Home
  By Author [ A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z |  Other Symbols ]
  By Title [ A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z |  Other Symbols ]
  By Language
all Classics books content using ISYS

Download this book: [ ASCII ]

Look for this book on Amazon


We have new books nearly every day.
If you would like a news letter once a week or once a month
fill out this form and we will give you a summary of the books for that week or month by email.

Title: Index of the Project Gutenberg Works of Henry Fielding
Author: Fielding, Henry
Language: English
As this book started as an ASCII text book there are no pictures available.
Copyright Status: Not copyrighted in the United States. If you live elsewhere check the laws of your country before downloading this ebook. See comments about copyright issues at end of book.

*** Start of this Doctrine Publishing Corporation Digital Book "Index of the Project Gutenberg Works of Henry Fielding" ***

This book is indexed by ISYS Web Indexing system to allow the reader find any word or number within the document.



CONTENTS

##  A VOYAGE TO LISBON

##  THIS WORLD TO THE NEXT

##  MR. JONATHAN WILD

##  AMELIA, Complete

##  THE HISTORY OF TOM JONES

##  JOSEPH ANDREWS VOL. 1

##  JOSEPH ANDREWS, VOL. 2

APOLOGY FOR LIFE OF MRS. SHAMELA ANDREWS

THE OLD DEBAUCHEES. A COMEDY



TABLES OF CONTENTS OF VOLUMES



THE JOURNAL OF A VOYAGE TO LISBON


by Henry Fielding



Contents

INTRODUCTION TO SEVERAL WORKS

THE JOURNAL OF A VOYAGE TO LISBON

DEDICATION TO THE PUBLIC

INTRODUCTION

THE VOYAGE



A JOURNEY FROM THIS WORLD
TO THE NEXT


By Henry Fielding



    CONTENTS


    A JOURNEY FROM THIS WORLD TO THE NEXT

    INTRODUCTION


    BOOK I

    CHAPTER I

    CHAPTER II

    CHAPTER III

    CHAPTER IV

    CHAPTER V

    CHAPTER VI

    CHAPTER VII

    CHAPTER VIII

    CHAPTER IX

    CHAPTER X

    CHAPTER XI

    CHAPTER XII

    CHAPTER XIII

    CHAPTER XIV

    CHAPTER XV

    CHAPTER XVI

    CHAPTER XVII

    CHAPTER XVIII

    CHAPTER XIX

    CHAPTER XX

    CHAPTER XXI

    CHAPTER XXII

    CHAPTER XXIII

    CHAPTER XXIV

    CHAPTER XXV


    BOOK XIX

    CHAPTER VII


    Footnotes:



THE HISTORY OF THE LIFE OF THE LATE MR. JONATHAN WILD THE GREAT
The Works Of Henry Fielding — Volume Ten
By Henry Fielding
With the Author's Preface, and an Introduction by G. H. Maynadier



CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION

THE LIFE OF THE LATE MR. JONATHAN WILD

BOOK I

CHAPTER ONE — SHEWING THE WHOLESOME USES DRAWN FROM RECORDING THE ACHIEVEMENTS OF THOSE WONDERFUL PRODUCTIONS OF NATURE CALLED GREAT MEN.

CHAPTER TWO — GIVING AN ACCOUNT OF AS MANY OF OUR HERO'S ANCESTORS AS CAN BE GATHERED OUT OF THE RUBBISH OF ANTIQUITY, WHICH HATH BEEN CAREFULLY SIFTED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

CHAPTER THREE — THE BIRTH, PARENTAGE, AND EDUCATION OF MR. JONATHAN WILD THE GREAT.

CHAPTER FOUR — MR. WILD'S FIRST ENTRANCE INTO THE WORLD. HIS ACQUAINTANCE WITH COUNT LA RUSE.

CHAPTER FIVE — A DIALOGUE BETWEEN YOUNG MASTER WILD AND COUNT LA RUSE, WHICH, HAVING EXTENDED TO THE REJOINDER, HAD A VERY QUIET, EASY, AND NATURAL CONCLUSION.

CHAPTER SIX — FURTHER CONFERENCES BETWEEN THE COUNT AND MASTER WILD, WITH OTHER MATTERS OF THE GREAT KIND.

CHAPTER SEVEN — MASTER WILD SETS OUT ON HIS TRAVELS, AND RETURNS HOME AGAIN. A VERY SHORT CHAPTER, CONTAINING INFINITELY MORE TIME AND LESS MATTER THAN ANY OTHER IN THE WHOLE STORY.

CHAPTER EIGHT — AN ADVENTURE WHERE WILD, IN THE DIVISION OF THE BOOTY, EXHIBITS AN ASTONISHING INSTANCE OF GREATNESS.

CHAPTER NINE — WILD PAYS A VISIT TO MISS LETITIA SNAP. A DESCRIPTION OF THAT LOVELY YOUNG CREATURE, AND THE SUCCESSLESS ISSUE OF MR. WILD'S ADDRESSES.

CHAPTER TEN — A DISCOVERY OF SOME MATTERS CONCERNING THE CHASTE LAETITIA WHICH MUST WONDERFULLY SURPRISE, AND PERHAPS AFFECT, OUR READER.

CHAPTER ELEVEN — CONTAINING AS NOTABLE INSTANCES OF HUMAN GREATNESS AS ARE TO BE MET WITH IN ANCIENT OR MODERN HISTORY. CONCLUDING WITH SOME WHOLESOME HINTS TO THE GAY PART OF MANKIND.

CHAPTER TWELVE — OTHER PARTICULARS RELATING TO MISS TISHY, WHICH PERHAPS MAY NOT GREATLY SURPRISE AFTER THE FORMER. THE DESCRIPTION OF A VERY FINE GENTLEMAN. AND A DIALOGUE BETWEEN WILD AND THE COUNT, IN WHICH PUBLIC VIRTUE IS JUST HINTED AT, WITH, ETC.

CHAPTER THIRTEEN — A CHAPTER OF WHICH WE ARE EXTREMELY VAIN, AND WHICH INDEED WE LOOK ON AS OUR CHEF-D'OEUVRE; CONTAINING A WONDERFUL STORY CONCERNING THE DEVIL, AND AS NICE A SCENE OF HONOUR AS EVER HAPPENED.

CHAPTER FOURTEEN — IN WHICH THE HISTORY OF GREATNESS IS CONTINUED.

BOOK II

CHAPTER ONE — CHARACTERS OF SILLY PEOPLE, WITH THE PROPER USES FOR WHICH SUCH ARE DESIGNED.

CHAPTER TWO — GREAT EXAMPLES OF GREATNESS IN WILD, SHEWN AS WELL BY HIS BEHAVIOUR TO BAGSHOT AS IN A SCHEME LAID, FIRST, TO IMPOSE ON HEARTFREE BY MEANS OF THE COUNT, AND THEN TO CHEAT THE COUNT OF THE BOOTY.

CHAPTER THREE — CONTAINING SCENES OF SOFTNESS, LOVE, AND HONOUR ALL IN THE GREAT STILE.

CHAPTER FOUR — IN WHICH WILD, AFTER MANY FRUITLESS ENDEAVOURS TO DISCOVER HIS FRIEND, MORALISES ON HIS MISFORTUNE IN A SPEECH, WHICH MAY BE OF USE (IF RIGHTLY UNDERSTOOD) TO SOME OTHER CONSIDERABLE SPEECH- MAKERS.

CHAPTER FIVE — CONTAINING MANY SURPRISING ADVENTURES, WHICH OUR HERO, WITH GREAT GREATNESS, ACHIEVED.

CHAPTER SIX — OF HATS.

CHAPTER SEVEN — SHEWING THE CONSEQUENCE WHICH ATTENDED HEARTFREE'S ADVENTURES WITH WILD; ALL NATURAL AND COMMON ENOUGH TO LITTLE WRETCHES WHO DEAL WITH GREAT MEN; TOGETHER WITH SOME PRECEDENTS OF LETTERS, BEING THE DIFFERENT METHODS OF ANSWERING A DUN.

CHAPTER EIGHT — IN WHICH OUR HERO CARRIES GREATNESS TO AN IMMODERATE HEIGHT.

CHAPTER NINE — MORE GREATNESS IN WILD. A LOW SCENE BETWEEN MRS. HEARTFREE AND HER CHILDREN, AND A SCHEME OF OUR HERO WORTHY THE HIGHEST ADMIRATION, AND EVEN ASTONISHMENT.

CHAPTER TEN — SEA-ADVENTURES VERY NEW AND SURPRISING.

CHAPTER ELEVEN — THE GREAT AND WONDERFUL BEHAVIOUR OF OUR HERO IN THE BOAT.

CHAPTER TWELVE — THE STRANGE AND YET NATURAL ESCAPE OF OUR HERO.

CHAPTER THIRTEEN — THE CONCLUSION OF THE BOAT ADVENTURE, AND THE END OF THE SECOND BOOK.

BOOK III

CHAPTER ONE — THE LOW AND PITIFUL BEHAVIOUR OF HEARTFREE; AND THE FOOLISH CONDUCT OF HIS APPRENTICE.

CHAPTER TWO — A SOLILOQUY OF HEARTFREE'S, FULL OF LOW AND BASE IDEAS, WITHOUT A SYLLABLE OF GREATNESS.

CHAPTER THREE — WHEREIN OUR HERO PROCEEDS IN THE ROAD TO GREATNESS.

CHAPTER FOUR — IN WHICH A YOUNG HERO, OF WONDERFUL GOOD PROMISE, MAKES HIS FIRST APPEARANCE, WITH MANY OTHER GREAT MATTERS.

CHAPTER FIVE — MORE AND MORE GREATNESS, UNPARALLELED IN HISTORY OR ROMANCE.

CHAPTER SIX — THE EVENT OF FIREBLOOD'S ADVENTURE; AND A THREAT OF MARRIAGE, WHICH MIGHT HAVE BEEN CONCLUDED EITHER AT SMITHFIELD OR ST. JAMES'S.

CHAPTER SEVEN — MATTERS PRELIMINARY TO THE MARRIAGE BETWEEN MR. JONATHAN WILD AND THE CHASTE LAETITIA.

CHAPTER EIGHT — A DIALOGUE MATRIMONIAL, WHICH PASSED BETWEEN JONATHAN WILD, ESQ., AND LAETITIA HIS WIFE, ON THE MORNING OF THE DAY FORTNIGHT ON WHICH HIS NUPTIALS WERE CELEBRATED; WHICH CONCLUDED MORE AMICABLY THAN THOSE DEBATES GENERALLY DO.

CHAPTER NINE — OBSERVATIONS ON THE FOREGOING DIALOGUE, TOGETHER WITH A BASE DESIGN ON OUR HERO, WHICH MUST BE DETESTED BY EVERY LOVER OF GREATNESS.

CHAPTER TEN — MR. WILD WITH UNPRECEDENTED GENEROSITY VISITS HIS FRIEND HEARTFREE, AND THE UNGRATEFUL RECEPTION HE MET WITH.

CHAPTER ELEVEN — A SCHEME SO DEEPLY LAID, THAT IT SHAMES ALL THE POLITICS OF THIS OUR AGE; WITH DIGRESSION AND SUBDIGRESSION.

CHAPTER TWELVE — NEW INSTANCES OF FRIENDLY'S FOLLY, ETC.

CHAPTER THIRTEEN — SOMETHING CONCERNING FIREBLOOD WHICH WILL SURPRIZE; AND SOMEWHAT TOUCHING ONE OF THE MISS SNAPS, WHICH WILL GREATLY CONCERN THE READER.

CHAPTER FOURTEEN — IN WHICH OUR HERO MAKES A SPEECH WELL WORTHY TO BE CELEBRATED; AND THE BEHAVIOUR OF ONE OF THE GANG, PERHAPS MORE UNNATURAL THAN ANY OTHER PART OF THIS HISTORY.

BOOK IV

CHAPTER ONE — SENTIMENT OF THE ORDINARY'S, WORTHY TO BE WRITTEN IN LETTERS OF GOLD; A VERY EXTRAORDINARY INSTANCE OF FOLLY IN FRIENDLY, AND A DREADFUL ACCIDENT WHICH BEFEL OUR HERO.

CHAPTER TWO — A SHORT HINT CONCERNING POPULAR INGRATITUDE. MR. WILD'S ARRIVAL IN THE CASTLE, WITH OTHER OCCURRENCES TO BE FOUND IN NO OTHER HISTORY.

CHAPTER THREE — CURIOUS ANECDOTES RELATING TO THE HISTORY OF NEWGATE.

CHAPTER FOUR — THE DEAD-WARRANT ARRIVES FOR HEARTFREE; ON WHICH OCCASION WILD BETRAYS SOME HUMAN WEAKNESS.

CHAPTER FIVE — CONTAINING VARIOUS MATTERS.

CHAPTER SIX — IN WHICH THE FOREGOING HAPPY INCIDENT IS ACCOUNTED FOR.

CHAPTER SEVEN — MRS. HEARTFREE RELATES HER ADVENTURES.

CHAPTER EIGHT — IN WHICH MRS. HEARTFREE CONTINUES THE RELATION OF HER ADVENTURES.

CHAPTER NINE — CONTAINING INCIDENTS VERY SURPRIZING.

CHAPTER TEN — A HORRIBLE UPROAR IN THE GATE.

CHAPTER ELEVEN — THE CONCLUSION OF MRS. HEARTFREE'S ADVENTURES.

CHAPTER TWELVE — THE HISTORY RETURNS TO THE CONTEMPLATION OF GREATNESS.

CHAPTER THIRTEEN — A DIALOGUE BETWEEN THE ORDINARY OF NEWGATE AND MR. JONATHAN WILD THE GREAT; IN WHICH THE SUBJECTS OF DEATH, IMMORTALITY, AND OTHER GRAVE MATTERS, ARE VERY LEARNEDLY HANDLED BY THE FORMER.

CHAPTER FOURTEEN — WILD PROCEEDS TO THE HIGHEST CONSUMMATION OF HUMAN GREATNESS.

CHAPTER FIFTEEN — THE CHARACTER OF OUR HERO, AND THE CONCLUSION OF THIS HISTORY.



AMELIA
Complete


By Henry Fielding


Edited By George Saintsbury
MDCCCXCIII



CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION.

DEDICATION.


AMELIA.


VOL. I

BOOK I.

Chapter i. — Containing the exordium, &c.

Chapter ii. — The history sets out. Observations on the excellency of the English constitution and curious examinations before a justice of peace.

Chapter iii. — Containing the inside of a prison.

Chapter iv. — Disclosing further secrets of the prison-house.

Chapter v. — Containing certain adventures which befel Mr. Booth in the prison.

Chapter vi. — Containing the extraordinary behaviour of Miss Matthews on her meeting with Booth, and some endeavours to prove, by reason and authority, that it is possible for a woman to appear to be what she really is not.

Chapter vii. — In which Miss Matthews begins her history.

Chapter viii. — The history of Miss Matthews continued.

Chapter ix. — In which Miss Matthews concludes her relation.

Chapter x. — Table-talk, consisting of a facetious discourse that passed in the prison.


BOOK II.

Chapter i. — In which Captain Booth begins to relate his history.

Chapter ii. — Mr. Booth continues his story. In this chapter there are some passages that may serve as a kind of touchstone by which a young lady may examine the heart of her lover. I would advise, therefore, that every lover be obliged to read it over

Chapter iii. — The narrative continued. More of the touchstone.

Chapter iv. — The story of Mr. Booth continued. In this chapter the reader will perceive a glimpse of the character of a very good divine, with some matters of a very tender kind.

Chapter v. — Containing strange revolutions of fortune

Chapter vi. — Containing many surprising adventures.

Chapter vii. — The story of Booth continued.—More surprising adventures.

Chapter viii. — In which our readers will probably be divided in their opinion of Mr. Booth’s conduct.

Chapter ix. — Containing a scene of a different kind from any of the preceding.


BOOK III.

Chapter i. — In which Mr. Booth resumes his story.

Chapter ii. — Containing a scene of the tender kind.

Chapter iii. — In which Mr. Booth sets forward on his journey.

Chapter iv. — A sea piece.

Chapter v. — The arrival of Booth at Gibraltar, with what there befel him.

Chapter vi. — Containing matters which will please some readers.

Chapter vii. — The captain, continuing his story, recounts some particulars which, we doubt not, to many good people, will appear unnatural.

Chapter viii. — The story of Booth continued.

Chapter ix. — Containing very extraordinary matters.

Chapter x. — Containing a letter of a very curious kind.

Chapter xi. — In which Mr. Booth relates his return to England.

Chapter xii. — In which Mr. Booth concludes his story.


BOOK IV.

Chapter i. — Containing very mysterious matter.

Chapter ii. — The latter part of which we expect will please our reader better than the former.

Chapter iii. — Containing wise observations of the author, and other matters.

Chapter iv. — In which Amelia appears in no unamiable light.

Chapter v. — Containing an eulogium upon innocence, and other grave matters.

Chapter vi. — In which may appear that violence is sometimes done to the name of love.

Chapter vii. — Containing a very extraordinary and pleasant incident.

Chapter viii. — Containing various matters.

Chapter ix. — In which Amelia, with her friend, goes to the oratorio.


VOL. II.

BOOK V.

Chapter i. — In which the reader will meet with an old acquaintance.

Chapter ii. — In which Booth pays a visit to the noble lord.

Chapter iii. — Relating principally to the affairs of serjeant Atkinson.

Chapter iv. — Containing matters that require no preface.

Chapter v. — Containing much heroic matter.

Chapter vi. — In which the reader will find matter worthy his consideration.

Chapter vii. — Containing various matters.

Chapter viii. — The heroic behaviour of Colonel Bath.

Chapter ix. — Being the last chapter of the fifth book.


BOOK VI.

Chapter i. — Panegyrics on beauty, with other grave matters.

Chapter ii. — Which will not appear, we presume, unnatural to all married readers.

Chapter iii. — In which the history looks a little backwards.

Chapter iv. — Containing a very extraordinary incident.

Chapter v. — Containing some matters not very unnatural.

Chapter vi. — A scene in which some ladies will possibly think Amelia’s conduct exceptionable.

Chapter vii. — A chapter in which there is much learning.

Chapter viii. — Containing some unaccountable behaviour in Mrs. Ellison.

Chapter ix. — Containing a very strange incident.


BOOK VII.

Chapter i. — A very short chapter, and consequently requiring no preface.

Chapter ii. — The beginning of Mrs. Bennet’s history.

Chapter iii. — Continuation of Mrs. Bennet’s story.

Chapter iv. — Further continuation.

Chapter v. — The story of Mrs. Bennet continued.

Chapter vi. — Farther continued.

Chapter vii. — The story farther continued.

Chapter viii. — Further continuation.

Chapter ix. — The conclusion of Mrs. Bennet’s history.

Chapter x. — Being the last chapter of the seventh book.


BOOK VIII.

Chapter i. — Being the first chapter of the eighth book.

Chapter ii. — Containing an account of Mr. Booth’s fellow-sufferers.

Chapter iii. — Containing some extraordinary behaviour in Mrs. Ellison.

Chapter iv. — Containing, among many matters, the exemplary behaviour of Colonel James.

Chapter v. — Comments upon authors.

Chapter vi. — Which inclines rather to satire than panegyric.

Chapter vii. — Worthy a very serious perusal.

Chapter viii. — Consisting of grave matters.

Chapter ix. — A curious chapter, from which a curious reader may draw sundry observations.

Chapter x. — In which are many profound secrets of philosophy.


VOL. III.

BOOK IX.

Chapter i. — In which the history looks backwards.

Chapter ii. — In which the history goes forward.

Chapter iii. — A conversation between Dr Harrison and others.

Chapter iv. — A dialogue between Booth and Amelia.

Chapter v. — A conversation between Amelia and Dr Harrison, with the result.

Chapter vi. — Containing as surprizing an accident as is perhaps recorded in history.

Chapter vii. — In which the author appears to be master of that profound learning called the knowledge of the town.

Chapter viii. — In which two strangers make their appearance.

Chapter ix. — A scene of modern wit and humour.

Chapter x. — A curious conversation between the doctor, the young clergyman, and the young clergyman’s father.


BOOK X.

Chapter i. — To which we will prefix no preface.

Chapter ii. — What happened at the masquerade.

Chapter iii. — Consequences of the masquerade, not uncommon nor surprizing.

Chapter iv. — Consequences of the masquerade.

Chapter v. — In which Colonel Bath appears in great glory.

Chapter vi. — Read, gamester, and observe.

Chapter vii. — In which Booth receives a visit from Captain Trent.

Chapter viii. — Contains a letter and other matters.

Chapter ix. — Containing some things worthy observation.


BOOK XI.

Chapter i. — Containing a very polite scene.

Chapter ii. — Matters political.

Chapter iii. — The history of Mr. Trent.

Chapter iv. — Containing some distress.

Chapter v. — Containing more wormwood and other ingredients.

Chapter vi. — A scene of the tragic kind.

Chapter vii. — In which Mr. Booth meets with more than one adventure.

Chapter viii. — In which Amelia appears in a light more amiable than gay.

Chapter ix. — A very tragic scene.


BOOK XII.

Chapter i. — The book begins with polite history.

Chapter ii. — In which Amelia visits her husband.

Chapter iii. — Containing matter pertinent to the history.

Chapter iv. — In which Dr Harrison visits Colonel James.

Chapter v. — What passed at the bailiff’s house.

Chapter vi. — What passed between the doctor and the sick man.

Chapter vii. — In which the history draws towards a conclusion.

Chapter viii. — Thus this history draws nearer to a conclusion.

Chapter ix. — In which the history is concluded.



THE HISTORY OF TOM JONES, A FOUNDLING
By Henry Fielding



CONTENTS

THE HISTORY OF TOM JONES, A FOUNDLING.


BOOK I. — CONTAINING AS MUCH OF THE BIRTH OF THE FOUNDLING AS IS NECESSARY OR PROPER TO ACQUAINT THE READER WITH IN THE BEGINNING OF THIS HISTORY.

Chapter i. — The introduction to the work, or bill of fare to the feast.

Chapter ii. — A short description of squire Allworthy, and a fuller account of Miss Bridget Allworthy, his sister.

Chapter iii. — An odd accident which befel Mr Allworthy at his return home. The decent behaviour of Mrs Deborah Wilkins, with some proper animadversions on bastards.

Chapter iv. — The reader's neck brought into danger by a description; his escape; and the great condescension of Miss Bridget Allworthy.

Chapter v. — Containing a few common matters, with a very uncommon observation upon them.

Chapter vi. — Mrs Deborah is introduced into the parish with a simile. A short account of Jenny Jones, with the difficulties and discouragements which may attend young women in the pursuit of learning.

Chapter vii. — Containing such grave matter, that the reader cannot laugh once through the whole chapter, unless peradventure he should laugh at the author.

Chapter viii. — A dialogue between Mesdames Bridget and Deborah; containing more amusement, but less instruction, than the former.

Chapter ix. — Containing matters which will surprize the reader.

Chapter x. — The hospitality of Allworthy; with a short sketch of the characters of two brothers, a doctor and a captain, who were entertained by that gentleman.

Chapter xi. — Containing many rules, and some examples, concerning falling in love: descriptions of beauty, and other more prudential inducements to matrimony.

Chapter xii. — Containing what the reader may, perhaps, expect to find in it.

Chapter xiii. — Which concludes the first book; with an instance of ingratitude, which, we hope, will appear unnatural.


BOOK II. — CONTAINING SCENES OF MATRIMONIAL FELICITY IN DIFFERENT DEGREES OF LIFE; AND VARIOUS OTHER TRANSACTIONS DURING THE FIRST TWO YEARS AFTER THE MARRIAGE BETWEEN CAPTAIN BLIFIL AND MISS BRIDGET ALLWORTHY.

Chapter i. — Showing what kind of a history this is; what it is like, and what it is not like.

Chapter ii. — Religious cautions against showing too much favour to bastards; and a great discovery made by Mrs Deborah Wilkins.

Chapter iii. — The description of a domestic government founded upon rules directly contrary to those of Aristotle.

Chapter iv. — Containing one of the most bloody battles, or rather duels, that were ever recorded in domestic history.

Chapter v. — Containing much matter to exercise the judgment and reflection of the reader.

Chapter vi. — The trial of Partridge, the schoolmaster, for incontinency; the evidence of his wife; a short reflection on the wisdom of our law; with other grave matters, which those will like best who understand

Chapter vii. — A short sketch of that felicity which prudent couples may extract from hatred: with a short apology for those people who overlook imperfections in their friends.

Chapter viii. — A receipt to regain the lost affections of a wife, which hath never been known to fail in the most desperate cases.

Chapter ix. — A proof of the infallibility of the foregoing receipt, in the lamentations of the widow; with other suitable decorations of death, such as physicians, &c., and an epitaph in the true stile.


BOOK III. — CONTAINING THE MOST MEMORABLE TRANSACTIONS WHICH PASSED IN THE FAMILY OF MR ALLWORTHY, FROM THE TIME WHEN TOMMY JONES ARRIVED AT THE AGE OF FOURTEEN, TILL HE ATTAINED THE AGE OF NINETEEN. IN THIS BOOK

Chapter i. — Containing little or nothing.

Chapter ii. — The heroe of this great history appears with very bad omens. A little tale of so LOW a kind that some may think it not worth their notice. A word or two concerning a squire, and more relating to a gamekeeper and a schoolmaster.

Chapter iii. — The character of Mr Square the philosopher, and of Mr Thwackum the divine; with a dispute concerning——

Chapter iv. — Containing a necessary apology for the author; and a childish incident, which perhaps requires an apology likewise.

Chapter v. — The opinions of the divine and the philosopher concerning the two boys; with some reasons for their opinions, and other matters.

Chapter vi. — Containing a better reason still for the before-mentioned opinions.

Chapter vii. — In which the author himself makes his appearance on the stage.

Chapter viii. — A childish incident, in which, however, is seen a good-natured disposition in Tom Jones.

Chapter ix. — Containing an incident of a more heinous kind, with the comments of Thwackum and Square.

Chapter x. — In which Master Blifil and Jones appear in different lights.


BOOK IV. — CONTAINING THE TIME OF A YEAR.

Chapter i. — Containing five pages of paper.

Chapter ii. — A short hint of what we can do in the sublime, and a description of Miss Sophia Western.

Chapter iii. — Wherein the history goes back to commemorate a trifling incident that happened some years since; but which, trifling as it was, had some future consequences.

Chapter iv. — Containing such very deep and grave matters, that some readers, perhaps, may not relish it.

Chapter v. — Containing matter accommodated to every taste.

Chapter vi. — An apology for the insensibility of Mr Jones to all the charms of the lovely Sophia; in which possibly we may, in a considerable degree, lower his character in the estimation of those men of wit and

Chapter vii. — Being the shortest chapter in this book.

Chapter viii. — A battle sung by the muse in the Homerican style, and which none but the classical reader can taste.

Chapter ix. — Containing matter of no very peaceable colour.

Chapter x. — A story told by Mr Supple, the curate. The penetration of Squire Western. His great love for his daughter, and the return to it made by her.

Chapter xi. — The narrow escape of Molly Seagrim, with some observations for which we have been forced to dive pretty deep into nature.

Chapter xii. — Containing much clearer matters; but which flowed from the same fountain with those in the preceding chapter.

Chapter xiii. — A dreadful accident which befel Sophia. The gallant behaviour of Jones, and the more dreadful consequence of that behaviour to the young lady; with a short digression in favour of the female sex. —

Chapter xiv. — The arrival of a surgeon.—His operations, and a long dialogue between Sophia and her maid.


BOOK V. — CONTAINING A PORTION OF TIME SOMEWHAT LONGER THAN HALF A YEAR.

Chapter i. — Of the SERIOUS in writing, and for what purpose it is introduced.

Chapter ii. — In which Mr Jones receives many friendly visits during his confinement; with some fine touches of the passion of love, scarce visible to the naked eye.

Chapter iii. — Which all who have no heart will think to contain much ado about nothing.

Chapter iv. — A little chapter, in which is contained a little incident.

Chapter v. — A very long chapter, containing a very great incident.

Chapter vi. — By comparing which with the former, the reader may possibly correct some abuse which he hath formerly been guilty of in the application of the word love.

Chapter vii. — In which Mr Allworthy appears on a sick-bed.

Chapter viii. — Containing matter rather natural than pleasing.

Chapter ix. — Which, among other things, may serve as a comment on that saying of Aeschines, that “drunkenness shows the mind of a man, as a mirrour reflects his person.”

Chapter x. — Showing the truth of many observations of Ovid, and of other more grave writers, who have proved beyond contradiction, that wine is often the forerunner of incontinency.

Chapter xi. — In which a simile in Mr Pope's period of a mile introduces as bloody a battle as can possibly be fought without the assistance of steel or cold iron.

Chapter xii. — In which is seen a more moving spectacle than all the blood in the bodies of Thwackum and Blifil, and of twenty other such, is capable of producing.


BOOK VI. — CONTAINING ABOUT THREE WEEKS.

Chapter i. — Of love.

Chapter ii. — The character of Mrs Western. Her great learning and knowledge of the world, and an instance of the deep penetration which she derived from those advantages.

Chapter iii. — Containing two defiances to the critics.

Chapter iv. — Containing sundry curious matters.

Chapter v. — In which is related what passed between Sophia and her aunt.

Chapter vi. — Containing a dialogue between Sophia and Mrs Honour, which may a little relieve those tender affections which the foregoing scene may have raised in the mind of a good-natured reader.

Chapter vii. — A picture of formal courtship in miniature, as it always ought to be drawn, and a scene of a tenderer kind painted at full length.

Chapter viii. — The meeting between Jones and Sophia.

Chapter ix. — Being of a much more tempestuous kind than the former.

Chapter x. — In which Mr Western visits Mr Allworthy.

Chapter xi. — A short chapter; but which contains sufficient matter to affect the good-natured reader.

Chapter xii. — Containing love-letters, &c.

Chapter xiii. — The behaviour of Sophia on the present occasion; which none of her sex will blame, who are capable of behaving in the same manner. And the discussion of a knotty point in the court of conscience.

Chapter xiv. — A short chapter, containing a short dialogue between Squire Western and his sister.


BOOK VII. — CONTAINING THREE DAYS.

Chapter i. — A comparison between the world and the stage.

Chapter ii. — Containing a conversation which Mr Jones had with himself.

Chapter iii. — Containing several dialogues.

Chapter iv. — A picture of a country gentlewoman taken from the life.

Chapter v. — The generous behaviour of Sophia towards her aunt.

Chapter vi. — Containing great variety of matter.

Chapter vii. — A strange resolution of Sophia, and a more strange stratagem of Mrs Honour.

Chapter viii. — Containing scenes of altercation, of no very uncommon kind.

Chapter ix. — The wise demeanour of Mr Western in the character of a magistrate. A hint to justices of peace, concerning the necessary qualifications of a clerk; with extraordinary instances of paternal madness and

Chapter x. — Containing several matters, natural enough perhaps, but low.

Chapter xi. — The adventure of a company of soldiers.

Chapter xii. — The adventure of a company of officers.

Chapter xiii. — Containing the great address of the landlady, the great learning of a surgeon, and the solid skill in casuistry of the worthy lieutenant.

Chapter xiv. — A most dreadful chapter indeed; and which few readers ought to venture upon in an evening, especially when alone.

Chapter xv. — The conclusion of the foregoing adventure.


BOOK VIII. — CONTAINING ABOUT TWO DAYS.

Chapter i. — A wonderful long chapter concerning the marvellous; being much the longest of all our introductory chapters.

Chapter ii. — In which the landlady pays a visit to Mr Jones.

Chapter iii. — In which the surgeon makes his second appearance.

Chapter iv. — In which is introduced one of the pleasantest barbers that was ever recorded in history, the barber of Bagdad, or he in Don Quixote, not excepted.

Chapter v. — A dialogue between Mr Jones and the barber.

Chapter vi. — In which more of the talents of Mr Benjamin will appear, as well as who this extraordinary person was.

Chapter vii. — Containing better reasons than any which have yet appeared for the conduct of Partridge; an apology for the weakness of Jones; and some further anecdotes concerning my landlady.

Chapter viii. — Jones arrives at Gloucester, and goes to the Bell; the character of that house, and of a petty-fogger which he there meets with.

Chapter ix. — Containing several dialogues between Jones and Partridge, concerning love, cold, hunger, and other matters; with the lucky and narrow escape of Partridge, as he was on the very brink of making a fatal

Chapter x. — In which our travellers meet with a very extraordinary adventure.

Chapter xi. — In which the Man of the Hill begins to relate his history.

Chapter xii. — In which the Man of the Hill continues his history.

Chapter xiii. — In which the foregoing story is farther continued.

Chapter xiv. — In which the Man of the Hill concludes his history.

Chapter xv. — A brief history of Europe; and a curious discourse between Mr Jones and the Man of the Hill.


BOOK IX. — CONTAINING TWELVE HOURS.

Chapter i. — Of those who lawfully may, and of those who may not, write such histories as this.

Chapter ii. — Containing a very surprizing adventure indeed, which Mr Jones met with in his walk with the Man of the Hill.

Chapter iii. — The arrival of Mr Jones with his lady at the inn; with a very full description of the battle of Upton.

Chapter iv. — In which the arrival of a man of war puts a final end to hostilities, and causes the conclusion of a firm and lasting peace between all parties.

Chapter v. — An apology for all heroes who have good stomachs, with a description of a battle of the amorous kind.

Chapter vi. — A friendly conversation in the kitchen, which had a very common, though not very friendly, conclusion.

Chapter vii. — Containing a fuller account of Mrs Waters, and by what means she came into that distressful situation from which she was rescued by Jones.


BOOK X. — IN WHICH THE HISTORY GOES FORWARD ABOUT TWELVE HOURS.

Chapter i. — Containing instructions very necessary to be perused by modern critics.

Chapter ii. — Containing the arrival of an Irish gentleman, with very extraordinary adventures which ensued at the inn.

Chapter iii. — A dialogue between the landlady and Susan the chamber-maid, proper to be read by all inn-keepers and their servants; with the arrival, and affable behaviour of a beautiful young lady; which may teach

Chapter iv. — Containing infallible nostrums for procuring universal disesteem and hatred.

Chapter v. — Showing who the amiable lady, and her unamiable maid, were.

Chapter vi. — Containing, among other things, the ingenuity of Partridge, the madness of Jones, and the folly of Fitzpatrick.

Chapter vii. — In which are concluded the adventures that happened at the inn at Upton.

Chapter viii. — In which the history goes backward.

Chapter ix. — The escape of Sophia.


BOOK XI. — CONTAINING ABOUT THREE DAYS.

Chapter i. — A crust for the critics.

Chapter ii. — The adventures which Sophia met with after her leaving Upton.

Chapter iii. — A very short chapter, in which however is a sun, a moon, a star, and an angel.

Chapter iv. — The history of Mrs Fitzpatrick.

Chapter v. — In which the history of Mrs Fitzpatrick is continued.

Chapter vi. — In which the mistake of the landlord throws Sophia into a dreadful consternation.

Chapter vii. — In which Mrs Fitzpatrick concludes her history.

Chapter viii. — A dreadful alarm in the inn, with the arrival of an unexpected friend of Mrs Fitzpatrick.

Chapter ix. — The morning introduced in some pretty writing. A stagecoach. The civility of chambermaids. The heroic temper of Sophia. Her generosity. The return to it. The departure of the company, and their

Chapter x. — Containing a hint or two concerning virtue, and a few more concerning suspicion.


BOOK XII. — CONTAINING THE SAME INDIVIDUAL TIME WITH THE FORMER.

Chapter i. — Showing what is to be deemed plagiarism in a modern author, and what is to be considered as lawful prize.

Chapter ii. — In which, though the squire doth not find his daughter, something is found which puts an end to his pursuit.

Chapter iii. — The departure of Jones from Upton, with what passed between him and Partridge on the road.

Chapter iv. — The adventure of a beggar-man.

Chapter v. — Containing more adventures which Mr Jones and his companion met on the road.

Chapter vi. — From which it may be inferred that the best things are liable to be misunderstood and misinterpreted.

Chapter vii. — Containing a remark or two of our own and many more of the good company assembled in the kitchen.

Chapter viii. — In which fortune seems to have been in a better humour with Jones than we have hitherto seen her.

Chapter ix. — Containing little more than a few odd observations.

Chapter x. — In which Mr Jones and Mr Dowling drink a bottle together.

Chapter xi. — The disasters which befel Jones on his departure for Coventry; with the sage remarks of Partridge.

Chapter xii. — Relates that Mr Jones continued his journey, contrary to the advice of Partridge, with what happened on that occasion.

Chapter xiii. — A dialogue between Jones and Partridge.

Chapter xiv. — What happened to Mr Jones in his journey from St Albans.

BOOK XIII. — CONTAINING THE SPACE OF TWELVE DAYS.

Chapter i. — An Invocation.

Chapter ii. — What befel Mr Jones on his arrival in London.

Chapter iii. — A project of Mrs Fitzpatrick, and her visit to Lady Bellaston.

Chapter iv. — Which consists of visiting.

Chapter v. — An adventure which happened to Mr Jones at his lodgings, with some account of a young gentleman who lodged there, and of the mistress of the house, and her two daughters.

Chapter vi. — What arrived while the company were at breakfast, with some hints concerning the government of daughters.

Chapter vii. — Containing the whole humours of a masquerade.

Chapter viii. — Containing a scene of distress, which will appear very extraordinary to most of our readers.

Chapter ix. — Which treats of matters of a very different kind from those in the preceding chapter.

Chapter x. — A chapter which, though short, may draw tears from some eyes.

Chapter xi. — In which the reader will be surprized.

Chapter xii. — In which the thirteenth book is concluded.


BOOK XIV. — CONTAINING TWO DAYS.

Chapter i. — An essay to prove that an author will write the better for having some knowledge of the subject on which he writes.

Chapter ii. — Containing letters and other matters which attend amours.

Chapter iii. — Containing various matters.

Chapter iv. — Which we hope will be very attentively perused by young people of both sexes.

Chapter v. — A short account of the history of Mrs Miller.

Chapter vi. — Containing a scene which we doubt not will affect all our readers.

Chapter vii. — The interview between Mr Jones and Mr Nightingale.

Chapter viii. — What passed between Jones and old Mr Nightingale; with the arrival of a person not yet mentioned in this history.

Chapter ix. — Containing strange matters.

Chapter x. — A short chapter, which concludes the book.


BOOK XV. — IN WHICH THE HISTORY ADVANCES ABOUT TWO DAYS.

Chapter i. — Too short to need a preface.

Chapter ii. — In which is opened a very black design against Sophia.

Chapter iii. — A further explanation of the foregoing design.

Chapter iv. — By which it will appear how dangerous an advocate a lady is when she applies her eloquence to an ill purpose.

Chapter v. — Containing some matters which may affect, and others which may surprize, the reader.

Chapter vi. — By what means the squire came to discover his daughter.

Chapter vii. — In which various misfortunes befel poor Jones.

Chapter viii. — Short and sweet.

Chapter ix. — Containing love-letters of several sorts.

Chapter x. — Consisting partly of facts, and partly of observations upon them.

Chapter xi. — Containing curious, but not unprecedented matter.

Chapter xii. — A discovery made by Partridge.


BOOK XVI.

Chapter i. — Of prologues.

Chapter ii. — A whimsical adventure which befel the squire, with the distressed situation of Sophia.

Chapter iii. — What happened to Sophia during her confinement.

Chapter iv. — In which Sophia is delivered from her confinement.

Chapter v. — In which Jones receives a letter from Sophia, and goes to a play with Mrs Miller and Partridge.

Chapter vi. — In which the history is obliged to look back.

Chapter vii. — In which Mr Western pays a visit to his sister, in company with Mr Blifil.

Chapter viii. — Schemes of Lady Bellaston for the ruin of Jones.

Chapter ix. — In which Jones pays a visit to Mrs Fitzpatrick.

Chapter x. — The consequence of the preceding visit.


BOOK XVII.

Chapter i. — Containing a portion of introductory writing.

Chapter ii. — The generous and grateful behaviour of Mrs Miller.

Chapter iii. — The arrival of Mr Western, with some matters concerning the paternal authority.

Chapter iv. — An extraordinary scene between Sophia and her aunt.

Chapter v. — Mrs Miller and Mr Nightingale visit Jones in the prison.

Chapter vi. — In which Mrs Miller pays a visit to Sophia.

Chapter vii. — A pathetic scene between Mr Allworthy and Mrs Miller.

Chapter viii. — Containing various matters.

Chapter ix. — What happened to Mr Jones in the prison.


BOOK XVIII.

Chapter i. — A farewel to the reader.

Chapter ii. — Containing a very tragical incident.

Chapter iii. — Allworthy visits old Nightingale; with a strange discovery that he made on that occasion.

Chapter iv. — Containing two letters in very different stiles.

Chapter v. — In which the history is continued.

Chapter vi. — In which the history is farther continued

Chapter vii. — Continuation of the history.

Chapter viii. — Further continuation.

Chapter ix. — A further continuation.

Chapter x. — Wherein the history begins to draw towards a conclusion.

Chapter xi. — The history draws nearer to a conclusion.

Chapter xii. — Approaching still nearer to the end.

Chapter the last.



THE WORKS OF HENRY FIELDING
EDITED BY GEORGE SAINTSBURY
IN TWELVE VOLUMES
VOL. I.
JOSEPH ANDREWS


Portrait of Fielding, from bust in the Shire Hall, Taunton.
CONTENTS.
INTRODUCTION.
PREFACE.
BOOK I.

CHAPTER I.
Of writing lives in general, and particularly of Pamela, with a word by the bye of Colley Cibber and others
CHAPTER II.
Of Mr Joseph Andrews, his birth, parentage, education, and great endowments, with a word or two concerning ancestors
CHAPTER III.
Of Mr Abraham Adams the curate, Mrs Slipslop the chambermaid, and others
CHAPTER IV.
What happened after their journey to London
CHAPTER V.
The death of Sir Thomas Booby, with the affectionate and mournful behaviour of his widow, and the great purity of Joseph Andrews
CHAPTER VI.
How Joseph Andrews writ a letter to his sister Pamela
CHAPTER VII.
Sayings of wise men. A dialogue between the lady and her maid; and a panegyric, or rather satire, on the passion of love, in the sublime style
CHAPTER VIII.
In which, after some very fine writing, the history goes on, and relates the interview between the lady and Joseph; where the latter hath set an example which we despair of seeing followed by his sex in this vicious age
CHAPTER IX.
What passed between the lady and Mrs Slipslop; in which we prophesy there are some strokes which every one will not truly comprehend at the first reading
CHAPTER X.
Joseph writes another letter; his transactions with Mr Peter Pounce, &c., with his departure from Lady Booby
CHAPTER XI.
Of several new matters not expected
CHAPTER XII.
Containing many surprizing adventures which Joseph Andrews met with on the road, scarce credible to those who have never travelled in a stage-coach
CHAPTER XIII.
What happened to Joseph during his sickness at the inn, with the curious discourse between him and Mr Barnabas, the parson of the parish
CHAPTER XIV.
Being very full of adventures which succeeded each other at the inn
CHAPTER XV.
Showing how Mrs Tow-wouse was a little mollified; and how officious Mr Barnabas and the surgeon were to prosecute the thief: with a dissertation accounting for their zeal, and that of many other persons not mentioned in this history
CHAPTER XVI.
The escape of the thief. Mr Adams's disappointment. The arrival of two very extraordinary personages, and the introduction of parson Adams to parson Barnabas
CHAPTER XVII.
A pleasant discourse between the two parsons and the bookseller, which was broke off by an unlucky accident happening in the inn, which produced a dialogue between Mrs Tow-wouse and her maid of no gentle kind.
CHAPTER XVIII.
The history of Betty the chambermaid, and an account of what occasioned the violent scene in the preceding chapter
BOOK II.

CHAPTER I.
Of Divisions in Authors
CHAPTER II.
A surprizing instance of Mr Adams's short memory, with the unfortunate consequences which it brought on Joseph
CHAPTER III.
The opinion of two lawyers concerning the same gentleman, with Mr Adams's inquiry into the religion of his host
CHAPTER IV.
The history of Leonora, or the unfortunate jilt
CHAPTER V.
A dreadful quarrel which happened at the inn where the company dined, with its bloody consequences to Mr Adams
CHAPTER VI.
Conclusion of the unfortunate jilt
CHAPTER VII.
A very short chapter, in which parson Adams went a great way
CHAPTER VIII.
A notable dissertation by Mr Abraham Adams; wherein that gentleman appears in a political light
CHAPTER IX.
In which the gentleman discants on bravery and heroic virtue, till an unlucky accident puts an end to the discourse
CHAPTER X.
Giving an account of the strange catastrophe of the preceding adventure, which drew poor Adams into fresh calamities; and who the woman was who owed the preservation of her chastity to his victorious arm
CHAPTER XI.
What happened to them while before the justice. A chapter very full of learning
CHAPTER XII.
A very delightful adventure, as well to the persons concerned as to the good-natured reader
CHAPTER XIII.
A dissertation concerning high people and low people, with Mrs Slipslop's departure in no very good temper of mind, and the evil plight in which she left Adams and his company
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

PORTRAIT OF FIELDING, FROM BUST IN THE SHIRE HALL, TAUNTON
"JOSEPH, I AM SORRY TO HEAR SUCH COMPLAINTS AGAINST YOU"
THE HOSTLER PRESENTED HIM A BILL
JOSEPH THANKED HER ON HIS KNEES



THE WORKS OF HENRY FIELDING
EDITED BY GEORGE SAINTSBURY
IN TWELVE VOLUMES
VOL. II.
JOSEPH ANDREWS
CONTENTS
BOOK II.—continued.

CHAPTER XIV.
An interview between parson Adams and parson Trulliber.
CHAPTER XV.
An adventure, the consequence of a new instance which parson Adams gave of his forgetfulness.
CHAPTER XVI.
A very curious adventure, in which Mr Adams gave a much greater instance of the honest simplicity of his heart, than of his experience in the ways of this world.
CHAPTER XVII.
A dialogue between Mr Abraham Adams and his host, which, by the disagreement in their opinions, seemed to threaten an unlucky catastrophe, had it not been timely prevented by the return of the lovers.
BOOK III.

CHAPTER I.
Matter prefatory in praise of biography.
CHAPTER II.
A night scene, wherein several wonderful adventures befel Adams and his fellow-travellers.
CHAPTER III.
In which the gentleman relates the history of his life.
CHAPTER IV.
A description of Mr Wilson's way of living. The tragical adventure of the dog, and other grave matters.
CHAPTER V.
A disputation on schools held on the road between Mr Abraham Adams and Joseph; and a discovery not unwelcome to them both.
CHAPTER VI.
Moral reflections by Joseph Andrews; with the hunting adventure, and parson Adams's miraculous escape.
CHAPTER VII.
A scene of roasting, very nicely adapted to the present taste and times.
CHAPTER VIII.
Which some readers will think too short and others too long.
CHAPTER IX.
Containing as surprizing and bloody adventures as can be found in this or perhaps any other authentic history.
CHAPTER X.
A discourse between the poet and the player; of no other use in this history but to divert the reader.
CHAPTER XI.
Containing the exhortations of parson Adams to his friend in affliction; calculated for the instruction and improvement of the reader.
CHAPTER XII.
More adventures, which we hope will as much please as surprize the reader.
CHAPTER XIII.
A curious dialogue which passed between Mr Abraham Adams and Mr Peter Pounce, better worth reading than all the works of Colley Cibber and many others.
BOOK IV.

CHAPTER I.
The arrival of Lady Booby and the rest at Booby-hall.
CHAPTER II.
A dialogue between Mr Abraham Adams and the Lady Booby.
CHAPTER III.
What passed between the lady and lawyer Scout.
CHAPTER IV.
A short chapter, but very full of matter; particularly the arrival of Mr Booby and his lady.
CHAPTER V.
Containing justice business; curious precedents of depositions, and other matters necessary to be perused by all justices of the peace and their clerks.
CHAPTER VI.
Of which you are desired to read no more than you like.
CHAPTER VII.
Philosophical reflections, the like not to be found in any light French romance. Mr Booby's grave advice to Joseph, and Fanny's encounter with a beau.
CHAPTER VIII.
A discourse which happened between Mr Adams, Mrs Adams, Joseph, and Fanny, with some behaviour of Mr Adams which will be called by some few readers very low, absurd, and unnatural.
CHAPTER IX.
A visit which the polite Lady Booby and her polite friend paid to the parson.
CHAPTER X.
The history of two friends, which may afford an useful lesson to all those persons who happen to take up their residence in married families.
CHAPTER XI.
In which the history is continued.
CHAPTER XII.
Where the good-natured reader will see something which will give him no great pleasure.
CHAPTER XIII.
The history, returning to the Lady Booby, gives some account of the terrible conflict in her breast between love and pride, with what happened on the present discovery.
CHAPTER XIV.
Containing several curious night-adventures, in which Mr Adams fell into many hair-breadth scapes, partly owing to his goodness, and partly to his inadvertency.
CHAPTER XV.
The arrival of Gaffar and Gammar Andrews with another person not much expected, and a perfect solution of the difficulties raised by the pedlar.
CHAPTER XVI.
Being the last. In which this true history is brought to a happy conclusion.
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

MR WILSON RELATES HIS HISTORY
PARSON ADAMS
HE RAN TOWARDS HER





*** End of this Doctrine Publishing Corporation Digital Book "Index of the Project Gutenberg Works of Henry Fielding" ***

Doctrine Publishing Corporation provides digitized public domain materials.
Public domain books belong to the public and we are merely their custodians.
This effort is time consuming and expensive, so in order to keep providing
this resource, we have taken steps to prevent abuse by commercial parties,
including placing technical restrictions on automated querying.

We also ask that you:

+ Make non-commercial use of the files We designed Doctrine Publishing
Corporation's ISYS search for use by individuals, and we request that you
use these files for personal, non-commercial purposes.

+ Refrain from automated querying Do not send automated queries of any sort
to Doctrine Publishing's system: If you are conducting research on machine
translation, optical character recognition or other areas where access to a
large amount of text is helpful, please contact us. We encourage the use of
public domain materials for these purposes and may be able to help.

+ Keep it legal -  Whatever your use, remember that you are responsible for
ensuring that what you are doing is legal. Do not assume that just because
we believe a book is in the public domain for users in the United States,
that the work is also in the public domain for users in other countries.
Whether a book is still in copyright varies from country to country, and we
can't offer guidance on whether any specific use of any specific book is
allowed. Please do not assume that a book's appearance in Doctrine Publishing
ISYS search  means it can be used in any manner anywhere in the world.
Copyright infringement liability can be quite severe.

About ISYS® Search Software
Established in 1988, ISYS Search Software is a global supplier of enterprise
search solutions for business and government.  The company's award-winning
software suite offers a broad range of search, navigation and discovery
solutions for desktop search, intranet search, SharePoint search and embedded
search applications.  ISYS has been deployed by thousands of organizations
operating in a variety of industries, including government, legal, law
enforcement, financial services, healthcare and recruitment.



Home