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Title: Hurst and Blackett's Standard Library (1895)
Author: Hurst, Fannie
Language: English
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Copyright Status: Not copyrighted in the United States. If you live elsewhere check the laws of your country before downloading this ebook. See comments about copyright issues at end of book.

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                           HURST & BLACKETT’S

                           STANDARD LIBRARY.
                                 (1895)

                         ---------------------

         To be had at all Booksellers and Railway Book-stalls.

                         ---------------------

                                LONDON:

                      HURST AND BLACKETT, LIMITED,

                     13, GREAT MARLBOROUGH STREET.


------------------------------------------------------------------------



                  HURST & BLACKETT’S STANDARD LIBRARY

                           OF NEW EDITIONS OF

                         POPULAR MODERN WORKS.

                             ILLUSTRATED BY

     SIR J. É. MILLAIS, SIR J. GILBERT, HOLMAN HUNT, BIRKET FOSTER,
            JOHN LEECH, JOHN TENNIEL, LASLETT J. POTT, ETC.

         Each in a Single Volume, with Frontispiece, price 5s.

                           ------------------

                I.—SAM SLICK’S NATURE AND HUMAN NATURE.

“The first volume of Messrs. Hurst and Blackett’s Standard Library of
Cheap Editions forms a very good beginning to what will doubtless be a
very successful undertaking. ‘Nature and Human Nature’ is one of the
best of Sam Slick’s witty and humorous productions, and well entitled to
the large circulation which it cannot fail to obtain in its present
convenient and cheap shape. The volume combines with the great
recommendations of a clear, bold type and good paper, the lesser, but
attractive merits of being well illustrated and elegantly
bound.”—_Morning Post._

                           ------------------

                      II.—JOHN HALIFAX, GENTLEMAN.

“The new and cheaper edition of this interesting work will doubtless
meet with great success. John Halifax, the hero of this most beautiful
story, is no ordinary hero, and no ordinary book. It is a full-length
portrait of a true gentleman, one of nature’s own nobility. It is also
the history of a home, and a thoroughly English one. The work abounds in
incident, and many of the scenes are full of graphic power and true
pathos. It is a book that few will read without becoming wiser and
better.”—_Scotsman._

“This story is very interesting. The attachment between John Halifax and
his wife is beautifully painted, as are the pictures of their domestic
life, and the growing up of their children; and the conclusion of the
book is beautiful and touching.”—_Athenæum._

                           ------------------

                    III.—THE CRESCENT AND THE CROSS.

                          BY ELIOT WARBURTON.

“Independent of its value as an original narrative, and its useful and
interesting information, this work is remarkable for the colouring power
and play of fancy with which its descriptions are enlivened. Among its
greatest and most lasting charms is its reverent and serious
spirit.”—_Quarterly Review._

“Mr. Warburton has fulfilled the promise of his title-page. The
‘Realities of Eastern Travel’ are described with a vividness which
invests them with deep and abiding interest; while the ‘Romantic’
adventures which the enterprising tourist met with in his course are
narrated with a spirit which shows how much he enjoyed these reliefs
from the ennui of every-day life.”—_Globe._

                           ------------------

                             IV.—NATHALIE.

                           BY JULIA KAVANAGH.

“‘Nathalie’ is Miss Kavanagh’s best imaginative effort. Its manner is
gracious and attractive. Its matter is good. A sentiment, a tenderness,
are commanded by her which are as individual as they are elegant. We
should not soon come to an end were we to specify all the delicate
touches and attractive pictures which place ‘Nathalie’ high among books
of its class.”—_Athenæum._

                           ------------------

                   V.—A WOMAN’S THOUGHTS ABOUT WOMEN.

              BY THE AUTHOR OF “JOHN HALIFAX, GENTLEMAN.”

“These thoughts are good and humane. They are thoughts we would wish
women to think: they are much more to the purpose than the treatises
upon the women and daughters of England, which were fashionable some
years ago, and these thoughts mark the progress of opinion, and indicate
a higher tone of character, and a juster estimate of woman’s
position.”—_Athenæum._

“This excellent book is characterised by good sense, good taste, and
feeling, and is written in an earnest, philanthropic, as well as
practical spirit.”—_Morning Post._

                           ------------------

                      VI.—ADAM GRAEME OF MOSSGRAY.

                           BY MRS. OLIPHANT.

“‘Adam Graeme’ is a story awakening genuine emotions of interest and
delight by its admirable pictures of Scottish life and scenery. The plot
is cleverly complicated, and there is great vitality in the dialogue,
and remarkable brilliancy in the descriptive passages, as who that has
read ‘Margaret Maitland’ would not be prepared to expect? But the story
has a ‘mightier magnet still,’ in the healthy tone which pervades it, in
its feminine delicacy of thought and diction, and in the truly womanly
tenderness of its sentiments. The eloquent author sets before us the
essential attributes of Christian virtue, their deep and silent workings
in the heart, and their beautiful manifestations in the life, with a
delicacy, a power, and a truth which can hardly be surpassed.”—_Morning
Post._

                           ------------------

            VII.—SAM SLICK’S WISE SAWS AND MODERN INSTANCES.

“We have not the slightest intention to criticise this book. Its
reputation is made, and will stand as long as that of Scott’s or
Bulwer’s novels. The remarkable originality of its purpose, and the
happy description it affords of American life and manners, still
continue the subject of universal admiration. To say thus much is to say
enough, though we must just mention that the new edition forms a part of
the Publishers’ Cheap Standard Library, which has included some of the
very best specimens of light literature that ever have been
written.”—_Messenger._

                           ------------------

     VIII.—CARDINAL WISEMAN’S RECOLLECTIONS OF THE LAST FOUR POPES.

“A picturesque book on Rome and its ecclesiastical sovereigns, by an
eloquent Roman Catholic. Cardinal Wiseman has here treated a special
subject with so much generality and geniality that his recollections
will excite no ill-feeling in those who are most conscientiously opposed
to every idea of human infallibility represented in Papal
domination.”—_Athenæum._

                           ------------------

                         IX.—A LIFE FOR A LIFE.

              BY THE AUTHOR OF “JOHN HALIFAX, GENTLEMAN.”

“‘A Life for a Life’ is a book of a high class. The characters are
depicted with a masterly hand; the events are dramatically set forth;
the descriptions of scenery and sketches of society are admirably
penned; moreover, the work has an object—a clearly defined moral—most
poetically, most beautifully drawn, and through all there is that
strong, reflective mind visible which lays bare the human heart and
human mind to the very core.”—_Morning Post._

                           ------------------

                        X.—THE OLD COURT SUBURB.

                             BY LEIGH HUNT.

“A book which has afforded us no slight gratification.”—_Athenæum._

“From the mixture of description, anecdote, biography, and criticism,
this book is very pleasant reading.”—_Spectator._

“A more agreeable and entertaining book has not been published since
Boswell produced his reminiscences of Johnson.”—_Observer._

                           ------------------

                   XI.—MARGARET AND HER BRIDESMAIDS.

           BY THE AUTHOR OF “THE VALLEY OF A HUNDRED FIRES.”

“We recommend all who are in search of a fascinating novel to read this
work for themselves. They will find it well worth their while. There are
a freshness and originality about it quite charming, and there is a
certain nobleness in the treatment both or sentiment and incident which
is not often found.”—_Athenæum._

                           ------------------

               XII.—THE OLD JUDGE; OR, LIFE IN A COLONY.

                             BY SAM SLICK.

“A peculiar interest attaches to sketches of colonial life, and readers
could not have a safer guide than the talented author of this work, who,
by a residence of half a century, has practically grasped the habits,
manners, and social conditions of the colonists he describes. All who
wish to form a fair idea of the difficulties and pleasures of life in a
new country, unlike England in some respects, yet like it in many,
should read this book.”—_John Bull._

                           ------------------

                 XIII.—DARIEN; OR, THE MERCHANT PRINCE.

                          BY ELIOT WARBURTON.

“This last production of the author of ‘The Crescent and the Cross’ has
the same elements of a very wide popularity. It will please its
thousands.”—_Globe._

“Eliot Warburton’s active and productive genius is amply exemplified in
the present book. We have seldom met with any work in which the
realities of history and the poetry of fiction were more happily
interwoven.”—_Illustrated News._

                           ------------------

      XIV.—FAMILY ROMANCE; OR, DOMESTIC ANNALS OF THE ARISTOCRACY.

               BY SIR BERNARD BURKE, ULSTER KING OF ARMS.

“It were impossible to praise too highly this most interesting book,
whether we should have regard to its excellent plan or its not less
excellent execution. It ought to be found on every drawing-room table.
Here you have nearly fifty captivating romances with the pith of all
their interest preserved in undiminished poignancy, and any one may be
read in half an hour. It is not the least of their merits that the
romances are founded on fact—or what, at least, has been handed down for
truth by long tradition—and the romance reality far exceeds the romance
of fiction.”—_Standard._

                           ------------------

                        XV.—THE LAIRD OF NORLAW.

                           BY MRS. OLIPHANT.

“We have had frequent opportunities of commending Messrs. Hurst and
Blackett’s Standard Library. For neatness, elegance, and distinctness
the volumes in this series surpass anything with which we are familiar.
‘The Laird of Norlaw’ will fully sustain the author’s high reputation.
The reader is carried on from first to last with an energy of sympathy
that never flags.”—_Sunday Times._

“‘The Laird of Norlaw’ is worthy of the author’s reputation. It is one
of the most exquisite of modern novels.”—_Observer._

                           ------------------

                    XVI.—THE ENGLISHWOMAN IN ITALY.

                          BY MRS. G. GRETTON.

“Mrs. Gretton had opportunities which rarely fall to the lot of
strangers of becoming acquainted with the inner life and habits of a
part of the Italian peninsula which is the very centre of the national
crisis. We can praise her performance as interesting, unexaggerated, and
full of opportune instruction.”—_The Times._

“Mrs. Gretton’s book is timely, life-like, and for every reason to be
recommended. It is impossible to close the book without liking the
writer as well as the subject. The work is engaging, because
real.”—_Athenæum._

                           ------------------

                           XVII.—NOTHING NEW.

              BY THE AUTHOR OF “JOHN HALIFAX, GENTLEMAN.”

“‘Nothing New’ displays all those superior merits which have made ‘John
Halifax’ one of the most popular works of the day. There is a force and
truthfulness about these tales which mark them as the production of no
ordinary mind, and we cordially recommend them to the perusal of all
lovers of fiction.”—_Morning Post._

                           ------------------

           XVIII.—LIFE OF JEANNE D’ALBRET, QUEEN OF NAVARRE.

                        BY MARTHA WALKER FREER.

“We have read this book with great pleasure, and have no hesitation in
recommending it to general perusal. It reflects the highest credit on
the industry and ability of Miss Freer. Nothing can be more interesting
than her story of the life of Jeanne D’Albret, and the narrative is as
trustworthy as it is attractive.”—_Morning Post._

                           ------------------

                  XIX.—THE VALLEY OF A HUNDRED FIRES.

            BY THE AUTHOR OF “MARGARET AND HER BRIDESMAIDS.”

“If asked to classify this work, we should give it a place between ‘John
Halifax’ and ‘The Caxtons.’”—_Standard._

“The spirit in which the whole book is written is refined and
good.”—_Athenæum._

“This is in every sense a charming novel.”—_Messenger._

                           ------------------

 XX.—THE ROMANCE OF THE FORUM; OR, NARRATIVES, SCENES, AND ANECDOTES FROM
                            COURTS OF JUSTICE.

                     BY PETER BURKE, SERJEANT AT LAW.

“This attractive book will be perused with much interest. It contains a
great variety of singular and highly romantic stories.”—_John Bull._

“A work of singular interest, which can never fail to charm and absorb
the reader’s attention. The present cheap and elegant edition includes
the true story of the Colleen Bawn.”—_Illustrated News._

                           ------------------

                              XXI.—ADÈLE.

                           BY JULIA KAVANAGH.

“‘Adèle’ is the best work we have read by Miss Kavanagh; it is a
charming story, full of delicate character-painting. The interest
kindled in the first chapter burns brightly to the close.”—_Athenæum._

“‘Adèle’ will fully sustain the reputation of Miss Kavanagh, high as it
already ranks.”—_John Bull._

“‘Adèle’ is a love-story of very considerable pathos and power. It is a
very clever novel.”—_Daily News._

                           ------------------

                        XXII.—STUDIES FROM LIFE.

              BY THE AUTHOR OF “JOHN HALIFAX, GENTLEMAN.”

“These ‘Studies’ are truthful and vivid pictures of life, often earnest,
always full of right feeling, and occasionally lightened by touches of
quiet, genial humour. The volume is remarkable for thought, sound sense,
shrewd observation, and kind and sympathetic feeling for all things good
and beautiful.”—_Morning Post._

“These ‘Studies from Life’ are remarkable for graphic power and
observation. The book will not diminish the reputation of the
accomplished author.”—_Saturday Review._

                           ------------------

                      XXIII.—GRANDMOTHER’S MONEY.

                           BY F. W. ROBINSON.

“We commend ‘Grandmother’s Money’ to readers in search of a good novel.
The characters are true to human nature, and the story is
interesting.”—_Athenæum._

                           ------------------

                      XXIV.—A BOOK ABOUT DOCTORS.

                       BY JOHN CORDY JEAFFRESON.

“A book to be read and re-read; fit for the study as well as the
drawing-room table and the circulating library.”—_Lancet._

“This is a pleasant book for the fireside season, and for the seaside
season. Mr. Jeaffreson has, out of hundreds of volumes, collected
thousands of good things, adding thereto much that appears in print for
the first time, and which, of course, gives increased value to this very
readable book.”—_Athenæum._

                           ------------------

                            XXV.—NO CHURCH.

                           BY F. W. ROBINSON.

“We advise all who have the opportunity to read this book. It is well
worth the study.”—_Athenæum._

“A work of great originality, merit, and power.”—_Standard._

                           ------------------

                        XXVI.—MISTRESS AND MAID.

              BY THE AUTHOR OF “JOHN HALIFAX, GENTLEMAN.”

“A good wholesome book, gracefully written, and as pleasant to read as
it is instructive.”—_Athenæum._

“A charming tale, charmingly told.”—_Standard._

                           ------------------

                         XXVII.—LOST AND SAVED.

                        BY THE HON. MRS. NORTON.

“‘Lost and Saved’ will be read with eager interest by those who love a
touching story; it is a vigorous novel.”—_Times._

“This story is animated, full of exciting situations and stirring
incidents. The characters are delineated with great power. Above and
beyond these elements of a good novel, there is that indefinable charm
with which true genius invests all it touches.”—_Daily News._

                           ------------------

                        XXVIII.—LES MISERABLES.

                            BY VICTOR HUGO.

              _Authorised Copyright English Translation._

“The merits of ‘Les Miserables’ do not merely consist in the conception
of it as a whole; it abounds with details of unequalled beauty. M.
Victor Hugo has stamped upon every page the hall-mark of
genius.”—_Quarterly Review._

                           ------------------

                        XXIX.—BARBARA’S HISTORY.

                      BY AMELIA B. EDWARDS, LL.D.

“It is not often that we light upon a novel of so much merit and
interest as ‘Barbara’s History.’ It is a work conspicuous for taste and
literary culture. It is a very graceful and charming book, with a
well-managed story, clearly-cut characters, and sentiments expressed
with an exquisite elocution. The dialogues especially sparkle with
repartee. It is a book which the world will like. This is high praise of
a work of art, and so we intend it.”—_The Times._

                           ------------------

                  XXX.—LIFE OF THE REV. EDWARD IRVING.

                           BY MRS. OLIPHANT.

“A good book on a most interesting theme.”—_Times._

“A truly interesting and most affecting memoir. ‘Irving’s Life’ ought to
have a niche in every gallery of religious biography. There are few
lives that will be fuller of instruction, interest, and
consolation.”—_Saturday Review._

                           ------------------

                           XXXI.—ST. OLAVE’S.

                   BY THE AUTHOR OF “JANITA’S CROSS.”

“This novel is the work of one who possesses a great talent for writing,
as well as experience and knowledge of the world. The whole book is
worth reading.”—_Athenæum._

“‘St. Olave’s’ belongs to a lofty order of fiction. It is a good novel,
but it is something more. It is written with unflagging ability, and it
is as even as it is clever. The author has determined to do nothing
short of the best, and has succeeded.”—_Morning Post._

                           ------------------

             XXXII.—SAM SLICK’S TRAITS OF AMERICAN HUMOUR.

“Dip where you will into this lottery of fun, you are sure to draw out a
prize. These ‘Traits’ exhibit most successfully the broad national
features of American humour.”—_Post._

                           ------------------

                      XXXIII.—CHRISTIAN’S MISTAKE.

              BY THE AUTHOR OF “JOHN HALIFAX, GENTLEMAN.”

“A more charming story has rarely been written. It is a choice gift to
be able thus to render human nature so truly, to penetrate its depths
with such a searching sagacity, and to illuminate them with a radiance
so eminently the writer’s own.”—_Times._

                           ------------------

                     XXXIV.—ALEC FORBES OF HOWGLEN.

                      BY GEORGE MAC DONALD, LL.D.

“No account of this story would give any idea of the profound interest
that pervades the work from the first page to the last.”—_Athenæum._

“A novel of uncommon merit. Sir Walter Scott said he would advise no man
to try to read ‘Clarissa Harlowe’ out loud in company if he wished to
keep his character for manly superiority to tears. We fancy a good many
hardened old novel-readers will feel a rising in the throat as they
follow the fortunes of Alec and Annie.”—_Pall Mall Gazette._

                           ------------------

                              XXXV.—AGNES.

                           BY MRS. OLIPHANT.

“‘Agnes’ is a novel superior to any of Mrs. Oliphant’s former
works.”—_Athenæum._

“Mrs. Oliphant is one of the most admirable of our novelists. In her
works there are always to be found high principle, good taste, sense,
and refinement. ‘Agnes’ is a story whose pathetic beauty will appeal
irresistibly to all readers.”—_Morning Post._

                           ------------------

                          XXXVI.—A NOBLE LIFE.

              BY THE AUTHOR OF “JOHN HALIFAX, GENTLEMAN.”

“Few men and no women will read ‘A Noble Life’ without feeling
themselves the better for the effort.”—_Spectator._

“A beautifully written and touching tale. It is a noble book.”—_Morning
Post._

“‘A Noble Life’ is remarkable for the high types of character it
presents, and the skill with which they are made to work out a story of
powerful and pathetic interest.”—_Daily News._

                           ------------------

                          XXXVII.—NEW AMERICA.

                         BY W. HEPWORTH DIXON.

“A very interesting book. Mr. Dixon has written thoughtfully and
well.”—_Times._

“We recommend everyone who feels any interest in human nature to read
Mr. Dixon’s very interesting book.”—_Saturday Review._

                           ------------------

                       XXXVIII.—ROBERT FALCONER.

                      BY GEORGE MAC DONALD, LL.D.

“‘Robert Falconer’ is a work brimful of life and humour and of the
deepest human interest. It is a book to be returned to again and again
for the deep and searching knowledge it evinces of human thoughts and
feelings.”—_Athenæum._

                           ------------------

                      XXXIX.—THE WOMAN’S KINGDOM.

              BY THE AUTHOR OF “JOHN HALIFAX, GENTLEMAN.”

“‘The Woman’s Kingdom’ sustains the author’s reputation as a writer of
the purest and noblest kind of domestic stories.”—_Athenæum._

“‘The Woman’s Kingdom’ is remarkable for its romantic interest. The
characters are masterpieces. Edna is worthy of the hand that drew John
Halifax.”—_Morning Post._

                           ------------------

                    XL.—ANNALS OF AN EVENTFUL LIFE.

                     BY GEORGE WEBBE DASENT, D.C.L.

“A racy, well-written, and original novel. The interest never flags. The
whole work sparkles with wit and humour.”—_Quarterly Review._

                           ------------------

                         XLI.—DAVID ELGINBROD.

                      BY GEORGE MAC DONALD, LL.D.

“A novel which is the work of a man of genius. It will attract the
highest class of readers.”—_Times._

                           ------------------

                          XLII.—A BRAVE LADY.

              BY THE AUTHOR OF “JOHN HALIFAX, GENTLEMAN.”

“We earnestly recommend this novel. It is a special and worthy specimen
of the author’s remarkable powers. The reader’s attention never for a
moment flags.”—_Post._

“‘A Brave Lady’ thoroughly rivets the unmingled sympathy of the reader,
and her history deserves to stand foremost among the author’s
works.”—_Daily Telegraph._

                           ------------------

                             XLIII.—HANNAH.

              BY THE AUTHOR OF “JOHN HALIFAX, GENTLEMAN.”

“A very pleasant, healthy story, well and artistically told. The book is
sure of a wide circle of readers. The character of Hannah is one of rare
beauty.”—_Standard._

“A powerful novel of social and domestic life. One of the most
successful efforts of a successful novelist.”—_Daily News._

                           ------------------

                  XLIV.—SAM SLICK’S AMERICANS AT HOME.

“This is one of the most amusing books that we ever read.”—_Standard._

“‘The Americans at Home’ will not be less popular than any of Judge
Halliburton’s previous works.”—_Morning Post._

                           ------------------

                         XLV.—THE UNKIND WORD.

              BY THE AUTHOR OF “JOHN HALIFAX, GENTLEMAN.”

“These stories are gems of narrative. Indeed, some of them, in their
touching grace and simplicity, seem to us to possess a charm even beyond
the authoress’s most popular novels. Of none of them can this be said
more emphatically than of that which opens the series, ‘The Unkind
Word.’ It is wonderful to see the imaginative power displayed in the few
delicate touches by which this successful love-story is sketched
out.”—_The Echo._

                           ------------------

                         XLVI.—A ROSE IN JUNE.

                           BY MRS. OLIPHANT.

“‘A Rose in June’ is as pretty as its title. The story is one of the
best and most touching which we owe to the industry and talent of Mrs.
Oliphant, and may hold it own with even ‘The Chronicles of
Carlingford.’”—_Times._

                           ------------------

                         XLVII.—MY LITTLE LADY.

                         BY E. FRANCES POYNTER.

“This story presents a number of vivid and very charming pictures.
Indeed, the whole book is charming. It is interesting in both character
and story, and thoroughly good of its kind.”—_Saturday Review._

                           ------------------

                         XLVIII.—PHŒBE, JUNIOR.

                           BY MRS. OLIPHANT.

“This last ‘Chronicle of Carlingford’ not merely takes rank fairly
beside the first which introduced us to ‘Salem Chapel,’ but surpasses
all the intermediate records. Phœbe, Junior, herself is admirably
drawn.”—_Academy._

                           ------------------

                    XLIX.—LIFE OF MARIE ANTOINETTE.

                    BY PROFESSOR CHARLES DUKE YONGE.

“A work of remarkable merit and interest, which will, we
doubt not, become the most popular English history of Marie
Antoinette.”—_Spectator._

                           ------------------

                             L.—SIR GIBBIE.

                      BY GEORGE MAC DONALD, LL.D.

“‘Sir Gibbie’ is a book of genius.”—_Pall Mall Gazette._

“This book has power, pathos, and humour.”—_Athenæum._

                           ------------------

                        LI.—YOUNG MRS. JARDINE.

              BY THE AUTHOR OF “JOHN HALIFAX, GENTLEMAN.”

“‘Young Mrs. Jardine’ is a pretty story, written in pure English.”—_The
Times._

“There is much good feeling in this book. It is pleasant and
wholesome.”—_Athenæum._

                           ------------------

                         LII.—LORD BRACKENBURY.

                      BY AMELIA B. EDWARDS, LL.D.

“A very readable story. The author has well conceived the purpose of
high-class novel-writing, and succeeded in no small measure in attaining
it. There is plenty of variety, cheerful dialogue, and general ‘verve’
in the book.”—_Athenæum._

                           ------------------

                   LIII.—IT WAS A LOVER AND HIS LASS.

                           BY MRS. OLIPHANT.

“In ‘It was a Lover and his Lass,’ we admire Mrs. Oliphant exceedingly.
It would be worth reading a second time, were it only for the sake of
one ancient Scottish spinster, who is nearly the counterpart of the
admirable Mrs. Margaret Maitland.”—_Times._

                           ------------------

         LIV.—THE REAL LORD BYRON—THE STORY OF THE POET’S LIFE.

                       BY JOHN CORDY JEAFFRESON.

“Mr. Jeaffreson comes forward with a narrative which must take a very
important place in Byronic literature; and it may reasonably be
anticipated that this book will be regarded with deep interest by all
who are concerned in the works and the fame of this great English
poet.”—_The Times._

                           ------------------

                      LV.—THROUGH THE LONG NIGHT.

                        BY MRS. E. LYNN LINTON.

“It is scarcely necessary to sign ‘Through the Long Night,’ for the
practised pen of Mrs. Lynn Linton stands revealed on every page of it.
It is like so many of its predecessors, hard and bright, full of
entertaining reflection and brisk development of plot.”—_Saturday
Review._



                         WORKS BY THE AUTHOR OF
                        JOHN HALIFAX, GENTLEMAN.

   _Each in One Volume, Frontispiece, and Uniformly Bound, Price 5s._

                           ------------------

                        JOHN HALIFAX, GENTLEMAN.

“This is a very good and a very interesting work. It is designed to
trace the career from boyhood to age of a perfect man—a Christian
gentleman; and it abounds in incident both well and highly wrought.
Throughout it is conceived in a high spirit, and written with great
ability. This cheap and handsome new edition is worthy to pass freely
from hand to hand as a gift-book in many households.”—_Examiner._

“The story is very interesting. The attachment between John Halifax and
his wife is beautifully painted, as are the pictures of their domestic
life, and the growing up of their children, and the conclusion of the
book is beautiful and touching.”—_Athenæum._

“The new and cheaper edition of this interesting work will doubtless
meet with great success. John Halifax, the hero of this most beautiful
story, is no ordinary hero, and this his history is no ordinary book. It
is a full-length portrait of a true gentleman, one of nature’s own
nobility. It is also the history of a home, and a thoroughly English
one. The work abounds in incident, and is full of graphic power and true
pathos. It is a book that few will read without becoming wiser and
better.”—_Scotsman._

                           ------------------

                    A WOMAN’S THOUGHTS ABOUT WOMEN.

“A book of sound counsel. It is one of the most sensible works of its
kind, well written, true hearted, and altogether practical. Whoever
wishes to give advice to a young lady may thank the author for means of
doing so.”—_Examiner._

“These thoughts are worthy of the earnest and enlightened mind, the
all-embracing charity, and the well-earned reputation of the author of
‘John Halifax.’”—_Standard._

“This excellent book is characterised by good sense, good taste, and
feeling, and is written in an earnest, philanthropic, as well as
practical spirit.”—_Post._

                           ------------------

                           A LIFE FOR A LIFE.

“We are always glad to welcome this author. She writes from her own
convictions, and she has the power not only to conceive clearly what it
is that she wishes to say, but to express it in language effective and
vigorous. In ‘A Life for a Life’ she is fortunate in a good subject, and
she has produced a work of strong effect. The reader, having read the
book through for the story, will be apt (if he be of our persuasion) to
return and read again many pages and passages with greater pleasure than
on a first perusal. The whole book is replete with a graceful tender
delicacy; and, in addition to its other merits, it is written in good
careful English.”—_Athenæum._

                           ------------------

                              NOTHING NEW.

“‘Nothing New’ displays all those superior merits which have made ‘John
Halifax’ one of the most popular works of the day.”—_Post._

“The reader will find these narratives calculated to remind him of that
truth and energy of human portraiture, that spell over human affections
and emotions, which have stamped this author as one of the first
novelists of our day.”—_John Bull._

                           ------------------

                          THE WOMAN’S KINGDOM.

“‘The Woman’s Kingdom’ sustains the author’s reputation as a writer of
the purest and noblest kind of domestic stories. The novelist’s lesson
is given with admirable force and sweetness.”—_Athenæum._

“‘The Woman’s Kingdom’ is remarkable for its romantic interest. The
characters are masterpieces. Edna is worthy of the hand that drew John
Halifax.”—_Post._

                           ------------------

                           STUDIES FROM LIFE.

“These studies are truthful and vivid pictures of life, often earnest,
always full of right feeling, and occasionally lightened by touches of
quiet genial humour. The volume is remarkable for thought, sound sense,
shrewd observation, and kind and sympathetic feeling for all things good
and beautiful.”—_Post._

                           ------------------

                          CHRISTIAN’S MISTAKE.

“A more charming story, to our taste, has rarely been written. Within
the compass of a single volume the writer has hit off a circle of varied
characters, all true to nature—some true to the highest nature—and she
has entangled them in a story which keeps us in suspense till the knot
is happily and gracefully resolved; while, at the same time, a pathetic
interest is sustained by an art of which it would be difficult to
analyse the secret It is a choice gift to be able thus to render human
nature so truly, to penetrate its depths with such a searching sagacity,
and to illuminate them with a radiance so eminently the writer’s own.
Even if tried by the standard of the Archbishop of York, we should
expect that even he would pronounce ‘Christian’s Mistake’ a novel
without a fault.”—_The Times._

“This is a story good to have from the circulating library, but better
to have from one’s bookseller, for it deserves a place in that little
collection of clever and wholesome stories which forms one of the
comforts of a well-appointed home.”—_Examiner._

                           ------------------

                           MISTRESS AND MAID.

“A good, wholesome book, as pleasant to read as it is
instructive.”—_Athenæum._

“This book is written with the same true-hearted earnestness as ‘John
Halifax.’ The spirit of the whole work is excellent”—_Examiner._

“A charming tale charmingly told.”—_Standard._

                           ------------------

                             A NOBLE LIFE.

“This is one of those pleasant tales in which the author of John
Halifax’ speaks out of a generous heart the purest truths of
life.”—_Examiner._

“Few men, and no women, will read ‘A Noble Life’ without finding
themselves the better.”—_Spectator._

“A story of powerful and pathetic interest.”—_Daily News._

                           ------------------

                             A BRAVE LADY.

“A very good novel, showing a tender sympathy with human nature, and
permeated by a pure and noble spirit.”—_Examiner._

“A most charming story.”—_Standard._

“We earnestly recommend this novel. It is a special and worthy specimen
of the author’s remarkable powers. The reader’s attention never for a
moment flags.”—_Post._

                           ------------------

                                HANNAH.

“A powerful novel of social and domestic life. One of the most
successful efforts of a successful novelist.”—_Daily News._

“A very pleasant, healthy story, well and artistically told. The book is
sure of a wide circle of readers. The character of Hannah is one of rare
beauty.”—_Standard._

                           ------------------

                            THE UNKIND WORD.

“The author of ‘John Halifax’ has written many fascinating stories, but
we can call to mind nothing from her pen that has a more enduring charm
than the graceful sketches in this work. Such a character as Jessie
stands out from a crowd of heroines as the type of all that is truly
noble, pure, and womanly.”—_United Service Magazine._

                           ------------------

                          YOUNG MRS. JARDINE.

“‘Young Mrs. Jardine’ is a pretty story, written in pure English.”—_The
Times._

“There is much good feeling in this book. It is pleasant and
wholesome.”—_Athenæum._

“A book that all should read. Whilst it is quite the equal of any of its
predecessors in elevation of thought and style, it is perhaps their
superior in interest of plot and dramatic intensity. The characters are
admirably delineated, and the dialogue is natural and clear.”—_Morning
Post._



                                WORKS BY
                        GEORGE MAC DONALD, LL.D.

   _Each in One Volume, Frontispiece, and Uniformly Bound, Price 5s._

                           ------------------

                        ALEC FORBES OF HOWGLEN.

“No account of this story would give any idea of the profound interest
that pervades the work from the first page to the last.”—_Athenæum._

“A novel of uncommon merit. Sir Walter Scott said he would advise no man
to try to read ‘Clarissa Harlowe’ out loud in company if he wished to
keep his character for manly superiority to tears. We fancy a good many
hardened old novel-readers will feel a rising in the throat as they
follow the fortunes of Alec and Annie.”—_Pall Mall Gazette._

“The whole story is one of surpassing excellence and beauty.”—_Daily
News._

“This book is full of good thought and good writing. Dr. Mac Donald
looks in his stories more to the souls of men and women than to their
social outside. He reads life and Nature like a true poet.”—_Examiner._

                           ------------------

                            ROBERT FALCONER.

“‘Robert Falconer’ is a work brimful of life and humour and of the
deepest human interest. It is a work to be returned to again and again
for the deep and searching knowledge it evinces of human thoughts and
feelings.”—_Athenæum._

“This story abounds in exquisite specimens of the word-painting in which
Dr. Mac Donald excels, charming transcripts of Nature, full of light,
air, and colour.”—_Saturday Review._

“This noble story displays to the best advantage all the powers of Dr.
Mac Donald’s genius.”—_Illustrated London News._

“‘Robert Falconer’ is the noblest work of fiction that Dr. Mac Donald
has yet produced.”—_British Quarterly Review._

“The dialogues in ‘Robert Falconer’ are so finely blended with humour
and pathos as to make them in themselves an intellectual treat to which
the reader returns again and again.”—_Spectator._

                           ------------------

                            DAVID ELGINBROD.

“A novel which is the work of a man of genius. It will attract the
highest class of readers.”—_Times._

“There are many beautiful passages and descriptions in this book. The
characters are extremely well drawn.”—_Athenæum._

“A clever novel. The incidents are exciting and the interest is
maintained to the close. It may be doubted if Sir Walter Scott himself
ever painted a Scotch fireside with more truth than Dr. Mac
Donald.”—_Morning Post._

“David Elginbrod is the finest character we have met in fiction for many
a day. The descriptions of natural scenery are vivid, truthful and
artistic; the general reflections are those of a refined, thoughtful,
and poetical philosopher, and the whole moral atmosphere of the book is
lofty, pure, and invigorating.”—_Globe._

                           ------------------

                              SIR GIBBIE.

“‘Sir Gibbie’ is a book of genius.”—_Pall Mall Gazette._

“This book has power, pathos, and humour. There is not a character which
is not lifelike. There are many powerful scenes, and the portraits will
stay long in our memory.”—_Athenæum._

“‘Sir Gibbie’ is unquestionably a book of genius. It abounds in
humour, pathos, insight into character, and happy touches of
description.”—_Graphic._

“‘Sir Gibbie’ contains some of the most charming writing the author has
yet produced-”—_Scotsman._

“‘Sir Gibbie’ is one of the most touching and beautiful stories that has
been written for many years. It is not a novel to be idly read and laid
aside; it is a grand work, to be kept near at hand, and studied and
thought over.”—_Morning Post._



                         WORKS BY THE AUTHOR OF
                      ‘SAM SLICK, THE CLOCKMAKER.’

   _Each in One Volume, Frontispiece, and Uniformly Bound, Price 5s._

                           ------------------

                        NATURE AND HUMAN NATURE.

“We enjoy our old friend’s company with unabated relish. This work is a
rattling miscellany of sharp sayings, stories, and hard hits. It is full
of fun and fancy.”—_Athenæum._

“Since Sam’s first work he has written nothing so fresh, racy, and
genuinely humorous as this. Every line of it tells in some way or
other—instructively, satirically, jocosely, or wittily. Admiration of
Sam’s mature talents, and laughter at his droll yarns, constantly
alternate as with unhalting avidity we peruse the work. The Clockmaker
proves himself the fastest time-killer a-going.”—_Observer._

                           ------------------

                    WISE SAWS AND MODERN INSTANCES.

“This delightful book will be the most popular, as beyond doubt it is
the best, of all the author’s admirable works.”—_Standard._

“The book before us will be read and laughed over. Its quaint and racy
dialect will please some readers—its abundance of yarns will amuse
others. There is something to suit readers of every humour.”—_Athenæum._

“The humour of Sam Slick is inexhaustible. He is ever and everywhere a
welcome visitor; smiles greet his approach, and wit and wisdom hang upon
his tongue. We promise our readers a great treat from the perusal of
these ‘Wise Saws,’ which contain a world of practical wisdom, and a
treasury of the richest fun.”—_Morning Post_.

                           ------------------

                  THE OLD JUDGE; OR, LIFE IN A COLONY.

“By common consent this work is regarded as one of the raciest, truest
to life, most humorous, and most interesting works which have proceeded
from the prolific pen of its author. We all know what shrewdness of
observation, what power of graphic description, what natural resources
of drollery, and what a happy method of hitting off the broader
characteristics of the life he reviews, belong to Judge Haliburton. We
have all those qualities here; but they are balanced by a serious
literary purpose, and are employed in the communication of information
respecting certain phases of colonial experience which impart to the
work an element of sober utility.”—_Sunday Times._

                           ------------------

                       TRAITS OF AMERICAN HUMOUR.

“No man has done more than the facetious Judge Haliburton, through the
mouth of the inimitable ‘Sam’ to make the old parent country recognise
and appreciate her queer transatlantic progeny. His present collection
of comic stories and laughable traits is a budget of fun, full of rich
specimens of American humour.”—_Globe._

“Yankeeism, portrayed in its raciest aspect, constitutes the contents of
these superlatively entertaining sketches. The work embraces the most
varied topics—political parties, religious eccentricities, the flights
of literature, and the absurdities of pretenders to learning, all come
in for their share of satire; while we have specimens of genuine
American exaggerations and graphic pictures of social and domestic life
as it is. The work will have a wide circulation.”—_John Bull._

                           ------------------

                         THE AMERICANS AT HOME.

“In this highly entertaining work we are treated to another cargo of
capital stories from the inexhaustible store of our Yankee friend. In
the volume before us he dishes up, with his accustomed humour and
terseness of style, a vast number of tales, none more entertaining than
another, and all of them graphically illustrative of the ways and
manners of brother Jonathan. The anomalies of American law, the
extraordinary adventures incident to life in the backwoods, and, above
all, the peculiarities of American society, are variously, powerfully,
and, for the most part, amusingly exemplified.”—_John Bull._

“In the picturesque delineation of character, and the felicitous
portraiture of national features, no writer equals Judge Haliburton, and
the subjects embraced in the present delightful book call forth, in new
and vigorous exercise, his peculiar powers. ‘The Americans at Home’ will
not be less popular than any of his previous works.”—_Post._



                                WORKS BY
                             MRS. OLIPHANT.

   _Each in One Volume, Frontispiece, and Uniformly Bound, Price 5s._

                           ------------------

                        ADAM GRAEME OF MOSSGRAY.

“‘Adam Graeme’ is a story awakening genuine emotions of interest and
delight by its admirable pictures of Scottish life and scenery. The plot
is cleverly complicated, and there is great vitality in the dialogue,
and remarkable brilliancy in the descriptive passages, as who that has
read ‘Margaret Maitland’ would not be prepared to expect? But the story
has a ‘mightier magnet still,’ in the healthy tone which pervades it, in
its feminine delicacy of thought and diction, and in the truly womanly
tenderness of its sentiments. The eloquent author sets before us the
essential attributes of Christian virtue, their deep and silent workings
in the heart, and their beautiful manifestations in the life, with a
delicacy, a power, and a truth which can hardly be surpassed.”—_Morning
Post._

                           ------------------

                          THE LAIRD OF NORLAW.

“We have had frequent opportunities of commending Messrs. Hurst and
Blackett’s Standard Library. For neatness, elegance, and distinctness
the volumes in this series surpass anything with which we are familiar.
‘The Laird of Norlaw’ will fully sustain the author’s high reputation.
The reader is carried on from first to last with an energy of sympathy
that never flags.”—_Sunday Times._

“‘The Laird of Norlaw’ is worthy of the author’s reputation. It is one
of the most exquisite of modern novels.”—_Observer._

                           ------------------

                      IT WAS A LOVER AND HIS LASS.

“In ‘It was a Lover and his Lass,’ we admire Mrs. Oliphant
exceedingly. Her story is a very pretty one. It would be worth reading
a second time, were it only for the sake of one ancient Scottish
spinster, who is nearly the counterpart of the admirable Mrs. Margaret
Maitland.”—_Times._

                           ------------------

                                 AGNES.

“‘Agnes’ is a novel superior to any of Mrs. Oliphant’s former
works.”—_Athenæum._

“Mrs. Oliphant is one of the most admirable of our novelists. In her
works there are always to be found high principle, good taste, sense,
and refinement. ‘Agnes’ is a story whose pathetic beauty will appeal
irresistibly to all readers.”—_Morning Post._

                           ------------------

                            A ROSE IN JUNE.

“‘A Rose in June’ is as pretty as its title. The story is one of the
best and most touching which we owe to the industry and talent of Mrs.
Oliphant, and may hold its own with even ‘The Chronicles of
Carlingford.’”—_Times._

                           ------------------

                             PHŒBE, JUNIOR.

“This last ‘Chronicle of Carlingford’ not merely takes rank fairly
beside the first which introduced us to ‘Salem Chapel,’ but surpasses
all the intermediate records. Phœbe, Junior, herself is admirably
drawn.”—_Academy._

                           ------------------

                    LIFE OF THE REV. EDWARD IRVING.

“A good book on a most interesting theme.”—_Times._

“A truly interesting and most affecting memoir. ‘Irving’s Life’ ought to
have a niche in every gallery of religious biography. There are few
lives that will be fuller of instruction, interest, and
consolation.”—_Saturday Review._



                           STANDARD EDITIONS

              EACH IN ONE VOLUME CROWN 8vo—FIVE SHILLINGS.

                           ------------------

               LIFE OF JEANNE D’ALBRET, QUEEN OF NAVARRE.

                             BY MISS FREER.

“We have read this book with great pleasure, and have no hesitation in
recommending it to general perusal. It reflects the highest credit on
the industry and ability of Miss Freer. Nothing can be more interesting
than her story of the life of Jeanne D’Albret, and the narrative is as
trustworthy as it is attractive.”—_Morning Post._

                           ------------------

                  THE LIFE OF THE REV. EDWARD IRVING.

                           BY MRS. OLIPHANT.

“A truly interesting and most affecting memoir. ‘Irving’s Life’ ought to
have a niche in every gallery of religious biography. There are few
lives that will be fuller of instruction, interest, and
consolation.”—_Saturday Review._

                           ------------------

                     THE LIFE OF MARIE ANTOINETTE.

                    BY PROFESSOR CHARLES DUKE YONGE.

“A work of remarkable merit and interest, which will, we
doubt not, become the most popular English history of Marie
Antoinette.”—_Spectator._

                           ------------------

                    THE REAL LORD BYRON—THE STORY OF
                            THE POET’S LIFE.

                       BY JOHN CORDY JEAFFRESON.

“Mr. Jeaffreson comes forward with a narrative which must take a very
important place in Byronic literature; and it may reasonably be
anticipated that this book will be regarded with deep interest by all
who are concerned in the works and the fame of this great English
poet.”—_The Times._

                           ------------------

                      THE CRESCENT AND THE CROSS.

                          BY ELIOT WARBURTON.

“Independent of its value as an original narrative, and its useful and
interesting information, this work is remarkable for the colouring power
and play of fancy with which its descriptions are enlivened. Among its
greatest and most lasting charms is its reverent and serious
spirit.”—_Quarterly Review._

                           ------------------

                         A BOOK ABOUT DOCTORS.

                       BY JOHN CORDY JEAFFRESON.

“This is a pleasant book for the fireside season, and for the seaside
season. Mr. Jeaffreson has, out of hundreds of volumes, collected
thousands of good things, adding thereto much that appears in print for
the first time, and which, of course, gives increased value to this very
readable book.”—_Athenæum._

                           ------------------

        FAMILY ROMANCE; OR, DOMESTIC ANNALS OF THE ARISTOCRACY.

               BY SIR BERNARD BURKE, ULSTER KING OF ARMS.

“It were impossible to praise too highly this most interesting book,
whether we should have regard to its excellent plan or its not less
excellent execution. It ought to be found on every drawing-room table.
Here you have nearly fifty captivating romances with the pith of all
their interest preserved in undiminished poignancy, and any one may be
read in half-an-hour.”—_Standard._


                       BEATRICE WHITBY’S NOVELS.

                  EACH IN ONE VOLUME CROWN 8vo—3s. 6d.

                           ------------------

                     THE AWAKENING OF MARY FENWICK.

“We have no hesitation in declaring that ‘The Awakening of Mary Fenwick’
is the best novel of its kind that we have seen for some years. It is
apparently a first effort, and, as such, is really remarkable. The story
is extremely simple. Mary Mauser marries her husband for external, and
perhaps rather inadequate, reasons, and then discovers that he married
her because she was an heiress. She feels the indignity acutely, and
does not scruple to tell him her opinion—her very candid opinion—of his
behaviour. That is the effect of the first few chapters, and the rest of
Miss Whitby’s book is devoted to relating how this divided couple hated,
quarrelled, and finally fell in love with one another. Mary Fenwick and
her husband live and move and make us believe in them in a way which few
but the great masters of fiction have been able to compass.”—_Athenæum._

                           ------------------

                            ONE REASON WHY.

“Our old friend the governess makes a re-entry into fiction under the
auspices of Beatrice Whitby in ‘One Reason Why.’ Readers generally,
however, will take a great deal more interest, for once, in the children
than in their instructress. ‘Bay’ and ‘Ellie’ are charmingly natural
additions to the children of novel-land; so much so, that there is a
period when one dreads a death-bed scene for one of them—a fear which is
happily unfulfilled. The name of the authoress will be remembered by
many in conjunction with ‘The Awakening of Mary Fenwick.’”—_Graphic._

                           ------------------

                         PART OF THE PROPERTY.

“The book is a thoroughly good one. The theme is fairly familiar—the
rebellion of a spirited girl against a match which has been arranged for
her without her knowledge or consent; her resentment at being treated,
not as a woman with a heart and will, but as ‘part of the property’; and
her final discovery, which is led up to with real dramatic skill, that
the thing against which her whole nature had risen in revolt has become
the one desire of her heart. The mutual relations each to each of the
impetuous Madge, her self-willed, stubborn grandfather, who has arranged
the match, and her lover Jocelyn, with his loyal, devoted
sweetly-balanced nature, are portrayed with fine truth of insight; but
perhaps the author’s greatest triumph is the portrait of Mrs. Lindsay,
who, with the knowledge of the terrible skeleton in the cupboard of her
apparently happy home, wears so bravely the mask of light gaiety as to
deceive everybody but the one man who knows her secret.”—_Spectator._

                           ------------------

                      IN THE SUNTIME OF HER YOUTH.

“A description of a home stripped by the cold wind of poverty of all
its comforts, but which remains home still. The careless optimism of
the head of the family would be incredible, if we did not know how men
exist full of responsibilities yet free from solicitudes, and who
tread with a jaunty step the very verge of ruin; his inconsolable
widow would be equally improbable, if we did not meet every day with
women who devote themselves to such idols of clay. The characters of
their charming children, whose penury we deplore, do not deteriorate,
as often happens in that cruel ordeal. A sense of fairness pervades
the book which is rarely found in the work of a lady. There is
interest in it from first to last, and its pathos is relieved by
touches of true humour.”—_Illustrated London News._

                           ------------------

                        MARY FENWICK’S DAUGHTER.

“This is one of the most delightful novels we have read for a long time.
‘Bab’ Fenwick is an ‘out of doors’ kind of girl, full of spirit, wit,
go, and sin, both original and acquired. Her lover, Jack, is all that a
hero should be, and great and magnanimous as he is, finds some
difficulty in forgiving the _insouciante_ mistress all her little sins
of omission and commission. When she finally shoots him in the leg—by
accident—the real tragedy of the story begins. The whole is admirable,
if a little long.”—_Black and White._

                           ------------------



               _Each in One Volume, Crown Octavo, 3s. 6d._

                         MARY FENWICK’S DAUGHTER.

                           By BEATRICE WHITBY.

“This is one of the most delightful novels we have read for a long time.
‘Bab’ Fenwick is an ‘out of doors’ kind of girl, full of spirit, wit,
go, and sin, both original and acquired. Her lover, Jack, is all that a
hero should be, and great and magnanimous as he is, finds some
difficulty in forgiving the _insouciante_ mistress all her little sins
of omission and commission. When she finally shoots him in the leg—by
accident—the real tragedy of the story begins. The whole is admirable,
if a little long.”—_Black and White._

                           ------------------

                            ROBERT CARROLL.

               By the Author of ‘MISTRESS BEATRICE COPE.’

“M. E. Le Clerc devotes herself to historic fiction, and her success is
sufficient to justify her in the occasional production of stories like
‘Mistress Beatrice Cope’ and ‘Robert Carroll.’ Beatrice Cope was a
Jacobite’s daughter, so far as memory serves, and Robert Carroll was the
son of a Jacobite baronet, who played and lost his stake at Preston,
fighting for the Old Pretender. Of course the hero loved a maiden whose
father was a loyal servant of King George, and, almost equally of course
one of this maiden’s brothers was a Jacobite. A second brother, by the
way, appears as a lad of sixteen in the spring of 1714, and as a wounded
colonel of cavalry on the morrow of the fight at Preston less than two
years later—rapid promotion even for those days, though certainly not
impossible. The author has taken pains to be accurate in her references
to the events of the time, and her blend of fact and fiction is romantic
enough.”—_Athenæum._

                           ------------------

                        THE HUSBAND OF ONE WIFE.

                By the Author of ‘SOME MARRIED FELLOWS.’

“It is a comfort to turn from the slipshod English and the tiresome
slang of many modern novels to the easy and cultured style of ‘The
Husband of One Wife,’ and we have been thoroughly interested in the
story, as well as pleased with the manner in which it is told. As for
Mrs. Goldenour, afterwards Mrs. Garfoyle, afterwards Mrs. Pengelley, she
is certainly one of the most attractive as well as one of the most
provoking of heroines, and Mrs. Venn has succeeded admirably in
describing her under both aspects. The scene of the dinner-party, and
the description of the bishop’s horror at its magnificence is very
clever. We are very glad to meet several old friends again, especially
Mrs. Gruter, who is severe and amusing as ever. Altogether we feel that
Mrs. Venn’s novels are books to which we can confidently look forward
with pleasure.”—_Guardian._

                           ------------------

                            BROTHER GABRIEL.

                         By M. BETHAM-EDWARDS.

“The story will be followed with unfaltering interest. Nor is anything
short of unmixed praise due to several of the episodes and separate
incidents of which it is composed. The principal characters—Delmar,
Zoé’s cousin and lover—stand out in decided and life-like relief. In the
sketches of scenery, especially those of the coast of Brittany and the
aspect of its sea, both in calm and storm, Miss Betham-Edwards need not
fear comparison with the best masters of the art.”—_Spectator._

“The book is one that may be read with pleasure; it is fluently,
flowingly, carefully written; and it contains very pleasant sketches of
character.”—_Academy._



                  LONDON: HURST AND BLACKETT, LIMITED.

------------------------------------------------------------------------



 ● Transcriber’s Notes:
    ○ Missing or obscured punctuation was silently corrected.
    ○ Typographical errors were silently corrected.
    ○ Text that was in italics is enclosed by underscores (_italics_).





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