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Title: Index of the Project Gutenberg Works of Alexandre Dumas, [père]
Author: Dumas, Alexandre
Language: English
As this book started as an ASCII text book there are no pictures available.
Copyright Status: Not copyrighted in the United States. If you live elsewhere check the laws of your country before downloading this ebook. See comments about copyright issues at end of book.

*** Start of this Doctrine Publishing Corporation Digital Book "Index of the Project Gutenberg Works of Alexandre Dumas, [père]" ***

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CONTENTS

##  THE BLACK TULIP

##  THE COUNT OF MONTE CRISTO

##  THE THREE MUSKETEERS

##  TEN YEARS LATER

##  TWENTY YEARS AFTER

##  THE VICOMTE DE BRAGELONNE

##  TEN YEARS LATER

##  LOUISE DE LA VALLIERE

##  THE MAN IN THE IRON MASK

##  CELEBRATED CRIMES, 18 VOLUMES

##  THE COMPANIONS OF JEHU

##  CHICOT THE JESTER

THE QUEEN'S NECKLACE

##  THE CONSPIRATORS

##  THE PRUSSIAN TERROR

##  CAPTAIN PAUL

##  THE SICILIAN BANDIT

THE CORSICAN BROTHERS

##  THE HERO OF THE PEOPLE

##  THE MESMERIST'S VICTIM

##  THE COUNTESS OF CHARNY

##  THE ROYAL LIFE GUARD

##  TAKING THE BASTILE

BALSAMO, THE MAGICIAN

##  LAST VENDÉE

##  MES MEMOIRS, Vol. I.

##  MY MEMOIRS, Vol. II.

##  MY MEMOIRS, Vol. III.

##  MY MEMOIRS, Vol. IV.

##  MY MEMOIRS, Vol. V.

##  MY MEMOIRS, Vol. VI.

##  THE WOLF-LEADER

THE WAR OF WOMEN I.

THE WAR OF WOMEN II.



TABLES OF CONTENTS OF VOLUMES



THE BLACK TULIP


By Alexandre Dumas



Contents

    Chapter 1. A Grateful People

    Chapter 2. The Two Brothers

    Chapter 3. The Pupil of John de Witt

    Chapter 4. The Murderers

    Chapter 5. The Tulip-fancier and his Neighbour

    Chapter 6. The Hatred of a Tulip-fancier

    Chapter 7. The Happy Man makes Acquaintance with Misfortune

    Chapter 8. An Invasion

    Chapter 9. The Family Cell

    Chapter 10. The Jailer’s Daughter

    Chapter 11. Cornelius van Baerle’s Will

    Chapter 12. The Execution

    Chapter 13. What was going on all this Time in the Mind of one of the Spectators

    Chapter 14. The Pigeons of Dort

    Chapter 15. The Little Grated Window

    Chapter 16. Master and Pupil

    Chapter 17. The First Bulb

    Chapter 18. Rosa’s Lover

    Chapter 19. The Maid and the Flower

    Chapter 20. The Events which took place during those Eight Days

    Chapter 21. The Second Bulb

    Chapter 22. The Opening of the Flower

    Chapter 23. The Rival

    Chapter 24. The Black Tulip changes Masters

    Chapter 25. The President van Systens

    Chapter 26. A Member of the Horticultural Society

    Chapter 27. The Third Bulb

    Chapter 28. The Hymn of the Flowers

    Chapter 29. In which Van Baerle, before leaving Loewestein, settles Accounts with Gryphus

    Chapter 30. Wherein the Reader begins to guess the Kind of Execution that was awaiting Van Baerle

    Chapter 31. Haarlem

    Chapter 32. A Last Request

    Chapter 33. Conclusion



THE COUNT OF MONTE CRISTO


by Alexandre Dumas [père]



Contents

    VOLUME ONE

    Chapter 1. Marseilles—The Arrival

    Chapter 2. Father and Son

    Chapter 3. The Catalans

    Chapter 4. Conspiracy

    Chapter 5. The Marriage Feast

    Chapter 6. The Deputy Procureur du Roi

    Chapter 7. The Examination

    Chapter 8. The Château d’If

    Chapter 9. The Evening of the Betrothal

    Chapter 10. The King’s Closet at the Tuileries

    Chapter 11. The Corsican Ogre

    Chapter 12. Father and Son

    Chapter 13. The Hundred Days

    Chapter 14. The Two Prisoners

    Chapter 15. Number 34 and Number 27

    Chapter 16. A Learned Italian

    Chapter 17. The Abbé’s Chamber

    Chapter 18. The Treasure

    Chapter 19. The Third Attack

    Chapter 20. The Cemetery of the Château d’If

    Chapter 21. The Island of Tiboulen

    Chapter 22. The Smugglers

    Chapter 23. The Island of Monte Cristo

    Chapter 24. The Secret Cave

    Chapter 25. The Unknown

    Chapter 26. The Pont du Gard Inn

    Chapter 27. The Story



    VOLUME TWO

    Chapter 28. The Prison Register

    Chapter 29. The House of Morrel & Son

    Chapter 30. The Fifth of September

    Chapter 31. Italy: Sinbad the Sailor

    Chapter 32. The Waking

    Chapter 33. Roman Bandits

    Chapter 34. The Colosseum

    Chapter 35. La Mazzolata

    Chapter 36. The Carnival at Rome.

    Chapter 37. The Catacombs of Saint Sebastian

    Chapter 38. The Rendezvous

    Chapter 39. The Guests

    Chapter 40. The Breakfast

    Chapter 41. The Presentation

    Chapter 42. Monsieur Bertuccio

    Chapter 43. The House at Auteuil

    Chapter 44. The Vendetta

    Chapter 45. The Rain of Blood

    Chapter 46. Unlimited Credit

    Chapter 47. The Dappled Grays



    VOLUME THREE

    Chapter 48. Ideology

    Chapter 49. Haydée

    Chapter 50. The Morrel Family

    Chapter 51. Pyramus and Thisbe

    Chapter 52. Toxicology

    Chapter 53. Robert le Diable

    Chapter 54. A Flurry in Stocks

    Chapter 55. Major Cavalcanti

    Chapter 56. Andrea Cavalcanti

    Chapter 57. In the Lucern Patch

    Chapter 58. M. Noirtier de Villefort

    Chapter 59. The Will

    Chapter 60. The Telegraph

    Chapter 61. How a Gardener May Get Rid of the Dormice

    Chapter 62. Ghosts

    Chapter 63. The Dinner

    Chapter 64. The Beggar

    Chapter 65. A Conjugal Scene

    Chapter 66. Matrimonial Projects

    Chapter 67. The Office of the King’s Attorney

    Chapter 68. A Summer Ball

    Chapter 69. The Inquiry

    Chapter 70. The Ball

    Chapter 71. Bread and Salt

    Chapter 72. Madame de Saint-Méran

    Chapter 73. The Promise



    VOLUME FOUR

    Chapter 74. The Villefort Family Vault

    Chapter 75. A Signed Statement

    Chapter 76. Progress of Cavalcanti the Younger

    Chapter 77. Haydée

    Chapter 78. We hear From Yanina

    Chapter 79. The Lemonade

    Chapter 80. The Accusation

    Chapter 81. The Room of the Retired Baker

    Chapter 82. The Burglary

    Chapter 83. The Hand of God

    Chapter 84. Beauchamp

    Chapter 85. The Journey

    Chapter 86. The Trial

    Chapter 87. The Challenge

    Chapter 88. The Insult

    Chapter 89. The Night

    Chapter 90. The Meeting

    Chapter 91. Mother and Son

    Chapter 92. The Suicide

    Chapter 93. Valentine

    Chapter 94. Maximilian’s Avowal

    Chapter 95. Father and Daughter


    VOLUME FIVE

    Chapter 96. The Contract

    Chapter 97. The Departure for Belgium

    Chapter 98. The Bell and Bottle Tavern

    Chapter 99. The Law

    Chapter 100. The Apparition

    Chapter 101. Locusta

    Chapter 102. Valentine

    Chapter 103. Maximilian

    Chapter 104. Danglars’ Signature

    Chapter 105. The Cemetery of Père-Lachaise

    Chapter 106. Dividing the Proceeds

    Chapter 107. The Lions’ Den

    Chapter 108. The Judge

    Chapter 109. The Assizes

    Chapter 110. The Indictment

    Chapter 111. Expiation

    Chapter 112. The Departure

    Chapter 113. The Past

    Chapter 114. Peppino

    Chapter 115. Luigi Vampa’s Bill of Fare

    Chapter 116. The Pardon

    Chapter 117. The Fifth of October



THE THREE MUSKETEERS
By Alexandre Dumas, Pere
First Volume of the d'Artagnan Series
CONTENTS

    AUTHOR'S PREFACE

    1 THE THREE PRESENTS OF D'ARTAGNAN THE ELDER

    2 THE ANTECHAMBER OF M. DE TREVILLE

    3 THE AUDIENCE

    4 THE SHOULDER OF ATHOS, THE BALDRIC OF PORTHOS AND THE HANDKERCHIEF OF ARAMIS

    5 THE KING'S MUSKETEERS AND THE CARDINAL'S GUARDS

    6 HIS MAJESTY KING LOUIS XIII

    7 THE INTERIOR* OF THE MUSKETEERS

    8 CONCERNING A COURT INTRIGUE

    9 D'ARTAGNAN SHOWS HIMSELF

    10 A MOUSETRAP IN THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY

    11 IN WHICH THE PLOT THICKENS

    12 GEORGE VILLIERS, DUKE OF BUCKINGHAM

    13 MONSIEUR BONACIEUX

    14 THE MAN OF MEUNG

    15 MEN OF THE ROBE AND MEN OF THE SWORD

    16 IN WHICH M. SEGUIER, KEEPER OF THE SEALS, LOOKS MORE THAN ONCE FOR THE BELL

    17 BONACIEUX AT HOME

    18 LOVER AND HUSBAND

    19 PLAN OF CAMPAIGN

    20 THE JOURNEY

    21 THE COUNTESS DE WINTER

    22 THE BALLET OF LA MERLAISON

    23 THE RENDEZVOUS

    24 THE PAVILION

    25 PORTHOS

    26 ARAMIS AND HIS THESIS

    27 THE WIFE OF ATHOS

    28 THE RETURN

    29 HUNTING FOR THE EQUIPMENTS

    30 D'ARTAGNAN AND THE ENGLISHMAN

    31 ENGLISH AND FRENCH

    32 A PROCURATOR'S DINNER

    33 SOUBRETTE AND MISTRESS

    34 IN WHICH THE EQUIPMENT OF ARAMIS AND PORTHOS IS TREATED OF

    35 A GASCON A MATCH FOR CUPID

    36 DREAM OF VENGEANCE

    37 MILADY'S SECRET

    38 HOW, WITHOUT INCOMMDING HIMSELF, ATHOS PROCURES HIS EQUIPMENT

    39 A VISION

    40 A TERRIBLE VISION

    41 THE SEIGE OF LA ROCHELLE

    42 THE ANJOU WINE

    43 THE SIGN OF THE RED DOVECOT

    44 THE UTILITY OF STOVEPIPES

    45 A CONJUGAL SCENE

    46 THE BASTION SAINT-GERVAIS

    47 THE COUNCIL OF THE MUSKETEERS

    48 A FAMILY AFFAIR

    49 FATALITY

    50 CHAT BETWEEN BROTHER AND SISTER

    51 OFFICER

    52 CAPTIVITY: THE FIRST DAY

    53 CAPTIVITY: THE SECOND DAY

    54 CAPTIVITY: THE THIRD DAY

    55 CAPTIVITY: THE FOURTH DAY

    56 CAPTIVITY: THE FIFTH DAY

    57 MEANS FOR CLASSICAL TRAGEDY

    58 ESCAPE

    59 WHAT TOOK PLACE AT PORTSMOUTH AUGUST 23, 1628

    60 IN FRANCE

    61 THE CARMELITE CONVENT AT BETHUNE

    62 TWO VARIETIES OF DEMONS

    63 THE DROP OF WATER

    64 THE MAN IN THE RED CLOAK

    65 TRIAL

    66 EXECUTION

    67 CONCLUSION

    EPILOGUE



TEN YEARS LATER


by Alexandre Dumas



Contents

THE VICOMTE DE BRAGELONNE.

Volume I.

CHAPTER 1. The Letter.

CHAPTER 2. The Messenger.

CHAPTER 3. The Interview.

CHAPTER 4. Father and Son.

CHAPTER 5. In which Something will be said of Cropoli—of Cropoli and of a Great Unknown Painter.

CHAPTER 6. The Unknown.

CHAPTER 7. Parry.

CHAPTER 8. What his Majesty King Louis XIV. was at the Age of Twenty-Two

CHAPTER 9. In which the Unknown of the Hostelry of Les Medici loses his Incognito.

CHAPTER 10. The Arithmetic of M. de Mazarin

CHAPTER 11. Mazarin's Policy

CHAPTER 12. The King and the Lieutenant

CHAPTER 13. Mary de Mancini

CHAPTER 14. In which the King and the Lieutenant each give Proofs of Memory

CHAPTER 15. The Proscribed

CHAPTER 16. "Remember!"

CHAPTER 17. In which Aramis is sought and only Bazin is found

CHAPTER 18. In which D'Artagnan seeks Porthos, and only finds Mousqueton

CHAPTER 19. What D'Artagnan went to Paris for

CHAPTER 20. Of the Society which was formed in the Rue des Lombards, at the Sign of the Pilon d'Or

CHAPTER 21. In which D'Artagnan prepares to travel for the Firm of Planchet and Company

CHAPTER 22. D'Artagnan travels for the House of Planchet and Company

CHAPTER 23. In which the Author, very unwillingly, is forced to write a Little History

CHAPTER 24. The Treasure

CHAPTER 25. The March

CHAPTER 26. Heart and Mind

CHAPTER 27. The Next Day

CHAPTER 28. Smuggling

CHAPTER 29. In which D'Artagnan begins to fear he has placed his Money and that of Planchet in the Sinking Fund

CHAPTER 30. The Shares of Planchet and Company rise again to Par

CHAPTER 31. Monk reveals himself

CHAPTER 32. Athos and D'Artagnan meet once more at the Hostelry of the Corne du Cerf

CHAPTER 33. The Audience.

CHAPTER 34. Of the Embarrassment of Riches

CHAPTER 35. On the Canal

CHAPTER 36. How D'Artagnan drew, as a Fairy would have done, a Country-seat from a Deal Box

CHAPTER 37. How D'Artagnan regulated the "Assets" of the Company before he established its "Liabilities"

CHAPTER 38. In which it is seen that the French Grocer had already been established in the Seventeenth Century

CHAPTER 39. Mazarin's Gaming Party

CHAPTER 40. An Affair of State

CHAPTER 41. The Recital

CHAPTER 42. In which Mazarin becomes Prodigal

CHAPTER 43. Guenaud

CHAPTER 44. Colbert

CHAPTER 45. Confession of a Man of Wealth

CHAPTER 46. The Donation

CHAPTER 47. How Anne of Austria gave one Piece of Advice to Louis XIV., and how M. Fouquet gave him another.

CHAPTER 48. Agony

CHAPTER 49. The First Appearance of Colbert

CHAPTER 50. The First Day of the Royalty of Louis XIV

CHAPTER 51. A Passion

CHAPTER 52. D'Artagnan's Lesson

CHAPTER 53. The King

CHAPTER 54. The Houses of M. Fouquet

CHAPTER 55. The Abbe Fouquet

CHAPTER 56. M. de la Fontaine's Wine

CHAPTER 57. The Gallery of Saint-Mande

CHAPTER 58. Epicureans

CHAPTER 59. A Quarter of an Hour's Delay

CHAPTER 60. Plan of Battle

CHAPTER 61. The Cabaret of the Image-de-Notre-Dame

CHAPTER 62. Vive Colbert!

CHAPTER 63. How M. d'Eymeris's Diamond passed into the Hands of M. D'Artagnan.

CHAPTER 64. Of the Notable Difference D'Artagnan finds between Monsieur the Intendant and Monsieur the Superintendent

CHAPTER 65. Philosophy of the Heart and Mind

CHAPTER 66. The Journey

CHAPTER 67. How D'Artagnan became acquainted with a Poet, who had turned Printer for the sake of printing his own Verses

CHAPTER 68. D'Artagnan continues his Investigations

CHAPTER 69. In which the Reader, no doubt, will be as astonished as D'Artagnan was to meet an Old Acquaintance

CHAPTER 70. Wherein the Ideas of D'Artagnan, at first strangely clouded, begin to clear up a little.

CHAPTER 71. A Procession at Vannes

CHAPTER 72. The Grandeur of the Bishop of Vannes

CHAPTER 73. In which Porthos begins to be sorry for having come with D'Artagnan

CHAPTER 74. In which D'Artagnan makes all Speed, Porthos snores, and Aramis counsels

CHAPTER 75. In which Monsieur Fouquet acts

CHAPTER 76. In which D'Artagnan finishes by at length placing his Hand upon his Captain's Commission

CHAPTER 77. A Lover and his Mistress

CHAPTER 78. In which we at length see the true Heroine of this History appear

CHAPTER 79. Malicorne and Manicamp

CHAPTER 80. Manicamp and Malicorne

CHAPTER 81. The Courtyard of the Hotel Grammont

CHAPTER 82. The Portrait of Madame

CHAPTER 83. Havre

CHAPTER 84. At Sea

CHAPTER 85. The Tents

CHAPTER 86. Night

CHAPTER 87. From Havre to Paris

CHAPTER 88. An Account of what the Chevalier de Lorraine thought of Madame

CHAPTER 89. A Surprise for Madame de Montalais

CHAPTER 90. The Consent of Athos

CHAPTER 91. Monsieur becomes jealous of the Duke of Buckingham

CHAPTER 92. Forever!

CHAPTER 93. King Louis XIV. does not think Mademoiselle de la Valliere either rich enough or pretty enough

CHAPTER 94. Sword-thrusts in the Water

CHAPTER 95. Sword-thrusts in the Water (concluded)

CHAPTER 96. Baisemeaux de Montlezun

CHAPTER 97. The King's Card-table

CHAPTER 98. M. Baisemeaux de Montlezun's Accounts

CHAPTER 99. The Breakfast at Monsieur de Baisemeaux's

CHAPTER 100. The Second Floor of la Bertaudiere

CHAPTER 101. The Two Friends

CHAPTER 102. Madame de Belliere's Plate

CHAPTER 103. The Dowry

CHAPTER 104. Le Terrain de Dieu



TWENTY YEARS AFTER
By Alexandre Dumas, Pere
Second Volume of the d'Artagnan Series
1910
CONTENTS

    1. The Shade of Cardinal Richelieu.

    2. A Nightly Patrol.

    3. Dead Animosities.

    4. Anne of Austria at the Age of Forty-six.

    5. The Gascon and the Italian.

    6. D'Artagnan in his Fortieth Year.

    7. Touches upon the Strange Effects a Half-pistole may have.

    8. D'Artagnan, Going to a Distance to discover Aramis.

    9. The Abbe D'Herblay.

    10. Monsieur Porthos du Vallon de Bracieux de Pierrefonds.

    11. Wealth does not necessarily produce Happiness.

    12. Porthos was Discontented with his Condition.

    13. Two Angelic Faces.

    14. The Castle of Bragelonne.

    15. Athos as a Diplomatist.

    16. The Duc de Beaufort.

    17. Duc de Beaufort amused his Leisure Hours in the Donjon of Vincennes.

    18. Grimaud begins his Functions.

    19. Pates made by the Successor of Father Marteau are described.

    20. One of Marie Michon's Adventures.

    21. The Abbe Scarron.

    22. Saint Denis.

    23. One of the Forty Methods of Escape of the Duc de Beaufort.

    24. The timely Arrival of D'Artagnan in Paris.

    25. An Adventure on the High Road.

    26. The Rencontre.

    27. The four old Friends prepare to meet again.

    28. The Place Royale.

    29. The Ferry across the Oise.

    30. Skirmishing.

    31. The Monk.

    32. The Absolution.

    33. Grimaud Speaks.

    34. On the Eve of Battle.

    35. A Dinner in the Old Style.

    36. A Letter from Charles the First.

    37. Cromwell's Letter.

    38. Henrietta Maria and Mazarin.

    39. How, sometimes, the Unhappy mistake Chance for Providence.

    40. Uncle and Nephew.

    41. Paternal Affection.

    42. Another Queen in Want of Help.

    43. In which it is proved that first Impulses are oftentimes the best.

    44. Te Deum for the Victory of Lens.

    45. The Beggar of St. Eustache.

    46. The Tower of St. Jacques de la Boucherie.

    47. The Riot.

    48. The Riot becomes a Revolution.

    49. Misfortune refreshes the Memory.

    50. The Interview.

    51. The Flight.

    52. The Carriage of Monsieur le Coadjuteur.

    53. How D'Artagnan and Porthos earned by selling Straw.

    54. In which we hear Tidings of Aramis.

    55. The Scotchman.

    56. The Avenger.

    57. Oliver Cromwell.

    58. Jesus Seigneur.

    59. Noble Natures never lose Courage, nor good Stomachs their Appetites.

    60. Respect to Fallen Majesty.

    61. D'Artagnan hits on a Plan.

    62. London.

    63. The Trial.

    64. Whitehall.

    65. The Workmen.

    66. Remember!

    67. The Man in the Mask.

    68. Cromwell's House.

    69. Conversational.

    70. The Skiff "Lightning."

    71. Port Wine.

    72. End of the Port Wine Mystery.

    73. Fatality.

    74. How Mousqueton had a Narrow Escape of being eaten.

    75. The Return.

    76. The Ambassadors.

    77. The three Lieutenants of the Generalissimo.

    78. The Battle of Charenton.

    79. The Road to Picardy.

    80. The Gratitude of Anne of Austria.

    81. Cardinal Mazarin as King.

    82. Precautions.

    83. Strength and Sagacity.

    84. Strength and Sagacity--Continued.

    85. The Oubliettes of Cardinal Mazarin.

    86. Conferences.

    87. Thinking that Porthos will be at last a Baron, and D'Artagnan a Captain.

    88. Shows how with Threat and Pen more is effected than by the Sword.

    89. Difficult for Kings to return to the Capitals of their Kingdoms.

    90. Conclusion.



THE VICOMTE DE BRAGELONNE
By Alexandre Dumas, Pere
This Begins the Final Volume of the D'Artagnan Series
CONTENTS

    Original Transcriber's Note:

    Chapter I. The Letter.

    Chapter II. The Messenger.

    Chapter III. The Interview.

    Chapter IV. Father and Son.

    Chapter V. In which Something will be said of Cropoli.

    Chapter VI. The Unknown.

    Chapter VII. Parry.

    Chapter VIII. What his Majesty King Louis XIV. was at the Age of Twenty-Two.

    Chapter IX. In which the Unknown of the Hostelry of Les Medici loses his Incognito.

    Chapter X. The Arithmetic of M. de Mazarin.

    Chapter XI. Mazarin's Policy.

    Chapter XII. The King and the Lieutenant.

    Chapter XIII. Mary de Mancini.

    Chapter XIV. In which the King and the Lieutenant each give Proofs of Memory.

    Chapter XV. The Proscribed.

    Chapter XVI. "Remember!"

    Chapter XVII. In which Aramis is sought, and only Bazin is found.

    Chapter XVIII. In which D'Artagnan seeks Porthos, and only finds Mousqueton.

    Chapter XIX. What D'Artagnan went to Paris for.

    Chapter XX. Of the Society which was formed in the Rue des Lombards.

    Chapter XXI. In which D'Artagnan prepares to travel.

    Chapter XXII. D'Artagnan travels for the House of Planchet and Company.

    Chapter XXIII. In which the Author is forced to write a Little History.

    Chapter XXIV. The Treasure.

    Chapter XXV. The Marsh.

    Chapter XXVI. Heart and Mind.

    Chapter XXVII. The Next Day.

    Chapter XXVIII. Smuggling.

    Chapter XXIX. Fear he has placed his Money and that of Planchet in the Sinking Fund.

    Chapter XXX. The Shares of Planchet and Company rise again to Par.

    Chapter XXXI. Monk reveals Himself.

    Chapter XXXII. Athos and D'Artagnan meet once more at the Hostelry of the Corne du Cerf.

    Chapter XXXIII. The Audience.

    Chapter XXXIV. Of the Embarrassment of Riches.

    Chapter XXXV. On the Canal.

    Chapter XXXVI. How D'Artagnan drew a Country-Seat from a Deal Box.

    Chapter XXXVII. How D'Artagnan regulated the "Assets" of the Company."

    Chapter XXXVIII. the French Grocer had already been established in the Seventeenth Century.

    Chapter XXXIX. Mazarin's Gaming Party.

    Chapter XL: An Affair of State.

    Chapter XLI. The Recital.

    Chapter XLII. In which Mazarin becomes Prodigal.

    Chapter XLIII. Guenaud.

    Chapter XLIV. Colbert.

    Chapter XLV. Confession of a Man of Wealth.

    Chapter XLVI. The Donation.

    Chapter XLVII. How Anne of Austria gave one Piece of Advice to Louis XIV.

    Chapter XLVIII. Agony.

    Chapter XLIX. The First Appearance of Colbert.

    Chapter L: The First Day of the Royalty of Louis XIV.

    Chapter LI. A Passion.

    Chapter LII. D'Artagnan's Lesson.

    Chapter LIII. The King.

    Chapter LIV. The Houses of M. Fouquet.

    Chapter LV. The Abbe Fouquet.

    Chapter LVI. M. de la Fontaine's Wine.

    Chapter LVII. The Gallery of Saint-Mande.

    Chapter LVIII. Epicureans.

    Chapter LIX. A Quarter of an Hour's Delay.

    Chapter LX. Plan of Battle.

    Chapter LXI. The Cabaret of the Image-de-Notre-Dame.

    Chapter LXII. Vive Colbert!

    Chapter LXIII. How M. d'Eymeris's Diamond passed into the Hands of M. d'Artagnan.

    Chapter LXIV. Difference D'Artagnan finds between the Intendant and the Superintendent.

    Chapter LXV. Philosophy of the Heart and Mind.

    Chapter LXVI. The Journey.

    Chapter LXVII. How D'Artagnan became Acquainted with a Poet.

    Chapter LXVIII. D'Artagnan continues his Investigations.

    Chapter LXIX. D'Artagnan was to meet an Old Acquaintance.

    Chapter LXX. Wherein the Ideas of D'Artagnan begin to clear up a little.

    Chapter LXXI. A Procession at Vannes.

    Chapter LXXII. The Grandeur of the Bishop of Vannes.

    Chapter LXXIII. In which Porthos begins to be sorry for having come with D'Artagnan.

    Chapter LXXIV. D'Artagnan makes all Speed, Porthos snores, and Aramis counsels.

    Chapter LXXV. In which Monsieur Fouquet Acts.



TEN YEARS LATER


(1660-1661, Chapters 76-140 of the Third Volume of the D’Artagnan series)


by Alexandre Dumas
THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EDITOR’S NOTE TO THE PG D’ARTAGNAN SERIES

LINKED INDEX OF PROJECT GUTENBERG VOLUMES:


 ORDER      TITLE            PG ETEXT#      DATES       VOLUME  CHAPTERS

 1  The Three Musketeers       1257       1625-1628        1

 2  Twenty Years After         1259       1648-1649        2

 3  The Vicomte de Bragelonne  2609         1660           3        1-75

 4  Ten Years Later            2681       1660-1661        3      76-140

 5  Louise de la Valliere      2710         1661           3     141-208

 6  The Man in the Iron Mask   2759       1661-1673        3     209-269

     [Project Gutenberg Etext 1258 listed below, is of the same
     title as etext 2681 and its contents overlap those of two
     other volumes: it includes all the chapters of etext 2609
     and  the first 28 chapters of 2681]

     Ten Years Later          1258       1660-1661        3       1-104



Contents

Transcriber’s Notes


Introduction


Chapter I. In which D’Artagnan finishes by at Length placing his Hand upon his Captain’s Commission.

Chapter II. A Lover and His Mistress.

Chapter III. In Which We at Length See the True Heroine of this History

Chapter IV. Malicorne and Manicamp.

Chapter V: Manicamp and Malicorne.

Chapter VI. The Courtyard of the Hotel Grammont.

Chapter VII. The Portrait of Madame.

Chapter VIII. Le Havre.

Chapter IX. At Sea.

Chapter X. The Tents.

Chapter XI. Night.

Chapter XII. From Le Havre to Paris.

Chapter XIII. An Account of what the Chevalier de Lorraine Thought of Madame.

Chapter XIV. A Surprise for Raoul.

Chapter XV. The Consent of Athos.

Chapter XVI. Monsieur Becomes Jealous of the Duke of Buckingham.

Chapter XVII. Forever!

Chapter XVIII. King Louis XIV. does not think Mademoiselle de la Valliere rich enough

Chapter XIX. Sword-Thrusts in the Water.

Chapter XX. Sword-Thrusts in the Water (concluded).

Chapter XXI. Baisemeaux de Montlezun.

Chapter XXII. The King’s Card-Table.

Chapter XXIII. M. Baisemeaux de Montlezun’s Accounts.

Chapter XXIV. The Breakfast at Monsieur de Baisemeaux’s.

Chapter XXV. The Second Floor of la Bertaudiere.

Chapter XXVI. The Two Friends.

Chapter XXVII. Madame de Belliere’s Plate.

Chapter XXVIII. The Dowry.

Chapter XXIX. Le Terrain de Dieu.

Chapter XXX. Threefold Love.

Chapter XXXI. M. de Lorraine’s Jealousy.

Chapter XXXII. Monsieur is Jealous of Guiche.

Chapter XXXIII. The Mediator.

Chapter XXXIV. The Advisers.

Chapter XXXV. Fontainebleau.

Chapter XXXVI. The Bath.

Chapter XXXVII. The Butterfly-Chase.

Chapter XXXVIII. What Was Caught after the Butterflies.

Chapter XXXIX. The Ballet of the Seasons.

Chapter XL: The Nymphs of the Park of Fontainebleau.

Chapter XLI. What Was Said under the Royal Oak.

Chapter XLII. The King’s Uneasiness.

Chapter XLIII. The King’s Secret.

Chapter XLIV. Courses de Nuit.

Chapter XLV. In Which Madame Acquires a Proof that Listeners Hear What Is Said.

Chapter XLVI. Aramis’s Correspondence.

Chapter XLVII. The Orderly Clerk.

Chapter XLVIII. Fontainebleau at Two o’Clock in the Morning.

Chapter XLIX. The Labyrinth.

Chapter L: How Malicorne Had Been Turned Out of the Hotel of the Beau Paon.

Chapter LI. What Actually Occurred at the Inn Called the Beau Paon.

Chapter LII. A Jesuit of the Eleventh Year.

Chapter LIII. The State Secret.

Chapter LIV. A Mission.

Chapter LV. Happy as a Prince.

Chapter LVI. Story of a Dryad and a Naiad.

Chapter LVII. Conclusion of the Story of a Naiad and of a Dryad.

Chapter LVIII. Royal Psychology.

Chapter LIX. Something That neither Naiad nor Dryad Foresaw.

Chapter LX. The New General of the Jesuits.

Chapter LXI. The Storm.

Chapter LXII. The Shower of Rain.

Chapter LXIII. Toby.

Chapter LXIV. Madame’s Four Chances.

Chapter LXV. The Lottery.

Footnotes



LOUISE DE LA VALLIERE


by Alexandre Dumas [Pere]
THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EDITOR’S NOTE TO THE PG D’ARTAGNAN SERIES

LINKED INDEX OF PROJECT GUTENBERG VOLUMES:


 ORDER      TITLE            PG ETEXT#      DATES       VOLUME  CHAPTERS

 1  The Three Musketeers       1257       1625-1628        1

 2  Twenty Years After         1259       1648-1649        2

 3  The Vicomte de Bragelonne  2609         1660           3        1-75

 4  Ten Years Later            2681       1660-1661        3      76-140

 5  Louise de la Valliere      2710         1661           3     141-208

 6  The Man in the Iron Mask   2759       1661-1673        3     209-269

     [Project Gutenberg Etext 1258 listed below, is of the same
     title as etext 2681 and its contents overlap those of two
     other volumes: it includes all the chapters of etext 2609
     and  the first 28 chapters of 2681]

     Ten Years Later          1258       1660-1661        3       1-104



Contents

Introduction

Chapter I. Malaga.

Chapter II. A Letter from M. Baisemeaux.

Chapter III. In Which the Reader will be Delighted to Find that Porthos Has Lost Nothing of His Muscularity.

Chapter IV. The Rat and the Cheese.

Chapter V. Planchet’s Country-House.

Chapter VI. Showing What Could Be Seen from Planchet’s House.

Chapter VII. How Porthos, Truchen, and Planchet Parted with Each Other on Friendly Terms, Thanks to D’Artagnan.

Chapter VIII. The Presentation of Porthos at Court.

Chapter IX. Explanations.

Chapter X. Madame and De Guiche.

Chapter XI. Montalais and Malicorne.

Chapter XII. How De Wardes Was Received at Court.

Chapter XIII. The Combat.

Chapter XIV. The King’s Supper.

Chapter XV. After Supper.

Chapter XVI. Showing in What Way D’Artagnan Discharged the Mission with Which the King Had Intrusted Him.

Chapter XVII. The Encounter.

Chapter XVIII. The Physician.

Chapter XIX. Wherein D’Artagnan Perceives that It Was He Who Was Mistaken, and Manicamp Who Was Right.

Chapter XX. Showing the Advantage of Having Two Strings to One’s Bow.

Chapter XXI. M. Malicorne the Keeper of the Records of France.

Chapter XXII. The Journey.

Chapter XXIII. Triumfeminate.

Chapter XXIV. The First Quarrel.

Chapter XXV. Despair.

Chapter XXVI. The Flight.

Chapter XXVII. Showing How Louis, on His Part, Had Passed the Time from Ten to Half-Past Twelve at Night.

Chapter XXVIII. The Ambassadors.

Chapter XXIX. Chaillot.

Chapter XXX. Madame.

Chapter XXXI. Mademoiselle de la Valliere’s Pocket-Handkerchief.

Chapter XXXII. Which Treats of Gardeners, of Ladders, and Maids of Honor.

Chapter XXXIII. Which Treats of Carpentry Operations, and Furnishes Details upon the Mode of Constructing Staircases.

Chapter XXXIV. The Promenade by Torchlight.

Chapter XXXV. The Apparition.

Chapter XXXVI. The Portrait.

Chapter XXXVII. Hampton Court.

Chapter XXXVIII. The Courier from Madame.

Chapter XXXIX. Saint-Aignan Follows Malicorne’s Advice.

Chapter XL: Two Old Friends.

Chapter XLI. Wherein May Be Seen that a Bargain Which Cannot Be Made with One Person, Can Be Carried Out with Another.

Chapter XLII. The Skin of the Bear.

Chapter XLIII. An Interview with the Queen-Mother.

Chapter XLIV. Two Friends.

Chapter XLV. How Jean de La Fontaine Came to Write His First Tale.

Chapter XLVI. La Fontaine in the Character of a Negotiator.

Chapter XLVII. Madame de Belliere’s Plate and Diamonds.

Chapter XLVIII. M. de Mazarin’s Receipt.

Chapter XLIX. Monsieur Colbert’s Rough Draft.

Chapter L: In Which the Author Thinks It Is High Time to Return to the Vicomte de Bragelonne.

Chapter LI. Bragelonne Continues His Inquiries.

Chapter LII. Two Jealousies.

Chapter LIII. A Domiciliary Visit.

Chapter LIV. Porthos’s Plan of Action.

Chapter LV. The Change of Residence, the Trap-Door, and the Portrait.

Chapter LVI. Rivals in Politics.

Chapter LVII. Rivals in Love.

Chapter LVIII. King and Noble.

Chapter LIX. After the Storm.

Chapter LX. Heu! Miser!

Chapter LXI. Wounds within Wounds.

Chapter LXII. What Raoul Had Guessed.

Chapter LXIII. Three Guests Astonished to Find Themselves at Supper Together.

Chapter LXIV. What Took Place at the Louvre During the Supper at the Bastile.

Chapter LXV. Political Rivals.

Chapter LXVI. In Which Porthos Is Convinced without Having Understood Anything.

Chapter LXVII. M. de Baisemeaux’s “Society.”

Footnotes:



THE MAN IN THE IRON MASK


by Alexandre Dumas



Contents

Transcriber’s Notes:

Introduction:

Chapter I. The Prisoner.

Chapter II. How Mouston Had Become Fatter without Giving Porthos Notice Thereof

Chapter III. Who Messire Jean Percerin Was.

Chapter IV. The Patterns.

Chapter V. Where, Probably, Moliere Obtained His First Idea of the Bourgeois Gentilhomme.

Chapter VI. The Bee-Hive, the Bees, and the Honey.

Chapter VII. Another Supper at the Bastile.

Chapter VIII. The General of the Order.

Chapter IX. The Tempter.

Chapter X. Crown and Tiara.

Chapter XI. The Chateau de Vaux-le-Vicomte.

Chapter XII. The Wine of Melun.

Chapter XIII. Nectar and Ambrosia.

Chapter XIV. A Gascon, and a Gascon and a Half.

Chapter XV. Colbert.

Chapter XVI. Jealousy.

Chapter XVII. High Treason.

Chapter XVIII. A Night at the Bastile.

Chapter XIX. The Shadow of M. Fouquet.

Chapter XX. The Morning.

Chapter XXI. The King’s Friend.

Chapter XXII. Showing How the Countersign Was Respected at the Bastile.

Chapter XXIII. The King’s Gratitude.

Chapter XXIV. The False King.

Chapter XXV. In Which Porthos Thinks He Is Pursuing a Duchy.

Chapter XXVI. The Last Adieux.

Chapter XXVII. Monsieur de Beaufort.

Chapter XXVIII. Preparations for Departure.

Chapter XXIX. Planchet’s Inventory.

Chapter XXX. The Inventory of M. de Beaufort.

Chapter XXXI. The Silver Dish.

Chapter XXXII. Captive and Jailers.

Chapter XXXIII. Promises.

Chapter XXXIV. Among Women.

Chapter XXXV. The Last Supper.

Chapter XXXVI. In M. Colbert’s Carriage.

Chapter XXXVII. The Two Lighters.

Chapter XXXVIII. Friendly Advice.

Chapter XXXIX. How the King, Louis XIV., Played His Little Part.

Chapter XL: The White Horse and the Black.

Chapter XLI. In Which the Squirrel Falls,—the Adder Flies.

Chapter XLII. Belle-Ile-en-Mer.

Chapter XLIII. Explanations by Aramis.

Chapter XLIV. Result of the Ideas of the King, and the Ideas of D’Artagnan.

Chapter XLV. The Ancestors of Porthos.

Chapter XLVI. The Son of Biscarrat.

Chapter XLVII. The Grotto of Locmaria.

Chapter XLVIII. The Grotto.

Chapter XLIX. An Homeric Song.

Chapter L: The Death of a Titan.

Chapter LI. Porthos’s Epitaph.

Chapter LII. M. de Gesvres’s Round.

Chapter LIII. King Louis XIV.

Chapter LIV. M. Fouquet’s Friends.

Chapter LV. Porthos’s Will.

Chapter LVI. The Old Age of Athos.

Chapter LVII. Athos’s Vision.

Chapter LVIII. The Angel of Death.

Chapter LIX. The Bulletin.

Chapter LX. The Last Canto of the Poem.

Epilogue.


Footnotes



CELEBRATED CRIMES, COMPLETE
By Alexandre Dumas, Pere
1910
CONTENTS

    CONTENTS
    NOTE:
    INTRODUCTION
    THE BORGIAS
    PROLOGUE
    CHAPTER I
    CHAPTER II
    CHAPTER III
    CHAPTER IV
    CHAPTER V
    CHAPTER VI
    CHAPTER VII
    CHAPTER VIII
    CHAPTER IX
    CHAPTER X
    CHAPTER XI
    CHAPTER XII
    CHAPTER XIII
    CHAPTER XIV
    CHAPTER XV
    CHAPTER XVI
    EPILOGUE
    THE CENCIâ?"1598
    MASSACRES OF THE SOUTHâ?"1551-1815
    CHAPTER I
    CHAPTER II
    CHAPTER III
    CHAPTER IV
    CHAPTER V
    CHAPTER VI
    CHAPTER VII
    CHAPTER VIII
    CHAPTER IX
    MARY STUARTâ?"1587
    CHAPTER I
    CHAPTER II
    CHAPTER III
    CHAPTER IV
    CHAPTER V
    CHAPTER VI
    CHAPTER VII
    CHAPTER VIII
    CHAPTER IX
    CHAPTER X
    KARL-LUDWIG SANDâ?"1819
    URBAIN GRANDIERâ?"1634
    CHAPTER I
    CHAPTER II
    CHAPTER III
    CHAPTER IV
    CHAPTER V
    CHAPTER VI
    CHAPTER VII
    CHAPTER VIII
    CHAPTER IX
    CHAPTER X
    CHAPTER XI
    CHAPTER XII
    NISIDAâ?"1825
    DERUES
    LA CONSTANTINâ?"1660
    CHAPTER I
    CHAPTER II
    CHAPTER III
    CHAPTER IV
    CHAPTER V
    CHAPTER VI
    CHAPTER VII
    CHAPTER VIII
    CHAPTER IX
    JOAN OF NAPLESâ?"1343-1382
    CHAPTER I
    CHAPTER II
    CHAPTER III
    CHAPTER IV
    CHAPTER V
    CHAPTER VI
    CHAPTER VII
    CHAPTER VIII
    THE MAN IN THE IRON MASK [An Essay]
    MARTIN GUERRE
    ALI PACHA
    CHAPTER I
    CHAPTER II
    CHAPTER III
    CHAPTER IV
    CHAPTER V
    CHAPTER VI
    CHAPTER VII
    CHAPTER VIII
    CHAPTER IX
    CHAPTER X
    CHAPTER XI
    THE COUNTESS DE SAINT-GERANâ?"1639
    MURATâ?"1815
    Iâ?"TOULON
    IIâ?"CORSICA
    IIIâ?"PIZZO
    THE MARQUISE DE BRINVILLIERS
    VANINKA
    THE MARQUISE DE GANGESâ?"1657



THE COMPANIONS OF JEHU
By Alexandre Dumas, père



    CONTENTS
    AN INTRODUCTORY WORD TO THE READER

    PROLOGUE. THE CITY OF AVIGNON
    CHAPTER I. A TABLE D’HÔTE
    CHAPTER II. AN ITALIAN PROVERB
    CHAPTER III. THE ENGLISHMAN
    CHAPTER IV. THE DUEL
    CHAPTER V. ROLAND
    CHAPTER VI. MORGAN
    CHAPTER VII. THE CHARTREUSE OF SEILLON
    CHAPTER VIII. HOW THE MONEY OF THE DIRECTORY WAS USED
    CHAPTER IX. ROMEO AND JULIET
    CHAPTER X. THE FAMILY OF ROLAND
    CHAPTER XI. CHÂTEAU DES NOIRES-FONTAINES
    CHAPTER XII. PROVINCIAL PLEASURES
    CHAPTER XIII. THE WILD-BOAR
    CHAPTER XIV. AN UNPLEASANT COMMISSION
    CHAPTER XV. THE STRONG-MINDED MAN
    CHAPTER XVI. THE GHOST
    CHAPTER XVII. INVESTIGATIONS
    CHAPTER XVIII. THE TRIAL
    CHAPTER XIX. THE LITTLE HOUSE IN THE RUE DE LA VICTOIRE
    CHAPTER XX. THE GUESTS OF GENERAL BONAPARTE
    CHAPTER XXI. THE SCHEDULE OF THE DIRECTORY
    CHAPTER XXII. THE OUTLINE OF A DECREE
    CHAPTER XXIII. ALEA JACTA EST
    CHAPTER XXIV. THE EIGHTEENTH BRUMAIRE
    CHAPTER XXV. AN IMPORTANT COMMUNICATION
    CHAPTER XXVI. THE BALL OF THE VICTIMS
    CHAPTER XXVII. THE BEAR’S SKIN
    CHAPTER XXVIII. FAMILY MATTERS
    CHAPTER XXIX. THE GENEVA DILIGENCE
    CHAPTER XXX. CITIZEN FOUCHÉ’S REPORT
    CHAPTER XXXI. THE SON OF THE MILLER OF LEGUERNO
    CHAPTER XXXII. WHITE AND BLUE
    CHAPTER XXXIII. THE LAW OF RETALIATION
    CHAPTER XXXIV. THE DIPLOMACY OF GEORGES CADOUDAL
    CHAPTER XXXV. A PROPOSAL OF MARRIAGE
    CHAPTER XXXVI. SCULPTURE AND PAINTING
    CHAPTER XXXVII. THE AMBASSADOR
    CHAPTER XXXVIII.    THE TWO SIGNALS
    CHAPTER XXXIX. THE GROTTO OF CEYZERIAT
    CHAPTER XL. A FALSE SCENT
    CHAPTER XLI. THE HÔTEL DE LA POSTE
    CHAPTER XLII. THE CHAMBÉRY MAIL-COACH
    CHAPTER XLIII. LORD GRENVILLE’S REPLY
    CHAPTER XLIV. CHANGE OF RESIDENCE
    CHAPTER XLV. THE FOLLOWER OF TRAILS
    CHAPTER XLVI. AN INSPIRATION
    CHAPTER XLVII. A RECONNOISSANCE
    CHAPTER XLVIII. IN WHICH MORGAN’S PRESENTIMENTS ARE VERIFIED
    CHAPTER XLIX. ROLAND’S REVENGE
    CHAPTER L. CADOUDAL AT THE TUILERIES
    CHAPTER LI. THE ARMY OF THE RESERVES
    CHAPTER LII. THE TRIAL
    CHAPTER LIII. IN WHICH AMÉLIE KEEPS HER WORD
    CHAPTER LIV. THE CONFESSION
    CHAPTER LV. INVULNERABLE
    CHAPTER LVI. CONCLUSION



CHICOT THE JESTER
Abridged translation of “La dame de Monsoreau”


By Alexandre Dumas



CONTENTS

CHAPTER I.

CHAPTER II.

CHAPTER III.

CHAPTER IV.

CHAPTER V.

CHAPTER VI.

CHAPTER VII.

CHAPTER VIII.

CHAPTER IX.

CHAPTER X.

CHAPTER XI.

CHAPTER XII.

CHAPTER XIII.

CHAPTER XIV.

CHAPTER XV.

CHAPTER XVI.

CHAPTER XVII.

CHAPTER XVIII.

CHAPTER XIX.

CHAPTER XX.

CHAPTER XXI.

CHAPTER XXII.

CHAPTER XXIII.

CHAPTER XXIV.

CHAPTER XXV.

CHAPTER XXVI.

CHAPTER XXVII.

CHAPTER XXVIII.

CHAPTER XXIX.

CHAPTER XXX.

CHAPTER XXXI.

CHAPTER XXXII.

CHAPTER XXXIII.

CHAPTER XXXIV.

CHAPTER XXXV.

CHAPTER XXXVI.

CHAPTER XXXVII.

CHAPTER XXXVIII.

CHAPTER XXXIX.

CHAPTER XI.

CHAPTER XLI.

CHAPTER XLII.

CHAPTER XLIII.

CHAPTER XLIV.

CHAPTER XLV.

CHAPTER XLVI.

CHAPTER XLVII.

CHAPTER XLVIII.

CHAPTER XLIX.

CHAPTER L.

CHAPTER LI.

CHAPTER LII.

CHAPTER LIII.

CHAPTER LIV.

CHAPTER LV.

CHAPTER LVI.

CHAPTER LVII.

CHAPTER LVIII.

CHAPTER LIX.

CHAPTER LX.

CHAPTER LXI.

CHAPTER LXII.

CHAPTER LXIII.

CHAPTER LXIV.

CHAPTER LXV.

CHAPTER LXVI.

CHAPTER LXVII.

CHAPTER LXVIII.

CHAPTER LXIX.

CHAPTER LXX.

CHAPTER LXXI.

CHAPTER LXXII.

CHAPTER LXXIII.

CHAPTER LXXIV.

CHAPTER LXXV.

CHAPTER LXXVI.

CHAPTER LXXVII.

CHAPTER LXXVIII.

CHAPTER LXXIX.

CHAPTER LXXX.

CHAPTER LXXXI.

CHAPTER LXXXII.

CHAPTER LXXXIII.

CHAPTER LXXXIV.

CHAPTER LXXXV.

CHAPTER LXXXVI.

CHAPTER LXXXVII.

CHAPTER LXXXVIII.

CHAPTER LXXXIX.

CHAPTER XC.

CHAPTER XCI.

CHAPTER XCII.

CHAPTER XCIII.

CHAPTER XCIV.

CHAPTER XCV.

CHAPTER XCVI.

CHAPTER XCVII.



THE CONSPIRATORS.
1. 	Captain Roquefinette 	240
2. 	The Meeting 	243
3. 	The Chevalier 	247
4. 	A Bal-Masque of the Period.--The Bat 	251
5. 	The Arsenal 	257
6. 	The Prince de Cellamare 	261
7. 	Alberoni 	264
8. 	The Garret 	269
9. 	A Citizen of the Rue du Temps-Perdu 	272
10. 	The Agreement 	276
11. 	Pros and Cons 	279
12. 	The Denis Family 	285
13. 	The Crimson Ribbon 	290
14. 	The Rue des bons Enfants 	295
15. 	Jean Buvat 	301
16. 	Bathilde 	310
17. 	First Love 	319
18. 	The Consul Duilius 	325
19. 	The Abbe Dubois 	331
20. 	The Conspiracy 	335
21. 	The Order of the Honey Bee 	338
22. 	The Queen of the Greenlanders 	340
23. 	The Duc de Richelieu 	344
24. 	Jealousy 	348
25. 	A Pretext 	352
26. 	Counterplots 	355
27. 	The Seventh Heaven 	360
28. 	Fenelon's Successor 	363
29. 	The Prince de Listhnay's Accomplice 	368
30. 	The Fox and Goose 	372
31. 	A Chapter of Saint-Simon 	376
32. 	A Snare 	378
33. 	The Beginning of the End 	382
34. 	Parliamentary Justice 	387
35. 	Man Proposes 	391
36. 	David and Goliath 	395
37. 	The Savior of France 	400
38. 	God Disposes 	408
39. 	A Prime Minister's Memory 	412
40. 	Boniface 	416
41. 	The Three Visits 	420
42. 	The Closet 	424
43. 	The Marriage in Extremis 	427
  	Postscriptum 	429
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

7.—He attacked the captain with such fury that their swords engaged at the hilt.

8.—D'Harmental.

9.—He then returned to his work with all the eagerness of an artist.

10.—The chevalier set Mirza to eat sugar.

11.—Buvat found himself in a sort of laboratory, situated on the ground-floor.

12.—The body of the captain lay stretched on the floor, swimming in a sea of blood.



THE PRUSSIAN TERROR
BY
ALEXANDRE DUMAS
A FIRST TRANSLATION FROM THE FRENCH
BY
R.S. GARNETT
1916
GAMBETTA.

CONTENTS

TRANSLATOR'S INTRODUCTION

CHAPTER I. BERLIN
II. THE HOUSE OF HOHENZOLLERN
III. COUNT VON BISMARCK
IV. IN WHICH BISMARCK EMERGES FROM AN IMPOSSIBLE POSITION
V. A SPORTSMAN AND A SPANIEL
VI. BENEDICT TURPIN
VII. KAULBACH'S STUDIO
VIII. THE CHALLENGE
IX. THE TWO DUELS
X. WHAT WAS WRITTEN IN A KING'S HAND
XI. BARON FREDERIC VON BÜLOW
XII. HELEN
XIII. COUNT KARL VON FREYBERG
XIV. THE GRANDMOTHER
XV. FRANKFORT-ON-MAIN
XVI. THE DEPARTURE
XVII. AUSTRIANS AND PRUSSIANS
XVIII. THE DECLARATION OF WAR
XIX. THE BATTLE OF LANGENSALZA
XX. IN WHICH BENEDICT'S PREDICTION CONTINUES TO BE FULFILLED
XXI. WHAT PASSED AT FRANKFURT BETWEEN THE BATTLES OF LANGENSALZA AND SADOWA
XXII. THE FREE MEAL
XXIII. THE BATTLE OF ASCHAFFENBURG
XXIV. THE EXECUTOR
XXV. FRISK
XXVI. THE WOUNDED MAN
XXVII. THE PRUSSIANS AT FRANKFORT
XXVIII. GENERAL MANTEUFFEL'S THREATS
XXIX. GENERAL STURM
XXX. THE BREAKING OF THE STORM
XXXI. THE BURGOMASTER
XXXII. QUEEN AUGUSTA
XXXIII. THE TWO PROCESSIONS
XXXIV. THE TRANSFUSION OF BLOOD
XXXV. THE MARRIAGE IN EXTREMIS
XXXVI. "WAIT AND SEE"
CONCLUSION
EPILOGUE



CAPTAIN PAUL


By Alexandre Dumas, pere



CONTENTS


INTRODUCTION.

CAPTAIN PAUL.

CHAPTER I—A STRANGE SAIL

CHAPTER II.—THE FRIGATE.

CHAPTER III.—THE SEA FIGHT.

CHAPTER IV.—THE MARCHIONESS.

CHAPTER V.—DEVOTED LOVE.

CHAPTER VI. BROTHER AND SISTER.

CHAPTER VII.—THE FAITHFUL SERVANT.

CHAPTER VIII.—THE SECRET.

CHAPTER IX.—FATAL LOVE.

CHAPTER X.—CONFIDENCE.

CHAPTER XI.—THE COURTIER.

CHAPTER XII.—THE CHALLENGE.

CHAPTER XIII.—THE CONTRACT.

CHAPTER XIV.—RELIGIOUS CONVICTION.

CHAPTER XV.—THE PAPERS.

CHAPTER XVI.—RECRIMINATION.

CHAPTER XVII.—THE BROTHERS

CHAPTER XVIII—RECOGNITION.

CHAPTER XIX.—THE FAREWELL.

EPILOGUE.



THE SICILIAN BANDIT
From the Volume “Captain Paul”


By Alexandre Dumas, pere



CONTENTS


CHAPTER I.—INTRODUCTION—PALERMO.

CHAPTER II.—BRUNO AND ALI.

CHAPTER III.—THE FATAL BRIDAL.

CHAPTER IV.—THE PRINCE AND THE BANDIT.

CHAPTER IV.—THE ROBBER’S CASTLE.

CHAPTER VI.—A BANDIT’S GRATITUDE.

CHAPTER VII.—A BRIGAND’S VENGEANCE.

CHAPTER VIII.—-TREACHERY.

CHAPTER IX.—THE SIEGE.

CHAPTER X.—THE CHAPELLE ARDENTE.

CHAPTER XI.—DEATH OF THE BANDIT.

CHAPTER XII.—CONCLUSION.



THE HERO OF THE PEOPLE.

A HISTORICAL ROMANCE
OF
LOVE, LIBERTY AND LOYALTY.

BY ALEX. DUMAS.


CHAPTER: I.,
II.,
III.,
IV.,
V.,
VI.,
VII.,
VIII.,
IX.,
X.,
XI.,
XII.,
XIII.,
XIV.,
XV.,
XVI.,
XVII.,
XVIII.,
XIX.,
XX.,
XXI.,
XXII.,
XXIII.,
XXIV.,
XXV.,
XXVI.,
XXVII.,
XXVIII.,
XXX.



THE
MESMERIST'S VICTIM.

BY

ALEX. DUMAS.


>


Chapter: I. ,
II. ,
III. ,
IV. ,
V. ,
VI. ,
VII. ,
VIII. ,
IX. ,
X. ,
XI. ,
XII. ,
XIII. ,
XIV. ,
XV. ,
XVI. ,
XVII. ,
XVIII. ,
XIX. ,
XX. ,
XXI. ,
XXII. ,
XXIII. ,
XXIV. ,
XXV. ,
XXVI. ,
XXVII. ,
XXVIII. ,
XXIX. ,
XXX. ,
XXXI. ,
XXXII. ,
XXXIII. ,
XXXIV. ,
XXXV. ,
XXXVI. ,
XXXVII. ,
XXXVIII. ,
XXXIX. ,
XL. ,
XLI. ,
XLII. ,
XLIII.



THE
COUNTESS OF CHARNY.

BY
Alex. Dumas.

The Countess of Charny;
OR,
THE EXECUTION OF KING LOUIS XVI.

A HISTORICAL NOVEL OF LOVE AND LOYALTY.

BY ALEX. DUMAS
CONTENTS.
Chapter 	  	Page
I. 	THE NEW MEN AT THE WHEEL. 	5
II. 	GILBERT'S CANDIDATE. 	17
III. 	POWERFUL, PERHAPS; HAPPY, NEVER. 	24
IV. 	THE FOES FACE TO FACE. 	38
V. 	THE UNINVITED VISITORS. 	42
VI. 	"THE COUNTRY IS IN DANGER!" 	56
VII. 	THE MEN FROM MARSEILLES. 	63
VIII. 	THE FRIEND IN NEED. 	66
IX. 	CHARNY ON GUARD. 	71
X. 	BILLET AND PITOU. 	76
XI. 	IN THE MORNING. 	82
XII. 	THE FIRST MASSACRE. 	88
XIII. 	THE REPULSE. 	92
XIV. 	THE LAST OF THE CHARNYS. 	99
XV. 	THE BLOOD-STAINS. 	109
XVI. 	THE WIDOW. 	117
XVII. 	WHAT ANDREA WANTED OF GILBERT. 	126
XVIII. 	THE ASSEMBLY AND THE COMMUNE. 	131
XIX. 	CAPTAIN BEAUSIRE APPEARS AGAIN. 	136
XX. 	THE EMETIC. 	142
XXI. 	BEAUSIRE'S BRAVADO. 	148
XXII. 	SET UPON DYING. 	153
XXIII. 	THE DEATH OF THE COUNTESS. 	162
XXIV. 	THE ROYAL MARTYR. 	167
XXV. 	MASTER GAMAIN TURNS UP. 	174
XXVI. 	THE TRIAL OF THE KING. 	178
XXVII. 	THE PARALLEL TO CHARLES I. 	185
XXVIII. 	CAGLIOSTRO'S ADVICE. 	190
XXIX. 	THE CROWN OF ANGE'S LOVE. 	195
XXX. 	THE EFFECT OF HAPPY NEWS. 	201
XXXI. 	THE EASY-CHAIR. 	206
XXXII. 	WHAT PITOU DID WITH THE FIND. 	210
  	ADVERTISEMENTS. 	215



THE
ROYAL LIFE GUARD.

BY

Alex. Dumas.


TABLE OF CONTENTS
I.   	A NEW LEASE OF LIFE.   	3
II.   	THE FEDERATION OF FRANCE.   	8
III.   	WHERE THE BASTILE STOOD.   	14
IV.   	THE LODGE OF THE INVISIBLES.   	21
V.   	THE CONSPIRATORS ACCOUNT.   	27
VI.   	WOMEN AND FLOWERS.   	33
VII.   	THE KING'S MESSENGER.   	44
VIII.   	THE HUSBAND'S PROMISE.   	49
IX.   	OFF AND AWAY.   	53
X.   	ON THE HIGHWAY.   	61
XI.   	THE QUEEN'S HAIRDRESSER.   	67
XII.   	MISCHANCE.   	71
XIII.   	STOP, KING! 	76
XIV.   	THE CAPTURE.   	84
XV.   	POOR CATHERINE.   	96
XVI.   	THE MAN OF THE PEOPLE.   	102
XVII.   	THE FEUD.   	110
XVIII.   	ON THE BACK TRACK.   	120
XIX.   	THE DOLOROUS WAY.   	125
XX.   	MIRABEAU'S SUCCESSOR.   	135
XXI.   	ANOTHER DUPE.   	141
XXII.   	THE CENTRE OF CATASTROPHES.   	150
XXIII.   	THE BITTER CUP.   	155
XXIV.   	AT LAST THEY ARE HAPPY! 	161
XXV.   	CORRECTING THE PETITION.   	168
XXVI.   	CAGLIOSTRO'S COUNSEL.   	176
XXVII.   	THE SQUEEZED LEMON.   	181
XXVIII.   	THE FIELD OF BLOOD.   	186
XXIX.   	IN THE HOSPITAL.   	191
XXX.   	THE MOTHER'S BLESSING.   	196
XXXI.   	FORTIER EXECUTES HIS THREAT.   	201



TAKING THE BASTILE;

OR,

PITOU THE PEASANT.

A HISTORICAL STORY OF THE GREAT FRENCH REVOLUTION.

BY ALEX. DUMAS.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
CHAPTER I. 	    	THE SON OF GILBERT.
CHAPTER II. 	    	ANGE PITOU.
CHAPTER III. 	    	A REVOLUTIONARY FARMER.
CHAPTER IV. 	    	LONG LEGS ARE GOOD FOR RUNNING, IF NOT FOR DANCING.
CHAPTER V. 	    	WHY THE POLICE AGENT CAME WITH THE CONSTABLES.
CHAPTER VI. 	    	ON THE ROAD.
CHAPTER VII. 	    	THE FIRST BLOOD.
CHAPTER VIII. 	    	PITOU DISCOVERS HE IS BRAVE.
CHAPTER IX. 	    	"TO THE BASTILE!"
CHAPTER X. 	    	BLOWING HOT AND COLD.
CHAPTER XI. 	    	THE PRISON GOVERNOR.
CHAPTER XII. 	    	STORMING THE BASTILE.
CHAPTER XIII. 	    	DOWN IN THE DUNGEONS.
CHAPTER XIV. 	    	THE TRIANGLE OF LIBERTY.
CHAPTER XV. 	    	THE YOUNG VISIONARY.
CHAPTER XVI. 	    	THE PHYSICIAN FOR THE STATE.
CHAPTER XVII. 	    	THE COUNTESS OF CHARNY.
CHAPTER XVIII. 	    	THE QUEEN AT BAY.
CHAPTER XIX. 	    	THE QUEEN'S FAVOURITE.
CHAPTER XX. 	    	THE TRIO OF LOVE.
CHAPTER XXI. 	    	THE QUEEN AND HER MASTER.
CHAPTER XXII. 	    	THE PRIVATE COUNCIL.
CHAPTER XXIII. 	    	WHY THE QUEEN WAITED.
CHAPTER XXIV. 	    	THE ARMY OF WOMEN.
CHAPTER XXV. 	    	THE NIGHT OF HORRORS.
CHAPTER XXVI. 	    	BILLET'S SORROW.



THE LAST VENDÉE
OR, THE
SHE-WOLVES OF MACHECOUL



TWO VOLUMES IN ONE


BY
ALEXANDRE DUMAS



ILLUSTRATED



CONTENTS.
CHAPTER
I. 	Charette's Aide-de-camp.
II. 	The Gratitude of Kings.
III. 	The Twins.
IV.

How Jean Oullier, coming to see the Marquis for an Hour, would be there still if they had not both been in their Grave these ten years.
V. 	A Litter of Wolves.
VI. 	The Wounded Hare.
VII. 	Monsieur Michel.
VIII. 	The Baronne de la Logerie.
IX. 	Galon-d'or and Allégro.
X.

In which Things do not Happen precisely as Baron Michel Dreamed they would.
XI. 	The Foster-father.
XII. 	Noblesse Oblige.
XIII. 	A Distant Cousin.
XIV. 	Petit-Pierre.
XV. 	An Unseasonable Hour.
XVI. 	Courtin's Diplomacy.
XVII.

The Tavern of Aubin Courte-Joie.
XVIII. 	The Man from La Logerie.
XIX. 	The Fair at Montaigu.
XX. 	The Outbreak.
XXI. 	Jean Oullier's Resources.
XXII. 	Fetch! Pataud, fetch!
XXIII. 	To whom the Cottage belonged.
XXIV.

How Marianne Picaut mourned her Husband.
XXV.

In which Love lends Political Opinions to those who have none.
XXVI. 	The Springs of Baugé.
XXVII. 	The Guests at Souday.
XXVIII.

In which the Marquis de Souday bitterly regrets that Petit-Pierre is not a Gentleman.
XXIX. 	The Vendéans of 1832.
XXX. 	The Warning.
XXXI. 	My Old Crony Loriot.
XXXII.

The General eats a Supper which had not been Prepared for him.
XXXIII.

In which Maître Loriot's Curiosity is not exactly satisfied.
XXXIV. 	The Tower Chamber.
XXXV.

Which ends quite otherwise than as Mary expected.
XXXVI. 	Blue and White.
XXXVII.

Which shows that it is not for Flies only that Spiders' Webs are dangerous.
XXXVIII.

In which the Daintiest Foot of France and of Navarre finds that Cinderella's Slipper does not fit it as well as Seven-league Boots.
XXXIX.

Petit-Pierre makes the best Meal he ever made in his Life.
XL. 	Equality in Death.
XLI. 	The Search.
XLII.

In which Jean Oullier speaks his mind About young Baron Michel.
XLIII.

Baron Michel becomes Bertha's Aide-de-camp.
XLIV. 	Maître Jacques and his Rabbits.
XLV.

The Danger of Meeting bad Company in the Woods.
XLVI.

Maître Jacques proceeds to keep the Oath he made to Aubin Courte-Joie.


CONTENTS.


I.

In which it appears that all Jews are not from Jerusalem, nor all Turks from Tunis.
II. 	Maître Marc.
III.

How Persons travelled in the Department of the Lower Loire in May, 1832.
IV. 	A little History does no Harm.
V.

Petit-Pierre resolves on keeping a Brave Heart against Misfortune.
VI.

How Jean Oullier proved that when the Wine is drawn it is best to drink it.
VII.

Herein is explained how and why Baron Michel decided to go to Nantes.
VIII.

The Sheep, returning to the Fold, tumbles into a Pit-fall.
IX.

Trigaud proves that if he had been Hercules He would probably have accomplished Twenty-four labors instead of twelve.
X. 	Giving the Slip.
XI.

Mary is victorious after the Manner of Pyrrhus.
XII.

Baron Michel finds an Oak instead of a Reed on which to lean.
XIII. 	The Last Knights of Royalty.
XIV.

Jean Oullier lies for the Good of the Cause.
XV.

Jailer and Prisoner escape together.
XVI. 	The Battlefield.
XVII. 	After the Fight.
XVIII. 	The Chateau de la Pénissière.
XIX. 	The Moor of Bouaimé.
XX.

The Firm of Aubin Courte-Joie & Co. does Honor to its Partnership.
XXI.

In which Succor comes from an Unexpected Quarter.
XXII. 	On the Highway.
XXIII. 	What became of Jean Oullier.
XXIV. 	Maître Courtin's Batteries.
XXV.

Madame la Baronne de la Logerie, Thinking to serve her Son's interests, serves those of Petit-Pierre.
XXVI. 	Marches and Counter-marches.
XXVII.

Michel's Love Affairs seem to be taking a Happier Turn.
XXVIII.

Showing how there may be Fishermen and Fishermen.
XXIX. 	Interrogatories and Confrontings.
XXX.

We again meet the General, and find he is not changed.
XXXI.

Courtin meets with Another Disappointment.
XXXII.

The Marquis de Souday drags for Oysters and brings up Picaut.
XXXIII.

That which happened in Two Dwellings.
XXXIV.

Courtin fingers at last his Fifty Thousand Francs.
XXXV.

The Tavern of the Grand Saint-Jacques.
XXXVI. 	Judas and Judas.
XXXVII.

An Eye for an Eye, and a Tooth for a Tooth.
XXXVIII. 	The Red-Breeches.
XXXIX. 	A Wounded Soul.
XL. 	The Chimney-back.
XLI. 	Three Broken Hearts.
XLII. 	God's Executioner.
XLIII.

Shows that a Man with Fifty Thousand Francs about him may be much Embarrassed.
  	EPILOGUE



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.


VOL. I.

Portrait of Dumas Frontispiece

Portrait of Charette

Castle Souday

Portrait of Louis XVIII.

Portrait of Dermoncourt


VOL. II.

Portrait of Louis Philippe

Cathedral of Nantes

Chateau of Nantes



MY MEMOIRS
BY
ALEXANDRE DUMAS
TRANSLATED BY
E. M. WALLER
WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY
ANDREW LANG
VOL. I
1802 TO 1821
1907

    CONTENTS

    BOOK I

    CHAPTER I

    My birth—My name is disputed—Extracts from the official registers of Villers-Cotterets—Corbeil Club—My father's marriage certificate—My mother—My maternal grandfather—Louis-Philippe d'Orléans, father of Philippe-Égalité—Madame de Montesson—M. de Noailles and the Academy—A morganatic marriage 1

    CHAPTER II

    My father—His birth—The arms of the family—The serpents of Jamaica—The alligators of St. Domingo—My grandfather—A young man's adventure—A first duel—M. le duc de Richelieu acts as second for my father—My father enlists as a private soldier—He changes his name—Death of my grandfather—His death certificate 11

    CHAPTER III

    My father rejoins his regiment—His portrait—His strength—His skill—The Nile serpent—The regiment of the King and the regiment of the Queen—Early days of the Revolution—Declaration of Pilnitz—The camp at Maulde—The thirteen Tyrolean chasseurs—My father's name is mentioned in the order of the day—France under Providence—Voluntary enlistments—St.-Georges and Boyer—My father lieutenant-colonel—The camp of the Madeleine—The pistols of Lepage—My father General of Brigade in the Army of the North 21

    CHAPTER IV

    My father is sent to join Kléber—He is nominated General-in-Chief in the Western Pyrenees—Bouchotte's letters—Instructions of the Convention—The Representatives of the People who sat at Bayonne—Their proclamation—In spite of this proclamation my father remains at Bayonne—Monsieur de l'Humanité 33

    [Pg x]

    CHAPTER V

    My father is appointed General-in-Chief of the Army of the West—His report on the state of La Vendée—My father is sent to the Army of the Alps as General-in-Chief—State of the army—Capture of Mont Valaisan and of the Little Saint-Bernard—Capture of Mont Cenis—My father is recalled to render an account of his conduct—What he had done—He is acquitted 43

    CHAPTER VI

    The result of a sword-stroke across the head—St. Georges and the remounts—The quarrel he sought with my father—My father is transferred to the Army of Sambre-et-Meuse—He hands in his resignation and returns to Villers-Cotterets—A retrospect over what had happened at home and abroad during the four years that had just elapsed 56

    CHAPTER VII

    My father at Villers-Cotterets—He is called to Paris to carry out the 13th Vendémiaire—Bonaparte takes his place—He arrives the next day—Buonaparte's attestation—My father is sent into the district of Bouillon—He goes to the Army of Sambre-et-Meuse and to the Army of the Rhine, and is appointed Commandant at Landau—He returns as Divisional General in the Army of the Alps, of which he had been Commander-in-Chief—English blood and honour—Bonaparte's plan—Bonaparte appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Army of Italy—The campaign of 1796 69

    CHAPTER VIII

    My father in the Army of Italy—He is received at Milan by Bonaparte and Joséphine—Bonaparte's troubles in Italy—Scurvy—The campaign is resumed—Discouragement—Battle of Arcole 82

    CHAPTER IX

    The despatch is sent to Bonaparte—Dermoncourt's reception—Berthier's open response—Military movements in consequence of the despatch—Correspondence between my father and Serrurier and Dallemagne—Battle of St.-Georges and La Favorite—Capture of Mantua—My father as a looker-on 90

    [Pg xi]

    CHAPTER X

    My father's first breeze with Bonaparte—My father is sent to Masséna's army corps—He shares Joubert's command in the Tyrol—Joubert—The campaign in the Tyrol 109

    BOOK II

    CHAPTER I

    The bridge of Clausen—Dermoncourt's reports—Prisoners on parole—Lepage's pistols—Three generals-in-chief at the same table 119

    CHAPTER II

    Joubert's loyalty towards my father—"Send me Dumas"—The Horatius Codes of the Tyrol—My father is appointed Governor of the Trévisan—The agent of the Directory—My father fêted at his departure—The treaty of Campo-Formio—The return to Paris—The flag of the Army of Italy—The charnel-house of Morat—Charles the Bold—Bonaparte is elected a member of the Institute—First thoughts of the expedition to Egypt—Toulon—Bonaparte and Joséphine—What was going to happen in Egypt 135

    CHAPTER III

    The voyage—The landing—The taking of Alexandria—The Chant du Départ and the Arabian concert—The respited prisoners—The march on Cairo—Rum and biscuit—My father's melons—The Scientific Institute—Battle of the Pyramids—Scene of the victory—My father's letter establishing the truth 151

    CHAPTER IV

    Admissions of General Dupuis and Adjutant-General Boyer—The malcontents—Final discussion between Bonaparte and my father—Battle of Aboukir—My father finds treasure—His letter on this subject 161

    CHAPTER V

    Revolt at Cairo—My father enters the Grand Mosque on horseback—His home-sickness—He leaves Egypt and lands at Naples—Ferdinand and Caroline of Naples—Emma Lyon and Nelson—Ferdinand's manifesto—Comments of his minister, Belmonte-Pignatelli 172

    [Pg xii]

    CHAPTER VI

    Report presented to the French Government by Divisional-General Alexandre Dumas, on his captivity at Taranto and at Brindisi, ports in the Kingdom of Naples 181

    CHAPTER VII

    My father is exchanged for General Mack—Events during his captivity—He asks in vain for a share in the distribution of the 500,000 francs indemnity granted to the prisoners—The arrears of his pay also refused him—He is placed on the retired list, in spite of his energetic protests 197

    CHAPTER VIII

    Letter from my father to General Brune on my birth—The postscript—My godfather and godmother—First recollections of infancy—Topography of the château des Fossés and sketches of some of its inhabitants—The snake and the frog—Why I asked Pierre if he could swim—Continuation of Jocrisse 204

    CHAPTER IX

    Mocquet's nightmare—His pipe—Mother Durand—Les bêtes fausses et le pierge—M. Collard—My father's remedy—Radical cure of Mocquet 212

    CHAPTER X

    Who was Berlick?—The fête of Villers-Cotterets—Faust and Polichinelle—The sabots—Journey to Paris—Dollé—Manette—Madame de Mauclerc's pension—Madame de Montesson—Paul and Virginia—Madame de Saint-Aubin 218

    CHAPTER XI

    Brune and Murat—The return to Villers-Cotterets—L'hôtel de l'Épée—Princess Pauline—The chase—The chief forester's permission—My father takes to his bed never to rise again—Delirium—The gold-headed cane—Death 225

    CHAPTER XII

    My love for my father—His love for me—I am taken away to my cousin Marianne's—Plan of the house—The forge—The apparition—I learn the death of my father—I wish to go to heaven to kill God—Our situation at the death of my father—Hatred of Bonaparte 232

    [Pg xiii]

    BOOK III

    CHAPTER I

    My mother and I take refuge with my grandfather—Madame Darcourt's house—My first books and my first terrors—The park at Villers-Cotterets—M. Deviolaine and his family—The swarm of bees—The old cloister 243

    CHAPTER II

    The two snakes—M. de Valence and Madame de Montesson—Who little Hermine was—Garnier the wheelwright and Madame de Valence—Madame Lafarge—Fantastic apparition of Madame de Genlis 253

    CHAPTER III

    Mademoiselle Pivert—I make her read the Thousand and One Nights, or, rather, one story in that collection—Old Hiraux, my music-master—The little worries of his life—He takes his revenge on his persecutors after the fashion of the Maréchal de Montluc—He is condemned to be flogged, and nearly loses the sight of his eyes—What happened on Easter Day in the organ-loft at the monastery—He becomes a grocer's lad—His vocation leads him to the study of music—I have little aptitude for the violin 259

    CHAPTER IV

    The dog lantern-bearer—Demoustier's epitaph—My first fencing-master—"The king drinks"—The fourth terror of my life—The tub of honey 277

    CHAPTER V

    My horror of great heights—The Abbé Conseil—My opening at the Seminary—My mother, much pressed, decides to enter me there—The horn inkstand—Cécile at the grocer's—My flight 285

    CHAPTER VI

    The Abbé Grégoire's College—The reception I got there—The fountains play to celebrate my arrival—The conspiracy against me—Bligny challenges me to single combat—I win 295

    [Pg xiv]

    CHAPTER VII

    The Abbé Fortier—The jealous husband and the viaticum—A pleasant visit—Victor Letellier—The pocket-pistol—I terrify the population—Tournemolle is requisitioned—He disarms me 304

    CHAPTER VIII

    A political chronology—Trouble follows trouble—The fire at the farm at None—Death of Stanislas Picot—The hiding-place for the louis d'or—The Cossacks—The haricot mutton 315

    CHAPTER IX

    The quarry—Frenchmen eat the haricot cooked for the Cossacks—The Duc de Treviso—He allows himself to be surprised—Ducoudray the hosier—Terrors 324

    CHAPTER X

    The return to Villers-Cotterets, and what we met on the way—The box with the thirty louis in it—The leather-bag—The mole—Our departure—The journey—The arrival at Mensal and our sojourn their—King Joseph—The King of Rome—We leave Mensal—Our visit to Crispy in Valois—The dead and wounded—The surrender of Paris—The isle of Elba 331

    CHAPTER XI

    Am I to be called Davy de La Pailleterie or Alexandre Dumas?—Deus dedit, Deus dabit—The tobacco-shop—The cause of the Emperor Napoleon's fall, as it appeared to my writing-master—My first communion—How I prepared for it 345

    BOOK IV

    CHAPTER I

    Auguste Lafarge—Bird-snaring on a large scale—A wonderful catch—An epigram—I wish to write French verses—My method of translating Virgil and Tacitus—Montanan—My political opinions 355

    CHAPTER II

    The single-barrelled gun—Quiot Biche—Biche and Boudoux compared—I become a poacher—It is proposed to issue a writ against me—Madame Darcourt as plenipotentiary—How it happened that Cretan's writ caused me no bother 363

    [Pg xv]

    CHAPTER III

    Bonaparte's landing at the Gulf of Juan—Proclamations and Ordonnances—Louis XVIII. and M. de Vitrolles—Cornu the hatter—Newspaper information 374

    CHAPTER IV

    General Exelmans—His trial—The two brothers Lallemand—Their conspiracy—They are arrested and led through Villers-Cotterets—The affronts to which they were subjected 382

    CHAPTER V

    My mother and I conspire—The secret—M. Richard—La pistole and the pistols—The offer made to the brothers Lallemand in order to save them—They refuse—I meet one of them, twenty-eight years later, at the house of M. le duc de Cazes 389

    CHAPTER VI

    Napoleon and the Allies—The French army and the Emperor pass through Villers-Cotterets—Bearers of ill tidings 402

    CHAPTER VII

    Waterloo—The Élysée—La Malmaison 411

    CHAPTER VIII

    Cæsar—Charlemagne—Napoleon 421

    CHAPTER IX

    The rout—The haricot mutton reappears—M. Picot the lawyer—By diplomatic means, he persuades my mother to let me go shooting with him—I despise sleep, food and drink 427

    CHAPTER X

    Trapping larks—I wax strong in the matter of my compositions—The wounded partridge—I take the consequences whatever they are—The farm at Brassoire—M. Deviolaine's sally at the accouchement of his wife 435

    CHAPTER XI

    M. Moquet de Brassoire—The ambuscade—Three hares charge me—What prevents me from being the king of the battue—Because I did not take the bull by the horns, I just escape being disembowelled by it—Sabine and her puppies 441

    [Pg xvi]

    BOOK V

    CHAPTER I

    The second period of my youth—Forest-keepers and sailors—Choron, Moinat, Mildet, Berthelin—La Maison-Neuve 449

    CHAPTER II

    Choron and the mad dog—Niquet, otherwise called Bobino—His mistress—The boar-hunt—The kill—Bobino's triumph—He is decorated—The boar which he had killed rises again 456

    CHAPTER III

    Boars and keepers—The bullet of Robin-des-Bois—The pork-butcher 464

    CHAPTER IV

    A wolf-hunt—Small towns—Choron's tragic death 474

    CHAPTER V

    My mother realises that I am fifteen years old, and that la marette and la pipée will not lead to a brilliant future for me—I enter the office of Me. Mennesson, notary, as errand-boy, otherwise guttersnipe—Me. Mennesson and his clerks—La Fontaine-Eau-Claire 483

    CHAPTER VI

    Who the assassin was and who the assassinated—Auguste Picot—Equality before the law—Last exploits of Marot—His execution 491

    CHAPTER VII

    Spring at Villers-Cotterets—Whitsuntide—The Abbé Grégoire invites me to dance with his niece—Red books—The Chevalier de Faublas—Laurence and Vittoria—A dandy of 1818 499

    CHAPTER VIII

    I leap the Haha—A slit follows—The two pairs of gloves—The quadrille—Fourcade's triumph—I pick up the crumbs—The waltz—The child becomes a man 508



MY MEMOIRS
BY
ALEXANDRE DUMAS
TRANsLATED BY
E. M. WALLER
WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY
ANDREW LANG
VOL. II
1822 TO 1825
1907

    CONTENTS

    BOOK I

    CHAPTER I

    An unpublished chapter from the Diable boiteux—History of Samud and the beautiful Doña Lorenza 1

    CHAPTER II

    The good my flouting at the hands of the two Parisians had done me—The young girls of Villers-Cotterets—My three friends—First love affairs 13

    CHAPTER III

    Adolphe de Leuven—His family—Unpublished details concerning the death of Gustavus III.—The Count de Ribbing—The shoemakers of the château de Villers-Hellon 24

    CHAPTER IV

    Adolphe's quatrain—The water-hen and King William—Lunch in the wood—The irritant powder, the frogs and the cock—The doctor's spectre—De Leuven, Hippolyte Leroy and I are exiled from the drawing-room—Unfortunate result of a geographical error—M. Paroisse 34

    CHAPTER V

    Amédée de la Ponce—He teaches me what work is—M. Arnault and his two sons—A journey by diligence—A gentleman fights me with cough lozenges and I fight him with my fists—I learn the danger from which I escaped 48

    CHAPTER VI

    First dramatic impressions—The Hamlet of Ducis—The Bourbons en 1815—Quotations from it 57

    CHAPTER VII

    The events of 1814 again—Marmont, Duc de Raguse, Maubreuil and Roux-Laborie at M. de Talleyrand's—The Journal des Débats and the Journal de Paris—Lyrics of the Bonapartists and enthusiasm of the Bourbons—End of the Maubreuil affair—Plot against the life of the Emperor—The Queen of Westphalia is robbed of her money and jewels 63

    CHAPTER VIII

    Account of the proceedings relative to the abstraction of the jewels of the Queen of Westphalia by the Sieur de Maubreuil—Chamber of the Court of Appeal—The sitting of 17 April, 1817 88

    BOOK II

    CHAPTER I

    The last shot of Waterloo—Temper of the provinces in 1817, 1818 and 1819—The Messéniennes—The Vêpres siciliennes—Louis IX.—Appreciation of these two tragedies—A phrase of Terence—My claim to a similar sentiment—Three o'clock in the morning—The course of love-making—Valeat res ludrica 96

    CHAPTER II

    Return of Adolphe de Leuven—He shows me a corner of the artistic and literary world—The death of Holbein and the death of Orcagna—Entrance into the green-rooms—Bürger's Lénore—First thoughts of my vocation 103

    CHAPTER III

    The Cerberus of the rue de Largny—I tame it—The ambush—Madame Lebègue—A confession 109

    CHAPTER IV

    De Leuven makes me his collaborator—The Major de Strasbourg—My first couplet-Chauvin—The Dîner d'amis—The Abencérages 117

    CHAPTER V

    Unrecorded stories concerning the assassination of the Duc de Berry. 123

    CHAPTER VI

    Carbonarism 132

    CHAPTER VII

    My hopes—Disappointment—M. Deviolaine is appointed forest-ranger to the Duc d'Orléans—His coldness towards me—Half promises—First cloud on my love-affairs—I go to spend three months with my brother-in-law at Dreux—The news waiting for me on my return—Muphti—Walls and hedges—The summer-house—Tennis—Why I gave up playing it—The wedding party in the wood 147

    CHAPTER VIII

    I leave Villers-Cotterets to be second or third clerk at Crespy—M. Lefèvre—His character—My journeys to Villers-Cotterets—The Pélerinage d'Ermenonville—Athénaïs—New matter sent to Adolphe—An uncontrollable desire to pay a visit to Paris—How this desire was accomplished—The journey—Hôtel des Vieux-Augustins—Adolphe—Sylla—Talma 155

    CHAPTER IX

    The theatre ticket—The Café du Roi—Auguste Lafarge—Théaulon—Rochefort—Ferdinand Langlé—People who dine and people who don't—Canaris—First sight of Talma—Appreciation of Mars and Rachel—Why Talma has no successor—Sylla and the Censorship—Talma's box—A cab-drive after midnight—The return to Crespy—M. Lefèvre explains that a machine, in order to work well, needs all its wheels—I hand in my resignation as his third clerk 166

    BOOK III

    CHAPTER I

    I return to my mother's—The excuse I give concerning my return—The calfs lights—Pyramus and Cartouche—The intelligence of the fox more developed than that of the dog—Death of Cartouche—Pyramus's various gluttonous habits 184

    CHAPTER II

    Hope in Laffitte—A false hope—New projects—M. Lecomier—How and on what conditions I clothe myself anew—Bamps, tailor, 12 rue du Helder—Bamps at Villers-Cotterets—I visit our estate along with him—Pyramus follows a butcher lad—An Englishman who loved gluttonous dogs—I sell Pyramus—My first hundred francs—The use to which they are put—Bamps departs for Paris—Open credit 191

    CHAPTER III

    My mother is obliged to sell her land and her house—The residu—The Piranèses—An architect at twelve hundred francs salary—I discount my first bill—Gondon—How I was nearly killed at his house—The fifty francs—Cartier—The game of billiards—How six hundred small glasses of absinthe equalled twelve journeys to Paris 204

    CHAPTER IV

    How I obtain a recommendation to General Foy—M. Danré of Vouty advises my mother to let me go to Paris—My good-byes—Laffitte and Perregaux—The three things which Maître Mennesson asks me not to forget—The Abbé Grégoire's advice and the discussion with him—I leave Villers-Cotterets 213

    CHAPTER V

    I find Adolphe again—The pastoral drama—First steps—The Duc de Bellune—General Sébastiani—His secretaries and his snuff-boxes—The fourth floor, small door to the left—The general who painted battles 223

    CHAPTER VI

    Régulus—Talma and the play—General Foy—The letter of recommendation and the interview—The Duc de Bellune's reply—I obtain a place as temporary clerk with M. le Duc d'Orléans—Journey to Villers-Cotterets to tell my mother the good news—No. 9—I gain a prize in a lottery 234

    CHAPTER VII

    I find lodgings—Hiraux's son—Journals and journalists in 1823—By being saved the expense of a dinner I am enabled to go to the play at the Porte-Saint-Martin—My entry into the pit—Sensation caused by my hair—I am turned out—How I am obliged to pay for three places in order to have one—A polite gentleman who reads Elzevirs 251

    CHAPTER VIII

    My neighbour—His portrait—The Pastissier françois—A course in bibliomania—Madame Méchin and the governor of Soissons—Cannons and Elzevirs 263

    CHAPTER IX

    Prologue of the Vampire—The style offends my neighbour's ear—First act—Idealogy—The rotifer—What the animal is—Its conformation, its life, its death and its resurrection 272

    CHAPTER X

    Second act of the Vampire—Analysis—My neighbour again objects—He has seen a vampire—Where and how—A statement which records the existence of vampires—Nero—Why he established the race of hired applauders—My neighbour leaves the orchestra 284

    CHAPTER XI

    A parenthesis—Hariadan Barberousse at Villers-Cotterets—I play the rôle of Don Ramire as an amateur—My costume—The third act of the Vampire—My friend the bibliomaniac whistles at the most critical moment—He is expelled from the theatre—Madame Allan-Dorval—Her family and her childhood—Philippe—His death and his funeral 295

    BOOK IV

    CHAPTER I

    My beginning at the office—Ernest Basset—Lassagne—M. Oudard—I see M. Deviolaine—M. le Chevalier de Broval—His portrait—Folded letters and oblong letters—How I acquire a splendid reputation for sealing letters—I learn who was my neighbour the bibliomaniac and whistler 307

    CHAPTER II

    Illustrious contemporaries—The sentence written on my foundation stone—My reply—I settle down in the place des Italiens—M. de Leuven's table—M. Louis-Bonaparte's witty saying—Lassagne gives me my first lesson in literature and history 323

    CHAPTER III

    Adolphe reads a play at the Gymnase—M. Dormeuil—Kenilworth Castle—M. Warez and Soulié—Mademoiselle Lévesque—The Arnault family—The Feuille—Marius à Minturnes—Danton's epigram—The reversed passport—Three fables—Germanicus —Inscriptions and epigrams—Ramponneau—The young man and the tilbury—Extra ecclesiam nulla est salus—Madame Arnault 334

    CHAPTER IV

    Frédéric Soulié, his character, his talent—Choruses of the various plays, sung as prologues and epilogues—Transformation of the vaudeville—The Gymnase and M. Scribe—The Folie de Waterloo 349

    CHAPTER V

    The Duc d'Orléans—My first interview with him—Maria-Stella-Chiappini—Her attempts to gain rank—Her history—The statement of the Duc d'Orléans—Judgment of the Ecclesiastical Court of Faenza—Rectification of Maria-Stella's certificate of birth 360

    CHAPTER VI

    The "year of trials"—The case of Potier and the director of the theatre of the Porte-Saint-Martin—Trial and condemnation of Magallon—The anonymous journalist—Beaumarchais sent to Saint-Lazare—A few words on censorships in general—Trial of Benjamin Constant—Trial of M. de Jouy—A few words concerning the author of Sylla—Three letters extracted from the Ermite de la Chaussée-d'Antin—Louis XVIII. as author 375

    CHAPTER VII

    The house in the rue Chaillot—Four poets and a doctor—Corneille and the Censorship—Things M. Faucher does not know—Things the President of the Republic ought to know 389

    BOOK V

    CHAPTER I

    Chronology of the drama—Mademoiselle Georges Weymer—Mademoiselle Raucourt—Legouvé and his works—Marie-Joseph Chénier—His letter to the company of the Comédie-Française—Young boys perfectionnés—Ducis—His work 398

    CHAPTER II

    Bonaparte's attempts at discovering poets—Luce de Lancival—Baour-Lormian—Lebrun-Pindare—Lucien Bonaparte, the author—Début of Mademoiselle Georges—The Abbé Geoffroy's critique—Prince Zappia—Hermione at Saint-Cloud 407

    CHAPTER III

    Imperial literature—The Jeunesse de Henri IV—Mercier and Alexandre Duval—The Templiers and their author—César Delrieu—Perpignan—Mademoiselle Georges' rupture with the Théâtre-Français—Her flight to Russia—The galaxy of kings—The tragédienne acts as ambassador 420

    CHAPTER IV

    The Comédie-Française at Dresden—Georges returns to the Théâtre-Français—The Deux Gendres—Mahomet II.—Tippo-Saëb—1814—Fontainebleau—The allied armies enter Paris—Lilies—Return from the isle of Elba—Violets—Asparagus stalks—Georges returns to Paris 430

    CHAPTER V

    The drawbacks to theatres which have the monopoly of a great actor—Lafond takes the rôle of Pierre de Portugal upon Talma declining it—Lafond—His school—His sayings—Mademoiselle Duchesnois—Her failings and her abilities-Pierre de Portugal succeeds 438

    CHAPTER VI

    General Riégo—His attempted insurrection—His escape and flight—He is betrayed by the brothers Lara—His trial—His execution 445

    CHAPTER VII

    The inn of the Tête-Noire—Auguste Ballet—Castaing—His trial—His attitude towards the audience and his words to the jury—His execution 452

    CHAPTER VIII

    Casimir Delavigne—An appreciation of the man and of the poet—The origin of the hatred of the old school of literature for the new—Some reflections upon Marino Faliero and the Enfants d'Édouard—Why Casimir Delavigne was more a comedy writer than a tragic poet—Where he found the ideas for his chief plays 465

    CHAPTER IX

    Talma in the École des Vieillards—One of his letters—Origin of his name and of his family—Tamerlan at the pension Verdier—Talma's début—Dugazon's advice—More advice from Shakespeare—Opinions of the critics of the day upon the débutant—Talma's passion for his art 480



MY MEMOIRS
BY
ALEXANDRE DUMAS
TRANSLATED BY
E. M. WALLER
WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY
ANDREW LANG
VOL. III
1826 TO 1830
1907

CONTENTS

BOOK I

CHAPTER I

I become a fully fledged employé—Bad plays—Thibaut—My studies with him—Where they have been of use to me—Amaury and the consumptives—My reading—Walter Scott—Cooper—Byron—The pleasure of eating sauerkraut at the Parthenon. 1

CHAPTER II

Byron's childhood—His grief at being lame—Mary Duff—The Malvern fortune-teller—How Byron and Robert Peel became acquainted—Miss Parker—Miss Chaworth—Verses on her portrait—Mrs. Musters—Lady Morgan—English Bards and Scotch Reviewers—Byron's letters to his mother—He takes his seat in the House of Lords. 3

CHAPTER III

Byron at Lisbon—How he quarrelled with his own countrymen—His poem Childe Harold—His fits of mad folly and subsequent depression—His marriage—His conjugal squabbles—He again quits England—His farewell to wife and child—His life and amours at Venice—He sets out for Greece—His arrival at Missolonghi—His illness and death. 21

CHAPTER IV

Usurped celebrity—M. Lemercier and his works—Racan's white hare—Le Fiesque by M. Ancelot—The Romantic artists —Scheffer—Delacroix—Sigalon—Schnetz—Coigniet—Boulanger —Géricault—La Méduse in the artist's studio—Lord Byron's funeral obsequies in England—Sheridan's body claimed for debt. 42

CHAPTER V

My mother comes to live with me—A Duc de Chartres born to me—Chateaubriand and M. de Villèle—Epistolary brevity—Re-establishment of the Censorship—A King of France should never be ill—Bulletins of the health of Louis XVIII.—His last moments and death—Ode by Victor Hugo—M. Torbet and Napoleon's tomb—La Fayette's voyage to America—The ovations showered upon him. 54

[Pg vi]

CHAPTER VI

Tallancourt and Betz—The café Hollandais—My Quiroga cloak—First challenge—A lesson in shooting—The eve of my duel—Analysis of my sensations—My opponent fails to keep his appointment—The seconds hunt him out—The duel—Tallancourt and the mad dog. 65

CHAPTER VII

The Duc d'Orléans is given the title of Royal Highness—The coronation of Charles X.—Account of the ceremony by Madame la Duchesse d'Orléans—Death of Ferdinand of Naples—De La ville de Miremont—Le Cid d'Andalousie—M. Pierre Lebrun—A reading at the camp at Compiègne—M. Taylor is appointed a royal commissioner to the Théâtre-Français—The curé Bergeron—M. Viennet—Two of his letters—Pichat and his Léonidas. 75

CHAPTER VIII

Death of General Foy—His funeral—The Royal Highness—Assassination of Paul-Louis Courier—Death of the Emperor Alexander—Comparison of England and Russia—The reason why these two powers have increased during the last century—How Napoleon meant to conquer India. 87

CHAPTER IX

The Emperor Alexander—Letter from Czar Nicolas to Karamsine—History after the style of Suetonius and Saint-Simon—Catherine and Potemkin—Madame Braniska—The cost of the imperial cab-drive—A ball at M. de Caulaincourt's—The man with the pipe—The emperor's boatman and coachman. 100

CHAPTER X

Alexander leaves St. Petersburg—His presentiments of his death—The two stars seen at Taganrog—The emperor's illness—His last moments—How they learnt of his death in St. Petersburg—The Grand-Duke Constantine—His character and tastes—Why he renounced his right to the imperial throne—Jeannette Groudzenska. 115

[Pg vii]

BOOK II

CHAPTER I

Rousseau and Romieu—Conversation with the porter—The eight hours' candle—The Deux Magots—At what hour one should wind up one's watch—M. le sous-préfet enjoys a joke—Henry Monnier—A paragraph of information—On suppers—On cigars. 131

CHAPTER II

The lantern—Le Chasse et l'Amour—Rousseau's part in it—The couplet about the hare—The couplet de facture—How there may be hares and hares—Reception at l'Ambigu—My first receipts as an author—Who Porcher was—Why no one might say anything against Mélesville. 144

CHAPTER III

The success of my first play—My three stories—M. Marle and his orthography—Madame Setier—A bad speculation—The Pâtre, by Montvoisin—The Oreiller—Madame Desbordes-Valmore—How she became a poetess—Madame Amable Tastu—The Dernier jour de l'année—Zéphire. 160

CHAPTER IV

Talma's illness—How he would have acted Tasso—His nephews—He receives a visit from M. de Quélen—Why his children renounced his faith—His death—La Noce et l'Enterrement—Oudard lectures me on my fondness for theatre-going—The capital reply that put the Palais-Royal in a gay humour—I still keep the confidence of Lassagne and de la Ponce—I obtain a success anonymously at the Porte-Saint-Martin. 173

CHAPTER V

Soulié at the mechanical saw-mill—His platonic love of gold—I desire to write a drama with him—I translate Fiesque—Death of Auguste Lafarge—My pay is increased and my position lowered—Félix Deviolaine, condemned by the medical faculty, is saved by illness—Louis XI. à Péronne—Talma's theatrical wardrobe—The loi de justice et d'amour—The disbanding of the National Guard. 187

[Pg viii]

CHAPTER VI

English actors in Paris—Literary importations—Trente Ans, or la Vie d'un Joueur—The Hamlet of Kemble and Miss Smithson—A bas-relief of Mademoiselle de Fauveau—Visit to Frédéric Soulié—He declines to write Christine with me—A night attack—I come across Adèle d'Alvin once more—I spend the night au violon. 198

CHAPTER VII

Future landmarks—Compliments to the Duc de Bordeaux—Votes—Cauchois-Lemaire's Orléaniste brochure—The lake of Enghien—Colonel Bro's parrot—Doctor Ferrus—Morrisel—A tip-top funeral cortège—Hunting in full cry—An autopsy—Explanation of the death of the parrot. 207

CHAPTER VIII

Barthélemy and Méry—M. Éliça Gallay—Méry the draught-player and anatomist—L'Épître à Sidi Mahmoud—The Ponthieu library—Soulé—The Villéliade—Barthélemy the printer—Méry the improvisator—The Voux de la nouvelle année—The pastiche of Lucrèce. 223

CHAPTER IX

I pass from the Secretarial Department to the Record Office—M. Bichet—Wherein I resemble Piron—My spare time—M. Pieyre and M. Parseval de Grandmaison—A scene missing in Distrait—La Peyrouse—A success all to myself. 239

CHAPTER X

The painter Lethière—Brutus unveiled by M. Ponsard—Madame Hannemann—Gohier—Andrieux—Renaud—Desgenettes—Larrey, Augereau and the Egyptian mummy—Soldiers of the new school—My dramatic education—I enter the offices of the Forestry Department—The cupboard full of empty bottles—Three days away from the office—Am summoned before M. Deviolaine. 250

CHAPTER XI

Conclusion of Christine—A patron, after a fashion—Nodier recommends me to Taylor—The Royal Commissary and the author of Hécube—Semi-official reading before Taylor—Official reading before the Committee—I am received with acclamation—The intoxication of success—How history is written—M. Deviolaine's incredulity—Picard's opinions concerning my play—Nodier's opinion—Second reading at the Théâtre-Français and definite acceptance. 262

[Pg ix]

CHAPTER XII

Cordelier-Delanoue—A sitting of the Athénée—M. Villenave—His family—The one hundred and thirty-two Nantais—Cathelineau—The hunt aux bleus—Forest—A chapter of history—Sauveur—The Royalist Committee—Souchu—The miraculous tomb—Carrier. 278

CHAPTER XIII

M. Villenave's house—The master's despotic rule—The savant's coquetry—Description of the sanctuary of the man of science—I am admitted, thanks to an autograph of Buonaparte—The crevice in the wall—The eight thousand folios—The pastel by Latour—Voyages of discovery for an Elzevir or a Faust—The fall of the portrait and the death of the original. 292

CHAPTER XIV

First representation of Soulié's Roméo et Juliette—Anaïs and Lockroy—Why French actresses cannot act Juliet—The studies of the Conservatoire—A second Christine at the Théâtre-Français—M. Évariste Dumoulin and Madame Valmonzey—Conspiracy against me—I give up my turn to have my play produced—How I found the subject of Henri III.—My opinion of that play. 308

CHAPTER XV

The reading of Henri III. at M. Villenave's and M. Roqueplan's—Another reading at Firmin's—Béranger is present—A few words about his influence and popularity—Effect produced by my drama—Reception by the Comédie-Française—Struggle for the distribution of parts—M. de Broval's ultimatum—Convicted of the crime of poetry I appeal to the Duc d'Orléans—His Royal Highness withholds my salary—M. Laffitte lends me three thousand francs—Condemnation of Béranger. 318

CHAPTER XVI

The Duc d'Orléans has my salary stopped—A scribbler (folliculaire)—Henri III. and the Censorship—My mother is seized with paralysis—Cazal—Edmond Halphen—A call on the Duc d'Orléans—First night of Henri III.—Effect is produced on M. Deviolaine—M. de Broval's congratulations. 328

[Pg x]

CHAPTER XVII

The day following my victory—Henri III. is interdicted—I obtain an audience with M. de Martignac—He removes the interdiction-Les hommes-obstacles—The Duc d'Orléans sends for me into his box—His talk with Charles X. on the subject of my drama—Another scribbler—Visit to Carrel—Gosset's shooting-box and pistols No. 5—An impossible duel. 341

BOOK III

CHAPTER I

The Arsenal—Nodier's house—The master's profile—The congress of bibliophiles—The three candles—Debureau—Mademoiselle Mars and Merlin—Nodier's family—His friends—In which houses I am at my best—The salon of the Arsenal—Nodier as a teller of tales—The ball and the warming-pan. 351

CHAPTER II

Oudard transmits to me the desires of the Duc d'Orléans—I am appointed assistant librarian—How this saved His Highness four hundred francs—Rivalry with Casimir Delavigne—Petition of the Classical School against Romantic productions—Letter of support from Mademoiselle Duchesnois—A fantastic dance—The person who called Racine a blackguard—Fine indignation of the Constitutionnel—First representation of Marino Faliero 365

CHAPTER III

Mesmerism—Experiment during a trance—I submit to being mesmerised—My observation upon it—I myself start to mesmerise—Experiment made in a diligence—Another experiment in the house of the procureur de la République of Joigny—Little Marie D****—Her political predictions—I cure her of fear. 380

CHAPTER IV

Fresh trials of newspaper editors—The Mouton-enragé—Fontan—Harel's witticism concerning him—The Fils de l'Homme before the Police Court—The author pleads his cause in verse—M. Guillebert's prose—Prison charges at Sainte-Pélagie—Embarrassment of the Duc d'Orléans about a historical portrait—The two usurpations. 395

[Pg xi]

CHAPTER V

The things that are the greatest enemies to the success of a play—The honesty of Mademoiselle Mars as an actress—Her dressing-room—The habitués at her supper-parties—Vatout—Denniée—Becquet—Mornay—Mademoiselle Mars in her own home—Her last days on the stage—Material result of the success of Henri III.—My first speculation—The recasting of Christine—Where I looked for my inspiration—Two other ideas. 408

CHAPTER VI

Victor Hugo—His birth—His mother—Les Chassebouf and les Cornet—Captain Hugo—The signification of his name—Victor's godfather—The Hugo family in Corsica—M. Hugo is called to Naples by Joseph Bonaparte—He is appointed colonel and governor of the province of Avellino—Recollections of the poet's early childhood—Fra Diavolo—Joseph, King of Spain—Colonel Hugo is made a general, count, marquis and major-domo—The Archbishop of Tarragona—Madame Hugo and her children in Paris—The convent of Feuillantines. 420

CHAPTER VII

Departure for Spain—Journey from Paris to Bayonne—The treasure—Order of march of the convoy—M. du Saillant—M. de Cotadilla—Irun—Ernani—Salinas—The battalion of écloppés (cripples)—Madame Hugo's supplies of provisions—The forty Dutch grenadiers—Mondragon—The precipice—Burgos—Celadas—Alerte—The queen's review. 435

CHAPTER VIII

Segovia—M. de Tilly—The Alcazar—The doubloons—The castle of M. de la Calprenède and that of a Spanish grandee—The bourdaloue—Otero—The Dutchmen again—The Guadarrama—Arrival at Madrid—The palace of Masserano—The comet—The College—Don Manoël and Don Bazilio—Tacitus and Plautus—Lillo—The winter of 1812 to 1813—The Empecinado—The glass of eau sucrée—The army of merinoes—Return to Paris. 450

CHAPTER IX

The college and the garden of the Feuillantines—Grenadier or general—Victor Hugo's first appearance in public—He obtains honourable mention at the Academy examination—He carries off three prizes in the Jeux Floraux—Han d'Islande—The poet and the bodyguard—Hugo's marriage—The Odes et Ballades—Proposition made by cousin Cornet. 466

[Pg xii]

CHAPTER X

Léopoldine—The opinions of the son of the Vendéenne—The Delon conspiracy—Hugo offers Delon shelter—Louis XVIII. bestows a pension of twelve hundred francs on the author of the Odes et Ballades—The poet at the office of the director-general des postes—How he learns the existence of the cabinet noir—He is made a chevalier of the Legion d'honneur—Beauchesne-Bug-Jargal—The Ambassador of Austria's soirée—Ode à la Colonne—Cromwell—How Marion Delorme was written. 480

CHAPTER XI

Reading of Marion Delorme at the house of Devéria—Steeplechase of directors—Marion Delorme is stopped by the Censorship—Hugo obtains an audience with Charles X.—His drama is definitely interdicted—They send him the brevet of a pension, which he declines—He sets to work on Hernani and completes it in twenty-four days. 496

CHAPTER XII

The invasion of barbarians—Rehearsals of Hernani—Mademoiselle Mars and the lines about the lion—The scene over the portraits—Hugo takes away from Mademoiselle Mars the part of Doña Sol—Michelot's flattering complaisance to the public—The quatrain about the cupboard—Joanny. 507

CHAPTER XIII

Alfred de Vigny—The man and his works—Harel, the manager at the Odéon—Downfall of Soulié's Christine—Parenthesis about Lassailly—Letter of Harel, with preface by myself and postscript by Soulié—I read my Christine at the Odéon—Harel asks me to put it into prose—First representation of the More de Venise—The actors and the papers. 521

CHAPTER XIV

Citizen-general Barras—Doctor Cabarrus introduces me to him—Barras's only two regrets—His dinners—The Princess de Chimay's footman—Fauche-Borel—The Duc de Bordeaux makes a mess—History lesson given to an ambassador—Walter Scott and Barras—The last happiness of the old directeur—His death. 535



MY MEMOIRS
BY
ALEXANDRE DUMAS
TRANSLATED BY
E. M. WALLER
WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY
ANDREW LANG
IN SIX VOLUMES
VOL. IV
1830 TO 1831
1908
CONTENTS

    BOOK I

    CHAPTER I

    Mademoiselle Georges' house—Harel and Jules Janin—Young Tom and Popol—The latter's prayer against cholera—Georges' Oriental style of living—Her cleanliness—Harel's fault to the contrary—Twenty-four thousand francs flung out of the window—Saint Anthony—Piaff-Piaff—His dissoluteness—His death—His funeral oration 1

    CHAPTER II

    M. Briffaut, Censor and Academician—History of Ninus II.—M. de Lourdoueix—The idea of Antony—The piece received by the Français is stopped by the Censorship—The Duc de Chartres—Negotiations for his presence with that of his two brothers at the first representation of Christine—Louët—An autograph of the Prince Royal 9

    CHAPTER III

    The first representation of Hernani—The old ace of spades—The old man has a quarrel—Parodies—Origin of the story of Cabrion and of Pipelet—Eugène Sue and Desmares—Soulié returns to me—He offers me fifty of his workmen in the capacity of applauders—First representation of Christine—A supper at my lodgings—Hugo and de Vigny correct the objectionable lines 23

    CHAPTER IV

    A passing cab—Madame Dorval in the Incendiaire—Two actresses—The Duc d'Orléans asks for the Cross of the Legion of Honour on my behalf—His recommendation has no effect—M. Empis—Madame Lafond's Salon—My costume as Arnaute—Madame Malibran—Brothers and sisters in Art 34

    CHAPTER V

    Why the Duc d'Orléans' recommendation on the subject of my croix d'honneur failed—The indemnity of a milliard—La Fayette's journey to Auvergne—His reception at Grenoble, Vizille and at[Pg vi] Lyons—Charles X.'s journey to Alsace—Varennes and Nancy—Opening of the Chambers—The royal speech and the Address of the 221—Article 14—The conquest of Algiers and the recapture of our Rhine frontiers 44

    CHAPTER VI

    The soirée on 31 May 1830 at the Palais-Royal—The King of Naples—A question of etiquette—How the King of France ought to be addressed—The real Charles X.—M. de Salvandy—The first flames of the volcano—The Duc de Chartres sends me to inquire into the commotion—Alphonse Signol—I tear him from the clutches of a soldier of the Garde royal—His irritation and threats—The volcano nothing but a fire of straw 54

    CHAPTER VII

    A pressing affair—One witness lost, and two found—Rochefort—Signol at the Théâtre des Italiens—He insults Lieutenant Marulaz—The two swords—The duel—Signol is killed—Victorine and le Chiffonnier—Death steps in 61

    BOOK II

    CHAPTER I

    Alphonse Karr—The cuirassier—The medal for life saving and the Cross of the Légion d'honneur—Karr's home at Montmartre—Sous les tilleuls and the critics—The taking of Algiers—M. Dupin senior—Why he did not write his Memoirs—Signing of the Ordinances of July—Reasons that prevented my going to Algiers 67

    CHAPTER II

    The third storey of No. 7 in the rue de l'Université—The first results of the Ordinances—The café du Roi—Étienne Arago—François Arago—The Academy—La Bourse—Le Palais-Royal—Madame de Leuven—Journey in search of her husband and son—Protest of the journalists—Names of the signatories 77

    CHAPTER III

    The morning of July 27—Visit to my mother—Paul Foucher—Amy Robsart—Armand Carrel—The office of the Temps—Baude—The Commissary of Police—The three locksmiths—The office of the National—Cadet Gassicourt—Colonel Gourgaud—M. de Rémusat—Physiognomy of the passers-by [Pg vii] 86

    CHAPTER IV

    Doctor Thibaut—The Government of Gérard and Mortemart—Étienne Arago and Mazue, the Superintendent of Police—The café Gobillard—Fire at the guard-house in the place de la Bourse—The first barricades—The night 97

    CHAPTER V

    The morning of the 27th—Joubert—Charles Teste—La Petite Jacobinière—Chemist Robinet—The arms used in Sergent Mathieu—Pillage of an armourer's stores—The three Royal Guards—A tall and fair young man—Oudard's fears 105

    CHAPTER VI

    The aspect of the rue de Richelieu—Charras—L'École polytechnique—The head with the wig—The café of the Porte Saint-Honoré—The tricoloured flag—I become head of a troop—My landlord gives me notice—A gentleman who distributes powder—The captain of the 15th Light Infantry 114

    CHAPTER VII

    The attack on the Hôtel de Ville—Rout—I take refuge at M. Lethière's—The news—My landlord becomes generous—General La Fayette—Taschereau—Béranger—The list of the Provisional Government—Honest mistake of the Constitutionnel 125

    CHAPTER VIII

    Invasion of the Artillery Museum—Armour of François I.—Charles IX.'s arquebuse—La place de l'Odéon—What Charras had been doing—The uniform of the École polytechnique—Millotte—The prison Montaigu—The barracks of l'Estrapade—D'Hostel—A Bonapartist—Riding-master Chopin—Lothon—The general in command 134

    CHAPTER IX

    Aspect of the Louvre—Fight on the Pont des Arts—The dead and wounded—A cannon ball for myself—Madame Guyet-Desfontaines—Return from the Babylone barracks—Charras's cockade—The taking of the Tuileries—A copy of Christine—Quadrille danced in the Tuileries court—The men who made the Revolution of 1830 [Pg viii] 149

    BOOK III

    CHAPTER I

    I go in search of Oudard—The house at the corner of the rue de Rohan—Oudard is with Laffitte—Degousée—General Pajol and M. Dupin—The officers of the 53rd Regiment—Interior of Laffitte's salon—Panic—A deputation comes to offer La Fayette the command of Paris—He accepts—Étienne Arago and the tricoloured cockade—History of the Hôtel de Ville from eight in the morning to half-past three in the afternoon 164

    CHAPTER II

    General La Fayette at the Hôtel de Ville—Charras and his men—"The Prunes of Monsieur"—The Municipal Commission—Its first Act—Casimir Périer's bank—General Gérard—The Duc de Choiseul—What happened at Saint-Cloud—The three negotiators—It is too late—M. d'Argout with Laffitte 175

    CHAPTER III

    Alexander de la Borde—Odilon Barrot—Colonel Dumoulin—Hippolyte Bonnelier—My study—A note in Oudard's handwriting—The Duc de Chartres is arrested at Montrouge—The danger he incurred and how he was saved—I propose to go to Soissons to fetch gunpowder—I procure my commission from General Gérard—La Fayette draws up a proclamation for me—The painter bard—M. Thiers to the fore once more 187

    CHAPTER IV

    Gee up, Polignac!—André Marchais—Post-master at Bourget—I display the Tricolour on my carriage—Bard joins me—M. Cunin-Gridaine—Old Levasseur—Struggle with him—I blow out his brains!—Two old acquaintances—The terror of Jean-Louis—Our halt at Villers-Cotterets—Hutin—Supper with Paillet 203

    CHAPTER V

    Arrival at Soissons—Strategic preparations—Reconnaissance round the magazine—Hutin and Bard plant the tricolour flag upon the cathedral—I climb the wall of the powder magazine—Captain Mollard—Sergeant Ragon—Lieutenant-Colonel d'Orcourt—Parleys with them—They promise me neutrality [Pg ix] 217

    CHAPTER VI

    How matters had proceeded with the sacristan—The four-inch gun—Bard as gunner—The commander of the fort—Lieutenant Tinga—M. de Lenferna—M. Bonvilliers—Madame de Linières—The revolt of the negroes—The conditions upon which the commander of the fort signed the order—M. Moreau—M. Quinette—The Mayor of Soissons—Bard and the green plums 224

    CHAPTER VII

    The Mayor of Soissons—The excise-office powder—M. Jousselin— The hatchet belonging to the warehouse-keeper—M. Quinette—I break open the door of the powder magazine—Triumphant exit from Soissons—M. Mennesson attempts to have me arrested—The Guards of the Duc d'Orléans—M. Boyer—Return to Paris—"Those devils of Republicans!" 234

    CHAPTER VIII

    First Orléanist proclamation—MM. Thiers and Scheffer go to Neuilly—The evening at Saint-Cloud—Charles X. revokes the Ordinances—Republican deputation at the Hôtel de Ville—M. de Sussy—Audry de Puyraveau—Republican proclamation—La Fayette's reply to the Duc de Mortemart—Charras and Mauguin 245

    CHAPTER IX

    Philippe VII.—How Béranger justified himself for having helped to make a King—The Duc d'Orléans during the three days—His arrival in Paris on the evening of the 30th—He sends for M. de Mortemart—Unpublished letter by him to Charles X.—Benjamin Constant and Laffitte—Deputation of the Chamber to the Palais-Royal—M. Sébastiani—M. de Talleyrand—The Duc d'Orléans accepts the Lieutenant-Generalship of the Kingdom—Curious papers found at the Tuileries 239

    CHAPTER X

    The Duc d'Orléans goes to the Hôtel de Ville—M. Laffitte in his sedan-chair—The king sans culotte—Tardy manifestation of the Provisional Government—Odilon Barrot sleeps on a milestone—Another Balthasar Gérard—The Duc d'Orléans is received by La Fayette—A superb voice—Fresh appearance of general Dubourg—The balcony of the Hôtel de Ville—The road to Joigny [Pg x] 276

    BOOK IV

    CHAPTER I

    M. Thiers' way of writing history—Republicans at the Palais-Royal—Louis-Philippe's first ministry—Casimir Périer's cunning—My finest drama—Lothon and Charras—A sword-thrust—The posting-master of Bourget once more—La Fère—Lieutenant-Colonel Duriveau—Lothon and General La Fayette 284

    CHAPTER II

    Letter of Charles X. to the Duc d'Orléans—A conjuring trick—Return of the Duc de Chartres to the Palais-Royal—Bourbons and Valois—Abdication of Charles X.—Preparations for the expedition of Rambouillet—An idea of Harel—The scene-shifters of the Odéon—Nineteen persons in one fiacre—Distribution of arms at the Palais-Royal—Colonel Jacqueminot 309

    CHAPTER III

    Mission of four commissioners to Charles X.—General Pajol—He is appointed commander of the Paris Volunteers—Charras offers to be his aide-de-camp—The map of Seine-et-Oise—The spies—The hirer of carriages—Rations of bread—D'Arpentigny—The taking of the artillery of Saint-Cyr—Halt at Cognières—M. Detours 320

    CHAPTER IV

    Boyer the Cruel—The ten thousand rations of bread—General Exelmans and Charras—The concierge at the prefecture of Versailles—M. Aubernon—Colonel Poque—Interview of Charles X. with MM. de Schonen, Odilon Barrot and Marshal Maison—The Royal Family leave Rambouillet—Panic—The crown jewels—Return to Paris 332

    CHAPTER V

    Harel's idea—It is suggested I should compose La Parisienne—Auguste Barbier—My state of morals after the Three Days—I turn solicitor—Breakfast with General La Fayette—My interview with him—An indiscreet question—The Marquis de Favras—A letter from Monsieur—My commission [Pg xi]344

    CHAPTER VI

    Léon Pillet—His uniform—Soissonnais susceptibility—Hard returns to the charge with his play—I set out for la Vendée—The quarry—I obtain pardon for a coiner condemned to the galleys—My stay at Meurs—Commandant Bourgeois—Disastrous effect of the tricolours in le Bocage—Fresh proofs that a kindness done is never lost 354

    CHAPTER VII

    A warning to Parisian sportsmen—Clisson—The château of M. Lemot—My guide—The Vendean column—The battle of Torfou—Two omitted names—Piffanges—Tibulle and the Loire—Gilles de Laval—His edifying death—Means taken to engrave a remembrance on the minds of children 368

    CHAPTER VIII

    Le Bocage—Its deep lanes and hedges—The Chouan tactics—Vendean horses and riders—Vendean politics—The Marquis de la Bretèche and his farmers—The means I suggested to prevent a fresh Chouannerie—The tottering stone—I leave la Jarrie—Adieux to my guide 376

    CHAPTER IX

    The Nantes Revolution—Régnier—Paimbouf—Landlords and travellers—Jacomety—The native of la Guadeloupe and his wife—Gull shooting—Axiom for sea-bird shooting—The captain of la Pauline—Woman and swallow—Lovers' superstition—Getting under sail 384

    CHAPTER X

    Story of Bougainville and his friend the curé of Boulogne 392

    CHAPTER XI

    Breakfast on deck—Saint-Nazaire—A thing husbands never think of—Noirmontiers —Belle-Ile—I leave the two Paulines—The rope-ladder—The ship's boat—A total immersion—The inn at Saint-Nazaire—I throw money through the window—A batch of clothes—Return to Paris 409

    BOOK V

    CHAPTER I

    Confidential letter from Louis-Philippe to the Emperor Nicholas—The Czar's reply—What France could do after the Revolution of[Pg xii] July—Louis-Philippe and Ferdinand VII.—The Spanish refugees—Reaction in the Home department—Scraping of the public monuments—Protest 418

    CHAPTER II

    The drama of Saint-Leu—The bravery of the Duc d'Aumale—The arrest of MM. Peyronnet, Chantelauze, Guernon-Ranville and Polignac—Madame de Saint-Fargeau's servant—Thomas and M. de Polignac—The ex-ministers at Vincennes—The abolition of the death penalty in the Chamber—La Fayette—M. de Kératry—Salverte—Death to the ministers—Vive Odilon Barrot and Pétion! 429

    CHAPTER III

    Oudard tells me that Louis-Philippe wishes to see me—Visit to M. Deviolaine—Hutin, supernumerary horse-guardsman—My interview with the king about la Vendée and the policy of juste milieu—Bixio an artilleryman—He undertakes to get me enrolled in his battery—I send in my resignation to Louis-Philippe 443

    CHAPTER IV

    First performance of la Mère et la Fille—I have supper with Harel after the performance—Harel imprisons me after supper—I am sentenced to eight days' enforced work at Napoléon—On the ninth day the piece is read to the actors and I am set at liberty—The rehearsals—The actor Charles—His story about Nodier 457

    CHAPTER V

    I am officially received into the Artillery Corps of the National Guard—Antony is put under rehearsal at the Théâtre-Français—Ill-will of the actors—Treaty between Hugo and the manager of the Porte-Saint-Martin—Firmin's proposition and confidence—Mademoiselle Mars' dresses and the new gas lights—I withdraw Antony from the Théâtre-Français—I offer Dorval the part of Adèle 472

    CHAPTER VI

    My agreements with Dorval—I read Antony—Her impressions— She makes me alter the last act there and then—Merle's room—Bocage as artist—Bocage as negotiator—Reading to M. Crosnier—He falls into a profound slumber—The play nevertheless is accepted

    APPENDIX493



MY MEMOIRS
BY
ALEXANDRE DUMAS
TRANSLATED BY
E. M. WALLER
WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY
ANDREW LANG
IN SIX VOLUMES
VOL. V
1831 TO 1832
1908
CONTENTS

    BOOK I

    CHAPTER I

    Organisation of the Parisian Artillery—Metamorphosis of my uniform of a Mounted National Guardsman—Bastide—Godefroy Cavaignac—Guinard—Thomas—Names of the batteries and of their principal servants—I am summoned to seize the Chamber—How many of us came to the rendez-vous 1

    CHAPTER II

    Odilon Barrot, Préfet of the Seine—His soirées—His proclamation upon the subject of riots—Dupont (de l'Eure) and Louis-Philippe—Resignation of the ministry of Molé and Guizot—The affair of the forest of Breteuil—The Laffitte ministry—The prudent way in which registration was carried out 10

    CHAPTER III

    Béranger as Patriot and Republican 20

    CHAPTER IV

    Béranger, as Republican 28

    CHAPTER V

    Death of Benjamin Constant—Concerning his life—Funeral honours that were conferred upon him—His funeral—Law respecting national rewards—The trial of the ministers—Grouvelle and his sister—M. Mérilhou and the neophyte—Colonel Lavocat—The Court of Peers—Panic—Fieschi 38

    CHAPTER VI

    The artillerymen at the Louvre—Bonapartist plot to take our cannon from us—Distribution of cartridges by Godefroy Cavaignac—The concourse of people outside the Luxembourg when the ministers were sentenced—Departure of the condemned for Vincennes—Defeat of the judges—La Fayette and the riot—Bastide and Commandant Barré on guard with Prosper Mérimée 50

    CHAPTER VII

    We are surrounded in the Louvre courtyard—Our ammunition taken by surprise—Proclamation of the Écoles—Letter of Louis-Philippe[Pg vi] to La Fayette—The Chamber vote of thanks to the Colleges—Protest of the École polytechnique—Discussion at the Chamber upon the General Commandership of the National Guard—Resignation of La Fayette—The king's reply—I am appointed second captain 59

    CHAPTER VIII

    The Government member—Chodruc-Duclos—His portrait—His life at Bordeaux—His imprisonment at Vincennes—The Mayor of Orgon—Chodruc-Duclos converts himself into a Diogenes—M. Giraud-Savine—Why Nodier was growing old—Stibert—A lesson in shooting—Death of Chodruc-Duclos 68

    CHAPTER IX

    Alphonse Rabbe—Madame Cardinal—Rabbe and the Marseilles Academy—Les Massénaires—Rabbe in Spain—His return—The Old Dagger—The Journal Le Phocéen—Rabbe in prison—The writer of fables—Ma pipe 77

    CHAPTER X

    Rabbe's friends—La Sour grise—The historical résumés—M. Brézé's advice—An imaginative man—Berruyer's style—Rabbe with his hairdresser, his concierge and confectioner—La Sour grise stolen—Le Centaure 88

    CHAPTER XI

    Adèle—Her devotion to Rabbe—Strong meat—Appel à Dieu—L'âme et la comédie humaine—La mort—Ultime lettere—Suicide—À Alphonse Rabbe, by Victor Hugo 99

    CHAPTER XII

    Chéron—His last compliments to Harel—Obituary of 1830—My official visit on New Year's Day—A striking costume—Read the Moniteur—Disbanding of the Artillery of the National Guard—First representation of Napoléon Bonaparte—Delaistre—Frédérick-Lemaître 109

    BOOK II

    CHAPTER I

    The Abbé Châtel—The programme of his church—The Curé of Lèves and M. Clausel de Montals—The Lévois embrace the religion of the primate of the Gauls—Mass in French—The Roman curé—A dead body to inter 117

    [Pg vii]

    CHAPTER II

    Fine example of religious toleration—The Abbé Dallier—The Circes of Lèves—Waterloo after Leipzig—The Abbé Dallier is kept as hostage—The barricades—The stones of Chartres—The outlook—Preparations for fighting 124

    CHAPTER III

    Attack of the barricade—A sequel to Malplaquet—The Grenadier—The Chartrian philanthropists—Sack of the bishop's palace—A fancy dress—How order was restored—The culprits both small and great—Death of the Abbé Ledru—Scruples of conscience of the former schismatics—The Dies iræ of Kosciusko 130

    CHAPTER IV

    The Abbé de Lamennais—His prediction of the Revolution of 1830—Enters the Church—His views on the Empire—Casimir Delavigne, Royalist—His early days—Two pieces of poetry by M. de Lamennais—His literary vocation—Essay on Indifference in Religious Matters—Reception given to this book by the Church—The academy of the château de la Chesnaie 138

    CHAPTER V

    The founding of l'Avenir—L'Abbé Lacordaire—M. Charles de Montalembert—His article on the sacking of Saint-Germain-l'Auxerrois—l'Avenir and the new literature—My first interview with M. de Lamennais—Lawsuit against l'Avenir—MM. de Montalembert and Lacordaire as schoolmasters—Their trial in the Cour des pairs—The capture of Warsaw—Answer of four poets to a word spoken by a statesman 148

    CHAPTER VI

    Suspension of l'Avenir—Its three principal editors present themselves at Rome—The Abbé de Lamennais as musician—The trouble it takes to obtain an audience of the Pope—The convent of Santo-Andrea della Valle—Interview of M. de Lamennais with Gregory XVI.—The statuette of Moses—The doctrines of l'Avenir are condemned by the Council of Cardinals—Ruin of M. de Lamennais—The Paroles d'un Croyant 160

    CHAPTER VII

    Who Gannot was—Mapah—His first miracle—The wedding at Cana—Gannot, phrenologist—Where his first ideas on phrenology came from—The unknown woman—The change wrought in Gannot's life—How he becomes Mapah 167

    [Pg viii]

    CHAPTER VIII

    The god and his sanctuary—He informs the Pope of his overthrow—His manifestoes—His portrait—-Doctrine of escape—Symbols of that religion—Chaudesaigues takes me to the Mapah—Iswara and Pracriti—Questions which are wanting in actuality—-War between the votaries of bidja and the followers of sakti—My last interview with the Mapah 176

    CHAPTER IX

    Apocalypse of the being who was once called Caillaux186

    BOOK III

    CHAPTER I

    The scapegoat of power—Legitimist hopes—The expiatory mass—The Abbé Olivier—The Curé of Saint-Germain-l'Auxerrois—Pachel—Where I begin to be wrong—General Jacqueminot—Pillage of Saint-Germain-l'Auxerrois—The sham Jesuit and the Préfet of Police—The Abbé Paravey's room 203

    CHAPTER II

    The Préfet of Police at the Palais-Royal—The function of fire—Valérius, the truss-maker—Demolition of the archbishop's palace—The Chinese album—François Arago—The spectators of the riot—The erasure of the fleurs-de-lis—I give in my resignation a second time—MM. Chambolle and Casimir Périer 211

    CHAPTER III

    My dramatic faith wavers—Bocage and Dorval reconcile me with myself—A political trial wherein I deserved to figure—Downfall of the Laffitte Ministry—Austria and the Duc de Modena—Maréchal Maison is Ambassador at Vienna—The story of one of his dispatches—Casimir Périer Prime Minister—His reception at the Palais-Royal—They make him the amende honorable 220

    CHAPTER IV

    Trial of the artillerymen—Procureur-général Miller—Pescheux d'Herbinville—Godefroy Cavaignac—Acquittal of the accused—The ovation they received—Commissioner Gourdin—The cross of July—The red and black ribbon—Final rehearsals of Antony 229

    CHAPTER V

    The first representation of Antony—The play, the actors, the public—Antony at the Palais-Royal—Alterations of the dénoûment 238

    [Pg ix]

    CHAPTER VI

    The inspiration under which I composed Antony—The Preface—Wherein lies the moral of the piece—Cuckoldom, Adultery and the Civil Code—Quem nuptiæ demonstrant—Why the Critics exclaimed that my Drama was immoral—Account given by the least malevolent among them—How prejudices against bastardy are overcome 249

    CHAPTER VII

    A word on criticism—Molière estimated by Bossuet, by Jean-Jacques Rousseau and by Bourdaloue—An anonymous libel—Critics of the seventeenth and nineteenth centuries—M. François de Salignac de la Motte de Fénelon—Origin of the word Tartuffe—M. Taschereau and M. Étienne 256

    CHAPTER VIII

    Thermometer of Social Crises—Interview with M. Thiers—His intentions with regard to the Théâtre-Français—Our conventions—Antony comes back to the rue de Richelieu—The Constitutionnel—Its leader against Romanticism in general, and against my drama in particular—Morality of the ancient theatre—Parallel between the Théâtre-Français and that of the Porte-Saint-Martin—First suspension of Antony 265

    CHAPTER IX

    My discussion with M. Thiers—Why he had been compelled to suspend Antony—Letter of Madame Dorval to the Constitutionnel—M. Jay crowned with roses—My lawsuit with M. Jouslin de Lasalle—There are still judges in Berlin! 278

    CHAPTER X

    Republican banquet at the Vendanges de Bourgogne—The toasts—To Louis-Philippe!—Gathering of those who were decorated in July—Formation of the board—Protests—Fifty yards of ribbon—A dissentient—Contradiction in the Moniteur—Trial of Évariste Gallois—His examination—His acquittal 289

    CHAPTER XI

    The incompatibility of literature with riotings—La Maréchale d'Ancre—My opinion concerning that piece—Farruck le Maure—The début of Henry Monnier at the Vaudeville—I leave Paris—Rouen—Havre—I[Pg x] meditate going to explore Trouville—What is Trouville?—The consumptive English lady—Honfleur—By land or by sea 299

    CHAPTER XII

    Appearance of Trouville—Mother Oseraie—How people are accommodated at Trouville when they are married—The price of painters and of the community of martyrs—Mother Oseraie's acquaintances—How she had saved the life of Huet, the landscape painter—My room and my neighbour's—A twenty-franc dinner for fifty sous—A walk by the sea-shore—Heroic resolution 308

    CHAPTER XIII

    A reading at Nodier's—The hearers and the readers—Début—Les Marrons du feu—La Camargo and the Abbé Desiderio—Genealogy of a dramatic idea—Orestes and Hermione—Chimène and Don Sancho—Goetz von Berlichingen—Fragments—How I render to Cæsar the things that are Cæsar's 317

    CHAPTER XIV

    Poetry is the Spirit of God—The Conservatoire and l'École of Rome—Letter of counsel to my Son—Employment of my time at Trouville—Madame de la Garenne—The Vendéan Bonnechose—M. Beudin—I am pursued by a fish—What came of it 336

    CHAPTER XV

    Why M. Beudin came to Trouville—How I knew him under another name—Prologue of a drama—What remained to be done—Division into three parts—I finish Charles VII.—Departing from Trouville—In what manner I learn of the first performance of Marion Delorme 345

    CHAPTER XVI

    Marion Delorme 356

    CHAPTER XVII

    Collaboration 364

    BOOK IV

    CHAPTER I

    The feudal edifice and the industrial—The workmen of Lyons—M. Bouvier-Dumolard—General Roguet—Discussion and signing of the tariff regulating the price of the workmanship of fabrics—The makers refuse to submit to it—Artificial prices for silk-workers—Insurrection[Pg xi] of Lyons—Eighteen millions on the civil list—Timon's calculations—An unlucky saying of M. de Montalivet 376

    CHAPTER II

    Death of Mirabeau—The accessories of Charles VII.—A shooting party—Montereau—A temptation I cannot resist—Critical position in which my shooting companions and I find ourselves—We introduce ourselves into an empty house by breaking into it at night—Inspection of the premises—Improvised supper—As one makes one's bed, so one lies on it—I go to see the dawn rise—Fowl and duck shooting—Preparations for breakfast—Mother Galop 388

    CHAPTER III

    Who Mother Galop was—Why M. Dupont-Delporte was absent— How I quarrelled with Viardot—Rabelais's quarter of an hour—Providence No. I—The punishment of Tantalus—A waiter who had not read Socrates—Providence No. 2—A breakfast for four—Return to Paris 397

    CHAPTER IV

    Le Masque de fer—Georges' suppers—The garden of the Luxembourg by moonlight—M. Scribe and the Clerc de la Basoche—M. d'Épagny and Le Clerc et le Théologien—Classical performances at the Théâtre-Français—Les Guelfes, by M. Arnault—Parenthesis—Dedicatory epistle to the prompter 406

    CHAPTER V

    M. Arnault's Pertinax—Pizarre, by M. Fulchiron—M. Fulchiron as a politician—M. Fulchiron as magic poet—A word about M. Viennet—My opposite neighbour at the performance of Pertinax—Splendid failure of the play—Quarrel with my vis-à-vis—The newspapers take it up—My reply in the Journal de Paris—Advice of M. Pillet 419

    CHAPTER VI

    Chateaubriand ceases to be a peer of France—He leaves the country—Béranger's song thereupon—Chateaubriand as versifier—First night of Charles VII.—Delafosse's vizor—Yaqoub and Frédérick-Lemaître—La Reine d'Espagne—M. Henri de Latouche—His works, talent and character—Interlude of La Reine d'Espagne—Preface of the play—Reports of the pit collected by the author 432

    [Pg xii]

    CHAPTER VII

    Victor Escousse and Auguste Lebras 440

    CHAPTER VIII

    First performance of Robert le Diable—Véron, manager of the Opéra—His opinion concerning Meyerbeer's music—My opinion concerning Véron's intellect—My relations with him—His articles and Memoirs—Rossini's judgment of Robert le Diable—Nourrit, the preacher—Meyerbeer—First performance of the Fuite de Law, by M. Mennechet—First performance of Richard Darlington—Frédérick—Lemaître—Delafosse—Mademoiselle Noblet 446

    CHAPTER IX

    Horace Vernet 456

    CHAPTER X

    Paul Delaroche 463

    CHAPTER XI

    Eugène Delacroix 472

    CHAPTER XII

    Three portraits in one frame 483

    CHAPTER XIII

    Collaboration—A whim of Bocage—Anicet Bourgeois—Teresa—Drama at the Opéra-Comique—Laferrière and the eruption of Vesuvius—Mélingue—Fancy-dress ball at the Tuileries—The place de Grève and the barrière Saint-Jacques—The death penalty 491

    CHAPTER XIV

    The peregrinations of Casimir Delavigne—Jeanne Vaubernier—Rougemont—His translation of Cambronne's mot—First representation of Teresa—Long and short pieces—Cordelier Delanoue and his Mathieu Luc—Closing of the Taitbout Hall and arrest of the leaders of the Saint-Simonian cult 500

    CHAPTER XV

    Mély-Janin's Louis XI. 506

    CHAPTER XVI

    Casimir Delavigne's Louis XI. 514

    NOTE (Béranger) 523

    NOTE (de Latouche) 531



MY MEMOIRS
BY
ALEXANDRE DUMAS
TRANSLATED BY
E. M. WALLER
WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY
ANDREW LANG
VOL. VI
1832 TO 1833

h5>
1909
CONTENTS

    BOOK I

    CHAPTER I

    Preparations for my Fancy Dress Ball—I find that my lodgings are too much after the style of Socrates—My artist-decorators—The question of the supper—I go for provisions to la Ferté-Vidame—View of this capital town of the Canton, by night, in a snowstorm—My nephew's room—My friend Gondon—Roebuck hunting—Return to Paris—I invent a Bank of Exchange before M. Proudhon—The artists at work—The dead 1

    CHAPTER II

    Alfred Johannot 10

    CHAPTER III

    Clément Boulanger 18

    CHAPTER IV

    Grandville 28

    CHAPTER V

    Tony Johannot 36

    BOOK II

    CHAPTER I

    Sequel to the preparations for my ball—Oil and distemper—Inconveniences of working at night—How Delacroix did his task—The ball—Serious men—La Fayette and Beauchene—Variety of costumes—The invalid and the undertaker's man—The last galop—A political play—A moral play 42

    [Pg vi]

    CHAPTER II

    Dix ans de la vie d'une femme 53

    CHAPTER III

    Doligny manager of the theatre in Italy—Saint-Germain bitten by the tarantula—How they could have livened up Versailles if Louis-Philippe had wished it—The censorship of the Grand-Duke of Tuscany—The bindings of printer Batelli—Richard Darlington, Angèle, Antony and La Tour de Nesle performed under the name of Eugène Scribe 83

    CHAPTER IV

    A few words on La Tour de Nesle and M. Frédérick Gaillardet—The Revue des Deux Mondes—M. Buloz—The Journal des Voyages—My first attempt at Roman history—Isabeau de Bavière—A witty man of five foot nine inches 91

    CHAPTER V

    Success of my Scènes historiques—Clovis and Hlodewig (Chlodgwig)—I wish to apply myself seriously to the study of the history of France—The Abbé Gauthier and M. de Moyencourt—Cordelier-Delanoue reveals to me Augustine Thierry and Chateaubriand—New aspects of history—Gaule et France—A drama in collaboration with Horace Vernet and Auguste Lafontaine 99

    CHAPTER VI

    Édith aux longs cheveux—Catherine Howard 107

    BOOK III

    CHAPTER I

    An invasion of cholera—Aspect of Paris—Medicine and the scourge—Proclamation of the Prefect of Police—The supposed poisoners—Harel's newspaper paragraph—Mademoiselle Dupont—Eugène Durieu and Anicet Bourgeois—Catherine (not Howard) and the cholera—First performance of Mari de la veuve—A horoscope which did not come true 115

    CHAPTER II

    My régime against the cholera—I am attacked by the epidemic —I invent etherisation—Harel comes to suggest to me[Pg vii] La Tour de Nesle—Verteuil's manuscript—Janin and the tirade of the grandes dames—First idea of the prison scene—My terms with Harel—Advantages offered by me to M. Gaillardet—The spectator in the Odéon—Known and unknown authors—My first letter to M. Gaillardet 127

    CHAPTER III

    M. Gaillardet's answer and protest—Frédérick and Buridan's part—Transaction with M. Gaillardet—First performance of La Tour de Nesle—The play and its interpreters—The day following a success—M. * * *—A profitable trial in prospect—Georges' caprice—The manager, author and collaborator 142

    CHAPTER IV

    The use of friends—Le Musée des Familles—An article by M. Gaillardet—My reply to it—Challenge from M. Gaillardet —I accept it with effusion—My adversary demands a first respite of a week—I summon him before the Commission of Dramatic Authors—He declines that arbitration—I send him my seconds—He asks a delay of two months—Janin's letter to the newspapers 156

    CHAPTER V

    Sword and pistol—Whence arose my aversion to the latter weapon—Philippe's puppet—The statue of Corneille—An autograph in extremis—Le bois de Vincennes—A duelling toilet—Scientific question put by Bixio—The conditions of the duel—Official report of the seconds—How Bixio's problem found its solution 186

    BOOK IV

    CHAPTER I

    The masquerade of the budget at Grenoble—M. Maurice Duval—The serenaders—Escapade of the 35th of the line—The insurrection it excites—Arrest of General Saint-Clair—Taking of the préfecture and of the citadel by Bastide—Bastide at Lyons—Order reigns at Grenoble—Casimir Périer, Gamier-Pages and M. Dupin—Report of the municipality of Grenoble—Acquittal of the rioters—Restoration of the 35th—Protest of a smoker 198

    [Pg viii]

    CHAPTER II

    General Dermoncourt's papers—Protest of Charles X. against the usurpation of the Duc d'Orléans—The stoutest of political men—Attempt at restoration planned by Madame la duchesse de Berry—The Carlo-Alberto—How I write authentic notes—Landing of Madame near La Ciotat—Legitimist affray at Marseilles—Madame set out for La Vendée—M. de Bonnechose—M. de Villeneuve—M. de Lorge 215

    CHAPTER III

    Madame's itinerary—Panic—M. de Puylaroque—Domine salvum fac Philippum—The château de Dampierre—Madame de la Myre—The pretended cousin and the curé—M. Guibourg—M. de Bourmont—Letter of Madame to M. de Coislin—The noms de guerre—Proclamation of Madame—New kind of henna—M. Charette—Madame is nearly drowned in the Maine—The sexton in charge of the provisions—A night in the stable—The Legitimists of Paris—They dispatch M. Berryer into la Vendée 230

    CHAPTER IV

    Interview between MM. Berryer and de Bourmont—The messenger's guides—The movable column—M. Charles—Madame's hiding-place—Madame refuses to leave la Vendée—She rallies her followers to arms—Death of General Lamarque—The deputies of the Opposition meet together at Laffitte's house—They decide to publish a statement to the nation—MM. Odilon Barrot and de Cormenin are commissioned to draw up this report—One hundred and thirty-three deputies sign it 247

    CHAPTER V

    Last moments of General Lamarque—What his life had been— One of my interviews with him—I am appointed one of the stewards of the funeral cortège—The procession—Symptoms of popular agitation—The marching past across the place Vendôme—The Duke Fitz-James—Conflicts provoked by the town police—The students of the École Polytechnique join the cortège—Arrival of the funeral procession at the pont d'Austerlitz—Speeches—First shots—The man with the red flag—Allocution of Étienne Arago 260

    [Pg ix]

    CHAPTER VI

    The artillerymen—Carrel and le National—Barricades of the boulevard Bourdon and in the rue de Ménilmontant— The carriage of General La Fayette—A bad shot from my friends—Despair of Harel—The pistols in Richard—The women are against us—I distribute arms to the insurgents—Change of uniform—The meeting at Laffitte's—Progress of the insurrection—M. Thiers—Barricade Saint-Merry—Jeanne—Rossignol—Barricade of the passage du Saumon—Morning of 6 June 281

    CHAPTER VII

    Inside the barricade Saint-Merry, according to a Parisian child's account—General Tiburce Sébastiani—Louis-Philippe during the insurrection—M. Guizot—MM. François Arago, Laffitte and Odilon Barrot at the Tuileries—The last argument of Kings—Étienne Arago and Howelt—Denunciation against me—M. Binet's report 301

    BOOK V

    CHAPTER I

    Le Fils de l'Émigré—I learn the news of my premature death—I am advised to take a voyage for prudence and health's sake—I choose Switzerland—Gosselin's literary opinion on that country—First effect of change of air—From Châlon to Lyons by a low train—The ascent of Cerdon—Arrival at Geneva 317

    CHAPTER II

    Great explanations about the bear-steak—Jacotot—An ill-sounding epithet—A seditious felt hat—The carabineers who were too clever—I quarrel with King Charles-Albert over the Dent du Chat—Princes and men of intellect 323

    CHAPTER III

    22 July 1832 339

    CHAPTER IV

    Edict unbaptizing the King of Rome—Anecdotes of the childhood of the Duc de Reichstadt—Letter of Sir Hudson Lowe announcing the death of Napoleon 346

    [Pg x]

    CHAPTER V

    Prince Metternich is appointed to teach the history of Napoleon to the Duc de Reichstadt—The Duke's plan of political conduct—The poet Barthélemy at Vienna—His interviews with Count Dietrichstein—Opinion of the Duc de Reichstadt on the poem Napoleon en Egypt 353

    CHAPTER VI

    Journey of the Duc de Reichstadt—M. le Chevalier de Prokesch—Questions concerning the recollections left by Napoléon en Égypte—The ambition of the Duc de Reichstadt—The Countesse Camerata—The prince is appointed lieutenant-colonel—He becomes hoarse when holding a review—He falls ill—Report upon his health by Dr. Malfatti 363

    CHAPTER VII

    The Duc de Reichstadt at Schönbrünn—Progress of his disease—The Archduchess Sophia—The prince's last moments—His death—Effect produced by the news at Paris—Article of the Constitutionnel upon this event 373

    BOOK VI

    CHAPTER I

    Lucerne—The lion of August 10—M. de Chateaubriand's fowls—Reichenau—A picture by Conder—Letter to M. le duc d'Orléans—A walk in the park of Arenenberg 383

    CHAPTER II

    News of France—First performance of Le Fils de l'Émigré— What Le Constitutionnel thought of it—Effect produced by that play on the Parisian population in general and on M. Véron in particular—Death of Walter Scott—Perrinet Leclerc—Sic vos non vobis 401

    CHAPTER III

    La Duchesse de Berry returns to Nantes disguised as a peasant woman—The basket of apples—The house Duguigny—Madame in her hiding-place—Simon Deutz—His antecedents—His mission—He enters into treaty with MM. Thiers and Montalivet—He starts for la Vendée 412

    [Pg xi]

    CHAPTER IV

    M. Maurice Duval is made Préfet of the Loire-Inférieure— The Nantais give him a charivari—Deutz's persistent attempts to see Madame—He obtains a first and then a second audience—Besieging of the maison Duguigny—The hiding-place—The police searches—Discovery of the Duchess 424

    CHAPTER V

    First moments after the arrest—Madame's 13,000 francs—What a gendarme can win by sleeping on a camp-bed and making philosophic reflections thereon—The duchess at the Château de Nantes—She is transferred to Blaye—Judas 438

    BOOK VII

    CHAPTER I

    Le Roi s'amuse—Criticism and censorship 462

    CHAPTER II

    Le Corsaire trial—The Duc d'Orléans as caricaturist—The Tribune trial—The right of association established by jury—Statistics of the political sentences under the Restoration—Le Pré-aux-Clercs 500

    CHAPTER III

    Victor Jacquemont 505

    CHAPTER IV

    George Sand 513

    CHAPTER V

    Eugène Sue—His family, birth, godfather and godmother— His education—Dr. Sue's wine-cellar—Choir of botanists —Committee of chemistry—Dinner on the grass—Eugène Sue sets out for Spain—His return—Ferdinand Langlé's room—Captain Gauthier 520

    CHAPTER VI

    Eugène Sue is ambitious enough to have a groom, horse and trap—He does business with the maison Ermingot,[Pg xii] Godefroi et Cie which permits him to gratify that fancy—Triumph at the Champs-Élysées—A vexing encounter—Desforges and Eugène Sue separate—Desforges starts Le Kaléidoscope at Bordeaux—Ferdinand Langlé starts La Nouveauté at Paris—César and the negro Zoyo—Dossion and his dog 531

    CHAPTER VII

    Eugène Sue's début in journalism—L'Homme-Mouche—The merino sheep—Eugène Sue in the Navy—He takes part in the battle of Navarino—He furnishes a house—The last folly of youth—Another Fils de l'Homme—Bossange and Desforges 540

    BOOK VIII

    CHAPTER I

    The political duels 547

    CHAPTER II

    Lucrèce Borgia—Discouragement—First conception of the Historical Romances 572

    CHAPTER III

    Condition of the Théâtre-Français in 1832 and 1833—Causes which had led to our emigration from the Théatre-Français—Reflections concerning the education of dramatic artists 577

    CHAPTER IV

    Talma—Mademoiselle Mars—The Conservatoire—Macready—Young —Kean—Miss Smithson—Mrs. Siddons—Miss Faucit—Shakespeare —The limits to dramatic art in France 582

    APPENDIX 587

    TRANSLATOR'S NOTE 636

    [Pg 1]

THE WOLF-LEADER


NEWLY TRANSLATED BY
A L F R E D   A L L I N S O N


NEVER BEFORE TRANSLATED INTO ENGLISH


WITH THREE COLOURED ILLUSTRATIONS BY
FRANK   ADAMS

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
  	PAGE
An immense Wolf entered the Room, walking on its hind Legs    	Frontispiece
A young Girl suddenly emerged from the Underwood 	23
The Baron's Horse Shied, throwing the Rider over its Head 	80
CONTENTS
CHAPTER 	  	PAGE
Introduction.—Who Mocquet was, and how this Tale became known to the Narrator 	1
I. 	—The Grand Master of His Highness' Wolf Hounds 	12
II. 	—The Seigneur Jean and the Sabot Maker 	16
III. 	—Agnelette 	22
IV. 	—The Black Wolf 	27
V. 	—The Pact with Satan 	31
VI. 	—The Bedevilled Hair 	35
VII. 	—The Boy at the Mill 	40
VIII. 	—Thibault's Wishes 	44
IX. 	—The Wolf-Leader 	47
X. 	—Maître Magloire 	51
XI. 	—David and Goliath 	55
XII. 	—Wolves in the Sheep-fold 	60
XIII. 	—Where it is demonstrated that a Woman never speaks more eloquently than when she holds her Tongue 	67
XIV. 	—A Village Wedding 	72
XV. 	—The Lord of Vauparfond 	76
XVI. 	—My Lady's Lady 	80
XVII. 	—The Baron de Mont-Gobert 	84
XVIII. 	—Death and Resurrection 	88
XIX. 	—The Dead and the Living 	90
XX. 	—True to Tryst 	94
XXI. 	—The Genius of Evil 	99
XXII. 	—Thibault's Last Wish 	105
XXIII. 	—The Anniversary 	108
XXIV. 	—Hunting down the Were-Wolf 	111





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