Home
  By Author [ A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z |  Other Symbols ]
  By Title [ A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z |  Other Symbols ]
  By Language
all Classics books content using ISYS

Download this book: [ ASCII ]

Look for this book on Amazon


We have new books nearly every day.
If you would like a news letter once a week or once a month
fill out this form and we will give you a summary of the books for that week or month by email.

Title: The Battle of San Jacinto and the San Jacinto Campaign
Author: Kilman, Edward Wolf, Kemp, Louis Wiltz
Language: English
As this book started as an ASCII text book there are no pictures available.
Copyright Status: Not copyrighted in the United States. If you live elsewhere check the laws of your country before downloading this ebook. See comments about copyright issues at end of book.

*** Start of this Doctrine Publishing Corporation Digital Book "The Battle of San Jacinto and the San Jacinto Campaign" ***

This book is indexed by ISYS Web Indexing system to allow the reader find any word or number within the document.



    [Illustration: THE BATTLE OF SAN JACINTO]



                             THE BATTLE OF
                              SAN JACINTO
                               _and the_
                          SAN JACINTO CAMPAIGN


    [Illustration: Flags]

                                   by
                        L. W. Kemp and Ed Kilman

                            COPYRIGHT, 1947
                                   by
                        L. W. KEMP and ED KILMAN
                            Second Printing

                Printed in the United States of America
                  The Webb Printing Co., Inc., Houston



                       The Battle of San Jacinto
                               _and the_
                          San Jacinto Campaign


                                FOREWORD

San Jacinto, birthplace of Texas liberty!... San Jacinto, one of the
world’s decisive battles!... San Jacinto, where, with cries of “Remember
the Alamo! Remember Goliad!” Sam Houston and his ragged band of 910
pioneers routed Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna, President and Dictator of
Mexico and self-styled “Napoleon of the West,” with his proud army, and
changed the map of North America!

Here is a story that has thrilled Texans for more than a century ... a
story of desperate valor and high adventure; of grim hardship, tragedy
and romance ... the story of the epochal battle that established the
independent Lone Star Republic, on April 21, 1836, and indelibly
inscribed the names of Texas patriots on history’s scroll of American
immortals.

The actual battle of San Jacinto lasted less than twenty minutes, but it
was in the making for six years. It had its prelude in the oppressive
Mexican edict of April 6, 1830, prohibiting further emigration of
Anglo-Americans from the United States to Texas; in the disturbance at
Anahuac and in the battle of Velasco, in 1832; in the imprisonment of
Stephen F. Austin, the “Father of Texas,” in Mexico in 1834.

Immediate preliminaries were the skirmish over a cannon at Gonzales, the
capture of Goliad, the “Grass Fight,” and the siege and capture of San
Antonio ... all in 1835. The Texas Declaration of Independence at
Washington-on-the-Brazos on March 2, 1836, officially signalized the
revolution.


                         RETREAT FROM GONZALES

Four days after the Declaration of Independence, news came to the
convention on the Brazos of the desperate plight of Colonel William
Barret Travis, under siege at the Alamo in San Antonio. Sam Houston,
commander-in-chief of the Texas Army, left Washington post-haste for
Gonzales, to take command of the troops there and go to the aid of
Travis. He arrived there on the 11th, and at about dark learned from two
Mexicans who had just arrived from San Antonio that the Alamo had fallen
and its 183 brave defenders massacred. This was confirmed two days later
by Mrs. Almeron Dickinson who had been released by the Mexicans after
seeing her lieutenant husband killed in the old mission. She was
trudging toward Gonzales with her babe in her arms when the Texas army
scouts found her.

The reports of the Alamo slaughter terrified the people of Gonzales.
They were panic-stricken by the general belief that Santa Anna next
would sweep eastward with his well-trained army, in a drive to wipe the
rebellious Texans from the face of the earth.

Then began the exodus of frantic colonists known to Texas history as the
“Runaway Scrape.” Men, women and children packed what belongings they
could take in wagons and carts, on horseback, or on their own backs, and
fled their homes in terror across the rain soaked country ... all moving
eastward toward the Louisiana border to escape the wrath of the
bloodthirsty Santa Anna.

General Houston, realizing that his few hundred green troops were no
match for the well-drilled hordes from Mexico, evacuated Gonzales and
had the rear guard put the town to the torch. The Texans crossed the
Colorado River on the 17th at Jesse Burnam’s, and camped there for two
days. Then the army resumed its march down the east bank to Benjamin
Beason’s crossing, some twenty miles below, near the present town of
Columbus. Camp was pitched at Beason’s on the 20th.

Had the retreating column been fifty miles farther south, the troops
might have heard the distant rumble and crackle of gunfire. On March 19,
Colonel James Walker Fannin Jr., commanding about 450 volunteers
withdrawing from Goliad toward Victoria, was defeated in battle on
Coleto Creek by General Jose Urrea’s forces of 1200 infantry and 700
cavalry. Fannin surrendered. On Palm Sunday, March 27, he and 352 of his
men were marched out on the roads near Goliad and brutally shot down, by
order of Santa Anna.


                          THE MEXICAN PURSUIT

Flushed with their Alamo victory, the Mexican forces were following the
colonists. Houston’s scouts reported that General Ramirez y Sesma and
General Adrian Woll were on the west side of the Colorado with
approximately 725 troops and General Eugenio Tolsa with 600. By this
time recruits and reinforcements had increased Houston’s army to a
strength estimated as high as 1200.

The chilling news of Fannin’s defeat, reaching the Texas forces on March
25, impelled many to leave the ranks, to remove their families beyond
the Sabine. Those remaining clamored for action, but Houston decided to
continue his retreat. On the 26th, keeping his own counsel, he marched
his army five miles. On the 27th the column reached the timbers of the
Brazos River bottoms, and on the 28th arrived at San Felipe de Austin,
on the west bank of the Brazos. On the 29th the army marched six miles
up the river in a driving rain, and camped on Mill Creek. On the 30th
after a fatiguing tramp of nine miles, the army reached a place across
the river from “Bernardo,” on one of the plantations of the wealthy
Jared E. Groce, and there camped and drilled for nearly a fortnight.[1]

When the _ad interim_ Texas government at Washington-on-the-Brazos
learned of the Mexicans’ approach, in mid-March, it fled to Harrisburg.
President David G. Burnet sent the commander-in-chief, a caustic note,
prodding him to stop his retreat and fight. Secretary of War Thomas J.
Rusk arrived at the camp April 4 at Burnet’s direction, to urge Houston
to a more aggressive course.

Houston having shown no disposition to fight, Santa Anna decided to take
possession of the coast and seaports, as a step in his plan to round up
the revolutionists. Crossing the Brazos at Fort Bend (now called
Richmond) on the 11th, the Mexican general proceeded on April 14 on the
road to Harrisburg, taking with him about 700 men and one twelve-pounder
cannon. Urrea was at Matagorda with 1200 men; Gaona was somewhere
between Bastrop and San Felipe, with 725; Sesma, at Fort Bend, with
about 1,000, and Vicente Filisola between San Felipe and Fort Bend, with
nearly 1800 men.

    [Illustration: Route of Sam Houston’s army (line of crosses) from
    San Felipe to San Jacinto, with stops at Groce’s, Donoho’s,
    McCurley’s, Burnett’s, White Oak Bayou (Houston), and Harrisburg.]

Santa Anna arrived at Harrisburg on the 15th. There he learned that the
Burnet government had gone down Buffalo Bayou to New Washington (now
Morgan’s Point), about eighteen miles southeast. Burning Harrisburg,
Santa Anna sped after them. On the 19th when he arrived at New
Washington he learned that the Texas government had fled to Galveston.
Santa Anna then set out for Anahuac, via Lynchburg.


                        THE ROAD TO SAN JACINTO

Meanwhile, on April 11th, the Texans at Groce’s received two small
cannon, known to history as the “Twin Sisters,” a gift from citizens of
Cincinnati, Ohio. Thus fortified, General Houston, after a consultation
with Rusk, decided to move on to the east side of the Brazos. The river
being very high, the steamboat “Yellow Stone” and a yawl were used to
ferry the army horses, cattle and baggage across. The movement began on
the 12th and was completed at 1 p.m. on the 13th.

On the 13th Houston ordered Major Wyly Martin, Captain Moseley Baker,
and other commanders of detachments assigned to delaying actions, to
rejoin the main army at the house of Charles Donoho, about three miles
from Groce’s. At Donoho’s the road from San Felipe to eastern Texas
crossed the road south from Groce’s.

On April 16 the army marched twelve miles to the home of Samuel McCurley
on Spring Creek, in present Harris county. The creek forms the boundary
line between Harris and Montgomery counties. Three miles beyond
McCurley’s was the home of Abram Roberts at a settlement known as “New
Kentucky.” At Roberts’ two wagon trails crossed, one leading to
Harrisburg and the other to Robbins’ Ferry on the Trinity and on to the
Sabine.

Many of his officers and men, as well as government officials, believed
that Houston’s strategy was to lead the pursuing Mexicans to the Sabine
River, the eastern border of Texas. There, it was known, were camped
United States troops under General Pendleton Gaines, with whose help the
Texans might turn on their foes and destroy them. However, on April 17,
when Roberts’ place was reached, Houston took the Harrisburg road
instead of the one toward the Louisiana line, much to the gratification
of his men. They spent the night of the 17th near the home of Matthew
Burnett on Cypress Creek, twenty miles from McCurley’s. On April 18 the
army marched twenty miles to White Oak Bayou in the Heights District of
the present city of Houston, and only about eight miles from
Harrisburg—now a part of Houston.

From two prisoners, captured by Erasmus “Deaf” Smith, the famous Texas
spy, Houston first learned that the Mexicans had burned Harrisburg and
had gone down the west side of the bayou and of San Jacinto River, and
that Santa Anna in person was in command. In his march downstream Santa
Anna had been forced to cross the bridge over Vince’s Bayou, a tributary
of Buffalo Bayou, then out of its banks. He would have to cross the same
bridge to return.

Viewing this strategic situation on the morning of the 19th, Houston
told his troops it looked as if they would soon get action. And he
admonished them to remember the massacres at San Antonio and at Goliad.

“Remember the Alamo!” The soldiers took up the cry. “Remember
Goliad!”[2]

In a letter to Henry Raguet he said:

“This morning we are in preparation to meet Santa Anna. It is the only
chance for saving Texas.”

In an address “To the People of Texas” he wrote:

“We view ourselves on the eve of battle. We are nerved for the contest,
and must conquer or perish.... We must act now or abandon all hope.”

Houston’s force crossed Buffalo Bayou to the west side, near the home of
Isaac Batterson, two and a half miles below Harrisburg, on the evening
of the 19th. Some 248 men, mostly sick and non-effective, were left with
the baggage at the camp opposite Harrisburg. The march was continued
until midnight.


                          ON THE EVE OF BATTLE

At dawn April 20 the Texans resumed their trek down the bayou, to
intercept the Mexicans. At Lynch’s ferry, near the juncture of Buffalo
Bayou and San Jacinto River, they captured a boat laden with supplies
for Santa Anna. This probably was some of the plunder of Harrisburg or
New Washington. Ascertaining that none of the enemy forces had crossed,
the Texans drew back about a mile on the Harrisburg road, and encamped
in a skirt of timber protected by a rising ground.

That afternoon, Colonel Sidney Sherman with a small detachment of
cavalry engaged the enemy infantry, almost bringing on a general action.
In the clash two Texans were wounded—one of them, Olwyn J. Trask,
mortally—and several horses were killed. In this preliminary skirmish
Mirabeau B. Lamar, a private from Georgia (later President of the
Republic of Texas), so distinguished himself that on the next day he was
placed in command of the cavalry.

Santa Anna’s blue-uniformed army made camp under the high ground
overlooking a marsh, about three-fourths of a mile from the Texas camp.
They threw up breastworks of trunks, baggage, pack-saddles and other
equipment. Both sides prepared for the expected conflict.

The Texans awoke to find Thursday, April 21, a clear fine day. Refreshed
by a breakfast of bread made with flour from the captured supplies and
meat from beeves slaughtered the day before, they were eager to attack
the enemy. They could see Santa Anna’s flags floating over the enemy
camp, and heard the Mexican bugle calls on the crisp morning air.

It was discovered at about nine o’clock that General Martin Perfecto de
Cos had crossed Vince’s bridge, about eight miles behind the Texans’
camp, with some 540 picked troops, swelling the enemy forces to about
1265. General Houston ordered “Deaf” Smith and a detail to destroy the
bridge and prevent further enemy reinforcements.[3] This also would
prevent the retreat of either the Texans or the Mexicans toward
Harrisburg. In dry weather Vince’s Bayou was about fifty feet wide and
ten feet deep, but the excessive April rains had made it several times
wider and deeper.

    [Illustration: Map of San Jacinto battlefield, showing positions of
    Texas army and Mexican army, and battle formation of Texas Infantry,
    Artillery and Cavalry in the attack on Santa Anna’s breastworks.]

Shortly before noon, General Houston held a council of war with Colonels
Edward Burleson and Sidney Sherman, Lieutenant-Colonels Henry Millard,
Alexander Somervell and Joseph L. Bennett, and Major Lysander Wells. Two
of the officers suggested attacking the enemy in his position, while the
others favored awaiting Santa Anna’s attack. Houston withheld his own
views, but later, after having formed his plan of battle, submitted it
to Secretary of War Rusk, who approved it.


                       THE BATTLE OF SAN JACINTO

General Houston disposed his forces in battle order at about 3:30 in the
afternoon. Over on the Mexican side all was quiet; many of the foemen
were enjoying their customary _siesta_. The Texans’ movements were
screened by the trees and the rising ground, and evidently Santa Anna
had no lookouts posted.

Big, shaggy and commanding in his mud-stained unmilitary garb, the
Chieftain rode his horse up and down the line. “Now hold your fire,
men,” he warned in his deep voice, “until you get the order!”

At the command, “Advance,” the patriots, 910 strong, moved quickly out
of the woods and over the rise, deploying.[4] Bearded and ragged from
forty days in the field, they were a fierce-looking band. But their long
rifles were clean and well oiled. Only one company, Captain William
Wood’s “Kentucky Rifles,” originally recruited by Sidney Sherman, wore
uniforms.

The battle line was formed with Edward Burleson’s regiment in the
center; Sherman’s on the left wing; the artillery, under George W.
Hockley, on Burleson’s right; the infantry, under Henry Millard, on the
right of the artillery; and the cavalry, led by Lamar, on the extreme
right.

Silently and tensely the Texas battle line swept across the prairie and
swale that was No Man’s land, the men bending low. A soldier’s fife
piped up with “Will You Come to the Bower,”[5] a popular tune of the
day. That was the only music of the battle.

As the troops advanced, “Deaf” Smith galloped up and told Houston,
“Vince’s bridge has been cut down.” The General announced it to the men.
Now both armies were cut off from retreat in all directions but one, by
a roughly circular moat formed by Vince’s and Buffalo Bayous to the west
and north, San Jacinto River to the north and east, and by the marshes
and the bay to the east and southeast.

At close range, the two little cannon, drawn by rawhide thongs, were
wheeled into position and belched their charges of iron slugs into the
enemy barricade. Then the whole line, led by Sherman’s men, sprang
forward on the run, yelling, “Remember the Alamo!” “Remember Goliad!”
All together they opened fire, blazing away practically point-blank at
the surprised and panic-stricken Mexicans. They stormed over the
breastworks, seized the enemy’s artillery, and joined in hand-to-hand
combat, emptying their pistols, swinging their guns as clubs, slashing
right and left with their knives. Mexicans fell by the scores under the
impact of the savage assault.

General Manuel Fernandez Castrillon, a brave Mexican, tried to rally the
swarthy Latins, but he was killed and his men became crazed with fright.
Many threw down their guns and ran; many wailed, “Me no Alamo!” “Me no
Goliad!” But their pleas won no mercy. The enraged revolutionists
reloaded and chased after the stampeding enemy, shooting them, stabbing
them, clubbing them to death.

From the moment of the first collision the battle was a slaughter,
frightful to behold. The fugitives ran in wild terror over the prairie
and into the boggy marshes, but the avengers of the Alamo and Goliad
followed and slew them, or drove them into the waters to drown. Men and
horses, dead and dying, in the morass in the rear and right of the
Mexican camp, formed a bridge for the pursuing Texans. Blood reddened
the water. General Houston tried to check the execution but the fury of
his men was beyond restraint.

    [Illustration: Sam Houston]

    [Illustration: The surrender of Santa Anna to Sam Houston on San
    Jacinto battlefield, April 22, 1836.]

Some of the Mexican cavalry tried to escape over Vince’s bridge, only to
find that the bridge was gone. In desperation, some of the flying
horsemen spurred their mounts down the steep bank; some dismounted and
plunged into the swollen stream. The Texans came up and poured a deadly
fire into the welter of Mexicans struggling with the flood. Escape was
virtually impossible.


General Houston rode slowly from the field of victory, his ankle
shattered by a rifle ball. At the foot of the oak where he had slept the
previous night he fainted and slid from his horse into the arms of Major
Hockley, his chief of staff.

As the crowning stroke of a glorious day, General Rusk presented to him
as a prisoner the Mexican general Almonte, who had surrendered formally
with about 400 men.

The casualties, according to Houston’s official report, numbered 630
Mexicans killed, 208 wounded, and 730 taken prisoner. As against this
heavy score, only nine Texans were killed or mortally wounded, and
thirty wounded less seriously. Most of their injuries came from the
first scattered Mexican volley when the attackers stormed their
barricade. The Texans captured a large supply of muskets, pistols,
sabers, mules, horses, provisions, clothing, tents and paraphernalia,
and $12,000 in silver.


                       THE CAPTURE OF SANTA ANNA

Santa Anna had disappeared during the battle, and next day General
Houston ordered a thorough search of the surrounding territory for him.
In the afternoon Sergeant J. A. Sylvester[6] spotted a Mexican slipping
through the woods toward Vince’s Bayou. Sylvester and his comrades
caught the fugitive trying to hide in the high grass. He wore a common
soldier’s apparel—round jacket, blue cotton pantaloons, skin cap and
soldier’s shoes.

They took the captive to camp, and on the way Mexican prisoners
recognized him and cried, “El Presidente!” Thus his identity was
betrayed; it was indeed the dictator from below the Rio Grande. He was
brought to General Houston, who lay under the headquarters oak, nursing
his wounded foot.

The Mexican President pompously announced, “I am General Antonio Lopez
de Santa Anna, and a prisoner of war at your disposition.”

General Houston, suffering with pain, received him coldly. He sent for
young Moses Austin Bryan and Lorenzo de Zavala Jr. to act as
interpreters. Santa Anna cringed with fright as the excited Texas
soldiers pressed around him, fearing mob violence. He pleaded for the
treatment due a prisoner of war. “You can afford to be generous,” he
whined; “you have captured the Napoleon of the West.”

“What claim have you to mercy?” Houston retorted, “when you showed none
at the Alamo or at Goliad?”

They talked for nearly two hours, using Bryan, de Zavala and Almonte as
interpreters. In the end Santa Anna agreed to write an order commanding
all Mexican troops to evacuate Texas. Later, treaties were signed at
Velasco, looking to the adjustment of all differences and the
recognition of Texas independence.


Thus ended the revolution of 1836, with an eighteen-minute battle which
established Texas as a free republic and opened the way for the United
States to extend its boundaries to the Rio Grande on the southwest and
to the Pacific on the west. Few military engagements in history have
been more decisive or of more far-reaching ultimate influence than the
battle of San Jacinto.

    [Illustration: Outline of Texas]



                      Opposing Commanders’ Reports


It is interesting to compare the accounts of the battle of San Jacinto
written by leaders of the opposing Texan and Mexican forces.

General Sam Houston, in his official report of the engagement to
President David G. Burnet, dated April 25, 1836, reviewed his movements
during the three days preceding the battle, and then said:

“_About nine o’clock on the morning of the 21st, the enemy were
reinforced by 500 choice troops, under the command of General Cos,
increasing their effective force to upward of 1500 men, whilst our
aggregate force for the field numbered 783. At half-past three o’clock
in the evening, I ordered the officers of the Texian army to parade
their respective commands, having in the meantime ordered the bridge on
the only road communicating with the Brazos, distant eight miles from
the encampment, to be destroyed—thus cutting off all possibility of
escape. Our troops paraded with alacrity and spirit, and were anxious
for the contest. Their conscious disparity in numbers seemed only to
increase their enthusiasm and confidence, and heightened their anxiety
for the conflict. Our situation afforded me an opportunity of making the
arrangements preparatory to the attack without exposing our designs to
the enemy. The first regiment, commanded by Colonel Burleson, was
assigned to the center. The second regiment, under the command of
Colonel Sherman, formed the left wing of the army. The artillery, under
special command of Colonel George W. Hockley, Inspector-General, was
placed on the right of the first regiment; and four companies of
infantry, under the command of Lieut.-Col. Henry Millard, sustained the
artillery upon the right. Our cavalry, 61 in number, commanded by
Colonel Mirabeau B. Lamar (whose gallant and daring conduct on the
previous day had attracted the admiration of his comrades), completed
our line. Our cavalry was first dispatched to the front of the enemy’s
left, for the purpose of attracting their notice, whilst an extensive
island of timber afforded us an opportunity of concentrating our forces,
and deploying from that point, agreeably to the previous design of the
troops. Every evolution was performed with alacrity, the whole advancing
rapidly in line, and through an open prairie, without any protection
whatever for our men. The artillery advanced and took station within 200
yards of the enemy’s breastwork, and commenced an effective fire with
grape and canister._

“_Colonel Sherman, with his regiment, having commenced the action upon
our left wing, the whole line, at the center and on the right, advancing
in double quick time, rung the war-cry, ‘Remember the Alamo!’ received
the enemy’s fire, and advanced within point blank shot, before a piece
was discharged from our lines. Our lines advanced without a halt, until
they were in possession of the woodland and the enemy’s breastwork—the
right wing of Burleson’s and the left of Millard’s taking possession of
the breastwork; our artillery having gallantly charged up within seventy
yards of the enemy’s cannon, when it was taken by our troops. The
conflict lasted about eighteen minutes from the time of close action
until we were in possession of the enemy’s encampment, taking one piece
of cannon (loaded), four stand of colors, all their camp equipage,
stores and baggage. Our cavalry had charged and routed that of the enemy
upon the right, and given pursuit to the fugitives, which did not cease
until they arrived at the bridge which I have mentioned before—Captain
Karnes, always among the foremost in danger, commanding the pursuers.
The conflict in the breastwork lasted but a few moments; many of the
troops encountered hand to hand, and, not having the advantage of
bayonets on our side, our riflemen used their pieces as war clubs,
breaking many of them off at the breech. The rout commenced at half-past
four, and the pursuit by the main army continued until twilight. A guard
was then left in charge of the enemy’s encampment, and our army returned
with our killed and wounded. In the battle, our loss was two killed and
twenty-three wounded, six of them mortally. The enemy’s loss was 630
killed ... wounded 208 ... prisoners 730...._”


                       MEXICAN VERSION OF BATTLE

General Santa Anna, in the memoirs of his old age, wrote a brief and
untruthful account of the battle of San Jacinto, an alibi blaming
General Filisola for the defeat. He said he had ordered Filisola to join
him by forced marches, for the attack on Houston’s army, and was waiting
for the reinforcements when he found Houston camped on the San Jacinto.
He continued:

“_At two o’clock in the afternoon of Aprl 21, 1836, I had fallen asleep
in the shade of an oak, hoping the heat would moderate so that I might
begin the march (to find Filisola), when the filibusterers surprised my
camp with admirable skill. Imagine my surprise, on opening my eyes, and
finding myself surrounded by those people, threatening me with their
rifles and overpowering my person. The responsibility of Filisola was
obvious, because he and only he had caused such a catastrophe by his
criminal disobedience._”

This is somewhat at variance with an earlier report, in which Santa Anna
recounted his own heroic efforts to rally his troops in the battle until
“the new recruits threw everything into confusion, breaking their ranks
and preventing veterans from making use of their arms, whilst the enemy
was rapidly advancing with loud hurrahs, and in a few minutes obtained a
victory which they could not some hours before, even have dreamed of.”

Then, _El Presidente_ went on:

“_All hopes being lost, and everyone flying as fast as he could, I found
myself in the greatest danger, when a servant of my aide-de-camp ...
offered me his horse, with the tenderest and most urging expressions
insisted on my riding off the field.... I remembered that General
Filisola was only seventeen leagues off, and I took my direction toward
him, darting through the enemy ranks. They pursued me, and after a ride
of one league and a half, overtook me on the banks of a large creek, the
bridge over which had been burned by the enemy to retard our pursuit._

    [Illustration: ANTONIO LOPEZ de SANTA ANNA]

“_I alighted from my horse and with much difficulty succeeded in
concealing myself in a thicket of dwarf pines. Night coming on I escaped
them, and the hope of reaching the army gave me strength. I crossed the
creek with the water up to my breast and continued my route on foot. I
found, in a house which had been abandoned, some articles of clothing,
which enabled me to change my apparel. At eleven o’clock a.m., while I
was crossing a large plain, my pursuers overtook me again. Such is the
history of my capture. On account of my change of apparel they did not
recognize me, and inquired whether I had seen Santa Anna. To this I
answered that he had made his escape; and this answer saved me from
assassination, as I have since been given to understand._”


Colonel Pedro Delgado, of Santa Anna’s staff, gave a more detailed and
more accurate Mexican version of the battle. He told how Santa Anna, his
staff and most of the men were asleep when the bugler sounded the alarm
of the Texan advance. Some of the men were out gathering boughs for
shelter; cavalrymen were riding bareback, to and from water. Continuing:

“_I stepped upon some ammunition boxes the better to observe the
movements of the enemy. I saw that their formation was a mere line of
one rank, and very extended. In their center was the Texas flag; on both
wings, they had two light cannons, well manned. Their cavalry was
opposite our front, overlapping our left. In this disposition yelling
furiously, with a brisk fire of grape, muskets and rifles, they advanced
resolutely upon our camp. There the utmost confusion prevailed. General
Castrillon shouted on one side; on another Colonel Almonte was giving
orders; some cried out to commence firing; others to lie down and avoid
the grape shot. Among the latter was His Excellency._

“_Then already, I saw our men; flying in small groups, terrified, and
sheltering themselves behind large trees. I endeavored to force some of
them to fight, but all efforts were in vain—the evil was beyond remedy;
they were a bewildered and panic-stricken herd._

“_The enemy kept up a brisk cross-fire of grape on the woods. Presently
we heard, in close proximity, the unpleasant noise of their clamor.
Meeting no resistance they dashed, lightning-like upon our deserted
camp._

“_Then I saw His Excellency running about in the utmost excitement,
wringing his hands, and unable to give an order. General Castrillon was
stretched on the ground, wounded in the leg. Colonel Trevino was killed,
and Colonel Marcial Aguirre was severely injured. I saw also, the enemy
reaching the ordnance train, and killing a corporal and two gunners who
had been detailed to repair cartridges which had been damaged on the
previous evening._”

In a grove on the bayshore, Colonel Delgado said, the Texans wrought the
worst carnage of the battle.

“_There they killed Colonel Batres; and it would have been all over with
us had not Providence placed us in the hands of the noble and generous
captain of cavalry, Allen, who by great exertion, saved us repeatedly
from being slaughtered by the drunken and infuriated volunteers._”

    [Illustration: Star]


               San Jacinto Museum of History Association

                           BOARD OF TRUSTEES

                    George A. Hill, Jr., _President_
                      L. W. Kemp, _Vice President_
                   W. B. Bates, _Secretary-Treasurer_
                               A. C. Finn
                          Mrs. Madge W. Hearne
                      Dorothy W. Estes, _Director_


                   San Jacinto State Park Commission

                       J. Perry Moore, _Chairman_
                                Mary Tod
                             W. E. Kendall



                          San Jacinto Monument


The great shaft of San Jacinto, piercing the sky from the scene of the
historic conflict between Sam Houston’s pioneers and Santa Anna’s
Mexican invaders, was erected as a memorial to the Texas heroes,
commemorating the Centennial of 1836. Appropriations aggregating
$1,866,148 were made by the State of Texas and the Federal Government
for the construction of the monument and improvement of San Jacinto
State Park. Of this amount approximately $1,200,000 was used in building
the monument.

On April 21, 1936, the one hundredth anniversary of the battle of San
Jacinto, with impressive ceremonies, the ground was broken for the
monument. Among the participants was General Andrew Jackson Houston,
only surviving child of the Commander-in-Chief of the Texas Army at San
Jacinto. The monument, 570 feet high, was officially dedicated April 21,
1939.

The reinforced concrete structure is faced with rough sawn fossilized
limestone quarried near Leander, Williamson County, Texas. The interior
walls are highly polished. The base of the building is 124 feet square
and 36 feet high. The shaft is 47 feet square at the base and 30 feet at
the top.

On the exterior walls of the shaft, about 90 feet above the ground, a
frieze 178 feet around and 15½ feet high shows in relief the history of
Texas from the coming of the Anglo-Americans to the present day. This
was executed by William McVey, Houston sculptor.

On the outer sides of the base of the monument are carved inscriptions,
summarizing the salient events of the Texas revolution. Each of these
eight spaces measures 25 feet by 13 feet, and the letters in the
inscriptions are 8 inches in height. Written by L. W. Kemp with
collaboration of Dr. E. C. Barker, Mrs. Herbert Gambrell and other
historical authorities, they epitomize the whole evolution of Texas
independence in approximately 600 words.

    [Illustration: San Jacinto Memorial Monument and Museum]

There are five rooms on the first floor of the monument. The entrance is
through the Hall of Honor, which is flanked by two spacious rooms. The
south room houses the exhibits relating to the Spanish and Mexican
period of Texas history, many of them donated by Colonel and Mrs. George
A. Hill, Jr. Exhibits in the north room relate to the Anglo-American
period until the beginning of the War between the States. An entrance
lobby from the Hall of Honor leads to the elevator which runs to the
observation deck in the tower. The elevator lobby serves as a gallery
for paintings. Behind the elevator is a small room connecting the north
and south rooms. It is devoted to relics of domestic life.

Two great bronze plaques adorn the interior walls of the monument. One,
in the south room, records the names of the 910 heroes who fought in the
battle; the other, in the north room, lists the 248 men of Houston’s
army, mostly sick and non-effectives, who were detailed to remain at the
camp established opposite Harrisburg. The lists were compiled by L. W.
Kemp. In this booklet they were revised to January 1, 1947.

The monument was designed by Alfred C. Finn and was constructed by the
W. S. Bellows Construction Company of Houston.

Operation and maintenance of the monument and museum is financed,
without cost to the State, by receipts from a small fee charged for
riding the elevator to the observation tower, and by the sale of
souvenirs. The San Jacinto Museum of History Association, which operates
the monument, is a non-profit organization incorporated under the laws
of Texas, November 7, 1938. Members of the Association’s board of
trustees are nominated by the San Jacinto State Park Board and approved
by the State Board of Control.


                       THE FIELD OF ST. HYACINTH

It is told that Franciscan friars of Mexico, exploring the Texas coast
during the period 1751-1772, found the stream now known as San Jacinto
River so choked with water hyacinths (a mauve species of lily that still
abounds in this region) that they could not pass. They called it the
“hyacinth stream.” From that name evolved “San Jacinto”—Spanish for
“Saint Hyacinth.”

Legend has it that Adjutant General John A. Wharton gave the battlefield
its name. Santa Anna, shortly after being captured, while conversing
with a group of Texan officers inquired concerning the correct name of
the field. One officer is supposed to have answered “Lynchburg,” but
Wharton suggested “San Jacinto.”

The battleground, off the La Porte road, some twenty-three miles from
the County Courthouse in Houston, is a State park of 402 acres. It is
situated near the confluence of San Jacinto River and Buffalo Bayou—now
the Houston Ship Channel—not far from the Bay. It is a spot of natural
beauty. The land has a gentle roll, and vegetation is brilliant. Wild
flowers here grow in profusion and fairly radiate their splendor.
Nowhere else in this section are more luxuriant mossy “beards” to be
found than on the huge liveoaks of San Jacinto.

The country surrounding the battlefield and nearby Lynchburg—known in
the old days as “Lynch’s Ferry”—was one of the early settlements of
Texas colonists. The sylvan retreats along the wide stream and adjacent
lagoons were once popular as homes of prominent Texans. Across the bayou
from the battleground was the home of Lorenzo de Zavala, _ad interim_
Vice President of the Republic.

Nearby lived David G. Burnet, _ad interim_ President. Later General
Houston had a home on Trinity Bay, a few miles from the battlefield. It
is now a Boy Scout camp. Ashbel Smith, minister of the Republic of Texas
to England, had his home at about the site of present Goose Creek, not
far from Lynchburg.

    [Illustration: Entrance to monument]



                      Texas Revolution Epitomized


The thumbnail history of the Texas revolution, inscribed on the exterior
of the monument’s base in eight panels, is as follows:

  THE EARLY POLICIES OF MEXICO TOWARD HER TEXAS COLONISTS HAD BEEN
  EXTREMELY LIBERAL. LARGE GRANTS OF LAND WERE MADE TO THEM, AND NO
  TAXES OR DUTIES IMPOSED. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE ANGLO-AMERICANS
  AND MEXICANS WAS CORDIAL. BUT, FOLLOWING A SERIES OF REVOLUTIONS BEGUN
  IN 1829, UNSCRUPULOUS RULERS SUCCESSIVELY SEIZED POWER IN MEXICO.
  THEIR UNJUST ACTS AND DESPOTIC DECREES LED TO THE REVOLUTION IN TEXAS.

  IN JUNE, 1832, THE COLONISTS FORCED THE MEXICAN AUTHORITIES AT ANAHUAC
  TO RELEASE WM. B. TRAVIS AND OTHERS FROM UNJUST IMPRISONMENT. THE
  BATTLE OF VELASCO, JUNE 26, AND THE BATTLE OF NACOGDOCHES, AUGUST 2,
  FOLLOWED: IN BOTH THE TEXANS WERE VICTORIOUS. STEPHEN FULLER AUSTIN,
  “FATHER OF TEXAS”, WAS ARRESTED JANUARY 3, 1834, AND HELD IN MEXICO
  WITHOUT TRIAL UNTIL JULY, 1835. THE TEXANS FORMED AN ARMY, AND ON
  NOVEMBER 12, 1835, ESTABLISHED A PROVISIONAL GOVERNMENT.

  THE FIRST SHOT OF THE REVOLUTION OF 1835-1836 WAS FIRED BY THE TEXANS
  AT GONZALES, OCTOBER 2, 1835, IN RESISTANCE TO A DEMAND BY MEXICAN
  SOLDIERS FOR A SMALL CANNON HELD BY THE COLONISTS. THE MEXICAN
  GARRISON AT GOLIAD FELL OCTOBER 9, THE BATTLE OF CONCEPCION WAS WON BY
  THE TEXANS, OCTOBER 28. SAN ANTONIO WAS CAPTURED DECEMBER 10, 1835
  AFTER FIVE DAYS OF FIGHTING IN WHICH THE INDOMITABLE BENJAMIN R. MILAM
  DIED A HERO, AND THE MEXICAN ARMY EVACUATED TEXAS.

  TEXAS DECLARED HER INDEPENDENCE AT WASHINGTON-ON-THE-BRAZOS, MARCH 2.
  FOR NEARLY TWO MONTHS HER ARMIES MET DISASTER AND DEFEAT; DR. JAMES
  GRANT’S MEN WERE KILLED ON THE AGUA DULCE, MARCH 2, WILLIAM BARRET
  TRAVIS AND HIS MEN SACRIFICED THEIR LIVES AT THE ALAMO, MARCH 6,
  WILLIAM WARD WAS DEFEATED AT REFUGIO, MARCH 14, AMON B. KING’S MEN
  WERE EXECUTED NEAR REFUGIO, MARCH 16, AND JAMES WALKER FANNIN AND HIS
  ARMY WERE PUT TO DEATH NEAR GOLIAD, MARCH 27, 1836.

  ON THIS FIELD ON APRIL 21, 1836 THE ARMY OF TEXAS COMMANDED BY GENERAL
  SAM HOUSTON, AND ACCOMPANIED BY THE SECRETARY OF WAR, THOMAS J. RUSK,
  ATTACKED THE SUPERIOR INVADING ARMY OF MEXICANS UNDER GENERAL SANTA
  ANNA. THE BATTLE LINE FROM LEFT TO RIGHT WAS FORMED BY SIDNEY
  SHERMAN’S REGIMENT, EDWARD BURLESON’S REGIMENT, THE ARTILLERY
  COMMANDED BY GEORGE W. HOCKLEY, HENRY MILLARD’S INFANTRY AND THE
  CAVALRY UNDER MIRABEAU B. LAMAR. SAM HOUSTON LED THE INFANTRY CHARGE.

  WITH THE BATTLE CRY, “REMEMBER THE ALAMO! REMEMBER GOLIAD!” THE TEXANS
  CHARGED. THE ENEMY, TAKEN BY SURPRISE, RALLIED FOR A FEW MINUTES, THEN
  FLED IN DISORDER. THE TEXANS HAD ASKED NO QUARTER AND GAVE NONE. THE
  SLAUGHTER WAS APPALLING, VICTORY COMPLETE, AND TEXAS FREE! ON THE
  FOLLOWING DAY GENERAL ANTONIO LOPEZ DE SANTA ANNA, SELF-STYLED
  “NAPOLEON OF THE WEST,” RECEIVED FROM A GENEROUS FOE THE MERCY HE HAD
  DENIED TRAVIS AT THE ALAMO AND FANNIN AT GOLIAD.

  CITIZENS OF TEXAS AND IMMIGRANT SOLDIERS IN THE ARMY OF TEXAS AT SAN
  JACINTO WERE NATIVES OF ALABAMA, ARKANSAS, CONNECTICUT, GEORGIA,
  ILLINOIS, INDIANA, KENTUCKY, LOUISIANA, MAINE, MARYLAND,
  MASSACHUSETTS, MICHIGAN, MISSISSIPPI, MISSOURI, NEW HAMPSHIRE, NEW
  YORK, NORTH CAROLINA, OHIO, PENNSYLVANIA, RHODE ISLAND, SOUTH
  CAROLINA, TENNESSEE, TEXAS, VERMONT, VIRGINIA, AUSTRIA, CANADA,
  ENGLAND, FRANCE, GERMANY, IRELAND, ITALY, MEXICO, POLAND, PORTUGAL AND
  SCOTLAND.

  MEASURED BY ITS RESULTS, SAN JACINTO WAS ONE OF THE DECISIVE BATTLES
  OF THE WORLD. THE FREEDOM OF TEXAS FROM MEXICO WON HERE LED TO
  ANNEXATION AND TO THE MEXICAN WAR, RESULTING IN THE ACQUISITION BY THE
  UNITED STATES OF THE STATES OF TEXAS, NEW MEXICO, ARIZONA, NEVADA,
  CALIFORNIA, UTAH, AND PARTS OF COLORADO, WYOMING, KANSAS AND OKLAHOMA.
  ALMOST ONE-THIRD OF THE PRESENT AREA OF THE AMERICAN NATION, NEARLY A
  MILLION SQUARE MILES OF TERRITORY, CHANGED SOVEREIGNTY.



                            Brigham Monument


                       DEAD ON THE FIELD OF HONOR

Prior to the erection of the present great shaft, the principal memorial
on the battlefield was a plain square spire monument of Rutland
variegated marble, fifteen and one-half feet high, which with the base
stands seventeen feet. After its dedication it was placed at the grave
of Benjamin R. Brigham, one of the nine Texans who were killed or
mortally wounded in the battle, and whose bodies, with one exception,
were buried on the ground on which the Texan army had camped April 20.
Board markers had been placed at all of the graves but when in 1879
Judge J. L. Sullivan of Richmond, Texas, began to raise funds by public
subscription to erect a joint monument where their bodies lay, the grave
of Brigham was alone recognizable.

The monument was unveiled at Galveston with fitting ceremonies August
25, 1881, Temple Houston, youngest son of General Sam Houston, being the
orator of the occasion. On April 23, 1883, the Eighteenth Legislature
purchased for $1,500, ten acres of land surrounding the monument. This
was the beginning of the present San Jacinto State Park.

Carved on the east front of the monument is:
                      “DEAD ON THE FIELD OF HONOR”

Below which, in bold relief is a Lone Star, surrounded by a wreath of
oak and laurel leaves.

Beneath the star:
                            “B. R. BRIGHAM”

On the base:
                             “SAN JACINTO”

Near the top of the shaft is a polished band, upon which are cut two
stars on each front and one above the band on the east front. These
represent the nine who fell in the battle.

    [Illustration: Brigham monument, marking the graves of eight of the
    nine dead at San Jacinto.]

    [Illustration: Marker at site of Santa Anna’s surrender at San
    Jacinto.]

On the north front, beneath the heading:

                      “TWO DAYS BEFORE THE BATTLE”

is recorded the statement of General Houston:

“_This morning we are in preparation to meet Santa Anna. It is the only
chance of saving Texas. From time to time I have looked for
reinforcements in vain: We will only have about seven hundred men to
march with besides the camp guard. We go on to conquer. It is wisdom
growing out of necessity to meet the enemy now. Every consideration
enforces it. No previous occasion would justify it. The troops are in
fine spirits and now is the time for action. We shall use our best
efforts to fight the enemy to such advantage as will insure victory
though the odds are greatly against us._

“_I leave the result in the hands of a wise God, and rely upon His
providence._

“_My country will do justice to those who serve her. The right for which
we fight will be secured, and Texas free._”

Below this is inscribed:
                          “REMEMBER THE ALAMO”

On the south front beneath the heading:
                       “THE DAY AFTER THE BATTLE”

is the report of Thomas J. Rusk, Secretary of War:

“_The sun was sinking in the horizon as the battle commenced, but, at
the close of the conflict, the sun of liberty and independence rose in
Texas, never, it is to be hoped, to be obscured by the clouds of
despotism. We have read of deeds of chivalry, and pursued with ardour
the annals of war; we have contemplated, with the highest emotions of
sublimity, the loud roaring thunder, the desolating tornado, and the
withering simoon of the desert; but neither of these, nor all, inspired
us with emotions like those felt on this occasion! There was a general
cry which pervaded the ranks: Remember the ALAMO! Remember LA BAHIA!
These words electrified all. Onward was the cry. The unerring aim and
irresistible energy of the Texan army could not be withstood, it was
freemen fighting against the minions of tyranny and the result proved
the inequality of such a contest._”

And below is the love song, then popular, which one of Houston’s
charging soldiers is said to have played on the flute:
                      “WILL YOU COME TO THE BOWER”

On the west front:

                 “This monument stands at the grave of
                         BENJAMIN RICE BRIGHAM
                who was mortally wounded April 21, 1836

                              “Nearby rest

                         LEMUEL STOCKTON BLAKEY
                              JOHN C. HALE
                             GEORGE A. LAMB
                         DR. WM. JUNIUS MOTTLEY
                             MATHIAS COOPER
                          THOMAS PATTON FOWLE
                           ASHLEY R. STEPHENS

 “Who were also killed or mortally wounded in the battle of San Jacinto

                            “OLWYN J. TRASK
 died on Galveston Island on about May 20 from the effects of the wound
he had received on the San Jacinto Battlefield in the skirmish of April
                               20, 1836.

 “This shaft was erected in 1881 by voluntary contributions of citizens
   of Texas to forever mark the spot where these heroes sleep and to
           perpetuate a knowledge of their names and prowess”

On the base following this tribute is the war cry,
                           “REMEMBER GOLIAD”

    [Illustration: MY COUNTRY WILL DO JUSTICE TO THEM WHO SERVE HER

THE RIGHT FOR WHICH WE FIGHT WILL BE RESCUED AND TEXAS FREE

GENERAL HOUSTON    APRIL 19 1836

OFFICERS AND MEN OF THE TEXAS ARMY WHO PARTICIPATED IN THE BATTLE FOUGHT
HERE APRIL 21 1836 OR IN THE SKIRMISH OF THE PREVIOUS DAY]



                           The Roll of Honor


One of the two great bronze plaques that adorn the walls of the San
Jacinto museum records the names of the officers and men of the Texas
army who fought in the battle on April 21, 1836, and in the skirmish of
the previous day. The other plaque lists the troops, mostly sick or
non-effective, who were left at Harrisburg two days before the battle.

Following is the roster of the participants at San Jacinto:

  Adams, Thomas Jefferson
  Aldrich, Collin
  Alexander, Jerome B.
  Allen, John Melville
  Allison, John C.
  Allison, Moses
  Alsbury, Horace Arlington
  Alsbury, Young Perry
  Anderson, Washington
  Andrews, Micah
  Angel, John
  Anson, Orin D.
  Armot, W. S.
  Armstrong, Irwin
  Arnold, Hayden
  Arocha, Jose Maria
  Arocha, Manuel
  Arreola, Simon
  Atkinson, Milton B.
  Avery, Willis

  Bailey, Alexander
  Bailey, Howard W.
  Bain, Noel M.
  Baker, Daniel Davis D.
  Baker, Joseph
  Baker, Moseley
  Balch, Hezekiah Benjamin
  Balch, John
  Bancroft, Jethro Russell
  Banks, Reason
  Barcinas, Andres
  Bardwell, Soloman B.
  Barker, George
  Barkley, John A.
  Barr, Robert
  Barstow, Joshua
  Bateman, William
  Barton, Jefferson A.
  Barton, Wayne
  Barton, Elder B.
  Baxter, Montgomery
  Baylor, Dr. John Walker
  Bear, Isaac H.
  Beard, Andrew Jackson
  Beason, Leander
  Beauchamp, John
  Beebe, John N.
  Begley, John
  Belden, John
  Belknap, Thomas
  Bell, James Madison
  Bell, Peter Hansbrough
  Bell, Thomas Henry
  Bennett, Joseph L.
  Bennett, W. B.
  Bennett, William
  Benson, Ellis
  Benton, Alfred
  Benton, Daniel
  Bernardi, Prospero
  Bernbeck, Wilhelm Christoph Frederick
  Berry, Andrew Jackson
  Berryhill, William M.
  Billingsley, Jesse
  Bingham, Mathias A.
  Bird, James
  Birt, Samuel Pearce
  Bissett, Robert B.
  Blackwell, Thomas
  Blakey, Lemuel Stockton
  Bledsoe, George L.
  Blue, Uriah
  Bollinger, Ephriam
  Bollinger, Peter
  Bond, Henry
  Booker, Dr. Shields
  Boom, Garret E.
  Borden, John Pettit
  Borden, Paschal Pavolo
  Bostick, Sion Record
  Bottsford, Seymour
  Bowen, William Robert
  Box, James Edward
  Box, John Andrew
  Box, Nelson
  Box, Thomas Griffin
  Boyd, James C.
  Boyle, William
  Bradley, Isaac B.
  Bradley, James
  Brake, Michael J.
  Branch, Edward Thomas
  Breeding, Fidelie S.
  Breedlove, A. W.
  Brenan, William
  Brewer, Henry Mitchell
  Brewster, Henry Percy
  Brigham, Benjamin Rice
  Brigham, Moses W.
  Briscoe, Andrew
  Brookfield, Francis E.
  Brooks, Thomas D.
  Brown, David
  Brown, George J.
  Brown, Oliver T.
  Brown, Wilson C.
  Browning, George Washington
  Bruff, Christopher Columbus
  Bryan, Luke O.
  Bryan, Moses Austin
  Bryant, Benjamin Franklin
  Buffington, Anderson
  Buford, Thomas Young
  Bullock, David M.
  Bunton, John Wheeler
  Burleson, Aaron
  Burleson, Edward
  Burnam, John Hickerson
  Burnam, William Owen
  Burton, Isaac Watts
  Bust, Luke W.
  Butts, Augustus J.

  Caddell, Andrew
  Cage, Benjamin Franklin
  Calder, Robert James
  Caldwell, Pinckney
  Callicoatte, John B.
  Callihan, Thomas Jefferson
  Campbell, Joseph
  Campbell, Michael
  Cannan, William Jarvis
  Carmona, Ceasario
  Carnal, Patrick
  Carpenter, John W.
  Carper, Dr. William M.
  Carr, John
  Carter, Robert W. P.
  Cartwright, Matthew Winston
  Cartwright, William P.
  Caruthers, Allen
  Casillas, Gabriel
  Cassidy, John W.
  Chadduck, Richard H.
  Chaffin, James A.
  Chapman, Henry S.
  Chavenoe, Michael
  Cheairs, John F.
  Cheevers, John
  Chenoweth, John
  Chiles, Lewis L.
  Choate, David, Jr.
  Christie, John
  Clapp, Elisha
  Clark, James
  Clark, John
  Clark, William
  Clarke, Charles A.
  Clarkson, Charles
  Clayton, Joseph Alvey
  Clelens, Josh
  Clemmons, Lewis Chapman
  Clemmons, William H.
  Cleveland, Horatio N.
  Clopper, ——
  Coble, Adam
  Cochran, Jeremiah D.
  Coffman, Elkin G.
  Coker, John
  Cole, Benjamin L.
  Cole, David
  Coleman, Robert M.
  Collard, Job Starks
  Collins, Willis
  Collinsworth, James
  Colton, William
  Conlee, Preston
  Conn, James
  Connell, Sampson
  Connor, James
  Cook, James R.
  Cooke, Francis Jarvis
  Cooke, Thomas
  Cooke, William Gordon
  Cooper, Mathias
  Corry, Thomas F.
  Corzine, Hershel
  Cox, Lewis
  Cox, Thomas
  Craddock, John Robert
  Craft, James A.
  Craft, Russell B.
  Craig, Henry R.
  Crain, Joel Burditt
  Crain, Roden Taylor
  Cravens, Robert M.
  Crawford, Robert
  Criswell, William Vanoy
  Crittenden, Robert
  Crittenden, William
  Crosby, Ganey
  Crunk, Nicholas S.
  Cruz, Antonio
  Cumba, James
  Cumberland, George
  Cunningham, Leander Calvin
  Curbiere, Antonio
  Curbiere, Matias
  Curtis, Hinton
  Curtis, James, Sr.

  Dale, Elijah Valentine
  Dallas, Walter Riddle
  Dalrymple, John
  Darling, Socrates
  Darr, George
  Darst, Edmund Calloway
  Darst, Richard Brownfield
  Davey, Thomas P.
  Davidson, John F.
  Davis, Abner C.
  Davis, George Washington
  Davis, James P.
  Davis, Jesse Kencheloe
  Davis, Moses H.
  Davis, Samuel
  Davis, Travis
  Davis, Washington H.
  Dawson, Nicholas Mosby
  Day, William
  Deadrick, David
  Deadrick, Fielding
  Deadrick, George M.
  Denham, M. H.
  Denman, Colden
  Dennis, Thomas Mason
  De Vore, Cornelius
  DeWitt, James C.
  Dibble, Henry
  Dillard, Abraham
  Dixon, James W.
  Doan, Joseph
  Doolittle, Berry
  Doubt, Daniel L.
  Douthet, James
  Dubromer, Dr. Tobias
  Duffee, William
  Dunbar, William
  Duncan, John
  Dunham, Daniel T.
  Dunn, Matthew
  Durham, William Daniel
  Dutcher, Alfred

  Earl, William
  Eastland, William Mosby
  Edgar, Joseph Smith
  Edingburg, Christopher Columbus
  Edson, Amos B.
  Edwards, Isiah
  Edwards, Tilford C.
  Egbert, James D.
  Eggleston, Horace
  Ehlinger, Joseph
  Eldridge, James J.
  Ellinger, Joseph
  Elliot, James D.
  Elliot, Peter S.
  Ellis, Willis L.
  Enriquez, Lucio
  Erath, George Bernhard
  Evetts, James H.
  Ewing, Dr. Alexander Wray
  Eyler, Jacob

  Faris, Hezekiah
  Farley, Thomas M.
  Farmer, James
  Farrish, Oscar
  Farwell, Joseph
  Fennell, George
  Ferrell, John P.
  Ferrill, William L.
  Fields, Henry
  Finch, Matthew
  Fisher, William
  Fisher, William S.
  Fitch, Benjamin Franklin
  Fitzhugh, Dr. John P. T.
  Flick, John
  Flores, Manuel
  Flores, Martin
  Flores, Nepomuceno
  Floyd, Joseph
  Flynn, Thomas
  Foard, Charles A.
  Fogle, Andrew
  Foley, Steven Tucker
  Forbes, George Washington
  Forbes, John
  Ford, Simon Peter
  Forrester, Charles
  Foster, Anthony
  Foster, John Ray
  Fowle, Thomas Patton
  Fowler, Styles J.
  Fowler, Thomas M.
  Franklin, Benjamin Cromwell
  Frazer, Hugh
  Freele, James
  Fry, Benjamin Franklin
  Fullerton, William

  Gafford, John
  Gage, Calvin
  Gainer, John N.
  Gallaher, Edward
  Gallatin, Albert
  Gammell, William
  Gant, William W.
  Gardner, George Washington
  Garner, John
  Garwood, S. Joseph
  Gay, Thomas
  Gedry, Lefroy
  Gentry, Frederick Browder
  Giddings, Giles Albert
  Gilbert, John Floyd
  Gill, John Porter
  Gill, William
  Gillaspie, James
  Gillespie, Luke John
  Glidwell, Abner
  Goheen, Michael R.
  Goodloe, Robert Kemp
  Goodwin, Lewis
  Graham, John
  Graves, Alexander S.
  Graves, Thomas A.
  Gray, James
  Gray, Mayberry B.
  Green, B.
  Green, George
  Green, James
  Green, Thomas
  Greenlaw, Augus
  Greenwood, James
  Greer, Thomas N. B.
  Grice, James B.
  Grieves, David
  Griffin, William
  Grigsby, Crawford
  Gross, Jacob
  Gustine, Dr. Lemuel

  Halderman, Jesse
  Hale, John C.
  Hale, William
  Hall, James S.
  Hall, John
  Hallet, John, Jr.
  Hallmark, William Calvert
  Halstead, E. B.
  Hamilton, Elias E.
  Hancock, George Duncan
  Handy, Robert Eden
  Hanson, Thomas
  Hardaway, Samuel G.
  Hardeman, Thomas Monroe
  Hardin, Benjamin Franklin
  Harmon, Clark M.
  Harmon, John A.
  Harness, William
  Harper, Benjamin J.
  Harper, John
  Harper, Peter
  Harris, Andrew Jackson
  Harris, James
  Harris, Temple Overton
  Harrison, A. L.
  Harrison, Elzy
  Harvey, David
  Harvey, John
  Haskins, Thomas A.
  Hassell, John W.
  Hawkins, William J.
  Hawkins, William Washington
  Hayr, James
  Hays, William C.
  Hazen, Nathaniel C.
  Heard, William Jones Elliot
  Heck, Charles F.
  Henderson, Francis K.
  Henderson, Hugh
  Henderson, Robert
  Henderstrom, Augustus
  Henry, Charles M.
  Henry, Robert
  Herrera, Pedro
  Herron, John Harvey
  Hickox, Franklin B.
  Higsmith, Ahijah M.
  Hill, Abraham Webb
  Hill, H.
  Hill, Isaac Lafayette
  Hill, James Monroe
  Hobson, John
  Hockley, George Washington
  Hogan, Josiah
  Hogan, Thomas
  Holder, Prior A.
  Holman, Sanford
  Holmes, Peter W.
  Homan, Harvey
  Hood, Robert
  Hope, Prosper
  Hopson, Lucien
  Horton, Alexander
  Hotchkiss, Rinaldo
  Houston, Samuel
  Howard, William C.
  Howell, Robert F.
  Hueser, John A.
  Hughes, Thomas M.
  Hunt, John Campbell
  Hyland, Joseph

  Ijams, Basil G.
  Ingram, Allen
  Ingram, John
  Irvine, James Thomas Patton
  Irvine, Josephus Somerville
  Isbell, James H.
  Isbell, William

  Jack, William Houston
  Jackson, W. R.
  James, Denward
  Jaques, Isaac L.
  Jennings, James D.
  Jett, James Matthew
  Jett, Stephen
  Johnson, Benjamin
  Johnson, George
  Johnson, George J.
  Johnson, James
  Johnson, John R.
  Johnson, John R.
  Johnston, Thomas F.
  Jones, Allen B.
  Jones, Dr. Anson
  Jones, David J.
  Jones, Edward S.
  Jones, George Washington
  Jordan, Alfred S.
  Joslin, James

  Karner, John
  Karnes, Henry Wax
  Kelly, Connell O’Donnell
  Kelso, Alfred
  Kenkennon, William P.
  Kennard, William Stephens
  Kent, Joseph
  Kenyon, Amos D.
  Kibbe, William
  Kimbro, William
  Kincheloe, Daniel R.
  King, W.
  Kleburg, Robert Justus
  Kornegay, David Smith
  Kraatz, Lewis
  Kuykendall, Matthew

  Labadie, Dr. Nicholas Descomp’s
  Lamar, Mirabeau Buonaparte
  Lamar, Shelly W.
  Lamb, George A.
  Lambert, Walter
  Lane, Walter Paye
  Lang, George Washington
  Lapham, Moses
  Larbarthrier, Charles
  Larrison, Allen
  Lasater, Francis B.
  Lawrence, George Washington
  Lawrence, Joseph
  Lealand, James
  Leek, George W.
  Leeper, Samuel
  Legg, Seneca
  Legrand, Edward Oswald
  Lemsky, Frederick
  Lessassier, Alexander
  Lester, James Seaton
  Leuders, Ferdinand
  Lewellyn, John
  Lewis, Abraham
  Lewis, Archibald S.
  Lewis, Edward
  Lewis, John Edward
  Lightfoot, William W.
  Lightfoot, Wilson T.
  Lind, John F.
  Lindsay, Benjamin Franklin, Jr.
  Loderback, John D.
  Logan, William M.
  Lolison, Abiah
  Lonis, George Washington
  Loughridge, William Wallace
  Love, David Hall
  Love, Robert S.
  Lowary, John L.
  Lupton, Cyrus W.
  Lyford, John
  Lynch, Nicholas

  Magill, William Harrison
  Maiden, Isaac
  Maldonado, Juan
  Malone, Charles
  Mancha, Jose Maria
  Manning, James M.
  Manuel, Albert C.
  Marner, John
  Marre, Achelle
  Marsh, Alonzo
  Marshall, John Ligett
  Martin, Joseph
  Martin, Philip
  Mason, Charles
  Mason, George W.
  Massey, William
  Maxwell, Pierre Menard
  Maxwell, Thomas
  Maybee, Jacob
  Mays, Ambrose
  Mays, Thomas H.
  McAllister, Joseph
  McClelland, Samuel
  McCloskey, Robert D.
  McCorlay, Placide B.
  McCormick, Joseph Manton
  McCoy, John
  McCoy, William
  McCrabb, John
  McCrabb, Joseph
  McCullough, Benjamin
  McFadin, David Hutcheson
  McFarlane, John W. B.
  McGary, Daniel H.
  McGary, Isaac
  McGay, Thomas
  McGown, Andrew Jackson
  McHorse, John W.
  McIntire, Thomas H.
  McIntire, William
  McKay, Daniel
  McKenzie, Hugh
  McKinza, Alexander
  McKneely, Samuel M.
  McLaughlin, Robert
  McLaughlin, Stephen
  McLean, McDougald
  McMillan, Edward
  McNeel, Pleasant D.
  McNelly, Bennett
  McStea, Andrew M.
  Menchaca, Jose Antonio
  Menefee, John Sutherland
  Mercer, Eli
  Mercer, Elijah G.
  Mercer, George Richie
  Merritt, Robert
  Merwin, Joseph W.
  Miles, Alfred H.
  Miles, Edward
  Millard, Henry
  Millen, William A.
  Miller, Daniel
  Miller, Hugh
  Miller, Joseph
  Miller, William H.
  Millerman, Ira
  Millett, Samuel
  Mills, Andrew Granville
  Mims, Benjamin Franklin
  Minnitt, Joshua.
  Mitchell, Alexander S.
  Mitchell, James
  Mitchell, Nathen
  Mitchell, S. B.
  Mixon, Noel
  Mock, William N.
  Molino, Jose
  Money, John Hamilton
  Montgomery, Andrew M.
  Montgomery, John
  Montgomery, Robert W.
  Moore, Robert
  Moore, Robert D.
  Moore, Samuel
  Moore, William P.
  Mordorff, Henry
  Moreland, Isaac N.
  Morgan, Hugh
  Morris, Jonathan D.
  Morton, John
  Mosier, Adam
  Moss, John
  Moss, Matthew Mark
  Mottley, Dr. Junius William
  Murphree, David
  Murphy, Daniel
  Murray, William
  Myrick, Eliakin P.

  Nabers, Robert
  Nabers, William
  Nash, James H.
  Navarro, Juan Nepomuceno
  Neal, John C.
  Nealis, Francis
  Neill, James Clinton
  Nelson, David S.
  Nelson, James
  Newman, William P.
  Noland, Eli

  O’Banion, Jennings
  O’Connor, Patrick B.
  O’Connor, Thomas
  Odem, David
  O’Driscoll, Daniel
  O’Neil, John
  Orr, Thomas
  Osborne, Benjamin S.
  Ownsby, James P.

  Pace, Dempsey Council
  Pace, James Robert
  Pace, Wesley Walker
  Pace, William Carroll
  Park, Joseph Belton
  Park, William A.
  Parker, Dickerson
  Parrott, C. W.
  Paschall, Samuel
  Pate, William H.
  Patterson, James S.
  Patton, St. Clair
  Patton, William
  Patton, William Hester
  Pearce, Edward
  Pearce, William J. C.
  Peck, Nathaniel
  Peck, Nicholas
  Peebles, Samuel W.
  Pena, Jacinto
  Penticost, George Washington
  Perry, Daniel
  Perry, James Hazard
  Peterson, John
  Peterson, William
  Pettus, Edward Cratic
  Pettus, John Freeman
  Petty, George Washington
  Peveto, Michael, Jr.
  Phelps, James A. E.
  Phillips, Eli
  Phillips, Samuel
  Phillips, Sydney
  Pickering, John
  Pinchback, James R.
  Plaster, Thomas Pliney
  Pleasants, John
  Plunkett, John
  Poe, George Washington
  Powell, James
  Pratt, Thomas A. S.
  Proctor, Joseph W.
  Pruitt, Levi
  Pruitt, Martin
  Putnam, Mitchell

  Rainey, Clement
  Rainwater, Edwin R.
  Ramey, Lawrence
  Ramirez, Eduardo
  Raymond, Samuel B.
  Reaves, Dimer W.
  Rector, Claiborne
  Rector, Elbridge Gerry
  Rector, Pendleton
  Redd, William Davis
  Reed, Henry
  Reed, Nathaniel
  Reel, Robert J. W.
  Reese, Charles Keller
  Reese, Washington Perry
  Rheinhart, Asa
  Rhodes, Joseph
  Rial, John W.
  Richardson, Daniel
  Richardson, John
  Richardson, Lewis
  Richardson, William
  Ripley, Phineas
  Robbins, John
  Robbins, Thomas
  Roberts, David
  Roberts, Zion
  Robinson, George Washington
  Robinson, James W.
  Robinson, Jesse
  Robinson, Thomas Jefferson
  Robinson, William
  Robison, Joel Walter
  Rockwell, Chester B.
  Rodriquez, Ambrosio
  Roeder, Louis Von
  Roman, Richard
  Rounds, Lyman Frank
  Rowe, James
  Ruddell, John
  Rudder, Nathaniel
  Rusk, David
  Rusk, Thomas Jefferson
  Russell, Robert Benedict
  Ryans, Thomas

  Sadler, John
  Sadler, William Turner
  Sanders, John
  Sanders, Uriah
  Sanett, D. Andrew
  Sayers, John
  Scallorn, John Wesley
  Scarborough, Paul
  Scates, William Bennett
  Scott, David
  Scott, William P.
  Scurry, Richardson A.
  Seaton, George Washington
  Secrest, Fielding Grundy
  Secrest, Washington Hampton
  Seguin, Juan Nepomuceno
  Self, George
  Sergent, W.
  Sevey, Manasseh
  Sevey, Ralph E.
  Shain, Charles B.
  Sharp, John
  Shaw, James
  Sherman, Sidney
  Shesten, Henry
  Shreve, John Milton
  Shupe, Samuel
  Sigmon, Abel
  Simmons, William
  Slack, Joseph H.
  Slayton, John
  Smith, Benjamin Fort
  Smith, Erastus
  Smith, George
  Smith, James Monroe
  Smith, John
  Smith, John
  Smith, John
  Smith, John
  Smith, John N. O.
  Smith, Leander
  Smith, Maxlin
  Smith, Robert W.
  Smith, William
  Smith, William C.
  Smith, William H.
  Smith, William M.
  Snell, Martin Kingsley
  Snyder, Asberry McKendree
  Somervell, Alexander
  Sovereign, Joseph
  Sparks, Stephen Franklin
  Spicer, Joseph A.
  Spillman, James H.
  Stancell, John F.
  Standifer, Jacob Littleton
  Standifer, William Bailey
  Stibbins, Charles C.
  Steel, Maxwell
  Steele, Alfonso
  Stephens, Ashley R.
  Stephenson, John Allen
  Stevenson, R.
  Stevenson, Robert
  Stewart, Charles
  Stewart, James
  Stilwell, William S.
  Stouffer, Henry S.
  Stout, William B.
  Stroh, Phillip
  Stroud, John W.
  Stump, John S.
  Sullivan, Dennis
  Summers, William W.
  Sutherland, George
  Swain, William L.
  Swearingen, Valentine Wesley
  Swearingen, William C.
  Sweeny, Thomas Jefferson
  Sweeny, William Burrell
  Swift, Hugh Montgomery
  Swisher, Henry H.
  Swisher, John Milton
  Sylvester, James Austin

  Tanner, Edward M.
  Tarin, Manuel
  Tarlton, James
  Taylor, Abraham R.
  Taylor, Campbell
  Taylor, Edward W.
  Taylor, John B.
  Taylor, John N.
  Taylor, Thomas
  Taylor, William S.
  Thomas, Benjamin, Jr.
  Thomas, Algernon P.
  Thompson, Charles P.
  Thompson, Cyrus W.
  Thompson, James B.
  Thompson, Jesse G.
  Threadgill, Joshua
  Tierwester, Henry H.
  Tindale, Daniel
  Tindall, William Pike
  Tinsley, James W.
  Tom, John Files
  Townsend, Spencer Burton
  Townsend, Stephen
  Trask, Olwyn J.
  Trenary, John B.
  Tumlinson, John James
  Turnage, Shelby C.
  Turner, Amasa
  Tyler, Charles C.
  Tyler, Robert D.

  Usher, Patrick
  Utley, Thomas C.

  Vandeveer, Logan
  Van Winkle, John
  Vermillion, Joseph D.
  Vinator, James
  Viven, John
  Votaw, Elijah

  Wade, John Marshall
  Waldron, C. W.
  Walker, James
  Walker, Martin
  Walker, Philip
  Walker, William S.
  Walling, Jesse
  Walmsley, James
  Walnut, Francis
  Wardziski, Felix
  Ware, William
  Waters, George
  Waters, William
  Watkins, James E.
  Watson, Dexter
  Webb, George
  Webb, Thomas H.
  Weedon, George
  Welch, James
  Wells, James A.
  Wells, Lysander
  Weppler, Phillip
  Wertzner, Christian Gotthelf
  Westgate, Ezra C.
  Wharton, James
  Wharton, John Austin
  Wheeler, Samuel L.
  Whitaker, Madison G.
  White, John Carey
  White, Joseph E.
  White, Levi W.
  Whitesides, Elisha S.
  Wilcox, Ozwin
  Wilder, Joseph
  Wildy, Samuel
  Wilkinson, Freeman
  Wilkinson, James
  Wilkinson, James G., Jr.
  Wilkinson, John
  Wilkinson, Leroy
  Williams, Charles
  Williams, Francis F.
  Williams, Hezekiah Reams
  Williams, Matthew R.
  Williams, William F.
  Williamson, John W.
  Williamson, Robert McAlpin
  Willoughby, Leiper
  Wilmouth, Louis
  Wilson, James
  Wilson, Thomas
  Wilson, Walker
  Winburn, McHenry
  Winn, Walter
  Winters, James Washington
  Winters, John Frelan
  Winters, William Carvin
  Wood, Edward B.
  Wood, William
  Woodlief, Deveraux J.
  Woods, Samuel
  Woodward, F. Marion
  Woolsey, Abner W.
  Wright, George Washington
  Wright, Rufus
  Wyly, Alfred Henderson

  Yancy, John
  Yarborough, Swanson
  York, James Allison
  Young, William Foster

  Zavala, Lorenzo de, Jr.
  Zumwalt, Andrew


Obeying the instructions of General Houston, the following officers and
men remained April 21, 1836, at the camp of the Texas army established
opposite Harrisburg. There the sick were attended by their comrades who
guarded the baggage and acted as rear guard of the main army.

  Abbott, Calvin P.
  Abbott, Launcelot
  Allphin, Ransom
  Anderson, John D.
  Anderson, John W.
  Anderson, Thomas
  Anderson, Thomas P.
  Atkinson, John

  Baker, Walter Elias
  Barker, William
  Bartlett, Jesse
  Beams, Obediah P.
  Belcher, Isham G.
  Bennett, James
  Benton, Jesse, Jr.
  Berry, John Bate
  Black, Albert
  Blaylock, James B.
  Blount, Stephen William
  Bomar, Dr. William W.
  Bond, George
  Bostick, James H.
  Box, Stilwell
  Boyce, Jeptha
  Bracey, McLin
  Bradley, Daniel
  Breeding, John
  Breeding, Napoleon Bonaparte
  Brown, Alexander
  Brown, Robert
  Bryody, Patrick
  Burch, James
  Burch, Valentine
  Burditt, Newell W.
  Burditt, William Buck
  Burleson, Jonathan
  Burtrang, Thomas

  Campbell, David Wilson
  Campbell, Heil Otem
  Campbell, John
  Campbell, Rufus Easton
  Cannon, Thomas
  Caruthers, Young
  Casey, George M.
  Castleman, Jacob
  Chamberlin, Willard
  Chance, Joseph Bell
  Chelaup, James K.
  Childress, James R.
  Cockrell, John R.
  Coe, Philip Haddox
  Cole, James
  Collard, James Hillness
  Collard, Jonathan S.
  Connell, David C.
  Conner, Evan
  Cook, Octavious A.
  Cottle, Sylvanus
  Cox, Phillip
  Crawford, John B.
  Crier, Andrew
  Crownover, Arter

  Darst, Emory Holman
  Davis, John
  Davis, William Francis H.
  Dickinson, Edward
  Douglass, Freeman Walker
  Douglass, Jonathan
  Duff, James Carson
  Dunn, Josiah G.

  Emmons, Calvin Brallery
  Etheridge, Godfrey
  Evans, Moses

  Farley, Massillon
  Farnsworth, Oliver
  Finley, Benjamin C.
  Fisk, Greenleaf
  Fitzgerald, Lankford
  Francis, Miller
  Freed, Henry
  Freeman, Thomas

  Gillett, Samuel S.
  Goolsey, William G.
  Gordon, James
  Gorham, Isaac
  Gorham, William
  Granville, Benjamin
  Gravis, John A. F.
  Grimes, Frederick Miller
  Grimes, George W.

  Haggard, Henry H.
  Hale, Jonas
  Hallmark, Alfred M.
  Harbour, John Monroe
  Harbour, T. J.
  Hardin, Ennis
  Harris, Isaac
  Hatfield, Basil Muse
  Head, Wiley M.
  Hensley, John M.
  Hill, David
  Hill, William Warner
  Hinds, James B.
  Hodge, Archibald
  Hodge, James
  Hodge, Robert
  Hodge, William
  Holcombe, James J.
  Hollingsworth, James
  Hope, Richard
  Hughes, James
  Hunter, Robert Hancock

  Jackson, Joseph
  Johnson, Joseph Ranson
  Johnson, Nathan B.
  Jones, Keeton McLemore

  Kemp, Thomas
  Kennard, William Everett
  Kenney, William H.
  Kerr, William P.
  Kokernot, Daniel L.
  Kuykendall, Adam
  Kuykendall, Brazilla
  Kuykendall, Gibson
  Kuykendall, H. A.
  Kuykendall, James Hampton
  Kuykendall, John
  Kuykendall, Thornton S.

  Law, Garret
  Lee, Hiram
  Lee, Theodore Staunton
  Lightfoot, Henry L.
  Litton, Addison
  Litton, Jesse
  Litton, John
  Liverall, A.
  Lloyd, Peterson
  Lynch, Joseph Penn

  Manning, James H.
  Mantin, L.
  Marshall, Elias J.
  Marshall, Hugh Lewis
  Marshall, John, Jr.
  Marshall, Joseph Taylor
  Marshall, Samuel B.
  Mather, Elisha
  Maurry, James
  McCrocklin, Jesse Lindsey
  McFaddin, Nathaniel A.
  McFadin, William M.
  McFall, Samuel
  McGown, Samuel
  McIntire, William
  McLaughlin, James
  McLaughlin, William
  McMaster, William
  McMillan, Andrew
  McMillan, James
  McNutt, Robert
  Means, William
  Merritt, Robert
  Moore, Azariah G.
  Moore, John D.
  Moore, Lewis
  Moore, Morris
  Morris, Burrel
  Morris, George
  Morris, James H.
  Morris, Spencer
  Newton, John
  Norment, Thomas

  Owen, James D.

  Page, Soloman Calvin
  Parker, Wiley
  Peebles, Richard Rodgers
  Pennington, J. M.
  Perry, Sion W.
  Perry, William M.
  Pettus, William
  Pevehouse, Preston
  Pier, James B.
  Pleasants, George Washington
  Polk, Thomas
  Polk, William P.
  Potts, R.
  Prewitt, Elisha
  Price, Hardy William Brown
  Price, Perry
  Price, Robert
  Price, William

  Rankin, David
  Raper, Daniel
  Reamos, Sherwood Y.
  Rhodes, John B.
  Rhorer, Conrad
  Ricks, George Washington
  Robbins, Early
  Roberts, Stephen R.
  Robertson, Sterling Clack
  Robinett, Enoch
  Robinett, James M.
  Robinson, Benjamin W.
  Robinson, James
  Rowlett, Alexander W.

  Scaggs, John H.
  Scott, Robert
  Seaton, George Washington
  Sharp, John
  Simpson, Jeremiah W.
  Smith, John G.
  Smith, William A.
  Smith, William P.
  Smith, William W.
  Snodgrass, J. G.
  Splane, Peyton R.
  Splane, Thomas M.
  Stephens, John
  Stevenson, Thomas B.
  Swoap, Benjamin Franklin

  Taylor, Josiah
  Teal, Henry
  Thompson, Thomas
  Tinnett, Robert
  Tollett, Wesley
  Tong, John B.
  Townsend, Moses
  Townsend, P. John
  Townsend, Stephen
  Townsend, William

  Vardeman, Henry W.
  Varner, Martin
  Vaughan, Richard

  Walker, John
  Walker, Josiah
  Walling, John C.
  Whitehead, Nicholas
  Whitlock, Robert
  Wilburn, Ransom
  Williams, Edward
  Williams, Hezekiah, Sr.
  Williams, Jesse
  Winnett, Robert
  Winters, Agabus
  Wood, William Riley
  Woods, Joseph H.
  Wright, Gilbert

  Yarborough, Joseph Randolph

  Zuber, William Physick



                            ACKNOWLEDGMENTS


Frontispiece “Battle of San Jacinto” is a photograph of a painting by
Henry A. McArdle.

Sam Houston’s picture is a photograph by Elwood M. Payne, of an etching
made from a daguerreotype in the San Jacinto Museum of History.

Mr. Payne also photographed the base of the monument, showing the
inscriptions.

Picture of Santa Anna is a photograph by Paul Peters of a daguerreotype
in the Museum.

The photographs of the Brigham monument and the Santa Anna surrender
marker also are by Paul Peters.

The surrender of Santa Anna is a photograph by Harry Pennington, Jr., of
a painting by W. H. Huddle.

The map showing the route of Sam Houston’s army was drawn by L. W. Kemp.
Map of San Jacinto battleground by Ed Kilman.

    [Illustration: Bronze armillary sun dial erected on the battlefield
    in memory of the nine Texans killed or mortally wounded at San
    Jacinto.

The dial, wrought by Julian Muench, measures twenty-five feet in
circumference. It was constructed with funds raised by the Daughters of
the Republic of Texas and the Texas Veterans association and was
dedicated April 21, 1940.]



                               Footnotes


[1]This plantation belonging to Groce has been confused by the historian
    John Henry Brown, and perhaps others, with another plantation he
    owned which was situated in the present county of Grimes, and known
    as “Groce’s Retreat.”

[2]Thomas J. Rusk, Secretary of War, and other Texans who were in the
    battle said the battle cry was “Remember the Alamo!” “Remember La
    Bahia!”

[3]With “Deaf” Smith in the detail that destroyed the bridge were Young
    P. Alsbury, John Coker, John Garner, Moses Lapham. Edwin R.
    Rainwater and Dimer W. Reaves.

[4]In his official report of the battle, April 25, 1836, Houston said
    783 Texans took part. Yet in a roster published later he listed 845
    officers and men at San Jacinto, and by oversight omitted Captain
    Alfred H. Wyly’s Company. In a Senate speech February 28, 1859,
    Houston said his effective force never exceeded 700 at any point.
    Conclusive evidence in official records brings the total number at
    San Jacinto up to 910.

[5]Several veterans of the battle said the tune played was “Yankee
    Doodle.”

[6]With Sylvester in the capture of Santa Anna were Joel W. Robison,
    Joseph D. Vermillion, Alfred H. Miles and David Cole.



                          Transcriber’s Notes


—Retained publication information from the printed edition: this eBook
  is public-domain in the country of publication.

—Silently corrected a few palpable typos.

—In the text versions only, text in italics is delimited by
  _underscores_.





*** End of this Doctrine Publishing Corporation Digital Book "The Battle of San Jacinto and the San Jacinto Campaign" ***

Doctrine Publishing Corporation provides digitized public domain materials.
Public domain books belong to the public and we are merely their custodians.
This effort is time consuming and expensive, so in order to keep providing
this resource, we have taken steps to prevent abuse by commercial parties,
including placing technical restrictions on automated querying.

We also ask that you:

+ Make non-commercial use of the files We designed Doctrine Publishing
Corporation's ISYS search for use by individuals, and we request that you
use these files for personal, non-commercial purposes.

+ Refrain from automated querying Do not send automated queries of any sort
to Doctrine Publishing's system: If you are conducting research on machine
translation, optical character recognition or other areas where access to a
large amount of text is helpful, please contact us. We encourage the use of
public domain materials for these purposes and may be able to help.

+ Keep it legal -  Whatever your use, remember that you are responsible for
ensuring that what you are doing is legal. Do not assume that just because
we believe a book is in the public domain for users in the United States,
that the work is also in the public domain for users in other countries.
Whether a book is still in copyright varies from country to country, and we
can't offer guidance on whether any specific use of any specific book is
allowed. Please do not assume that a book's appearance in Doctrine Publishing
ISYS search  means it can be used in any manner anywhere in the world.
Copyright infringement liability can be quite severe.

About ISYS® Search Software
Established in 1988, ISYS Search Software is a global supplier of enterprise
search solutions for business and government.  The company's award-winning
software suite offers a broad range of search, navigation and discovery
solutions for desktop search, intranet search, SharePoint search and embedded
search applications.  ISYS has been deployed by thousands of organizations
operating in a variety of industries, including government, legal, law
enforcement, financial services, healthcare and recruitment.



Home