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Title: Shakspeare's Mental Photographs
Author: Anonymous
Language: English
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Copyright Status: Not copyrighted in the United States. If you live elsewhere check the laws of your country before downloading this ebook. See comments about copyright issues at end of book.

*** Start of this Doctrine Publishing Corporation Digital Book "Shakspeare's Mental Photographs" ***

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                    SHAKSPEARE’S MENTAL PHOTOGRAPHS.



------------------------------------------------------------------------



                              SHAKSPEARE’S

                          MENTAL PHOTOGRAPHS.



      —whose end, both at the first, and now, was, and is, to hold, as
    ’t were, the mirour up to nature.—HAMLET

      He cannot flatter, he!—
    An honest mind and plain,—he must speak truth;
    An they will take it, so.
                                    KING LEAR.



                    [Illustration: Publisher’s Logo]



                               NEW YORK:
                    PUBLISHED BY HURD AND HOUGHTON.
                   BOSTON: E. P. DUTTON AND COMPANY.
                                 1866.



------------------------------------------------------------------------



       Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1865, by
                           HURD AND HOUGHTON,
 In the Clerk’s Office of the District Court for the Southern District
                              of New York.



                         RIVERSIDE, CAMBRIDGE:

                       STEREOTYPED AND PRINTED BY

                      H. O. HOUGHTON AND COMPANY.



------------------------------------------------------------------------



                               CONTENTS.

                                -------


_The Game consists of ten Questions, to each of which there are twenty
Answers. The Questions are_:

                                                              PAGE
       1. What are you?                                          9
       2. What Quality or Qualities in others among you?        12
       3. What is your favorite Occupation or Pursuit?          14
       4. What is your Pet Aversion?                            17
       5. What Style of Beauty do you admire?                   19
       6. Describe your Ideal?                                  22
       7. Where was, or will be, your First Meeting?            26
       8. What was, or will be, your First Greeting?            28
       9. What do you most wish for?                            31
      10. What will be your Future?                             33



------------------------------------------------------------------------



To obtain a photograph, one of the party must keep the book and ask the
questions in order; the person asked, being at liberty to choose any
number from one to twenty.



------------------------------------------------------------------------



                    SHAKSPEARE’S MENTAL PHOTOGRAPHS.

                                -------



                              QUESTION I.

                             WHAT ARE YOU?


  1.                 I am Sir Oracle,
    And, when I ope my lips, let no dog bark!
                         _Merchant of Venice._ Act i. Scene 1.


  2.             A woman: and for secrecy,
    No lady closer.
                          _Henry IV._ Part I. Act ii. Scene 3.


  3.   I am so full of business, I cannot answer thee acutely.
                  _All’s Well That Ends Well._ Act i. Scene 1.


  4.   A braver soldier never couched lance,
    A gentler heart did never sway in court.
                         _Henry VI._ Part I. Act iii. Scene 2.


  5.   Above my fortunes, yet my state is well:
    I am a gentleman.
                              _Twelfth Night._ Act i. Scene 5.


  6.   Infirm of purpose!
                                   _Macbeth._ Act ii. Scene 2.


  7.   Being a woman, I will not be slack
    To play my part in fortune’s pageant.
                          _Henry VI._ Part II. Act i. Scene 2.


  8.                  But man, proud man!
    Drest in a little brief authority.
                       _Measure for Measure._ Act ii. Scene 2.


  9.   To answer every man directly, and briefly,
    Wisely, and truly. Wisely I say, I am a bachelor.
                             _Julius Cæsar._ Act iii. Scene 3.


 10.  Perfect.
                          _Henry IV._ Part I. Act ii. Scene 4.


 11.  A man, who is the abstract of all faults
    That all men follow.
                       _Antony and Cleopatra._ Act i. Scene 4.


 12.  A woman of an invincible spirit.
                          _Henry VI._ Part II. Act i. Scene 4.


 13.  A very superficial, ignorant, unweighing fellow.
                      _Measure for Measure._ Act iii. Scene 2.


 14.  A promise-breaker.
                                 _Coriolanus._ Act i. Scene 8.


 15.  A man, worth any woman.
                                  _Cymbeline._ Act i. Scene 2.


 16.  A railing wife.
                         _Henry IV._ Part I. Act iii. Scene 1.


 17.  I am an ass, I am a woman’s man, and
    besides myself.
                         _Comedy of Errors._ Act iii. Scene 2.


 18.  I am the very pink of courtesy.
                          _Romeo and Juliet._ Act ii. Scene 4.


 19.            An angel! or, if not,
    An earthly paragon!
                                _Cymbeline._ Act iii. Scene 6.


 20.            As opposite to every good,
    As the antipodes.
                         _Henry VI._ Part III. Act i. Scene 4.


                                -------



                              QUESTION II.

             WHAT QUALITY OR QUALITIES IN OTHERS AMONG YOU?


 1.  A quietness of spirit.
              _Merchant of Venice._ Act iv. Scene 1.


 2.  Good, your highness, patience.
            _Antony and Cleopatra._ Act ii. Scene 5.


 3.       Faint deeds, hollow welcomes,
    Recanting goodness, sorry ere ’t is shown.
                  _Timon of Athens._ Act i. Scene 2.


 4.  Liberal thanks.
            _Antony and Cleopatra._ Act ii. Scene 6.


 5.  Shallow spirit of judgment.
                _Henry VI._ Part I. Act ii. Scene 4.


 6.            That glib and oily art,
    To speak and purpose not.
                        _King Lear._ Act i. Scene 1.


 7.  The slanderous tongue.
            _Measure for Measure._ Act iii. Scene 2.


 8.  A patient sufferance.
           _Much Ado About Nothing._ Act i. Scene 3.


 9.                      Sweet words,
    Low crooked curt’sies, and base spaniel fawning.
                   _Julius Cæsar._ Act iii. Scene 1.


 10.  Defect of manners, want of government,
    Pride, haughtiness, opinion, and disdain.
               _Henry IV._ Part I. Act iii. Scene 1.


 11.  Ingratitude!
                        _King Lear._ Act i. Scene 4.


 12.  Back-wounding calumny.
            _Measure for Measure._ Act iii. Scene 2.


 13.  Modest stillness and humility.
                        _Henry V._ Act iii. Scene 1.


 14.  Self-harming jealousy!
                _Comedy of Errors._ Act ii. Scene 1.


 15.  Fear and doting.
           _Antony and Cleopatra._ Act iii. Scene 9.


 16.  Vaulting ambition.
                          _Macbeth._ Act i. Scene 7.


 17.  Scorn, and defiance; slight regard, contempt.
                         _Henry V._ Act ii. Scene 4.


 18.  Vainness, and self-glorious pride.
                           _Henry V._ Act v. Chorus.


 19.  A base, ignoble mind.
               _Henry VI._ Part II. Act ii. Scene 1.


 20.                  A mind impatient,
    An understanding simple and unschool’d.
                           _Hamlet._ Act i. Scene 2.


                                -------



                             QUESTION III.

              WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE OCCUPATION OR PURSUIT?


 1.  To discover islands far away.
            _Two Gentlemen of Verona._ Act i. Scene 3.


 2.  I wash, wring, brew, bake, scour, dress meat
    and drink, make the beds, and do all myself.
             _Merry Wives of Windsor._ Act i. Scene 4.


 3.  My brain, more busy than the laboring spider,
    Weaves tedious snares to trap mine enemies.
                _Henry VI._ Part II. Act iii. Scene 1.


 4.  The disposing of new dignities.
                     _Julius Cæsar._ Act iii. Scene 1.


 5.  Billiards.
              _Antony and Cleopatra._ Act ii. Scene 5.


 6.  Methinks, it were a happy life,
    To be no better than a homely swain.
                _Henry VI._ Part III. Act ii. Scene 5.


 7.  Steal hearts.
              _Antony and Cleopatra_. Act ii. Scene 6.


 8.  To outlook conquest, and to win renown,
    Even in the jaws of danger and of death.
                          _King John._ Act v. Scene 2.


 9.                           Quaint lies,
    How honorable ladies sought my love,
    Which I denying, they fell sick and died.
               _Merchant of Venice._ Act iii. Scene 4.


 10.      A ghostly confessor,
    A sin-absolver.
                 _Romeo and Juliet._ Act iii. Scene 3.


 11.  A mender of bad soles.
                       _Julius Cæsar._ Act i. Scene 1.


 12.  No women’s matters.
                  _Henry VI._ Part II. Act i. Scene 3.


 13.  Eating and drinking.
                     _Twelfth Night._ Act ii. Scene 3.


 14.  Why, sir, a carpenter.
                       _Julius Cæsar._ Act i. Scene 1.


 15.  To be in love.
            _Two Gentlemen of Verona._ Act i. Scene 1.


 16.  To number _Ave-Maries_.
                   _Henry VI._ Part I. Act i. Scene 3.


 17.  Chanting faint hymns to the cold fruitless moon.
            _Midsummer Night’s Dream._ Act i. Scene 1.


 18.  Give me mine angle,—We’ll to the river; there,
    My music playing far off, I will betray
    Tawny-finn’d fishes; my bended hook shall pierce
    Their slimy jaws.
              _Antony and Cleopatra._ Act ii. Scene 5.


 19.  A piece of work that will make sick men whole.
                      _Julius Cæsar._ Act ii. Scene 1.


 20.  To carve out dials quaintly, point by point.
                _Henry VI._ Part III. Act ii. Scene 5.


                                -------



                              QUESTION IV.

                       WHAT IS YOUR PET AVERSION?


 1.  A woman’s tongue.
                   _Taming of the Shrew._ Act i. Scene 2.


 2.  Marriage.
                      _Henry VI._ Part I. Act v. Scene 5.


 3.                 The lover,
    Sighing like furnace.
                       _As You Like It._ Act ii. Scene 7.


 4.  Women and fools.
                            _King John._ Act ii. Scene 1.


 5.  The first bringer of unwelcome news.
                     _Henry IV._ Part II. Act i. Scene 1.


 6.  Sleek-headed men.
                          _Julius Cæsar._ Act i. Scene 2.


 7.  The livery of a nun.
               _Midsummer Night’s Dream._ Act i. Scene 1.


 8.  A lady’s tears.
                             _King John._ Act v. Scene 2.


 9.  Unbidden guests.
                     _Henry VI._ Part I. Act ii. Scene 2.


 10.  A good rebuke.
                _Antony and Cleopatra._ Act iii. Scene 7.


 11.  Words, words, mere words, no matter from the heart.
                  _Troilus and Cressida._ Act v. Scene 3.


 12.  A younker, prancing to his love.
                   _Henry VI._ Part III. Act ii. Scene 1.


 13.  To climb steep hills.
                            _Henry VIII._ Act i. Scene 1.


 14.  A fawning greyhound.
                            _Coriolanus._ Act i. Scene 6.


 15.            A twice-told tale,
    Vexing the dull ear of a drowsy man.
                           _King John._ Act iii. Scene 4.


 16.                     Coy looks,
    With heart-sore sighs.
               _Two Gentlemen of Verona._ Act i. Scene 1.


 17.  To be suspected of more tenderness
    Than doth become a man!
                             _Cymbeline._ Act i. Scene 2.


 18.  To fight with you.
                 _Antony and Cleopatra._ Act ii. Scene 6.


 19.                             My wife,
    I would you had her spirit in such another;
    The third o’ the world is yours; which with a snaffle
    You may pace easy, but not such a wife.
                 _Antony and Cleopatra._ Act ii. Scene 2.


 20.  A silly woman.
                    _Henry VI._ Part III. Act i. Scene 1.


                                -------



                              QUESTION V.

                  WHAT STYLE OF BEAUTY DO YOU ADMIRE?


 1.  Her hair is auburn.
                   _Two Gentlemen of Verona._ Act iv. Scene 4.


 2.  A sweet-faced man.
                    _Midsummer Night’s Dream._ Act i. Scene 2.


 3.  She has brown hair, and speaks small like a woman.
                     _Merry Wives of Windsor._ Act i. Scene 1.


 4.                   Her sunny locks
    Hang on her temples like a golden fleece.
                         _Merchant of Venice._ Act i. Scene 1.


 5.  Her hair, what color?
    Brown, Madam: and her forehead is as low
    As she would wish it.
                     _Antony and Cleopatra._ Act iii. Scene 3.


 6.  As plays the sun upon the glassy streams,
    Twinkling another counterfeited beam,
    So seems this gorgeous beauty to mine eyes.
                           _Henry VI._ Part I. Act v. Scene 3.


 7.  A lean cheek; which you have not: a blue
    eye and sunken; which you have not: an
    unquestionable spirit; which you have not.
                           _As You Like It._ Act iii. Scene 2.


 8.  Her eyes are gray as glass.
                   _Two Gentlemen of Verona._ Act iv. Scene 4.


 9.  There is never a fair woman has a true face.
                      _Antony and Cleopatra._ Act ii. Scene 6.


 10.  Item, two lips indifferent red; item, two gray
    eyes with lids to them; item, one neck, one
    chin, and so forth.
                              _Twelfth Night._ Act i. Scene 5.


 11.  She is fair, and fairer than that word,—
    Of wondrous virtues.
                         _Merchant of Venice._ Act i. Scene 1.


 12.  Straight and slender; and as brown in hue as hazel-nuts.
                       _Taming of the Shrew._ Act ii. Scene 1.


 13.  The April’s in her eyes; It is love’s spring,
    And these the showers to bring it on.
                     _Antony and Cleopatra._ Act iii. Scene 2.


 14.  Most radiant, exquisite, and unmatchable beauty.
                              _Twelfth Night._ Act i. Scene 5.


 15.  Her sight did ravish; but her grace in speech,
    Her words y-clad with wisdom’s majesty,
    Makes me from wondering, fall to weeping joys,
    Such is the fulness of my heart’s content.
                          _Henry VI._ Part II. Act i. Scene 1.


 16.  A fellow of this temper, Kate, whose face
    is not worth sun-burning, that never looks
    in his glass for love of anything he sees
    there.
                                    _Henry V._ Act v. Scene 2.


 17.  There’s nothing ill can dwell in such a temple;
    If the ill spirit have so fair an house,
    Good things will strive to dwell with ’t.
                                    _Tempest._ Act i. Scene 2.


 18.  He’s as tall a man as any’s in Illyria.
                              _Twelfth Night._ Act i. Scene 3.


 19.  Fam’d for mildness, peace, and prayer.
                        _Henry VI._ Part III. Act ii. Scene 1.


 20.  A gray eye or so.
                          _Romeo and Juliet._ Act ii. Scene 4.


                                -------



                              QUESTION VI.

                          DESCRIBE YOUR IDEAL?


 1.           Her voice was ever soft,
    Gentle, and low; an excellent thing in woman.
                            _King Lear._ Act v. Scene 3.


 2.  His words are bonds, his oaths are oracles;
    His love sincere, his thoughts immaculate;
    His tears, pure messengers sent from his heart;
    His heart as far from fraud, as heaven from earth.
             _Two Gentlemen of Verona._ Act ii. Scene 7.


 3.           She is not yet so old
    But she may learn; and happier than this,
    She is not bred so dull but she can learn.
                 _Merchant of Venice._ Act iii. Scene 2.


 4.  She’s not froward, but modest as the dove;
    She is not hot, but temperate as the morn;
    For patience she will prove a second Grissel.
                 _Taming of the Shrew._ Act ii. Scene 1.


 5.                 She is not so divine,
    So full replete with choice of all delights,
    But, with as humble lowliness of mind,
    She is content to be at your command.
                     _Henry VI._ Part I. Act v. Scene 5.


 6.               A rarer spirit never
    Did steer humanity.
                 _Antony and Cleopatra._ Act v. Scene 1.


 7.  He plays o’ the viol-de gambo, and speaks
    three or four languages word for word
    without book, and hath all the good gifts
    of nature.
                        _Twelfth Night._ Act i. Scene 3.


 8.  One fairer than my love! the all-seeing sun
    Ne’er saw her match, since first the world begun.
                     _Romeo and Juliet._ Act i. Scene 2.


 9.  O, when she’s angry, she is keen and shrewd;
    She was a vixen when she went to school;
    And, though she be but little, she is fierce.
            _Midsummer Night’s Dream._ Act iii. Scene 2.


 10.           Whose beauty claims
    No worse a husband than the best of men;
    Whose virtue, and whose general graces, speak
    That which none else can utter.
                _Antony and Cleopatra._ Act ii. Scene 2.


 11.  He is a very valiant trencher-man, he hath
    an excellent stomach.
               _Much Ado About Nothing._ Act i. Scene 1.


 12.  Gentle and fair.
                  _Measure for Measure._ Act i. Scene 5.


 13.  I suppose him virtuous, know him noble,
    Of great estate, of fresh and stainless youth;
    In voices well divulg’d, free, learn’d, and valiant,
    And, in dimension, and the shape of nature,
    A gracious person.
                        _Twelfth Night._ Act i. Scene 5.


 14.  He hath a tear for pity, and a hand
    Open as day for melting charity:
    Yet notwithstanding, being incens’d, he’s flint.
                   _Henry IV._ Part II. Act iv. Scene 4.


 15.       A pure unspotted heart,
    Never yet taint with love.
                     _Henry VI._ Part I. Act v. Scene 3.


 16.               The kindest man,
    The best condition’d and unwearied spirit
    In doing courtesies; and one in whom
    The ancient Roman honor more appears,
    Than any that draws breath.
                 _Merchant of Venice._ Act iii. Scene 2.


 17.  Free from gross passion, or of mirth, or anger,
    Constant in spirit, not swerving with the blood.
                             _Henry V._ Act ii. Scene 2.


 18.           The poor rude world
    Hath not her fellow.
                 _Merchant of Venice._ Act iii. Scene 5.


 19.  Of a holy, cold, and still conversation.
                _Antony and Cleopatra._ Act ii. Scene 6.


 20.  Not yet old enough for a man, nor young
    enough for a boy; as a squash is before
    ’t is a peascod, or a codling when ’t is almost
    an apple:——He is very well
    favored, and he speaks very shrewishly.
                        _Twelfth Night._ Act i. Scene 5.


                                -------



                             QUESTION VII.

               WHERE WAS, OR WILL BE, YOUR FIRST MEETING?


 1.  On the Alps.
        _Antony and Cleopatra._ Act i. Scene 4.


 2.  In Russia.
        _Measure for Measure._ Act ii. Scene 1.


 3.  Hereafter, in a better world than this.
              _As You Like It._ Act i. Scene 2.


 4.  In the famous ancient city, Tours.
           _Henry VI._ Part II. Act i. Scene 1.


 5.  In a thick-pleached alley.
      _Much Ado About Nothing._ Act i. Scene 2.


 6.  At dinner.
       _Antony and Cleopatra._ Act ii. Scene 1.


 7.  Under an oak, whose antique root peeps out
    Upon the brook that brawls along.
             _As You Like It._ Act ii. Scene 1.


 8.  At the moated grange.
       _Measure for Measure._ Act iii. Scene 1.


 9.  In Egypt.
        _Antony and Cleopatra._ Act i. Scene 3.


 10.                 The pleached bower,
    Where honey-suckles, ripened by the sun,
    Forbid the sun to enter.
    _Much Ado About Nothing._ Act iii. Scene 1.


 11.  In the wood, a league without the town.
     _Midsummer Night’s Dream._ Act i. Scene 1.


 12.  In England.
          _Henry VI._ Part II. Act. i. Scene 3.


 13.  Under the shade of melancholy boughs.
             _As You Like It._ Act ii. Scene 7.


 14.  At the consecrated fount,
    A league below the city.
        _Measure for Measure._ Act iv. Scene 3.


 15.  On the beached margent of the sea.
    _Midsummer Night’s Dream._ Act ii. Scene 2.


 16.  In Italy.
       _Antony and Cleopatra._ Act. i. Scene 4.


 17.  Within seven leagues of Rome.
              _Julius Cæsar._ Act iii. Scene 1.


 18.  Behind the Abbey wall.
           _Romeo and Juliet._ Act ii. Scene 4.


 19.  O, the Nile.
       _Antony and Cleopatra._ Act ii. Scene 7.


 20.  At Milford-Haven.
                  _Cymbeline._ Act iv. Scene 2.


                                -------



                             QUESTION VIII.

               WHAT WAS, OR WILL BE, YOUR FIRST GREETING?


 1.  Wilt thou be gone?
           _Two Gentlemen of Verona._ Act i. Scene 1.


 2.                     I love thee well;
    And by my troth, I think, thou lov’st me well.
                       _King John._ Act iii. Scene 3.


 3.                         Away,
    Away, you trifler!—Love?—I love thee not.
                 _Henry IV._ Part I. Act ii. Scene 3.


 4.  Pray, get you out.
                       _Coriolanus._ Act iv. Scene 5.


 5.  Love me, and leave me not.
                _Merchant of Venice._ Act v. Scene 1.


 6.  I can express no kinder sign of love,
    Than this kind kiss.
                 _Henry VI._ Part II. Act i. Scene 1.


 7.   Doubt thou, the stars are fire;
    Doubt, that the sun doth move;
    Doubt truth to be a liar;
    But never doubt, I love.
                           _Hamlet._ Act ii. Scene 2.


 8.  The door is open, sir, there lies your way.
             _Taming of the Shrew._ Act iii. Scene 2.


 9.                   Learn now, for all,
    That I, which know my heart, do here pronounce,
    By the very truth of it, I care not for you;
    And am so near the lack of charity,
    (To accuse myself) I hate you.
                        _Cymbeline._ Act ii. Scene 3.


 10.  Bless you, fair shrew.
                     _Twelfth Night._ Act i. Scene 3.


 11.  Go, base intruder!
         _Two Gentlemen of Verona._ Act iii. Scene 1.


 12.  Look, here I have you; thus I let you go,
            _Antony and Cleopatra._ Act iii. Scene 2.


 13.  I had rather hear my dog bark at a crow,
    than a man swear he loves me.
            _Much Ado About Nothing._ Act i. Scene 1.


 14.  Madam, if your heart be so obdurate,
    Vouchsafe me yet your picture for my love.
          _Two Gentlemen of Verona._ Act iv. Scene 2.


 15.         By the roses of the spring,
    By maidhood, honor, truth, and everything,
    I love thee so, that, maugre all my pride,
    Nor wit, nor reason, can my passion hide.
                   _Twelfth Night._ Act iii. Scene 1.


 16.           Down on your knees,
    And thank Heaven, fasting, for a good man’s love.
                  _As You Like It._ Act iii. Scene 5.


 17.  I am very loth to be your idol, sir.
          _Two Gentlemen of Verona._ Act iv. Scene 2.


 18.  Most excellent accomplished lady, the heavens
    rain odors on you!
                   _Twelfth Night._ Act iii. Scene 1.


 19.  I know no ways to mince it in love, but
    directly to say––I love you.
                           _Henry V._ Act v. Scene 2.


 20.  Upon thy cheek lay I this zealous kiss,
    As seal to this indenture of my love.
                        _King John._ Act ii. Scene 1.


                                -------



                              QUESTION IX.

                       WHAT DO YOU MOST WISH FOR?


 1.  Large sums of gold.
                     _Henry VI._ Part II. Act i. Scene 1.


 2.     A slight unmeritable man,
    Meet to be sent on errands.
                         _Julius Cæsar._ Act iv. Scene 1.


 3.  Awhile to work, and, after, holiday.
                          _Richard II._ Act iii. Scene 1.


 4.  A noble memory.
                            _Coriolanus._ Act v. Scene 5.


 5.  Such wind as scatters young men through the world,
    To seek their fortunes.
                   _Taming of the Shrew._ Act i. Scene 2.


 6.             Sleep, gentle sleep,
    Nature’s soft nurse.
                   _Henry IV._ Part II. Act iii. Scene 1.


 7.  A lover, that kills himself most gallantly for love.
               _Midsummer Night’s Dream._ Act i. Scene 2.


 8.  The heart of woman.
                         _Julius Cæsar._ Act ii. Scene 4.


 9.  A gentle answer.
                   _Merchant of Venice._ Act iv. Scene 1.


 10.  A bachelor, sir.
                  _Measure for Measure._ Act iv. Scene 2.


 11.  A hundred and fifty pounds.
              _Merry Wives of Windsor._ Act iii. Scene 4.


 12.  Costly apparel, tents, and canopies,
    Fine linen, Turkey cushions boss’d with pearl,
    Valance of Venice, gold in needle-work,
    Pewter and brass, and all things that belong
    To house or housekeeping.
                  _Taming of the Shrew._ Act ii. Scene 1.


 13.  If I might but see you at my death.
                  _Merchant of Venice._ Act iii. Scene 2.


 14.  A dower, my lords!
                      _Henry VI._ Part I. Act v. Scene 5.


 15.  By Jove, I am not covetous for gold,
    Nor care I, who doth feed upon my cost;
    It yearns me not, if men my garments wear;
    Such outward things dwell not in my desire:
    But, if it be a sin to covet honor,
    I am the most offending soul alive.
                              _Henry V._ Act iv. Scene 3.


 16.                             A heart,
    Dearer than Plutus’ mine, richer than gold.
                         _Julius Cæsar._ Act iv. Scene 3.


 17.  Would I were dead! if God’s good will were so;
    For what is in this world, but grief and woe?
                   _Henry VI._ Part III. Act ii. Scene 5.


 18.  Love, and quiet life.
                   _Taming of the Shrew._ Act v. Scene 2.


 19.  I would, I were at home.
                       _As You Like It._ Act iv. Scene 8.


 20.                 Music, moody food
    Of us that trade in love.
                 _Antony and Cleopatra._ Act ii. Scene 5.


                                -------



                              QUESTION X.

                       WHAT WILL BE YOUR FUTURE?


 1.  A worky-day fortune.
                 _Antony and Cleopatra._ Act i. Scene 2.


 2.  All days of glory, joy, and happiness.
                          _King John._ Act iii. Scene 4.


 3.  To view with hollow eye, and wrinkled brow,
    An age of poverty.
                  _Merchant of Venice._ Act iv. Scene 1.


 4.  God’s vassals drop and die;
    And sword and shield,
    In bloody field,
    Doth win immortal fame.
                            _Henry V._ Act iii. Scene 2.


 5.  I will live a bachelor.
               _Much Ado About Nothing._ Act i. Scene 1.


 6.  I’ll see thee hang’d on Sunday.
                 _Taming of the Shrew._ Act ii. Scene 1.


 7.  You shall paint when you are old.
                 _Antony and Cleopatra._ Act i. Scene 2.


 8.  Lean famine, quartering steel, and climbing fire.
                    _Henry VI._ Part I. Act iv. Scene 2.


 9.  Groaning for love.
                    _Romeo and Juliet._ Act ii. Scene 4.


 10.           Would you not suppose
    Your bondage happy to be made a queen?
                     _Henry VI._ Part I. Act v. Scene 3.


 11.  Hated by one he loves; brav’d by his brother;
    Check’d like a bondman, all his faults observ’d,
    Set in a note-book, learn’d and conn’d by rote
    To cast into my teeth. O, I could weep
    My spirit from mine eyes!
                        _Julius Cæsar._ Act iv. Scene 3.


 12.  For aye to be in shady cloister mew’d.
              _Midsummer Night’s Dream._ Act i. Scene 1.


 13.  Made a toast for Neptune.
                 _Troilus and Cressida._ Act i. Scene 3.


 14.  You shall be more beloving, than belov’d.
                 _Antony and Cleopatra._ Act i. Scene 2.


 15.               Upon your sword
    Sit laurel’d victory, and smooth success
    Be strew’d before your feet!
                 _Antony and Cleopatra._ Act i. Scene 3.


 16.  To live in prayer and contemplation.
                 _Merchant of Venice._ Act iii. Scene 4.


 17.  Within a loathsome dungeon, there to pine.
                    _Henry VI._ Part I. Act ii. Scene 5.


 18.  You shall be yet far fairer than you are.
                 _Antony and Cleopatra._ Act i. Scene 2.


 19.  All heart’s content.
                 _Merchant of Venice._ Act iii. Scene 4.


 20.           When thou art old and rich,
    Thou hast neither heat, affection, limb, nor beauty,
    To make thy riches pleasant.
                _Measure for Measure._ Act iii. Scene 1.



------------------------------------------------------------------------



 ● Transcriber’s Notes:
    ○ Quotes from Shakespeare’s plays were verified with the texts at
      opensourceshakespeare.org.
    ○ Question III, Answer 3 - “more busy than laboring spider” changed
      to “more busy than the laboring spider”.
    ○ Question III, Answer 7 - “Celopatra” changed to “Cleopatra”.
    ○ Minor punctuation errors and missing or obscured punctuation were
      corrected.
    ○ Inconsistent spelling and hyphenation were made consistent only
      when a predominant form was found in this book.
    ○ Text that was in italics is enclosed by underscores (_italics_).





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