then mix them very well together with
4 ounces of white sugar candie finely beaten of this you must take
mornings and evenings a dram at a time drying your herb well before you
make it this is ye Lady Wroughtons with the following ointment.


298. _An Ointment for the Giddiness in the Head or any other Distemper
in Ye Brain or Deffect in the Memorie._

Take white lillyes colwort leaves wild balme of each one dram being
pounded put them into a pot with 2 ounces of Sallet oyle fresh butter
as much as all the rest 3 spoonfulls of the spirit of Sack 3 times
rectified water of rue of sage of Sallendine of each 2 spoonfulls
temper these well together and set it in embers to keep it warme 8
hours then strain it through a cloth, then boyle your liquor till it
be as thick as honey on a mild fire then take it off the fire and put
it in a wide mouth’d glass and Sun it till it come to the colour of
copper so keeping it for use when you have occasion to use it anoint
the hinder part of the head your poule and temple especially warming
it when you use it and keep the head warme some time after this is best
made when the Sun is hottest.


299. _Mrs Skillins Re^{ct} for the Yellow Jaundise._

Take a pint of strong beer or Ale 9 earth wormes Slit them and Scoure
them from their slime then take a handfull of Sallendine and one penny
worth of Saffron and put all these together and let them boyle up once
or twice then let them stand till they are cold then strain them out &
drink this 3 mornings.


300. _The Lady St Johns Aproved Re^{ct} for the Stone._

Take 20 bees and kill them as they come out of their hives dry them
on a tile stone or fire shovel then beat them into fine powder take
then some snail shells such as snails have left the clearest and most
transparent of them and beat them into very fine powder then take a
double quantity of this and mix with a single quantity of your bee
powder and put as much of both these powders very well mixt as will
lay on a 6 pence into half a spoonfull of Sirrop of althea called
marshmallows stiring it well together so giving it to ye party w^{hn}
the fits upon them and he shall find (God willing) present ease if you
please you may an hour or 2 after give the party a good draught of
white wine wherein you must boyle half a handfull of prosper and as
much pellitory of the wall.


301. _For a Cough a Drink by Dr. Bauyer._

Take 3 quarters of an ounce of french barley of the finest you can get
wash it in 3 or 4 waters then let it steep one night in water in the
morning pour away that water then put the barley into a quart of Spring
water and a small spoonfull of anyseeds with it boyle these together
till half the water be consumed then strain away the water and let it
stand and settle the space of an hour then take the clearest of this
water and sweeten it with white Sugar Candie to your liking swallow
down thereof as leasurely as you can a spoonfull or 2 in your coughing
fitts making it first blood warme before you drink of it.


302. _An Aproved Rect. for a Consumption._

Take 4 bunches of turneps and 12 bunches of coltsfoot leaves sweet
fennell seed annyseeds carraway seeds coriander seeds of each half
an ounce bruising them in a morter 4 ounces of english liquorish not
scraped or bruised but sliced thin half a pint of hysope water half a
pint of red rose water 4 ounces of white Sugar candie 5 or 6 ounces of
the best hive honey then 1^{st} you must pare your turneps then take a
well glazed earthen pot that is strong and lay in the bottom thereof
some of your coltsfoot leaves and strew thereon some of your liquorish
and bruised seeds then lay a laying of turneps then leaves then seeds
again then more of your seeds all over and down the sides of the pot
then your liquorish and seeds then your turneps so laying your lays
till all be in the pot but the last lay must be coltsfoot leaves then
cover your pot up close with paper or paste and set it in a bakers oven
with their peck loaves and when it drawn strain it as soon as you can
into a great yellow pipkin that will hold a gallon then put in your
waters and Sugar Candie and set it on the fire till ye Sugar candie be
dissolved then take it off the fire and put in your honney and keep it
stiring till your honney be dissolved then cover it w^{th} y^e cover of
the pipkin till it be cold then put it in glasses or bottles and keep
it in as coole a place as you can and drink thereof 3 times a day blood
warme the quantity of a quarter of a pint at a time fasting an hour
after.


303. _An Aproved Re^{ct} for the Wind._

Take a quart of white wine and a thimblefull of parsley seed the like
quantity of annyseeds and so much more of fennell seeds & carraway seed
and one penny worth of liquorish and half an ounce of nutmegs and a
lemon sliced put all this together in the wine and boyle it till half a
pint of the wine be boyled away then put into it a quarter of a pint of
Spearmint water and one penny worth of treacle & half a pint of fennell
water & so keep it for your use & when you have occasion drink of this
3 or 4 mornings when you rise and last at night & let it be blood warme
when you drink it this is excellent for what it is mentioned.


304. _For Convultion Fits in Man Woman or Child._

Take 3 drops of cats blood in breast milk or cowes of the milk one
spoonfull blood warme mingle the milk and blood together puting thereto
a grain of musk and give it the patient an hour before the fit if you
know at what time it comes if not then as soon as they find it coming
let them drink it. this is aproved.


305. _A Cordial Water of any Cherries._

Take one pound of cherries pluckt off their stalks then take 2 quarts
of claret wine and half an ounce of nutmegs and an ounce & half of
cinnamon and beat them to powder then take half a handfull of balme
tops 10 tops of rosemary spriggs then mix all these together and let
them steep 24 hours then put them in a hot still and let your water
distill with a soft fire into your glass and before you stop it up put
thereto 2 ounces and a half of white Sugar candie finely beaten & hang
therein a grain of musk So stop it very close and keep it for your use
it being good for any oppression at the stomache & to comfort ye heart.


306. _S^r Roger Pallmers Teeth Powder._

Take a quantity of Sandoues and half as much allome and burn your
allome then take a quarter so much bole-ameniacke and you must scrape
your bole-ameniacke beat your sandoues and allome into fine powder then
mix them all well together So keep it dry (or it will run to water)
and rub your teeth with it weting your finger to make the powder stick
and wash it off either with clarret white wine or water every morning
w^{ch} will long preserve y^e teeth. Probatum.


307. _Dr. Feners Strengthening Broth to Thicken any Sharpe Humour._

Take a pullet put it to boyle in 7 pints of fair water first breaking
& quartering and washing it before you boyle it and when it boyles
scumme it very clean of shavings of ivory and hartshorn of each one
ounce which ye night before you use you must first infuse it in hot
water add to them an ounce of french barley of cumffry roots thinly
sliced the quantity of four fingers of china roots thinly sliced one
ounce of dates finely sliced 2 ounces of gume dragon a dram of dry red
roses a small handfull, of burnet a handfull let all this boyle gently
the vessel cover’d till half be consumed then take it from the fire and
put thereto 2 ounces of old conserve of roses dissolved first in half
a pint of clarret wine and one ounce of marmelade of quinces 2 ounces
of peniedice of sugar one nutmeg thinly sliced so much cinnamon and of
the wood of red saunders thinly sliced or grossly beaten as your little
finger then set it on the hot embers to infuse 6 or 7 hours the vessel
close stop’d as I have direct’d and when it has infused as aforesaid
increase the fire y^t it may boyle and so soon as you perceive it boyle
take it off the fire & about half an hour after strain hard away the
broth and drink of this half a pint warm in the morning & at 4 a clock
in y^e evening. Probatum.


308. _A Wash for the face after y^e Small Pox._

Take a gallon of small white wine and 8 pints of rosemary flowers 3
pints of shell snails 3 lemons sliced thin, of balme & flax seed of
each a handfull 4 sheets of Venice paper and a dog of 9 days old take
the snails out of the shells and wash them in 12 waters then drain
them in a linnen cloth kill also the dog and flay it and fling away
the head dry the 4 quarters in a linnen cloth then put all this into a
glass still together and draw it with a pretty quick fire y^e 1^{st}
pint will be the principal the 2^d and 3^d very good put to each pint
2 ounces of white Sugar candie finely beaten & so keep it for your use
bathing it 3 times a day with a fine cloth or tuft of white raw silk.


309. _To make Runnet Cream._

Take a quantity of the best cream and boyle it and when it hath boyled
very well take it off and season it with Sugar and amber-grease mix’d
with a little rosewater but you must not put them in when your cream is
to hot but stir it till it be but warme and then put in a little runnet
as much as you think fiting then stir it till it be cold then serve it
up.


310. _To make Egg Cream._

Take a quart of the best cream and boyle it then take 9 yolkes of eggs
beat them well with a little rose water and season it with Sugar and
some amber-grease and when your cream is well boyled put your eggs so
prepared to it and let them have a walme together but it must be stir’d
all the while then take it off keeping it stiring till it be cold.


311. _To make Plumme Cream._

First take your plummes pare them and cut them from the stone then
slice them very thin and put them into a tankard then set it into a
Skillet of boyling water upon the fire that the water get not into your
tankard so let it boyle till it comes to a jelly then take it out and
beat it with Sugar & rosewater cut it into quarters and put some large
mace into it so let it boyle well then take it and stir it till it be
but warm then put in as much of your plumme stuff as will thicken it
and so beat them altogether and when it is cold serve it up.


312. _To make Apple Pasties._

Take of the best apples and pare them and core them and slice them very
thin and season them with Sugar and a little ginger and orange peels
& so stir it well together and put them into your paste which is best
when thinest.


313. _To make fresh Cheese and Cream._

Take a quart of new milk and a pottle of cream boyle them with whole
cinnamon large mace and sliced nutmeg then take the whole spice out
and coole the cream very well then wring a whole lemon into a little
whitewine vinegar as much as will turn the curd then take the curde
off with your hand and put it into a clean cloth tye it with a thread
& hang it up y^t the whey may drain out of it, in the mean time take
a quarter of a pound of almonds blanch them and grind them very well
as fine as you can then mingle the curd and the almonds being finely
beaten together and put 2, 3 or 4 spoonfulls of rosewater 2 grains of
ambergrease one grain of musk Sugar as much as you please and being
mixt together rub them through a hair sive with a spoon.


314. _To make Dutch Waffers._

Take a pottle of milk and warme it 2 spoonfulls of yest temper it with
a little cold milk and a pretty quantity of salt as may season your
waffers then put it into your milk and 3 manchets which you must first
soake in your milk cuting away the crust then breake it small and put
to it so much flour as will make it batter as thin as pancake batter
beat 18 eggs very thin with a little salt and put them first to your
milk if you will you may grate your bread and mingle it with your flour
and then stir it very well in your milk and eggs melt half a pound of
butter and put it to your batter and set it ariseing in the chimney
corner being cover’d with a cloth till it rise very well and then heat
your irons and take a piece of a bottom cruste and spread it with
butter and so anoint the irons with it then put some of your butter in
ye irons but not to much bake it awhile on that side then turn it on
the other side in like manner and Serve it up w^{th} butter and Sugar.
Probatum.


315. _To make Cracknells._

Take a pound of fine flour and half a pound of fine Sugar finely
searched mingle 3 parts of the flour with the sugar and a few anyseeds
and colliander seeds take 2 ounces of sweet butter and melt it with
2 spoonfulls of rosewater put in it one grain of musk one grain of
ambergreese made into dust with a little sugar mingle it with your
flour and sugar and make your paste with your liquor make it into thin
round cakes and so bake them no thicker than a plate make them up with
the rest of the flour and dust your paper very thick prick your paper
very thick before you lay them on when you set them in the oven wett
them over with the yolk of an egg and rosewater beaten together so bake
them in a reasonable hot oven.


316. _The Lady Jenkinsons Ointment for ye Pain in ye Stomach._

Take one handfull of garden tansey the like quantity of rosemary one
handfull of cammomile shred all these and then boyle them in one pound
of fresh butter till the strength of the herbs be boyled out then
strain it and keep it for your use.


317. _To stop vomitting for one in a Consumption._

Take of nutmegs cloves cubibs Sasanas of each an ounce Cinnamon
Gallingall roots Sippris roots Sasaperilla of each half an ounce put
all these in a jugg with a gallon of Sack or white methegline stop it
close and infuse 2 hours then run it through a bag then put in 3 grains
of muske as much ambergrease and half a pound of sugar you must set
it to infuse on some hot embers or near the fire that it may a little
warme then through the bag run it again when it is cold so keep it for
your use takeing of it morning and evening fasting 6 spoonfulls.


318. _The Lady Jenkinsons way to preserve Barberries._

Take the fairest and best colour’d barberries & take out (with a
needle put into a stick) the stones then put your barberries into a
silver bason w^{th} as much clariefied Sugar as will cover them and
so let them boyle in a seething pot of water leasurely till you see
your barberryes tender and the sirrop well coloured then take up your
barberryes and put into your sirrop half a pound of Sugar finely beaten
and so let your sirrop boyle till it be thick to a jelly and when it
is cold put in your barberryes & they will seem quaking and so you may
keep them all the year.


319. _To make Sugar Cakes._

Take a quart of fine wheat flour finely search’t half a pound of Sugar
beaten and searcht mingle these together with the yolke of an egg and
one pound of butter and one spoonfull of rosewater knead all these
cold together then make your cakes round and thin and prick them thick
laying them on flour’d papers so bake them in your oven.


320. _To make Biskit._

Take half a pound of sugar finely beaten 7 yolkes of eggs 5 whites beat
ye sugar and eggs together an hour then having your oven ready put
in five ounces of flour and a spoonfull of carraway seeds stir it to
mingle all well together then have paper ready cut and put a spoonfull
on every paper and so fast as you can hasten to the oven they will soon
be baked if y^r oven be hot as for manchet.


321. _To make Cheese Cakes._

Take new milk cheese when it is well pressed and work it with your hand
till it be like pulpe then work it with some cold butter and put in 6
yolkes and 2 whites some plumpt currants season it with nutmeg cinnamon
& Sugar and so make them up in very good paste.


322. _To make Almond Loaves._

Take a pot of milk and put so much runnet to it as will make a fine
tender curd then drain it very dry then take the yolks of 6 eggs a
spoonfull of rosewater 3 or 4 spoonfulls of cream 3 spoonfulls of
flour and 2 of grated bread So season it with Salt Sugar and nutmeg
then being well mingled, make them like loaves and bake them in wooden
dishes and bake them very quick or else they will flat when you serve
them then let their sauce be rosewater butter and sugar.


323. _Mrs Daniells Re^{ct} to make White Metheglin._

To every 3 gallons of water put one gallon of honey seeth the same on a
moderate fire till the third part be consumed scumming it clear stiring
it with a Scummer now and then to raise the honey from the bottom w^n
its sodden enough it will be clear in boyling by which you may know
it is boyled suffitiently then put it into a sweet vessel to every 3
gallons so boyl’d and clear’d put one quart of good ale barme the next
day draw y^e same liquor into another vessel leaving the grounds in the
bottom & then put new barme the same quantity after it’s again thus
purified and so let it rest in the vessel puting in your bag of spices.
The Lady Downs adds Sweet marjerom, rosemary pennyroyall, violets,
sweet bryer tops, fennell balme tops lavender tops and time the best of
seeds corriander carraway and anyseeds, of spices ginger nutmegs cloves
and mace the spices and seeds to hang in a bag in the barrell, these
herbs and spices to the quantity of 8 gallons half an ounce or better
of each. But with this addition twill not be so white.


324. _Another of Hers to make White Metheglin._

To 12 gallons of water you must take rosemary half a handfull broad
time, sweet marjerrom, egremony, harts tongue burrage buglace of each
one handfull of violet flowers 2 handfulls of jillie flowers one
handfull anyseeds corriander carraway parsley seeds of each one ounce
well bruised w^{ch} with the seeds boyle the herbs in the water till it
comes to 10 gallons then strain it out and let it coole a little put in
your honey good hive honey and stir it together ading so much liquor
as will bear an egg to the breadth of 6 pence then take the liquor and
put it over ye fire and boyle it a little but scumme it very well, then
make it cold and put a little fresh ale barme into it then put it into
a barrel & when it hath done working put in a little bag of such spices
as you please with a small quantity of musk.


325. _To make a Silliebube._

Take a pint of white wine a pint of mornings cream and a quarter of
a pound of Sugar and put them in a bason and beat them well together
till it come to a froth then pour it into a Syllabub pot and milk a
suffitient quantity of milk upon it and let it stand in a coole place
till night for the longer it stand so it grow not sour the clearer the
drink will be and the firmer ye curd.


326. _To make a Posset without Milk._

Take a pint of Sack and as much ale and put them into that you will
make your posset in and in a skillet of water set your pot with the ale
and wine till they boyle then season them with Sugar and other spices
then take the whites of 16 eggs and the yolkes of 2 or 3 and beat them
till they be as thin as water and when your Sack and ale doth boyle
pour your eggs upon it as you would do milk stiring it that while with
a spoon.


327. _To make Sugar Puffs._

Take half a pound of the finest sugar beat and search it as fine as you
can then put it in a stone alabaster morter then take the whites of 4
eggs beat them to a froth and put it to your Sugar and beat it with
your Sugar as white as you can and as fine as may be then put as much
civet as a pins head and as much musk then butter your plates & wipe
then afterward lay them in workes bake them in an oven after the bread
is drawn or pyes you may put seeds if you please.


328. _The Lady Jenkinsons Plumme Cake._

Take a peck of fine wheat flour 3 pound of butter breake your butter in
pieces into the flour till it be crumbly and then take 8 pound of y^e
best currants and put them in with a quarter of an ounce of mace & one
ounce and half of nutmegs a pound and half of loafe Sugar a spoonfull
of salt and an ale pint of Scaulded cream and a pint of cream cold
something better than a quarter of a pint of sack 6 eggs both yolkes
and whites a pint of new ale barme strain’d, mingle all these together
but do not knead it longer than to mingle it, then set it before the
fire to rise, which will be in half an hour, it must be cover’d with a
blanket, when you rowle it out you may if you will put a sheet of other
paste under it the oven must be well and hot and it must stand in the
oven at least 3 hours when it is almost baked you may draw it to the
mouth of the oven and see it as you do tarts.


329. _To make Light Bread the French Way._

Take half a peck of fine dress’d flour and a pint and half of the best
ale barme & as much fair water made hot not to Scauld y^e barme but
hotter than to endure your hand in it then put your barme to it and
season it w^{th} a small handfull of salt then make your dough with it
& knead it well together & as fast as you can make it into 16 small
balls & spread a woollen cloth to lay your loaves on & cover them with
ye same on board lay them one by one not to touch then put them in the
oven when you go about your dough you must not let it stand to long but
there is no directions to be given when to draw, but you must draw it
as you see Cause.


330. _The Lady Buttons Almond Butter._

Take the best Jourdan almonds and blanch them beating them very small
with sweet cream and strain it out and put in as much Sugar as will
sweeten it beat your almonds after the first straining 3 or 4 times
then set it over a gentle fire till it is pretty thick then put it in
a cloth to whey So let it hang all night to drain then turn it into
dishes.


331. _The Lady Bidollyps Rasberry Wine._

Take to every gallon of white wine 2 quarts of rasberryes bruise them
then put them and your wine into a stone pot and add to every gallon of
wine a quarter of a pound of sugar so cover it close and let it stand
steeping 5 days stiring it once every day then take an hipocras bag &
wet it with milk and so run your wine through it several times till it
run clear then draw it off into bottles and let it stand 3 week with
the corkes but slightly put in then put into each bottle a knob of
sugar and stop up your bottles then very close & tye down y^e corke &
set them in a coole place and it will keep a great while.


332. _The Lady Ashfields Metheglin._

Take fair water and the best honey beat them well together but not in a
wooden vessel for wood drinks up your honey put it together in a kittle
and trye it with a new laid egg which will swim at top if it be very
strong but if it bob up and sinke it will be to weake and you must add
more honey one quarter of honey to a gallon of water will make it very
strong then boyle it an hour and put in to it a bundle of herbs what
sort you like best a little bag of spices of nutmegs, ginger, cloves
and mace and cinnamon Scumme it well all the while it boyles when it
hath boyled a full hour take it off and put it into earthen pans and
so let it stand till the next day pour out all the clear of it into
a good vessel that hath had sack or white wine in it let your bag of
spices hang in it and so let it be very close stop’d & well filled and
let it stand a month longer then if you desire to drink it quickly you
may bottle it up if it be strong of the honey you may keep it a year
or 2, but if weaker than the proportions above writen then it will be
ready in 3 months to be spent rosemary time & sweet marjeron are ye
herbs should go into it a sprig or 2 of each.


333. _The Marleborow Cake._

Take a peck of fine flour to it 4 pound of currants 4 pound of butter
of cloves mace nutmegs carraway (or corriander) of each a quarter an
ounce but most of mace a pound of Sugar a pennyworth of Saffron Sack
and rosewater ale yest something less than a pint so make them up into
cakes about 2 inches thick prick them w^{th} a bodkin and bake them for
your use.


334. _To make ye Spanish Cream._

Take 5 quarts of milk warm from the cow and when it’s boyl’d up to ye
top of the Skillet have a quart of cream ready and put it into the milk
and stir it well about while on the fire then take it off and put it
in 3 or 4 Sallet dishes and let it stand in a coole place that day and
a night ye next day take ye cream clean off and put it in a deep gally
pot and put as much Sugar as will sweeten it and with a spoon beat it
till it be as thick as cream in a churn when it is ready to break and
then put it in a dish in what fashion you please with raw cream with it
or rather about it.


335. _A Cabbidge Cream._

Take fresh milk and scauld it and while very hot put it in severall
pans and let it stand till there be a yellow scumme upon it then cut
the scumme in ye middle then take it off the milk and lay it on a
sawcer which put in your dish you will serve it in with the bottom of
the sawcer upward when the sawcer is all cover’d with the cream search
some fine sugar through a tiffanie upon it and sprinkle some rose or
orange flower water upon it then take the same milk and do as you did
before so make your cabbidge as big as you will.


336. _My Lord Howards Re^{ct} for Sherbett._

Take 12 lemons and 12 oranges pare them as you pare an apple neither to
thick nor to thin then pinch out the juice out of your peels into sugar
next strain out the juice of your oranges and lemons into a pound of
powder Sugar then mingle all your juices together and let them stand
all night then the next day add another pound of sugar and let it stand
till it dissolves then bottle it up for your use keeping it coole and
perfumeing it to your likeing.


337. _To keep Damsons all the Year._

Take 3 pounds of the fairest Damsons off the tree and wipe them and
pick them with a few holes and lay them one by one in earthen dishes
and after y^e bread is drawn set them in the oven but not to hot let
them stand a day to coole after they are drawn then take a pound of
sugar to 3 pounds of Damsons and lay a thin paste in the bottom of a
Skillet and lay your damsons close one by one the rest strew between
and over your damsons to cover them so put them hot into your pot and
the liquor hot also to them so let them stand till through cold then
clarifie butter and put on them not to hot and so let it coole then
cover it close and keep it for your use all the year & when you take
of them to use and breake your butter you must keep the same butter to
cover the remainder till all the damsons be spent. Probatum.


338. _Oyster Porrage._

Take a barrell of oysters and in opening them save all the liquor
with them put a quart of white wine and a little mace a whole onion
and 5 anchovise set them over a gentle fire and let them stew till
you conceive them ready then take the yolkes of 16 eggs well beaten
together and so put them into your oysters stiring it constantly to
keep your eggs from curdling and when you find them enough stew’d take
it off the fire puting into it half a pound of sweet butter and rub the
bottom of your dish with garlicke or shellot and serve them up with
sipputs round the sides of your dish.


339. _To make Pancakes._

Take 8 eggs whites and all beat them very well and put to them a quart
of cream and as much flour as is needfull then take a pound of fresh
butter and melt it and throw into your batter and a nutmeg grat’d and
so fry them without any other butter in the pan your batter must be
made an hour or 2 before you frye it up eat them with juice of orange
and Sugar.


340. _The Lady Seymours way to Coller Beefe._

Take a flanke of the youngest beef you can get and cut it into 3 pieces
& put it into a paile of plump water and put 2 quarts of salt peeter to
it and so let it lay 4 days then take it out and take nutmegs cloves
and mace a reasonable quantity and a little pepper beat altogether
then take a handfull of sage and half as much young bay leaves shred
very small and mingle ye spices and them together and strew them
between every laying of beef and so rowle it up in collers very close
and keep fast with skewers as you tie it up then put in a pot with 3
pints of claret wine and a gallon of strong broth of mutton or fresh
beefe before you lay your coller beefe in water take off the scumme in
the inside and when you put the collers in the pot cover it with the
scumme then lay the over scumme 3 pounds of beefe sewit the pot must be
very close past’d up and set in the oven with brown bread & stand 10
hours then take it out of the pot from the liquor and keep them dry for
your eating.


341. _To boyle a Rump, Surloine, or Rearing of Beef._

First corne it well with salt 44 hours at the lest or 48 if the time
will permit then take of the marrow of the beef or the beef sewit
the length of your finger then take sweet herbs as marjerom, winter
savorie, pennyroyall, and some time mince them small with your fat or
marrow & so stuff it in 4 or 5 rowes all over your beef boyle it with 4
or 5 onions whole then put in pepper and ginger very small beaten only
as much as will give it a taste when all these are half boyled put into
the broth half a collender of any wholesome sweet herbs grossly cut put
into the broth a little vinegar when it is throughly boyled serve it
up w^{th} good store of white sippets in your dish pour your broth and
herbs upon the beef before you boyle y^e beef wash off the salt and cut
off the fat very well otherwise ye broth will be too fat and too salt
and when your onions are boyled enough take y^n out also for they are
only to give a taste but not to be seen or served in.


342. _To preserve Oranges or Lemons._

Take oranges or lemons large and well colour’d and with a little grater
grate off the very outside and deep colour then lay them in water 3 or
4 days then boyle them very tender shifting your water 3 times but let
your water be hot which you shift them with in boyling to take away
their bitterness from them and when they be very tender then take them
out into some earthen dish and with a penknife cut a little hole in the
top and take out all the kernells, then take to every pound of oranges
a pound and half of good loafe sugar and to every pound of Sugar half a
pint of fair water and breake your sugar and mix it with your quantity
off water and boyle it to a pretty sirrop then take it off the fire and
when it is between hot and cold put in your oranges and let them simber
a little but not boyle to fast, for fast boyling will make them hard
and tough then put orange and sirrop together in a pot and let them
stand 3 days then take out the oranges again and put some more Sugar
into the Sirrop & boyle it something thicker and scumme it clean and
when it is almost cold put in your oranges again and then set them on a
soft fire as before leting them only simber half an hour and then put
them up for 3 days more and the 3^d or 4^{th} day do likewise as before
to take out the oranges again and let y^m simber another half hour then
take them off the fire and put your oranges first in your pot you will
keep them in then pour the sirrop on them and let them stand till they
be cold then tie them up to keep.


343. _To preserve Pippins Green._

Take pippins when small and green off the tree pare a few and slice
them and boyle them in a quart of fair water till they be pap then
drain them through a cloth into a bason of earth then put the liquor
into a skillet with a pound of clarified Sugar and put as many green
pippins unpared as that liquor will cover and so let them boyle softly
and when you see them boyled as tender as a colding then take them off
and peel them the upermost white skin and then put them in your sirrop
again & boyle them till the sirrop be thick and your pippins will be
green and you must pot and keep your pot near y^e fire. Probatum.


344. _To preserve Cherries._

Take 6 pound of fair cherries and 7 pound of double refined Sugar then
take a pound of cherries and pick off the stalks and bruise them into
a gallypot and set it in a skellet of water and boyle a good while
puting a little water to get out all their juice the whilst they are
infusing stone your raw cherries and as you stone them put them into
some of your sugar finely beaten which will keep them from turning
black and when you have stoned all of them laying them in a preserving
pan strew on your cherries a third part of your Sugar and then pour on
your strain’d liquor of your other cherries to the raw cherries in your
preserving pan and set it on a charcole fire and so let it boyle very
leasurely takeing off the scumme as it rises and very often shake them
and stir them up from the bottom takeing them off the fire sometimes
to scumme them clean and let them boyle a pretty while then put in
the other part of your Sugar and let them boyle very high to clear
them & when they be boyled enough just as you be going to take them
off fire take a lemon and cut it in the middle and take out the seeds
and squeeze out y^e juice into the cherries all over them then take
them off the fire and take a sheet of cap paper and lay all over the
cherries to take off y^e remaining scumme very clean then take out the
cherries leaving them in your sirrop to cleanse them from the scumme
then when the sirrop is also cleaned of scumme pour it to your cherries
in your pot and when they are throughly cold tie them up in your pot
sometimes opening & stiring them will keep them from candieing & they
will keep the better.


345. _The Carraway Comfit Cake without Fruit in it._

Take 2 pound of fine flour 3 quarters of a pound of fresh butter a
pound of Sugar both these put into the flour dry (the butter in many
small pieces) 7 yolkes and but 3 eggs more which put into the 7 with
their whites also and beat them very well together with 4 spoonfulls
of Sack and as much rosewater first steeping in the Sack and rosewater
6 pennyworth of saffron some nutmegs grated then take half a pint of
cream boyled and cool’d again then take a pint and quarter of very
good ale yest and mingle it with the cream eggs and spices sack and
rosewater, warming it altogether milk warm keeping it stiring while you
warm it & when warm pour it into your flour, covering it over lightly
with the flour & so let it stand a quarter of an hour close cover’d
then mingle it all very well together and add thereto a pound and a
half of carraway comfits w^{ch} when all very well mix’d put into a
paper hoop & set it in an oven prepared for it 3 quarters of an hour
for if it stand to long it will run abroad & be heavy.


 346. _The Lady Marquess of Worcester’s Re^{ct} to sugar all Sorts of
 Sharpe Fruits or Herbs to dry or Flowers._

Take the whites of eggs and beat them to a froth and when the froth is
high dipe your fruits herbs or flowers and have some fine sugar double
searched and while they are wet with the froth dipe in your herbs
fruits or flowers into your sugar your fruit must be spent but your
herbs and flowers will keep all the year.


347. _To preserve Chyna Oranges._

Take what quantity you please of chyna oranges and with a smaller
grater grate off the yellow peel (the deepest and ripest oranges do
best and clearest) let your grater be very clean else it will change
the colour, and take great care you grate not to deep and as you grate
them put them in water or they will turn blackish and when you have
done them all wash them in 2 or 3 waters and have a kettle of clear
water to set them over the fire for a quarter of an hour let them boyle
in this first water then have another kettle of water boyling and shift
them into it so shifting them into fresh kettles of boyling waters 5
or 6 times so boyling them till they be so tender as a straw may go
through them then take them and with a penknife cut out a round piece
in the bottome and keep it to go in again, after you have first taken
out all the seeds very clean with your little finger and preserved
them and are going to pot them up then only you must put in the piece
you cut out as a Stople to them you must weigh them when they are
boyled and to every pound of orange you must take 2 pound and a half
of double refined sugar and to every pound of sugar you may put almost
half a pint of fair water, divide your sugar into 3 parts then take
one part and put into all the quantity of water stir it together in
a great Skellet and set it on the fire and let it boyle a little and
Scumme it clear then take it off the fire and let it be pretty coole
then put in your oranges and set them on a soft fire and let them not
boyle but simber a little while then take them off the fire puting your
oranges 1^{st} into a pot and then pour on the sirrop to them and let
them stand 3 days then take the oranges from the sirrop and put your
sirrop into a skellet and put the second part of the sugar and pare and
core and quarter 6 John apples and put them into your sirrop and set it
on the fire leting it boyle quick till it be much thicker than it was
before when you think it thick enough take it off y^e fire and let it
be almost cold then put in y^e oranges again and set them on ye fire
and let them simber half an hour as before turning them often (or they
will not be all over of one colour) then take them off the fire and pot
them up as before to stand 3 days more, and at the 3^d days end take
out the oranges and put in y^e 3^d part of your sugar into the sirrop
and 6 more John apples ordered as before in with the sirrop and boyle
it very thick then take it off and set it acooling as before then put
in the oranges and give them one boyling up or 2 but have a care in
boyling they do not harden but take them off the fire and when they are
quite cold tye them up in your pot very close to keep for your spending
remember to take out the apples before you put in your oranges or that
they be so tender as to make the sirrop. Probatum.


348. _A Cake for Ordinary Uses._

Take 4 pound of fine flour warm it in an earthen pan by the fire then
break in a pound of fresh butter and a pound of sugar mixing both
very well into y^r dryed flour then take 10 eggs put in but 3 of the
whites and beat them very well then put to your eggs when well beaten
3 spoonfulls of rosewater and a quarter of a pint of sack a quart of
good ale yest more yest if not very good a pint of cream boyled and
cooled again some salt a nutmeg grated and some cloves & mace beaten
also small mixing all very well together and warm it milk warm & so
pour it to your flour very well covering it up warm for a quarter of an
hour then put in a pound of raisons of the Sun stoned and cut small 3
pound of currants clean washt rubbed and dryed all which mixt very well
together and put it into a paper hoop and set it in a oven as hot as
for small bread and let it stand one hour and a quarter which will be
long enough.


349. _Madame Brewen’s French Way to make ye Runnet or Trifle Cream._

Take the blossomes of hartiechokes when they blow and keep them dry all
ye year for your use as you do other flowers and when you would make
this cream put a few of these blossomes in about a spoonfull of flowers
to a pint of cream or new milk and it will turn it as well as runnet
and give a more pleasant flavour.


350. _Cowslips into Plummes to make Wine._

Instead of cowslips take Plummes and slit them and put them into a
vessel with a tap in it then take as many gallons of water to your
Damsens as you please & to every gallon of water a pound of Powder
Sugar and boyle it till it be clear of ye Scumme then pour it on your
Damsens into your vessel boyling hot first puting in with your Plummes
some raisons of the Sun Stoned so stop it up 5 or 6 days then draw it
off through a strainer and when the vessel is clean pour it in again
when it’s strain’d and set it to working with a toast spred with ale
yest and let it worke and after working let it stand 4 or 5 days a
clearing then draw it into bottles and put a raison of the Sun Ston’d
and a nob of Sugar in each bottle & stop it loosly 2 or 3 days else
they will fly but afterwards stop your bottles as fast as you can and
set them very coole. Probatum est By ye Lady Seymour.


351. _My Lady Seymours Pancake._

Take 12 yolkes of eggs 2 large nutmegs grated a little Salt to season
it and 4 full spoonfull of Sugar beat these together halfe an hour then
stir in as much fine flour as will stiffen it as soft as a pudding then
add to all these a quarter of a pint of Sack & beat it in till it be
well mix’d then beat in cream a little and little till it comes to a
thin batter so fry them up with a quick fire either with beef lard or
fresh butter make your pans first hot with ordinary batter which will
make your best fry the better, it is ye best way to make them eat short
and light not to make your batter before you are ready to fry them up.


352. _My Lady Ffosters Metheglin._

Take so much clear honey in cold spring water it must be such water
as will bear soap well and mingle your water and honey till it will
bear an egg when your honey is dissolved in your water cold then put
it in a kettle and boyle it 2 hours still scumming it while any scumme
will rise then put it into coolers and when coole as wort to every
12 gallons of liquor put a large quarter of a pint of ale yest then
barrel it up filling your vessel not full about 3 fingers breadth of
ye bung hole and hang in your barrell an ounce and half of nutmegs
grossly beaten in a bag with a bullet or the like to keep your spice
low in your barrell so stop it up and at the years end drink of it and
when you draw of it you may bottle it if you please the older it is
the better but your vessel must be stop’d very close all the time you
keep it and Drink not of it till 12 months old. Probatum est by ye Lady
Downs.


353. _A Metheglin to be made at Barthollemew Tide._

Take 8 gallons of the best fair water that is not harsh for the better
the water the better your liquor will be then take corriander seeds
carraways & anyseeds of each half a spoonfull 2 or 3 large maces and
also agremoney sweet marjerom broad time, sweet brier tops pennyroyall
of each a quarter of a handfull a few double violet flowers and a
branch or 2 of rosemary boyle all these together in the water half an
hour then strain it through a ranger then set it a cooling till it be
almost cold then pour it from the bottom and put so much honey to it as
will make it so strong as to carry an egg that nothing may be seen of
it but the breadth of a 6 pence then boyle it again and let it boyle
till you have scummed it clean then set it abroad as you do wort to
coole and put a pint of ale barm to it when you tun it into the barrell
put into a bag sliced ginger nutmegs cloves mace and cinnamon and
likewise a stone to weigh down the bag and tye a string to it and nail
it to ye barrell that it may hang in the middle and when it hath done
purging mingle half a grain of musk into a spoonfull or the liquor and
put it into the barrell and stop it up very close it will keep long and
be very good to y^e last ye receipt is to put the barme to it in the
barrell but by experience it is found the best way to put the barm to
it before you tun it and set it to working in a little cooler it being
cover’d close and so kept cover’d close till the barme begin to flat
w^{ch} will be 3 or 4 days & then tun it into the barrell & if it worke
again stop it not till it hath done working.


354. _To preserve Grapes for all the Year._

Take fair clusters of grapes and lay them in a platter then cast sugar
on them & so put them into a hot oven now and then pouring the liquor
from them then turn them and cast more sugar on them as before then
take that liquid substance and make a sirrop of it and when your sirrop
is cold put in your grapes & so keep them all the year.


355. _A Marrow Pudding._

Take the marrow out of the bones and after boyle the bones and take
of the fat that riseth in the boyling then take the fat of the sheeps
guts and shred it very small then mingle it with manchet crums being
grat’d and nutmegs cloves mace and some Sugar (musk if you please) and
a few currants but you must first Plump your currants because all the
other ingredients require but little boyling add some rosewater to your
spices and sugar these puddings must not be cut in eating but suckt out
otherwise the marrow will run out which is all their goodness.


356. _To Candie Irringoe Roots._

Take your roots new gather’d without joints or knots boyle them tender
in fair water but let your water first boyle before you put them in
then peel them and slit them and wash them in 2 or 3 waters dry them
with a cloth then take twice as much sugar and when your sugar is
refin’d boyle them in one half till they be tender and clear and make
a sirrop of the other half to the hight of manus Christi that is till
it will draw off as fine as a hair then put in your roots again and
boyle them and when you find them enough take them up and shake them in
a bason till they be pretty dry after lay them on papers till they be
quite dry.


357. _To make a Sweetmeat like Rashers of Bacon._

Take some of your marshpane paste rowle it in sanders till it be red
then rowle abroad 3 rowles of the red and 4 of the white and so lay a
white and red & when all is so lay’d cut them a thwart in thin slices
and dry them & it will be like.


358. _To Preserve Oranges in Jelly._

Take thick rind oranges pare or grate them very thin lay them in water
3 or 4 days then boyle them tender in fair water then take them out and
put them into a pan of cold water all night next day dry them with a
cloth put them into so much clarified Sugar as will cover them so let
them boyle soberly close cover’d now and then turning them then let
them stand in an earthen pann all night the next day set them on the
fire again & when you see them look clear & tender then pour them into
a Sive and let your sirrop drain from them then put a quart of apple
water into that sirrop and a pound of fresh Sugar & that will make your
oranges lay in quaking jelly when it boyled with the other sirrop.


359. _Mathew Cariers Ollio or Pottage._

Take 13 pound of beef sliced small and boyle out the gravie of it then
strain it and stew in that broth 6 sweet breads 12 Squobe pigeons 6
pair of Lamb stones 6 sheeps tongues and pallets, 8 marrow bones the
bones boyle with your beef before you strain it and then take them out
and serve them in ye broth with the forementioned ingredients in your
strain’d broth and season it with convenient Salt and Sweet Spices and
put manchet cut grossly in it and raw cuccumber iff in season or a few
green pease or the like and so stew altogether & then serve it in hot
as possible & be sure to have broth enough therefore rather more than
less beef.


360. _To make Sugar Jumballs._

Take the best sort of gume dragon the weight of 6 pence steep it in a
good spoonfull of rose or orange flower water then beat an egg to froth
and let it stand to settle put the juice of a fair lemon into it and
when it hath stood a while strain it out clear then take a quarter
of a pound of double refined Sugar well sifted put it into a marble
morter with some ambergreese prepared then put in your gum and a little
spoonfull of the pure froth of the egg so grind it altogether now and
then puting in a spoonfull of sugar which you must keep out, if it grow
dry in ye doing put in a drop or 2 of juice of Lemon in a quarter of an
hour they will beat easie sift some sugar on a paper take out the stuff
which must be as thick as pap rowle it with your fingers into what form
you please but first sift Sugar on your paper you bake them on and set
them in the oven when white bread comes forth when they rise they are
enough and when you take them off the papers and your oven cooled set
them in again one night.


361. _To make Gooseberry Wine._

Take a skillet with a quart or 3 pints of goosberries full ripe to a
quart of Spring water set them on a soft fire and let them stand till
the water taste sharpe of y^e goosberrys but let them not break to
pieces for that will make your liquor thick then strain it and boyle
it again half as clear then set it in an earthen pan leting it stand
till the next day then bottle it up with 3 ounces of Sugar to each
bottle. Stop it not till it hath done working but then very close. redd
goosberries make a very pretty wine.


362. _Balls to take Stains out of Linnen._

Take 4 ounces of hard white soap beat it in a morter with 2 small
lemons the outward peel pared off and as much rock allome as a small
nut and when all these are well mixt make it up in balls Rubbing the
stains therewith wetting it in fair warme water till you see all out.


363. _To Pickle Green Ashen Keys, Elder Buds, Broom Buds, or ye like._

Take any of them severall and put them in linnen bags let them lay
in vinegar & salt 8 or 9 days then set them in a pot of water close
cover’d on a gentle fire till they look green which will not be under a
day or 2^s greening and when they are cold put them in the pickle which
must be the vinegar and salt they were steep’d in very well boyled.


364. _To Preserve White Pear Plummes Green._

Take them about the end of July or when they are at their full bigness
wipe them well then set on a skellet of fair water and when it boyles
put in your Plummes and cover them up close and when your plumme begins
to blister take them out of the water and peel off their skins then
weigh them and to every pound of plummes allow a pound and 2 ounces of
Sugar well beaten then set on a skillet of water and when it begins to
boyle then put in your plummes again and let them boyle softly till
they change their colour from yellow to green then take them off and
cover them close and let them stand a quarter of an hour then strew on
a handfull or 2 of your weighed Sugar on your plummes in the preserving
pan you will preserve them in laying them one by one in your pan on
your first part of your sugar and then throw on the 2^d part over them
and as much water as will dissolve your sugar and let them boyle softly
least they break in less than 1 hour they will be enough as you will
find by the greeness of the sirrop then take out your plummes and put
in your last quantity of Sugar to clear and thicken your sirrop and
pour it on your plummes in your pot and when through cold tye them
close & keep them for your use but if your sirrop grow thin never boyle
your sirrop & pour it hot on your plummes & besure when you preserve
them to boyle them in such a pan as you may lay them one by one y^t you
may turn them as you see occasion.


365. _To Candie Flowers._

Take the flowers on the Stalk and wash them in rosewater wherein
gumarrabeck hath been steep’d then take fine Sugar candie search it
after finely beaten on your flowers and set them a drying in the bottom
of a sive in an oven after the bread is drawn and the oven cold and
they will glitter and look well.


366. _A Sack Posset._

Take 6 Naples Biskit beaten in a morter and boyle it in 2 quarts of
cream till it be thick then have ale and Sack ready sweetned and warm
& a few eggs let your cream coole else your eggs will be hard & to a
quart of cream you must have a pint of ale and Sack pour it in your
bason stir it a little & so serve it in.


367. _To make Barberrie Wine._

Take 20 quarts of water and 10 pound of Sugar boyle it half an hour
and scume it then take 10 quarts of barberries mull them in an earthen
stewing pot y^n bruise them and put your liquor on them very hot and
when cold as wort put in some yest and set it a working and when it
hath done working stop it up close and after 3 weeks bottle & keep So
may you do with currance or Rasberrys only with a pound less of Sugar
than the barberries wine.


368. _To make Apricocke Wine._

Take to every pint of water 10 or 12 apricockes let it boyle gently at
first after a pace till it be strong of the fruit then let it stand and
take of the clear and bottle it to a bottle take an ounce and half of
Sugar and stop it close. The sirrop y^t comes from dryed apricocks put
in white wine and bottled a month is very good.


369. _To make a Conserve of Clove Jilly Flowers as an excellent
Cordiall._

Take to every ounce of flowers all the white cut off 3 ounces of sugar
beat them very small so keep them to a pound which put into an earthen
or silver bason set it over the fire stir it till the Sugar dissolve
and to a pound put an ounce and half of powder of cloves a grain and
half of civet a grain and half of beaszer half a grain of unicorns horn
the juice of half a lemon mingle all well together and keep it for your
use.


370. _Apricockes the best way to preserve in Jelly._

Take apricockes before full ripe pare them and cut them in halves & lay
them in double refined Sugar finely beaten to a pound of apricockes 3
quarters of a pound of Sugar let them stand all night and if you have
not jelly of white currance take the worser sort of apricockes pale in
colour and slice them thin and to 3 quarters of a pound of slices take
half a pound of Sugar put them in a silver bason and set them on the
fire till the Sugar be melted and when it is scaulding hot strain the
sirrop from your apricocks and set it by till your half apricocks boyle
then put your sirrop to them and boyle it together till your apricocks
be clear they must be very well scummed to a pound of halves take 3
quarters of a pound of slices put your halves in glasses & strain your
sirrop to them through a tiffeny.


371. _To pickle Violets for Sallets._

Cut your stalks very close put them in a glass strew some Sugar on
y^m mingled with a little Salt so do till all be in then pour on your
vinegar a pint of vinegar to half a pound of sugar and press them down
till the flowers sinke which they will in 4 or 5 days.


372. _To preserve Goosberrys in Jelly._

Take the fairest goosberries stone them into fair water to every pound
of the berrie 3 quarters of a pound of double refined sugar and put a
little fair water to it when it boyles put in 3 quarters of pound of
measur’d goosberrys and boyle them in your sirrop till they are all
broken then strain out your sirrop and set it by then take to a pound
of your stoned goosberrys a pound of double refined Sugar put it in
your bason set it on the fire with very little water when it boyles and
is clear scummed put in your stoned goosberries as it boyles so let it
boyle till they are clear then put to them the sirrop you set by let
them boyle a little together then glass them up you must do but a row
at a time ye berry must turn white.


373. _To preserve Goosberries._

Take fair goosberries stoned into fair water and to one pound of the
berries 3 quarters of a pound of jelly of red currance or juice and to
a pound of Goosberries and this jelly take a pound and half of Sugar
put your Sugar into a silver bason wet it with a little water and when
it boyls and is scummed put in your goosberries and in a little time
your jelly or juice of currance and when they are boyled enough strain
your jelly to them but if you put juice of currance you must allow
proportionable Sugar more to it.


374. _A Pippin drink._

Take 20 pippins large ones cut them in halves into an earthen pipkin
that will hold 2 gallons then fill it up with Spring water and let it
boyle over a gentle fire till all the vertue be out of the pippins then
strain it into an earthen pan pare a lemon put in half the peel and
slice in 2 or 3 lemons being first pared clean sweeten it well with
refined sugar and let it stand then take out the lemon and bottle it up
for your Spending.


375. _To make Vinegar of Unripe Grapes._

Take them and pound them and press them through a hair bag as yo do
Sider then put into every 4 gallons as much allome as a wallnut then
boyle it well and scumme as the scumme riseth as clear as possible
coole it and when through cold tun it up and keep it till it is steal
and fit for use very close stopt and it will be very good.


376. _A Re^{ct} of Harts Horne Jelly._

Take shaved harts horne half a pound to five pints of water the which
boyle very leasurely till half be wasted then put in a little red rose
water and then give it a walme or 2 more then strain it you may add
juice of Lemons & fine Sugar and eat it cold or dissolve it and drink
it warm w^{ch} you please.


377. _The Countess of Kents Lozenges for a Cold._

Take 12 ounces of liquorish scraped and bruised a little then take half
a pint of coltfoot water red rose water hysop water of each half a
pint 2 quarts of fair water so put them altogether with your liquorish
& let it steep 24 hours then set it on the fire and let it boyle very
softly till it be as thick as cream then strain out the juice clean
from the liquorish and set it on the fire again puting in 2 grains
of ambergreese as much allkermes as a large bean let it not boyle but
stand till it be well incorporated then put it out into 2 or 3 pans and
set it in the sun till it thicken to worke like wax y^n make it into
little cakes it will keep it’s vertue many years but if in drying in
the sun a drop of water or rain chance to fall on any of it, it will
never come to good. Aproved by the Lady Elizabeth Cope to add half a
pint of whorehound water.


378. _To make Cherry Wine._

Take of the best sort of cherries full ripe Stone them then breake
them to mash and let them stand all night in something that will not
change the colour of the cherrie liquor next day strain them out in a
jelly bagg & press out all the juice let it run upon Sugar and to every
gallon put a pound of Sugar then tun it up stop it up close and let
it stand a month or 6 weeks then draw it out into bottles & in every
bottle put a little loaf Sugar & stop it up close.


379. _The Portugal Cake._

Take a pound of loafe Sugar beat and search it very fine through a sive
w^{th} a pound of very well dryed and fine flour that the Sugar and
flour may be well mingled together then take a pound of butter and wash
it well in rose water and then worke it with your hand till it be very
soft then strew your flour and Sugar in by degrees till it be half in
then put in 6 yolkes of eggs and but 4 whites then by degrees worke in
the other half of flour and Sugar and when the oven is hot or ready put
in 2 spoonfulls of rosewater and a pound of currants or 3 quarters of
carraway comfits which you like best and have your plats ready buttered
and fill them but half full & sift on some double refined Sugar on
them let the oven be pretty hot and set up the Lid these will keep and
Spend well.


380. _To Cure the Heart Burning._

Take of the Stone under the crafish eyes taken from the crafish when
the Sun is in cancer is best take as much of these stones in powder as
will lay on a 6 pence in a morning and fast after it in some small ale
posset drink or burrage water aproved in its cure and the quality of
the stone in powder it will turn vinegar sweet if steep’d in it.


381. _A Cream Cheese._

Take a gallon of stroakings and 2 quarts of cream you must take a pint
of new milk and put to your cream your cream must be very sweet cream
then take as many pickt marigold flowers as you can hold in your hands
pound them and strain them into the stroakings you must but boyle up
your cream and run it up almost scaulding hot you must not breake your
curd but cut it a cross and a thwart into your vate about an inch deep
your vate must be. So set it in ye press & when you take it out you
must keep it in rushes it will be ready in 10 days or a fortnight.


382. _The Lady Ashfields Almond Puffs, Jumballs Beaten Small with Rose
Water or Orange Flower Water._

Take 5 or 6 almonds to a quarter of a pound of Sugar a quarter of the
white of an egg froth’d so made up and dryed in an oven. Her Angelicoe
cakes thus pour your angeligoe into hot water to green boyle your Sugar
to a candy hight chop your angeligoe when green’d and peeled & so boyle
them in your sirrop and drop them into cakes and strew them till dry &
they will keep all the year.


383. _The Lady Fusts Hipoccras._

Take a quart of white wine and as much Sherry Sack put to it an ounce
of ginger of nutmegs cloves and cinnamon an ounce stir it altogether
& let it stand 22 hours then put them to a wine quart of milk stir it
well then strain it through a jelly bag which hath a sprig of rosemarie
in it so bottle it up add if you like it a little bag of musk &
ambergreese into each bottle.


384. _To Pickle Oysters._

Take a peck of oysters take a care you cut them not in y^e opening Save
the liquor that comes from them wash your oysters in a pint of elder or
white wine vinegar mingle your oyster liquor and vinegar together and
strain it add to it a pint of fair water put to your liquor 3 blades of
mace 6 cloves some whole pepper and Salt to your taste let them boyle a
quarter of an hour till they are tender take them off the fire & when
they are cold pott them. Ye Lady Downs thinks Jamaca pepper better than
the black or white pepper.


385. _To make Elder Vinegar._

To a gallon of white wine vinegar put a quarter of a peck of dryed
elder flowers steep them 3 days close cover’d the 4th distill it off it
will be clear as rock water and very quick and sharpe.


386. _To Dry Orringo Roots._

Take the roots of the youngest Springing boyling them tender and peel
them picking and wash them and Shape them in a bason with some warme
water and their weight in Sugar let them boyle now and then turning
them and when the Sugar begins to consume Shake them as you do pease
to butter which shaking will work the Sugar into them then lay them
before the fire in halfe a day you box them up as dry.


387. _To Dry a Gamon of Bacon._

First lay your gamon a soaking in a strong brine a week then hang it
up raw and salt it well with bay salt then let it lay a fortnight then
hang it up & Smoake it with green broome then boyle it with rain water
you must Smoake it 4 or 5 times with the broome.


388. _To Dry Neat’s Tongues._

Take 12 large tongues and make a strong brine for them of bay salt &
water so strong as to bare an egg and add to it half a pound of peeter
first cleanse your tongues from all slimeness then put them into the
brine pressing y^m down to keep under the liquor and let them lay in it
a month then take them and dry them to keep for your use.


389. _To make Almond Jomballs._

Take half a pound of vallentia almonds and as many Jordan almonds put
them in a skellet of boyling water and blanch them as fast as you can
put them in 3 several waters then beat them as small as may be but keep
them from oyling by puting in often some rose water and fair water
Soake some gume dragon in some rose water and fair water mingled then
take a pound of double refined Sugar Siveted through a tiffanie sive
then take half your almonds & half your Sugar put it on a chaffendish
of coles in a pewter dish when it is well dissolved put in some of your
gumme and mingle it very well beat the whites of 10 eggs to a froth and
put them in keeping it still stiring till it be stiff to mould let it
stand till it be near cold Sive some Sugar on a paper and make them
up if you like colliander or any other seed you may add to them if you
please.

To make cakes of the other half Take the other half of your almonds and
Sugar mingle it well but set it not on the fire till the oven be hot
and sweeping then have ready the whites of 4 eggs beaten to a froth
mingle it with the cakes then sift some fine Sugar on a pye plate drop
it on the plate sift some Sugar on them so set them in your oven make
your jomballs first the cakes must be baked as soon as made the almonds
will require half a day to beat them.


390. _To Dry Apricocks._

Take a pound of apricocks before full ripe half a pound of the best
Sugar Scauld your apricocks in fair water after they are pared then dry
them in a cloth then boyle them in a Sirrop of that Sugar & so dry y^m
in y^e sun or stove.


391. _To Ice Cakes._

Take 3 quarters of a pound of double refined Sugar Sifted through
tiffany put it into a porrenger have ready 2 penny worth of gum dragon
steep’d in rose water 4 days with some muske or ambergreese beat it
together till it be very white this will glaze jomballs or cakes or
anything.


392. _To Preserve Grapes Green._

To a pound of grapes take half a pound of Sugar after they are scummed
and stoned put them in your Sugar without water set them on a quick
fire and boyle them as fast as you can first they will look like
Scaulded goosberries afterwards very clear after that as if they were
burnt but by long boyling they will come to a very good green colour
and then they are enough. aproved as ye best way to preserve grapes.


393. _To dry Peaches._

Green them as other fruit put a little Sugar in the water it will do
the better when they are tender you may wipe off the skin make with 3
quarters of a pound of Sugar a Sirrop for a pound of peaches when they
a little tender stone them boyle them till they are half enough then
put them in a pot close covered where they may stand warme 3 or 4 days
take half a pound of Sugar make more Sirrop drain them from the old
then put them in a clean pot pour ye other Sirrop boyling hot on them
cover them up close put the pot on embers a while then keep them in a
stove.


394. _To make Almond Cake._

Take a peck of fine flour dry’d 6 pounds of almonds blancht and beaten
with rosewater a pint of Sack 4 pints of ale barme breake in 4 pound
of butter carraway seeds and what spice you please mingle all well
together 10 pound of currants after it hath risen & some chopt raisons
will make it moist and some Salt.

395. _To make Jockallato drink._

Take half a pint of milk and as much fair water put both into a glass
bottle set it in a skellet of water when it boyles put to it an ounce
of jockallato finely scraped 2 eggs and 2 ounces of Sugar beat them
very well together and put it into your water in the bottle shaking it
together till it be coole enough to drink.


396. _To make Sugar Cakes._

Take half a pound of flour a quarter of Sugar as much butter 6
spoonfulls of rosewater make it into paste and bake them on plates it
will make 24.


397. _To make Almond Tarts._

Take a quart of cream and a quarter & half quarter of a pound of
blancht almonds beaten very small with a little rosewater and cold
cream put them to the boyling cream with the yolkes of 6 eggs let it
boyle till it be pretty thick still stiring it then take it from the
fire and put in a grain of musk dissolved in a little rosewater put in
a quarter of a pound of sweet butter Sugar to your taste your crust
must be made with an egg a little butter & fair water to your flour
then raise your dough of what fashion you please a little higher than
biskit pans & put no leds to it but pin them up in papers to keep them
up in y^e oven a little more than a quarter of an hour will bake them.


398. _To make Jellies._

Take a log of veal and a pair of calves feet boyle them in 4 gallons
of water and let it boyle 4 or 5 hours till it is a strong jellie then
strain it out through a linnen cloth and let it stand a little while
and take off the fat as clean as you can then put in an ounce of whole
cinnamon & the juice of 6 lemons a quarter of a pint of white wine
vinegar but I think rather white wine a little Salt half a pound of
white Sugar boyle all these in a stew pan or Skillet a little while
then put in the whites of 20 eggs pretty well beaten and let it boyle
half a quarter of an hour then put it into your jelly bag and hang
it as near the fire as you can & let it run into a large dish when
it is all run out put it into a stue pan again & clear it again with
the whites of 6 eggs then put it into your jelly bag again then what
you intend shall be clear let it run into a mazarine or flat dish &
what you would have white let it run through almonds finely beaten and
strain your jelly through them in a cloth into the dish you will serve
it in and you must have Scooped oringes and lemons & egg shells and
fill them with jelly of several colours as you will have them.

To make the red take half an ounce of Kucheneall half an ounce of Roach
allome half an ounce of cream of tartar boyle all these in a pint of
water till half be consumed then put it into a glass and stop it close
& it will keep a year.


399. _Friccasies or Veal Collops._

Hacke or chop your veal colops and grate nutmeg over it then heat in
your frying white wine butter Anchovese and Shallot and capers with
your meat still shaking your pan as the liquor may thicken then when
your meat is fryed enough from being raw (for if to long it will make
it hard) then take more white wine nutmeg and the yolks of 3 eggs and
beat them into your pan and shake all very well together and So Serve
it in you may mince your capers if you please and rabits or chickens
eat well so.


400. _S^r Edward Gust’s Cordiall for Old and Young._

Take an ounce of conserve of red roses a dram of Diascordium & a
Scruple of confection of allkermes incorporate all these well together
then pot it up for your use and take the quantity of a nutmeg last at
night when any faintiness is on the Spirits or Stomache.


401. _A Oringe Pudding or Lemon._

Take half a pound of loafe Sugar sift’d and dryed 4 ounces of Lammas
wheat flour finely sift’d and dryed very well 6 ounces of fresh butter
and the yolkes of 4 new laid eggs and the whites of 7 beat your
butter in a bowle till it be like pap not heat at all but raw with 2
spoonfulls of Sack and 2 of rosewater you may infuse some clovejilly
flowers in your rosewater to make it look brown when your butter is
beat like pap then you must put in your 4 yolkes and 7 whites of egg
and beat them up together till it’s a little mingled then put in the
Sugar then the flour and keep beating of it upwards as for Biskit it
must not be Slackned in the beating but beat an hour then take the peel
of 2 oringes candied or raw but if raw boyle out the bitterness shred
in your peel but put it not in till the last and then squeeze in the
juice of 2 oringes if you have any when it is beat an hour and half and
your peel in you may add perfume and have a pound of flour 4 ounces
of butter 2 eggs whites and yolkes 2 spoonfulls of Sack make it up in
paste cover the dish with it very thin bottom and brims and put your
pudding in a flat broad dish and cover it with some of the same paste
a little thicker at top set it in an oven hot enough for manchet & 3
quarters of an hour will bake it.


402. _The Lady Long’s way of drying a Gamon of Bacon._

Let it be as long as you can unsalt’d if it take wind a little the
better provided it taint not then salt it leasurely by degrees
moderately with bay salt and some peeter salt if you please then gently
Dry it and when you boyle it change it out of boyling into cold waters
divers times w^{ch} will make it look ye reder.


403. _To frye Venison._

First slice it then flour’t through a tin drudge then fry it in fresh
butter untill it is a little crisped then pour away that butter then
put to it a little gravey nutmeg, mustard, and Sugar and So Serve it
in when warmed and Shaked with your venison in a pan and pour’d out
altogether into your dish.


404. _To order Venison to keep it cold a year round w^{th} y^e Gravey
in it._

Take when your venison is boned and good Sweet and fat bacon thin
sliced and y^r seasoning spices ready by you about a pint of claret
wine and a clean bunch of feathers then slit all the lean parts of
your venison about the length of your finger dip your feathers in the
wine and wet the slit then put in some of the seasoning of the Sweet
Spices made of nutmegs cloves Jamacoe pepper and a little ginger and
Salt and then to that a slice of thin sliced bacon and thus do in all
the lean parts of your venison slitting it and weting the slits with
the wine and then filling up the slits with the Seasonings and sliced
bacon then put into the bottom of the pot you bake and keep it in some
good beef sewit and your ordinary of Seasoning pepper and salt among
your sewit & all over your venison and sit your venison to the side of
your pot and put good Sweet butter also at the bottom of your pot and
round the sides and some of your seasoning and the remainder of your
wine then turn down the best and top of your venison the flatest part
to the bottom of the pot in the baking and keeping it so till you come
to spend it seting it into the oven with some brown bread and when you
draw it forth press out the gravie as well as you can and as hot with
a trencher and a great weight on it washing your weight and trencher
clean ere used then put all the gravie you strain out into a larger
skillet then it will hold that you may also put to it the gravie of the
bones baked and broken ere you bake them with wine and seasoning of
Sweet Spices which when you have drain’d from the baked bones add to
the former gravie and then take a faggot of Sweet marjerom bay leaves
a little pennyroyall and a little rosemary ty’d up in a fagot and put
into your gravie and then take a clean stick and measure the depth of
your gravie in your skellet and make a nick in the stick at the middle
of depth, that you may be sure to boyle half away by the measure of
your stick then take it off the fire and pour it as hot as you can into
your pot of venison and so let it stand till it be cold gently pressing
down your venison before it be quite cold that the meat may be cover’d
and sink down to bottom and the gravie cake over it Remember to take
out the fagot of herbs ere you put your gravie to your meat if it cake
hard over then noe butter need be aded to keep it the year round but if
it be thin you must add butter melt’d up to cover it but pour it not
to your gravie till it be cold and head’d pour your melt’d butter on
it no warmer than just to run all over it and when quite cold cover up
your pot with a board and paper that no air nor vermine as rats or mice
come to it and it will keep a year round very good but when you come
to spend it take off the stale butter and set it in a Kettle of water
to melt it off and let none of the water get in but when throughly hot
take your pot out pour off the stale butter and turn out your venison
the bottom upwards as being the best and put fresh butter to it and
when cold it will eat as if new done but while it is spending wherever
cut it must be cover’d again with butter or it will turn vinie if it
stand to take air where cut the pot you turn it into ought to be a
sweet and well seasoned pot w^{th} some fresh butter in it.


405. _To make Wigs._

Take 3 pound and a half of fine flour a pound of butter melt’d in a
pint of milk and a quart of good ale yest half a pound of Sugar mix’t
in your butter milk and yest halfe an ounce of cloves mace and nutmegs
a quarter of an ounce of carraway seeds a little salt mingle all these
well together in your flour working them all into a pretty stiff paste
w^{th} your hands & weigh out about 4 ounces to a wig and So rowle
them up into wigs and bake them upon paper or tin plates butter.


406. _To dry Goosberryes Plummes or Angelicoe._

Take your goosberries the fairest you can get or your plummes and slit
them on the side with a penknife or on the top and lay them in hot
water and so let them lay in the hot water till they be tender as you
will have them at all then take them out and put them into cold water
your goosberrys or plummes and let them lay a week or 10 days till the
water be very sharpe of the taste but the angelicoe must lay in water
but 4 days then make a very strong sirrop and so boyle them up you must
keep your angelicoe a fortnight in your sirrop then take it out of your
sirrop and lay it on a confectioners wyer to dry over a charcole fire
throughly kindled that there be no smoake in the kindled coales of
either wood or cole if you have occasion to dry oringes or lemons keep
y^m in a strong sirrop till a day or 2 before you use them and dry them
after the same manner they will be dry in half an hour or Less, dry
without & moist within and this way will make your fruit green enough
without any peeling and also your angelicoe.


407. _To Roste a Haunch of Venison._

Skin and bone your venison beat it and season it as you like best sweet
or hot spices salt and herbs such as please your taste best then coller
it as you do beef with some butter or bacon with your Seasoning tyeing
it hard with pack thread wraping it up first in the caul or skin of the
venison so tye it on to your spit Save what drops from it in rosting
for your Sauce rosting it very well and so Serve it up.


408. _To make the Cockleshell Sweetmeat._

Take some double refined Sugar and search it very fine through a fine
sive and beat it into a stiff paste with a white of an egg and rowle it
very thin and put it on your shells and dry it in a stove or in the sun
you may colour y^m as you please.


409. _To make Red Currant Wine._

Let your fruit be full ripe and gather’d on a dry day and to every 3
pound of currants good weight with their stalks and stems on take one
quart of water & one pound of sugar put your water to your currants &
with your hands squeeze them through a hair Sive then put your Sugar
to your juice and when it is well mingled together and the Sugar is
dissolved then put it into a very dry and sweet vessel fill your vessel
quite full and let it worke a week and then stop it up and let it not
be tap’d under 10 weeks time and then draw it off as you drink it or
bottle it which you please.


410. _To make Aquamirabilis._

Take a pint of the juice of Sallendine and half a pint of the juice
of balme and half a pint of the juice of Spermint of rosemary flowers
cowslip flowers clovejilly flowers burrage and burglass flowers
mellilot flowers of each one dram and all other cordiall flowers you
think fit and of cubibs ginger cardimums gallingall cloves mace nutmegs
of each one dram put all these ingredients in 3 pints of Sack with a
pint of strong angelicoe water and half a pint of red rose water steep
them one night and the next morning put it in a cold still and draw off
3 quarts of water first laying harts tongue leaves at the bottom of the
still when the water is drawn off mingle it altogether sweetening it
with white Sugar candie or very fine loafe Sugar bottle it close stopt
and to stand cool.


411. _To make Vinegar._

Take 6 gallons of fair water and put it into a 9 gallon vessel hoop’d
with iron put thereto 18 pound of ordinary malligoe raisons washt a
little in one water stalks and raisons altogether paste on a coarse
strong cloth over y^e bung hole with yest set in the hotest sun you can
May June July and in September it may be used.


412. _A Pickle for Brawn._

Take 9 gallons of water 2 handfulls and a half of bay salt an ounce of
cloves mace and white pepper altogether and put it whole in and boyle
it a full hour boyling in it a quart of milk scumme the milk clear off
but leave your Spice at the bottom for your liquor to feed on and keep
it sweet so keep it till the morrow to be through cold ere you put in
your brawn and when your brawn is in keep it as coole as you can and
twill keep a quarter of a year you may add jamacoe pepper and it will
be the better.


413. _For Fits._

Take of gentian roots grated as much as will lay on a 6 pence 3 nights
before and 3 nights after every change of the moon in 2 or 3 spoonfulls
of wine or beer.


414. _A Cordiall Tincture for the Collicke by ye Lady Fust._

Take sena liquorish Guiacum or lignum-vite elecampane roots not dryed
of each 2 ounces annyseed corriander seeds of each an ounce raisons of
the Sun pick’d and ston’d one pound infuse all these in 3 quarts of the
best aquavite a fortnight or 3 weeks till all becomes a red tincture so
strain it out and keep it for use.


415. _Hysterick Electuary the Lady Gerrard’s Re^{ct}._

Venise treacle half an ounce bittony flowers rosemary flowers & burrage
flowers of each ahalf an ounce amber in powder half an ounce castor
in fine powder one dram let these be incorporated in a stone morter
w^{th} as much sirrop of pioneys as will make a stiff electuary, Let ye
patient at the full and change of the moon at going to rest take the
quantity of a nutmeg in 3 small pills and drink after it a small drink
of posset made with white wine with a root of a single pioney boyled
in it & for 3 mornings after use no other breakfast but a draught of
the same posset Hereby are cured both old and young of convulsions
Hysterick vapours fitts and falling sickness.


416. _To Pickle Kidney Beans._

Take young beans boyle them tender (and take them before they be
stringy) in pickle made of vinegar and salt as strong as will bare an
egg and therin let them lay about a week then take them out again and
boyle them in fair water till they look as green as you like them then
put them in the former pickle again and they will keep all the year.


417. _To Pickle Cucumbers._

Take small cucumbers and scauld them then take 2 handfulls of fennell
seeds half so much deaill seeds a little mace 2 quarts of water half so
much vinegar one pint of white wine season it well with salt and when
it is cold keep your cuccumbers in it.


418. _The Lady Lees Sore Breast Poultise._

Take a pint of strong ale of hollyhock leaves chickweed gruncell
mallows of each herb a handfull chop them very small boyling them in
the ale till half be consumed then thicken it with rie meale or brane
of wheat and put in a pretty piece of boars grease, boyle it till it
come to a fit thickness for use if it break the breast keep it open
with a mallow root dressing it twice a day. this aproved good for many
Cares.


419. _The Lord Bristoes Contraerva, or Counter Poison._

Take rags of pearl, corall white amber crabs eyes beazar stone harts
horne of each half an ounce roots of contraerva one ounce all finely
powdered sift them through a treble sive then take the powder of crabs
claws the black only 8 ounces finely searcht, then as much harts horne
jelly as will make them up in paste and rowle them into balls and dip
them into cakes with the top of your finger drying them temporately the
eyes and claws must be taken in may only.


420. _A Sweet Water._

Take a gallon of Spring water a handfull of Lavender flowers as many
pinks 3 handfulls of roses as much sweet marjerom the peeling of 6
oringes 12 cloves bruise all these and put to them one ounce of orrice
powder 4 ounces of benjamin put all these into a rose still and draw
off the first quart by itselfe and then a pint, you may draw after that
another water from the leese which will serve for present use but not
keep, put into your quart bottle 12 pennyworth of musk and in the pint
bottle 6 pennyworth tied in bags and a little juniper sliced very thin
as much as will lay on half crown 2 or 3 spoonfulls will sweeten a
bason of water keep it stop’t very close it will keep a year or 2.


421. _The best way to make Sirrop of Violets._

Stamp and strain out the juice of the blewest Single garden violets
or ither to one pint of juice alowe a pound of Sugar or more, put no
more water to your Sugar than will wet it when it’s boyled to a candie
hight pour in your juice and mingle them well together and when it is
ready to boyle take it from the fire and scumme it clean then set it to
the fire again and when ready to boyle scumme it again thus do 5 or 6
times and keep it after for your use but if it boyle it will change the
colour.


422. _To make Oringe Water._

Take 60 of middling oringes and pare off the yellow of the peel besure
to cut between the red and white peel that you may cut off all ye poars
then take the yellow peel so pared and steep them in a gallon of Sack
canarie Sack 48 hours then distill them in a limbeck if you would have
it very Strong or else in a cold still with a gentle fire puting Sugar
candie in the receiver you may draw 2 or 3 sorts the first runings
being the Strongest.


423. _To Preserve the Water Mellon._

First pare and quarter them and boyle them in severall waters till it
be tender and look green put them in the water when it boyles when it
has boyled in that water a pretty while take it out and put it in cold
water and so do till it be tender boyle in the waters some lemon peel
cover them with a cloth in the boyling, if they are so ripe that the
seeds look red then take y^m out then take to every pound of mellon a
pound and a quarter or a pound & a half of double refined Sugar and
a pint of fair water; make a Sirrop thereof and put in your mellon
and lemon peel which preserve with the mellon then let it lay in that
Sirrop for 9 days then boyle it again and when it is done take it up
and add some pippin liquor to it (Loafe Sugar at the first) for the
quantity or liquor you have then add some juice of Lemon to it musk or
ambergreese if you like it.


424. _To make Paste of Gennaye the true way._

Take quinces and boyle them in their skin then strain all the pulpe
from y^e coare strain it through a piece of cushen canvis take as much
sugar as y^e pulpe do weigh put to it twice as much water as will melt
it that is half a pint to every pound of Sugar boyle it to a candie
hight dry the pulpe upon a chaffendish of coles then put the Sirrop and
the pulpe hot together boyle it with stiring until it will lye upon
a pye plate even as you laye it and run no broader, then faishion it
some like leaves and some like letters so put your pye plate in a warme
stove or oven set it upon 2 billets of wood from the hearth of the oven
all one night, on the morning turn it & so set it in the like heat
again and every day turn it till it be dry.


425. _To make Marmalade of some of these Quinces._

Take some of this paste after it be placed upon the pye plate and boyle
it untill it will come clean from the bottom of the posswett and then
box it that is all the Difference between paste and marmalade.


426. _To make Paste of Oringes and Lemons._

Take your oringes well coloured boyle them tender in water Shifting of
them 6 or 7 times in the boyling put into the first water a handfull of
salt and then beat them in a wooden bowle with a wooden pestel strain
them through a piece of cushen canvis take the weight of them in Sugar
and some what more then boyle it and dry & fashion it as before in ye
424 Re^{ct}.


427. _To make Paste of any tender Plummes._

Take any tender plummes and put them in an earthen pot and put your
pot into a pot of Seething water and when they are dissolved strain
all y^e water or liquor from them through a fair cloth and set the
liquor by to make quiddenye of then strain the pulpe through a piece
of cushen canvis take as much Sugar as the pulpe do weigh put to it as
much water as will melt it and boyle it to a candie hight and boyle the
pulpe of the plummes very well upon a chafendish of coles and put them
hot together so boyle them with stiring then lay them upon a pye plate
and fashion it & dry it as before put some pulpe of apples amongst the
plumme pulpe or it will be tough.

To make marmalade of these plummes there is no difference but boyle it
higher then your paste till it come clean from the bottom of ye skillet
then box it.


428. _To make Conserve of any of these Fruits._

When you have boyled your paste before said ready to fashion upon the
pye plates put it up in gallypots and never dry it and that is all the
Difference between conserve and paste, and so you may make conserve
of any fruits this is for all hard bodyed fruits as quinces, pippins,
oringes & lemons.


429. _To make any Conserve of tender Fruits._

First dissolve your plummes as you did to make your paste strain
through the liquor and pulpe and all to every pint of that take 3
quarters of a pound of Sugar and so boyle it untill it be somewhat
thick that when you lay some of it upon a cold dish it will run no
broader then pot it up.


430. _To make Quidony of the Liquor you kept of your Plummes before._

Take a quart of that liquor and boyle it with half a dozen fair pippins
pared and cut in small pieces then strain all the thinest from it and
put to every pint of that liquor half a pound of Sugar and boyle it
until it will stand upon the back of your spoon like quaking jelly,
then pound it into your moulds your moulds being wett before and when
it is almost cold turn it off unto a wet trencher so slive it into a
box your box being wet also.


431. _To make Paste Royal of any Fruits._

Take marmalade before it be cold & then mould it up in searched Sugar
until it come to perfect paste then print it in your moulds & then dry
it.


432. _To preserve Fruits Green._

Take pippins apricocks pear plummes or peaches while they are green
scauld them in hot water and peel them the peaches and apricocks Scrape
the furr off them y^n boyle them very tender take as much Sugar as they
weigh put to it as much water as will make a Sirrop to cover them then
boyle them something leasurely and take them up then boyle the Sirrop
until it be something thick that it will button upon a dish side and
when they are cold pot them up together.


433. _To preserve these Plummes when ripe._

Take as much Sugar as they weigh and put not so much water to them as
you did to the green for they will yield liquor of them selves boyle
them not altogether so leasurely as you did the other if you do the
Sirrop will turn red and so when you have boyled them take them up and
pot them as aforesaid.


434. _To preserve Damosens Red or Black Plummes._

Take as much Sugar as they do weigh and as much water as will make a
Sirrop to cover them then boyle them a little while in the Sirrop close
covered and turn them very often for spoting them set them all night
in their own Sirrop and on the morrow set them upon a pot of seething
water and let them boyle no faster then the water seethe under them
then when they be through sweet and tender take them up and pot them
but let the Sirrop be boyled till it will button upon a dish side
before it be poted.


435. _To preserve Grapes Barberryes or Goosberrys._

Take as much Sugar as they do weigh and somewhat more and beat it very
fine take a preserving pan or skillet lay a lay of Sugar and a lay of
the fruit till you have laid all then take 6 spoonfulls of fair water
as much as will wet the bottom of your pan then boyle them as fast as
you can untill they be clear then boyle the sirrop until it will button
upon a dish side then when they are cold pot them up together.


436. _To preserve Quinces white._

Pare them and core them and take as much Sugar as they weigh & to every
pound of Sugar put but a wine pint of water put your quinces Sugar &
water together and boyle them as fast as you can uncover’d and this may
you preserve pippins.


437. _To keep Quinces raw all the year._

Take some of the worst quinces and cut them in small pieces boyle them
in water till it be strong of the quince put into in the boyling to
every gallon 2 spoonfulls of Salt as much of english honey half a pint
of white wine vinegar then strain it and when it is cold put it into
a wooden vessel and take as many of your best quinces as will go into
that liquor then stop them up very close that no air get into them and
they will keep all the year.


438. _To candy Barberries Grapes and Goosberries._

After you have preserved them by Numb^r 435 dip them in warme water
very sodainly to wash off the ropie Sirrop then strew them over with
searched Sugar as you would do flower upon fish to fry and so set them
in a warme oven or Stove 3 or 4 times and never let them be cold untill
they be dry and they will look like sparkling diamonds.


439. _To make Clear Cakes._

Take plummes of any sort Rasberries are best put them in a stone jugg &
when they are dissolved strain them through a fair cloth and take to a
pint of that a pound of Sugar and put to it as much water as will melt
it & boyle it to a candie hight boyle the liquor likewise in another
possnet by them put them seething hot together boyle them a little
while together with seething then put them into glasses made like
marmalade boxes and so set them in a warm oven or stove in a drying
heat let them stand so a fortnight or 3 weeks and never be cold remove
them from one warm place to another that they may not be cold they will
turn in a week beware you set them not to hot they will be tough & so
every day turn them till they be dry & they will look very clear canded
without and moist within.


440. _To Dry any Fruit after they are Preserved._

Take pippins pears or plummes wash them out in warme water from that
sirrop they are preserved in and strew them over with searched Sugar as
you would do flour upon fish to fry them set them in a broad earthen
pan that they may lie one by one then set them in a warme oven or stove
to dry if you will candie them with all you must strew on Sugar 3 or 4
times in drying.


441. _To Dry any Fruit without Sugar._

Take pears or pippins and lay them in an earthen pan one by one and
bake them full but not let them brake then lay them upon seafe bottomes
in an oven and so dry them up in a drying heat and so every day turn
them till they be dry.


442. _To candie the Clear Rock Candie._

Take Spices or flowers or any dryed sucket any fruits after they be
preserved and dry again lay them upon round wyers in an earthen pan
the pan narrow at the bottom and broad on the top and take as much
refine Sugar or Craseel powder you must neither take barberry Sugar nor
maderous they are to fat put to it as much water as will melt it that
is half a pint to every pound and something more and when your Sugar
is all melt’d take the white of an egg and a dozen spoonfulls of fair
water beat it together in a bason w^{th} a burchen rod till it come to
a froth then put the froth of the egg into the hot Sirrop set it on the
fire again and when it is boyled and when it riseth drop a drop or 2 of
cold water amongst it then set it on the fire and scumme it then boyle
it to a candie hight that is when it will draw like a thread between
your finger and your thumbe then pour it seething hot into your pan
amongst your fruit set it upon a cushen in a warme chimney corner cover
it close with a blancket on the morrow pour out all the Sirrop that
will run from it and then set your pot in a warme place again to dry
pick up your wyer take of all your fruits lay them on paper to dry y^n
box y^m.


443. _To sucket Candie Oringes Lemons Pome-Citerons & Lettice Stalks._

Boyle them tender in water and then Candie y^m as you do Ringoe roots
by Re^{ct} 356.


444. _To candye Flowers the Spanish Fashion._

Take flowers of any Sort whatsoever and picke off the leaves from the
flower and make a Sirrop of Sugar and put in the blossoms of your
flowers as many as will go into the Sirrop boyle them with stiring
until it be turned to Sugar again set it off the fire and with the back
of a spoon stir them and bruise the sugar from them and they will be
canded and no Sugar seen upon them.


445. _To make Lozenges of any of these Flowers._

Make a Sirrop of Sugar as before and take the blossoms of what flowers
you will & sherd them on a trencher or beat them in a wooden dish then
put in as many as will colour the Sirrop of that colour the flowers are
of and boyle it with stiring till it will come clear from the bottom
of the Skillet and so thick that it will scarce drop out of your spoon
then pour it upon a wet trencher w^{th} a wet knife spread it abroad
not very thin when it is cold cut it in square lozenges like square
diamonds.


446. _To make a March Payne Ice it Garnishe it & Gild it._

Take almonds and blanch them out of seething water beat them in a stone
morter drop in now and then a drop or 2 of rosewater to keep them
from oyling now & then strew in a handful of searched Sugar to bring
it to paste when you have brought it to perfect paste rowle it abroad
as thin as you will have it set an edge about it as about a tart then
make little conceiptes to garnish it then set it in an oven as hot as
for manchet and bake it lay wafers under it upon a double paper bake
it on a pye plate, then ice it with the white of an egg rosewater and
searched Sugar beaten together as thick as batter for fritters when it
is half baked spread on this ice with a feather set it into the oven
again when the ice is risen take it out stick in your garnishing in
long cumfitts while it is hot then when it is cold gild it.


447. _To make Sugar Plate._

Take searched Sugar make it up to paste with gumdragon steep’d with
rosewater when you have brought it to a perfect paste rowle it as thin
as ever you can so print it in moulds & it will dry as it lies.


448. _To make Wallnuts Artificial._

Take some of the Sugar plate print it in a mould made for a wallnut
kernell and yellow it over with a little safforn water with a feather
take search’d cinnamon and Sugar as much of the one as the other make
it up to paste with gumdragon steep’d with rose water print that in a
mould made like a wallnut shell & when they be dry close them together
with a little gumdragon.


449. _To make Muskedyne Cumfits._

Take Sugar plate mould it in a little muske and ambergreese then rowle
it as thin as paper and cut it square like lozenges like small diamonds
then let it dry as it lyeth.


450. _To make Italyan Biskit._

Take Searched Sugar a little of the white of an egg a little
ambergreese and muske according to your taste and when you have beaten
this to paste in an Alleblaster morter then mould it in a little
annyseed finely dusted and make it up in loaves as big as crabs cut
them about like manchet and when they be risen Something high take them
forth upon the plate you baked them on remove them not till they cold
for if they be they will breake.


451. _To make French Biskit._

Take half a peck of flour 4 eggs half a pint of ale yest an ounce and
half of annyseeds make all these together in a loaf with a little sweet
cream and a little cold water make it in the fashion of a dutch loaf
something long cut it in good thick slices like toasts when it is 2 day
old then rub it over with powder Sugar and lay it in a warme Stove and
let it dry in and so you must Sugar it over 3 or 4 times & then box it.


452. _To make Macaroons._

Take almonds and blanche them take a quarter of a pound and 3 ounces
of Searched Sugar beat these in a morter with a little of the white of
an egg and rose water so beat it till it be a thicker than batter for
fritters drop it upon wafers and so bake it.


453. _To make Naples Biskit._

Take almonds as you did for macaroons to a quarter of a pound an ounce
of pine apple seeds bake it as before that is all the difference.


454. _To make any Artificial Fruits, as Oranges, Lemons, Cucumbers,
Radish, Herrings, Sprats, Oysters, or Mushells._

Take alleblaster moulds made in 3 pieces bind 2 pieces together water
them very well an hour or 2 take as much sugar as will fill your mould
by your own aime boyle it to a manus Christi that is till it be almost
Sugar again then pour it into your mould very quick put on the lid of
the mould & turn it round with your hand very quick & when it is cold
take it out it will be whole and hollow.


455. _To boyle Sugar to a Manus Christi._

Boyle it till it be almost Sugar again and the last drop of your spoon
there will a hair drop from it as fine as the hair of your head.


456. _To boyle Sugar to a Candy Hight._

Boyle your sugar till it will draw like a thread between your finger &
thumbe.


457. _To make a Pomander._

Take Benjamine, Storax, Labdanum, of each half an ounce Muske, civit,
of each six grains, 2 grains of ambergreese a dram of sweet balmesum
beat all these together in a hot morter then rowle it up in beads as
big or as little as you will have it while it is hot and so make holes
in them and so use them.


458. _To make a Perfume to burn in a Chamber._

Take Benjamine, Storax and Labdanum of each a like a little damaske
powder orace powder a little, a little frankensense and mirr powder
of Jewiper beat all these together to a paste in a hot morter and so
make it up in the fashion of great black cloves & so burn them when you
please it’s a pleasant smell.


459. _A Perfume to perfume Starch._

After you have made your starch something thick put in some rose water
w^{ch} musk and ambergreese have been Steed in all night and it will
make your linnen to smell most pleasently.


460. _To perfume Gloves._

Take benjamine, Storax, civit, muske and ambergreese with the oyle of
Sweet balsame with a little orace flower water grind all these very
well upon a painters stone and so wash your gloves with it and put them
upon sticks & dry them the oyle of balsame keeps y^m supple that they
will not dry stiff.


461. _To make a Mothes Powder to lay amongst your Linnen or Wollen
Clothes._

Take the moss of a sweet apple tree lay it in steep in rose water all
one night stop the vessel very close that it is in then lay it a drying
in a paper in a warme oven So steep it and dry it 3 times then beat it
very fine and put to the powder of cloves the powder of sweet marjerom
orace powder damaske powder as much musk and ambergreese as you please
no civit for that will clam it then put it in a taffety bag and so use
it.


462. _A Water to make the Breath Sweet._

Take the powder of Sage the powder of Winter Savery and the powder of
Sweet marjerom the powder of cloves and mace a little nutmeg a little
musk steep’d in the juice of lemons and white wine drink all these
together a spoonfull at a time evening and morning w^{th} the juice of
lemons amongst it.


463. _A Powder to make the Teeth White and Sweet._

Take the powder of Sage the Shavings of ivory put them amongst ye juice
of lemons & every evening and morning rub your teeth therewith & it
will make them both white and sweet.


464. _An excellent Water to clear Hands and Face._

Take a quart of fair water a pint of white wine the juice of 4 lemons
put into these bean blossoms elder blossoms white lilly blossoms a
handfull of them all put them amongst the wine and water and put into 4
wild dasie roots 4 marsh mallow roots and 2 or 3 bunches of wild tansie
as much of femitary the weight of 2 pence in campheer put all these
together in an earthen pot set the pot in warm aishes all night then
in the morning strain it through a piece of white cotton clean washt
and put it into a narrow mouth’d glass set the glass in the sun 3 or 4
days in the heat of the sun if there be any redness or pimples in the
face take the white dung of a hen and so steep it in that water all one
night then strain it again through the cloth wash your face with this
water evening & morning if you wash your hands with any of this water
put thereto 3 or 4 bruised almonds this is y^e most excellent water
that ever was made to clear hands and face withall. Probatum Est.


465. _Sr. George Horseyes Green Ointment for Aches proceeding from a
Cold Cause for Shrunke Sinews in Man, or Beast, & for Strains it it’s
incomperably good & holds Perfection 40 years._

Take mallows groundcel strawberry lavender cotten birtch leaves
chickweed comfry parsley sage leaves bayleaves cammomile, Adderstongue
oxeye of each 3 handfulls chop the herbs very small and beat them in a
morter take of roses four pound frankensence 2 pound and set them upon
the fire then put in hogsgrease 12 pound may butter clarified in the
Sun 38 pound Sallet oyle 1 gallon Turpentine 4 pound verdigrease half
a pound when all these are melt’d put in the herbs & let them boyle
half a quarter of an hour and carefully stir while it is upon y^e fire
then take it off and stir it a quarter of an hour after when it is
cold put it into pots close covered and set them in a horse dunghill
a yard deep for 21 days then take them out and put them altogether
& set them on the fire again and boyle y^m a walme or 2 then strain
it and put thereto 2 pound of oyle of spike so apply it to the place
agrived gently warming it with one hand this is only to be made in may.
Probatum Est.


466. To make Thin Cheese.

Take 8 quarts of new milk from y^e cow strain’d put to it 4 or 5 quarts
of cream strained and put to 8 quarts or little more of water very hot
then put in the runnet & stir it together then cover it very close till
it comes and so soon as it’s come put y^e cloth upon the cheese-vate
& lade the curds as whole as you can into it & let it whey draw it
self and when it hath done runing lay on ye cloth and the follower & a
weight so let it stand a pretty while then shift it into a dry cloth
and when it hath done weting the cloth it must be put into a piece of
bays or cloth & lay it on y^e floor and in 9 or 10 days it will be for
your eating.


467. _To make Angelot Cheese._

Take 2 gallons of new milk put to it 2 quarts of thick cream then
heat it some what more then blood warme then set it together with 2
spoonfulls of runnet, when it is run whey it not but set your fat ready
which must be about half a yard high turned round like a pint but biger
without a bottom it must be set upon a even board & the curd put into
it and ever as the whey runeth from it, it must be filled up it will
take a whole day to fill it, then let it stand and settle 3 days in the
fat untill it be so hardned that you may take off the moulds without
breaking when they be out salt them with white salt 3 or 4 hours at the
most strew’d all over y^m but never put in pickle then wipe them over
with a fair dry cloth as clean as possible the lest will best leper all
the cheese so let them dry upon clean cloths in a window turne them
every day and as they grow mouldy or fowle rub them easily with clean
and dry clothes this proportion will make 2 cheeses. these cheeses are
best to be made in may or september.


468. _To make Pastills._

Take a pound of Sugar a quarter of a pound of ambergreese & of musk
the 8th, 10th or 12th part let the Sugar be double refined beat it &
incorporate it well with the amber and musk then take gumdragon steep
it in oringe flower water Impast the Sugar with it make it into cakes
dry them in the Shade and Sun take heed of using to much gum for a very
little will serve besure to let your cakes dry well in the shade before
you put them in the Sun or they will crack.


469. _For Fine Linnen._

Take of orrice 4 pounds callamase half a pound benjamin a pound Storax
a pound cloves a quarter of a pound civet half an ounce muske an ounce
ointment of oringe flowers 2 ounces lignum alloes 2 ounces ambergreese
half an ounce rose wood half a pound the amber civet musk and ointment
of oringes must be mingled together & melt’d & you must either rub the
roses with it or else some wool the wool will keep the smell longest to
every pound of roses a pound of powder.


470. _Perfumes to Burn._

Take Damask rose buds and cut off the whites then beat them very small
take half a pound of them when they are beaten and put to them 3 ounces
of benjamine half a quarter of an ounce of muske as much of civet and
as much ambergreese then mingle it all well together and make it up in
little thin cakes and lay them upon rose leaves & dry them in the sun
till they be very dry.


471. _For Ordinary Linnen._

Take of orrice 8 pound callamase 2 pound damaske powder a pound cloves
a pound gallingall half a pound benjamin half a pound Storax halfe a
pound lavender a pound to every pound of rose leaves you must put a
pound of powder.


472. _To destroy Moths & preserve Cloths untouch’d._

Take the bear frame of a square table cover it over with such furniture
you mean to preserve you must let your furniture touch the ground at
the sides & ends of the frame to keep in the heat and vapor then take a
chaffendish of charcole or cole of wood fire and put thereon a quantity
of alloes sequetrina and a quantity of gallinger roots then put your
chaffendish in the midst of the frame and let it remaine there untill
y^e vapor be quite setled and the engredients consumed this absolutely
at once ordering will destroy all the moths bred in your furniture &
continually preserve such furnitures as is untouched.


473. _To destroy Moths in Chairs & Stools & to refresh ye Colour._

Take a quantity of sharp small beer or ale put therein a quantity of
alloes & a quantity of gallinger as aforesaid make it boyle 3 or 4
walmes untill ye alloes be dissolved then take a piece of woollen cloth
dip it therein and wash over your chairs and stools therewith then
put them to dry this will kill all the moths though bred in the seats
amongst feathers flox or wool and refresh any colour’d cloth or stuff
turkey workes or needel workes not altering the property of ye colours
nor hurting the workes.


 474. _To scoure and refresh the Colour of Cloth Carpets, Silk
 Curtains, or any Stuff y^t is Stain’d or Soil’d._

Take a quantity of orgull break it to a small powder then put it into
some pewter platter then put it over a chaffendish of coles make it hot
then put your carpet or curtain abroad upon a table afterwards take a
brush made of swines hairs dip it therein and so rub over your carpet
or curtain therewith this will take away all the spots and refresh the
colour.


475. _To scoure & refresh ye Colour of Gold & Silver Lace or Fringe._

Take a quantity of wine vinegar put therein a quantity of rock allome
make it boyle till the allome be dissolved then rub over your lace
therein afterwards wash it over with clean water and castle soap this
will make your lace very fair and fresh. Some rub it only w^{th} the
powder of Common Palk burnt:


476. _To scoure or refresh ye Colours of Pictures y^t are Stain’d or
Soil’d._

Take a quantity of wine vinegar & a quantity of allome let it boyle
till ye allome be dissolved then take a piece of fine clean linnen
cloth dip it therein & wash over your pictures therewith then let them
dry and after they are dry take a little piece of fine linnen cloth dip
it in linset oyle and so wipe over your picktures therewith then hang
them in their places this will fetch off all y^e stains and make y^e
pictures fresh.


477. _To dress & order Thin & Old Bedtikes to make y^m keep in their
Feathers._

Take a quantity of wheat flour and a quantity of yellow wax put it into
clean water make it boyle and stir it well together untill the wax be
clear dissolved then let it cool and after it is cold use it after
this manner, take your bedtike turn the wrong side outwards and spred
it abroad upon a table then take a brush made of swines hairs dip it
therein rub over every place of your bed tike therewith and put it to
dry this will make your bed thick and strong & cause that no feathers
shall come out nor dust enter in.


 478. _To perfume Bedtikes for Down or other Bedtikes w^n y^e Feathers
 smell Strong and Mustie._

Take clean water, wax and flour make it boyle and stir it well together
untill the wax be dissolved and when your wax is dissolved take a
quantity of cloves beaten to powder and a quantity of sweet water or
damaske rose water cast it therein Stir it well together and when it
is cold dress your bed therewith according to ye last receipt this
done you shall smell your bed all over ye chamber w^n it cometh to the
heat of the body it’s both comfortable to ye head and stomach and not
offencive to a woman in child bed.


479. _To make Butter Cheese._

Run the morning milk as you ussially do Stir and sink it when it is
well whey and gather’d put it in a great vate press it very little then
put it in a great trendell and break it very small and mix with it good
store of runnet(?) and all the butter that can be made of the evening
cream well beat from the butter milk they must be so wrought together
that you may not discern the one from the other then put it in a great
vate that will hold a peck at lest in a large cloth well fastned y^t
the curd worke not forth you must press it by degrees and not put on
the full weight at first change it in a dry cloth at noon and salt it
well it must stand in the press 2 days & 2 nights puting twice a day in
fresh cloths it must not be eat under 2 years old at soonest neither
made in a little quantity.


480. _To keep Oringes fresh all y^e Year._

Take such a number as you intend to keep out of the ship before they
are wash’d strow 2 inches of wood aishes finely sift’d in the bottom
of a box or barrell then lay the oringes in rowes to that they may
neither touch one another or the sides of the box then sifting 2 inches
thick of aishes more over them and place so many rowes of oringes after
the same manner as the box or barrell will hold.


481. _To make Quince Marmalade._

Take your quinces that are full ripe look yellow without spots & fresh
gather’d from the tree pare them and quarter them and cut out their
core very clean and take their weight in good refined Sugar then take
some of your other quinces that are not so purely fine quarter them &
core them only and beat them in a stone morter so small as with adding
a spoonfull or two of fair water now & then to them you may gett the
juice out of them then strain and wring them very hard through a thin
cloth or boulter geting as much juice from them as possible you can
and for want of this juice in case you have not quinces enough to make
it up you may take the pareings and cores of those you intend for
marmalade with the addition of a few ordinary quinces more & boyle them
in a quantity of fair water till the quinces & pareings are tender and
the water very strong of them then strain it and let it stand till it
be throughly cold and to every pound of quinces and Sugar take a full
pint or something more of this liquor or ye juice before mentioned and
pour it into your quarter’d quinces alone & let them boyle in it till
they are very tender then mash them well together with a spoon but
break not your quinces to small but leave some pretty big bitts and
then put in your sugar being first finely beaten stirring it altogether
and makeing it boyle if you intend to have it red marmalade you must
keep it continually boyling very close cover’d and stir’d hard from ye
bottom or it will soon burn when ye Sugar is in it & when you perceive
it grow red & come to a pure cherry colour w^{ch} with long constant
boyling and stiring it will be then warme your glasses at the fire lest
they break & so put in into them as fast as you can and keep it in a
moderately hot Stove all ye year for your use.


482. _An excellent Pommander._

Take half an ounce of benjamin half an ounce of damase rose leaves a
quarter of an ounce of Storax beat these very small severally then sift
them and mingle the powder then take some gumdragon steep’d in rose
water 24 hours and make it into a stiff past then take 4 grains of
ambergreese 4 grains of musk and 2 of civit grind these together with a
little juice of Lemon till they are dissolved then anoint the hand with
essence of jessamie or roses & work the past well with the musk and
amber if it be to limber put in powder of roses if to stiff a little
rose water then weigh them of an equal weight and rowle them up in your
hand but while they are wet make holes through them with a bodkin dry
them betwixt 2 papers.


483. _To make Mince Pyes._

Take tongues par-boyled cut the roots and hard all off then to 4 pound
of meat take 8 pound of the best sewit cut the tongues in little square
pieces like dice then shred it fine do the sewit the same then put it
to the meat by degrees and stir it lightly to keep it from lumping then
chop meat and sewit together & sift it through a fine split sive save
the lumps that remain behind chop them again and sift them as before
till all are gone to this proportion of meat and sewit take half an
ounce of nutmegs half an ounce of cinnamon almost as much mace half a
quarter of an ounce of cloves beat the spice all but the nutmegs very
fine then sift it through a sive as you strain water grewel through let
your sive be very dry that done and your meat ready then put in your
spice and salt to your taste 2 pound and a half of the best raisons of
the Sun Stoned and shred as fine as can be dates half a pound shred
as fine as the raisons, cittern above a quarter of a pound, a quarter
of a pound of canded lemon not quite a quarter of a pound of canded
oringe shred them but not so fine as the rest 10 or a dozen of the
best pippins par’d and shred as fine as can be but neither pare nor
shred them till just you put them into y^r meat then rub in everything
severally into your meat & well without clodding have 4 pound of
the best currants clean wash’d pick’d and dryed 2 pound of Sugar or
something better beat fine a quarter of a pint of the best rose water
of the best canary a pint and a quarter, 3 quarters of a pint of the
best verges lay more sliced cittern on the top of the pyes if you keep
any of the meat by to make up after the first time stir it well every
day & do not put in the juice of Lemon for it will not do well to stand
in long you must mingle your Sack rosewater & verges together then turn
up your meat and sprinkle it in by degrees y^t all the meat may fare
alike & not Lump to this quantity you may put the juice of 2 lemons but
not to stand in longer then just while you make y^m up.


484. _An excellent Water for ye Head & for Sleep called ye Emperour
Charleses Water._

When roses are blown, take a quart of good aquavite in a glass with a
narrow neck and when the roses are half blown take a handfull of the
leaves without ye seed put them into the glass and when the marioran
bloweth & the Apiastrum take then a handfull of their buds chop them
small and put them into the glass Take also cloves nutmegs cinnamon
mace cardamum of each an ounce & a half bruise all these grossly and
put it in the glass and when the lavender and rosemary are blown add
a handfull of each flowers also shake them well together and stop it
close let it stand 10 days in a hot sun it must be used by anointing
the temples and nostrells it fortifieth and Corroborateh the head and
memory.


485. _The Lady Drakes Re^{ct} to cure the Stone._

Take Saxafrage, Pellitory of the wall parsley, mother of time of each
a handfull clean pickt 3 or 4 radish roots scrap’t and sliced steep
these in a gallon of new milk at night cover it close distill it in
the morning in a common still let it run while good mix it all of a
strength take 6 spoonfulls of this water with as much white or renish
with a little nutmeg & sugar just warmed and drink it nights & mornings
3 days before the new and the full of the moon for a year together.
Probatum Est.


486. _Cere Clothes._

Dissolve on the coals an ounce and half of virgins wax and put to it
as much Spermacitti as will lye on a shilling and a spoonfull of oyle
of sweet almonds a few drops of oyle of cloves dip your cloths in it
and when they are cold wring them in a cloth and clap them between your
hands.


487. _Almond Custards._

Take 2 pound of almonds stamp them with rose water strain them into a
quart of thick cream washing them through with a little of the cream
till you have got out the best of them but reserve one spoonfull to put
to it without straining put to it 14 whites of eggs well beaten sweeten
& bake it as you please.


488. _Macaroons._

Half a pound of almonds stamp’d with rosewater the whites of 4 eggs
whipt to froth with 2 spoonfulls of rosewater half a pound of double
refined Sugar 2 spoonfulls of rice flour both searched fine mix it in
a bason & set it on hot coals keep stiring it till tis boyling hot lay
wafers on white papers and put this on them bake them in a quick oven.


489. _A Ragou of Veal._

Take a breast of veal lard it pretty thick with great lards then brown
it very well in a frying pan put it into a stew pan with some of the
butter it was fry’d in flower it and let it fry there a little then put
in gravie or strong broth almost to cover it & let it stew till tis
tender then season it with pepper, salt, mace nutmeg Sweet herbs, an
onion put in 2 or 3 Sweet breads slicet some pallats 6 yolks of eggs
put in juice of lemon or verjuice a quarter of a pound of butter dish
it on toast and pour the sauce over it.


490. _For a Tickling Cough or Rhume._

2 ounces of conserve of red roses 2 ounces of honey 60 grains of
mastick 60 grains of libanum 20 drops of Sulphur or as much as will
make it sharp and make it all up together in an Electuary & tyed up
close which will serve for half a year or a year and take the quantity
of a nutmeg first in the morning and last at night.


491. _For Flegme when it sticks that it cannot come up._

Take a spoonfull of mustard 2 spoonfulls of honey & a spoonfull of
good oyle or oyle of sweet almonds a spoonful of vinegar or good crab
verjuice or wine vinegar if not to sharp beat it well together and
take it in bed and swallow it down by degrees tye it up close it will
keep but a little time take a quarter of a spoonfull at a time mornings
and last at night.


492. _For a Cold newly taken._

Take a pint of posset drink cut 5 large lent-figgs in small thin
slices a stick of liquorish stript small and about half a spoonfull
of annyseeds bruised put these into the posset drink boyle them till
almost half be consumed drink it hot as you go to bed.


493. _To keep damosens all ye Year._

Bake your Damosens and take the juice only a good quantity and put
Sugar thereto about the weight of your liquor so boyle it & scumme it
clean then let it stand till it be cold then put it in your damosens
raw as many as your juice will cover and stop them up close to keep all
the year.


494. _For a Healing Ointment._

Take mallows orpine dandelion brooklime St Johns wort Elder leaves of
each one handfull boyle all these together in the fleck of a pig or
fresh butter for the space of 2 hours under a soft fire yn strain it
and keep it for use.


495. _For a Drawing Salve._

Take of pitch and bees wax of each a quarter of a pound & of rozen half
a pound & 4 pennyworth of venice turpentine add thereunto so much of
the healing ointment as your own reason will direct you that may serve
to make it up into a plastering salve all these must be boyled and
stir’d together untill they are well incorporated you may observe that
a little of the ointment being put in will serve for the incorporating
& dissolving the other ingredients after these are boyled together you
are to pour them into a vessel of fair water and then break & worke
them well together and then make them up into rowles for use.


496. _For a Tenting Salve._

Take an ounce of beeswax and 2 ounces of Rozin and one penny worth of
venice turpentine and boyle them together with so much deers sewit
as will consolidate them into a Salve when these are boyled together
strain them for use if you cannot get deers sewit you may take the best
sheeps sewit.


497. _A Poultise._

Take all the herbs before named in the healing ointment & boyle them
in beer for an hour then strain out the herbs and thicken the liquor
w^{th} oatmeal or bread then boyle it well until it become a thick
poultise and y^n put into it oyle or fresh liquor If the maladye ye
poultise is to be apply’d unto requires speedy breaking then boyle
together w^{th} ye herbs an handful or less of white lilly mores this
poultise is very usefull for all sorts of swellings.


498. _A Cordiall or Surffit Water of Poppies._

Take of the poppie flowers pluck them from the stalks then sift y^m
from the seeds and weigh out 4 pounds then steep them in 3 gallons of
strong ale and with them half a pound of liquorish and half a pound
of annyseeds and let them steep a whole night then distill them in
your limbeck the first runing will be very strong the second somewhat
smaller when you have drawn a quart or 2 then take 2 handfulls of
poppie flowers being pickt and sift’d and let them lye in the water 5
or 6 days till it comes to the colour of a peal claret wine and upon
any indisposition of the stomach sickness or surffit 5 or 6 spoonfuls
of this is very cordiall the 2 quarts will be strong and you must
strain out the leaves after 5 or 6 days. Probatum est.


499. _To make a Surfit Water._

Take of ale measure 6 gallons of strong ale one pound of liquorish half
a pound of annyseeds 2 pound of red poppey one ounce of cloves one
ounce of nutmegs one ounce of cinnamon and one ounce of ginger bruise
the cloves gently and slice all the rest of ye spices take likewise
half a pound of figs a quarterne of dates a pound of raisons of the Sun
Stoned lay all these in steep over night in the ale then take a quarter
of a pound of white Sugar candy finely beaten and put it into your
glass which receives your distillation put the first and second runing
together otherwise it will be to strong you may put in a grain or 2 of
ambergreese & a handfull of poppie leaves to colour it.


500. _For a Sinew Strain in Man or Beast._

Take of Nerve oyle Frankinsence Brandy Venice turpentine and black soap
of each a convenient quantity melt them together and chafe it well in
with your hand and hold a red hot iron or fire shovel to it whilst
you are doing of it to force it the better in. You may add a little
quantity of gum anomy. Probatum est.


501. _To make Juice of Liquorish as a special Cordiall._

Take a pound of liquorish a quart of Isope water the 3^d part of a
quart of red rose water Sugar candy one pound confection of alkermise
2 ounces ambergreese 80 grains musk 50 grains unicornes horn 30 grains
prepared pearl 2 drams beasor stone 40 grains Harts horne half an ounce
take your liquorish scrape it and slice it then beat it to powder and
put it into a silver or earthern pipkin and let it stand on a soft fire
simpering till it be reasonably thick then strain it through a searce
and put in the Sugar candie finely beaten then set it in the sun where
no rain comes stiring it together once in 4 or 5 days you must make
it in april & it must stand close cover’d in the Sun (stiring it as
aforesaid) the space of 2 months at least w^n it hath been thus dryed
you must take your other ingredients and with some of the liquor grind
them in a smooth stone morter or on a perfumers stone till these be
very fine then mix them well together with the rest & set it again in
the Sun 3 months more or till it be hard enough to box up still stiring
it as aforesaid every 4 or 5 days.


502. _To make a Powder for the Stone used by Pope Silvester ye 2d._

Take groundsell seed and Saxaifrage seed of each an ounce filipendula
half an ounce white amber and corrall white and red of each a quarter
of an ounce make all these into a fine powder and mix them well
together and of this give the patient one spoonfull each morning while
it last in broth or pottage and it will help and deffend him from the
stone that it never will come again.


503. _For an Ague._

Take of alloes Sickatryna and beat it in 2 spoonfulls of english honey
half a pint of white wine vinegar and a little piece of allome boyle
these together till they be thick then make a plaister thereof on a
piece of leather and apply it to the navel of the belly as hot as may
be suffred it cureth the ague and killeth wormes.


504. _For Agues of all Sorts._

Take venice turpentine and white frankinsence finely powdered and strew
it into your turpentine till it be stiff enough not to run abroad well
mingling it together with a knife then spread it on round pieces of
leather 2 inches and half over for a man & less for children and when
you have spread over your plaister with this liquid turpentine and
frankinsence mingled as before then strew on more of the powder finely
search’d and so let them lay and dry till a white paper will not stick
to them and so puting papers between each plaister lay them up for use
& when you use them warme them and apply them to the navel a little
before the fit comes & let it lay on till they fall off themselves if
one plaister cures not then use a 2^d and so a 3^d but a 1^{st} seldom
fails. Probatum est.


505. _An Ointment for Eyes._

Take 4 ounces of may butter 2 ounces of virgins wax 2 scruples of tutty
fully prepared 2 scruples of camphir 4 spoonfulls of white or red rose
water melt the butter and wax and then put in all the materialls and
besure to keep it stiring till it be quite cold when there is occasion
to use it take a little of it and put it into the palme of your hand
& when it is softned then with your finger anoint all about it on the
outside of your eyes and the temples the last thing you do when you go
to bed if there should be occasion to wash ye eyes in the morning white
or red rose water is best.


506. _A Puff Paste._

Take 2 pound of flour a pound and half of butter 2 eggs 3 spoonfulls of
Sack make the paste not to stiff with cold water work it very smooth
rowle it out 4 square beat up your butter lay it on in thin slices
strewing flour between rowle it up again till ye butter is used up in a
sheet as thick as a finger half an hour will bake it.


507. _A Water for Wounds and Old Sores._

Take 2 ounces of white copperas and a quarter of an ounce of camphir
put them into some little earthen pot and set it in hot embers and stir
it till it be melted and dryed again to a powder then take 2 ounces
of boel-armeniack and beat it small and mix it with the other powder
when this is done take 2 pottle of spring water and let it boyle till a
quarter of it be consumed then take it off and put half of the powder
into it So put it into a glass and keep it for your use it will keep
a long time before you dress any wound (shake the glass well then let
it settle again least any of the powder should be amongst it when you
dress the wound and so eat into the flesh) which having washt well
fould a clout 6 or 8 double weting it throughly with ye same water and
lay it on the wound then take another clout 8 or 10 times double as
near as you can guess to the bigness of the wound or a thought less and
lay it on the other cloth as wet as the former full in the mouth of the
wound and so bind it on with a swath or rowler it is excellent good for
men to use y^t have le grand veroll aue vierge pour le laver. Probatum
est.


508. _The Wound Drink._

Take wormwood southernwood sanicle white bottles Ragwort plantin
ribwort woodbins oake-buds dandelyon mugwort dayseyes roots and all
bramble buds herbgrease violet leaves strawberry leaves Suinquefoyle,
angellicoe, adderstongue scordium wood bittoney agrimoney hawthorne
buds bugle lungewort avens comfry mints Scabious and pimpernell these
herbs are to be gather’d pick’d and dryed in may month then put them
in severall papers & so keep them all the year but the buds are to
be gather’d at their first comeing forth when you make it take one
handfull of each sort a pottle of fair water and a quart of white wine
boyle these together till half be boyled away then strain the liquor
from the herbs and put to it a pint of honey then boyle it a little
till you have scummed it then take it off and let it coole & keep it,
close stop’d let the patient take 3 spoonfulls of it morning & evening
first & last but if for a child 2 spoonfulls is sufficient.


_The vertues of it._

It cureth wounds and sores laying on them a plaister of honey and wax
or one of the following cere cloths without tents it scaleth putrified
bones breaketh and expelleth imposthumes cureth aches in the stomach
expelleth bullets & cureth the Isue it stopeth bleeding at nostrells
all wounds and broken veins the herbs must be gathered at the latter
end of april in may or ye beginning of June as the season of the herbs
are w^{ch} must be dryed without Sun or fire comeing near them & the
handfulls mentioned are to be understood handfulls of dry herbs.
Probatum Est.


509. _The Black Cere Cloth._

Take a quart of sallet oyle a pound of red ledd boyle these together on
a soft fire untill it be black then dip your old linnen cloth therein,
and hang it up till it be throughly cold & stiff when it leaves its
clamminess & sticking to the finger it is enough boyled. Probatum est.


510. _The White Cere Cloth._

Take a quart of sallet oyle red ledd half a pound white lead ½ a pound
camfir 2 drams boyle these until they leave their claminess and stick
to ye finger which is then enough boyled.

The poultise if occasion for any is only milk thickened with white
bread crums and a quantity of saffron as will colour it to the colour
of the yolke of an egg and the wound drink drank as afore prescribed.


511. _Direction to cure Ye King’s Evil & 1st for the drink._

Take agremoney mugwort march sanicle liverwort Kingswort coltsfoot
maiden hair scabious harts tongue of bittony of each of all these a
small handfull to be boyled in 6 quarts of spring water with half a
pound of raisons of the Sun Stoned a quarter of a pound of currants
8 figgs better than half a pound of annyseeds one stick of liquorish
boyle all these together til it be consumed to 3 quarts then strain
it through a hair sive & cool it and so put it in a pot and let the
patient drink it in the morning fasting and again about 4 a clock in
the afternoon.

If it must be broken take castle soap and temper it with barme & apply
it till it break when it is broken apply the same as long as you shall
think there is anything to be drawn forth of the wound then heal it
w^{th} the following Salve:


512. _A healing Salve for ye King’s Evil._

Take groundsell vallerian elder buds or in the winter the inner rind
of ye elder tree Issope brown Sage a good handfull of each sort half a
pound of clarified butter 3 ounces of beeswax one ounce of rozin half
a pound of sheeps sewit 2 ounces of hog’s lard chop these herbs small
and boyle them in those liquors softly a quarter of an hour then strain
it and stir it till it be almost cold and then apply it to the sore but
if you think the sore doth breed a worme then take the powder of a Sea
crab shell & all together baked in an oven and so made to powder the
powder also of frankinsence of oyle of wormwood an ounce and the oyle
of 6 eggs put off ye powder of crab as much as will fill a thimble half
as much of the powder of frankinsence stir it together into ye oyle and
with a feather put some of it into the wound under the plaister.

To wash it you must take warme white wine or crab verjuice, if these
things heal not then take the oyle of the finest tar stir’d with a
stick the oyle will come upon the top which take with a feather and
apply to ye sore.


513. _To raise a Blister._

If you raise a blister then it must not be broken but take speare grass
and pound a little of the leaves putting a little butter amongst it put
also as much of it as a small nut and that will raise a blister of the
same bigness cut the blister clean away and then put castle soap and
barme as aforesaid to draw it as long as it will yield anything then
after apply the forementioned Salve unto the sore and (God willing)
this will cure the party in time. Probatum Est.


514. _Swallows Ointment._

Take lavender cotten, spike, knot grass, Ribwort barme vallerian,
rosemary tops alehoofe, strawberrystrings woodbine tops, vinestrings,
french mallows the tops of tutsan, plantin leaves, walnut leaves, the
tops of young bays Issope, violet leaves, Sage of virtue, fine Roman
wormwood of each of these one handfull of redroses and cammomile 2
handfulls of each 10 young swallows alive one quart of neats foot
oyle or may butter 2 ounces of cloves pound all these together in a
morter small then put them in an earthen pipkin and stop it close with
a piece of dough that no air get in then set it in a seller or coole
place 9 days then take it and open it and add thereto a pint of sallet
oyle a quarter of a pound of yellow wax then set it over ye fire in a
kettle of water and let it boyle 6 or 7 hours then take it off the fire
and strain it into your pot to keep it for your use keeping it close
cover’d. it is good for a sprain or wrinch or ache of long continuance.


515. _The Lady Biddolphs Green Oyle to be made in May._

Take red sage, rosemary, lavender broad leaved balsom cammomile,
vallerian of each 4 ounces wormwood 2 ounces gather them in a Sunshine
day wipe y^m and not wash them chop them very small and put them into
a convenient vessel and put to them a quart of the best oyle of olives
you can get tye it up close let it stand in the sun 2 or 3 weeks
stiring it once in 3 or 4 days then put it into a skillet and boyle it
a little then strain out all the herbs as hard as you can wring them
and put into the oyle half the same quantity of herbs again and let
them stand as before in the Sun 3 or 4 days then set them on the fire
which must be very gentle and let boyle very softly till your oyle is
of a perfect green then strain out the herbs and let your oyle stand
all night in a pewter bason then set your oyle on a chaffendish of
coles and let it boyle a while and scumme it if anything do arise then
take it off and let it stand till it be cold then take a glass of the
uppermost for special use the rest put into a glass for more ordinary
use if there be any water at ye bottom cast it away or trye it for eyes
so preserving the balsam oyle for your use.


_The vertue of it._

It is good to anoint and tent all sores or wounds for it doth heal
first at the bottom it will not suffer proud or dead flesh to grow
in a wound it draws out thornes and splinters, it is excellent for
bruises in any part of ye body to anoint the place outwardly or to take
inwardly to drink 10 or 12 drops to a man or woman and half so much to
a child in a spoonfull of ale or white wine posset drink and drink a
little more posset drink after it 3 or 4 nights and mornings it will
drive out any bruised blood out of the body you may give it to a woman
after her travell it is good for deafness that comes by cold drop 3 or
4 at night and morning for 2 or 3 days together so used it will help
an imposthume in the head break and heal it you may drop into the eye
if it be bruised with a blow it is good to anoint ye throat for the
swelling of the almonds and to drop into ye ear for ye toothache.


516. _To stop Bleeding if a Veine be cut asunder._

Take the shell of goose or hen that the chick comes out of when hacht &
make it into powder being first burnt and cast thereon & it stanch it
presently. Probatum Est.


517. _For the Jaundice._

Take a handfull of earth wormes and put them awhile in salt & water to
cleanse themselves then put them into a quart of white wine to steep
until they dissolve then strain them out then put to the strain’d
liquor 4 penny worth of english saffron and let that steep well in
it also and let the party grieved take of this liquor thus prepared
a quarter of a pint first in the morning and at 4 a clock in the
afternoon and last at night. Probatum Est.


518. _Dr. Willis his electuarie for a Dead Palsey._

Take conserve of sage flowers, bittony Rosemary of each an ounce the
flowers of turrica 2 ounces preserved Mirobalence number 2 preserved
nutmegs 2 drams spirits diambra, Salt of wormwood, powder of pioney
roots and of pioney seeds of each one dram white amber white corral
prepared of each 2 scruples & a half with a sufficient quantity of
sirrop of stœchas to make it into an electuarie.


519. _His Whey for ye same Palsey._

Take bittony sage mugwort pennyroyall fumetory of each one handfull
damask rose leaves 3 handfulls epythum 2 ounces corriander & sweet
fennell seeds of each an ounce cut these and dry them in the shade and
so keep y^m for your use mixing them altogether one handfull of these
herbs must be boyled in new whey a quarter of an hour & ye liquor drank
when almost cold.

The above mentioned Electuary prescribed to be taken every morning very
early in your bed and last at night the quantity of a nutmeg.


520. _An Eye Water._

Take a new earthen vessel never used & so many gallons as it will hold
pound so many ounces of white copperice in fine powder & when snow is
on the ground fresh gather it very clean and put some snow in the pot
& then some of the powder doing so untill all the copperice powder be
spent and the vessel full then cover it with a clean cloth & set it in
a cellar till the snow is all melted off the ground then strain it &
keep it for use in bottles.

It is good for Ruehmetick eyes being dropt in when they go to bed it
will take away pearls phillmes, webbs & blood sheds in eyes if you take
a piece of red rose cake enough to cover and soake it in some of this
water warme and lay it to the eye when you go to bed and let it lay on
ye eye till the next morning. In short it is good for all distempers in
ye eyes & for old sores in legs if bathed warme with, but to drop in ye
eyes it must be cold.


521. _To make Wigs._

Take 3 pound and a half of flour a pound of butter melt’d in a pint of
milk a quart of yest half a pound of Sugar mixt into the milk butter &
yest half an ounce of cloves and mace a quarter of an ounce of carraway
seeds a little salt and put all this into the flour and mix it up into
a pretty stiff paste then weigh them into 4 ounces a piece & rowle them
into wigs & bake them upon paper or tin plates butter’d.


522. _Pills for Vapours of Spleen & Fits of ye Mother to Suppress and
cure them._

Take castor, saffron, Gallbanum orsephetita and make them into fine
powder of each half an ounce, half an ounce of methridate added in
which well mix your powder with as much oyle of amber as will make it
into pills of the largest size (or half an ounce of the powder) as the
receipt exprest and then as much oyle of amber as will make it up in
pills and of them one large or 2 middle size when you find the fits
comeing keeping y^r selfe fasting an hour before & an hour after but if
followed with ye fits then take one of them being of ye largest size
morning afternoon and last at night if you drink anything after them
let it be a little hystericall water.


523. _For a Cold._

Take 4 ounces of old conserve of red roses 2 ounces of white sugar
candie 2 ounces of raisons of the Sun Stoned beat all these till well
incorporated then add the quantity of a small walnut of diescordium and
2 spoonfulls of Sirrop of popies 7 drops of oyle of sulphur 11 drops of
spirit of vitriol mingle all these very well together and take of it as
much as a large nutmeg first in the morning fasting 2 or 3 hours after
it & last at night leting it melt (as it were) gently down y^r throat.


524. _For the Scurvy._

Take one good handfull of pine tree tops & bruise them and infuse y^m
in one quart of white wine or renish 3 or 4 hours then take one good
handfull of dandilyon boyle it in one quart of new milk make it into
a posset with the wine take off the curd pour the drink scaulding hot
upon brooklimes, water cresses, sea scurvy grass garden scurvy grass of
each a large handfull with the rine of a lemon cover it & drink every
morning & afternoon a quarter of a pint sweeten in with Sirrop made of
oringe juice & wormwood cold still’d water--drink this ale april and
september.


525. _To make the Convulsion Water._

Take 2 quarts of Spring water and put therein half a handfull of
bittony and as much plantin and Spermint & whore hound a quarter of a
handfull of centry and as much cardus half a handfull of single pioney
roots green & half a handfull of burdock roots green & both sliced very
thin half an ounce of hart’s horne & half an ounce of sweet fennell
seed bruised a little a quarter of an ounce of bastorium and a quarter
of an ounce Assifetita stop all these very close in a stone jugg and
set it in a kettle of seething water up to the neck of the jugg & let
it stand seething 8 hours then take it out and let it stand close stopt
till next day then put it out into a brass pot and add to it a quart
of cardus water and a quart of spermint water half a pint of red rose
water & half a pint of old malligo Sack then put a small handfull of
bittony & as much plantin and Spermin and whorehound and a quarter of
a handfull of centry and as much cardus one handfull of single pioney
roots and a handfull of burdock roots sliced 2 ounces & a half of harts
horne an ounce and a half of sweet fennellseeds bruised 3 quarters of
an ounce of bastorium and half an ounce of Assifetita and one nutmeg
sliced stop this pot very close that no breath may come out and on the
cover set a weight of 18 or 20 pounds keep this to a moderate heat 8
hours more then let it stand close stopt till the next day then open
it & strain it out and put therein a pint and a half of malligo Sack &
half a pint of annyseed water & a lb. or more of jeans treacle put it
up into bottles & feed it w^{th} treacle when you see fit all the herbs
must be very dry.


526. _For the Yellow Jaundice or Collick in the Stomach or the
Consumption, Obstructions in ye Liver Spleen & especially for ye
Falling Sickness._

Take a peck of garden snails and wash them in a great bowle of beer &
then make your chinney very clean and pour half a bushell of charcole
& set y^m afire and when they are throughly kindled then with a shoule
make a great hole in the midst of the fire and pour in your snails &
scatter in some of your fire amongst them and so let them rest as long
as you hear them make a noise then you must take them out of the fire
and pick them out of their shells with a knife and with a coarse cloth
pick and wipe all the green froth from them then in a stone morter
bruise them shells and all next take a quart of earth wormes and slit
them then scoure them with salt then wash them and break them in pieces
in a stone morter then (the pot being very clean uppon which you set
your limbeck) put them into it and about 2 handfulls of Angelico to
put into the bottom & 2 handfulls of sallendine then put in a quart
of rosemary flowers if you please you may put in Egremony of red dock
roots, bear foot, the inner rine of barberry roots of woodsorrell &
bittony of each 2 handfulls of rew half a handfull of Fenegrick &
Turmerick of each an ounce of Saffron well Dry’d and beaten to powder
the weight of 6 pence then pour into all these 3 gallons of the
strongest Ale you can get cover your pot & let it stand all night in
the place where you mean to put fire to it in the morning you must put
to them 3 ounces of very good cloves beaten to powder and before you
put your fire to it with 6 ounces of good Harts horne you must not stir
it after you have put in the Harts horne lest it go down to ye bottom
then set on the limbeck and make it fast and so receive the water by
pints the first water is best and strongest & must be received by its
Selfe ye last is smallest and may be mended by putting the strongest to
it when it is used this water must be given to the patient in a morning
who must fast 2 hours after it and not sleep upon it or it may be
given 2 hours after each meale he or she must take 2 spoonfulls of the
strongest w^{th} 4 spoonfulls of Ale or white wine and when you give ye
smallest you must give as much water as drink. This has been aproved &
is an excellent cordial.


527. _An Oyle for any deep wound or wounds through the Body or wounds
made w^{th} an envenomed Weapon, or Sinews Prickt._

Take white wine or rather so much brown bastard, one quart of oyle of
olives 2 quarts, one quart of the oyle of turpentine put all these
together in a great double glass and with them of ye leaves flowers
Hieperig on andseeds of St Johnswort of each 2 great handfulls gently
bruised set the glass in the sun close stopt 8 or 10 days then boyle
them in a kettle with straw at the bottom for ye glass to stand upon
and when it hath gently boyled a great while then take off the kettle
and coole it by degrees and then take out the glass and strain out all
the moisture from the herbs and put it into the glass again with 2 of
the fresh leaves of St Johnswort and of the flowers & seeds of each two
handfulls & then set them in the sun as before 8 or 10 days then boyle
and strain them as before & so have you a oyle for all the purposes
beforementioned & every year let it be again clarified in ye sun.


528. _The Countess of Bristolls Black Salve._

Take one pound of white lead as much Lietheriegie of gold finely beaten
& search’d into a quart of sallet oyle then take 4 ounces of yellow wax
& 3 drams of camphire boyle them together on a good fire till they grow
very black and 6 hours after this is an exceeding good skining Salve.
Probatum Est.


529. _An Ointment to cure old Sores, to search Fistolas, to eate Dead
Flesh and to dry up Wattery Humors._

Take verdigreese 5 drams Honey 14 drams, white wine vinegar 5 drams
boyle them on a soft fire and stir them well together till it come to a
red substance & so keep it for use. Probatū Est.


530. _To make Milke Punch._

Take 5 quarts of Brandy 8 quarts of water and two of new milke, four
dozen of lemons, three nutmegs, a pound and half of double refin’d
sugar, pare one dozen of the lemons very thin leaving none of the
white, infuse the parings in some of the brandy about three hours with
the nutmegs grated, dissolve the sugar in water before you putt it to
the brandy, squeeze in the lemons and let all the ingredients be mixt
together, then put them all into a bag of thick flannel & let it run
without stirring, let about a quart run out, then put it into the bag
againe, so repeat it till it is fine.


531. _For the Farcy in a Horse._

Take three ounces of Sal Tartar, one ounce of lapis Calaminary, one
ounce of Putty pulveriz’d; boyl two quarts of stale piss, one quart
of Ale, one handfull of Rue till it comes to one quart, then give it
the horse fasting; if you finde the horse very sick in taking it, you
may the next time abate a small matter of the quantity, by this twice
repeated I have cur’d an inveterate Farcy; but let him rest three or
four daies between.


532. _To cure the Grease in a Horse._

Take three quarters of a pound of Rozin, two ounces of Sal Prunella,
two ounces of stone Brimstone all in fine powders; boyle three pints
of brine & three pints of stale Urine till it comes to three pints in
the hole, strain it thro a woollen bag, and when tis cold stir in the
saide powders and give it the horse fasting, and in two hours time give
him corne and as much warme water with a little bran in it, as he will
drinke, give him exercise as soon as he has taken the drink, and every
time you give him water; Note your liquor must be very cold before you
mix your powders with it: give him three Drinks resting about four
daies between, and the whole quantity in each Drink;

The Oyntment if the Horse be very sore:

Take two ounces of the best Aloes and two ounces of spirits of Wine
made into a salve over the fire.



                               THE TABLE

Transcriber’s Note: The numbers are item numbers not page numbers.

  For an Ache. 184.

  For Agues. 296, 503, 504.

  Almond Loaves. 322.

  Angelicoe to Dry. 406.

  Apples green to Preserve. 25.

  Apricocks to Dry. 75, 77, 115.
    To Preserve them Green, 104.

  Apricocks to preserve. 131.

  Apples Pasties. 312.

  Aqua Mirabilis. 10, 178, 410.


  Balsam. 39, 57.

  To Bake a Bullock’s Head. 260.

  Barberrys to Preserve. 318.

  Bacon Gamon to Dry. 387,402.

  Rump of Beef to stew. 14.

  Rump of Beef to Bake. 17.

  Beef to Coller. 133, 340.

  Beef to Pot. 156.

  Beef Collops. 190.

  Beef to boyle. 341.

  Bed Tickins to Prepare. 477.

  Biskit. 16, 58, 99, 320.

  Fruit Biskit. 23.

  Spanish Biskit. 278.

  Italian Biskit. 450.

  French Biskit. 451.

  Naples Biskit. 453.

  Bite of Mad Dog. 165, 251, 252.

  Bleeding to stop. 516.

  French Bread. 114, 329.

  For a Bruise. 184.

  Black Cherry Brandy. 232.

  Strengthening Broth. 307.

  Fowl Breath. 462.

  For a Burn. 244, 245, 249.

  Almond Butter. 286, 330.


  Cake. 87, 157, 328, 333, 348.

  Wood-street Cake. 1.

  Almond Cakes. 15, 394.

  Oringe Cakes. 48, 61.

  Quince Cakes Red. 59.

  Quince clear, Cakes. 60.

  Apricock Cakes. 62, 65.

  Rasberry Cakes. 72.

  Clear Cakes. 81, 439.

  Carroway Cake. 86, 345.

  Sugar Cakes. 91, 319, 396.

  Little Cakes. 92, 135.

  Bean Cakes. 118.

  Angelicoe Cakes. 121.

  Portugal Cakes. 379.

  Canker to kill. 46, 225.

  Angelicoe to Candy. 146.

  Clear Rock Candy. 442.

  To Candy Grapes, etc. 438.

  To Sucket Candy Oringes, etc. 443.

  To Candy Flowers ye Spanish way. 444.

  To Rost a Carp. 273.

  Cere Cloth. 18, 486, 509, 510.

  Cherries to Drye. 64, 117.

  Cherrie Water. 93.

  Cherrie Wine. 134, 378.

  Cordial Cherry Water. 305.

  Cherries to Preserve. 344.

  Cheese Cakes. 103, 321.

  A Flesh Cheese. 138.

  Angelot Cheese. 283, 284, 467.

  A Thick Cheese. 285.

  Cream Cheese. 381, 466.

  A Butter Cheese. 479.

  For Chilblains. 244.

  Chocolate to make. 395.

  Pectorals for a Cold. 2, 377.

  Convulsions to Cure. 167, 220, 221, 222, 224, 304, 525.

  Cold to Cure. 22, 29, 32, 197, 204, 292, 492, 523.

  Cough to Cure. 31, 33, 34, 231, 301, 490, 491.

  For the Consumption. 302.

  Conserve of Fruits. 428, 429.

  A Cordial Powder. 37, 38.

  Cordial organy water. 139.

  A cordial water. 145.
    Dr. Stevens Water. 182.
    Imperial Water. 186.
    Palsey Water. 187.
    Melancholy Water. 191.

  A Rich Cordial. 282.

  Gascoins Cordial Powder. 295.

  Conserve of Roses a Cordial. 369.

  A Cordial Electuary. 400.

  A Cordial for Cholick. 414.

  Counterpoyson Cordial. 419.

  Muskadine Comfits. 449.

  Almond Cream. 83, 153.

  Quince Cream. 95.

  Lady Ingrams Cream. 96.

  Pyramid Cream. 97.

  Clouted Cream. 112, 123.

  Cabage Cream. 119, 335.

  Lemon Cream. 122, 152.

  A Cream. 137.

  Runnet Cream. 309.

  Egg Cream. 310.

  Plumme Cream. 311.

  A Cheese Cream. 313.

  The Spanish Cream. 334.

  Trifle Cream ye French way. 349.

  Cracknels to make. 168, 315.

  Almon Custards. 487.

  Cucumbers to pickle. 417.


  Damosens to preserve. 69.

  Damosens to keep. 337, 493.

  Deafness to Cure. 160, 218, 238.

  A Diet Drink. 208.

  Pippin Drink. 374.

  For ye Dropsy. 175.

  To Dry Fruits. 440.

  To Dry them without Sugar. 441.


  Ebulum to make. 5.

  Eels to stew. 259.

  Eels to Coller. 275.

  Eye water. 43, 219, 281, 520.

  Eye powder. 52, 294.

  Filme in Eye to cure. 161.

  Ointment for eyes. 194, 505.


  Vomit for Falling Sickness. 229.

  For Faintings. 273.

  Wash for Face. 308, 464.

  Feavor in Children. 47.

  Fits. Vide Mother.

  Convulsion Fits. 4, 220, 221, 222, 227, 413.

  Flowers to dry. 207.

  Flowers to Candy. 365.

  Floors of Dale to Varnish. 214.

  Forced Meat. 28.

  Frigacy of Chickens. 30.

  Water for Falling Sickness, Jaundice, etc. 526.

  For the Farcy in a Horse. 531.


  Gascoins Powder. 295.

  Goosberries to Preserve. 105, 126, 372, 373.

  A Goosberry Fool. 261.

  Goosberrys to dry. 406.

  Gout to cure. 202, 236.

  Grapes to preserve. 354, 392.

  For Green Sickness. 290, 293.

  To cure the Grease in a Horse. 532.


  Hams to salt. 140, 210, 387, 402.

  Harsh of Calves Head. 27.

  For Giddiness in ye Head. 13, 174.

  Heartburning to Cure. 380.

  Water for the Head. 484.

  Hippocras. 383.

  Hysterick Fits. 413, 415.


  Jaundice to cure. 159, 180, 299, 517.

  Jelly to make. 101, 127, 398.

  Jelly of Currance, etc. 158.

  Jelly of Harts horne. 376.

  Icing for Cakes. 391.

  Jimbols to make. 98, 360.

  Imperial Water. 186.

  For an Imposthume. 239.

  Iringo roots to Candy. 356.

  Iringo roots to dry. 386.

  Itch to cure. 177.

  Plumme Jumbols. 116.


  King’s Evil. 185, 212, 511, 512, 513.


  Lace to wash. 211.

  Lemon water. 19.

  Lemons to preserve. 106, 342.

  Leg of Mutton to Roast. 253.

  Juice of Liquorish. 501.

  For Looseness in Lying in. 233.

  Lozenges of Flowers. 445.


  Marmalade of Apricocks. 65.
    Of Quinces, White. 66, 82.
    Of Quinces, Red. 78, 425, 481.
    Of Pippins. 82.
    Of Oringes. 88.
    Of Plummes. 427.

  A March Paine. 446.

  Macaroons. 452, 488.

  Metheglin. 8, 323, 324, 332, 352, 353.

  Mead to make. 55, 90.

  Miscarrying to prevent. 196.

  Milk water. 217.

  Minc’d Pyes. 483.

  Mother Fits. 24, 26, 216, 224, 227.

  Sore Mouth to cure. 179.

  Moths to destroy. 461, 472, 473.

  Mumme to make. 50.


  Nipples to Harden. 164.


  Oringe water. 19, 422.

  Oringes to preserve. 106, 129, 342, 358.

  Oringes to keep. 480.

  China Oringes to preserve. 347.

  Oyster Porridge. 338.

  Oysters to pickle. 384.

  A Green oyntment. 465.

  A Healing Oyntment. 494.

  Oyntment of Swallows. 514.

  Oyle for sores. 515.

  An oyntment for old sores, etc. 529.


  Paste of Peaches. 76.

  Paste of Apricocks. 120.

  Cracknell Paste. 168, 315.

  Jumbal Paste. 169.

  Puff Paste. 264, 506.

  Paste of Ginnay. 424.

  Paste of Oringes or Lemons. 426.

  Paste of Plummes. 427.

  Paste Royal of Fruits. 431.

  Palsey Water. 187.

  For ye Palsey. 234, 247, 248.

  Pasty Crust. 263.

  Pancakes. 339, 351.

  Electuary for ye Palsey. 518, 519.

  For ye Sinking of the Pallat. 183, 226, 243.

  Perfumed Water. 49.

  A Perfume to burne. 458, 468, 470.

  A Perfume for Starch. 459.

  To Perfume Gloves. 460.

  Perfume for Linnen. 469, 471.

  To Perfume Bedding. 478.

  Peaches to Dry. 75, 393.

  To Pickle Mushrooms. 124.

  To Pickle Kidny Beans. 147, 416.

  To Pickle Turnips. 148.

  To Pickle Oysters. 149.

  To Pickle Broom Buds. 150, 363.

  Pickle for Brawn. 258.

  To Pickle Trouts or Salmon. 276.

  To Pickle Violets. 371.

  Fig to Souce. 130.

  Dr. Moore’s Pills. 141.

  Piles Inwardly. 205, 206.

  Pidgeons to encrease. 246.

  Pidgeons to Stew. 271.

  Plague Water. 3.

  For the Plague. 176, 181.

  Plaister for Sprains, &c. 198.

  Plummes to Dry. 406.

  Posset to make. 67, 109, 366.

  Posset without Milk. 326.

  Point to Wash. 211.

  Pomatum to make. 230.

  To Pot Hare. 279.

  Poultrey to fat. 287.

  Oyster Porridge. 338.

  Pottage. 359.

  Poultise for a Sore Breast. 418.

  A Poultise. 497.

  Pomander to make. 457, 482.

  To Preserve Plummes white. 80.

  To Preserve Pippins. 89,343.

  To Preserve Plummes Green. 364.

  To Preserve ye Water Melon. 423.

  To Preserve Fruits Green. 432.

  To Preserve Plumbs. 433, 434.

  To Preserve Grapes, etc. 435.

  To Preserve Quinces white. 436.

  For Proud Flesh. 209.

  Oringe Pudding. 68, 254, 401.

  Almond Pudding. 48, 142, 269.

  Almond Puddings. 94, 296.

  Quaking Pudding. 85, 257.

  Black Puddings. 107.

  White Puddings. 108.

  Carrot Pudding. 136.

  Oatmeal Pudding. 215.

  Puddings 4 in a Dish. 270.

  Marrow Pudding. 355.

  A Purge. 163, 192, 193, 289.

  Sugar Puffs. 327.

  Chicken Pye with Sweet Seasonings. 274.

  A Lumber Pye. 277.

  Punch to make. 530.

  Pectorals for a Cold. 2.


  Quidony of Plummes. 430.

  Quince to preserve red. 79.
    White preserve & whole. 125.

  Quinces to Preserve. 436.

  Quinces to keep raw. 437.


  Rasberries to Preserve. 70, 74, 128.

  A Ragou of Veal. 489.

  To Refresh Carpets, etc. 474.

  To Refresh Gold Lace. 475.

  To Refresh Pictures. 476.

  Rickets to Cure. 35, 44, 45, 56.

  For a Rupture. 173.


  Sack to make Fine. 199.

  Sawce for Boyl’d Fish. 256.

  Sawce for Boyled Mutton. 265.

  Sawce for all Stewed Meats. 268.

  Sauceages to make. 143.

  Scaulds. See Burns.

  Scurvy to Cure. 170, 524.

  A Tenting Salve. 496.

  A Drawing Salve. 495.

  A Sherbet. 336.

  Sirrop of Lemons. 53.

  Sirrop of Violets. 63, 73, 42.

  Sirrop of Clove Jilly Flowers, &c. 54, 73.

  Sirrop of Buckthorne. 155.

  Snow for Syllabubs. 111, 154.

  Spleen Plaister. 9.

  For the Stone. 171, 200, 201, 241, 242, 250, 300, 485, 502.

  Stag Powder. 237.

  Stomach Paine. 316.

  To take Stains out of Linnen. 362.

  For a Strain. 500, 198.

  Sugar Cakes. 100.

  Surfeit Water. 113, 498, 499.

  To Sugar any Herbs or Fruit to Dry. 346.

  To Boyle Sugar to a Candy Hight. 456.

  To Boyle Sugar to a Manus Christi. 455.

  Sugar Plate. 447.

  Sweet Bag. 132.

  Sweet Meat like Bacon. 357.

  Cockle Shell Sweetmeat. 408.

  To Mould Sweetmeats in Shape of Fruits, etc. 448, 454.

  Sweet Water. 420.

  Swelling to Asswage. 162.

  Syllabub to make. 110, 325.

  Whipt Syllabubs. 144.

  A Healing Salve. 528.


  Tansie to make. 255.

  Teeth Powder. 306, 463.

  Almond Tarts. 397.

  Sore Throat to Cure. 179, 203, 240.

  Tongues to Salt. 140, 388.


  Vapours. 522.

  Venison to Pot. 40, 404.

  Venison to Fry. 403.

  Haunch of Venison to Boyle. 272.

  Haunch of Venison to Roast. 407.

  Veal Collups. 189, 399.

  Vinegar to make. 6, 375, 411.

  Elder Vinegar. 385.

  Vomiting to stop. 228, 317.


  Walnuts to Preserve. 102.

  To Wash Lace. 211.

  To Wash Gloves. 280.

  For those which make Bloody Water. 288.

  Dutch Wafers. 314.

  A White Pot. 267.

  Goosberry Wine. 7, 361.

  Celeriony Wine. 71.

  Cowslip Wine. 20, 41, 42.

  Quince Wine. 51.

  Cherry Wine. 134, 378.

  Rasberry or Currant Wine. 151.

  Currant Wine. 195, 409.

  Nants Wine to Counterfeit. 213.

  Rasberry Wine. 331.

  Wine of Plummes. 350.

  Barberry Wine. 367.

  Apricock Wine. 368.

  For Wind in ye Bladder. 235.

  For ye Wind. 303.

  Wigs. 12, 521.

  Past for Wigs. 405.

  Worms to kill. 21, 36, 172.

  Man Wormes to Kill. 166.

  Green Wounds. 291.

  Water for Wounds. 507.

  Wound Drink. 508.

  An Oyle for Wounds, 527.



                               GLOSSARY


 AVENS. Geum Urbanum. Herb Bennet. Flower Yellow. Perennial. Roots
 scented like cloves, sudorific, tonic, antipodagric stomachic. When
 young the roots give a pleasant flavour to ale. They are said to be
 useful in diarrhœa.

 BENJAMIN. Styrax Benzoin. A gum exuded from a species of laurel.
 Stimulant. Is the principal ingredient in Friar’s Balsam.

 BOLE ARMENIACK. Armenian Bole. Several minerals were formerly used
 in medicine under this name. The Armenian Bole of the present day is
 usually made by mixing pipe-clay or common chalk with oxide of iron or
 red ochre.

 CARDOMUM. Elettaria Cardamomum. Amomum Repens. Repens. True Cardamom.
 Seeds, stimulant, assisting digestion, largely used in medicine.
 Strong, pungent, but aromatic odour when bruised.

 CARDUS. Cardunus is probably this herb, and there is a great variety.
 It is evidently one of the Thistles, or the Artichoke.

 COMMING SEED. Cumin. Cyminum Cumin. Seeds carminative, smell
 disagreeable, chiefly used in veterinary medicine.

 CRAB’S EYES, or CRAFISH EYES. Concretions found in the stomach of the
 river Crawfish. They are white, and resemble in appearance miniature
 mushrooms. They vary in size from a quarter to five-eights of an inch
 in diameter. Formerly used as absorbents and antacids. Only to be
 found to-day in Museums. Prepared chalk used instead.

 CUBIBS. Cubebs. Piper Cubebae. A pepper, contains an oil largely used
 in medicine. Aromatic, pungent, stimulant, and purgative.

 DYASCORDIRUM. Diascordium. An electuary which was formerly in high
 repute as an antipestilential. The Swedish Pharmacopeia of 1845 had
 a formula for this, and the principal ingredient was Herb of Water
 Germander (Teucrium Scordium).

 EGREMONY. This evidently must be Agrimony. Agrimonia Eupatoria. Flower
 yellow. Perennial. Herb used in gargles, also as tea. Celebrated as a
 vermifuge.

 ENUL-CAMPANE. Inula Helenium. After Officinalis Elecampane. Flower
 Yellow. Perennial. Moist pastures. Root aromatic, slightly bitter,
 tonic, diaphoretic, stomachic. A decoction of the root used as an
 application in several cutaneous diseases, especially those attended
 with a troublesome itching.

 FAIR WATER. The Oxford English Dictionary, edited by Dr. J. A. H.
 Murray, defines fair water as “clean, pure.”

 FFILIPENDULA. Spiraea Filipendula. Flower white, tipped with pink.
 July. Perennial. Herb astringent, and diuretic. Roots dried and
 powdered used for bread in famine. Tonic.

 FLOWERS OF TUSSICA. Can this be Coltsfoot? ?Tuffilago Farfara. Used
 still as an expectorant in coughs.

 FUMETORY. Fumitory-Corydalis. Capnoides. Flower yellow. Very opening,
 refreshing, used in cutaneous diseases.

 GALLBANUM, plaizsters of. A plaister made of Gum Galbanum, Lead
 Plaister, Turpentine, and Frankincense, nearly but not quite obsolete.
 Still used in some country districts. The formula was published in the
 London Pharmacopeia of 1851.

 GWACOMBEWOOD. Guaiacum Officinale. Lignum vitae tree. Wood resinous,
 hot, aromatic, diaphoretic, diuretic. Has been used in dropsy and
 gout. Is still used in the Compound Decoction of Sarsaparilla.

 ISOPE WATER. Hyssop Water.

 LAPIS CALAMINARY. Lapis Calaminaris. Calamine. A native impure
 carbonate of zinc. Largely used in lotions for all skin diseases.
 Nearly all the old cooling lotions for the face contained this
 ingredient, generally with rose water and glycerine.

 LIETHERIEGIE OF GOLD. A name for Protoxide of Lead. Litharze, the
 basis of lead plaister.

 MELLILOT. Melilotus Officinalis. Yellow Melilot. Herb pectoral,
 discussive, causes the peculiar flavour of the Schabziger or scraped
 cheese of Germany. Decoction emolient. Still used in country places in
 plaisters, but dying out.

 METHRIDATE. Mithridate or Damocrates Confection. An example of
 Poly-Pharmacy, it contained between 40 and 50 ingredients, and was
 supposed to contain the antidote to every known poison. The formula
 was included in the London Pharmacopeia of 1746.

 MIROBALENCE. Myrobalanus belerica. Fruit dried and used as an
 astringent. Used in India, but not much in this country, except as a
 substitute for Galls in ink manufacture.

 MUSKADINE. Muscardine. A fungus which grows on silk worms, or
 Muscadine, which was a rich spiced wine.

 OYLE OF BENN. Oil of Ben. An oil obtained from the seeds of Moringa
 Aptera (Egypt and East India), used in perfumery and by watchmakers,
 as it does not readily freeze.

 PURSLAWE WATER. Probably Purslane. Portulaca Oleracea. Used as a
 potherb, cooling, useful in scurvy, and bilious disorders.

 RED SANDERS. Red Sandal Wood. Pterocarpus Santalinus. Resinous,
 odoriferous, austere, astringent, tonic, used as a red colouring
 ingredient in spirituous tinctures.

 SANICLE. Sanicula Europaea. Wood Sanicle. Flowers white. May--June
 Perennial. Leaves vulnerary, cleaning.

 SCORDIUMWOOD. Scordium is the Teucrium Scordium, or Water Germander.
 Flowers pale purple. Perennial. Found in wet meadows, rare.

 SEYNAC. Probably meant for Senna. Leaves a very welknown purgative.

 SNEEZING POWDER ROOT. This is either Achillea Ageratum, Sweet Maudlin,
 or Ptarmica Vulgaris. Achillea Ptarmica Sneezewort.

 SPERMINT. Mentha Viridis. Spearmint. The ordinary garden mint. The oil
 used in medicine.

 SPIRITS DIAMBRA. Spirits of Diambar. The name of a stomachic and
 cordial, which consisted of Amber, Musk, various aromatics, and other
 ingredients.

 STORAX. Styrax Officinale. A fragrant resinous balsam obtained from
 the tree by incision. A close relative of Gum Benzoin, and is with it
 an ingredient of Friar’s Balsam.

 TORMENTIL. Potentilla Tormentilla. Sept-foil. Root very astringent,
 febrifuge, and not stimulant. Recommended in some cases of diarrhœa.



                             BIBLIOGRAPHY

                           A LIST OF HERBALS


 THE GRETE HERBALL, which giveth parfyt knowledge and understanding of
 all manner of herbes, and their gracyous vertues. Lond., 1516. Fol.
 Lowndes gives the following dates: Printed by Peter Treveris, 1525,
 1526, 1529; Laurens Andrewe, 1527; Thomas Gybson, 1539; John Kynge,
 1561.

BANCKES (Richarde).

 Here begynnyth a newe Mater ye which sheweth ... ye vertues and
 Properties of Herbes.... Lodo by me Richarde Banckes, 1526. 4to.

BRAUNSCHWEIG (Hieronymus).

 The Vertuose boke of Distyllacyon of the waters of all maner of
 Herbes, etc, etc....now newly Translate out of Duyche into Englysshe.
 B.L. Lond. 1527. Fol.

MACER (Armilius) pseud. Ü(_i.e._, Odo a Physician).

 Macers Herbal practysyd by Doctor Lynacro. Translated out of laten
 into Englysshe, etc. R. Wyer. Lond. (1530?). 8vo.

MACER (A.).

 A Newe Herball of Macer.... No pagination. (Lond., 1535?). 8vo.

 A boke of the Properties of Herbes.... Lond. (printed) by me Rob.
 Redman, (1530?). 8vo.

 Other editions printed by Rich. Kele. 16mo. (No date); Wyllyam
 Myddylton, 1546; T. Petyt, 1541. 8vo.

TURNER (William).

 The names of herbes in Greke, Latin, Englishe, Duche, & Frenche, wyth
 the commune names that Herbalies and Apotecaries use. B.L. J. Day & W.
 Seres. Lond. (1548). 8vo.

ASCHAM (A.).

 A little Herball.... Lond., 1550. 12mo.

TURNER (W.).

 A Newe Herball.... Part I. Lond., 1551. Fol. Part II. Collen, 1562.
 Part III. Collen, 1568. (With the third part was issued a revised
 edition of Parts I and II).

CAREY (Walter).

 A boke of the properties of Herbes, called an herball whereunto is
 added the time yt herbes ... should be gathered, etc., etc. B.L. W.
 Copland for T. Wyght. Lond. (1552?). 8vo.

BULLEYNE (W.).

 The Book of simples.... Lond., 1562. Fol. (This forms the first part
 of his “Bulwarke of defece”).

MAPLET (J.).

 A Greene Forest, or a Naturall Historie, Wherein may be seene ... the
 most sufferaigne vertues, etc. Lond., 1567. 8vo.

MONARDES (Nicolas).

 Joyfull Newes out of the newe founde worlde, wherein is declared
 the rare and singuler vertues of diverse ... Herbes, Trees, Oyles,
 Plantes, ... with their applications as well for Phisicke as
 Chirurgerie.... Englished by J. Frampton. Lond., 1577. 4to.

LYTE (H.).

 A niewe Herball.... Lond. (Antwerp printed), 1578. Fol.

 Other editions in 1586, 1595, 1619.

LANGHAM (W.).

 Garden of Health. Lond., 1579. 4to.

 2nd edit. 1633. 4to.

LEMNIUS (Levinus).

 An Herbal for the Bible containing a plaine ... exposition of such
 Similitudes, ... as are ... taken from Herbs, plants ... simples.
 Drawen into Englich by T. Newton. E. Bollifant. Lond., 1587. 8vo.

GERARDE (John).

 The Herball or Generall Historie of Plantes. J. Norton. Lond., 1597.
 Fol.

 2nd edit., enlarged and amended by Thomas Johnson. 1633 and 1636.

 A Boke of the Propertyes of Herbes, the which is called an Herbal.
 Imp. at London by me, Johan Scot, dwellynge in Fauster Lane. (No date).

DODVENS (Rimbert).

 Rams little Dodeon. A briefe epitome of the new Herball.... Collected
 out of the ... Newe Herball ... first set forth in the Dutch ...
 translated by H. Lyte ... now collected and abridged by W. Ram. S.
 Stafford. Lond., 1606. 4to.

PARKINSON (John).

 Paradisi in Sole, Paradisus terrestris. Or a Garden of ... flowers;
 ... with a Kitchen garden and an Orchard ... and their uses and
 vertues, etc. H. Lownes & R. Young. Lond., 1629. Fol.

CULPEPER (Nicholas).

 The English Physician, or an astrologo-physical discourse on the
 vulgar herbs of the nation.... Lond., 1652. 12mo.

 Other editions, 1653, 1661, 1695, 1714, 1725, 1733, 1784, 1792, etc.

SOWERBY (Leonard).

 The Ladies Dispensatory; containing the natures, vertues, and
 qualities of all herbs and simples useful in physick, reduced into a
 methodicall order, etc. Lond., 1652. 8vo.

COLES (William).

 Art of simpling: an introduction to the knowledge and gathering of
 Plants.... Lond., 1656. 12mo.

RENODAENS (J. de).

 A medicinal Dispensatory ... discovering the Natures, Properties, and
 Vertues of Vegetables, Minerals, and Animals. Lond., 1657. 8vo.

 Translated by R. Tomlinson.

COLES (William).

 Adam in Eden, or Natures paradise. The history of plants, fruits,
 herbs, and flowers ... together with observations on the seasons of
 planting, and gathering of our English simples, etc. Lond., 1657. Fol.

LOVELL (Robt.).

 Enchiridion Botanicum, or a Complete Herbal. Oxford, 1659. 8vo. 2 vols.

 The Nature of the drinke Kauhi or Coffee, and the berry of which it is
 made, described by an Arabian phisitian. Oxford, 1659. 8vo.

D. (N).

 The Vertues of Coffee. Set forth in the works of the Lord Bacon, his
 Natural Hist. Mr. Parkinson his Herbal, etc. Lond., 1663. 4to.

TURNER (Robert).

 Botanologia, the British physician; or the nature and vertues of
 English plants, etc. Lond., 1664. 8vo. 2nd edit. 1687.

LOVELL (Robert).

 Pambotanologia ... Or, A Compleat Herball. 2nd edit., with many
 additions. Oxford. Printed by W. H. for Ric. Davis, 1665. 8vo.

BLAGRAVE (Joseph).

 Supplement or enlargement of Nich. Culpeper’s English Physician, etc.
 Lond., 1666. 8vo. 2nd edit. 1674.

HUGHES (William).

 The American physician, or a treatise of the roots, plants, trees,
 shrubs, etc., growing in the English plantations in America.... Lond.,
 1672. 12mo.

ARCHER (J.).

 A Compendious Herbal. Lond., 1673. 8vo.

 (Forming Part II of “Every Man his own Doctor”).

PEACHIE (J.).

 Some observations made upon the Root Cassummuniar, called otherwise
 Rysagone. Lond., 1679. 4to. 2nd edit. 1693.

DALE (S.).

 Pharmacologia. Lond., 1693. 12vo. 12mo.

 Supplement. 1705.

 3rd edit. (greatly enlarged and improved). 1737. 4to.

WESTMACOTT (William).

 Theobotanologia. A Scripture Herbal. Lond., 1694. 12mo.

PECHEY (J.).

 The Compleat Herbal of physical plants. Lond., 1694. 8vo.

MULLINS (James).

 Some observations made upon the Cylonian Plant. Shewing its ...
 vertues against Deafness, etc. Lond., 1695. 4to.

PETIVER (J.).

 Hortus siccus pharmaceuticus. Lond. (1700?). Fol.

TOURNEFORT (Joseph Pitton de).

 Materia Medica, or a description of simple medicines generally used in
 physick. Lond., 1708. 8vo. 3rd edit. 1716.

POMET (Pierre).

 History of Drugs. Lond., 1712. 4to.

PETIVER (James). F.R.S.

 A Catalogue of Mr. Ray’s English Herbal. Illustrated with figures,
 1713. Fol.; and continued in 1715.

MARTYN (J.).

 The Compleat Herbal of Tournefort, with large additions from Ray,
 Gerrard, etc. Translated by J. Martyn. Lond., 1716-1730. 4to.

BRADELEY (Richard).

 The Virtue and use of Coffee with regard to the Plague, and other
 enfectious Distempers, etc. Lond., 1721. 8vo.

MILLER (Joseph).

 Botanicum officinale; or a compendious Herbal. Lond., 1722. 8vo.

BLAIR (P.).

 Pharmaco-botanologia. Lond., 1723-1728. 4to.

KNOWLES (G.).

 Materia Medica botanica. Lond., 1723. 4to.

THOMSON (G.).

 Short method of discovering the virtues of plants. Lond., 1734. 8vo.

BLACKWELL (Elizabeth) Mrs.

 A Curious herbal, containing 500 cuts of the most useful plants, which
 are now used in the practice of physick, etc. Lond., 1737-1739. Fol. 2
 vols.

 Another edit. edited by C. J. Trew, 1750-1773, entitled “Herbarium
 Blackwellianum.”

SHORT (Thomas).

 Medicina britannica, or a treatise on such physical plants as are
 generally to be found in the fields or gardens of Great Britain.
 Lond., 1747. 8vo.

HILL (John).

 History of the Materia Medica. Lond., 1751. 4to.

NEWTON (James).

 A Compleat Herbal. Lond., 1752. 8vo.

 2nd edit. 1798; with portrait of author.

HILL (John).

 Useful Family Herbal. Lond., 1755. 8vo.

CURTIS (W.).

 Assistant plates to the Materia Medica. Lond., 1756. 8vo.

SHELDRAKE (T.).

 Botanicum Medicinale; an Herbal of medicinal Plants on the College of
 Physician’s List. Lond. (1759). Fol.

HILL (John).

 Centaury, the great stomachic. Lond., 1765. 8vo.

HILL (John).

 Virtues of British Herbs, with the history, description, and figures,
 etc. 4th edit. Lond., 1771. 8vo.

LETTSOM (John Coakley).

 The Natural history of the Tea-tree, with observations on the medical
 qualities of Tea, and effects of Tea drinking. Lond., 1772. 4to.

 2nd edit. 1799.

WILMER (B.).

 Observations on the Poisonous vegetables which are either Indigenous
 in Great Britain or cultivated for ornament. Lond., 1781. 8vo.

CURTIS (William).

 A Catalogue of the British Medicinal, culinary, and agricultural
 plants, cultivated in the London Botanical Garden. Lond., 1783. 8vo.

PARMENTIER (A. A.).

 Observations on such nutritive vegetables as may be substituted in the
 place of ordinary foods in times of scarcity. Lond., 1783. 8vo.

BURROWS (J.). M.D.

 A dissertation on the Nature and Effects of a Vegetable Remedy. 4th
 ed. Lond., 1784.

MOSELEY (Benjamin).

 A treatise concerning the properties and effect of Coffee. Lond.,
 1785. 8vo.

 2nd ed. 1785. 3rd ed. 1785. 5th ed. 1792.

FONTANA (Felix).

 Treatise on the Venom of the Viper; on the American poisons; and on
 the Cherry Laurel, and some other vegetable poisons. Translated by
 Joseph Skinner. 2 vols. Lond., 1787. 8vo.

MEYRICK (W.).

 New Family Herbal. Birmingham, 1789. 8vo.

 Another ed. 1790.

 The useful Family Herbal; or an account of all those English plants
 which are remarkable for their virtues, and of the Drugs which are
 produced by vegetables of other countries. Lond., 1790. 8vo.

BAYLIS (E.).

 A New and Compleat body of practical botanic physic from the medicinal
 plants of the Vegetable kingdom, selected from some of the best
 authors. Lond., 1791. 4to.

ROXBURGH (William).

 A botanical description of a new species of Swietenia, with
 experiments and observations on the bark thereof. (Lond. 1793.) 4to.

BARHAM (Henry).

 Hortus Americanus: containing an account of the trees, shrubs, and
 other vegetable productions of South America ... their uses in
 medicine, etc. Kingston, Jamaica, 1794. 8vo.

LAMBERT (Aylmer Bourke).

 A description of the genus Cinchona, comprehending the various species
 of Vegetables from which the Peruvian and other barks of a similar
 quality are taken. Lond., 1797. 4to.

 A New Medicinal, Economical, and Domestic Herbal. Lond., 1809. 8vo.

STOKES (J.).

 Botanical Materia Medica. 4 vols. Lond., 1812. 8vo.


BOOKS OF COOKERY

APICIUS (Caelius).

 De Arte Coquinaria Mediol. 1498. 8vo. Reprinted Venet, 1503. 8vo.
 Basil, 1541. 4vo.

PYNSON (Richard).

 This is the Boke of Cokery. Lond., 1500. 4vo.

 A proper new Booke of Cookerie, Declaring what manner of meates be
 best in season for al times of the yeere and how thei ought to be
 dressed. With a new addition, very necessary for all them that delight
 in Cookery.[1] Lond., 1575. 8vo.

 Another edit. 1576. [1] W. How for A. Veale.

CERVIO (Vincenzo).

 Il Trinciante di M. V. C. ampliato et ridotto a perfettione dal
 Cavallier R. Tusoritto da Narni. Venetia, 1581. 4vo.

 Other edits. 1593, 1604, 1622, 1643.

DAWSON (Thomas) printer.

 The Good Huswifes Jewel and rare conceits in Cookery. Lond., 1585.

 Other edits. 1596, 1597, 1610.

PARTRIDGE (John).

 Treasury of Commodious Conceits and Hidden Secrets, Commonly called
 The Good Huswives Closet of provision for the health of her household.
 Now the fourth time corrected and inlarged, etc. B.L. Richarde Jhones.
 Lond., 1584. 8vo.

 Another edit. 1586.

 The Good Huswives Handmayde; contayning many principall pointes of
 Cookerie, etc. Lond., 1588. 8vo.

ALLDE or ALDEE (Edward).

 The Good Husewives Treasurie, being a verie necessarie booke,
 instructing to the dressing of meates. Lond., 1588. 8vo.

ALLDE (Edward).

 A book of Cookerie gathered by A. W., and now newlie enlarged with
 the serving in of the table. With the proper Snaces to each of them
 convenient. Lond., 1591. 8vo.

  BUTTE (Henry).

 Dyets Dry Dinner. Lond., 1599. 12mo.

 A Closet for ladies and Gentlewomen, or the art of preserving,
 conserving, and candying, with the manner of howe to make divers kinds
 of syrups and all kind of banquetting stuffes. Lond., 1608. 12vo.

 Other editions. 1632, 1636, 1647, 1651, 1654, 1656.

MARKHAM (Gervase).

 Country Contentments, in two bookes: the first containing the whole
 art of riding great Horses in very short time ... etc. The second
 intituled The English Huswife, containing the inward and outward
 vertues which ought to be in a compleate Woman, etc. 2nd pt. Lond.,
 1615. 4to.

MURRELL (John).

 A delightful daily exercise for Ladies and Gentlemen, whereby is set
 forth the secrete misteries of the present preservings in Glasses and
 other confrictionaries as making the Breads, Pastes, Preserves....
 Whereto is added a Booke of Cookery. 2nd pt. Printed for T. Devve.
 Lond., 1621. 12mo.

 MURRELL (John).

 Cookerie and Manner of Making Kickshawes, etc. 1630.

 Murrell’s two books of Cookerie and Carving. The fifth time printed
 with new editions. B.L. 3rd pt. (With a second title page reading: A
 New Booke of Cookerie, Wherein is set forth a most perfect direction
 to furnish an extraordinary or ordinary feast, either in Summer or
 Winter, etc. Printed by M. F. for J. Marriot. Lond., 1638. 12mo.)

 Another edit., 5th. 1641.

SCAPPI (B.)

 M. B. Scappi dell’ Arte del Cucinare, etc. 1643.

GENTLEWOMAN.

 The Gentlewoman’s Cabinet unlocked; wherein is contained many
 excellent receipts for neat dressing of divers sorts of meats.... Also
 directions for the best way of making Pancakes, etc. B.L. Lond., 1650.

 8th impression. B.L. 1673. 12mo.

 7th impression. With new editions. B.L. 1675.

 The Schoolmaster, or Teacher of Table Philosophy. 1652.

GREY (Elizabeth), Countess of Kent.

 A Choice Manuall, or rare and select secrets in Physick and Chyrwgery.
 Collected by the Countess of Kent.... As also most exquisite waies
 of preserving, conserving, candying, etc. (Part 2 has a distinct
 title-page as follows: A true Gentlewoman’s De-light: wherein is
 contained all manner of Cookery, etc. Lond., 1653. 8vo.)

 Many editions of this work.

 Nature unembowelled, or 1,720 Receipts.

MOUFET (Thomas).

 Health’s improvement, or, rules comprizing and discovering the nature,
 method, and manner of preparing all sorts of food used in this
 nation.... Corrected and enlarged by C. Bennet. Lond., 1655. 4to.


 Another edition, to which is prefixed a short view of the author’s
 life.... by Mr. Oldys, and an introduction by R. James. Lond., 1745.

M. (W.).

 The Queen’s Closet opened: incomparable secret in Physick, Chirurgery,
 Preserving, Candying, and Cookery, as they were presented to the Queen
 ... etc. Lond., 1655.

 Other editions, 1662, 1668, 1671, 1674, 1679, 1710.

 The editions vary in title-pages, as: A Queen’s Delight, or the Art of
 Preserving, etc.; The Compleat Cook, etc.

MAY (Robert).

 The Accomplisht Cook, or the Art and Mystery of Cookery, etc. (With
 life of the author by W. W.) Lond., 1660. 8vo.

COOK.

 The Compleat Cook, etc. Pp. 123. J. Winter for N. Brooke. Lond., 1668.
 12mo.

 Another edit., 1671.

DIGBY (Sir K.).

 Choice and experimented receipts in Physick and Chirurgery, as also
 cordial and distilled waters, and spirits, perfumes, and other
 curiosities. Translated ... by G. H(artman). Lond., 1668. 8vo.

 2nd edit., 1675.

RABISHA (William).

 The whole Body of Cookery dissected, taught and fully manifested....
 According to the best traditions of the English, French, Italian,
 Dutch, etc. or a sympathy of all the varieties in natural compounds in
 that mystery.... Second edit., whereunto is annexed a second part of
 rare receipt of Cookery, and with a book of preserving, etc. Lond.,
 1675. 8vo.

 The Queen Like Closet, or Rich Cabinet. 1675.

DIGBY (Sir Kenelm).

 The Closet of ... Sir Kenelm Digbie, Kt. opened: whereby is discovered
 several ways for making of Metheglin, Sider, Cherry-wine, etc.
 Together with ... directions for Cookery, etc. Pp. 312. Lond., 1677.
 8vo.

 3rd edit., corrected (printed) by E. C. for H. Brome. 1669.

 The Ladies Cabinet enlarged concerning preserving, Physic, and of
 Cookery. Lond., 1682. 8vo.

  ROSE (Giles).

 A perfect school of Instructions for the Officers of the Mouth.
 Shewing the whole art of a Master of the Household, a Master Carver, a
 Master Butler.... A Master Cook ... with pictures ... displaying the
 whole arts. Lond., 1682. 12mo.

TRYON, T.

 A treatise of Cleanness in Meats, and Drinks, of the preparation
 of food ... and the benefit of clean sweet beds.... Also of the
 generation of bugs, and their cure. To which is added A Short
 discourse of the pain in the teeth, etc. Lond., 1682. 4to.

HARTMAN (George).

 The true preserver and restorer of health; being a choice collection
 ... of ... remedies for all distempers ... together with ...
 directions for Cookery, etc. 2nd pt. Lond., 1682. 8vo.

 2nd edit., with additions, 3rd pt. Lond., 1684-82. 12mo. (Pt. 2 has a
 separate title page, “Excellent Directions for Cookery.”)

 The Young Cook’s monitor, by M. H. Lond., 1683.

 Another edition. 1690.

 Hannah Wooley’s Rare Receipts. 1684.

 The Accomplisht Ladies Delight. 1686.

 The Kitchen Physician. 1688.

 The Cupboard Door opened. 1689.

SALMON (William), M.D.

 The Family-Dictionary; or Household Companion: Containing in an
 alphabetical method: I. Directions for Cookery. II. Making all sorts
 of pastry-ware.... III. Making of conserves.... IV. The making all
 kinds of potable liquors. V. The making of all sorts of rare perfumes
 ... etc. Lond., 1696. 8vo.

 4th edit. 1710.

LÉMERY (Louis).

 Traité des aliments, ou l’on trouve par ordre, etc., etc. Paris, 1702.
 12mo.

 2nd edit. 1705.

CUISINIER.

 Le Cuisinier familier, tant pour les grandes maisons & Familles
 Bourgeoises que pour les gens de la Campagne. Bruxelles, 1705. 12mo.

HORATIUS FLACEUS (Quintus).

 The Art of Cookery: in imitation of Horace’s Art of Poetry, with some
 letters to Dr. Lister and others, etc., etc. Lond., (1709). 8vo.

LAMB (Patrick), Chef to her Majesty.

 Royal Cookery, or the Complete Court Cook, containing the choicest
 receipt in all the particular branches of cookery now in use in the
 Queen’s Palaces.... To which are added bills of fare, etc. Lond., 1710.

 2nd edit. 1716.

 3rd edit. 1726.

HOWARD (Henry), Cook.

 England’s Newest way in all sorts of Cookery, Pastry, and all pickles
 fit to be used; with copperplates. Lond., 1710. 8vo.

 Another edition. 1726.

 The Whole Duty of a Woman: or guide to the female sex: also choice
 receipts in Physick and Chyrurgery: with the whole art of Cookery. 5th
 edit. 1712.

 Other editions published 1701, 1707, 1739, 1792, 1793.

HALL (T.), Cook.

 The Queens Royal Cookery: or expert and ready way for the dressing
 of all sorts of flesh.... With the Art of preserving and candying of
 fruit and flowers. Lond., 1713.

 3rd edit. 1719.

 5th edit. (1730.)


 A Collection of above three hundred Receipts in Cookery, Physick, and
 Surgery, etc. Lond., 1714. 8vo.

 2nd edit. 1719.

 5th edit. 1734.

EALES (Mary).

 Mrs. M. E’s receipts (for confectionery, etc). Lond., 1718. 8vo.

 The Accomplish’d Ladys Delight in preserving, physick, beautifying,
 Cookery, and gardening.... 10th edit., enlarged. D. Pratt, Lond., 1719.

NOTT (John), Cook.

 The Cook’s and Confectioner’s Dictionary: or the Accomplish’d
 Housewifes Companion ... (compiled) revised, and recommended ... by J.
 N. Lond., 1723. 8vo.

SMITH (Robert).

 Court Cookery: or the compleat English Cook, containing the ... newest
 receipt, etc. 2nd pt. Lond., 1723. 8vo.

S--(E.).

 The Compleat Housewife: or Accomplished Gentlewoman’s Companion: being
 a collection of upwards of Five hundred of the most approved Receipts
 in Cookery ... to which is added a collection of above Two hundred
 Family receipts of medicines. By E. S--. (i.e., E. Smith). 3rd edit.,
 improved. Lond., 1729.

 Other editions, 1734, 1741, 1742.

CARTER (Charles), Cook.

 The Complete Practical Cook; or a new system of the whole art and
 mystery of Cookery.... Adorned with sixty curious copper plates, etc.
 Lond., 1730.

CARTER (Charles).

 The Complete City and Country Cook; or accomplish’d Housewife....
 Illustrated with forty-nine large copper plates. Lond., 1732. 8vo.

LA CHAPELLE (Vincent).

  The Modern Cook (with plates). 2 vols. 1733.
  The Modern Cook 3 vols., 2nd edit. 1736.
  The Modern Cook 3rd edit. 1744.

  MIDDLETON (John), Cook.

 Five hundred new receipts in Cookery; revised by Henry Howard. Lond.,
 1734. 8vo.

 The Young Lady’s Companion in Cookery, and Pastry, preserving,
 pickling, candying, etc. Lond., 1734.

BAILEY (Nathan).

 Dictionarum domesticum, being a compleat Household Dictionary, for the
 use of both city and Country. Lond., 1736. 8vo.

HARRISON (Sarah).

 The Housekeeper’s Pocket Book, and compleat family cook; containing
 above seven hundred curious ... receipts ... etc. etc. 2nd edit.
 Lond., 1739. 12mo.

 7th edit. 1760.

 8th edit. 1764.

 9th edit. 1777.

KIDDER (Edward).

 E. Kidder’s Receipts of Pastry and Cookery for the use of his
 scholars, etc. (with plates). Lond., (1740).

 Another edit. (1741).

ATKYNS (Arabella), pseud.

 The Family Magazine, in two parts. Part 1 containing useful directions
 in all the branches of housekeeping and Cookery.... Lond., 1741. 8vo.

ADAM.

 Adam’s Luxury and Eve’s Cookery, or the Kitchin Garden display’d, etc.
 Lond., 1744. 12mo.

LADY.

 The art of Cookery made plain and Easy, etc. By a Lady (Hannah
 Glasse). 1747.

 4th edit. 1751.

 5th edit. 1755.

 7th edit. 1760.

 9th edit. 1765.

 New edit. 1770.

 “ 1774.

 ” 1784.

 (There are slight variations in the titles of the different editions.)

MOXON (Elizabeth).

 English Housewifery. Exemplified in above four hundred and fifty
 receipts ... with cuts, etc. Leeds, 1749. 12mo.

FISHER (Mrs.) of Richmond.

 The Prudent Housewife; or Complete English Cook, for town and country.
 Being the newest collection of ... receipts, etc. Lond., (1750?). 12mo.

 Another edit. 1788.

JACKSON (Sarah).

 The Director; or Young Woman’s best companion, containing above three
 hundred receipts in Cookery, pastry, preserving ... physick and
 Surgery.... The whole makes a complete family cook and physician.
 Lond., 1754. 12mo.

MOXON (Eliz.)

 English Housewifery Improved; or a supplement to Moxon’s Cookery,
 contains upwards of sixty modern ... receipts. Collected by a Person
 of Judgment. Leeds, 1758.

 Third edit. (1775).

COACHMAN.

 A treatise on the use and abuse of the commonly called the Stewards
 Table in families of the first rank, etc. Lond., (1758). 8vo.

  VERRAL (William).

 A Compleat System of Cookery. In which is set forth a variety of
 genuine receipts collected ... under ... M. de St. Clouet.... Lond.,
 1759. 8vo.

CLELAND (Elizabeth).

 A New and Easy Method of Cookery. 2nd edit. Lond., 1759. 8vo.

 The Art of modern Cookery displayed; consisting of the most approved
 Methods of Cookery, Pastry, and Confectionery of the present time,
 etc. By the Translator, a Foreigner, who has been several years Clerk
 of the Kitchin in Noble Families in this Kingdom. Lond., Davis, 1767.
 8vo.

SHACKLEFORD (Mrs. Anne), of Winchester.

 The Modern Art of Cookery improved; or elegant, cheap and easy methods
 of preparing most of the Dishes now in vogue; in the composition
 whereof both health and pleasure hath been consulted. Lond., 1767.
 12mo.

COOKERY.

 Primitive Cookery, or the Kitchen garden displayed: containing a
 collection of receipts for preparing a great variety of cheap,
 healthful, and palatable dishes, without either fish, flesh, or fowl.
 2nd edit., with additions. Lond., 1767. 12mo.

JENKS (James).

 The Complete Cook ... Containing the greatest variety of ... receipts
 in Cookery, pastry, confectionery, etc. With an appendix, teaching the
 art of making wine, etc. Lond., 1768. 12mo.

SKEAT (J.)

 Art of Cookery and Pastry made easy and familiar in upwards of
 two hundred different receipts and bills of fare.... To which is
 added a variety of tables for forms of entertainment and an exact
 representation of the table of the Guild feasts of Norwich and Lynn.
 Norwich, printed 1769. 8vo.

 Another edit. Lond., 1772.

TAYLOR (E.), of Berwick.

 The Lady’s, Housewife’s, and Cookmaid’s Assistant: or the Art of
 Cookery explained, etc. Berwick on Tweed, 1769. 12mo.

 Art of Cookery, adapted to the meanest capacity. Berwick, 1769. 12mo.

RUFFALD (Elizabeth).

 The experienced English Housekeeper for the use and ease of ladies,
 house keepers, cooks, etc.... consisting of near 800 original recipts
 most of which never appeared in print, etc. Manchester, 1769. 8vo.

 Other editions, 1776, 1780, 1782, 1786.

 The Professed Cook, or the Modern art of Cookery, Pastry, and
 Confectionery made plain and easy. Lond., 1769. 8vo.

 Mary Smith’s Compleat Housekeeper. 1772.

BORELLA (--).

 The Court and Country Confectioner, or the Housekeepers Guide, etc.
 etc. Lond., 1772. 8vo.

MASON (Mrs. Sarah).

 The Lady’s Assistant, for regulating and supplying her Table,
 containing 150 select Bills of Fare, properly disposed for Family
 Dinners of five dishes to two courses of eleven and fifteen; with
 upwards of 50 Bills of Fare for Suppers from five dishes to 19, and
 several Desserts. Lond., 1773. 8vo.

CLERMONT (B.)

 The Professed Cook; or the Modern Art of Cookery, Pastry, etc. made
 easy. 1776.

 The Accomplished Lady’s Delight in Cookery; or the Complete Servants
 Maids (sic) Guide. J. Smart, Wolverhampton, (1780).

DALRYMPLE (George).

 The Practice of Modern Cookery.... To which is added a Glossary
 explaining the terms of Art. Edinburgh, 1781. 8vo.

MACIVER (Mrs.)

 Cookery and Pastry. 4th edit. Lond., 1784. 12mo.

 The Honours of the table; or rules of behaviour during meals. With the
 whole art of carving, etc. (By John Trusler). Lond., 1788.

 2nd edit. 1791.

 3rd edit. 1805.

 4th edit. 1805.

DR. STARK’S.

 Dietetical Experiments. 1788.

BRIGGS (Richard).

 The English art of Cookery, according to the present practise, being a
 complete Guide to all Housekeepers, on a plan entirely new. Cork, 1788.

 Lond., Robinson, 1791. 8vo.

 1792.

COLE (Mrs. Mary), Cook to the Rt. Hon. the Earl of Drogheda.

 The Lady’s Complete Guide, or Cookery and Confectionary in all their
 branches. To which is added, The Complete Brewer, also the Family
 Physician, etc., etc. 1789. 8vo.

CONFECTIONER.

 The Complete C. or the whole art of confectionary.... By a person late
 apprentice to Messrs. Negri and Witten of Berkely Square. (F. Nutt),
 Lond., 1789, 1790.

COOKERY.

 Ancient C.--from a MS. in the Library of the Royal Society. (This is
 an extract from “A Collection of Ordinances ... for the government of
 the Royal Household” published by the Society of Antiquaries, but with
 distinct register and pagination.”) Lond., 1790. 4to.

FRAZER (--), Mrs.

 The Practice of Cookery, Pastry, Pickling, Preserving, etc. Edin.,
 1791. 12mo.

SAUNDERS (Sarah), Mrs.

 The Fountain of Knowledge, or Complete Family Guide; containing
 curious particulars of the utmost service to families in general. 6th
 edit. Lond., 1792.

COLLINGWOOD (Francis) and WOLLAMS (John).

 The Universal Cook, and City and Country Housekeeper, containing all
 the various branches of Cookery, etc., etc. Lond., 1792. 8vo.

FRENCH COOK.

 The French family Cook, being a complete System of French Cookery,
 etc. Lond., 1793. 8vo.

MELROSE (Eliza).

 An economical and new method of Cookery, describing upwards of
 eighty ... dishes ... and above forty soups: with new and useful
 observations, etc. Lond., 1798. 8vo.

HOLLAND (Mary), Mrs.

 The Complete British Cook, etc. Lond., 1800. 12mo.

CHAMBERS (Amelia).

 The Ladies best companion ... containing the whole art of Cookery,
 Pastry, etc. Lond., (1800?) 12mo.

CHISWICK PRESS: PRINTED BY CHARLES WHITTINGHAM AND CO. TOOKS COURT,
CHANCERY LANE, LONDON.





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