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Title: Index for the Project Gutenberg Series "American Pioneers and Patriots"
Author: Abbott, John S. C. (John Stevens Cabot)
Language: English
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Copyright Status: Not copyrighted in the United States. If you live elsewhere check the laws of your country before downloading this ebook. See comments about copyright issues at end of book.

*** Start of this Doctrine Publishing Corporation Digital Book "Index for the Project Gutenberg Series "American Pioneers and Patriots"" ***

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INDEX FOR THE JOHN S. C. ABBOTT SERIES "AMERICAN PIONEERS AND PATRIOTS"



CONTENTS
Click on the ## before each title to view a linked
table of contents for each of the twelve volumes.
Click on the title itself to open the original online file.
##  I. CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS

##  II. FERDINAND DE SOTO

##  III. CHEVALIER DE LA SALLE

##  IV. MILES STANDISH

##  V. CAPTAIN WILLIAM KIDD

##  VI. PETER STUYVESANT

##  VII. BENJAMIN FRANKLIN

##  VIII. GEORGE WASHINGTON

##  IX. DANIEL BOONE

##  X. CHRISTOPHER CARSON

##  XI. ADMIRAL JOHN PAUL JONES

##  XII. DAVID CROCKETT



TABLES OF CONTENTS OF VOLUMES

I. CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS


CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS
AND THE NEW WORLD OF HIS DISCOVERY


A NARRATIVE BY FILSON YOUNG
ILLUSTRATIONS AND MAPS



    "LES CONQUERANTS" Frontpiece By NORMAN WILKINSON

    SAINT ANDREW’S GATE

    STREET IN GENOA

    LA RABIDA

    PALOS HARBOUR

    THE SEA ASTROLABE

    PORTUGUESE MAPPEMONDE

    BEHAIM’S GLOBE

    WATLING’S ISLAND

    CARAVEL. (FIFTEENTH CENTURY MAP OF ESPANOLA

    THE FOUR VOYAGES OF COLUMBUS

    CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS—Frontispiece Volume II.

    MAP OF THE NORTHERN COAST OF ESPANOLA—Drawn by COLUMBUS

    VERAGUA

    FACSIMILE LETTER OF COLUMBUS

    THE WEST INDIES

    ISABELLA OF CASTILE

    FERDINAND OF ARRAGON

    HOUSE AT VALLADOLID WHERE COLUMBUS DIED



CONTENTS



BOOK I.



THE INNER LIGHT



I   THE STREAM OF THE WORLD

II   THE HOME IN GENOA

III   YOUNG CHRISTOPHER

IV   DOMENICO

V   SEA THOUGHTS

VI   IN PORTUGAL

VII   ADVENTURES BODILY AND SPIRITUAL

VIII   THE FIRE KINDLES

IX   WANDERINGS WITH AN IDEA

X   OUR LADY OF LA RABIDA

XI   THE CONSENT OF SPAIN

XII   THE PREPARATIONS AT PALOS

XIII   EVENTS OF THE FIRST VOYAGE

XIV   LANDFALL



BOOK II.



THE NEW WORLD



I   THE ENCHANTED ISLANDS

II   THE EARTHLY PARADISE

III   THE VOYAGE HOME

IV   THE HOUR OF TRIUMPH

V   GREAT EXPECTATIONS

VI   THE SECOND VOYAGE

VII   THE EARTHLY PARADISE REVISITED



BOOK III.



DESPERATE REMEDIES



I   THE VOYAGE TO CUBA

II   THE CONQUEST OF ESPANOLA

III   UPS AND DOWNS

IV   IN SPAIN AGAIN

V   THE THIRD VOYAGE

VI   AN INTERLUDE

VII   THE THIRD VOYAGE (continued)



BOOK IV.



TOWARDS THE SUNSET



I   DEGRADATION

II   CRISIS IN THE ADMIRAL’S LIFE

III   THE LAST VOYAGE

IV   HEROIC ADVENTURES BY LAND AND SEA

V   THE ECLIPSE OF THE MOON

VI   RELIEF OF THE ADMIRAL

VII   THE HERITAGE OF HATRED

VIII   THE ADMIRAL COMES HOME

IX   THE LAST DAYS

X   THE MAN COLUMBUS



II. FERDINAND DE SOTO
AMERICAN PIONEERS AND PATRIOTS.
FERDINAND DE SOTO.


THE
DISCOVERER OF THE MISSISSIPPI.
By JOHN S. C. ABBOTT.
CONTENTS.

————?————
CHAPTER I.
Childhood and Youth.
  	PAGE
Birthplace of Ferdinand De Soto.—Spanish Colony at Darien.—Don Pedro de Avila, Governor of Darien.—Vasco Nuñez.—Famine.—Love in the Spanish Castle.—Character of Isabella.—Embarrassment of De Soto.—Isabella's Parting Counsel. 	9

CHAPTER II.
The Spanish Colony.
Character of De Soto.—Cruel Command of Don Pedro.—Incident.—The Duel.—Uracca.—Consternation at Darien.—Expedition Organized.—Uracca's Reception of Espinosa and his Troops.—The Spaniards Retreat.—De Soto Indignant.—Espinosa's Cruelty, and Deposition from Command. 	21

CHAPTER III.
Life at Darien.
Reinforcements from Spain.—Aid sent to Borrica.—Line of Defense Chosen by the Natives.—Religion of the Buccaneers.—The Battle and the Rout.—Strategy of Uracca.—Cruelty of Don Pedro.—The Retreat.—Character of Uracca.—Embarrassment of Don Pedro.—Warning of M. Codro.—Expedition of Pizarro.—Mission of M. Codro.—Letter of De Soto to Isabella. 	37

CHAPTER IV.
Demoniac Reign.
Giles Gonzales.—Unsuccessful Contest of De Soto with Gonzales.—Bold Reply of De Soto to the Governor.—Cruelty of Don Pedro to M. Codro.—Assassination of Cordova.—New Expedition of Discovery.—Revenge upon Valenzuela.—Reign of Don Pedro at Nicaragua.—Unwise Decision of De Soto. 	55

CHAPTER V.
The Invasion of Peru.
The Kingdom of Peru.—Its Metropolis.—The Desperate Condition of Pizarro.—Arrival of De Soto.—Character of the Spaniards.—Exploring Tour of De Soto.—The Colony at San Miguel.—The General Advance.—Second Exploration of De Soto.—Infamous Conduct of the Pizarros. 	72

CHAPTER VI.
The Atrocities of Pizarro.
Fears of Pizarro.—Honorable Conduct of the Inca.—The March to Caxamarca.—Hospitable Reception.—Perfidious Attack upon the Inca.—His Capture and Imprisonment.—The Honor of De Soto.—The Offered Ransom.—Treachery and Extortion of Pizarro. 	90

CHAPTER VII.
The Execution of the Inca, and Embarrassments of
De Soto.
Pledges of Pizarro.—His Perfidy.—False Mission of De Soto.—Execution of the Inca.—His Fortitude.—Indignation of De Soto.—Great Embarrassments.—Extenuating Considerations.—Arrival of Almagro.—March Towards the Capital. 	107

CHAPTER VIII.
De Soto Returns to Spain.
Dreadful Fate of Chalcukima.—His Fortitude.—Ignominy of Pizarro.—De Soto's Advance upon Cuzco.—The Peruvian Highway.—Battle in the Defile.—De Soto takes the Responsibility.—Capture of the Capital and its Conflagration.—De Soto's Return to Spain.—His Reception there.—Preparations for the Conquest of Florida. 	126

CHAPTER IX.
The Landing in Florida.
The Departure from Spain.—Arrival in Cuba.—Leonora and Tobar.—Isabella Invested with the Regency.—Sad Life of Isabella.—Sailing of the Expedition.—The Landing at Tampa Bay.—Outrages of Narvaez.—Noble Spirit of Ucita.—Unsuccessful Enterprises.—Disgrace and Return of Porcallo. 	144

CHAPTER X.
The March to Ochile.
The March Commenced.—The Swamps of Florida.—Passage of the Morass.—Heroism of Sylvestre.—Message to Acuera.—His Heroic Reply.—Fierce Hostility of the Indians.—Enter the Town of Ocali.—Strange Incident.—Death of the Bloodhound.—Historical Discrepancies.—Romantic Entrance to Ochile. 	163

CHAPTER XI.
The Conspiracy and its Consequences.
The Three Brother Chieftains.—Reply of Vitachuco to his Brothers.—Feigned Friendship for the Spaniards.—The Conspiracy.—Its Consummation and Results.—Clemency of De Soto.—The Second Conspiracy.—Slaughter of the Indians.—March of the Spaniards for Osachile.—Battle in the Morass. 	180

CHAPTER XII.
Winter Quarters.
Incidents of the March.—Passage of the River.—Entering Anhayea.—Exploring Expeditions.—De Soto's desire for Peace.—Capture of Capafi.—His Escape.—Embarrassments of De Soto.—Letter of Isabella.—Exploration of the Coast.—Discovery of the Bay of Pensacola.—Testimony Respecting Cofachiqui.—The March Resumed. 	199

CHAPTER XIII.
Lost in the Wilderness.
Incidents at Achise.—Arrival at Cofa.—Friendly Reception by Cofaqui.—The Armed Retinue.—Commission of Patofa.—Splendors of the March.—Lost in the Wilderness.—Peril of the Army.—Friendly Relations.—The Escape from the Wilderness.—They Reach the Frontiers of Cofachiqui.—Dismissal of Patofa.—Wonderful Reception by the Princess of Cofachiqui. 	220

CHAPTER XIV.
The Indian Princess.
Crossing the River.—Hospitable Reception.—Attempts to visit the Queen Mother.—Suicide of the Prince.—Futile search for Gold.—The Discovery of Pearls.—The Pearl Fishery.—The Princess a Captive.—Held in Silken Chains.—Her Escape.—Location of Cutifachiqui.—The March Resumed. 	240

CHAPTER XV.
The Dreadful Battle of Mobila.
The Army in Alabama.—Barbaric Pageant.—The Chief of Tuscaloosa.—Native Dignity.—Suspected Treachery of the Chief.—Mobila, its Location and Importance.—Cunning of the Chief.—The Spaniards Attacked.—Incidents of the Battle.—Disastrous Results. 	259

CHAPTER XVI.
Days of Darkness.
The Melancholy Encampment.—The Fleet at Pensacola.—Singular Resolve of De Soto.—Hostility of the Natives.—Beautiful Scenery.—Winter Quarters on the Yazoo.—Feigned Friendship of the Cacique.—Trickery of Juan Ortiz.—The Terrible Battle of Chickasaw.—Dreadful Loss of the Spaniards. 	276

CHAPTER XVII.
The Discovery of the Mississippi.
The Fortress of Hostile Indians.—Its Capture.—The Disastrous Conflict.—The Advance of the Army.—Discovery of the Mississippi River.—Preparations for Crossing.—Extraordinary Pageants.—Unjustifiable Attack.—The passage of the River.—Friendly Reception by Casquin.—Extraordinary Religious Festival. 	296

CHAPTER XVIII.
Vagrant Wanderings.
Trickery of Casquin.—The March to Capaha.—The Battle and its Results.—Friendly Relations with Capaha.—The Return Journey.—The March Southward.—Salt Springs.—The Savages of Tula.—Their Ferocity.—Anecdote.—Despondency of De Soto. 	315

CHAPTER XIX.
Death of De Soto.
Ascent of the Mississippi.—Revenge of Guachoya.—Sickness of De Soto.—Affecting Leave-taking.—His Death and Burial.—The March for Mexico.—Return to the Mississippi.—Descent of the River.—Dispersion of the Expedition.—Death of Isabella. 	334



III. CHEVALIER DE LA SALLE

AMERICAN PIONEERS AND PATRIOTS.


THE ADVENTURES
OF THE
Chevalier De La Salle
AND HIS COMPANIONS,
IN THEIR EXPLORATIONS OF THE
PRAIRIES, FORESTS, LAKES, AND RIVERS, OF THE NEW WORLD,
AND THEIR INTERVIEWS WITH THE SAVAGE TRIBES,
TWO HUNDRED YEARS AGO.


By
JOHN S. C. ABBOTT.



CONTENTS.
CHAPTER I.
The Enterprise of James Marquette.
  	Page
The Discovery of America. Explorations of the French in Canada. Ancestry of James Marquette. His noble Character. Mission to Canada. Adventures with the Indians. Wild Character of the Region and the Tribes. Voyage to Lake Superior with the Nez-Percés. Mission at Green Bay. Search for the Mississippi. The Outfit. The Voyage through Green Bay. Fox River and the Illinois. Enters the Mississippi. Scenes Sublime and Beautiful. Adventures in an Indian Village. 	15

CHAPTER II.
The First Exploration of the Mississippi River.
River Scenery. The Missouri. Its Distant Banks. The Mosquito Pest. Meeting the Indians. Influence of the Calumet. The Arkansas River. A Friendly Greeting. Scenes in the Village. Civilization of the Southern Tribes. Domestic Habits. Fear of the Spaniards. The Return Voyage. 	41

CHAPTER III.
Marquette's Last Voyage, and Death.
The Departure from Green Bay. Navigating the Lake in a Canoe. Storms of rain and snow. Night Encampments. Ascending the Chicago River. A Winter with the Savages. Journey to the Kankakee. The Great Council on the Prairie. Interesting Incidents. The Escort of Savages. The Death Scene. Sublime Funeral Solemnities. 	61

CHAPTER IV.
Life upon the St. Lawrence and the Lakes Two Hundred Years Ago.
Birth of La Salle. His Parentage and Education. Emigrates to America. Enterprising Spirit. Grandeur of his Conceptions. Visits the Court of France. Preparations for an Exploring Voyage. Adventures of the River and Lake. Awful Scene of Indian Torture. Traffic with the Indians. The Ship-yard at Lake Erie. 	81

CHAPTER V.
The Voyage Along the Lakes.
The Embarcation. Equipment of the Griffin. Voyage through the Lakes and Straits. The Storm. Superstition of the Voyagers. Arrival at Mackinac. Scenery there. Friendship of the Indians. Sail on Lakes Huron and Michigan. Arrival at Green Bay. The well-freighted Griffin sent back. 	104

CHAPTER VI.
The Expedition of Father Hennepin.
Seeking a Northwest Passage. The Voyage Commenced. The Alarm. Delightful Scenery. The Indian Village. Entrance to the Mississippi. Appearance of the Country. The Midnight Storm. Silence and Solitude. A Fleet of Canoes. Captured by the Savages. Merciful Captivity. Alarming Debate. Condition of the Captives. 	128

CHAPTER VII.
Life with the Savages.
Ascending the River with the Savages. Religious Worship. Abundance of Game. Hardihood of the Savages. The War-Whoop. Savage Revelry. The Falls of St. Anthony. Wild Country Beyond. Sufferings of the Captives. Capricious Treatment. Triumphal Entrance. The Adoption. Habits of the Savages. 	145

CHAPTER VIII.
Escape from the Savages.
Preaching to the Indians. Studying the Language. The Council. Speech of Ou-si-cou-dè. The Baptism. The Night Encampment. Picturesque Scene. Excursion on the St. Francis. Wonderful River Voyage. Incidents by the Way. Characteristics of the Indians. Great Peril. Strange Encounter with the Indian Chief. Hardships of the Voyage. Vicissitudes of the Hunter's Life. Anecdote. The Return Voyage. 	163

CHAPTER IX.
The Abandonment of Fort Crèvecœur.
Departure of La Salle. Fathers Membré and Gabriel. Their Missionary Labors. Character of the Savages. The Iroquois on the War Path. Peril of the Garrison. Heroism of Tonti and Membré. Infamous Conduct of the Young Savages. Flight of the Illinois. Fort Abandoned. Death of Father Gabriel. Sufferings of the Journey to Mackinac. 	188

CHAPTER X.
La Salle's Second Exploring Tour.
Disasters. Energy of La Salle. The Embarcation. Navigating the Lakes. Sunshine and Storm, Beauty and Desolation. Ruins at Crèvecœur. Steps Retraced. Christian Character of La Salle. Arrival at Mackinac. The Enterprise Renewed. Travelling on the Ice. Descent of the Illinois River. Entering the Mississippi. Voyage of the Canoes. Adventures with the Indians. 	210

CHAPTER XI.
The Great Enterprise Accomplished.
Scenes in the Arkansas Villages. Indian Hospitality. Barbarian Splendor. Attractive Scenery. The Alarm. Its Joyful Issue. Genial Character of La Salle. Erecting the Cross. Pleasant Visit to the Koroas. The Two Channels. Perilous Attack. Humanity of La Salle. The Sea Reached. Ceremonies of Annexation. 	232

CHAPTER XII.
The Return Voyage.
The Numerous Alligators. Destitution of Provisions. Encountering Hostile Indians. A Naval Battle. Visit to the Village. Treachery of the Savages. The Attack. Humane Conduct of La Salle. Visit to the Friendly Taensas. Severe Sickness of La Salle. His Long Detention at Prudhomme. The Sick Man's Camp. Lieutenant Tonti sent Forward. Recovery of La Salle. His Arrival at Fort Miami. 	249

CHAPTER XIII.
Sea Voyage to the Gulf of Mexico.
La Salle returns to Quebec. Sails for France. Assailed by Calumny. The Naval Expedition. Its Object. Its Equipment. Disagreement between La Salle and Beaujeu. The Voyage to the West Indies. Adventures in the Caribbean Sea. They Enter the Gulf. Storms and Calms. The Voyagers Lost. 	268

CHAPTER XIV.
Lost in the Wilderness.
Treachery of Beaujeu. Accumulating Troubles. Anxieties of La Salle. March on the Land. The Encampment. Wreck of the Aimable. Misadventure with the Indians. Commencement of Hostilities. Desertion of Beaujeu with the Joli. The Encampment. The Indians Solicit Friendship. The Cruel Repulse. Sickness and Sorrow. Exploring Expeditions. The Mississippi sought for in vain. 	290

CHAPTER XV.
A Trip toward Mexico.
Arrangements for the Journey. The Departure. Indians on Horseback. Scenes of Enchantment. Attractive Character of La Salle. Visit to the Kironas. The Bite of the Snake. Adventures Wild and Perilous. Hardihood of the Indian Hunter. The Long Sickness. A Man Devoured by a Crocodile. The Return. 	311

CHAPTER XVI.
The Last Days of La Salle.
Plan for the New Journey. Magnitude of the Enterprise. Affecting Leave-taking. The Journey Commenced. Adventures by the Way. Friendly Character of the Indians. Vast Realms of Fertility and Beauty. The Joys and the Sorrows of such a Pilgrimage. The Assassination of La Salle and of three of his Companions. 	326

CHAPTER XVII.
The Penalty of Crime.
Nature's Storms. The Gloom of the Soul. Approach to the Cenis Village. Cordial Welcome. Barbaric Ceremonials. Social Habits of the Indians. Meeting with the French Deserters. Traffic with the Indians. Quarrel between Hiens and Duhaut. The Assassins Assassinated. Departure of the War Party. Fiend-like Triumph. The March Resumed. 	316

CHAPTER XVIII.
The Close of the Drama.
Ludicrous Scene. Death of M. Marle. Sympathy of the Savages. Barbaric Ceremonies. The Mississippi Reached. Joyful Interview. Ascending the River. Incidents by the Way. The Beautiful Illinois. Weary Detention. The Voyage to Mackinac. Thence to Quebec. Departure for France. Fate of the Colony. 	366



IV. MILES STANDISH
MILES STANDISH
CONTENTS.
CHAPTER I.
  	Page
Elizabeth's Act of Uniformity.-Oppressive Enactments.-King James and his Measures.-Persecution of the Non-Conformists.-Plans for Emigration.-The Unavailing Attempt.-The Disaster near Hull.-Cruel Treatment of the Captives.-The Exiles at Amsterdam.-Removal to Leyden.-Decision to Emigrate to America.-The reasons.-Elder Brewster Selected as Pastor.-The Departure from Leyden.-Scene at Delft Haven.-The Embarkation. 	9
CHAPTER II.
The Departure from Southampton.-Hindrances.-Delay at Dartmouth and Plymouth.-Abandonment of the Speedwell.-Sketch of Miles Standish.-Death at Sea.-Perils and Threatened Mutiny.-Narrow Escape of John Howland.-Arrival at Cape Cod.-Testimony of Governor Bradford.-The Civil Contract.-John Carver Chosen Governor.-The First Exploring Tour.-The Sabbath. 	30
CHAPTER III.
Repairing the Shallop.-The Second Exploring Tour.-Interesting Discoveries.-Return to the Ship.-A Week of Labor.-The Third Exploring Tour.-More Corn Found.-Perplexity of the Pilgrims.-The Fourth Expedition.-The First Encounter.-Heroism of the Pilgrims.-Night of Tempest and Peril.-A Lee Shore Found.-Sabbath on the Island. 	44
CHAPTER IV.iv
The Voyage Resumed.-Enter an Unknown Harbor.-Aspect of the Land.-Choose it for their Settlement.-The Mayflower Enters the Harbor.-Sabbath on Shipboard.-Exploring the Region.-The Storm and Exposure.-The Landing.-View from the Hill.-Arduous Labors.-The Alarm.-Arrangement of the Village.-The Evident Hostility of the Indians.-Gloomy Prospects.-Expedition of Captain Standish.-Billington Sea.-Lost in the Woods.-Adventures of the Lost men.-The Alarm of Fire. 	71
CHAPTER V.
Days of Sunshine and Storm.-Ravages of Pestilence.-A Raging Storm.-New Alarm of Fire.-Twelve Indians Seen.-Two Indians Appear on the Hill.-Great Alarm in the Settlement.-Measures of Defense.-More Sunny Days.-Humanity and Self-Denial of Miles Standish and Others.-Conduct of the Ship's Crew.-Excursion to Billington Sea.-The Visit of Samoset.-Treachery of Captain Hunt.-The Shipwrecked Frenchmen.-The Plague.-The Wampanoags.-More Indian Visitors.-Bad Conduct of the Billingtons. 	92
CHAPTER VI.
Two Savages on the Hill.-The Return of Samoset with Squantum.-The Story of Squantum.-The Visit of Massasoit and His Warriors.-Etiquette of the Barbarian and Pilgrim Courts.-The Treaty.-Return of the Mayflower to England.-A View of Plymouth.-Brighter Days.-Visit of Messrs. Winslow and Hopkins to the Seat of Massasoit.-Incidents of the Journey. 	117
CHAPTER VII.
The Lost Boy.-The Expedition to Nauset.-Interesting Adventures.-The Mother of the Kidnapped Indians.-Tyanough.-Payment for the Corn.-Aspinet, the Chief.-The Boy Recovered.-Alarmingv Intelligence.-Hostility of Corbitant.-The Friendship of Hobbomak.-Heroic Achievement of Miles Standish.-The Midnight Attack.-Picturesque Spectacle.-Results of the Adventure.-Visit to Massachusetts.-The Squaw Sachem.-An Indian Fort.-Charming Country.-Glowing Reports. 	145
CHAPTER VIII.
Arrival of the Fortune.-Object of the Pilgrims in their Emigration.-Character of the New-Comers.-Mr. Winslow's Letter.-The First Thanksgiving.-Advice to Emigrants.-Christmas Anecdote.-Alarming Rumor.-The Narragansets.-Curious Declaration of War.-The Defiance.-Fortifying the Village.-The Meeting in Council and the Result.-The Alarm.-The Shallop Recalled. 	164
CHAPTER IX.
The Double-Dealing of Squantum.-False Alarm.-Voyage to Massachusetts.-Massasoit Demands Squantum.-The Arrival of the Boat.-The Virginia Massacre.-Preparations for Defense.-Arrival of the Charity and the Swan.-Vile Character of the Weymouth Colonists.-Arrival of the Discovery.-Starvation at Weymouth.-Danger of the Plymouth Colony.-Expeditions for Food.-Death of Squantum.-Voyage to Massachusetts and the Cape. 	187
CHAPTER X.
Search for Corn.-Trip to Buzzard's Bay.-Interesting Incident.-Energy and Sagacity of Captain Standish.-Hostile Indications.-Insolence of Witeewamat.-The Plot Defeated.-Sickness of Massasoit.-The Visit.-Gratitude of the Chief.-Visit to Corbitant.-Condition of the Weymouth Colony.-The Widespread Coalition.-Military Expedition of Captain Standish.-His Heroic Adventures.-End of the Weymouth Colony. 	209
CHAPTER XI.vi
Letter from Rev. Mr. Robinson.-Defense of Captain Standish.-New Policy Introduced.-Great Destitution.-Day of Fasting and Prayer.-Answer to Prayer.-The First Thanksgiving.-The Colony at Weymouth.-Worthless Character of the Colonists.-Neat Cattle from England.-Captain Standish Sent to England.-Captain Wollaston and His Colony.-Heroism of Captain Standish.-Morton Vanquished.-Difficulty at Cape Ann.-Increasing Emigration.-The Division of Property. 	232
CHAPTER XII.
The Virginia Emigrants.-Humanity and Enterprise of the Governor.-Envoy Sent to England.-Trading-Posts on the Kennebec and Penobscot Rivers.-Capture by the French.-The Massachusetts Colony.-Its Numbers and Distinguished Characters.-Trade with the Indians.-Wampum the New Currency.-Trading-Post at Sandwich.-Sir Christopher Gardener.-Captain Standish Moves to Duxbury.-Lament of Governor Bradford. 	257
CHAPTER XIII.
Removal to Duxbury.-Intercourse with the Dutch.-Trading-Posts on the Connecticut.-Legend of the Courtship of Miles Standish.-Personal Appearance of the Captain.-Proposition to John Alden.-His Anguish and Fidelity.-Interview with Priscilla.-The Indian Alarm.-Departure of Captain Standish.-Report of his Death.-The Wedding. 	281
CHAPTER XIV.
Menace of the Narragansets.-Roger Williams.-Difficulty on the Kennebec.-Bradford's Narrative.-Captain Standish as Mediator.-The French on the Penobscot.-Endeavors to Regain the Lost Port.-Settlements on the Connecticut River.-Mortality Among the Indians.-Hostility of thevii Pequots.-Efforts to Avert War.-The Pequot Forts.-Death of Elder Brewster.-His Character. 	301
CHAPTER XV.
Friendship Between Captain Standish and Mr. Brewster.-Character of Mr. Brewster.-His Death and Burial.-Mode of Worship.-Captain's Hill.-Difficulty with the Narragansets.-Firmness and Conciliation.-Terms of Peace.-Plans for Removal from Plymouth.-Captain Standish's Home in Duxbury.-Present Aspect of the Region. 	332
CHAPTER XVI.
The Will of Captain Standish.-His Second Wife.-Captain's Hill.-The Monument.-Letters from President Grant and General Hooker.-Oration by General Horace Binney Sargent.-Sketch of his Life.-Other Speakers.-Laying the Corner Stone.-Description of the Shaft. 	358



V. CAPTAIN WILLIAM KIDD
CAPTAIN WILLIAM KIDD
AND OTHERS OF THE
BUCCANEERS
By

JOHN S. C. ABBOTT
CONTENTS.
PAGE
CHAPTER I.
Origin of the Buccaneers.
Renown of Captain Kidd.—Wild Legends.—Demands of Spain.—Opposition of the Maritime Powers.—The Rise of the Buccaneers.—The Pirates' Code.—Remonstrance of Spain.—Reply of France and England.—Confession of a Buccaneer.—Adventures of Peter the Great. 	9
CHAPTER II.
William Kidd becomes a Pirate.
Ravages of the Pirates.—The King's Interview with Earl Bellomont.—William Kidd, the New-York Merchant.—His Commission.—Sailing of the Adventure.—Recruiting in New York.—Circuitous Trip to Madagascar.—Perils and Sufferings.—Madagascar the Pirates' Home.—Murmurings of the Crew.—Kidd reluctantly turns Pirate.—His Repulses, and his Captures. 	29
CHAPTER III.
Piratic Adventures.
Audacity of Kidd.—Fate of the November.—Kidd kills William Moore.—The Renowned Ballad.—Kidd's Compunctions.—Kidd at Madagascar.—Piratic Carousals.—The Artificial Hell.—Kidd's Return to the West Indies.—Exaggerated Reports of Avery.—His wretched Career and wretched End. 	51
vi CHAPTER IV.
Arrest, Trial, and Condemnation of Kidd.
Appalling Tidings.—Trip to Curacoa.—Disposal of the Quedagh Merchant.—Purchase of the Antonio.—Trembling Approach toward New York.—Measures for the Arrest of Kidd.—He enters Delaware Bay.—Touches at Oyster Bay and Block Island.—Communications with the Government.—Sails for Boston.—His Arrest.—Long Delays.—Public Rumors.—His Trial and Condemnation. 	75
CHAPTER V.
Kidd, and Stede Bonnet.
The Guilt of Kidd.—Rumors of Buried Treasure.—Mesmeric Revelation.—Adventures of Bradish.—Strange Character of Major Bonnet.—His Piracies.—Encounters.—Indications of Insanity.—No Temptation to Turn Pirate.—Blackbeard.—Bonnet Deposed. 	98
CHAPTER VI.
The Adventures of Edward Teach, or Blackbeard.
Seizure of the Protestant Cæsar.—The Piratic Squadron.—Villany of the Buccaneers.—The Atrocities of Blackbeard.—Illustrative Anecdotes.—Carousals on Shore.—Alleged Complicity with the Governor.—Hiding-place near Ocracoke Inlet.—Arrangements for his Capture.—Boats sent from two Men-of-War.—Bloody Battle.—The Death of the Pirate.—His Desperate and Demoniac Character. 	110
CHAPTER VII.
The Close of Stede Bonnet's Career.
Bonnet's Abandonment by Blackbeard.—Avails Himself of the King's Pardon.—Takes Commission as a Privateer.—Rescues Blackbeard's Pirates.—Piratic Career.—Enters Capevii Fear River for Repairs.—Captured by Colonel Rhet.—The Conflict.—Escapes from Prison.—The Pursuit, and Trial and Sentence. 	125
CHAPTER VIII.
The Portuguese Barthelemy.
Commencement of his Career.—Bold Capture.—Brutality of the Pirates.—Reverses and Captivity.—Barthelemy doomed to Die.—His Escape.—Sufferings in the Forest.—Reaches Gulf Triste.—Hardening Effect of his Misfortunes.—His new Piratic Enterprise.—Wonderful Success.—The Tornado.—Impoverishment and Ruin. 	139
CHAPTER IX.
Francis Lolonois.
Early Life of Lolonois.—His Desperate Character.—Joins the Buccaneers.—His Fiend-like Cruelty.—The Desperadoes Rally around Him.—Equips a Fleet.—Captures Rich Prizes.—Plans the Sack of Maracaibo.—The Adventurous Voyage.—Description of Venezuela.—Atrocities at Maracaibo and Gibraltar.—Doom of the Victors. 	151
CHAPTER X.
The Plunder; the Carousal; and the New Enterprise.
Gibraltar in Ashes.—The Return to Maracaibo.—Division of the Plunder.—Peculiar Scene.—Reception of the Pirates at Tortuga.—Fiend-like Carousal.—The Pirates Reduced to Beggary.—Lolonois's New Enterprise.—The "Furious Calm."—Days of Disaster.—Ravaging the Coast.—Capture of San Pedro. 	170
CHAPTER XI.
The End of Lolonois's Career.
The Pirates' Perfidy.—Capture of a Spanish Ship.—Misery of the Pirates.—Desertion of Vauclin.—The Shipwreck.—Life uponviii the Island.—Expedition to Nicaragua.—Its utter Failure.—Ferocity of the Indians.—Exploring the River.—The Retreat.—Coasting to Darien.—Capture and Death of Lolonois.—Fate of the Remnants. 	186
CHAPTER XII.
The Female Pirate, Mary Read.
Testimony of Charles Johnson.—Marriage of Mary Read's Mother.—Singular Adventure.—Reasons for Disguising her Daughter.—Early Training of Mary as a Boy.—She Enlists on board a Man-of-War.—The Character she Developed.—Enters the Army.—Skill and Bravery.—Falls in Love with a Fleming.—Reveals her Sex.—The Marriage.—Happy Days.—Death of her Husband.—Adversity.—Resumes Male Attire. 	201
CHAPTER XIII.
Anne Bonny, the Female Pirate.
Rackam the Pirate.—Anne Bonny his Wife.—Her Reasons for Assuming a Boy's Dress.—Infamous Character of Rackam.—Anne falls in Love with Mary.—Curious Complications.—The Duel.—Chivalry of Frank.—The Capture.—The Trial.—Testimony of the Artist.—Death of Mary Read.—Rackam Dies on the Scaffold. 	214
CHAPTER XIV.
Sir Henry Morgan.
His Origin.—Goes to the West Indies.—Joins the Buccaneers.—Meets Mansvelt the Pirate.—Conquest of St. Catharine.—Piratic Colony there.—Ravaging the Coast of Costa Rica.—Sympathy of the Governor of Jamaica.—Death of Mansvelt.—Expedition of Don John.—The Island Recaptured by the Spaniards.—Plans of Morgan.—His Fleet.—The Sack of Puerto Principe.—Horrible Atrocities.—Retreat of theix Pirates.—The Duel.—They Sail for Puerto Velo.—Conquest of the City.—Heroism of the Governor. 	225
CHAPTER XV.
The Capture of Puerto Velo, and its Results.
The Torture.—Sickness and Misery.—Measures of the Governor of Panama.—The Ambuscade.—Awful Defeat of the Spaniards.—Ferocity of the Pirates.—Strange Correspondence.—Exchange of Courtesies.—Return to Cuba, and Division of the Spoil.—Wild Orgies at Jamaica.—Complicity of the British Government with the Pirates.—The New Enterprise.—Arrival of the Oxford.—Destruction of the Cerf Volant.—Rendezvous at Samona. 	246
CHAPTER XVI.
The Expedition to Maracaibo.
The Delay at Ocoa.—Hunting Excursions.—The Repulse.—Cities of Venezuela.—The Plan of Morgan.—Suggestions of Pierre Picard.—Sailing of the Expedition.—They Touch at Oruba.—Traverse Venezuela.—Enter Lake Maracaibo.—Capture of the Fort.—The City Abandoned.—Atrocities of the Pirates. 	260
CHAPTER XVII.
Adventures on the Shores of Lake Maracaibo.
Preparations for the Defence of Gibraltar.—The Hidden Ships.—The Hiding-place of the Governor and the Women.—Disaster and Failure.—Capture of the Spanish Ships.—The Retreat Commenced.—Peril of the Pirates.—Singular Correspondence.—Strength of the Spanish Armament.—The Public Conference of the Pirates.—The Naval Battle.—The Fire-Ship.—Wonderful Achievement of the Pirates. 	273
x CHAPTER XVIII.
A New Expedition Planned.
The Threat to Espinosa.—Adroit Stratagem.—Wonderful Escape.—The Storm.—Revelry at Jamaica.—History of Hispaniola.—Plan of a New Expedition.—The Foraging Ships.—Morgan's Administrative Energies.—Return of the Foragers.—Rendezvous at Cape Tiburon.—Magnitude and Armament of the Fleet.—Preparations to Sail. 	290
CHAPTER XIX.
Capture of St. Catherine and Chagres.
The Defences at St. Catherine.—Morgan's Strategy.—The Midnight Storm.—Deplorable Condition of the Pirates.—The Summons to Surrender.—Disgraceful Conduct of the Spanish Commander.—The Advance to Chagres.—Incidents of the Battle.—The Unexpected Victory.—Measures of Morgan. 	305
CHAPTER XX.
The March from Chagres to Panama.
Preparations to Ascend the River.—Crowding of the Boats.—The Bivouac at Bracos.—Sufferings from Hunger.—The Pathless Route.—The Boats Abandoned.—Light Canoes Employed.—Abandoned Ambuscades.—Painful Marches, Day by Day.—The Feast on Leathern Bags.—Murmurs and Contentions.—The Indians Encountered.—Struggling through the Forest.—The Conflagration at Santa Cruz.—Battle and Skirmishes.—First Sight of Panama.—Descent into the Plain.—Feasting. 	319
CHAPTER XXI.
The Capture of Panama.
First Sight of the City.—The Spanish Scouts Appear.—Morgan's Advance.—Character of the Country.—Fears of the Spaniards.—Removalxi of Treasure.—Capture of the City.—The Poisoned Wine.—Magnificent Scenery of the Bay.—Description of Panama and its Surroundings.—Wealth of the City.—Scenes of Crime and Cruelty. 	335
CHAPTER XXII.
The Return from Panama.
Return of the Explorers.—The Beautiful Captive.—Sympathy in her behalf.—Embarrassments of Morgan.—Inflexible Virtue of the Captive.—The Conspiracy.—Efficiency of Morgan.—His Obduracy.—The Search of the Pirates.—The Return March.—Morgan Cheats the Pirates.—Runs Away. 	349
CHAPTER XXIII.
Montbar the Fanatic.
Partial Solution of a Mystery.—Montbar's Birth.—His Education and Delusions.—Anecdote of the Dramatic Performance.—Montbar Runs Away from Home.—Enters the Navy.—His Ferocious Exploits.—Joins the Buccaneers.—Desperate Battles on the Land and on the Sea.—His Final Disappearance. 	360



VI. PETER STUYVESANT



PETER STUYVESANT,
THE LAST DUTCH GOVERNOR
OF NEW AMSTERDAM
By John S. C. Abbott



CONTENTS

PREFACE

DETAILED CONTENTS.

PETER STUYVESANT.

CHAPTER I.—DISCOVERY OF THE HUDSON RIVER.

CHAPTER II.—THE PROGRESS OF DISCOVERY.

CHAPTER III.—THE COMMENCEMENT OF COLONISATION.

CHAPTER IV.—THE ADMINISTRATION OF VAN TWILLER.

CHAPTER V.—WAR AND ITS DEVASTATIONS.

CHAPTER VI.—GOVERNOR STUYVESANT.

CHAPTER VII.—WAR BETWEEN ENGLAND AND HOLLAND.

CHAPTER VIII.—ANOTHER INDIAN WAR.

CHAPTER IX.—AN ENERGETIC ADMINISTRATION.

CHAPTER X.—THE ESOPUS WAR.

CHAPTER XI.—THE DISASTROUS YEAR.

CHAPTER XII.—ENCROACHMENTS OF THE ENGLISH.

CHAPTER XIII.—HOSTILE MEASURES COMMENCED.

CHAPTER XIV.—THE CAPTURE OF NEW AMSTERDAM.

CHAPTER XV.—THE FINAL SURRENDER.

CHAPTER XVI.—THE OLDEN TIME.

NOTES:



CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.—DISCOVERY OF THE HUDSON RIVER.
The Discovery of America.
Colonies.
The Bay of New York.
Description of the Bay.
Voyage of Sir Henry Hudson.
Discovery of the Delaware.
The Natives.
The Boat Attacked.
Ascending the Hudson.
Escape of the Prisoners.
The Chiefs Intoxicated.
The Return.
The Village at Castleton.
The Theft and its Punishment.
The Return to England.


CHAPTER II.—THE PROGRESS OF DISCOVERY.
Value of the Territory Discovered.
Fate of Hudson.
The Conspiracy.
Aspect of Manhattan Island.
The Trail which has Widened into Broadway.
The Opening Commerce.
The Fur Trade.
Visit of the English Man of War.
Exploring the Sound.
Commercial Enterprise Receives a New Stimulus.
Erection of Forts.
Character of the Fur Trade.


CHAPTER III.—THE COMMENCEMENT OF COLONIZATION.
The Puritans.
Memorial to the States-General.
Disagreement of the English and the Dutch.
Colony on the Delaware.
Purchase Of Manhattan.
The First Settlement.
An Indian Robbed and Murdered.
Description of the Island.
Diplomatic Intercourse.
Testimony of De Rassieres.
The Patroons.
The Disaster at Swaanendael.


CHAPTER IV.—THE ADMINISTRATION OF VAN TWILLER.
Friendly Relations Restored.
Wouter Van Thiller New Director.
Captain Elkins.
Remonstrance of De Vrees.
Claims for the Connecticut.
The Plymouth Expedition.
A Boat's Crew Murdered.
Condition of the Colony in 1633.
Emigration to the Connecticut.
Emigrants from Holland.
The Red Rocks.
New Haven Colony Established.
Natural.
Indian Remonstrance Against Taxation.
Outrage upon the Raritan Indians.
Indian Revenge.


CHAPTER V.—WAR AND ITS DEVASTATIONS.
Approaching Hostilities.
Noble Remonstrance.
Massacre of the Natives.
The War Storm.
Noble Conduct of De Vrees.
The Humiliation of Kieft.
Wide Spread Desolation.
The Reign of Terror.
State of Affairs at Fort Nassau.
The Massacre at Stamford.
Memorial of the Select Men.
Kieft Superseded by Peter Stuyvesant.


CHAPTER VI.—GOVERNOR STUYVESANT.
New Netherland in 1646.
Early Years of Peter Stuyvesant.
Decay of New Amsterdam.
The Germs of a Representative Government.
Energetic Administration.
Death of Governor Winthrop.
Claims for Long Island.
Arrogance of the Governor.
Remonstrance of the Nine Men.
The Pastoral Office.
Boundary Lines.
Increasing Discontent.
Division of Parties.
Dictatorial Measures.


CHAPTER VII.—WAR BETWEEN ENGLAND AND HOLLAND.
Action of the Patroons.
Settlements on the Hudson.
Alarm of the Home Government.
Recall of Stuyvesant.
His Escape from Humiliation.
Difficulties between England and Holland.
The Breaking Out of War.
Directions to Stuyvesant.
The Relations of the Colonies.
Charges Against the Dutch Governor.
Their Refutation.
Efforts of Stuyvesant for Peace.
Noble Conduct of the Massachusetts Government.
The Advocates for War.


CHAPTER VIII.—ANOTHER INDIAN WAR.
Conflict Between the Governor and the Citizens.
Energy of the Governor.
His Measures of Defence.
Action of the English Colony.
Claims of the Government of Sweden.
Fort Casimir Captured by the Swedes.
Retaliation.
Measures for the Recapture of Fort Casimir.
Shooting a Squaw.
Its Consequences.
The Ransom of Prisoners.
Complaints of the Swedish Governor.
Expedition from Sweden.
Its Fate.


CHAPTER IX—AN ENERGETIC ADMINISTRATION.
New Amsterdam in 1656.
Religious Intolerance.
Persecution of the Waldenses.
The New Colony on South River.
Wreck of the Prince Maurice.
The Friendly Indians.
Energetic Action of the Governor.
Persecution of the Quakers.
Remonstrance from Flushing.
The Desolation of Staten Island.
Purchase of Bergen.
Affairs at Esopus.
The Indian Council.
Generosity of the Indians.
New Amstel.
Encroachments of the English.


CHAPTER X.—THE ESOPUS WAR.
Outrage at Esopus.
New Indian War.
Its Desolations.
Sufferings of Both Parties.
Wonderful Energies of the Governor.
Difficulties of his Situation.
The Truce.
Renewal of the War.
The Mohawks.
The Controversy with Massachusetts.
Indian Efforts for Peace.
The Final Settlement.
Claims of the English Upon the Delaware.
Renewed Persecution of the Quakers.


CHAPTER XI.—THE DISASTROUS YEAR.
Purchase of Staten Island.
The Restoration of Charles Second.
Emigration Invited.
Settlement of Bushwick.
The Peculiar People.
Persecution of John Brown.
The Governor Rebuked.
Cumulation of Disasters.
The Outbreak at Esopus.
The Panic.
Measures of the Governor.
The Indian Fort.
The Expedition to Mamaket.
Capture of the Fort.
Annihilation of the Esopus Indians.


CHAPTER XII.—ENCROACHMENTS OF THE ENGLISH.
Annihilation of the Esopus Tribe.
The Boundary Question.
Troubles on Long Island. The Dutch and English Villages.
Petition of the English.
Embarrassments of Governor Stuyvesant.
Embassage to Hartford.
The Repulse.
Peril of New Netherland.
Memorial to the Fatherland.
New Outbreak on Long Island.
John Scott and his Highhanded Measures.
Strengthening the Fortifications.


CHAPTER XIII.—HOSTILE MEASURES COMMENCED.
John Scott and his Movements.
Losses of the Dutch.
The First General Assembly.
Action of the Home Government.
Peace with the Indians.
Arrest of John Scott.
Governor Winthrop's Visit to Long Island.
Sailing of the Fleet.
Preparations for War.
The False Dispatches.
Arrival of the Fleet.
The Summons to Surrender.


CHAPTER XIV.—THE CAPTURE OF NEW AMSTERDAM.
The Approach of the Fleet.
The Governor Unjustly Censured.
The Flag of Truce.
The Haughty Response.
The Remonstrance.
The Defenceless City.
The Surrender.
The Expedition to the Delaware.
Sack and Plunder.
Change of Name.
Testimony to the Dutch Government.
Death of the Governor.
His Farm, or Bouwerie.
War Between Holland and England.
New York Menaced by the Dutch.


CHAPTER XV.—THE FINAL SURRENDER.
The Summons.
The Bombardment.
Disembarkation of the Land Force.
Indecision of Captain Manning.
The Surrender.
Short Administration of the Dutch.
Social Customs.
The Tea Party.
Testimony of Travellers.
Visit to Long Island.
Fruitfulness of the Country.
Exploration of Manhattan Island.


CHAPTER XVI.—THE OLDEN TIME.
Wealth and Rank of the Ancient Families.
Their Vast Landed Estates.
Distinctions in Dress.
Veneration for the Patroon.
Kip's Mansion.
Days of the Revolution.
Mr. John Adams' Journal.
Negro Slavery.
Consequences of the System.
General Panic.



VII. BENJAMIN FRANKLIN
AMERICAN PIONEERS AND PATRIOTS.
Benjamin Franklin.

A PICTURE OF THE

STRUGGLES OF OUR INFANT NATION,

ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO.
BY
JOHN S. C. ABBOTT.

“Print me as I am.”—Cromwell.
CONTENTS.
CHAPTER I.
Parentage and Early Life.
  	PAGE
The parentage of Franklin—His parents emigrate to America—Character of his father—Abiah Folger, his mother—Birth and baptism—Influence of his Uncle Strong—Of the Whistle—Childish exploits—Uncongenial employment—Skill in swimming—Early reading—Boston at that time—An indentured apprentice—Form of Indenture—Enters a printing office—Fondness for reading—Anecdotes—Habits of study—Fondness for argument—Adopts a vegetable diet—The two creeds.
	11

CHAPTER II.
Developments of Character.
Views of the Sabbath—Writings of Collins and Shaftsbury—The creed of Collins—Franklin at sixteen—The Courant—Denunciations of the paper—Franklin’s mode of acquiring the art of composition—His success as a writer—The Editor prosecuted—Benjamin becomes Editor and Publisher—Jealousy of his brother—The runaway apprentice—The voyage to New York—Great disappointment—Eventful Journey to Philadelphia—Gloomy prospects—The dawn of brighter days.
	31

CHAPTER III.
Excursion to England.
Attention to dress—Receives a visit from Gov. Keith—His visit to Boston—Collins returns to Philadelphia with him—Sir William Keith’s aid—Excursions on the Sabbath—Difficulty with Collins—Spending Mr. Vernon’s money—His three friends—Engagement with Deborah Read—Voyage to England—Keith’s deceit—Ralph—Franklin enters a printing house in London.
	52

CHAPTER IV.
Mental and Moral Conflicts.
Faithfulness to work—Neglect of Deborah Read—Treatise on Liberty and Necessity—Skill in swimming—Return to America—Marriage of Miss Read—Severe sickness—Death of Mr. Denham—Returns to Keimer’s employ—The Junto—His Epitaph—Reformation of his treatise on Liberty and Necessity—Franklin’s creed.
	75

CHAPTER V.
The Dawn of Prosperity.
Franklin takes a house—His first job—His industry—Plans a Newspaper—Enters the list as a writer—Advocates a Paper currency—Purchases Keimer’s paper—Character of Meredith—Struggles of the firm—Unexpected assistance—Dissolves partnership with Meredith—Franklin’s energetic conduct—His courtship, and marriage—Character of Mrs. Franklin—Increase of luxury—Plans for a library—Prosperity of Pennsylvania—Customs in Philadelphia—Style of dress in 1726—Franklin’s social position in Philadelphia—His success—A hard student.
	101

CHAPTER VI.
Religious and Philosophic Views.
Studious habits—New religion—Personal habits—Church of the Free and Easy—His many accomplishments—The career of Hemphall—Birth and Death of Franklin’s son—The Ministry of Whitefield—Remarkable friendship between the philosopher and the preacher—Prosperity of Franklin—His convivial habits—The defense of Philadelphia—Birth of a daughter—The Philadelphia Academy.
	126

CHAPTER VII.
The Tradesman becomes a Philosopher.
Franklin appointed Indian commissioner—Effects of Rum—Indian logic—Accumulating honors—Benevolent enterprises—Franklin’s counsel to Tennent—Efforts for city improvement—Anecdotes—Franklin appointed postmaster—Rumors of War—England enlists the Six Nations in her cause—Franklin plans a Confederacy of States—Plans rejected—Electrical experiments—Franklin’s increase of income—Fearful experiments—The kite—New honors—Views of the French philosopher—Franklin’s Religious views—His counsel to a young pleader—Post-office Reforms.
	147

CHAPTER VIII.
The Rising Storms of War.
Aristocracy—Anecdote—Conflicting laws of Nations—Franklin’s scheme of colonization—Proposal of the British Court—The foresight of Franklin—Braddock’s campaign—Remonstrances of Franklin and Washington—Franklin’s interviews with Braddock—Franklin’s efficiency—Confidence of Braddock—The conflict with the Proprietaries—The non-resistant Quakers—Fate of the Moravian villages—The winter campaign—The camp of Gaudenhutton—Anecdote—Renewal of the strife with the Proprietaries—Franklin recalled to assist the Assembly—Destruction of the Fort—Claim of the Proprietaries—The great controversy.
	168

CHAPTER IX.
Franklin’s Mission to England.
New marks of respect—Lord Loudoun—Gov. Denny and Franklin—Visit the Indians—Franklin commissioner to England—His constant good nature—Loudoun’s delays—Wise action of an English captain—The voyagers land at Falmouth—Journey to London—Franklin’s style of living in London—His electrical experiments—He teaches the Cambridge professor—Complimentary action of St. Andrews—Gov. Denny displaced, and dark clouds arising—Franklin’s successful diplomacy—His son appointed Governor of New Jersey—Great opposition—The homeward voyage—Savage horrors—Retaliating cruelties—Franklin’s efforts in behalf of the Moravian Indians.
	190

CHAPTER X.
Franklin’s Second Mission to England.
Fiendish conduct of John Penn—Petition to the crown—Debt of England—Two causes of conflict—Franklin sent to England—His embarkation—Wise counsel to his daughter—The stamp act—American resolves—Edmund Burke—Examination of Franklin—Words of Lord Chatham—Dangers to English operatives—Repeal of the stamp act—Joy in America—Ross Mackay—New taxes levied—Character of George III—Accumulation of honors to Franklin—Warlike preparations—Human conscientiousness—Unpopularity of William Franklin—Marriage of Sarah Franklin—Franklin’s varied investigations—Efforts to civilize the Sandwich Islands.
	215

CHAPTER XI.
The Intolerance of King and Court.
Parties in England—Franklin the favorite of the opposition—Plans of the Tories—Christian III—Letter of Franklin—Dr. Priestley—Parisian courtesy—Louis XV—Visit to Ireland—Attempted alteration of the Prayer Book—Letter to his son—Astounding letters from America—Words of John Adams—Petition of the Assembly—Violent conspiracy against Franklin—His bearing in the court-room—Wedderburn’s infamous charges—Letter of Franklin—Bitter words of Dr. Johnson—Morals of English lords—Commercial value of the Colonies—Dangers threatening Franklin.
	240

CHAPTER XII.
The Bloodhounds of War Unleashed.
The mission of Josiah Quincy—Love of England by the Americans—Petition to the king—Sickness and death of Mrs. Franklin—Lord Chatham—His speech in favor of the colonists—Lord Howe—His interview with Franklin—Firmness of Franklin—His indignation—His mirth—Franklin’s fable—He embarks for Philadelphia—Feeble condition of the colonies—England’s expressions of contempt—Franklin’s reception at Philadelphia—His letter to Edmund Burke—Post-office arrangements—Defection and conduct of William Franklin—His arrest.
	265

CHAPTER XIII.
Progress of the War, both of Diplomacy and
the Sword.
Letter of Henry Laurens—Franklin visits the army before Boston—Letter of Mrs. Adams—Burning of Falmouth—Franklin’s journey to Montreal—The Declaration of Independence—Anecdote of the Hatter—Framing the Constitution—Lord Howe’s Declaration—Franklin’s reply—The Conference—Encouraging letter from France—Franklin’s embassy to France—The two parties in France—The voyage—The reception in France.
	292

CHAPTER XIV.
The Struggles of Diplomacy.
Anecdote of Gibbon—John Adams—Residence at Passy—Lafayette introduced—Cruise of the Reprisal—Paul Jones—Capture of Burgoyne—Alliance with France—Anecdote of the Cake—Excitement in England—Franklin’s introduction to the king—Joy in America—Extraordinary letter of Count Wissenstein—The reply—Injustice to Paul Jones—French troops in America—Character of John Adams—Franklin’s mature views of human nature—Anecdote of the Angel—Capture of Cornwallis—Its effect in England—Prejudices of Mr. Jay—Testimony of Dr. Sparks—Jealousy of Franklin—Shrewd diplomatic act—The treaty signed.
	322

CHAPTER XV.
Life’s Closing Scenes.
Advice to Thomas Paine—Scenes at Passy—Journey to the Coast—Return to America—Elected Governor of Pennsylvania—Attends the Constitutional Convention—Proposes prayers—Remarkable speech—Letter to Dr. Stiles—Christ on the Cross—Last sickness and death.
	356



VIII. GEORGE WASHINGTON

AMERICAN PIONEERS AND PATRIOTS.
George Washington;
OR,
Life in America One Hundred Years Ago.

BY
JOHN S. C. ABBOTT.
CONTENTS
  	PAGE
PREFACE. 	3
CHAPTER I.
The Youth of George Washington. 	9
CHAPTER II.
The First Military Expedition. 	44
CHAPTER III.
The French War. 	78
CHAPTER IV.
The Warrior, the Statesman, and the Planter. 	108
CHAPTER V.
The Gathering Storm of War. 	138
CHAPTER VI.
The Conflict Commenced. 	170
CHAPTER VII.
Progress of the War. 	202
CHAPTER VIII.
The Siege of Boston. 	232
CHAPTER IX.
The War in New York. 	264
CHAPTER X.
The Vicissitudes of War. 	295
CHAPTER XI.
The Loss of Philadelphia, and the Capture of Burgoyne. 	325
CHAPTER XII.
Concluding Scenes. 	341



IX. DANIEL BOONE
DANIEL BOONE

THE

PIONEER OF KENTUCKY.
BY
JOHN S. C. ABBOTT.
CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.

The Discovery and early Settlement of America.

Discovery of the New World.—Of Florida.—Conquest and cruelties of De Soto.—The Wigwam.—Colony at St. Mary.—Sir Walter Raleigh and his Colonies.—Grant of King James.—Settlements in the Virginia.—Adventures of John Smith.—Arrival of Lord Delaware.—Terrible massacres.—Pressures of Colonists to the West.—Doherty Trade with Indians.—Attempted Colony on the Tennessee.—Daniel Boone. Page 9

CHAPTER II.

Daniel Boone, his Parentage, and early Adventures.

Trials of the Colonists.—George Boone and his home.—Squire Boone.—Birth and character of Daniel Boone.—His limited education.—A pioneer's camp.—A log house and furnishings.—Annoyance of Boone on the arrival of Scotch emigrants.—His longings for adventure.—Camp meetings.—Frontier life.—Sports.—Squirrel hunting.—Snuffing the candle. 36

CHAPTER III.

Louisiana, its Discovery and Vicissitudes.

Louisiana, and its eventful history.—The expedition of De Soto.—The Missionary Marquette.—His voyage on the Upper Mississippi.—The Expedition of La Salle.—Michilimackinac.—Its History.—Fate of the "Griffin."—Grief of La Salle.—His voyage of Discovery.—Sale of Louisiana to the United States.—Remarks of Napoleon. 74

CHAPTER IV.

Camp Life Beyond the Alleghanies.

John Finley and his adventures.—Aspect of the Country.—Boone's Private Character.—His Love for the Wilderness.—First view of Kentucky.—Emigrants' Dress.—Hunter's Home.—Capture of Boone and Stewart by the Indians.—Their Escape.—Singular Incident. 89

CHAPTER V.

Indian Warfare.

Alleghany Ridges.—Voyage in a canoe.—Speech of Logan.—Battle at the Kanawha.—Narrative of Francis Marion.—Important commission of Boone.—Council at Circleville.—Treaty of Peace.—Imlay's description of Kentucky.—Settlement right.—Richard Henderson.—Boone's letter.—Fort at Boonesborough. 109

CHAPTER VI.

Sufferings of the Pioneers.

Emigration to Boonesborough.—New Perils.—Transylvania Company.—Beneficence of its Laws—Interesting incident.—Infamous conduct of Great Britain.—Attack on the Fort.—Reinforcements.—Simon Kenton and his Sufferings.—Mrs. Harvey. 129

CHAPTER VII.

Life in the Wilderness.

Stewart killed by the Indians.—Squire Boone returns to the Settlements.—Solitary Life of Daniel Boone.—Return of Squire Boone.—Extended and Romantic Explorations.—Charms and Perils of the Wilderness.—The Emigrant Party.—The Fatal Ambuscade.—Retreat of the Emigrants.—Solitude of the Wilderness.—Expedition of Lewis and Clarke.—Extraordinary Adventures of Cotter. 151

CHAPTER VIII.

Captivity and Flight.

Heroism of Thomas Higgins and of Mrs. Pursley.—Affairs at Boonesborough.—Continued Alarms.—Need of Salt.—Its Manufacture.—Indian Schemes.—Capture of Boone and twenty-seven men.—Dilemma of the British at Detroit.—Blackfish adopts Colonel Boone.—Adoption Ceremony.—Indian Designs.—Escape of Boone.—Attacks the Savages.—The Fort Threatened. 182

CHAPTER IX.

Victories and Defeats.

Situation of the Fort.—Indian Treachery.—Bombardment.—Boone goes to North Carolina.—New Trials.—Boone Robbed.—He returns to Kentucky.—Massacre of Colonel Rogers.—Adventure of Col. Bowman.—New Attack by the British and Indians.—Retaliatory Measures.—Wonderful Exploit. 209

CHAPTER X.

British Allies.

Death of Squire Boone.—Indian Outrages.—Gerty and McGee.—Battle of Blue Lick.—Death of Isaac Boone.—Colonel Boone's Narrow Escape.—Letter of Daniel Boone.—Determination of General Clarke.—Discouragement of the Savages.—Amusing Anecdote of Daniel Boone. 230

CHAPTER XI.

Kentucky organized as a State.

Peace with England.—Order of a Kentucky Court.—Anecdotes.—Speech of Mr. Dalton.—Reply of Piankashaw.—Renewed Indications of Indian Hostility.—Conventions at Danville.—Kentucky formed into a State.—New Trials for Boone. 249

CHAPTER XII.

Adventures Romantic and Perilous.

The Search for the Horse.—Navigating the Ohio.—Heroism of Mrs. Rowan.—Lawless Gangs.—Exchange of Prisoners.—Boone Revisits the Home of his Childhood.—The Realms beyond the Mississippi.—Habits of the Hunters.—Corn.—Boone's Journey to the West. 271

CHAPTER XIII.

A New Home.

Colonel Boone welcomed by the Spanish Authorities.—Boone's Narrative to Audubon.—The Midnight Attack.—Pursuit of the Savages.—Sickness in the Wilderness.—Honesty of Colonel Boone.—Payment of his Debts.—Loss of all his Property. 292

CHAPTER XIV.

Conclusion.

Colonel Boone Appeals to Congress.—Complimentary Resolutions of the Legislature of Kentucky.—Death of Mrs. Boone.—Catholic Liberality.—Itinerant Preachers.—Grant by Congress to Colonel Boone.—The Evening of his Days.—Personal Appearance.—Death and Burial.—Transference of the Remains of Mr. and Mrs. Boone to Frankfort, Kentucky. 320



X. CHRISTOPHER CARSON
AMERICAN PIONEERS AND PATRIOTS
CHRISTOPHER CARSON
FAMILIARLY KNOWN
AS
KIT CARSON
The Pioneer of the West.
BY
JOHN S. C. ABBOTT
WITH ILLUSTRATIONS BY ELEANOR GREATOREX
CONTENTS.
PREFACE.
CONTENTS.
CHAPTER I.
Early Training.
	Page
Birth of Christopher Carson.—Perils of the Wilderness.—Necessary Cautions.—Romance of the Forest.—The Far West.—The Encampment.—The Cabin and the Fort.—Kit an Apprentice.—The Alarm.—Destruction of a Trading Band.—The Battle and the Flight.—Sufferings of the Fugitives.—Dreadful Fate of Mr. Schenck.—Features of the Western Wilderness.—The March. 	9
CHAPTER II.
Life in the Wilderness.
A Surgical Operation.—A Winter with Kin Cade.—Study of the Languages and Geography.—Return towards Missouri.—Engagement with a new Company and Strange Adventures.—The Rattlesnake.—Anecdote of Kit Carson.—The Sahara.—New Engagements.—Trip to El Paso.—Trapping and Hunting.—Prairie Scenery.—The Trapper's Outfit.—Night Encampment.—Testimony of an Amateur Hunter. 	29
CHAPTER III.
Among the Trappers.
The Discomfited Trappers.—The New Party Organized.—A Battle with the Indians.—Trapping on the Colorado.—March to the Sacramento.—The Friendly Indians.—Crossing the Desert.—Instinct of the Mule.—The Enchanting Valley of the Colorado.—The Mission of San Gabriel.—Vast Herds of Cattle.—The Mission of San Fernando.—Adventures in the Valley of San Joaquin.—The Meeting of two Trapping Bands.—Reasons for Kit Carson's Celebrity.—A Military Expedition.—The Indian Horse Thieves.—The Pursuit and Capture. 	51
CHAPTER IV.
Conflicts with the Indians.
The American Trapper.—The Trapper of the Hudson's Bay Company.—The Return Trip.—Polished Life in the Wilderness.—The Spanish Gentlemen.—Council of the Trappers.—Self-possession of Kit Carson.—The Camp Cleared of Intruders.—Robbing the Robbers.—Sale of the Furs.—Mr. Fitzpatrick's Expedition.—Pains and Pleasures of Rocky Mountain Life.—Pursuit of Indian Horse Thieves.—Extraordinary Battle. 	72
CHAPTER V.
Marches and Encampments.
The Encampment Among the Rocky Mountains.—The Attempted Stampede.—Retreat and Pursuit by the Savages.—The Alarm.—Loss of the Horses.—Their Recovery.—Enterprise of Kit Carson.—Fight with the Indians.—The Litter for the Wounded.—Union of the two Trapping Parties.—Successful Return to Taos.—Carson joins a Trading Party.—Chivalric Adventures.—Attacked by Bears. 	94
CHAPTER VI.
The Rendezvous.
Fair in the Wilderness.—The Encampment.—Dispersion of the Trappers.—Hostility of the Blackfeet.—Camp on the Big Snake River.—The Blackfeet Marauders.—The Pursuit.—The Calumet.—The Battle.—Kit Carson wounded.—The Rencontre with Shunan.—The Defeat and Humiliation of Shunan.—Remarkable Modesty of Carson.—Testimony to Mr. Carson's Virtues. 	121
CHAPTER VII.
War with the Blackfeet Indians.
Unsuccessful Trapping.—Disastrous March to Fort Hall.—The Feast upon Horse-flesh.—The Hunting Expedition.—Its Rare Attractions.—Dogged by the Blackfeet.—Safe Arrival at the Fort.—All their Animals Stolen by the Indians.—Expedition to the Blackfeet Country.—Winter Quarters with the Friendly Indians.—Sufferings of the Animals.—Return to the Blackfeet Country.—Battle with the Indians.—Incidents of the Battle. 	141
CHAPTER VIII.
Encampments and Battles.
The Renewal of the Battle.—Peculiarities of the Fight.—The Rout.—Encampment in the Indian Village.—Number of Trappers among the Mountains.—The New Rendezvous.—Picturesque Scene of the Encampment.—The Missionary and the Nobleman.—Brown's Hole.—The Navajoes.—Kit Carson Purveyor at the Fort.—Trapping at the Black Hills.—Again upon the Yellowstone.—Pleasant Winter Quarters.—Signs of the Indians.—Severe Conflict.—Reappearance of the Indians.—Their utter Discomfiture. 	160
CHAPTER IX.
The Trapper's Elysium.
Trapping on the Missouri.—Attacked by the Blackfeet.—The Battle.—Persevering Hostility of the Indians.—The Trappers driven from the Country.—Repair to the North Fork.—Cheerful Encampments.—Enchanting Scene.—Village of the Flatheads.—The Blessings of Peace.—Carson's Knowledge of Languages.—Pleasant Winter Quarters on the Big Snake River.—Successful Trapping.—Winter at Brown's Hole.—Trip to Fort Bent.—Peculiar Characters.—Williams and Mitchel.—Hunter at Fort Bent.—Marriage.—Visit to the States. 	179
CHAPTER X.
Fremont's Expedition.
Carson's Visit to his Childhood's Home.—On the Steamer.—Introduction to Fremont.—Object of Fremont's Expedition.—Joins the Expedition.—Organization of the Party.—The Encampment.—Enchanting View.—Fording the Kansas.—The Stormy Night.—The Boys on Guard.—The Alarm.—The Returning Trappers.—The Homeless Adventurer.—Three Indians join the Party.—First sight of the Buffaloes.—The Chase. 	197
CHAPTER XI.
The Return of the Expedition.
Beautiful Prairie Scene.—Fate of the Buffalo Calf.—Vast Buffalo Herds.—The Fourth of July on the Plains.—Journey up the South Fork of the Platte.—Visit to Fort St. Vrain.—Remonstrance of the Chiefs.—Second Marriage of Mr. Carson.—New Engagements.—Perilous Ride to Santa Fe.—The Successful Mission.—The Noble Mexican Boy.—Conflict with the Savages.—Discomfiture of the Indians.—Fremont's Second Expedition.—Carson joins the Party.—Course of the Expedition.—Arrival at the Great Salt Lake. 	217
CHAPTER XII.
Marches and Battles.
Entering the Lake.—Dangerous Navigation.—The Return to Camp.—Feast upon Horse Flesh.—Meeting the Indians.—Joyful Meeting.—Return to Fort Hall.—Feasting at the Fort.—The Party Diminished.—The Journey down Snake River.—Crossing the Sierra Nevada.—Carson Rescues Fremont.—Fort Sutter.—Heroic Achievement of Carson.—Disbanding the Party.—The third Expedition.—Crossing the Desert.—Threatened by the Mexicans.—Fight with the Indians.—The Surprise.—Chastisement of the Indians. 	236
CHAPTER XIII.
The Dispatch Bearer.
Colonel Fremont.—Hazardous Undertaking of Kit Carson.—Carson's Courage and Prudence.—Threatened Danger.—Interview with General Kearney, and Results.—Severe Skirmish.—Wonderful Escape of Carson.—Daring Adventure.—Fearful Suffering.—Lieutenant Beale.—Carson's Journey to Washington.—Adventures on his Return. 	255
CHAPTER XIV.
The Chivalry of the Wilderness.
Injustice of the Government.—Heroic Resolve of Mr. Carson.—Indian Outrages.—The valley of Razado.—Barbaric Murders by Apaches.—An Exciting Chase.—An Attractive Picture.—Plot of Fox Overthrown.—Gift of Messrs. Brevoort and Weatherhead.—Adventure with the Cheyennes. 	272
CHAPTER XV.
Recollections of Mountain Life.
Character of the Native Indian.—The Caravan.—Interesting Incident.—Effects of Cholera.—Commission of Joe Smith.—Snow on the Mountains.—Government Appointment.—Adventure with three Bears.—Journey to Los Angelos.—Mt. St. Bernardino.—The Spring.—Character of Men.—Insubordination Quelled.—Suffering for Water and Relief.—A Talk with Indians. 	286
CHAPTER XVI.
Recollections of Mountain Life.
Position of The Spring.—The Cachè.—Kit Carson's Character and Appearance.—Cool Bravery of a Mountain Trapper.—Untamed Character of Many Hunters.—The Surveyor's Camp in an Indian Territory.—Terrors from Indians.—Joe Walker.—A Mountain Man.—Soda Lake.—Optical Illusion.—Camp on Beaver Lake.—The Piyute Chief.—Conversation with Him.—An Alarm.—A Battle. 	306
CHAPTER XVII.
Frontier Desperadoes and Savage Ferocity.
Original Friendliness of the Indians.—The River Pirates, Culbert and Magilbray.—Capture of Beausoliel.—His Rescue by the Negro Cacasotte.—The Cave in the Rock.—The Robber Mason.—His Assassination.—Fate of the Assassins.—Hostility of the Apaches.—Expedition of Lieutenant Davidson.—Carson's Testimony in his Favor.—Flight of the Apaches. 	322
CHAPTER XVIII.
The Last Days of Kit Carson.
The Hunting Party.—Profits of Sheep Raising.—Governmental Appointment.—Carson's Talk with the Apaches.—His Home in Taos.—His Character.—Death of Christopher Carson. 	337
CHAPTER XIX.
The Last Hours of Kit Carson.



XI. ADMIRAL JOHN PAUL JONES
THE LIFE AND ADVENTURES OF REAR-ADMIRAL JOHN PAUL JONES
BY JOHN S. C. ABBOTT.
CONTENTS
CHAPTER I.
  	PAGE
The Early Life of John Paul Jones.

His Birth and Childhood.-Residence and Employments in Scotland.-His Studious Habits.-First Voyage to America.-Engaged in the Slave Trade.-Reasons for Abandoning it.-False Charges against him.-His Sensitiveness to Obloquy.-Espouses the Cause of the Colonies.-Developments of Character.-Extracts from his Letters. 	9

CHAPTER II.
The Infant Navy.

Rescuing the Brigantine.-Commissioned as Captain.-Escape from the Solway.-Conflict with the Milford.-Adventures at Canso and Madame.-Return with Prizes.-Expedition to Cape Breton.-Wise Counsel of Jones.-Brilliant Naval Campaign.-Saving the Prizes.-Value of the Mellish.-Mission to France.-Disappointment.-Sails with the Ranger. 	32

CHAPTER III.
Bearding the British Lion.

Aid from France.-Plan for the Destruction of the British Fleet.-The American Flag Saluted.-Bold Movement of Captain Jones.-Cruise along the Shores of England.-Capture of Prizes.-Salutary Lessons given to England.-Operations in the Frith of Clyde.-At Carrickfergus.-Attempt upon the Drake.-Burning the Shipping at Whitehaven.-Capture of the Plate of Lord Selkirk. 	56


viiiCHAPTER IV.
Captain Jones at Nantes and at Brest.

Correspondence with Lord Selkirk.-Terrible Battle with the ship Drake.-Capture of the ship.-Carnage on board the Drake.-Generosity to Captured Fishermen.-Insubordination of Lieutenant Simpson.-Embarrassments of Captain Jones.-Hopes and Disappointments.-Proofs of Unselfish Patriotism.-Letter to the King of France.-Anecdote of Poor Richard. 	78


CHAPTER V.
Cruise of the Bon Homme Richard.

Plans of Lafayette.-Correspondence.-Humane Instructions of Franklin.-Proposed Invasion of England.-Sailing of the Squadron.-Conduct of Pierre Landais.-The Collision.-Adventures of the Cruise.-Insane Actions of Landais.-Plan for Capture.-Plan for the Capture of Leith and Edinburgh. 	100


CHAPTER VI.
The Bon Homme Richard and the Serapis.

Leith Threatened.-The Summons.-Remarkable Prayer.-Wide-spread Alarm.-Continuation of the Cruise.-Insubordination of Landais.-Successive Captures.-Terrible Battle between the Bon Homme Richard and the Serapis.-The Great Victory. 	123


CHAPTER VII.
Result of the Victory.

ixDreadful Spectacle.-Sinking of the Bon Homme Richard.-Escape of the Baltic Fleet.-Sails for the Texel.-Interesting Correspondence.-Sufferings of the American Prisoners.-Barbarity of the English Government.-Humanity of Captain Jones.-The Transference from the Serapis to the Alliance.-Extracts from the British Press.-Release of Prisoners. 	148


CHAPTER VIII.
Commodore Jones at Court.

Offer of a Privateersman.-Indignant Reply.-The Renown of Commodore Jones.-Successful Retreat.-Cruise through the Channel.-Poetic Effusion.-Enters Corunna.-Letter to Lafayette.-Embarrassed Finances of Franklin.-Intrigues of Landais.-His Efforts to Excite Mutiny.-Testimony against him.-Commodore Jones at Court. 	172


CHAPTER IX.
The Mutiny of Landais.

The Visit of Jones to Versailles.-Intrigues of Landais.-The Alliance Wrested from Jones.-Complicity of Arthur Lee.-Magnanimity of Jones.-Strong Support of Dr. Johnson.-Honors Conferred upon Jones.-Strange Career of Landais.-His Life in America, and Death.-Continued Labors and Embarrassments of Jones.-His Correspondence. 	193


CHAPTER X.
The Return to America.

Fitting the Ariel.-Painful Delays.-The Sailing.-Terrible Tempest.-The Disabled Ship.-Puts back to L'Orient.-The Second Departure.-Meets the Triumph.-Bloody Naval Battle.-Perfidious Escape of the Triumph.-The Ariel Reaches America.-Honors Lavished upon Jones.-Appointed to Build and Command the America.-Great Skill Displayed.-The Ship given to France.-The Launch. 	214

xCHAPTER XI.
The War Ended.

Promise of the South Carolina.-A New Disappointment.-The Great Expedition Planned.-Magnitude of the Squadron.-The Appointed Rendezvous.-Commodore Jones Joins the Expedition.-His Cordial Reception.-Great Difficulties and Embarrassments.-The Rendezvous at Port Cabella.-Tidings of Peace.-Return to America.-New Mission to France. 	236


CHAPTER XII.
The Difficulties of Diplomacy.

Courteous Reception in Paris.-Compliment of the King.-Principles of Prize Division.-Embarrassing Questions.-Interesting Correspondence.-The Final Settlement.-Modest Claims of Commodore Jones.-Plan for a Commercial Speculation.-Its Failure.-The Mission to Denmark.-Return to America. 	258


CHAPTER XIII.
The Mission to Denmark.

Letter to Mr. Jefferson.-The Marquise de Marsan.-Unfounded Charges and Vindication.-Flattering Application from Catherine II.-His Reception at the Polish Court.-Jones receives the Title of Rear-Admiral.-English Insolence.-Letter of Catherine II. 	280


CHAPTER XIV.
The Russian Campaign.

xiAdmiral Jones repairs to the Black Sea.-Designs of Catherine II.-Imposing Cavalcade.-Turkey Declares War against Russia.-Daring Conduct of Admiral Jones.-A Greek Officer AlexianoAlexiano.-The Prince of Nassau Siegen.-Annoyances of Admiral Jones from Russian Officers.-Battle in the Black Sea.-Jones yields the Honor to the Prince of Nassau. 	298


CHAPTER XV.
Adventures in the Black Sea.

The First Battle.-Folly of the Prince of Nassau.-Inefficiency of the Gun-boats.-Burning of the Greek Captives.-Humanity of Jones.-Alienation between the Admiral and the Prince of Nassau.-The Second Conflict.-Annoyances of the Admiral.-Hostility of the English.-Necessary Employment of Foreign Seamen.-Disgrace of Nassau.-Transference of the Admiral to the Baltic. 	316


CHAPTER XVI.
Retirement and Death.

The Return to Cherson.-Sickness and Sadness.-Oczakow Stormed.-The Wintry Journey to St. Petersburg.-Mental Activity.-Calumniated by the English.-The Admiral's Defence.-Slanderous Accusation.-His Entire Acquittal.-Testimony of Count Segur.-Letter to the Empress.-Obtains Leave of Absence.-Returns to France.-Life in Paris.-Sickness and Death. 	337



XII. DAVID CROCKETT



AMERICAN PIONEERS AND PATRIOTS.



DAVID CROCKETT:


HIS
LIFE AND ADVENTURES


BY
JOHN S. C. ABBOTT



ILLUSTRATED.



CONTENTS
CHAPTER I.
Parentage and Childhood.

The Emigrant.—Crossing the Alleghanies.—The Boundless Wilderness.—The Hut on the Holston.—Life's Necessaries.—The Massacre.—Birth of David Crockett.—Peril of the Boys.—Anecdote.—Removal to Greenville; to Cove Creek.—Increased Emigration.—Loss of the Mill.—The Tavern.—Engagement with the Drover.—Adventures in the Wilderness.—Virtual Captivity.—The Escape.—The Return.—The Runaway.—New Adventures. . . . 7
CHAPTER II.
Youthful Adventures.

David at Gerardstown.—Trip to Baltimore.—Anecdotes.—He ships for London.—Disappointment.—Defrauded of his Wages.—Escapes.—New Adventures.—Crossing the River.—Returns Home.—His Reception.—A Farm Laborer.—Generosity to his Father.—Love Adventure.—The Wreck of his Hopes.—His School Education.—Second Love adventure.—Bitter Disappointment.—Life in the Backwoods.—Third Love Adventure. . . . 35
CHAPTER III.
Marriage and Settlement.

Rustic Courtship.—The Rival Lover.—Romantic Incident. The Purchase of a Horse.—The Wedding.—Singular Ceremonies.—The Termagant.—Bridal Days.—They commence Housekeeping.—The Bridal mansion and Outfit.—Family Possessions.—The Removal to Central Tennessee.—Mode of Transportation.—The New Income and its Surroundings.—Busy Idleness.—The Third Move.—The Massacre at Fort Mimms. . . . 54
CHAPTER IV.
The Soldier Life.

War with the Creeks.—Patriotism of Crockett.—Remonstrances of his Wife.—Enlistment.—The Rendezvous.—Adventure of the Scouts.—Friendly Indians,—A March through the Forest.—Picturesque Scene.—The Midnight Alarm.—March by Moonlight.—Chagrin of Crockett.—Advance into Alabama.—War's Desolations.—Indian Stoicism.—Anecdotes of Andrew Jackson.—Battles, Carnage, and Woe. . . . 93
CHAPTER V.
Indian Warfare.

The Army at Fort Strother.—Crockett's Regiment.—Crockett at Home.—His Reenlistment.—Jackson Surprised.—Military Ability of the Indians.—Humiliation of the Creeks.—March to Florida.—Affairs at Pensacola.—Capture of the City.—Characteristics of Crockett.—The Weary March,—Inglorious Expedition.—Murder of Two Indians.—Adventures at the Island.—The Continued March.—Severe Sufferings.—Charge upon the Uninhabited Village. . . . 124
CHAPTER VI.
The Camp and the Cabin.

Deplorable Condition of the Army.—Its wanderings.—Crockett's Benevolence.—Cruel Treatment of the Indians.—A Gleam of Good Luck.—The Joyful Feast.—Crockett's Trade with the Indian.—Visit to the Old Battlefield.—Bold Adventure of Crockett.—His Arrival Home.—Death of his Wife.—Second Marriage.—Restlessness.—Exploring Tour.—Wild Adventures.—Dangerous Sickness.—Removal to the West.—His New Home. . . . 155
CHAPTER VII.
The Justice of Peace and the Legislator.

Vagabondage.—Measures of Protection.—Measures of Government.—Crockett's Confession.—A Candidate for Military Honors.—Curious Display of Moral Courage.—The Squirrel Hunt.—A Candidate for the Legislature.—Characteristic Electioneering.—Specimens of his Eloquence.—Great Pecuniary Calamity.—Expedition to the Far West.—Wild Adventures.—The Midnight Carouse.—A Cabin Reared. . . . 183
CHAPTER VIII.
Life on the Obion.

Hunting Adventures.—The Voyage up the River.—Scenes in the Cabin.—Return Home.—Removal of the Family.—Crockett's Riches.—A Perilous Enterprise.—Reasons for his Celebrity.—Crockett's Narrative.—A Bear-Hunt.—Visit to Jackson.—Again a Candidate for the Legislature.—Electioneering and Election. . . . 212
CHAPTER IX.
Adventures in the Forest, on the River, and in the City

The Bear Hunter's Story.—Service in the Legislature.—Candidate for Congress.—Electioneering.—The New Speculation.—Disastrous Voyage.—Narrow Escape.—New Electioneering Exploits.—Odd Speeches.—The Visit to Crockett's Cabin.—His Political Views.—His Honesty.—Opposition to Jackson.—Scene at Raleigh.—Dines with the President.—Gross Caricature.—His Annoyance. . . . 240
CHAPTER X.
Crockett's Tour to the North and the East.

His Reelection to Congress.—The Northern Tour.—First Sight of a Railroad.—Reception in Philadelphia.—His First Speech.—Arrival in New York.—The Ovation there.—Visit to Boston.—Cambridge and Lowell.—Specimens of his Speeches.—Expansion of his Ideas.—Rapid Improvement. . . . 267
CHAPTER XI.
The Disappointed Politician.—Off for Texas.

Triumphal Return.—Home Charms Vanish.—Loses His Election.—Bitter Disappointment.—Crockett's Poetry.—Sets out for Texas.—Incidents of the Journey.—Reception at Little Rock.—The Shooting Match.—Meeting a Clergyman.—The Juggler.—Crockett a Reformer.—The Bee Hunter.—The Rough Strangers.—Scene on the Prairie. . . . 290
CHAPTER XII.
Adventures on the Prairie.

Disappearance of the Bee Hunter.—The Herd of Buffalo Crockett lost.—The Fight with the Cougar.—Approach of Savages.—Their Friendliness.—Picnic on the Prairie.—Picturesque Scene.—The Lost Mustang recovered.—Unexpected Reunion.—Departure of the Savages.—Skirmish with the Mexicans.—Arrival at the Alamo. . . .312
CHAPTER XIII.
Conclusion.

The Fortress of Alamo.—Colonel Bowie.—Bombardment of the Fort.—Crockett's Journal.—Sharpshooting.—Fight outside of the Fort.—Death of the Bee Hunter.—Kate of Nacogdoches.—Assault on the Citadel.—Crockett a Prisoner.—His Death. . . . 340





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