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Title: Index of The Project Gutenberg Works of H. B. Stowe
Author: Stowe, Harriet Beecher
Language: English
As this book started as an ASCII text book there are no pictures available.
Copyright Status: Not copyrighted in the United States. If you live elsewhere check the laws of your country before downloading this ebook. See comments about copyright issues at end of book.

*** Start of this Doctrine Publishing Corporation Digital Book "Index of The Project Gutenberg Works of H. B. Stowe" ***

This book is indexed by ISYS Web Indexing system to allow the reader find any word or number within the document.



WORKS OF HARRIET BEECHER STOWE



CONTENTS

##  UNCLE TOM'S CABIN

UNCLE TOM'S CABIN, YOUNG FOLKS' EDITION

PICTURES AND STORIES FROM UNCLE TOM'S CABIN

##  QUEER LITTLE FOLKS

THE AMERICAN WOMAN'S HOME

##  LIFE OF HARRIET BEECHER STOWE

DEACON PITKIN'S FARM; AND THE FIRST CHRISTMAS OF NEW ENGLAND

##  PINK AND WHITE TYRANNY

##  SUNNY MEMORIES OF FOREIGN LANDS, VOLUME 1 (OF 2)

##  OLDTOWN FIRESIDE STORIES

##  HOUSEHOLD PAPERS AND STORIES

##  THE PEARL OF ORR'S ISLAND

##  PALMETTO-LEAVES

##  THE SALEM WITCHCRAFT

##  MEN OF OUR TIMES

THE MINISTER'S WOOING

##  WOMAN IN SACRED HISTORY



TABLES OF CONTENTS OF VOLUMES



UNCLE TOM\x92S CABIN
or
Life among the Lowly
By Harriet Beecher Stowe



CONTENTS

    VOLUME I

    CHAPTER I -- In Which the Reader Is Introduced to a Man of Humanity

    CHAPTER II -- The Mother

    CHAPTER III --The Husband and Father

    CHAPTER IV -- An Evening in Uncle Tom’s Cabin

    CHAPTER V -- Showing the Feelings of Living Property on Changing Owners

    CHAPTER VI -- Discovery

    CHAPTER VII -- The Mother’s Struggle

    CHAPTER VIII -- Eliza’s Escape

    CHAPTER -- In Which It Appears That a Senator Is But a Man IX

    CHAPTER X -- The Property Is Carried Off

    CHAPTER XI -- In Which Property Gets into an Improper State of Mind

    CHAPTER XII -- Select Incident of Lawful Trade

    CHAPTER XIII -- The Quaker Settlement

    CHAPTER XIV -- Evangeline

    CHAPTER XV -- Of Tom’s New Master, and Various Other Matters

    CHAPTER XVI -- Tom’s Mistress and Her Opinions

    CHAPTER XVII -- The Freeman’s Defence

    CHAPTER XVIII -- Miss Ophelia’s Experiences and Opinions


    VOLUME II

    CHAPTER -- Miss Ophelia’s Experiences and Opinions Continued XIX

    CHAPTER XX -- Topsy

    CHAPTER XXI -- Kentuck

    CHAPTER XXII -- “The Grass Withereth—the Flower Fadeth”

    CHAPTER XXIII -- Henrique

    CHAPTER XXIV -- Foreshadowings

    CHAPTER XXV -- The Little Evangelist

    CHAPTER XXVI -- Death

    CHAPTER XXVII -- “This Is the Last of Earth”

    CHAPTER XXVIII -- Reunion

    CHAPTER XXIX -- The Unprotected

    CHAPTER XXX -- The Slave Warehouse

    CHAPTER XXXI -- The Middle Passage

    CHAPTER XXXII -- Dark Places

    CHAPTER XXXIII -- Cassy

    CHAPTER XXXIV -- The Quadroon’s Story

    CHAPTER XXXV -- The Tokens

    CHAPTER XXXVI -- Emmeline and Cassy

    CHAPTER XXXVII -- Liberty

    CHAPTER XXXVIII -- The Victory

    CHAPTER XXXIX -- The Stratagem

    CHAPTER XL -- The Martyr

    CHAPTER XLI -- The Young Master

    CHAPTER XLII -- An Authentic Ghost Story

    CHAPTER XLIII -- Results

    CHAPTER XLIV -- The Liberator

    CHAPTER XLV -- Concluding Remarks



QUEER LITTLE FOLKS
By Harriet Beecher Stowe



CONTENTS

Hen that Hatched Ducks


11

The Nutcrackers of Nutcracker Lodge


29

The History of Tip-Top


43

Miss Katy-Did and Miss Cricket


61

Mother Magpie\x92s Mischief


70

The Squirrels that live in a House


80

Hum, the Son of Buz


93

Our Country Neighbours


106

The Diverting History of Little Whiskey


117
List of Illustrations.

The Brood Hatched


19

Feeding the Fame Robin


59

Erecting the Hen-House


15

The Hen that Hatched Ducks


25

Enemies in Waiting


39

The Nest in the Apple-Tree


47

Tip-Top in bad Company


57

Venturous Squirrels


89



LIFE OF HARRIET BEECHER STOWE
Compiled From Her Letters And Journals By Her Son Charles Edward Stowe
1890
CONTENTS
CHAPTER I.
CHILDHOOD 1811-1824.
Death of her Mother.\x97First Journey from Home.\x97Life at Nut Plains.\x97School Days and Hours with Favorite Authors.\x97The New Mother.\x97Litchfield Academy and its Influence.\x97First Literary Efforts.\x97A Remarkable Composition.\x97Goes to Hartford
	1

CHAPTER II.
SCHOOL DAYS IN HARTFORD, 1824-1832.
Miss Catherine Beecher.\x97Professor Fisher.\x97The Wreck of the Albion and Death of Professor Fisher.\x97"The Minister's Wooing."\x97Miss Catherine Beecher's Spiritual History.\x97Mrs. Stowe's Recollections of her School Days in Hartford.\x97Her Conversion.\x97Unites with the First Church in Hartford.\x97Her Doubts and Subsequent Religious Development.\x97Her Final Peace
	22

CHAPTER III.
CINCINNATI, 1832-1836.
Dr. Beecher called to Cincinnati.\x97The Westward Journey.\x97First Letter from Home.\x97Description of Walnut Hills.\x97Starting a New School.\x97Inward Glimpses.\x97The Semi-Colon Club.\x97Early Impressions of Slavery.\x97A Journey to the East.\x97Thoughts aroused by First Visit to Niagara.\x97Marriage to Professor Stowe
	53
[vi]

CHAPTER IV.
EARLY MARRIED LIFE, 1836-1840.
Professor Stowe's Interest in Popular Education.\x97His Departure for Europe.\x97Slavery Riots in Cincinnati.\x97Birth of Twin Daughters.\x97Professor Stowe's Return and Visit to Columbus.\x97Domestic Trials.\x97Aiding a Fugitive Slave.\x97Authorship under Difficulties.\x97A Beecher Round Robin
	78

CHAPTER V.
POVERTY AND SICKNESS, 1840-1850.
Famine in Cincinnati.\x97Summer at the East.\x97Plans for Literary Work.\x97Experience on a Railroad.\x97Death of her Brother George.\x97Sickness and Despair.\x97A Journey in Search of Health.\x97Goes to Brattleboro' Water-cure.\x97Troubles at Lane Seminary.\x97Cholera in Cincinnati.\x97Death of Youngest Child.\x97Determined to leave the West
	100

CHAPTER VI.
REMOVAL TO BRUNSWICK, 1850-1852.
Mrs. Stowe's Remarks on Writing and Understanding Biography.\x97Their Appropriateness to her own Biography.\x97Reasons for Professor Stowe's leaving Cincinnati.\x97Mrs. Stowe's Journey to Brooklyn.\x97Her Brother's Success as a Minister.\x97Letters from Hartford and Boston.\x97Arrives in Brunswick.\x97History of the Slavery Agitation.\x97Practical Working of the Fugitive Slave Law.\x97Mrs. Edward Beecher's Letter to Mrs. Stowe and its Effect.\x97Domestic Trials.\x97Begins to write "Uncle Tom's Cabin" as a Serial for the "National Era."\x97Letter to Frederick Douglass.\x97"Uncle Tom's Cabin" a Work of Religious Emotion
	126

CHAPTER VII.
UNCLE TOM'S CABIN, 1852.
"Uncle Tom's Cabin" as a Serial in the "National Era."\x97An [vii]Offer for its Publication in Book Form.\x97Will it be a Success?\x97An Unprecedented Circulation.\x97Congratulatory Messages.\x97Kind Words from Abroad.\x97Mrs. Stowe to the Earl of Carlisle.\x97Letters from and to Lord Shaftesbury.\x97Correspondence with Arthur Helps
	156

CHAPTER VIII.
FIRST TRIP TO EUROPE, 1853.
The Edmondsons.\x97Buying Slaves to set them Free.\x97Jenny Lind.\x97Professor Stowe is called to Andover.\x97Fitting up the New Home.\x97The "Key to Uncle Tom's Cabin."\x97"Uncle Tom" Abroad.\x97How it was Published in England.\x97Preface to the European Edition.\x97The Book in France.\x97In Germany.\x97A Greeting from Charles Kingsley.\x97Preparing to visit Scotland.\x97Letter to Mrs. Follen
	178

CHAPTER IX.
SUNNY MEMORIES, 1853.
Crossing the Atlantic.\x97Arrival in England.\x97Reception in Liverpool.\x97Welcome to Scotland.\x97A Glasgow Tea-Party.\x97Edinburgh Hospitality.\x97Aberdeen.\x97Dundee and Birmingham.\x97Joseph Sturge.\x97Elihu Burritt.\x97London.\x97The Lord Mayor's Dinner.\x97Charles Dickens and his Wife
	205

CHAPTER X.
FROM OVER THE SEA, 1853.
The Earl of Carlisle.\x97Arthur Helps.\x97The Duke and Duchess of Argyll.\x97Martin Farquhar Tupper.\x97A Memorable Meeting at Stafford House.\x97Macaulay and Dean Milman.\x97Windsor Castle.\x97Professor Stowe returns to America.\x97Mrs. Stowe on the Continent.\x97Impressions of Paris.\x97En Route to Switzerland and Germany.\x97Back to England.\x97Homeward Bound
	228

CHAPTER XI.
HOME AGAIN, 1853-1856.
Anti-Slavery Work.\x97Stirring Times in the United States.\x97Address [viii]to the Ladies of Glasgow.\x97Appeal to the Women of America.\x97Correspondence with William Lloyd Garrison.\x97The Writing of "Dred."\x97Farewell Letter from Georgiana May.\x97Second Voyage to England
	250

CHAPTER XII.
DRED, 1856.
Second Visit to England.\x97A Glimpse at the Queen.\x97The Duke of Argyll and Inverary.\x97Early Correspondence with Lady Byron.\x97Dunrobin Castle and its Inmates.\x97A Visit to Stoke Park.\x97Lord Dufferin.\x97Charles Kingsley at Home.\x97Paris Revisited.\x97Madame Mohl's Receptions
	270

CHAPTER XIII.
OLD SCENES REVISITED, 1856.
En Route to Rome.\x97Trials of Travel.\x97A Midnight Arrival and an Inhospitable Reception.\x97Glories of the Eternal City.\x97Naples and Vesuvius.\x97Venice.\x97Holy Week in Rome.\x97Return to England.\x97Letter from Harriet Martineau on "Dred."\x97A Word from Mr. Prescott on "Dred."\x97Farewell to Lady Byron
	294

CHAPTER XIV.
THE MINISTER'S WOOING, 1857-1859.
Death of Mrs. Stowe's Oldest Son.\x97Letter to the Duchess of Sutherland.\x97Letter to her Daughters in Paris.\x97Letter to her Sister Catherine.\x97Visit to Brunswick and Orr's Island.\x97Writes "The Minister's Wooing" and "The Pearl of Orr's Island."\x97Mr. Whittier's Comments.\x97Mr. Lowell on "The Minister's Wooing."\x97Letter to Mrs. Stowe from Mr. Lowell.\x97John Ruskin on "The Minister's Wooing."\x97A Year of Sadness.\x97Letter to Lady Byron.\x97Letter to her Daughter.\x97Departure for Europe
	315

CHAPTER XV.
THE THIRD TRIP TO EUROPE, 1859.
Third Visit to Europe.\x97Lady Byron on "The Minister's Wooing."\x97Some Foreign People and Things as they Appeared [ix]to Professor Stowe.\x97A Winter in Italy.\x97Things Unseen and Unrevealed.\x97Speculations concerning Spiritualism.\x97John Ruskin.\x97Mrs. Browning.\x97The Return to America.\x97Letters to Dr. Holmes
	343

CHAPTER XVI.
THE CIVIL WAR, 1860-1865.
The Outbreak of Civil War.\x97Mrs. Stowe's Son enlists.\x97Thanksgiving Day in Washington.\x97The Proclamation of Emancipation.\x97Rejoicings in Boston.\x97Fred Stowe at Gettysburg.\x97Leaving Andover and Settling in Hartford.\x97A Reply to the Women of England.\x97Letters from John Bright, Archbishop Whately, and Nathaniel Hawthorne
	363

CHAPTER XVII.
FLORIDA, 1865-1869.
Letter to Duchess of Argyll.\x97Mrs. Stowe desires to have a Home at the South.\x97Florida the best Field for Doing Good.\x97She Buys a Place at Mandarin.\x97A Charming Winter Residence.\x97"Palmetto Leaves."\x97Easter Sunday at Mandarin.\x97Correspondence with Dr. Holmes.\x97"Poganuc People."\x97Receptions in New Orleans and Tallahassee.\x97Last Winter at Mandarin
	395

CHAPTER XVIII.
OLDTOWN FOLKS, 1869.
Professor Stowe the Original of "Harry" in "Oldtown Folks."\x97Professor Stowe's Letter to George Eliot.\x97Her Remarks on the Same.\x97Professor Stowe's Narrative of his Youthful Adventures in the World of Spirits.\x97Professor Stowe's Influence on Mrs. Stowe's Literary Life.\x97George Eliot on "Oldtown Folks"
	419

CHAPTER XIX.
THE BYRON CONTROVERSY, 1869-1870.
Mrs. Stowe's Statement of her own Case.\x97The Circumstances under which she first met Lady Byron.\x97Letters to Lady Byron.\x97Letter to Dr. Holmes when about to publish "The True Story of Lady Byron's Life" in the "Atlantic."\x97Dr. Holmes's Reply.\x97The Conclusion [x]of the Matter
	445

CHAPTER XX.
GEORGE ELIOT.
Correspondence with George Eliot.\x97George Eliot's First Impressions of Mrs. Stowe.\x97Mrs. Stowe's Letter to Mrs. Follen.\x97George Eliot's Letter to Mrs. Stowe.\x97Mrs. Stowe's Reply.\x97Life in Florida.\x97Robert Dale Owen and Modern Spiritualism.\x97George Eliot's Letter on the Phenomena of Spiritualism.\x97Mrs. Stowe's Description of Scenery in Florida.\x97Mrs. Stowe concerning "Middlemarch."\x97George Eliot to Mrs. Stowe during Rev. H. W. Beecher's Trial.\x97Mrs. Stowe concerning her Life Experience with her Brother, H. W. Beecher, and his Trial.\x97Mrs. Lewes' Last Letter to Mrs. Stowe.\x97Diverse Mental Characteristics of these Two Women.\x97Mrs. Stowe's Final Estimate of Modern Spiritualism
	459

CHAPTER XXI.
CLOSING SCENES, 1870-1889.
Literary Labors.\x97Complete List of Published Books.\x97First Reading Tour.\x97Peeps Behind the Curtain.\x97Some New England Cities.\x97A Letter from Maine.\x97Pleasant and Unpleasant Readings.\x97Second Tour.\x97A Western Journey.\x97Visit to Old Scenes.\x97Celebration of Seventieth Birthday.\x97Congratulatory Poems from Mr. Whittier and Dr. Holmes.\x97Last Words
	489
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.
 	PAGE
Portrait of Mrs. Stowe. From a crayon by Richmond, made in England in 1853
	Frontispiece
Silver Inkstand presented to Mrs. Stowe by her English Admirers in 1853
	xi
Portrait of Mrs. Stowe's Grandmother, Roxanna Foote. From a miniature painted on ivory by her daughter, Mrs. Lyman Beecher
	6
Birthplace at Litchfield, Conn.[A]
	10
Portrait of Catherine E. Beecher. From a photograph taken in 1875
	30
The Home at Walnut Hills, Cincinnati[A]
	56
Portrait of Henry Ward Beecher. From a photograph by Rockwood, in 1884
	130
Manuscript Page of "Uncle Tom's Cabin" (fac-simile)
	160
The Andover Home. From a painting by F. Rondel, in 1860, owned by Mrs. H. F. Allen
	186[xii]
Portrait of Lyman Beecher, at the Age of Eighty-Seven. From a painting owned by the Boston Congregational Club
	264
Portrait of the Duchess of Sutherland. From an engraving presented to Mrs. Stowe
	318
The Old Home at Hartford
	374
The Home at Mandarin, Florida
	402
Portrait of Calvin Ellis Stowe. From a photograph taken in 1882
	422
Portrait of Mrs. Stowe. From a photograph by Ritz and Hastings, in 1884
	470
The Later Hartford Home
	508
FOOTNOTE:

[A] From recent photographs and from views in the Autobiography of Lyman Beecher, published by Messrs. Harper & Brothers.



PINK AND WHITE TYRANNY
A Society Novel
By Mrs. Harriet Beecher Stowe
1871



CONTENTS.
Chap. 	Page
I.   	Falling in Love 	1
II.   	What she thinks of it 	19
III.   	The Sister 	31
IV.   	Preparation for Marriage 	39
V.   	Wedding, and Wedding-trip 	56
VI.   	Honey-moon, and after 	63
VII.   	Will she like it? 	74
VIII.   	Spindlewood 	86
IX.   	A Crisis 	92
X.   	Changes 	104
XI.   	Newport; or, the Paradise of Nothing to do 	112
XII.   	Home \xC3  la Pompadour 	126
XIII.   	John’s Birthday 	137
XIV.   	A Great Moral Conflict 	152
XV.   	The Follingsbees arrive 	161
XVI.   	Mrs. John Seymour’s Party, and what came of it 	181
XVII.   	After the Battle 	197
XVIII.   	A Brick turns up 	213
XIX.   	The Castle of Indolence 	228[viii]
XX.   	The Van Astrachans 	243
XXI.   	Mrs. Follingsbee’s Party, and what came of it 	250
XXII.   	The Spider-web broken 	268
XXIII.   	Common-sense Arguments 	281
XXIV.   	Sentiment v. Sensibility 	284
XXV.   	Wedding Bells 	291
XXVI.   	Motherhood 	297
XXVII.   	Checkmate 	304
XXVIII.   	After the Storm 	321
XXIX.   	The New Lillie 	326



SUNNY MEMORIES OF FOREIGN LANDS, VOL. 1 (of 2)
By Harriet Beecher Stowe



CONTENTS
Preface
Introductory
Breakfast In Liverpool\x97April 11.
Public Meeting In Liverpool\x97April 13.
Public Meeting In Glasgow\x97April 15.
Public Meeting In Edinburgh\x97April 20.
Public Meeting In Aberdeen\x97April 21.
Public Meeting In Dundee\x97April 22.
Address Of The Students Of Glasgow University\x97April 25.
Loud Mayor's Dinner At The Mansion House, London\x97May 2.
Stafford House Reception\x97May 7.
Congregational Union\x97May 13.
Royal Highland School Society Dinner, At The Freemason's Tavern, London\x97May 14.
Antislavery Society, Exeter Hall\x97May 16.
Soir\xE9e At Willis's Rooms\x97May 25.
Concluding Note.
Letter I
Letter II
Letter III
Letter IV
Letter V
Letter VI.
Letter VII
Letter VIII
Letter IX
Letter X
Letter XI
Letter XII
Letter XIII
Letter XIV
Letter XV
Letter XVI
Letter XVII
Letter XVIII
Notes
Credits



OLDTOWN FIRESIDE STORIES.
By Harriet Beecher Stowe.



CONTENTS

    THE GHOST IN THE MILL

    THE SULLIVAN LOOKING-GLASS.

    THE MINISTER'S HOUSEKEEPER.

    THE WIDOW'S BANDBOX.

    CAPTAIN KIDD'S MONEY.

    \x93MIS' ELDERKIN'S PITCHER.\x94

    THE GHOST IN THE CAP'N BROWNHOUSE.



    ILLUSTRATIONS


    Titlepage

    Frontispiece

    The Ghost in the Mill, Page 001

    Old Cack Knew Him Too, Page 020

    Tailpiece, Page 024

    The Sullivan Looking-glass, Page 025

    Tailpiece, Page 052

    The Minister's Housekeeper, Page 053

    Huldy Came Behind Chokin' With Laugh, Page 065

    I've Thrown the Pig in The Well, Page 070

    Tailpiece, Page 078

    The Widow's Bandbox, Page 079

    Tailpiece, Page 102

    Captain Kidd's Money, Page 108

    They Dug Down About Five Feet, Page 119

    Mis' Elderkin's Pitcher, Page 122

    Ghost in Cap'n Brown House, Page 139

    Stood There Lookin' Right at Cinthy, Page 149



HOUSEHOLD PAPERS AND STORIES
By Harriet Beecher Stowe
1868



CONTENTS


PAGE

INTRODUCTORY NOTE	1
II. 	Homekeeping vs. Housekeeping 	33
IV. 	The Economy of the Beautiful 	69
VI. 	The Lady who does her own Work 	101
VIII. 	Economy 	133
X. 	Cookery 	182
XII. 	Home Religion 	231
II. 	Woman\x92s Sphere 	274
IV. 	Is Woman a Worker? 	316
VI. 	Bodily Religion: A Sermon on Good Health 	347
VIII. 	How shall we be Amused? 	374
X. 	What are the Sources of Beauty in Dress? 	412
XII. 	The New Year 	438

OUR SECOND GIRL	473



THE PEARL OF ORR'S ISLAND
A Story of the Coast of Maine
By Harriet Beecher Stowe
1896



CONTENTS
Introductory Note
CHAPTER
I.	Naomi 	1
II.	Mara 	5
III.	The Baptism and the Burial 	9
IV.	Aunt Roxy and Aunt Ruey 	15
V.	The Kittridges 	25
VI.	Grandparents 	36
VII.	From the Sea 	47
VIII.	The Seen and the Unseen 	58
IX.	Moses 	74
X.	The Minister 	85
XI.	Little Adventurers 	99
XII.	Sea Tales 	110
XIII.	Boy and Girl 	120
XIV.	The Enchanted Island 	132
XV.	The Home Coming 	143
XVI.	The Natural and the Spiritual 	154
XVII.	Lessons 	165
XVIII.	Sally 	175
XIX.	Eighteen 	179
XX.	Rebellion 	186
XXI.	The Tempter 	198
XXII.	A Friend in Need 	208
XXIII.	The Beginning of the Story 	218
XXIV.	Desires and Dreams 	229
XXV.	Miss Emily 	235
XXVI.	Dolores 	245
XXVII.	Hidden Things 	258
XXVIII.	A Coquette 	270
XXIX.	Night Talks 	279
XXX.	The Launch of the Ariel 	290
XXXI.	Greek meets Greek 	303
XXXII.	The Betrothal 	315
XXXIII.	At a Quilting 	323
XXXIV.	Friends 	329
XXXV.	The Toothacre Cottage 	335
XXXVI.	The Shadow of Death 	339
XXXVII.	The Victory 	351
XXXVIII.	Open Vision 	358
XXXIX.	The Land of Beulah 	368
XL.	The Meeting 	376
XLI.	Consolation 	380
XLII.	Last Words 	387
XLIII.	The Pearl 	393
XLIV.	Four Years After 	398



PALMETTO-LEAVES
By Harriet Beecher Stowe
1873



CONTENTS.
 	PAGE.
Nobody's Dog	1
A Flowery January in Florida	16
The Wrong Side of the Tapestry	26
A Letter To the Girls	40
A Water-coach, and a Ride in It	53
Picnicking up Julington	69
Magnolia	87
Yellow Jessamines	97
"Florida for Invalids"	116
Swamps and Orange-Trees	137
Letter-Writing	148
Magnolia Week	161
Buying Land in Florida	175
Our Experience in Crops	185
May in Florida	196
St. Augustine	206
Our Neighbor Over the Way	225
The Grand Tour up River	247
Old Cudjo and the Angel	267
The Laborers of the South	279
Map of the St. John River

MAP OF THE ST. JOHN RIVER, FLORIDA.
The Savannah Steamer



SALEM WITCHCRAFT
THE PLANCHETTE MYSTERY AND MODERN SPIRITUALISM
By Harriet Beecher Stowe
CONTENTS.
  	PAGE
The Place 	7
The Salemite of Forty Years Ago 	8
How the Subject was opened 	9
Careful Historiography 	10
The Actors in the Tragedy 	12
Philosophy of the Delusion 	12
Character of the Early Settlement 	13
First Causes 	15
Death of the Patriarch 	16
Growth of Witchcraft 	17
Trouble in the Church 	18
Rev. Mr. Burroughs 	19
Deodat Lawson 	20
Parris\x97a Malignant 	20
A Protean Devil 	21
State of Physiology 	22
William Penn as a Precedent 	22
Phenomena of Witchcraft 	23
Parris and his Circle 	25
The Inquisitions\x97Sarah Good 	26
A Child Witch 	27
The Towne Sisters 	28
Depositions of Parris and his Tools 	31
Goody Nurse\x92s Excommunication 	35
Mary Easty 	36
Mrs. Cloyse 	38
The Proctor Family 	40
The Jacobs Family 	41
Giles and Martha Corey 	42
Decline of the Delusion 	44
The Physio-Psychological Causes of the Trouble 	45
The Last of Parris 	47
\x93One of the Afflicted\x94\x97Her Confession 	49
The Transition 	50
The Fetish Theory Then and Now 	51
The Views of Modern Investigators 	53
Importance of the Subject 	55

CONTENTS OF THE PLANCHETTE MYSTERY.
What Planchette is and does (with review of Facts and Phenomena) 	63
The Press on Planchette (with further details of Phenomena) 	67
Theory First\x97That the Board is moved by the hands that rest upon it 	70
Theory Second\x97\x93It is Electricity or Magnetism\x94 	71
Proof that Electricity has nothing to do with it 	78
Theory Third\x97The Devil Theory 	79
Theory of a Floating Ambient Mentality 	81
\x93To Daimonion\x94\x97The Demon 	83
\x93It is some principle of nature as yet unknown\x94 	85
Theory of the Agency of Departed Spirits 	85
Planchette\x92s own Theory 	89
The Rational Difficulty 	92
The Medium\x97The Doctrine of Spheres 	93
The Moral and Religious Difficulty 	98
What this Modern Development is, and what is to come of it 	102
Conclusion 	105
How to work Planchette 	106

SPIRITUALISM.
History of Spiritualism 	107
Scriptural Views 	110
Communion of Saints 	112

DR. DODDRIDGE\x92S DREAM.

Pages 123-125



MEN OF OUR TIMES; OR LEADING PATRIOTS OF THE DAY
LINCOLN, GRANT, GARRISON, SUMNER, CHASE, WILSON, GREELEY, FARRAGUT, ANDREW, COLFAX, STANTON, DOUGLASS, BUCKINGHAM, SHERMAN, SHERIDAN, HOWARD, PHILLIPS AND BEECHER.
By Harriet Beecher Stowe
1868



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
  	PAGE.
1. 	President Lincoln, 	FRONTISPIECE.
2. 	Gen. U. S. Grant, 	111
3. 	William L. Garrison, 	154
4. 	Charles Sumner, 	214
5. 	Salmon P. Chase, 	241
6. 	Henry Wilson, 	269
7. 	Horace Greeley, 	293
8. 	Com. D. G. Farragut, 	311
9. 	Gov. John A. Andrew, 	325
10. 	Schuyler Colfax, 	347
11. 	E. M. Stanton, 	363
12. 	Frederick Douglass, 	380
13. 	Gen. P. H. Sheridan, 	405
14. 	Gen. W. T. Sherman, 	423
15. 	Gen. Oliver O. Howard, 	447
16. 	Gov. Wm. A. Buckingham, 	463
17. 	Wendell Phillips, 	483
18. 	Rev. Henry Ward Beecher, 	505



CONTENTS
  	PAGE
CHAPTER I.\x97ABRAHAM LINCOLN.
The Men of our Time\x97Lincoln Foremost\x97The War was the Working-Man's Revolution\x97Abraham Lincoln's Birth and Youth\x97The Books he Read\x97The Thirty Thousand Dollars for Tender\x97The Old Stocking of Government Money\x97A Just Lawyer; Anecdotes\x97His First Candidacy and Speech\x97Goes to Legislature and Congress\x97The Seven Debates and Campaign against Douglass in 1858\x97Webster's and Lincoln's Language Compared\x97The Cooper Institute Speech\x97The Nomination at Chicago\x97Moral and Physical Courage\x97The Backwoodsman President and the Diplomatists\x97Significance of his Presidential Career\x97Religious Feelings\x97His Kindness\x97"The Baby Did It"\x97The First Inaugural\x97The Second Inaugural, and other State Papers\x97The Conspiracy and Assassination\x97The Opinions of Foreign Nations on Mr. Lincoln. 	11
CHAPTER II.\x97ULYSSES S. GRANT.
A General Wanted\x97A Short War Expected\x97The Young Napoleon\x97God's Revenge Against Slavery\x97The Silent Man in Galena\x97"Tanning Leather"\x97Gen. Grant's Puritan Descent\x97How he Loaded the Logs\x97His West Point Career\x97Service in Mexico\x97Marries, and Leaves the Army\x97Wood-Cutting, Dunning and Leather-Selling\x97Enlists against the Rebellion\x97Missouri Campaign\x97Paducah Campaign\x97Fort Donelson Campaign\x97Battle of Shiloh\x97How Grant Lost his Temper\x97Vicksburg Campaign\x97Lincoln on Grant's "Drinking"\x97Chattanooga\x97Grant's Method of Making a Speech\x97Appointed Lieutenant-General\x97The Richmond Campaign\x97"Mr. Grant is a Very Obstinate Man"\x97Grant's Qualifications as a Ruler\x97Honesty\x97Generosity to Subordinates\x97Sound Judgment of Men\x97Power of Holding his Tongue\x97Grant's Sidewalk Platform\x97Talks Horse to Senator Wade\x97"Wants Nothing Said"\x97The Best Man for Next President. 	111
CHAPTER III.\x97WILLIAM LLOYD GARRISON.
Mr. Garrison's Birth and Parents\x97His Mother\x97Her Conversion\x97His Boyhood\x97Apprenticed to a Printer\x97First Anti-Slavery Address\x97Advice to Dr. Beecher\x97Benjamin Lundy\x97Garrison Goes to Baltimore\x97First Battle with Slavery\x97In Jail\x97First Number of the Liberator\x97Threats and Rage from the South\x97The American Anti-Slavery Society\x97First Visit to England\x97The Era of Mob Violence\x97The Respectable Boston Mob\x97Mr. Garrison's Account\x97Again in Jail\x97The Massachusetts Legislature Uncivil to the Abolitionists\x97Logical Vigor of the Slaveholders\x97Garrison's Disunionism\x97Denounces the Church\x97Liberality of the Liberator\x97The Southerners' own Testimony\x97Mr. Garrison's Bland Manners\x97His Steady Nerves\x97xHis use of Language\x97Things by their Right Names\x97Abolitionist "Hard Language;" Garrison's Argument on it\x97Protest for Woman's Rights\x97The Triumph of his Cause\x97"The Liberator" Discontinued\x97Second Visit to England\x97Letter to Mrs. Stowe. 	154
CHAPTER IV.\x97CHARLES SUMNER.
Mr. Sumner an instance of Free State High Culture\x97The "Brahmin Caste" of New England\x97The Sumner Ancestry; a Kentish Family\x97Governor Increase Sumner; His Revolutionary Patriotism\x97His Stately Presence; "A Governor that can Walk"\x97Charles Sumner's Father\x97Mr. Sumner's Education, Legal and Literary Studies\x97Tendency to Ideal Perfection\x97Sumner and the Whigs\x97Abolitionism Social Death\x97Sumner's Opposition to the Mexican War\x97His Peace Principles\x97Sumner Opposes Slavery Within the Constitution, as Garrison Outside of it\x97Anti-Slavery and the Whigs\x97The Political Abolitionist Platform\x97Webster asked in vain to Oppose Slavery\x97Sumner's Rebuke of Winthrop\x97Joins the Free Soil Party\x97Succeeds Webster in the Senate\x97Great Speech against the Fugitive Slave Law\x97The Constitution a Charter of Liberty\x97Slavery not in the Constitution\x97First Speech after the Brooks Assault\x97Consistency as to Reconstruction. 	214
CHAPTER V.\x97SALMON P. CHASE.
England and our Finances in the War\x97President Wheelock and Mr. Chase's Seven Uncles\x97His Uncle the Bishop\x97His Sense of Justice at College\x97His Uncle the Senator\x97Admitted to the Bar for Cincinnati\x97His First Argument before a U. S. Court\x97Society in Cincinnati\x97The Ohio Abolitionists\x97Cincinnati on Slavery\x97The Church admits Slavery to be "an Evil"\x97Mr. Chase and the Birney Mob\x97The Case of the Slave Girl Matilda\x97How Mr. Chase "Ruined Himself"\x97He Affirms the Sectionality of Slavery\x97The Van Zandt Case\x97Extracts from Mr. Chase's Argument\x97Mr. Chase in Anti-Slavery Politics\x97His Qualifications as a Financier. 	241
CHAPTER VI.\x97HENRY WILSON.
Lincoln, Chase and Wilson as Illustrations of Democracy\x97Wilson's Birth and Boyhood\x97Reads over One Thousand Books in Ten Years\x97Learns Shoemaking\x97Earns an Education Twice Over\x97Forms a Debating Society\x97Makes Sixty Speeches for Harrison\x97Enters into Political Life on the Working-Men's Side\x97Helps to form the Free Soil Party\x97Chosen United States Senator over Edward Everett\x97Aristocratic Politics in those Days\x97Wilson and the Slaveholding Senators\x97The Character of his Speaking\x97Full of Facts and Practical Sense\x97His Usefulness as Chairman of the Military Committee\x97His "History of the Anti-Slavery Measures in Congress"\x97The 37th and 38th Congresses\x97The Summary of Anti-Slavery Legislation from that Book\x97Other Abolitionist Forces\x97Contrast of Sentiments of Slavery and of Freedom\x97Recognition of Hayti and Liberia; Specimen of the Debate\x97Slave and Free Doctrine on Education\x97Equality in Washington Street Cars\x97Pro-Slavery Good Taste\x97Solon's Ideal of Democracy Reached in America. 	269
xi
CHAPTER VII.\x97HORACE GREELEY.
The Scotch-Irish Race in the United States\x97Mr. Greeley a Partly Reversed Specimen of it\x97His Birth and Boyhood\x97Learns to Read Books Upside Down\x97His Apprenticeship on a Newspaper\x97The Town Encyclopedia\x97His Industry at his Trade\x97His First Experience of a Fugitive Slave Chase\x97His First Appearance in New York\x97The Work on the Polyglot Testament\x97Mr. Greeley as "The Ghost"\x97The First Cheap Daily Paper\x97The Firm of Greeley & Story\x97The New Yorker, the Jeffersonian and the Log Cabin\x97Mr. Greeley as Editor of the New Yorker\x97Beginning of The Tribune\x97Mr. Greeley's Theory of a Political Newspaper\x97His Love for The Tribune\x97The First Week of that Paper\x97The Attack of the Sun and its Result\x97Mr. McElrath's Partnership\x97Mr. Greeley's Fourierism\x97"The Bloody Sixth"\x97The Cooper Libel Suits\x97Mr. Greeley in Congress\x97He Goes to Europe\x97His Course in the Rebellion\x97His Ambition and Qualifications for Office\x97The Key-Note of his Character. 	293
CHAPTER VIII.\x97DAVID G. FARRAGUT.
The Lesson of the Rebellion to Monarchs\x97The Strength of the United States\x97The U. S. Naval Service\x97The Last War\x97State of the Navy in 1861\x97Admiral Farragut Represents the Old Navy and the New\x97Charlemagne's Physician, Farraguth\x97The Admiral's Letter about his Family\x97His Birth\x97His Cruise with Porter when a Boy of Nine\x97The Destruction of the Essex\x97Farragut in Peace Times\x97Expected to go with the South\x97Refuses, is Threatened, and goes North\x97The Opening of the Mississippi\x97The Bay Fight at Mobile\x97The Admiral's Health\x97Farragut and the Tobacco Bishop. 	311
CHAPTER IX.\x97JOHN A. ANDREW.
Governor Andrew's Death Caused by the War\x97The Governors Dr. Beecher Prayed for\x97Governor Andrew a Christian Governor\x97Gov. Andrew's Birth\x97He goes to Boston to Study Law\x97Not Averse to unfashionable and Unpopular Causes\x97His Cheerfulness and Social Accomplishments\x97His Sunday School Work\x97Lives Plainly\x97His Clear Foresight of the War\x97Sends a Thousand Men to Washington in One Day\x97The Story of the Blue Overcoats\x97The Telegram for the Bodies of the Dead of Baltimore\x97Gov. Andrew's Tender Care for the Poor\x97The British Minister and the Colored Women\x97The Governor's Kindness to the Soldier's Wife\x97His Biblical Proclamations\x97The Thanksgiving Proclamation of 1861\x97The Proclamation of 1862\x97His Interest in the Schools for the Richmond Poor\x97Cotton Mather's Eulogy on Gov. Winthrop\x97Gov. Andrew's Farewell Address to the Massachusetts Legislature\x97State Gratitude to Gov. Andrew's Family. 	325
CHAPTER X.\x97SCHUYLER COLFAX.
General William Colfax, Washington's Friend\x97Mr. Colfax his Grandson\x97Mr. Colfax's Birth and Boyhood\x97Removes to Indiana\x97Becomes Deputy County Auditor\x97Begins to Deal with Politics\x97Becomes an Editor\x97Thexii Period of Maximum Debt\x97Mr. Colfax's First Year\x97He is Burnt Out\x97His Subsequent Success as an Editor\x97His Political Career as a Whig\x97Joins the Republican Party\x97Popularity in his own District\x97The Nebraska Bill\x97Mr. Colfax goes into Congress\x97The Famous Contest for Speakership\x97Mr. Colfax Saves his Party from Defeat\x97Banks Chosen Speaker\x97Mr. Colfax's Great Speech on the Bogus Laws of Kansas\x97The Ball and Chain for Free Speech\x97Mr. Colfax Shows the Ball, and A. H. Stephens Holds it for him\x97Mr. Colfax Renominated Unanimously\x97His Remarkable Success in his own District\x97Useful Labors in Post Office Committee\x97Early for Lincoln for President\x97Mr. Colfax urged for Post Master General\x97His Usefulness as Speaker\x97The Qualifications for that Post\x97Mr. Colfax's Public Virtues. 	347
CHAPTER XI.\x97EDWIN M. STANTON.
Rebel Advantages at Opening of the War\x97They Knew all about the Army Officers\x97Early Contrast of Rebel Enthusiasm and Union Indifference\x97Importance of Mr. Stanton's Post\x97His Birth and Ancestry\x97His Education and Law Studies\x97County Attorney\x97State Reporter\x97Defends Mr. McNulty\x97Removes to Pittsburg\x97His Line of Business\x97The Wheeling Case\x97He Removes to Washington\x97His Qualifications as a Lawyer\x97He Enters Buchanan's Cabinet\x97His Unexpected Patriotism\x97His Own Account of the Cabinet at News of Anderson's Move to Sumter\x97The Lion before the Old Red Dragon\x97Appointed Secretary of War\x97"Bricks in his Pockets"\x97Stanton's Habitual Reserve\x97His Wrath\x97"The Angel Gabriel as Paymaster"\x97Anecdotes of Lincoln's Confidence in Stanton\x97Lincoln's Affection for him\x97The Burdens of his Office\x97His Kindness of Heart within a Rough Outside\x97The Country his Debtor. 	363
CHAPTER XII.\x97FREDERICK DOUGLASS.
The Opportunity for Every Man in a Republic\x97The Depth Below a White Man's Poverty\x97The Starting Point whence Fred Douglass Raised Himself\x97His Mother\x97Her Noble Traits\x97Her Self Denial for the sake of Seeing him\x97She Defends him against Aunt Katy\x97Her Death\x97Col. Loyd's Plantation\x97The Luxury of his own Mansion\x97The Organization of his Estate\x97"Old Master"\x97How they Punished the Women\x97How Young Douglass Philosophized on Being a Slave\x97Plantation Life\x97The Allowance of Food\x97The Clothes\x97An Average Plantation Day\x97Mr. Douglass' Experience as a Slave Child\x97The Slave Children's Trough\x97The Slave Child's Thoughts\x97The Melancholy of Slave Songs\x97He Becomes a House Servant\x97A Kind Mistress Teaches him to Read\x97How he Completed his Education\x97Effects of Learning to Read\x97Experiences Religion and Prays for Liberty\x97Learns to Write\x97Hires his Time, and Absconds\x97Becomes a Free Working-Man in New Bedford\x97Marries\x97Mr. Douglass on Garrison\x97Mr. Douglass' Literary Career. 	380
CHAPTER XIII.\x97PHILIP H. SHERIDAN.
Sheridan a Full-Blooded Irishman\x97The Runaway Horse\x97Constitutional Fearlessness\x97Sheridan Goes to West Point\x97Sheridan's Apprenticeship toxiii War\x97The Fight with the Apaches at Fort Duncan\x97He is Transferred to Oregon\x97Commands at Fort Yamhill in the Yokima Reservation\x97The Quarrel among the Yokimas\x97Sheridan Popular with Indians\x97He Thinks he has a Chance to be Major Some Day\x97Sheridan's Shyness with Ladies\x97He Employs a Substitute in Waiting on a Lady\x97Sheridan's Kindness and Efficiency in Office Work\x97He Becomes a Colonel of Cavalry\x97His Shrewd Defeat of Gen. Chalmers\x97Becomes Brigadier\x97The Kentucky Campaign against Bragg\x97Sheridan Saves the Battle of Perrysville\x97Saves the Battle of Murfreesboro\x97Gen. Rousseau on Sheridan's Fighting\x97Sheridan at Missionary Ridge\x97Joins Grant as Chief of Cavalry\x97His Raids around Lee\x97His Campaign in the Valley of Virginia\x97He Moves Across and Joins in the Final Operations\x97His Administration at New Orleans\x97Grant's Opinion of Sheridan. 	405
CHAPTER XIV.\x97WILLIAM T. SHERMAN.
The Result of Eastern Blood and Western Developments\x97Lincoln, Grant, Chase and Sherman Specimens of it\x97The Sherman Family Character\x97Hon. Thomas Ewing adopts Sherman\x97Character of the Boy\x97He Enters West Point\x97His Peculiar Traits Showing thus Early\x97How he Treated his "Pleb"\x97His Early Military Service\x97His Appearance as First Lieutenant\x97Marries and Resigns\x97Banker at San Francisco\x97Superintendent of Louisiana Military Academy\x97His Noble Letter Resigning the Superintendency\x97He Foresees a Great War\x97Cameron and Lincoln Think not\x97Sherman at Bull Run\x97He Goes to Kentucky\x97Wants Two Hundred Thousand Troops\x97The False Report of his Insanity\x97Joins Grant; His Services at Shiloh\x97Services in the Vicksburg Campaigns\x97Endurance of Sherman and his Army\x97Sherman's estimate of Grant\x97How to live on the Enemy\x97Prepares to move from Atlanta\x97The Great March\x97His Courtesy to the Colored People\x97His Foresight in War\x97Sherman on Office-Holding. 	423
CHAPTER XV.\x97OLIVER O. HOWARD.
Can there be a Christian Soldier?\x97General Howard's Birth\x97His Military Education\x97His Life Before the Rebellion\x97Resigns in Order to get into the Field\x97Made Brigadier for Good Conduct at Bull Run\x97Commands the Eleventh Corps and Joins the Army at Chattanooga\x97His Services in the Army of the Potomac\x97Extreme Calmness on the Field of Battle\x97Services with Sherman\x97Sherman's high Opinion of him\x97Col. Bowman's Admiration of Howard's Christian Observances\x97Patriotic Services while Invalided at Home\x97Reproves the Swearing Teamster\x97Placed over the Freedmen's Bureau\x97The Central Historic Fact of the War\x97The Rise of Societies to Help the Freedmen\x97The Work of the Freedmen's Bureau\x97Disadvantages Encountered by it, and by General Howard\x97Results of the Bureau thus far\x97Col. Bowman's Description of Gen. Howard's Duties\x97Gen. Sherman's Letter to Gen. Howard on Assuming the Post\x97Estimate of Gen. Howard's Abilities. 	447
xiv
CHAPTER XVI.\x97WILLIAM A. BUCKINGHAM.
The Buckinghams an Original Puritan Family\x97Rev. Thomas Buckingham\x97Gov. Buckingham's Father and Mother\x97Lebanon, the Birthplace of Five Governors\x97Gov. Buckingham's Education\x97He Teaches School\x97His Natural Executive Tendency\x97His Business Career\x97His Extreme Punctuality in Payments\x97His Business and Religious Character\x97His Interest in the Churches and Schools\x97His Benefactions in those Directions\x97His Political Course\x97He Accepts Municipal but not Legislative Offices\x97A Member of the Peace Conference\x97He Himself Equips the First State Militia in the War\x97His Zealous Co-operation with the Government\x97Sends Gen. Aiken to Washington\x97The Isolation of that City from the North\x97Gov. Buckingham's Policy for the War; Letter to Mr. Lincoln\x97His Views on Emancipation; Letter to Mr. Lincoln\x97Anecdote of the Temperance Governor's Staff. 	463
CHAPTER XVII.\x97WENDELL PHILLIPS.
Birth and Ancestry of Wendell Phillips\x97His Education and Social Advantage\x97The Lovejoy Murder\x97Speech in Faneuil Hall\x97The Murder Justified\x97Mr. Phillips' First Speech\x97He Defends the Liberty of the Press\x97His Ideality\x97He Joins the Garrisonian Abolitionists\x97Gives up the Law and Becomes a Reformer\x97His Method and Style of Oratory\x97Abolitionists Blamed for the Boston Mob\x97Heroism of the Early Abolitionists\x97His Position in Favor of "Woman's Rights"\x97Anecdote of His Lecturing\x97His Services in the Cause of Temperance\x97Extract from His Argument on Prohibition\x97His Severity towards Human Nature\x97His Course During and Since the War\x97A Change of Tone Recommended. 	483
CHAPTER XVIII.\x97HENRY WARD BEECHER.
Mr. Beecher a Younger Child\x97Death of his Mother\x97His Step-Mother's Religious Influence\x97Ma'am Kilbourn's School\x97The Passing Bell\x97Unprofitable Schooling\x97An Inveterate School Joker\x97Masters the Latin Grammar\x97Goes to Amherst College\x97His Love of Flowers\x97Modes of Study; a Reformer\x97Mr. Beecher and the Solemn Tutor\x97His Favorite Poetry\x97His Introduction to Phrenology\x97His Mental Philosophy\x97Doctrine of Spiritual Intuition\x97Punctuality for Joke's Sake\x97Old School and New School\x97Doubts on Entering the Ministry\x97Settlement at Lawrenceburg\x97His Studies; First Revival\x97Large Accessions to the Church\x97"Tropical Style"\x97Ministerial Jokes\x97Slavery in the Pulpit\x97The Transfer to Brooklyn\x97Plymouth Church Preaching\x97Visit to England\x97Speeches in England\x97Letters from England\x97Christian View of England\x97The Exeter Hall Speech\x97Preaches an Unpopular Forgiveness. 	505



WOMAN IN SACRED HISTORY
A SERIES OF SKETCHES DRAWN FROM SCRIPTURAL, HISTORICAL, AND LEGENDARY SOURCES
By Harriet Beecher Stowe
1874



CONTENTS.

INTRODUCTION.

I. WOMEN OF THE PATRIARCHAL AGES.

1. Sarah the Princess.

2. Hagar the Slave.

3. Rebekah the Bride.

4. Leah and Rachel.

II. WOMEN OF THE NATIONAL PERIOD.

5. Miriam, Sister of Moses.

6. Deborah the Prophetess.

7. Delilah the Destroyer.

8. Jephtha's Daughter.

9. Hannah the Praying Mother.

10. Ruth the Moabitess.

11. The Witch of Endor.

12. Queen Esther.

13. Judith the Deliverer.

III. WOMEN OF THE CHRISTIAN ERA.

14. The Mythical Madonna.

15. Mary the Mother of Jesus.

16. The Daughter of Herodias.

17. The Woman of Samaria.

18. Mary Magdalene.

19. Martha and Mary.





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