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Title: Index of the Project Gutenberg Works of Jules Verne
Author: Verne, Jules
Language: English
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Copyright Status: Not copyrighted in the United States. If you live elsewhere check the laws of your country before downloading this ebook. See comments about copyright issues at end of book.

*** Start of this Doctrine Publishing Corporation Digital Book "Index of the Project Gutenberg Works of Jules Verne" ***

This book is indexed by ISYS Web Indexing system to allow the reader find any word or number within the document.



WORKS OF

JULES VERNE



CONTENTS


##  AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 DAYS

##  20000 LEAGUES UNDER THE SEA

##  THE MYSTERIOUS ISLAND

##  OFF ON A COMET

##  THE UNDERGROUND CITY

##  THE SURVIVORS OF THE CHANCELLOR

##  MICHAEL STROGOFF

##  IN SEARCH OF THE CASTAWAYS

##  IN SEARCH OF THE CASTAWAYS

##  EIGHT HUNDRED LEAGUES ON THE AMAZON

##  FIVE WEEKS IN A BALLOON

##  ROBUR THE CONQUEROR

##  THE MASTER OF THE WORLD

##  THE FUR COUNTRY

##  THE BLOCKADE RUNNERS

##  THE MYSTERIOUS ISLAND

##  DICK SANDS THE BOY CAPTAIN

##  THE FIELD OF ICE

##  AN ANTARCTIC MYSTERY

##  TOPSY-TURVY

ADVENTURES OF A SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT

##  FACING THE FLAG

TICKET NO. 9672

A VOYAGE IN A BALLOON (1852)

THE WAIF OF THE CYNTHIA

##  ALL AROUND THE MOON

##  CENTRE OF THE EARTH

IN THE YEAR 2889

THE SECRET OF THE ISLAND

##  GODFREY MORGAN

##  CELEBRATED TRAVELS AND TRAVELLERS, Vol. 1

##  CELEBRATED TRAVELS AND TRAVELLERS, Vol. 2

##  THE PEARL OF LIMA

##  A WINTER AMID THE ICE

##  VOYAGES OF CAPTAIN HATTERAS

##  ABANDONED

##  THE EARTH TO THE MOON, IN NINETY-SEVEN HOURS



TABLES OF CONTENTS OF VOLUMES



AROUND THE WORLD IN EIGHTY DAYS
By Jules Verne



CONTENTS
CHAPTER
I   	IN WHICH PHILEAS FOGG AND PASSEPARTOUT ACCEPT EACH OTHER, THE ONE AS MASTER, THE OTHER AS MAN
II   	IN WHICH PASSEPARTOUT IS CONVINCED THAT HE HAS AT LAST FOUND HIS IDEAL
III   	IN WHICH A CONVERSATION TAKES PLACE WHICH SEEMS LIKELY TO COST PHILEAS FOGG DEAR
IV   	IN WHICH PHILEAS FOGG ASTOUNDS PASSEPARTOUT, HIS SERVANT
V   	IN WHICH A NEW SPECIES OF FUNDS, UNKNOWN TO THE MONEYED MEN, APPEARS ON 'CHANGE
VI   	IN WHICH FIX, THE DETECTIVE, BETRAYS A VERY NATURAL IMPATIENCE
VII   	WHICH ONCE MORE DEMONSTRATES THE USELESSNESS OF PASSPORTS AS AIDS TO dETECTIVES
VIII   	IN WHICH PASSEPARTOUT TALKS RATHER MORE, PERHAPS, THAN IS PRUDENT
IX   	IN WHICH THE RED SEA AND THE INDIAN OCEAN PROVE PROPITIOUS TO THE DESIGNS OF PHILEAS FOGG
X   	IN WHICH PASSEPARTOUT IS ONLY TOO GLAD TO GET OFF WITH THE LOSS OF HIS SHOES
XI   	IN WHICH PHILEAS FOGG SECURES A CURIOUS MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AT A FABULOUS PRICE
XII   	IN WHICH PHILEAS FOGG AND HIS COMPANIONS VENTURE ACROSS THE INDIAN FORESTS, AND WHAT ENSUED
XIII   	IN WHICH PASSEPARTOUT RECEIVES A NEW PROOF THAT FORTUNE FAVORS THE BRAVE
XIV   	IN WHICH PHILEAS FOGG DESCENDS THE WHOLE LENGTH OF THE BEAUTIFUL VALLEY OF THE GANGES WITHOUT EVER THINKING OF SEEING IT
XV   	IN WHICH THE BAG OF BANKNOTES DISGORGES SOME THOUSANDS OF POUNDS MORE
XVI   	IN WHICH FIX DOES NOT SEEM TO UNDERSTAND IN THE LEAST WHAT IS SAID TO HIM
XVII   	SHOWING WHAT HAPPENED ON THE VOYAGE FROM SINGAPORE TO HONG KONG
XVIII   	IN WHICH PHILEAS FOGG, PASSEPARTOUT, AND FIX GO EACH ABOUT HIS BUSINESS
XIX   	IN WHICH PASSEPARTOUT TAKES A TOO GREAT INTEREST IN HIS MASTER, AND WHAT COMES OF IT
XX   	IN WHICH FIX COMES FACE TO FACE WITH PHILEAS FOGG
XXI   	IN WHICH THE MASTER OF THE "TANKADERE" RUNS GREAT RISK OF LOSING A REWARD OF TWO HUNDRED POUNDS
XXII   	IN WHICH PASSEPARTOUT FINDS OUT THAT, EVEN AT THE ANTIPODES, IT IS CONVENIENT TO HAVE SOME MONEY IN ONE'S POCKET
XXIII   	IN WHICH PASSEPARTOUT'S NOSE BECOMES OUTRAGEOUSLY LONG
XXIV   	DURING WHICH MR. FOGG AND PARTY CROSS THE PACIFIC OCEAN
XXV   	IN WHICH A SLIGHT GLIMPSE IS HAD OF SAN FRANCISCO
XXVI   	IN WHICH PHILEAS FOGG AND PARTY TRAVEL BY THE PACIFIC RAILROAD
XXVII   	IN WHICH PASSEPARTOUT UNDERGOES, AT A SPEED OF TWENTY MILES AN HOUR, A COURSE OF MORMON HISTORY
XXVIII   	IN WHICH PASSEPARTOUT DOES NOT SUCCEED IN MAKING ANYBODY LISTEN TO REASON
XXIX   	IN WHICH CERTAIN INCIDENTS ARE NARRATED WHICH ARE ONLY TO BE MET WITH ON AMERICAN RAILROADS
XXX   	IN WHICH PHILEAS FOGG SIMPLY DOES HIS DUTY
XXXI   	IN WHICH FIX, THE DETECTIVE, CONSIDERABLY FURTHERS THE INTERESTS OF PHILEAS FOGG
XXXII   	IN WHICH PHILEAS FOGG ENGAGES IN A DIRECT STRUGGLE WITH BAD FORTUNE
XXXIII   	IN WHICH PHILEAS FOGG SHOWS HIMSELF EQUAL TO THE OCCASION
XXXIV   	IN WHICH PHILEAS FOGG AT LAST REACHES LONDON
XXXV   	IN WHICH PHILEAS FOGG DOES NOT HAVE TO REPEAT HIS ORDERS TO PASSEPARTOUT TWICE
XXXVI   	IN WHICH PHILEAS FOGG'S NAME IS ONCE MORE AT A PREMIUM ON 'CHANGE
XXXVII   	IN WHICH IT IS SHOWN THAT PHILEAS FOGG GAINED NOTHING BY HIS TOUR AROUND THE WORLD, UNLESS IT WERE HAPPINESS



TWENTY THOUSAND LEAGUES UNDER THE SEA
Jules Verne



CONTENTS
PART I
CHAPTER
I   	A SHIFTING REEF
II   	PRO AND CON
III   	I FORM MY RESOLUTION
IV   	NED LAND
V   	AT A VENTURE
VI   	AT FULL STEAM
VII   	AN UNKNOWN SPECIES OF WHALE
VIII   	MOBILIS IN MOBILI
IX   	NED LAND'S TEMPERS
X   	THE MAN OF THE SEAS
XI   	ALL BY ELECTRICITY
XII   	SOME FIGURES
XIII   	THE BLACK RIVER
XIV   	A NOTE OF INVITATION
XV   	A WALK ON THE BOTTOM OF THE SEA
XVI   	A SUBMARINE FOREST
XVII   	FOUR THOUSAND LEAGUES UNDER THE PACIFIC
XVIII   	VANIKORO
XIX   	TORRES STRAITS
XX   	A FEW DAYS ON LAND
XXI   	CAPTAIN NEMO'S THUNDERBOLT
XXII   	"AEGRI SOMNIA"
XXIII   	THE CORAL KINGDOM


PART II
CHAPTER
I   	THE INDIAN OCEAN
II   	A NOVEL PROPOSAL OF CAPTAIN NEMO'S
III   	A PEARL OF TEN MILLIONS
IV   	THE RED SEA
V   	THE ARABIAN TUNNEL
VI   	THE GRECIAN ARCHIPELAGO
VII   	THE MEDITERRANEAN IN FORTY-EIGHT HOURS
VIII   	VIGO BAY
IX   	A VANISHED CONTINENT
X   	THE SUBMARINE COAL-MINES
XI   	THE SARGASSO SEA
XII   	CACHALOTS AND WHALES
XIII   	THE ICEBERG
XIV   	THE SOUTH POLE
XV   	ACCIDENT OR INCIDENT?
XVI   	WANT OF AIR
XVII   	FROM CAPE HORN TO THE AMAZON
XVIII   	THE POULPS
XIX   	THE GULF STREAM
XX   	FROM LATITUDE 47° 24' TO LONGITUDE 17° 28'
XXI   	A HECATOMB
XXII   	THE LAST WORDS OF CAPTAIN NEMO
XXIII   	CONCLUSION



THE MYSTERIOUS ISLAND
by Jules Verne
1874



CONTENTS
PART 1. DROPPED
FROM THE CLOUDS
Chapter 1
Chapter 2
Chapter 3
Chapter 4
Chapter 5
Chapter 6
Chapter 7
Chapter 8
Chapter 9
Chapter 10
Chapter 11
Chapter 12
Chapter 13
Chapter 14
Chapter 15
Chapter 16
Chapter 17
Chapter 18
Chapter 19
Chapter 20
Chapter 21
Chapter 22


PART 2. ABANDONED
Chapter 1
Chapter 2
Chapter 3
Chapter 4
Chapter 5
Chapter 6
Chapter 7
Chapter 8
Chapter 9
Chapter 10
Chapter 11
Chapter 12
Chapter 13
Chapter 14
Chapter 15
Chapter 16
Chapter 17
Chapter 18
Chapter 19
Chapter 20


PART 3. THE SECRET
OF THE ISLAND
Chapter 1
Chapter 2
Chapter 3
Chapter 4
Chapter 5
Chapter 6
Chapter 7
Chapter 8
Chapter 9
Chapter 10
Chapter 11
Chapter 12
Chapter 13
Chapter 14
Chapter 15
Chapter 16
Chapter 17
Chapter 18
Chapter 19
Chapter 20



OFF ON A COMET
or HECTOR SERVADAC
By Jules Verne
CONTENTS
	INTRODUCTION TO VOLUME NINE
	OFF ON A COMET OR HECTOR SERVADAC
	BOOK I.
CHAPTER I 	A CHALLENGE
CHAPTER II 	CAPTAIN SERVADAC AND HIS ORDERLY
CHAPTER III 	INTERRUPTED EFFUSIONS
CHAPTER IV 	A CONVULSION OF NATURE
CHAPTER V 	A MYSTERIOUS SEA
CHAPTER VI 	THE CAPTAIN MAKES AN EXPLORATION
CHAPTER VII 	BEN ZOOF WATCHES IN VAIN
CHAPTER VIII 	VENUS IN PERILOUS PROXIMITY
CHAPTER IX 	INQUIRIES UNSATISFIED
CHAPTER X 	A SEARCH FOR ALGERIA
CHAPTER XI 	AN ISLAND TOMB
CHAPTER XII 	AT THE MERCY OF THE WINDS
CHAPTER XIII 	A ROYAL SALUTE
CHAPTER XIV 	SENSITIVE NATIONALITY
CHAPTER XV 	AN ENIGMA FROM THE SEA
CHAPTER XVI 	THE RESIDUUM OF A CONTINENT
CHAPTER XVII 	A SECOND ENIGMA
CHAPTER XVIII 	AN UNEXPECTED POPULATION
CHAPTER XIX 	GALLIA’S GOVERNOR GENERAL
CHAPTER XX 	A LIGHT ON THE HORIZON
CHAPTER XXI 	WINTER QUARTERS
CHAPTER XXII 	A FROZEN OCEAN
CHAPTER XXIII 	A CARRIER-PIGEON
CHAPTER XXIV 	A SLEDGE-RIDE


BOOK II.
CHAPTER I 	THE ASTRONOMER
CHAPTER II 	A REVELATION
CHAPTER III 	THE PROFESSOR’S EXPERIENCES
CHAPTER IV 	A REVISED CALENDAR
CHAPTER V 	WANTED: A STEELYARD
CHAPTER VI 	MONEY AT A PREMIUM
CHAPTER VII 	GALLIA WEIGHED
CHAPTER VIII 	JUPITER SOMEWHAT CLOSE
CHAPTER IX 	MARKET PRICES IN GALLIA
CHAPTER X 	FAR INTO SPACE
CHAPTER XI 	A FETE DAY
CHAPTER XII 	THE BOWELS OF THE COMET
CHAPTER XIII 	DREARY MONTHS
CHAPTER XIV 	THE PROFESSOR PERPLEXED
CHAPTER XV 	A JOURNEY AND A DISAPPOINTMENT
CHAPTER XVI 	A BOLD PROPOSITION
CHAPTER XVII 	THE VENTURE MADE
CHAPTER XVIII 	SUSPENSE
CHAPTER XIX 	BACK AGAIN



THE UNDERGROUND CITY
or, THE BLACK INDIES (Sometimes Called The Child of the Cavern)
By Jules Verne



CONTENTS
	THE UNDERGROUND CITY
CHAPTER I. 	CONTRADICTORY LETTERS
CHAPTER II. 	ON THE ROAD
CHAPTER III. 	THE DOCHART PIT
CHAPTER IV. 	THE FORD FAMILY
CHAPTER V. 	SOME STRANGE PHENOMENA
CHAPTER VI. 	SIMON FORD’S EXPERIMENT
CHAPTER VII. 	NEW ABERFOYLE
CHAPTER VIII. 	EXPLORING
CHAPTER IX. 	THE FIRE-MAIDENS
CHAPTER X. 	COAL TOWN
CHAPTER XI. 	HANGING BY A THREAD
CHAPTER XII. 	NELL ADOPTED
CHAPTER XIII. 	ON THE REVOLVING LADDER
CHAPTER XIV. 	A SUNRISE
CHAPTER XV. 	LOCH LOMOND AND LOCH KATRINE
CHAPTER XVI. 	A FINAL THREAT
CHAPTER XVII. 	THE “MONK”
CHAPTER XVIII. 	NELL’S WEDDING
CHAPTER XIX. 	THE LEGEND OF OLD SILFAX



THE SURVIVORS OF THE CHANCELLOR.
DIARY OF J.R.KAZALLON, PASSENGER.
By Jules Verne



CONTENTS
CHAPTER I.
CHAPTER II.
CHAPTER III.
CHAPTER IV.
CHAPTER V.
CHAPTER VI.
CHAPTER VII.
CHAPTER VIII.
CHAPTER IX.
CHAPTER X.
CHAPTER XI.
CHAPTER XII.
CHAPTER XIII.
CHAPTER XIV.
CHAPTER XV.
CHAPTER XVI.
CHAPTER XVII.
CHAPTER XVIII.
CHAPTER XIX.

CHAPTER XX.
CHAPTER XXI.
CHAPTER XXII.
CHAPTER XXIII.
CHAPTER XXIV.
CHAPTER XXV.
CHAPTER XXVI.
CHAPTER XXVII.
CHAPTER XXVIII.
CHAPTER XXIX.
CHAPTER XXX.
CHAPTER XXXI.
CHAPTER XXXII.
CHAPTER XXXIII.
CHAPTER XXXIV.
CHAPTER XXXV.
CHAPTER XXXVI.
CHAPTER XXXVII.
CHAPTER XXXVIII.

CHAPTER XXXIX.
CHAPTER XL.
CHAPTER XLI.
CHAPTER XLII.
CHAPTER XLIII.
CHAPTER XLIV.
CHAPTER XLV.
CHAPTER XLVI.
CHAPTER XLVII.
CHAPTER XLVIII.
CHAPTER XLIX.
CHAPTER L.
CHAPTER LI.
CHAPTER LII.
CHAPTER LIII.
CHAPTER LIV.
CHAPTER LV.
CHAPTER LVI.
CHAPTER LVII.



MICHAEL STROGOFF
OR, THE COURIER OF THE CZAR
by Jules Verne



CONTENTS
BOOK I
CHAPTER I 	  A FETE AT THE NEW PALACE
CHAPTER II 	  RUSSIANS AND TARTARS
CHAPTER III 	  MICHAEL STROGOFF MEETS THE CZAR
CHAPTER IV. 	  FROM MOSCOW TO NIJNI-NOVGOROD
CHAPTER V 	  THE TWO ANNOUNCEMENTS
CHAPTER VI 	  BROTHER AND SISTER
CHAPTER VII 	  GOING DOWN THE VOLGA
CHAPTER VIII 	  GOING UP THE KAMA
CHAPTER IX 	  DAY AND NIGHT IN A TARANTASS
CHAPTER X. 	  A STORM IN THE URAL MOUNTAINS
CHAPTER XI 	  TRAVELERS IN DISTRESS
CHAPTER XII 	  PROVOCATION
CHAPTER XIII 	  DUTY BEFORE EVERYTHING
CHAPTER XIV 	  MOTHER AND SON
CHAPTER XV 	  THE MARSHES OF THE BARABA
CHAPTER XVI. 	  A FINAL EFFORT
CHAPTER XVII 	  THE RIVALS

BOOK II
CHAPTER I 	  A TARTAR CAMP
CHAPTER II 	  CORRESPONDENTS IN TROUBLE
CHAPTER III 	  BLOW FOR BLOW
CHAPTER IV 	  THE TRIUMPHAL ENTRY
CHAPTER V 	  "LOOK WHILE YOU MAY!”
CHAPTER VI 	  A FRIEND ON THE HIGHWAY
CHAPTER VII. 	  THE PASSAGE OF THE YENISEI
CHAPTER VIII 	  A HARE CROSSES THE ROAD
CHAPTER IX 	  IN THE STEPPE
CHAPTER X 	  BAIKAL AND ANGARA
CHAPTER XI 	  BETWEEN TWO BANKS
CHAPTER XII 	  IRKUTSK
CHAPTER XIII 	     THE CZAR’S COURIER
CHAPTER XIV 	  THE NIGHT OF THE FIFTH OF OCTOBER
CHAPTER XV 	  CONCLUSION



IN SEARCH OF THE CASTAWAYS
A Romantic Narrative Of The Loss Of Captain Grant Of The Brig Britannia And Of The Adventures Of His Children And Friends In His Discovery And Rescue.
By Jules Verne
CONTENTS
	I. 	The Shark
	II. 	The Three Documents
	III. 	The Captain's Children
	IV. 	Lady Glenarvan's Proposal
	V. 	The Departure of the Duncan
	VI. 	An Unexpected Passenger
	VII. 	Jacques Paganel is Undeceived
	VIII. 	The Geographer's Resolution
	IX. 	Through the Strait of Magellan
	X. 	The Course Decided
	XI. 	Traveling in Chili
	XII. 	Eleven Thousand Feet Aloft [Pg 6]
	XIII. 	A Sudden Descent
	XIV. 	Providentially Rescued
	XV. 	Thalcave
	XVI. 	News of the Lost Captain
	XVII. 	A Serious Necessity
	XVIII. 	In Search of Water
	XIX. 	The Red Wolves
	XX. 	Strange Signs
	XXI. 	A False Trail
	XXII. 	The Flood
	XXIII. 	A Singular Abode
	XXIV. 	Paganel's Disclosure
	XXV. 	Between Fire and Water
	XXVI. 	The Return on Board
	XXVII. 	A New Destination [Pg 7]
	XXVIII. 	Tristan d'Acunha and the Isle of Amsterdam
	XXIX. 	The Storm on the Indian Ocean
	XXX. 	A Hospitable Colonist
	XXXI. 	The Quartermaster of the Britannia
	XXXII. 	Preparations for the Journey
	XXXIII. 	An Accident
	XXXIV. 	Australian Explorers
	XXXV. 	Crime or Calamity?
	XXXVI. 	Fresh Faces
	XXXVII. 	A Warning
	XXXVIII. 	Wealth in the Wilderness
	XXXIX. 	Suspicious Occurrences
	XL. 	A Startling Discovery
	XLI. 	The Plot Unveiled
	XLII. 	Four Days of Anguish
	XLIII. 	Helpless and Hopeless [Pg 8]
	XLIV. 	A Rough Captain
	XLV. 	The Wreck of the Macquarie
	XLVI. 	Vain Efforts
	XLVII. 	A Dreaded Country
	XLVIII. 	Introduction to the Cannibals
	XLIX. 	A Momentous Interview
	L. 	The Chief's Funeral
	LI. 	Strangely Liberated
	LII. 	The Sacred Mountain
	LIII. 	A Bold Stratagem
	LIV. 	From Peril to Safety
	LV. 	Why the Duncan went to New Zealand
	LVI. 	Ayrton's Obstinacy
	LVII. 	A Discouraging Confession
	LVIII. 	A Cry in the Night
	LIX. 	Captain Grant's Story
	LX. 	Paganel's Last Entanglement
LIST OF PLATES
"Good," said Glenarvan, "wash the dirty thing and bring it into the cabin." 	p. 13.
The fragments soon strewed the table, and several pieces of paper were perceived adhering to each other. Glenarvan drew them out carefully. 	p. 17.
Dumbarton Castle. 	p. 27.
"Please, madam, speak! I am strong against grief, and can hear all." 	p. 33.
"My father, my poor father!" cried Mary Grant, throwing herself at the feet of Lord Glenarvan. 	p. 41.
The Rev. Mr. Morton implored the blessing of Heaven, and commended the expedition to the care of Providence. 	p. 52.
This man, tall, lank, and shriveled, might have been forty years old. He resembled a long, broad-headed nail, for his head was large and thick, his forehead high, his nose prominent, his mouth wide, and his chin blunt. 	p. 57.
Paganel was grandiloquent. He spoke with a lofty animation, and was carried away in the rapid flight of imagination. 	p. 65.
They could scarcely see the city, which was on an elevated plain in the form of a terrace, resting on volcanic rocks three hundred feet in height. The appearance of the island through this rainy curtain was misty. 	p. 73.
Peak of Teneriffe. 	p. 74.
Sometimes the tips of her yards would graze the branches of the beeches that hung over the waves. 	p. 81
Port Famine. 	p. 83.
In Concepcion 	p. 86.
The mate, Tom Austin, Wilson, a powerful fellow, and Mulready, were the fortunate ones. 	p. 92.
By means of a ford, they crossed the Rio Tubal, the mountains visible in the distance. 	p. 100.
Two hours more of terrible exertion followed. They kept ascending, in order to reach the highest summit of this part of the mountain. 	p. 108.
The internal rumblings, the din of the avalanche, the crash of the blocks of granite, and the whirlwinds of snow, rendered all communication with each other impossible. 	p. 117.
The bird had raised him by his garments, and was now hovering in mid-air at least one hundred and fifty feet above the encampment. He had perceived the travelers, and was violently striving to escape with his heavy prey. 	p. 125.
A man of lofty stature was standing, motionless, on one of the first ledges of the mountain. This individual had broad shoulders, and long hair tied with leathern thongs. 	p. 132.
An important road--that from Carmen to Mendoza--distinguishable by the bones of such animals as mules, horses, sheep and oxen, whose remains were scattered by the birds of prey, and lay bleaching in the sun. 	p. 144.
They set out at daybreak. The horses advanced at a brisk pace among the tufts of "paja-brava," a kind of grass that serves the Indians as a shelter during the storms. 	p. 149.
"Poor father!" exclaimed Robert; "how he will thank you when you have found him!" And, so saying, he took his lordship's hand and pressed it to his lips. 	p. 157.
Frightful howls resounded. The wolves, starting on the track of the horse, fled into the darkness with a terrible speed. 	p. 173.
Arriving within range, Paganel fired a blank charge (for he would not needlessly destroy even a bird), and all the flamingoes flew away, while the geographer gazed at them attentively through his glasses. 	p. 181.
In fact, they were a dozen young children and boys who were drilling very nicely. Their uniform consisted of a striped shirt confined at the waist by a leathern girdle. 	p. 185.
"Ah, I am delighted! Welcome, welcome! I am almost a Frenchman," cried the commander, shaking the geographer's arm with rather painful violence. 	p. 188.
More than once during the journey, the attention and interest of all, but especially of Paganel, were arrested by the curious illusion of the mirage. 	p. 193.
"The flood! the flood!" replied Thalcave, spurring his horse towards the north. 	p. 201.
A huge wave, forty feet high, overwhelmed the fugitives with a terrible roar. Men and beasts, everything, disappeared in a whirlpool of foam. A ponderous liquid mass engulfed them in its furious tide. 	p. 205.
He turned his intelligent head towards his master, and, shaking his long mane, neighed for him beseechingly. 	p. 208.
Glenarvan, Paganel, the major, Austin, and Mulready were seated astraddle, or dangling in the branches, according to their own inclinations. 	p. 213.
A long body appeared. Paganel dangled from branch to branch. His hands could grasp nothing. Was he alive, or dead? 	p. 217.
The hunt promised well, and gave hopes of culinary wonders. 	p. 223.
However, the repast was as varied as it was delicate. The dried meat, the hard eggs, the broiled mojarras, and the roast sparrows and hilgueros, formed a repast which was long remembered. 	p. 225.
They were agreed on this point, that it was necessary to have courage for every fortune, and be contented with a tree when one has neither palace nor cottage. 	p. 229.
The incessant flashes assumed various forms. Some, darting perpendicularly towards the earth, were repeated five or six times in the same place; others spread in zigzag lines, and produced on the dark vault of the heavens astonishing jets of arborescent flame. 	p. 233.
In a few moments the gigantic water-spout struck the ombu, and enveloped it in its watery folds. 	p. 237.
The sound of a horse's hoofs was heard upon the plain, and the tall form of the Indian emerged from the darkness. 	p. 241.
Glenarvan watched alone. He could not convince himself that the Duncan was so near him; but as for supposing that she had not arrived at her appointed rendezvous, it was impossible, for such a ship there were no delays. 	p. 245.
They pushed off, and the boat was rapidly borne from the shore by the ebbing tide. For a long time the motionless outline of the Indian was seen through the foam of the waves. 	p. 249.
Lady Helena and Mary Grant, while the boat was approaching the ship, had experienced all the anguish of suspense. From the deck they endeavored to count those who were returning. 	p. 252.
"My object," said MacNabb, "is not to invalidate the arguments of my friend Paganel, still less to refute them." 	p. 257.
At sunrise they saw the conical peak of Tristan, seemingly separated from all the rest of the rocky group. 	p. 260.
A few hours of their united toil resulted in the death of a large number of seals who were "caught napping." 	p. 261.
Our friends found a few voluntary exiles on the former island, who, by means of seal-fishing, eke out a scanty existence in this out-of-the-way spot. 	p. 264.
Inasmuch as this was sufficient to cook fish, Paganel decided that it was not necessary for him to bathe here "geographically." 	p. 265.
"Major," said Paganel, "will you wager your rifle against my telescope that I cannot name at least fifty Australian explorers?" 	p. 268.
"Master Robert shall count for us." And forthwith the learned geographer opened his budget, and poured forth the history of the discovery of Australia. 	p. 269.
Then, impelled by the hurricane, the billows outran her; they leaped over the taffrail, and the whole deck was swept with tremendous violence. 	p. 276.
"Let go!" cried the young captain. The barrels were inverted, and from their sides streamed floods of oil. 	p. 280.
As the boats containing the whole of the party were rowed ashore, they felt that the fate of their father would soon be probably decided. 	p. 284.
A fair and comfortable locality, which the merry mill crowned with its pointed gable and caressed with the moving shadow of its sails. 	p. 288.
He was a somewhat rough-looking, broad-shouldered man, of about forty-five. 	p. 292.
"When I was washed from the forecastle, as I was hauling down the jib, the Britannia was driving towards the coast of Australia, which was not two cable-lengths distant." 	p. 293.
When he came to himself, he was in the hands of the natives, who carried him into the interior of the country. 	p. 296.
At last, exhausted and almost dead, he reached the hospitable dwelling of Mr. O'Moore, where his labor insured him a comfortable livelihood. 	p. 297.
This business being settled, the party returned on board. 	p. 305.
The vehicle was a cart twenty feet long and covered with an awning, the whole resting upon four wheels, without spokes, felloes, or tires. 	p. 308.
Ayrton and Olbinett took their places respectively in front and in the rear part of the cart, while Glenarvan, the major, Paganel, Robert, Captain Mangles, and the two sailors, mounted their horses. 	p. 312.
The "Mosquito Plains," whose very name describes them, and serves to tell of the tortures that our friends had to encounter. 	p. 313.
Red-gum Station, the home and settlement of an emigrant engaged in the cattle-breeding which is the source of so much Australian wealth. 	p. 316.
The major was skillful enough to shoot a very rare bird,--a "jabiru," or giant crane. This creature was five feet high; and its broad, black, sharp conical beak measured eighteen inches in length. 	p. 317.
A crack was heard; the cart inclined at an alarming angle; the water reached the feet of the ladies, and the whole vehicle threatened to give way. It was an anxious moment. 	p. 324.
After dinner the traveling party had, as if in anticipation, seated themselves at the foot of a magnificent banksia; the young moon was rising high into the heavens, lengthening the twilight, and prolonging it into the evening hour. 	p. 325.
"When I am dead, place a pistol in my right hand, and leave me without burial." His forebodings were realized, and the next morning he died. 	p. 328.
He beheld the waters of the Indian Ocean, and proudly unfurled the Australian flag from the topmost branch of the highest tree he could find. 	p. 329.
A terrible accident had occurred, not a collision, but a running off the track and a fall into the river, which was filled with the fragments of cars and locomotives. 	p. 333.
In the midst of the multitude two men were bearing a corpse. It was that of the guard, already cold. A poniard-thrust had pierced him to the heart. 	p. 337.
A boy of eight years, with a notice pinned to the back of his jacket which read as follows: "Toliné, to be conducted to Echuca, care of Jeff Smith, Railway Porter. Prepaid." 	p. 340.
Paganel and the others had now gathered round, and Toliné had to answer many a question. He came out of his examination very creditably. 	p. 341.
In the streets, in connection with the strange sign-boards and announcements, the novel erections and purposes to which some of them were adapted, Paganel had a history and commentary for every one. 	p. 344.
Here was the mineralogical museum, in which might be seen specimens illustrative of all the various ways in which the gold has been found. 	p. 345.
Anon you might see him as in the illustration, when he had picked up a pebble and was sure that it was in itself so interesting as a mineralogical specimen that he must treasure it up for the Bank of France. 	p. 348.
They were like so many columns exactly mated, and could be counted by hundreds. 	p. 352.
At evening they encamped at the foot of some trees that bore the marks of a recent fire. They formed tall chimneys, as it were, for the flames had hollowed them out internally throughout their entire length. 	p. 353.
Of these miserable beings there were about thirty, men, women, and children, dressed in ragged kangaroo-skins. 	p. 360.
A sham fight, which lasted about ten minutes, the women urging on the combatants and pretending to mutilate those who fell in the fray. 	p. 361.
Paganel did not lie down, but, rifle on shoulder, guarded the encampment, walking to and fro that he might the better resist sleep. 	p. 364.
Here, for the first time, they saw the menure, or lyre-bird, whose tail has the form of the graceful instrument of Orpheus. 	p. 368.
It was a charming house of wood and brick, surrounded by clusters of plants, and had the elegant form of a Swiss cottage. 	p. 372.
Of all the sports of the day the most interesting was unquestionably a kangaroo hunt. 	p. 376.
Not hailstones, but pieces of ice as large as one's hand, were precipitated from the angry clouds. 	p. 380.
Early in the afternoon they passed through a curious forest of ferns. These arborescent plants, in full bloom, measured thirty feet in height. 	p. 384.
Flashes of lightning, the dazzling forerunners of a coming storm, every now and then illumined the horizon. 	p. 385.
He crouched down, and, after a long and attentive observation, distinctly perceived several men. 	p. 388.
But the heavy vehicle did not stir. The clay, now dry, held it as if it had been cemented. 	p. 393.
"If it please your lordship, I will go." 	p. 397.
A report was heard; and Glenarvan fell, struck by a bullet. 	p. 401.
A pair of cassowaries proved that the presence of man did not disturb these peaceful solitudes. 	p. 408.
"Adieu, my lord," said he, in a calm voice, and soon disappeared by a path along the edge of the wood. 	p. 413.
In the midst of these terrific gusts, Glenarvan, the major, and the captain bore the body of Mulready. The animal reared. Mulready seized his revolver and fired. 	p. 420.
The animal reared, Mulready seized his revolver and fired. 	p. 424.
However, the raft was entangled in the midst of the river, half a mile below where they started. 	p. 429.
The two ladies exerted themselves heroically, but their strength was failing every hour. They dragged themselves along, they no longer walked. 	p. 433.
It was a brig of two hundred and fifty tons, called the Macquarie, which traded between the different ports of Australia and New Zealand. 	p. 437.
The landlord of Victoria Hotel furnished them with two horses, and they set out. 	p. 441.
But on the next day seven canoes of the islanders attacked it most violently and suddenly, causing it to capsize. 	p. 445.
It was on the sixth of October, 1769, that this navigator (Captain Cook) first landed on the shores. 	p. 447.
Safe themselves, the French marksmen picked off the chief. 	p. 450.
Day and night, heedless of the torrents of rain and the dashing spray of the sea, he remained on deck. 	p. 452.
The sailor who was steering, and had been forcibly pushed aside, did not at all understand this sudden attack. 	p. 456.
The mainmast went by the board with all its rigging, the brig heaved twice and was motionless, leaning over to starboard. 	p. 460.
As the Macquarie lay over on her starboard beams, her opposite side was raised, and the defective seams were out of water. 	p. 461.
They therefore anchored, half a cable's length distant, in ten fathoms of water. 	p. 468.
The work was accordingly begun, and considerably advanced when night interrupted them. 	p. 472.
Not long since, in the year 1864, one of these clergymen was seized by the chiefs and hung from the tree. 	p. 473.
The yawl was drawn alongside. 	p. 477.
Night approached. Already the sun's disk was disappearing beneath the horizon. 	p. 480.
The ladies were carried in their companions' arms, and reached the shore without wetting a single fold of their garments. 	p. 481.
While the fire served to dry their garments conversation beguiled the hours, as they lay or stood at ease. 	p. 484.
Louper, with difficulty, managed to support himself on one of them. 	p. 485.
These seals, with rounded heads, upturned look, expressive eyes, presented an appearance, almost a physiognomy, that was mild and wellnigh tender. 	p. 488.
The New Zealand "kiwi," known to naturalists as the apteryx. 	p. 489.
A boat might have been seen ascending the Waikato. It was a canoe seventy feet long and five broad. 	p. 496.
At this point the river flowed between warm springs, and not a yard of firm earth could be seen. 	p. 501.
At noon the whole fleet of boats entered Lake Taupo. 	p. 504.
On their arrival, the captives were terribly impressed at sight of the heads that ornamented the stakes of the second inclosure. 	p. 505.
Robert was scarcely within the hut before he climbed on Wilson's shoulders, and succeeded in thrusting his head through an opening. 	p. 508.
At last his voice rose above the tumult. "Taboo! taboo!" cried he. 	p. 513.
A terrible scene of cannibalism, which followed in all its horrible details. 	p. 519.
The corpses, folded together, in a sitting posture, and tied in their clothes by a girdle of withes, were placed on this primitive bier. 	p. 521.
First her husband, and then she, slid down the rope to the point where the perpendicular wall met the summit of the slope. 	p. 529.
They saw, but were also seen. 	p. 533.
"Be seated, my dear lord; breakfast is awaiting you." 	p. 537.
The steward started back in terror. 	p. 545.
The fugitives made themselves levers out of the stakes of the tomb. 	p. 552.
An incandescent column poured forth towards the sky with loud explosions, while streams of boiling water and lava rolled towards the encampment of the natives. 	p. 553.
On every side water-spouts, with spiral rings of vapor, spirted from the ground like the jets of a fountain. 	p. 560.
A second ball whistled over their heads, and demolished the nearest of the three canoes. 	p. 564.
As soon as they set foot on deck the bagpiper struck up a well remembered air, while hearty hurrahs welcomed the owner's return on board. 	p. 568.
This sally finished the poor geographer. 	p. 569.
Ayrton soon made his appearance. He crossed the deck with a confident step, and ascended the poop-stairs. 	p. 576.
For an hour the two ladies were closeted with the quartermaster, but nothing resulted from this conference. 	p. 580.
He contented himself with shrugging his shoulders, which so increased the rage of the crew, that nothing less than the intervention of the captain and his lordship could restrain them. 	p. 581.
"Do you agree or not?" 	p. 584.
The unfortunate girl arose, and, leaning over the bulwark, would have thrown herself into the sea. 	p. 600.
A man was standing on the beach between two others. His form was tall and stout. 	p. 604.
Harry Grant set his table in the shade, and all took seats around it. 	p. 608.
The passengers could see the quartermaster, with folded arms, standing motionless as a statue, on a rock, and gazing at the vessel. 	p. 613.
Early in the afternoon the travelers reached Malcolm Castle, amidst the hurrahs of their tenantry and friends. 	p. 617.
Fifteen weeks after a marriage was celebrated with great pomp in the chapel of Malcolm Castle. 	p. 619.



IN SEARCH OF THE CASTAWAYS
or THE CHILDREN OF CAPTAIN GRANT
By Jules Verne



CONTENTS
	INTRODUCTION TO VOLUME FOUR
	IN SEARCH OF THE CASTAWAYS
	SOUTH AMERICA
CHAPTER I 	THE SHARK
CHAPTER II 	THE THREE DOCUMENTS
CHAPTER III 	THE CAPTAIN’S CHILDREN
CHAPTER IV 	LADY GLENARVAN’S PROPOSAL
CHAPTER V 	THE DEPARTURE OF THE “DUNCAN”
CHAPTER VI 	AN UNEXPECTED PASSENGER
CHAPTER VII 	JACQUES PAGANEL IS UNDECEIVED
CHAPTER VIII 	THE GEOGRAPHER’S RESOLUTION
CHAPTER IX 	THROUGH THE STRAITS OF MAGELLAN
CHAPTER X 	THE COURSE DECIDED
CHAPTER XI 	TRAVELING IN CHILI
CHAPTER XII 	ELEVEN THOUSAND FEET ALOFT
CHAPTER XIII 	A SUDDEN DESCENT
CHAPTER XIV 	PROVIDENTIALLY RESCUED
CHAPTER XV 	THALCAVE
CHAPTER XVI 	THE NEWS OF THE LOST CAPTAIN
CHAPTER XVII 	A SERIOUS NECESSITY
CHAPTER XVIII 	IN SEARCH OF WATER
CHAPTER XIX 	THE RED WOLVES
CHAPTER XX 	STRANGE SIGNS
CHAPTER XXI 	A FALSE TRAIL
CHAPTER XXII 	THE FLOOD
CHAPTER XXIII 	A SINGULAR ABODE
CHAPTER XXIV 	PAGANEL’S DISCLOSURE
CHAPTER XXV 	BETWEEN FIRE AND WATER
CHAPTER XXVI 	THE RETURN ON BOARD


	AUSTRALIA
CHAPTER I 	A NEW DESTINATION
CHAPTER II 	TRISTAN D’ACUNHA AND THE ISLE OF AMSTERDAM
CHAPTER III 	CAPE TOWN AND M. VIOT
CHAPTER IV 	A WAGER AND HOW DECIDED
CHAPTER V 	THE STORM ON THE INDIAN OCEAN
CHAPTER VI 	A HOSPITABLE COLONIST
CHAPTER VII 	THE QUARTERMASTER OF THE “BRITANNIA”
CHAPTER VIII 	PREPARATION FOR THE JOURNEY
CHAPTER IX 	A COUNTRY OF PARADOXES
CHAPTER X 	AN ACCIDENT
CHAPTER XI 	CRIME OR CALAMITY
CHAPTER XII 	TOLINE OF THE LACHLAN
CHAPTER XIII 	A WARNING
CHAPTER XIV 	WEALTH IN THE WILDERNESS
CHAPTER XV 	SUSPICIOUS OCCURRENCES
CHAPTER XVI 	A STARTLING DISCOVERY
CHAPTER XVII 	THE PLOT UNVEILED
CHAPTER XVIII 	FOUR DAYS OF ANGUISH
CHAPTER XIX 	HELPLESS AND HOPELESS


	NEW ZEALAND
CHAPTER I 	A ROUGH CAPTAIN
CHAPTER II 	NAVIGATORS AND THEIR DISCOVERIES
CHAPTER III 	THE MARTYR-ROLL OF NAVIGATORS
CHAPTER IV 	THE WRECK OF THE “MACQUARIE”
CHAPTER V 	CANNIBALS
CHAPTER VI 	A DREADED COUNTRY
CHAPTER VII 	THE MAORI WAR
CHAPTER VIII 	ON THE ROAD TO AUCKLAND
CHAPTER IX 	INTRODUCTION TO THE CANNIBALS
CHAPTER X 	A MOMENTOUS INTERVIEW
CHAPTER XI 	THE CHIEF’S FUNERAL
CHAPTER XII 	STRANGELY LIBERATED
CHAPTER XIII 	THE SACRED MOUNTAIN
CHAPTER XIV 	A BOLD STRATAGEM
CHAPTER XV 	FROM PERIL TO SAFETY
CHAPTER XVI 	WHY THE “DUNCAN” WENT TO NEW ZEALAND
CHAPTER XVII 	AYRTON’S OBSTINACY
CHAPTER XVIII 	A DISCOURAGING CONFESSION
CHAPTER XIX 	A CRY IN THE NIGHT
CHAPTER XX 	CAPTAIN GRANT’S STORY
CHAPTER XXI 	PAGANEL’S LAST ENTANGLEMENT



EIGHT HUNDRED LEAGUES ON THE AMAZON
By Jules Verne



CONTENTS
PART I. 	  THE GIANT RAFT
CHAPTER I 	  A CAPTAIN OF THE WOODS
CHAPTER II 	  ROBBER AND ROBBED
CHAPTER III 	  THE GARRAL FAMILY
CHAPTER IV 	  HESITATION
CHAPTER V 	  THE AMAZON
CHAPTER VI 	  A FOREST ON THE GROUND
CHAPTER VII 	  FOLLOWING A LIANA
CHAPTER VIII 	  THE JANGADA
CHAPTER IX 	  THE EVENING OF THE FIFTH OF JUNE
CHAPTER X 	  FROM IQUITOS TO PEVAS
CHAPTER XI 	  FROM PEVAS TO THE FRONTIER
CHAPTER XII 	  FRAGOSO AT WORK
CHAPTER XIII 	  TORRES
CHAPTER XIV 	  STILL DESCENDING
CHAPTER XV 	  THE CONTINUED DESCENT
CHAPTER XVI 	  EGA
CHAPTER XVII 	  AN ATTACK
CHAPTER XVIII 	  THE ARRIVAL DINNER
CHAPTER XIX 	  ANCIENT HISTORY
CHAPTER XX 	  BETWEEN THE TWO MEN
PART II. 	  THE CRYPTOGRAM
CHAPTER I 	  MANAOS
CHAPTER II 	  THE FIRST MOMENTS
CHAPTER III 	  RETROSPECTIVE
CHAPTER IV 	  MORAL PROOFS
CHAPTER V 	  MATERIAL PROOFS
CHAPTER VI 	  THE LAST BLOW
CHAPTER VII 	  RESOLUTIONS
CHAPTER VIII 	  THE FIRST SEARCH
CHAPTER IX 	  THE SECOND ATTEMPT
CHAPTER X 	  A CANNON SHOT
CHAPTER XI 	  THE CONTENTS OF THE CASE
CHAPTER XII 	  THE DOCUMENT
CHAPTER XIII 	  IS IT A MATTER OF FIGURES?
CHAPTER XIV 	  CHANCE!
CHAPTER XV 	  THE LAST EFFORTS
CHAPTER XVI 	  PREPARATIONS
CHAPTER XVII 	  THE LAST NIGHT
CHAPTER XVIII 	    FRAGOSO
CHAPTER XIX 	  THE CRIME OF TIJUCO
CHAPTER XX 	  THE LOWER AMAZON



FIVE WEEKS IN A BALLOON
Journeys And Discoveries In Africa By Three Englishmen.
By Jules Verne,


CONTENTS
	PUBLISHERS’ NOTE.
	DETAILED CONTENTS.
	FIVE WEEKS IN A BALLOON.
CHAPTER FIRST. 	The End of a much-applauded Speech.-The Presentation of Dr. Samuel Ferguson.-Excelsior.-Full-length Portrait of the Doctor.-A Fatalist convinced.-A Dinner at the Travellers' Club.-Several Toasts for the Occasion
CHAPTER SECOND. 	The Article in the Daily Telegraph.-War between the Scientific Journals.-Mr. Petermann backs his Friend Dr. Ferguson.-Reply of the Savant Koner.-Bets made.-Sundry Propositions offered to the Doctor
CHAPTER THIRD. 	The Doctor's Friend.-The Origin of their Friendship.-Dick Kennedy at London.-An unexpected but not very consoling Proposal.-A Proverb by no means cheering.-A few Names from the African Martyrology.-The Advantages of a Balloon.-Dr. Ferguson's Secret
CHAPTER FOURTH. 	African Explorations.-Barth, Richardson, Overweg, Werne, Brun-Rollet, Penney, Andrea, Debono, Miani, Guillaume Lejean, Brace, Krapf and Rebmann, Maizan, Roscher, Burton and Speke
CHAPTER FIFTH. 	Kennedy's Dreams.-Articles and Pronouns in the Plural.-Dick's Insinuations.-A Promenade over the Map of Africa.-What is contained between two Points of the Compass.-Expeditions now on foot.-Speke and Grant.-Krapf, De Decken, and De Heuglin
CHAPTER SIXTH. 	A Servant-match him!-He can see the Satellites of Jupiter.-Dick and Joe hard at it.-Doubt and Faith.-The Weighing Ceremony.-Joe and Wellington.-He gets a Half-crown
CHAPTER SEVENTH. 	Geometrical Details.-Calculation of the Capacity of the Balloon.-The Double Receptacle.-The Covering.-The Car.-The Mysterious Apparatus.-The Provisions and Stores.-The Final Summing up
CHAPTER EIGHTH. 	Joe's Importance.-The Commander of the Resolute.-Kennedy's Arsenal.-Mutual Amenities.-The Farewell Dinner.-Departure on the 21st of February.-The Doctor's Scientific Sessions.-Duveyrier.-Livingstone.-Details of the Aerial Voyage.-Kennedy silenced
CHAPTER NINTH. 	They double the Cape.-The Forecastle.-A Course of Cosmography by Professor Joe.-Concerning the Method of guiding Balloons.-How to seek out Atmospheric Currents.-Eureka
CHAPTER TENTH. 	Former Experiments.-The Doctor's Five Receptacles.-The Gas Cylinder.-The Calorifere.-The System of Manoeuvring.-Success certain
CHAPTER ELEVENTH. 	The Arrival at Zanzibar.-The English Consul.-Ill-will of the Inhabitants.-The Island of Koumbeni.-The Rain-Makers.-Inflation of the Balloon.-Departure on the 18th of April.-The last Good-by.-The Victoria
CHAPTER TWELFTH 	Crossing the Strait.-The Mrima.-Dick's Remark and Joe's Proposition.-A Recipe for Coffee-making.-The Uzaramo.-The Unfortunate Maizan.-Mount Duthumi.-The Doctor's Cards.-Night under a Nopal
CHAPTER THIRTEENTH. 	Change of Weather.-Kennedy has the Fever.-The Doctor's Medicine.-Travels on Land.-The Basin of Imenge.-Mount Rubeho.-Six Thousand Feet Elevation.-A Halt in the Daytime
CHAPTER FOURTEENTH. 	The Forest of Gum-Trees.-The Blue Antelope.-The Rallying-Signal.-An Unexpected Attack.-The Kanyeme.-A Night in the Open Air.-The Mabunguru.-Jihoue-la-Mkoa.-A Supply of Water.-Arrival at Kazeh
CHAPTER FIFTEENTH. 	Kazeh.-The Noisy Market-place.-The Appearance of the Balloon.-The Wangaga.-The Sons of the Moon.-The Doctor's Walk.-The Population of the Place.-The Royal Tembe.-The Sultan's Wives.-A Royal Drunken-Bout.-Joe an Object of Worship.-How they Dance in the Moon.-A Reaction.-Two Moons in one Sky.-The Instability of Divine Honors
CHAPTER SIXTEENTH. 	Symptoms of a Storm.-The Country of the Moon.-The Future of the African Continent.-The Last Machine of all.-A View of the Country at Sunset.-Flora and Fauna.-The Tempest.-The Zone of Fire.-The Starry Heavens.
CHAPTER SEVENTEENTH. 	The Mountains of the Moon.-An Ocean of Venture.-They cast Anchor.-The Towing Elephant.-A Running Fire.-Death of the Monster.-The Field Oven.-A Meal on the Grass.-A Night on the Ground
CHAPTER EIGHTEENTH. 	The Karagwah.-Lake Ukereoue.-A Night on an Island.-The Equator.-Crossing the Lake.-The Cascades.-A View of the Country.-The Sources of the Nile.-The Island of Benga.-The Signature of Andrea Debono.-The Flag with the Arms of England
CHAPTER NINETEENTH. 	The Nile.-The Trembling Mountain.-A Remembrance of the Country.-The Narratives of the Arabs.-The Nyam-Nyams.-Joe's Shrewd Cogitations.-The Balloon runs the Gantlet.-Aerostatic Ascensions.-Madame Blanchard.
CHAPTER TWENTIETH. 	The Celestial Bottle.-The Fig-Palms.-The Mammoth Trees.-The Tree of War.-The Winged Team.-Two Native Tribes in Battle.-A Massacre.-An Intervention from above
CHAPTER TWENTY-FIRST. 	Strange Sounds.-A Night Attack.-Kennedy and Joe in the Tree.-Two Shots.-"Help! help!"-Reply in French.-The Morning.-The Missionary.-The Plan of Rescue
CHAPTER TWENTY-SECOND. 	The Jet of Light.-The Missionary.-The Rescue in a Ray of Electricity.-A Lazarist Priest.-But little Hope.-The Doctor's Care.-A Life of Self-Denial.-Passing a Volcano
CHAPTER TWENTY-THIRD. 	Joe in a Fit of Rage.-The Death of a Good Man.-The Night of watching by the Body.-Barrenness and Drought.-The Burial.-The Quartz Rocks.-Joe's Hallucinations.-A Precious Ballast.-A Survey of the Gold-bearing Mountains.-The Beginning of Joe's Despair
CHAPTER TWENTY-FOURTH. 	The Wind dies away.-The Vicinity of the Desert.-The Mistake in the Water Supply.-The Nights of the Equator.-Dr. Ferguson's Anxieties.-The Situation flatly stated.-Energetic Replies of Kennedy and Joe.-One Night more
CHAPTER TWENTY-FIFTH. 	A Little Philosophy.-A Cloud on the Horizon.-In the Midst of a Fog.-The Strange Balloon.-An Exact View of the Victoria.-The Palm-Trees.-Traces of a Caravan.-The Well in the Midst of the Desert
CHAPTER TWENTY-SIXTH. 	One Hundred and Thirteen Degrees.-The Doctor's Reflections.-A Desperate Search.-The Cylinder goes out.-One Hundred and Twenty-two Degrees.-Contemplation of the Desert.-A Night Walk.-Solitude.-Debility.-Joe's Prospects.-He gives himself One Day more
CHAPTER TWENTY-SEVENTH. 	Terrific Heat.-Hallucinations.-The Last Drops of Water.-Nights of Despair.-An Attempt at Suicide.-The Simoom.-The Oasis.-The Lion and Lioness.
CHAPTER TWENTY-EIGHTH. 	An Evening of Delight.-Joe's Culinary Performances.-A Dissertation on Raw Meat.-The Narrative of James Bruce.-Camping out.-Joe's Dreams.-The Barometer begins to fall.-The Barometer rises again.-Preparations for Departure.-The Tempest
CHAPTER TWENTY-NINTH. 	Signs of Vegetation.-The Fantastic Notion of a French Author.-A Magnificent Country.-The Kingdom of Adamova.-The Explorations of Speke and Burton connected with those of Dr. Barth.-The Atlantika Mountains.-The River Benoue.-The City of Yola.-The Bagele.-Mount Mendif
CHAPTER THIRTIETH. 	Mosfeia.-The Sheik.-Denham, Clapperton, and Oudney.-Vogel.-The Capital of Loggoum.-Toole.-Becalmed above Kernak.-The Governor and his Court.-The Attack.-The Incendiary Pigeons
CHAPTER THIRTY-FIRST. 	Departure in the Night-time.-All Three.-Kennedy's Instincts.-Precautions.-The Course of the Shari River.-Lake Tchad.-The Water of the Lake.-The Hippopotamus.-One Bullet thrown away
CHAPTER THIRTY-SECOND. 	Departure in the Night-time.-All Three.-Kennedy's Instincts.-Precautions.-The Course of the Shari River.-Lake Tchad.-The Water of the Lake.-The Hippopotamus.-One Bullet thrown away
CHAPTER THIRTY-THIRD. 	Conjectures.-Reestablishment of the Victoria's Equilibrium.-Dr. Ferguson's New Calculations.-Kennedy's Hunt.-A Complete Exploration of Lake Tchad.-Tangalia.-The Return.-Lari
CHAPTER THIRTY-FOURTH. 	The Hurricane.-A Forced Departure.-Loss of an Anchor.-Melancholy Reflections.-The Resolution adopted.-The Sand-Storm.-The Buried Caravan.-A Contrary yet Favorable Wind.-The Return southward.-Kennedy at his Post
CHAPTER THIRTY-FIFTH. 	What happened to Joe.-The Island of the Biddiomahs.-The Adoration shown him.-The Island that sank.-The Shores of the Lake.-The Tree of the Serpents.-The Foot-Tramp.-Terrible Suffering.-Mosquitoes and Ants.-Hunger.-The Victoria seen.-She disappears.-The Swamp.-One Last Despairing Cry
CHAPTER THIRTY-SIXTH. 	A Throng of People on the Horizon.-A Troop of Arabs.-The Pursuit.-It is He.-Fall from Horseback.-The Strangled Arab.-A Ball from Kennedy.-Adroit Manoeuvres.-Caught up flying.-Joe saved at last
CHAPTER THIRTY-SEVENTH. 	The Western Route.-Joe wakes up.-His Obstinacy.-End of Joe's Narrative.-Tagelei.-Kennedy's Anxieties.-The Route to the North.-A Night near Aghades
CHAPTER THIRTY-EIGHTH. 	A Rapid Passage.-Prudent Resolves.-Caravans in Sight.-Incessant Rains.-Goa.-The Niger.-Golberry, Geoffroy, and Gray.-Mungo Park.-Laing.-Rene Caillie.-Clapperton.-John and Richard Lander
CHAPTER THIRTY-NINTH. 	The Country in the Elbow of the Niger.-A Fantastic View of the Hombori Mountains.-Kabra.-Timbuctoo.-The Chart of Dr. Barth.-A Decaying City.-Whither Heaven wills
CHAPTER FORTIETH. 	Dr. Ferguson's Anxieties.-Persistent Movement southward.-A Cloud of Grasshoppers.-A View of Jenne.-A View of Sego.-Change of the Wind.-Joe's Regrets
CHAPTER FORTY-FIRST. 	The Approaches to Senegal.-The Balloon sinks lower and lower.-They keep throwing out, throwing out.-The Marabout Al-Hadji.-Messrs. Pascal, Vincent, and Lambert.-A Rival of Mohammed.-The Difficult Mountains.-Kennedy's Weapons.-One of Joe's Manoeuvres.-A Halt over a Forest
CHAPTER FORTY-SECOND. 	A Struggle of Generosity.-The Last Sacrifice.-The Dilating Apparatus.-Joe's Adroitness.-Midnight.-The Doctor's Watch.-Kennedy's Watch.-The Latter falls asleep at his Post.-The Fire.-The Howlings of the Natives.-Out of Range
CHAPTER FORTY-THIRD. 	The Talabas.-The Pursuit.-A Devastated Country.-The Wind begins to fall.-The Victoria sinks.-The last of the Provisions.-The Leaps of the Balloon.-A Defence with Fire-arms.-The Wind freshens.-The Senegal River.-The Cataracts of Gouina.-The Hot Air.-The Passage of the River
CHAPTER FORTY-FOURTH. 	Conclusion.-The Certificate.-The French Settlements.-The Post of Medina.-The Battle.-Saint Louis.-The English Frigate.-The Return to London.



ROBUR THE CONQUEROR
By Jules Verne



CONTENTS
I   	Mysterious sounds
II   	Agreement Impossible
III   	A Visitor is Announced
IV   	In Which a New Character Appears
V   	Another Disappearance
VI   	The President and Secretary Suspend Hostilities
VII   	On board the Albatross
VIII   	The Balloonists Refuse to be Convinced
IX   	Across the Prairie
X   	Westward—but Whither?
XI   	The Wide Pacific
XII   	Through the Himalayas
XIII   	Over the Caspian
XIV   	The Aeronef at Full Speed
XV   	A Skirmish in Dahomey
XVI   	Over the Atlantic
XVII   	The Shipwrecked Crew
XVIII   	Over the Volcano
XIX   	Anchored at Last
XX   	The Wreck of the Albatross
XXI   	The Institute Again
XXII   	The Go-Ahead is Launched
XXIII   	The Grand Collapse



THE MASTER OF THE WORLD
Jules Verne



CONTENTS
1   	What Happened in the Mountains
2   	I Reach Morganton
3   	The Great Eyrie
4   	A Meeting of the Automobile Club
5   	Along the Shores of New England
6   	The First Letter
7   	A Third Machine
8   	At Any Cost
9   	The Second Letter
10   	Outside the Law
11   	The Campaign
12   	Black Rock Creek
13   	On Board the Terror
14   	Niagara
15   	The Eagle's Nest
16   	Robur, the Conqueror
17   	In the Name of the Law
18   	The Old Housekeeper's Last Comment



THE FUR COUNTRY
or, Seventy Degrees North Latitude
Translated from the French of Jules Verne
By N. D'Anvers
With One Hundred Illustrations
1874
CONTENTS PART I

I


A Soiree at Fort Reliance

II


The Hudson's Bay Fur Company

III


A Savant Thawed

IV


A Factory

V


From Fort Reliance to Fort enterprise

VI


A Wapiti Duel

VII


The Arctic Circle

VIII


The Great Bear Lake

IX


A Storm on the Lake

X


A Retrospect

XI


Along the Coast

XII


The Midnight Sun

XIII


Fort Hope

XIV


Some Excursions

XV


Fifteen Miles from Cape Bathurst

XVI


Two Shots

XVII


The Approach of Winter

XVIII


The Polar Night

XIX


A Neighbourly Visit

XX


Mercury Freezes

XXI


The Large Polar Bears

XXII


Five Months More

XXIII


The Eclipse of the 18th June 1860
PART II
CONTENTS.

I


A Floating Fort

II


Where Are We?

III


A Tour Of The Island

IV


A Night Encampment

V


From July 25th To August 20th

VI


Ten Days Of Tempest

VII


A Fire And A Cry

VIII


Mrs. Paulina Barnett's Excursion

IX


Kalumah's Adventures

X


The Kamtchatka Current

XI


A Communication From Lieutenant Hobson

XII


A Chance To Be Tried

XIII


Across The Ice-Field

XIV


The Winter Months

XV


A Last Exploring Expedition

XVI


The Break-Up Of The Ice

XVII


The Avalanche

XVIII


All At Work

XIX


Behring Sea

XX


In The Offing

XXI


The Island Becomes An Isle

XXII


The Four Following Days

XXIII


On A Piece Of Ice

XXIV


Conclusion



THE BLOCKADE RUNNERS
By Jules Verne
CONTENTS
I 	THE DOLPHIN
II 	GETTING UNDER SAIL
III 	THINGS ARE NOT WHAT THEY SEEM
IV 	CROCKSTON'S TRICK
V 	THE SHOT FROM THE IROQUOIS, AND MISS JENNY'S ARGUMENTS
VI 	SULLIVAN ISLAND CHANNEL
VII 	A SOUTHERN GENERAL
VIII 	THE ESCAPE
IX 	BETWEEN TWO FIRES
X 	ST. MUNGO



THE THE MYSTERIOUS ISLAND ISLAND
Jules Verne's Last Story
By Jules Verne



CONTENTS
PART I

SHIPWRECKED IN THE AIR

I


The Hurricane of 1865-Cries in the Air-A Balloon Caught By a Waterspout-Only the Sea in Sight-Five Passengers-What Took Place in the Basket-Land Ahead!-The End.

II


An Episode of the Rebellion-The Engineer Cyrus Smith-Gideon Spilett-The Negro Neb-The Sailor Pencroft-The Youth, Herbert-An Unexpected Proposal-Rendezvous at 10 O'clock P.M.-Departure in the Storm.

III


Five O'clock in the Afternoon-The Lost One-The Despair of Neb-Search to the Northward-The Island-A Night of Anguish-The Fog of the Morning-Neb Swimming-Sight of the Land-Fording the Channel.

IV


The Lithodomes-The Mouth of the River-The "Chimneys"-Continuation of the Search-The Forest of Evergreens-Getting Firewood-Waiting for the Tide-On Top of the Cliff-The Timber-Float-The Return to the Coast.

V


Arranging the Chimneys-The Important Question of Fire-The Match Box-Search Over the Shore-Return of the Reporter and Neb-One Match-The Crackling Fire-The Fish Supper-The First Night on Land.

VI


The Castaways' Inventory-No Effects-The Charred Linen-An Expedition Into the Forest-The Flora of the Woods-The Flight of the Jacamar-Tracks of Wild Beasts-The Couroucous-The Heath-Cock-Line-Fishing Extraordinary.

VII


Neb Has Not Yet Returned-The Reflections of the Reporter-The Supper-Prospect of a Bad Night-The Storm Is Frightful-They Go Out Into the Night-Struggle with the Rain and Wind.

VIII


Is Cyrus Smith Alive?-Neb's Story-Footprints-An Insoluble Question-The First Words of Smith-Comparing the Footprints-Return to the Chimneys-Pencroff Dejected.

IX


Cyrus Is Here-Pencroff's Attempts-Rubbing Wood-Island or Continent-The Plans of the Engineer-Whereabouts in the Pacific-In the Depths of the Forest-The Pistachio Pine-A Pig Chase-A Smoke of Good Omen.

X


The Engineer's Invention-Island Or Continent?-Departure for the Mountain-The Forest-Volcanic Soil-The Tragopans-The Moufflons-The First Plateau-Encamping for the Night-The Summit of the Cone

XI


At the Summit of the Cone-The Interior of the Crater-Sea Everywhere-No Land in Sight-A Bird's Eve View of the Coast-Hydrography and Orography-Is the Island Inhabited?-A Geographical Baptism-Lincoln Island.

XII


Regulation of Watches-Pencroff Is Satisfied-A Suspicious Smoke-The Course of Red Creek-The Flora of the Island-Its Fauna-Mountain Pheasants-A Kangaroo Chase-The Agouti-Lake Grant-Return to the Chimneys.

XIII


Top's Contribution-Making Bows and Arrows-A Brick-Kiln-A Pottery-Different Cooking Utensils-The First Boiled Meat-Mugwort-The Southern Cross-An Important Astronomical Observation.

XIV


The Measure Of the Granite Wall-An Application of the Theorem of Similar Triangles-The Latitude of the Island-An Excursion to the North-An Oyster-Bed-Plans for the Future-The Sun's Passage of the Meridian-The Co-ordinates of Lincoln Island.

XV


Winter Sets In-The Metallurgic Question-The Exploration of Safety Island-A Seal Hunt-Capture of an Echidna-The Ai-The Catalonian Method-Making Iron and Steel.

XVI


The Question of a Dwelling Discussed Again-Pencroff's Ideas-An Exploration to the North of the Lake-The Western Boundary of the Plateau-The Serpents-The Outlet of the Lake-Top's Alarm-Top Swimming-A Fight Under Water-The Dugong.

XVII


A Visit to the Lake-The Direction of the Current-The Prospects of Cyrus Smith-The Dugong Fat-The Use of the Schistous Limestone-The Sulphate of Iron-How Glycerine Is Made-Soap-Saltpetre-Sulphuric Acid-Nitric Acid-The New Outlet.

XVIII


Pencroff Doubts No More-The Old Outlet of the Lake-A Subterranean Descent-The Way Through the Granite-Top Has Disappeared-The Central Cavern-The Lower Well-Mystery-The Blows with the Pick-The Return.

XIX


Smith's Plan-The Front of Granite House-The Rope Ladder-Pencroff's Ideas-The Aromatic Herbs-A Natural Warren-Getting Water-The View From the Windows of Granite House.

XX


The Rainy Season-What to Wear-A Seal-Hunt-Candle-Making--Work in the Granite House-The Two Causeways-Return From a Visit to the Oyster-Bed-What Herbert Found in His Pocket.

XXI


Several Degrees Below Zero-Exploration of the Swamp Region to the Southeast-The View of the Sea-A Conversation Concerning the Future of the Pacific Ocean-The Incessant Labor of the Infusoria-What Will Become of This Globe-The Chase-The Swamp of the Tadorns.

XXII.


The Traps-The Foxes-The Peccaries-The Wind Veers to the Northwest-The Snow-Storm-The Basket-Makers-The Coldest Snap of Winter-Crystallization of the Sugar-Maple-The Mysterious Shafts-The Projected Exploration-The Pellet of Lead.
PART II

THE ABANDONED

XXIII


Concerning the Leaden Pellet-Making a Canoe-Hunting-In the Top of a Kauri-Nothing to Indicate the Presence of Man-The Turtle on its Back-The Turtle Disappears-Smith's Explanation.

XXIV


Trial of the Canoe-A Wreck on the Shore-The Tow-Jetsam Point-Inventory of the Box-What Pencroff Wanted-A Bible-A Verse from the Bible.

XXV


The Departure-The Rising Tide-Elms and Other Trees-Different Plants-The Kingfisher-Appearance of the Forest-The Gigantic Eucalypti-Why They Are Called Fever-Trees-Monkeys-The Waterfall-Encampment for the Night.

XXVI


Going Toward the Coast-Troops of Monkeys-A New Water-Course-Why the Tide Was Not Felt-A Forest on the Shore-Reptile Promontory-Spilett Makes Herbert Envious-The Bamboo Fusilade.

XXVII


Proposal to Return By the South Coast-Its Configuration-Search for the Shipwrecked-A Waif in the Air-Discovery of a Small Natural Harbor-Midnight on the Mercy-A Drifting Canoe.

XXVIII


Pencroff's Halloos-A Night in the Chimneys-Herbert's Arrow-Smith's Plan-An Unexpected Solution-What Had Happened in Granite House-How the Colonists Obtained a New Domestic.

XXIX


Projects to Be Carried Out-A Bridge Over the Mercy-To Make An Island of Prospect Plateau-The Draw-Bridge-The Corn Harvest-The Stream-The Causeway-The Poultry Yard-The Pigeon-House-The Two Wild Asses-Harnessed to the Wagon-Excursion to Balloon Harbor.

XXX


Clothing-Seal-Skin Boots-Making Pyroxyline-Planting-The Fish-Turtles' Eggs-Jup's Education-The Corral-Hunting Moufflons-Other Useful Animals and Vegetables-Home Thoughts.

XXXI


Bad Weather-The Hydraulic Elevator-Making Window Glass and Table Ware-The Bread Tree-Frequent Visits to the Corral-The Increase of the Herd-The Reporter's Question-The Exact Position of Lincoln Island-Pencroff's Proposal.

XXXII


Ship Building-The Second Harvest-Ai Hunting-A New Plant-A Whale-The Harpoon From the Vineyard-Cutting Up This Cetacea-Use of the Whalebone-The End of May-PencroffIs Content.

XXXIII


Winter-Fulling Cloth-The Mill-Pencroff's Fixed Purpose-The Whalebones-The Use of An Albatross-Top and Jup-Storms-Damage to the Poultry-Yard-An Excursion to the Marsh-Smith Alone-Exploration of the Pits.

XXXIV


Rigging the Launch-Attacked By Foxes-Jup Wounded-Jup Nursed-Jup Cured-Completion of the Launch-Pencroff's Triumph-The Good Luck-Trial Trip, to the South of the Island-An Unexpected Document.

XXXV


Departure Decided Upon-Preparations-The Three Passengers-The First Night-The Second Night-Tabor Island-Search on the Shore-Search in the Woods-No One-Animals-Plants-A House-Deserted.

XXXVI


The Inventory-The Night-Some Letters-The Search Continued-Plants and Animals-Herbert in Danger-Aboard-The Departure-Bad Weather-A Glimmer of Intelligence-Lost At Sea-A Timely Light.

XXXVII


The Return-Discussion-Smith and the Unknown-Balloon Harbor-The Devotion of the Engineer-A Touching Experience-Tears.

XXXVIII


A Mystery to Be Solved-The First Words of the Unknown-Twelve Years on the Island-Confessions-Disappearance-Smith's Confidence-Building a Wind-Mill-The First Bread-An Act of Devotion-Honest Hands.

XXXIX


Always Apart-A Bequest of the Unknown's-The Farm Established At the Corral-Twelve Years-The Boatswain's Mate of the Britannia-Left on Tabor Island-The Hand of Smith-The Mysterious Paper

XL


A Talk-Smith and Spilett-The Engineer's Idea-The Electric Telegraph-The Wires-The Batter-the Alphabet-Fine Weather-The Prosperity of the Colony-Photography-A Snow Effect-Two Years on Lincoln Island.

XLI


Thoughts of Home-Chances of Return-Plan to Explore the Coast-The Departure of the 16th of April-Serpentine Peninsula Seen From Sea-The Basaltic Cliffs of the Western Coast-Bad Weather-Night-A New Incident.

XLII


Night At Sea-Shark Gulf-Confidences-Preparations for Winter-Early Advent of Bad Weather-Cold-In-Door Work-Six Months Later-A Speck on the Photograph-An Unexpected Event.
PART III

THE SECRET OF THE ISLAND

XLIII


Lost Or Saved?-Ayrton Recalled-Important Discussion-It Is Not the Duncan-Suspicion And Precaution-Approach of the Ship-A Cannon Shot-The Brig Anchors in Sight of the Island-Night Fall.

XLIV


Discussions-Presentiments-Ayrton's Proposal-It Is Accepted-Ayrton and Pencroff on Safety Islet-Norfolk Convicts-Their Projects-Heroic Attempt of Ayrton-His Return-Six Against Fifty.

XLV


The Mist Rises-The Engineer's Disposition of Forces-Three Posts-Ayrton and Pencroft-The First Attack-Two Other Boat Loads-On the Islet-Six Convicts on Shore-The Brig Weighs Anchor-The Speedy's Projectiles-Desperate Situation-Unexpected Denouement.

XLVI


The Colonists on the Beach-Ayrton and Pencroff as Salvors-Talk At Breakfast-Pencroff's Reasoning-Exploration of the Brig's Hull in Detail-The Magazine Uninjured-New Riches-A Discovery-A Piece of a Broken Cylinder.

XLVII


The Engineer's Theory-Pencroff's Magnificent Suppositions-A Battery in the Air-Four Projectiles-The Surviving Convicts-Ayrton Hesitates-Smith's Generosity and Pencroff's Dissatisfaction.

XLVIII


The Projected Expedition-Ayrton At the Corral-Visit to Port Balloon-Pencroff's Remarks-Despatch Sent to the Corral-No Answer From Ayrton-Setting Out Next Day-Why the Wire Did Not Act-A Detonation.

XLIX


The Reporter and Pencroff in the Corral-Moving Herbert-Despair of the Sailor-Consultation of the Engineer and the Reporter-Mode of Treatment-A Glimmer of Hope-How to Warn Neb-A Faithful Messenger-Neb's Reply.

L


The Convicts in the Neighborhood of the Corral-Provisional Occupation-Continuation of Herbert's Treatment-Pencroff's Jubilation-Review of the Past-Future Prospects-Smith's Ideas.

LI


No News of Neb-A Proposal From Pencroff and Spilett-The Reporter's Sorties-A Fragment Of Cloth-A Message-Hurried Departure-Arrival At Prospect Plateau.

LII


Herbert Carried to Granite House-Neb Relates What Had Happened-Visit of Smith to the Plateau-Ruin and Devastation-The Colonists Helpless-Willow Bark-A Mortal Fever-Top Barks Again.

LIII


An Inexplicable Mystery-Herbert's Convalescence-The Unexplored Parts of the Island-Preparations for Departure-The First Day-Night-Second Day-The Kauris-Cassowaries-Footprints in the Sand-Arrival At Reptile End.

LIV


Exploration of Reptile End-Camp At the Mouth of Fall River-By the Corral-The Reconnaissance-The Return-Forward-An Open Door-A Light in the Window-By Moonlight.

LV


Ayrton's Recital-Plans of His Old Comrades-Taking Possession of the Corral-The Rules of the Island-The Good Luck-Researches About Mount Franklin-The Upper Valleys-Subterranean Rumblings-Pencroff's Answer-At the Bottom of the Crater-The Return

LVI


After Three Years-The Question of a New Ship-Its Determination-Prosperity of the Colony-The Shipyard-The Cold Weather-Pencroff Resigned-Washing-Mount Franklin.

LVII


The Awakening of the Volcano-The Fine Weather-Resumption of Work-The Evening of the 15th of October-A Telegraph-A Demand-An Answer-Departure for the Corral-The Notice-The Extra Wire-The Basalt Wall-At High Tide-At Low Tide-The Cavern-A Dazzling Light.

LVIII


Captain Nemo-His First Words-History of a Hero of Liberty-Hatred of the Invaders-His Companions-The Life Under Water-Alone-The Last Refuge of the Nautilus-The Mysterious Genius of the Island.

LIX


The Last Hours of Captain Nemo-His Dying Wishes-A Souvenir for His Friends-His Tomb-Some Counsel to the Colonists-The Supreme Moment-At the Bottom of the Sea.

LX


The Reflections of the Colonists-Renewal of Work-The 1st of January, 1869-A Smoke From the Volcano-Symptoms of An Eruption Ayrton and Smith At the Corral-Exploration of the Crypt Dakkar-What Captain Nemo Had Said to the Engineer.

LXI


Smith's Recital-Hastening the Work-A Last Visit to the Corral-The Combat Between the Fire and the Water-The Aspect of the Island-They Decide to Launch the Ship-The Night of the 8th of March.

LXII


An Isolated Rock in the Pacific-The Last Refuge of the Colonists-The Prospect of Death-Unexpected Succor-How and Why It Came-The Last Good Action-An Island on Terra Firma-The Tomb of Captain Nemo.



THE BOY CAPTAIN.
By JULES VERNE
1879



CONTENTS.
  	PART THE FIRST
I 	THE "PILGRIM"
II 	THE APPRENTICE
III 	A RESCUE
IV 	THE SURVIVORS OF THE "WALDECK"
V 	DINGO'S SAGACITY
VI 	A WHALE IN SIGHT
VII 	PREPARATIONS FOR AN ATTACK
VIII 	A CATASTROPHE
IX 	DICK'S PROMOTION
X 	THE NEW CREW
XI 	ROUGH WEATHER
XII 	HOPE REVIVED
XIII 	LAND AT LAST
XIV 	ASHORE
XV 	A STRANGER
XVI 	THROUGH THE FOREST
XVII 	MISGIVINGS
XVIII 	A TERRIBLE DISCOVERY
	PART THE SECOND
I 	THE DARK CONTINENT
II 	ACCOMPLICES
III 	ON THE MARCH AGAIN
IV 	ROUGH TRAVELLING
V 	WHITE ANTS
VI 	A DIVING-BELL
VII 	A SLAVE CARAVAN
VIII 	NOTES BY THE WAY
IX 	KAZONDÉ
X 	MARKET-DAY
XI 	A BOWL OF PUNCH
XII 	ROYAL OBSEQUIES
XIII 	IN CAPTIVITY
XIV 	A RAY OF HOPE
XV 	AN EXCITING CHASE
XVI 	A MAGICIAN
XVII 	DRIFTING DOWN THE STREAM
XVIII 	AN ANXIOUS VOYAGE
XIX 	AN ATTACK
XX 	A HAPPY REUNION.



THE FIELD OF ICE
By Jules Verne
1875



CONTENTS
CHAPTER I. 	THE DOCTOR'S INVENTORY 	 1
CHAPTER II. 	FIRST WORDS OF ALTAMONT 	 10
CHAPTER III. 	A SEVENTEEN DAYS' MARCH 	 22
CHAPTER IV. 	THE LAST CHARGE OF POWDER 	 32
CHAPTER V. 	THE SEAL AND THE BEAR 	 44
CHAPTER VI. 	THE "PORPOISE" 	 55
CHAPTER VII. 	AN IMPORTANT DISCUSSION 	 66
CHAPTER VIII. 	AN EXCURSION TO THE NORTH OF VICTORIA BAY 	 77
CHAPTER IX. 	COLD AND HEAT 	 88
CHAPTER X. 	WINTER PLEASURES 	 97
CHAPTER XI. 	TRACKS OF BEARS 	 107
CHAPTER XII. 	IMPRISIONED IN DOCTOR'S HOUSE 	 118
CHAPTER XIII. 	THE MINE 	 130
CHAPTER XIV. 	AN ARCTIC SPRING 	 143
CHAPTER XV. 	THE NORTH WEST PASSAGE 	 154
CHAPTER XVI. 	ARCTIC ARCADIA 	 163
CHAPTER XVII. 	ALTAMONT'S REVENGE 	 173
CHAPTER XVIII. 	FINAL PREPARATIONS 	 181
CHAPTER XIX. 	MARCH TO THE NORTH 	 187
CHAPTER XX. 	FOOTPRINTS IN THE SNOW 	 199
CHAPTER XXI. 	THE OPEN SEA 	 209
CHAPTER XXII. 	GETTING NEAR THE POLE 	 216
CHAPTER XXIII. 	THE ENGLISH FLAG 	 227
CHAPTER XXIV. 	MOUNT HATTERAS 	 240
CHAPTER XXV. 	RETURN SOUTH 	 253
CHAPTER XXVI. 	CONCLUSION 	 264



AN ANTARCTIC MYSTERY
By Jules  Verne
Translated By Mrs. Cashel Hoey
1899
ILLUSTRATIONS
The Tasman to the rescue 	frontispiece
The approach of the Halbrane 	11
Going aboard the Halbrane 	29
Cook's route was effectively barred by ice floes 	83
Taking in sail under difficulties 	103
"There, look there! That's a fin-back!" 	117
Hunt to the rescue 	127
Four sailors at the oars, and one at the helm 	139
Hunt extended his enormous hand, holding a metal collar 	161
Dirk Peters shows the way 	179
The half-breed in the crow's nest 	189
The Halbrane fast in the iceberg 	227
The Halbrane, staved in, broken up 	253
"I was afraid; I got away from him" 	267
William Guy 	299
An Antarctic Mystery 	321
The Paracuta 	329


CONTENTS
Chapter I. 	The Kerguelen Islands.
Chapter II. 	The Schooner Halbrane
Chapter III. 	Captain Len Guy
Chapter IV. 	From the Kerguelen Isles to Prince Edward Island
Chapter V. 	Edgar Poe's Romance
Chapter VI. 	An Ocean Waif
Chapter VII. 	Tristan D'Acunha
Chapter VIII. 	Bound for the Falklands
Chapter IX. 	Fitting out the Halbrane
Chapter X. 	The Outset of the Enterprise
Chapter XI. 	From the Sandwich Islands to the Polar Circle
Chapter XII. 	Between the Polar Circle and the Ice Wall
Chapter XIII. 	Along the Front of the Icebergs
Chapter XIV. 	A Voice in a Dream
Chapter XV. 	Bennet Islet
Chapter XVI. 	Tsalal Island
Chapter XVII. 	And Pym
Chapter XVIII. 	A Revelation
Chapter XIX. 	Land?
Chapter XX. 	"Unmerciful Disaster"
Chapter XXI. 	Amid the Mists
Chapter XXII. 	In Camp
Chapter XXIII. 	Found at Last
Chapter XXIV. 	Eleven Years in a Few Pages
Chapter XXV. 	"We Were the First"
Chapter XXVI. 	A Little Remnant



"TOPSY-TURVY"
By Jules Verne



CONTENTS

CHAPTER I.


IN WHICH THE NORTH POLAR PRACTICAL ASSOCIATION RUSHES A DOCUMENT ACROSS TWO WORLDS

CHAPTER II.


IN WHICH THE DELEGATES FROM ENGLAND, HOLLAND, SWEDEN, DENMARK AND RUSSIA ARE PRESENTED TO THE READER

CHAPTER III.


IN WHICH THE ARCTIC REGIONS ARE SOLD AT AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER

CHAPTER IV.


IN WHICH OLD ACQUAINTANCES APPEAR TO OUR NEW READERS, AND IN WHICH A WONDERFUL MAN IS DESCRIBED

CHAPTER V.


IN WHICH THE POSSIBILITY THAT COAL MINES SURROUND THE NORTH POLE IS CONSIDERED

CHAPTER VI.


IN WHICH A TELEPHONE COMMUNICATION BETWEEN MRS SCORBITT AND J. T. MASTON IS INTERRUPTED

CHAPTER VII.


IN WHICH PRESIDENT BARBICANE SAYS NO MORE THAN SUITS HIS PURPOSE

CHAPTER VIII.


YES, JUST LIKE JUPITER

CHAPTER IX.


IN WHICH APPEARS THE FRENCH GENTLEMAN TO WHOM WE REFERRED AT THE BEGINNING OF THIS TRUTHFUL STORY

CHAPTER X.


IN WHICH A LITTLE UNEASINESS BEGINS TO SHOW ITSELF

CHAPTER XI.


WHAT WAS FOUND IN THE NOTEBOOK OF J. T. MASTON AND WHAT IT NO LONGER CONTAINED

CHAPTER XII.


IN WHICH J. T. MASTON HEROICALLY CONTINUES TO BE SILENT

CHAPTER XIII.


AT THE CLOSE OF WHICH JT MASTON UTTERS AN EPIGRAM

CHAPTER XIV.


VERY SHORT, BUT IN WHICH "X" TAKES A GEOGRAPHICAL VALUE

CHAPTER XV.


WHICH CONTAINS A FEW INTERESTING DETAILS FOR THE INHABITANTS OF THE EARTHLY SPHERE

CHAPTER XVI.


IN WHICH A CROWD OF DISSATISFIED PEOPLE BREAK INTO THE CELL OF J. T. MASTON

CHAPTER XVII.


WHAT HAD BEEN DONE AT KILIMANJARO DURING EIGHT MONTH OF THIS MEMORABLE YEAR

CHAPTER XVIII.


IN WHICH THE POPULATION OF WAMASAI ASSEMBLE TO HEAR PRESIDENT BARBICANE SAY "FIRE" TO CAPT NICHOLL

CHAPTER XIX.


IN WHICH J. T. MASTON REGRETS THAT THE CROWD DID NOT LYNCH HIM WHEN HE WAS IN PRISON

CHAPTER XX.


IN WHICH THIS STORY, AS TRUTHFUL AS IT IS IMPROBABLE, IS FINISHED

CHAPTER XXI.


VERY SHORT, SINCE ENOUGH HAS BEEN SAID TO MAKE THE WORLD'S POPULATION FEEL PERFECTLY SURE AGAIN



FACING THE FLAG
By Jules  Verne
CONTENTS
CHAP
I 	Healthful House
II 	Count d'Artigas
III 	Kidnapped
IV 	The Schooner "Ebba"
V 	Where am I.--(Notes by Simon Hart, the Engineer.)
VI 	On Deck
VII 	Two Days at Sea
VIII 	Back Cup
IX 	Inside Back Cup
X 	Ker Karraje
XI 	Five Weeks in Back Cup
XII 	Engineer Serko's Advice
XIII 	God Be with It
XIV 	Battle Between the "Sword" and the Tug
XV 	Expectation
XVI 	Only a few more Hours
XVII 	One against Five
XVIII 	On Board the "Tonnant"



ALL AROUND THE MOON
By Jules Verne



CONTENTS
CONTENTS
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
PRELIMINARY CHAPTER
CHAPTER I. FROM 10 P.M. TO 10. 46' 40''
CHAPTER II. THE FIRST HALF HOUR
CHAPTER III. THEY MAKE THEMSELVES AT HOME AND FEEL QUITE COMFORTABLE
CHAPTER IV. FOR THE CORNELL GIRLS
CHAPTER V. THE COLDS OF SPACE
CHAPTER VI. INSTRUCTIVE CONVERSATION
CHAPTER VII. A HIGH OLD TIME
CHAPTER VIII. THE NEUTRAL POINT
CHAPTER IX. A LITTLE OFF THE TRACK
CHAPTER X. THE OBSERVERS OF THE MOON
CHAPTER XI. FACT AND FANCY
CHAPTER XII. A BIRD'S EYE VIEW OF THE LUNAR MOUNTAINS
CHAPTER XIII. LUNAR LANDSCAPES
CHAPTER XIV. A NIGHT OF FIFTEEN DAYS
CHAPTER XV. GLIMPSES AT THE INVISIBLE
CHAPTER XVI. THE SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE
CHAPTER XVII. TYCHO
CHAPTER XVIII. PUZZLING QUESTIONS
CHAPTER XIX. IN EVERY FIGHT, THE IMPOSSIBLE WINS
CHAPTER XX. OFF THE PACIFIC COAST
CHAPTER XXI. NEWS FOR MARSTON!
CHAPTER XXII. ON THE WINGS OF THE WIND
CHAPTER XXIII. THE CLUB MEN GO A FISHING
CHAPTER XXIV. FAREWELL TO THE BALTIMORE GUN CLUB
ILLUSTRATIONS
1. HIS FIRST CARE WAS TO TURN ON THE GAS
2. DIANA AND SATELLITE
3. HE HELPED ARDAN TO LIFT BARBICAN
4. MORE HUNGRY THAN EITHER
5. THEY DRANK TO THE SPEEDY UNION OF THE EARTH AND HER SATELLITE
6. DON'T I THOUGH? MY HEAD IS SPLITTING WITH IT!
7. POOR SATELLITE WAS DROPPED OUT
8. THE BODY OF THE DOG THROWN OUT YESTERDAY
9. A DEMONIACAL HULLABALOO
10. THE OXYGEN! HE CRIED
11. A GROUP à la Jardin Mabille
12. AN IMMENSE BATTLE-FIELD PILED WITH BLEACHING BONES
13. NEVERTHELESS THE SOLUTION ESCAPED HIM
14. IT'S COLD ENOUGH TO FREEZE A WHITE BEAR
15. THEY COULD UTTER NO WORD, THEY COULD BREATHE NO PRAYER
16. THEY SEEMED HALF ASLEEP IN HIS VITALIZING BEAMS
17. THESE ARCHES EVIDENTLY ONCE BORE THE PIPES OF AN AQUEDUCT
18. ARDAN GAZED AT THE PAIR FOR A FEW MINUTES
19. OLD MAC DISCOVERED TAKING OBSERVATIONS
20. FOR A SECOND ONLY DID THEY CATCH ITS FLASH
21. HOW IS THAT FOR HIGH?
22. EVERYWHERE THEIR DEPARTURE WAS ACCOMPANIED WITH THE MOST TOUCHING SYMPATHY



A JOURNEY TO THE CENTRE OF THE EARTH
By Jules Verne


CONTENTS
CHAPTER 1 	MY UNCLE MAKES A GREAT DISCOVERY
CHAPTER 2 	THE MYSTERIOUS PARCHMENT
CHAPTER 3 	AN ASTOUNDING DISCOVERY
CHAPTER 4 	WE START ON THE JOURNEY
CHAPTER 5 	FIRST LESSONS IN CLIMBING
CHAPTER 6 	OUR VOYAGE TO ICELAND
CHAPTER 7 	CONVERSATION AND DISCOVERY
CHAPTER 8 	THE EIDER-DOWN HUNTER—OFF AT LAST
CHAPTER 9 	OUR START—WE MEET WITH ADVENTURES BY THE WAY
CHAPTER 10 	TRAVELING IN ICELAND
CHAPTER 11 	WE REACH MOUNT SNEFFELS—THE "REYKIR"
CHAPTER 12 	THE ASCENT OF MOUNT SNEFFELS
CHAPTER 13 	THE SHADOW OF SCARTARIS
CHAPTER 14 	THE REAL JOURNEY COMMENCES
CHAPTER 15 	WE CONTINUE OUR DESCENT
CHAPTER 16 	THE EASTERN TUNNEL
CHAPTER 17 	DEEPER AND DEEPER—THE COAL MINE
CHAPTER 18 	THE WRONG ROAD!
CHAPTER 19 	THE WESTERN GALLERY—A NEW ROUTE
CHAPTER 20 	WATER, WHERE IS IT? A BITTER DISAPPOINTMENT
CHAPTER 21 	UNDER THE OCEAN
CHAPTER 22 	SUNDAY BELOW GROUND
CHAPTER 23 	ALONE
CHAPTER 24 	LOST!
CHAPTER 25 	THE WHISPERING GALLERY
CHAPTER 26 	A RAPID RECOVERY
CHAPTER 27 	THE CENTRAL SEA
CHAPTER 28 	LAUNCHING THE RAFT
CHAPTER 29 	ON THE WATERS—A RAFT VOYAGE
CHAPTER 30 	TERRIFIC SAURIAN COMBAT
CHAPTER 31 	THE SEA MONSTER
CHAPTER 32 	THE BATTLE OF THE ELEMENTS
CHAPTER 33 	OUR ROUTE REVERSED
CHAPTER 34 	A VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY
CHAPTER 35 	DISCOVERY UPON DISCOVERY
CHAPTER 36 	WHAT IS IT?
CHAPTER 37 	THE MYSTERIOUS DAGGER
CHAPTER 38 	NO OUTLET—BLASTING THE ROCK
CHAPTER 39 	THE EXPLOSION AND ITS RESULTS
CHAPTER 40 	THE APE GIGANS
CHAPTER 41 	HUNGER
CHAPTER 42 	THE VOLCANIC SHAFT
CHAPTER 43 	DAYLIGHT AT LAST
CHAPTER 44 	THE JOURNEY ENDED



GODFREY MORGAN
A CALIFORNIAN MYSTERY
Jules Verne
CONTENTS
CHAPTER I.
	In which the reader has the opportunity of buying an Island in the Pacific Ocean
CHAPTER II.
	How William W. Kolderup, of San Francisco, was at loggerheads with J. R. Taskinar, of Stockton
CHAPTER III.
	The conversation of Phina Hollaney and Godfrey Morgan, with a piano accompaniment
CHAPTER IV.
	In which T. Artelett, otherwise Tartlet, is duly introduced to the reader
CHAPTER V.
	In which they prepare to go, and at the end of which they go for good
CHAPTER VI.
	In which the reader makes the acquaintance of a new personage
[Pg iv]
CHAPTER VII.
	In which it will be seen that William W. Kolderup was probably right in insuring his ship
CHAPTER VIII.
	Which leads Godfrey to bitter reflections on the mania for travelling
CHAPTER IX.
	In which it is shown that Crusoes do not have everything as they wish
CHAPTER X.
	In which Godfrey does what any other shipwrecked man would have done under the circumstances
CHAPTER XI.
	In which the question of lodging is solved as well as it could be
CHAPTER XII.
	Which ends with a thunder-bolt
CHAPTER XIII.
	In which Godfrey again sees a slight smoke over another part of the Island
CHAPTER XIV.
	Wherein Godfrey finds some wreckage, to which he and his companion give a hearty welcome
[Pg v]
CHAPTER XV.
	In which there happens what happens at least once in the life of every Crusoe, real or imaginary
CHAPTER XVI.
	In which something happens which cannot fail to surprise the reader
CHAPTER XVII.
	In which Professor Tartlet's gun really does marvels
CHAPTER XVIII.
	Which treats of the moral and physical education of a simple native of the Pacific
CHAPTER XIX.
	In which the situation already gravely compromised becomes more and more complicated
CHAPTER XX.
	In which Tartlet reiterates in every key that he would rather be off
CHAPTER XXI.
	Which ends with quite a surprising reflection by the negro Carefinotu
CHAPTER XXII.
	Which concludes by explaining what up to now had appeared inexplicable


ILLUSTRATIONS
"Going! Going!"—Frontispiece
Nothing appeared through the mist.
"An Island!"
There was the column of smoke.
"A Canoe!"
Of lions and tigers quite a score.



CELEBRATED TRAVELS AND TRAVELLERS, PART 1
THE EXPLORATION OF THE WORLD
By Jules Verne
With 59 Illustrations By L. Benett And P. Philippoteaux, And 50 Fac-Similes Of Ancient Drawings.
LIST OF MAPS AND ILLUSTRATIONS
FIRST PART.
Map of the World as known to the Ancients.
Approach to Constantinople. Anselmi Banduri Imperium orientale, tome II., p. 448. 2 vols. folio. Parisiis, 1711.
Map of the World according to Marco Polo's ideas. Vol. I., p. 134 of the edition of Marco Polo published in London by Colonel Yule, 2 vols. 8vo.
Plan of Pekin in 1290. Yule's edition. Vol. I., p. 332.
Portrait of Jean de Béthencourt. "The discovery and conquest of the Canaries." Page 1, 12mo. Paris, 1630.
Plan of Jerusalem. "Narrative of the journey beyond seas to the Holy Sepulchre of Jerusalem," by Antoine Régnant, p. 229, 4to. Lyons, 1573.
Prince Henry the Navigator. From a miniature engraved in "The Discoveries of Prince Henry the Navigator," by H. Major. 8vo. London, 1877.
Christopher Columbus. Taken from "Vitæ illustrium virorum," by Paul Jove. Folio. Basileæ, Perna.
Imaginary view of Seville. Th. de Bry. Grands Voyages, pl. I., part IV.
Building of a caravel. Th. de Bry. Grands Voyages, Americæ, part IV., plate XIX.
Christopher Columbus on board his caravel. Th. de Bry. Grands Voyages, Americæ, part IV., plate VI.
Embarkation of Christopher Columbus. Th. de Bry. Grands Voyages, Americæ, part IV., plate VIII.
Map of the Antilles and the Gulf of Mexico. Th. de Bry. Grands Voyages, Americæ, part V.
Fishing for Pearl oysters. Th. de Bry. Grands Voyages, Americæ, part IV., plate XII.
Gold-mines in Cuba. Th. de Bry. Grands Voyages, Americæ, part V., plate I.
Vasco da Gama. From an engraving in the Cabinet des Estampes of the Bibl. Nat.
La Mina. "Histoire générale des Voyages," by the Abbé Prévost. Vol. III., p. 461, 4to. 20 vols. An X. 1746.
Map of the East Coast of Africa, from the Cape of Good Hope to the Cape del Gado. From the French map of the Eastern Ocean, published in 1740 by order of the Comte de Maurepas.
Map of Mozambique. Bibl. Nat. Estampes.
Interview with the Zamorin. "Hist. Gén. des Voyages," by Prévost. Vol. I., p. 39. 4to. An X. 20 vols. 1746.
View of Quiloa. From an engraving in the Cabinet des Estampes. Topography. (Africa).
Map of the Coasts of Persia, Guzerat, and Malabar. From the French Map of the Eastern Ocean, pub. in 1740 by order of the Comte de Maurepas.
The Island of Ormuz. "Hist. Gén. des Voyages." Prévost. Vol. II., p. 98.
SECOND PART.
Americus Vespucius. From an engraving in the Cabinet des Estampes of the Bibliothèque Nationale.
Indians devoured by dogs. Th. de Bry. Grands Voyages, Americæ, part IV., plate XXII.
Punishment of Indians. Page 17 of Las Casas' "Narratio regionum indicarum per Hispanos quosdam devastatarum," 4to. Francofurti, sumptibus Th. de Bry, 1698.
Portrait of F. Cortès. From an engraving after Velasquez in the Cabinet des Estampes of the Bibliothèque Nationale.
Plan of Mexico. From Clavigero and Bernal Diaz del Castillo. Jourdanet's translation, 2nd Edition.
Portrait of Pizarro. From an engraving in the Cabinet des Estampes of the Bib. Nat.
Map of Peru. From Garcilasso de la Vega. History of the Incas. 4to. Bernard, Amsterdam, 1738.
Atahualpa taken prisoner. Th. de Bry. Grands Voyages, Americæ, part VI., plate VII.
Assassination of Pizarro. Th. de Bry. Grands Voyages, Americæ, part VI., plate XV.
Magellan on board his caravel. Th. de Bry. Grands Voyages, Americæ, part IV., plate XV.
Map of the Coast of Brazil. From the map called Henry 2nd's. Bibl. Nat., Geographical collections.
The Ladrone Islands. Th. de Bry. Grands Voyages, Occidentalis Indiæ, pars VIII., p. 50.
Portrait of Sebastian Cabot. From a miniature engraved in "The remarkable Life, adventures, and discoveries of Sebastian Cabot," by Nicholls. 8vo. London, 1869.
Fragment of Cabot's map. Bibl. Nat., Geographical collections.
Map of Newfoundland and of the Mouth of the St. Lawrence. Lescarbot, "Histoire de la Nouvelle France." 12mo. Perier, Paris, 1617.
Portrait of Jacques Cartier. After Charlevoix. "History and general description of New France," translated by John Gilmary Shea, p. III. 6 vols. 4to. Shea, New York, 1866.
Barentz' ship fixed in the ice. Th. de Bry. Grands Voyages. Tertia pars Indiæ Orientales, plate XLIV.
Interior of Barentz' house. Th. de Bry. Grands Voyages. Tertia pars Indiæ Orientalis, plate XLVII.
Exterior view of Barentz' house. Th. de Bry. Grands Voyages. Tertia pars Indiæ Orientalis, plate XLVIII.
Map of Nova Zembla. Th. de Bry. Grands Voyages. Tertia pars Indiæ Orientalis, plate LIX.
A sea-lion hunt. Th. de Bry. Grands Voyages, Occidentalis Indiæ, pars VIII., p. 37.
A fight between the Dutch and the Spaniards. Th. de Bry. Grands Voyages, "Historiarum novi orbis;" part IX., book II., page 87.
Portrait of Raleigh. From an engraving in the Cabinet des Estampes of the Bibl. Nat.
Berreo seized by Raleigh. Th. de Bry. Grands Voyages. Occid. Indiæ, part VIII., p. 64.
Portrait of Chardin. "Voyages de M. le Chevalier Chardin en Perse." Vol. I. 10 vols. 12mo. Ferrand, Rouen, 1723.
Japanese Archer. From a Japanese print engraved by Yule, vol. II., p. 206.
Attack upon an Indian Town. "Voyages du Sieur de Champlain," p. 44. 12mo. Collet, Paris, 1727.
TABLE OF CONTENTS.
FIRST PART.
CHAPTER I.
CELEBRATED TRAVELLERS BEFORE THE CHRISTIAN ERA.

HANNO, 505; HERODOTUS, 484; PYTHEAS, 340; NEARCHUS, 326;
EUDOXUS, 146; CÆSAR, 100; STRABO, 50.

    Hanno, the Carthaginian—Herodotus visits Egypt, Lybia, Ethiopia, Phoenicia, Arabia, Babylon, Persia, India, Media, Colchis, the Caspian Sea, Scythia, Thrace, and Greece—Pytheas explores the coasts of Iberia and Gaul, the English Channel, the Isle of Albion, the Orkney Islands, and the land of Thule—Nearchus visits the Asiatic coast, from the Indus to the Persian Gulf—Eudoxus reconnoitres the West Coast of Africa—Cæsar conquers Gaul and Great Britain—Strabo travels over the interior of Asia, and Egypt, Greece, and Italy


CHAPTER II.
CELEBRATED TRAVELLERS FROM THE FIRST TO THE NINTH CENTURY.

PAUSANIAS, 174; FA-HIAN, 399; COSMOS INDICOPLEUSTES, 500;
ARCULPHE, 700; WILLIBALD, 725; SOLEYMAN, 851.

    Pliny, Hippalus, Arian, and Ptolemy—Pausanias visits Attica, Corinth, Laconia, Messenia, Elis, Achaia, Arcadia, Boeotia, and Phocis—Fa-Hian explores Kan-tcheou, Tartary, Northern India, the Punjaub, Ceylon, and Java—Cosmos Indicopleustes, and the Christian Topography of the Universe—Arculphe describes Jerusalem, the valley of Jehoshaphat, the Mount of Olives, Bethlehem, Jericho, the river Jordan, Libanus, the Dead Sea, Capernaum, Nazareth, Mount Tabor, Damascus, Tyre, Alexandria, and Constantinople—Willibald and the Holy Land—Soleyman travels through Ceylon, and Sumatra, and crosses the Gulf of Siam and the China Sea


CHAPTER III.
CELEBRATED TRAVELLERS BETWEEN THE TENTH AND THIRTEENTH CENTURIES.

BENJAMIN OF TUDELA, 1159-1173; PLAN DE CARPIN, OR CARPINI, 1245-1247;
RUBRUQUIS, 1253-1254.

    The Scandinavians in the North, Iceland and Greenland—Benjamin of Tudela visits Marseilles, Rome, Constantinople, the Archipelago, Palestine, Jerusalem, Bethlehem, Damascus, Baalbec, Nineveh, Baghdad, Babylon, Bassorah, Ispahan, Shiraz, Samarcand, Thibet, Malabar, Ceylon, the Red Sea, Egypt, Sicily, Italy, Germany, and France—Carpini explores Turkestan—Manners and customs of the Tartars—Rubruquis and the Sea of Azov, the Volga, Karakorum, Astrakhan, and Derbend


CHAPTER IV.
MARCO POLO, 1253-1324.

I.

    The interest of the Genoese and Venetian merchants in encouraging the exploration of Central Asia—The family of Polo, and its position in Venice—Nicholas and Matteo Polo, the two brothers—They go from Constantinople to the Court of the Emperor of China—Their reception at the Court of Kublaï-Khan—The Emperor appoints them his ambassadors to the Pope—Their return to Venice—Marco Polo—He leaves his father Nicholas and his uncle Matteo for the residence of the King of Tartary—The new Pope Gregory X.—The narrative of Marco Polo is written in French from his dictation, by Rusticien of Pisa


II.

    Armenia Minor—Armenia—Mount Ararat—Georgia—Mosul, Baghdad, Bussorah, Tauris—Persia—The Province of Kirman—Comadi—Ormuz—The Old Man of the Mountain—Cheburgan—Balkh—Cashmir—Kashgar—Samarcand—Kotan—The Desert—Tangun—Kara-Korum—Signan-fu—The Great Wall—Chang-tou—The residence of Kublaï-Khan—Cambaluc, now Pekin—The Emperor's fêtes—His hunting—Description of Pekin—Chinese Mint and bank-notes—The system of posts in the Empire


III.

    Tso-cheu—Tai-yen-fou—Pin-yang-fou—The Yellow River—Signan-fou—Szu-tchouan—Ching-tu-fou—Thibet—Li-kiang-fou—Carajan—Yung-tchang—Mien—Bengal—Annam—Tai-ping—Cintingui—Sindifoo—Té-cheu—Tsi-nan-fou—Lin-tsin-choo—Lin-sing—Mangi—Yang-tcheu-fou—Towns on the coast—Quin-say or Hang-tcheou-foo—Fo-kien


IV.

    Japan—Departure of the three Venetians with the Emperor's daughter and the Persian ambassadors—Sai-gon—Java—Condor—Bintang—Sumatra—The Nicobar Islands—Ceylon—The Coromandel coast—The Malabar coast—The Sea of Oman—The island of Socotra—Madagascar—Zanzibar and the coast of Africa—Abyssinia—Yemen—Hadramaut and Oman—Ormuz—The return to Venice—A feast in the household of Polo—Marco Polo a Genoese prisoner—Death of Marco Polo about 1323


CHAPTER V.
IBN BATUTA, 1328-1353.

    Ibn Batuta—The Nile—Gaza, Tyre, Tiberias, Libanus, Baalbec, Damascus, Meshid, Bussorah, Baghdad, Tabriz, Mecca and Medina—Yemen—Abyssinia—The country of the Berbers—Zanguebar—Ormuz—Syria—Anatolia—Asia Minor—Astrakhan—Constantinople—Turkestan—Herat—The Indus—Delhi—Malabar—The Maldives—Ceylon—The Coromandel coast—Bengal—The Nicobar Islands—Sumatra—China—Africa—The Niger—Timbuctoo


CHAPTER VI.
JEAN DE BÉTHENCOURT, 1339-1425.

I.

    The Norman cavalier—His ideas of conquest—What was known of the Canary Islands—Cadiz—The Canary Archipelago—Graciosa—Lancerota—Fortaventura—Jean de Béthencourt returns to Spain—Revolt of Berneval—His interview with King Henry III.—Gadifer visits the Canary Archipelago—Canary Island or "Gran Canaria"—Ferro Island—Palma Island


II.

    The return of Jean de Béthencourt—Gadifer's jealousy—Béthencourt visits his archipelago—Gadifer goes to conquer Gran Canaria—Disagreement of the two commanders—Their return to Spain—Gadifer blamed by the King—Return of Béthencourt—The natives of Fortaventura are baptized—Béthencourt revisits Caux—Returns to Lancerota—Lands on the African coast—Conquest of Gran Canaria, Ferro, and Palma Islands—Maciot appointed Governor of the archipelago—Béthencourt obtains the Pope's consent to the Canary Islands being made an Episcopal See—His return to his country and his death


CHAPTER VII.
CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS, 1436-1506.

I.

    Discovery of Madeira, Cape de Verd Islands, the Azores, Congo, and Guinea—Bartholomew Diaz—Cabot and Labrador—The geographical and commercial tendencies of the middle ages—The erroneous idea of the distance between Europe and Asia—Birth of Christopher Columbus—His first voyages—His plans rejected—His sojourn at the Franciscan convent—His reception by Ferdinand and Isabella—Treaty of the 17th of April, 1492—The brothers Pinzon—Three armed caravels at the port of Palos—Departure on the 3rd of August, 1492


II.

    First voyage: The Great Canary—Gomera—Magnetic variation—Symptoms of revolt—Land, land—San Salvador—Taking possession—Conception—Fernandina or Great Exuma—Isabella, or Long Island—The Mucaras—Cuba—Description of the island—Archipelago of Notre-Dame—Hispaniola or San Domingo—Tortuga Island—The cacique on board the Santa-Maria—The caravel of Columbus goes aground and cannot be floated off—Island of Monte-Christi—Return—Tempest—Arrival in Spain—Homage rendered to Christopher Columbus


III.

    Second Voyage: Flotilla of seventeen vessels—Island of Ferro—Dominica—Marie-Galante—Guadaloupe—The Cannibals—Montserrat—Santa-Maria-la-Rodonda—St. Martin and Santa Cruz—Archipelago of the Eleven Thousand Virgins—The island of St. John Baptist, or Porto Rico—Hispaniola—The first Colonists massacred—Foundation of the town of Isabella—Twelve ships laden with treasure sent to Spain—Fort St. Thomas built in the Province of Cibao—Don Diego, Columbus' brother, named Governor of the Island—Jamaica—The Coast of Cuba—The Remora—Return to Isabella—The Cacique made prisoner—Revolt of the Natives—Famine—Columbus traduced in Spain—Juan Aguado sent as Commissary to Isabella—Gold-mines—Departure of Columbus—His arrival at Cadiz


IV.

    Third Voyage: Madeira—Santiago in the Cape Verd Archipelago—Trinidad—First sight of the American Coast in Venezuela, beyond the Orinoco, now the Province of Cumana—Gulf of Paria—The Gardens—Tobago—Grenada—Margarita—Cubaga—Hispaniola during the absence of Columbus—Foundation of the town of San Domingo—Arrival of Columbus—Insubordination in the Colony—Complaints in Spain—Bovadilla sent by the king to inquire into the conduct of Columbus—Columbus sent to Europe in fetters with his two brothers—His appearance before Ferdinand and Isabella—Renewal of royal favour


V.

    Fourth Voyage: A Flotilla of four vessels—Canary Islands—Martinique—Dominica—Santa-Cruz—Porto-Rico—Hispaniola—Jamaica—Cayman Island—Pinos Island—Island of Guanaja—Cape Honduras—The American Coast of Truxillo on the Gulf of Darien—The Limonare Islands—Huerta—The Coast of Veragua—Auriferous Strata—Revolt of the Natives—The Dream of Columbus—Porto-Bello—The Mulatas—Putting into port at Jamaica—Distress—Revolt of the Spaniards against Columbus—Lunar Eclipse—Arrival of Columbus at Hispaniola—Return of Columbus to Spain—His death, on the 20th of March, 1506


CHAPTER VIII.
THE CONQUEST OF INDIA, AND OF THE SPICE COUNTRIES.

I.

    Covilham and Païva—Vasco da Gama—The Cape of Good Hope is doubled—Escalès at Sam-Braz—Mozambique, Mombaz, and Melinda—Arrival at Calicut—Treason of the Zamorin—Battles—Return to Europe—The scurvy—Death of Paul da Gama—Arrival at Lisbon


II.

    Alvarès Cabral—Discovery of Brazil—The coast of Africa—Arrival at Calicut, Cochin, Cananore—Joao da Nova—Gama's second expedition—The King of Cochin—The early life of Albuquerque—The taking of Goa—The siege and capture of Malacca—Second expedition against Ormuz—Ceylon—The Moluccas—Death of Albuquerque—Fate of the Portuguese empire of the Indies


SECOND PART.
CHAPTER I.
THE CONQUERORS OF CENTRAL AMERICA.

I.

    Hojeda—Americus Vespucius—The New World named after him—Juan de la Cosa—Vincent Yañez Pinzon—Bastidas—Diego de Lepe—Diaz de Solis—Ponce de Leon and Florida—Balboa discovers the Pacific Ocean—Grijalva explores the coast of Mexico


II.

    Ferdinand Cortès—His character—His appointment—Preparations for the expedition, and attempts of Velasquez to stop it—Landing at Vera-Cruz—Mexico and the Emperor Montezuma—The republic of Tlascala—March upon Mexico—The Emperor is made prisoner—Narvaez defeated—The Noche Triste—Battle of Otumba—The second siege and taking of Mexico—Expedition to Honduras—Voyage to Spain—Expeditions on the Pacific Ocean—Second Voyage of Cortès to Spain—His death


III.

    The triple alliance—Francisco Pizarro and his brothers—Don Diego d'Almagro—First attempts—Peru, its extent, people, and kings—Capture of Atahualpa, his ransom and death—Pedro d'Alvarado—Almagro in Chili—Strife among the conquerors—Trial and execution of Almagro—Expeditions of Gonzalo Pizarro and Orellana—Assassination of Francisco Pizarro—Rebellion and execution of his brother Gonzalo


CHAPTER II.
THE FIRST VOYAGE ROUND THE WORLD.

    Magellan—His early history—His disappointment—His change of nationality—Preparations for the expedition—Rio de Janeiro— St. Julian's Bay—Revolt of a part of the squadron—Terrible punishment of the guilty—Magellan's Strait—Patagonia—The Pacific—The Ladrone Islands—Zebu and the Philippine Islands— Death of Magellan—Borneo—The Moluccas and their Productions— Separation of the Trinidad and Victoria—Return to Europe by the Cape of Good Hope—Last misadventures


CHAPTER III.
THE POLAR EXPEDITIONS AND THE SEARCH FOR THE NORTH-WEST PASSAGE.

I.

    The Northmen—Eric the Red—The Zenos—John Cabot—Cortereal—Sebastian Cabot—Willoughby—Chancellor


II.

    John Verrazzano—Jacques Cartier and his three voyages to Canada—The town of Hochelaga—Tobacco—The scurvy—Voyage of Roberval—Martin Frobisher and his voyages—John Davis—Barentz and Heemskerke—Spitzbergen—Winter season at Nova Zembla— Return to Europe—Relics of the Expedition


CHAPTER IV.
VOYAGES OF ADVENTURE AND PRIVATEERING WARFARE.

    Drake—Cavendish—De Noort—Walter Raleigh


CHAPTER V.
MISSIONARIES AND SETTLERS. MERCHANTS AND TOURISTS.

I.

    Distinguishing characteristics of the Seventeenth Century—The more thorough exploration of regions previously discovered—To the thirst for gold succeeds Apostolic zeal—Italian Missionaries in Congo—Portuguese Missionaries in Abyssinia—Brue in Senegal and Flacourt in Madagascar—The Apostles of India, of Indo-China, and of Japan


II.

    The Dutch in the Spice Islands—Lemaire and Schouten—Tasman—Mendana—Queiros and Torrès—Pyrard de Laval—Pietro della Valle—Tavernier—Thévenot—Bernier—Robert Knox—Chardin—De Bruyn—Kæmpfer


CHAPTER VI.
I.
THE GREAT CORSAIR.

    William Dampier; or a Sea-King of the Seventeenth Century


II.
THE POLE AND AMERICA.

    Hudson and Baffin—Champlain and La Sale—The English upon the coast of the Atlantic—The Spaniards in South America—Summary of the information acquired at the close of the 17th century—The measure of the terrestrial degree—Progress of cartography—Inauguration of Mathematical Geography



CELEBRATED TRAVELS AND TRAVELLERS
THE GREAT NAVIGATORS OF THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY
By Jules Verne
WITH 96 ILLUSTRATIONS BY PHILIPPOTEAUX, BENETT, AND MATTHIS,
AND 20 MAPS BY MATTHIS AND MORIEU
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS AND MAPS
PART THE FIRST.
Hoisting the signals for triangulation
Pierre Louis Moreau de Maupertuis
Selkirk falling over the precipice with his prey
"I plunged my pike into his breast"
Fight between the Centurion and a Spanish galleon
"The council chose the latter alternative"
"Most of them on horseback"
"One of them tore the carrion with his teeth"
"They made a thousand grimaces"
The natives waving palm-leaves as a sign of welcome
Head-dresses of natives of Otahiti
"Pursued by the arrows of the natives"
A struggle between the Swallow and a Malay prah
Portrait of Bougainville
"We made them sing"
Lancers' Island
Pirogue of the Marquesas Islands
Mdlle. Barré's adventure
Captain James Cook
"They were pursued so closely"
Otahitian flute-player
A Fa-toka, New Zealand
Interior of a morai in Hawaii
Tatooed head of a New Zealander
An I-pah
A New Zealand family
"They were kangaroos"
Otahitian fleet off Oparee
"Three Indians emerged from the wood"
Among the icebergs
New Zealand war canoe
New Zealand utensils and weapons
"Who passed his days in being fed by his wives"
O-Too, King of Otaheite
Monuments in Easter Island
Natives of Easter Island
Natives of the Marquesas
Typical natives of the Sandwich Islands
"The natives had sufficient confidence"
"With the roof of considerable height"
View of Christmas Sound
Kerguelen Islands
Fête in Cook's honour at Tonga
Human sacrifice at Otahiti
Tree, from beneath which Cook observed the transit of Venus
Cook's reception by the natives
Prince William's Sound
"They gave him a little pig"
PART THE SECOND.
Pirogues of the Admiralty Islands
"Picking up the enemies' weapons"
"A lighted brand was also presented to them"
"The only one who had escaped"
"A man's skull was found"
Portrait of La Pérouse
Costumes of the inhabitants of Conception
Inhabitants of Easter Island
Typical natives of the Port des Français
Shipwreck of French boats outside the Port des Français
"An Indian with a stag's head over his own"
He traced the coast of Tartary
Typical Orotchys
Portrait of D'Entrecasteaux
"They came upon four natives"
Fête in honour of D'Entrecasteaux at the Friendly Islands
Typical native of New Holland
Natives of New Caledonia
View of the Island of Bouron
Native hut in Endracht Land
King of the Island of Timor
The Swan River
"A sail was seen on the horizon"
"The sick were carried on shore"
View of Sydney
Water-carrier at Timor
"He received a cordial welcome"
The Baobab
Portrait of Mungo Park
Natives of Senegal
A Hottentot
A Bosjeman
"Till Master Rees had given his verdict"
A Kaffir woman
Portrait of James Bruce
"I found the monarch seated on his throne"
Chinese magic-lantern
The Emperor of China
The great wall of China
Chinese Prime Minister
"The famous bird Leutzé"
Port Monterey
Mackenzie's first view of the North Pacific Ocean
Portrait of Condamine
Celebrated Narrows of Manseriche
Omagua Indians
Portrait of Alex. de Humboldt
Gigantic vegetation on the banks of the Temi
MAPS.
Map of France, corrected by order of the King, in accordance with the instructions of the Members of the Academy of Sciences
Map of the Eastern Hemisphere
Straits of Magellan, after Bougainville
Polynesia
Map of Queen Charlotte Islands
New Zealand
Louisiade Archipelago
Map of Australia, after Perron's atlas
Map of the east coast of New Holland, after Cook
Captain Cook's chart of Otaheite
Itinerary of the principal voyagers during the 18th century, after Cook
Map of Surville's discoveries, after Fleurieu
Island discovered by M. Marion du Fresnes in 1772, called Prince Edward's Island by Cook in 1776
Map of the journey of La Pérouse, after the atlas published by General Millet-Mureau
Map of the coast of Asia, after the map of La Pérouse's voyage
Map of part of North Africa
Map of part of Western Africa
Map of the Empire of China
Map of North-West America
Map of the two Americas
Itinerary of Humboldt's route in equinoctial America
TABLE OF CONTENTS.
FIRST PART.
CHAPTER I.
I.
ASTRONOMERS AND CARTOGRAPHERS.

    Cassini, Picard, and La Hire—The Meridian line and the map of France—G. Delisle and D'Anville—The shape of the earth—Maupertuis in Lapland—Condamine at the Equator


II.
VOYAGES IN THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY.

    Expedition of Wood Rogers—Adventures of Alexander Selkirk—Galapagos Island—Puerto Seguro—Return to England—Expedition of George Anson—Staten Island—Juan Fernandez—Tinian—Macao—Taking of the vessel—Canton river—Results of the Cruise


CHAPTER II.
CAPTAIN COOK'S PREDECESSORS.

I.

    Roggewein—Scanty information respecting him—The uncertainty of his discoveries—Easter Island—The Pernicious Islands—Bauman Islands—New Britain—Arrival at Batavia—Byron—Stay at Rio Janeiro and Port Desire—Entrance into Magellan's Strait—Falkland Islands and Port Egmont—The Fuegians—Mas-a-fuero—Disappointment Islands—Danger Islands—Tinian—Return to Europe


II.

    Wallis and Carteret—Preparations for the Expedition—Difficult Navigation of the Strait of Magellan—Separation of the Dauphin and Swallow—Whitsunday Island—Queen Charlotte's Island—Cumberland and Henry Islands—Otaheite—Howe, Boscawen, and Keppel Islands—Wallis Islands—Batavia—The Cape—The Downs—Discovery of Pitcairn, Osnaburgh, and Gloucester Islands by Carteret—Santa Cruz Archipelago—Solomon Islands—St. George's Strait and New Ireland—Portland Island and the Admiralty Islands—Macassar and Batavia—Meeting with Bougainville in the Atlantic


III.

    Bougainville—Changes in the life of a Notary's son—Colonization of the Falkland Islands—Buenos Ayres and Rio Janiero—Cession of the Falkland Islands to Spain—Hydrographical Survey of the Straits of Magellan—The Pecherais—The Four Facardins—Otaheite—Incidents of stay there—Productions of the country and manners of the people—Samoan Islands—Tierra del Santo Espirito or the New Hebrides—The Louisiade—Anchorite Islands—New Guinea—Buotan—From Batavia to St. Malo


CHAPTER III.
CAPTAIN COOK'S FIRST VOYAGE.

I.

    The beginning of his maritime career—The command of the Adventure entrusted to him—Tierra del Fuego—Discovery of some islands in the Pomotou Archipelago—Arrival at Otaheite—Manners and Customs of the inhabitants—Discovery of other islands in the Society group—Arrival off New Zealand—Interview with the natives—Discovery of Cook's Strait—Circumnavigation of two large islands—Manners of the people and productions of the country


II.

    Survey of the Eastern Coast of Australia—Botany Bay—Wreck of the Endeavour—Crossing Torres Straits—Return to England


CHAPTER IV.
CAPTAIN COOK'S SECOND VOYAGE.

I.

    Search for the Unknown—Second stay in New Zealand—Pomotou Archipelago—Second Stay at Otaheite—Survey of Tonga Islands—Third stay in New Zealand—Second crossing of the Pacific—Survey of Easter Island—Visit to the Marquesas


II.

    Fresh visit to Otaheite and the Friendly Archipelago—Exploration of the New Hebrides—Discovery of New Caledonia and the Island of Pines—Stay in Queen Charlotte's Strait—South Georgia—Accident to the Adventure


CHAPTER V.
CAPTAIN COOK'S THIRD VOYAGE.

I.

    Search for lands discovered by the French—Stay in Van Diemen's land—Queen Charlotte's Strait—Palmerston Island—Grand fêtes at the Tonga Islands


II.

    Discovery of the Sandwich Islands—Exploration of the Western Coast of America—From thence to Behring Straits—Return to the Hawaian Archipelago—History of Rono—Cook's death—Return of the Expedition to England



SECOND PART.
CHAPTER I.
FRENCH NAVIGATORS.

I.

    Discoveries by Bouvet de Lozier in the Southern Seas—Surville— Land of the Arsacides—Incident during the stay at Port Praslin—Arrival off the Coast of New Ireland—Surville's death—Marion's discoveries in the Antarctic Ocean—His massacre in New Zealand—Kerguelen in Iceland and the Arctic Regions—The Contest of the Watches—Fleurien and Verdun de la Crenne


II.

    Expedition under command of La Perouse—St. Catherine's Island—Conception Island—Sandwich Islands—Survey of the American Coast—Fort des Français—Loss of two boats—Monterey and the Indians of California—Stay at Macao—Cavite and Manilla—En route for China and Japan—Formosa—Quelpaert Island—The Coast of Tartary—Ternay Bay—The Tartars of Saghalien—The Orotchys—Straits of La Perouse—Ball at Kamtchatka—Navigator Archipelago—Massacre of M. de Langle and several of his companions—Botany Bay—Cessation of news of the expedition—D'Entrecasteaux sent in search of La Perouse—False News—Strait of D'Entrecasteaux—The Coast of New Caledonia—Land of the Arsacides—Natives of Bouka—Stay at Port Carteret—Admiralty Islands—Stay at Amboine—Lewin Land—Nuyts Land—Stay in Tasmania—Fête in the Friendly Islands—Details of La Perouse's visit to Tonga Tabou—Stay at Balado—Traces of La Perouse's Voyage to New Caledonia—Vanikoro—Sad end of the Expedition


III.

    Voyage by Captain Marchand—The Marquesas—Discovery of Nouka-Hiva—Manners and Customs of the people—Revolution Islands—The American Coast and Tchinkitané Port—Cox's Straits—Stay in the Sandwich Islands—Macao—Deception—Return to France—Discoveries by Bass and Flinders upon the Australian coast—Expedition under Captain Baudin—Endracht and De Witt Lands—Stay at Timor—Survey of Van Diemen's land—Separation of the Géographe and Naturaliste—Stay at Port Jackson—The Convicts—Pastoral riches of New South Wales—Return of the Naturaliste to France—Cruises by the Géographe and Casuarina to Nuyts, Edels, Endracht and De Witt Lands—Second Stay at Timor—Return to France


CHAPTER II.
AFRICAN EXPLORERS.

    Shaw in Algeria and Tunis—Hornemann in the Fezzan—Adanson in Senegal—Houghton in Senegambia—Mungo Park and his two journeys to the Djoliba or Niger—Sego and Timbuctoo—Sparmann and Le Vaillant at the Cape, at Natal, and in the interior—Lacerda at Mozambique and Cazembé—Bruce in Abyssinia—The Sources of the Blue Nile—Tzana Lake—Browne's Voyage in Darfur


CHAPTER III.
ASIA AND ITS INHABITANTS.

    Tartary according to Witzen—China according to the Jesuits and Du Halde—Macartney in China—Stay at Chu-Sang—Arrival in Nankin—Negotiations—Reception of the Embassy by the Emperor—Fêtes and ceremonies at Zhé Hol—Return to Pekin, and Europe—Volney—Choiseul Gouffier—Le Chevalier in the Troade—Olivier in Persia—A semi-Asiatic country—Russia according to Pallas


CHAPTER IV.
THE TWO AMERICAS.

    The Western Coast of America—Juan de Fuca and De Fonte—The three voyages of Behring and Vancouver—The exploration of the Straits of De Fuca—Survey of the Archipelago of New Georgia and a portion of the American Coast—Exploration of the interior of America—Samuel Hearn—Discovery of the Coppermine River—Mackenzie, and the river named after him—Fraser River—Journey of Humboldt and De Bonpland—Teneriffe—Guachero cavern—The "Llaños"—The electric eels—The Amazon, Negro, and Orinoco rivers—The earth-eaters—Results of the journey—Humboldt's second journey—The Volcanitos, or Little Volcanoes—The cascade at Tequendama—The bridges of Icononzo—Crossing the Quindiu on men's backs—Quito and the Pinchincha—Ascent of Chimborazo—The Andes—Lima—The transit of Mercury—Exploration of Mexico—Mexico—Puebla and Cofre de Perote—Return to Europe



THE PEARL OF LIMA.
A STORY OF TRUE LOVE.
Translated From The French Of M. Jules Verne By Anne T. Wilbur
THE PLAZA-MAYOR.
EVENING IN THE STREETS OF LIMA.
THE JEW EVERY WHERE A JEW.
A SPANISH GRANDEE.
THE HATRED OF THE INDIANS.
THE BETROTHAL.
ALL INTERESTS AT STAKE.
CONQUERORS AND CONQUERED.
THE CATARACTS OF THE MADEIRA.



A WINTER AMID THE ICE, AND OTHERS
By Jules Verne



CONTENTS
DOCTOR OX'S EXPERIMENT
CHAPTER I.
How it is useless to seek, even on the best maps, for the small town of Quiquendone
CHAPTER II.
In which the Burgomaster Van Tricasse and the Counsellor Niklausse consult about the affairs of the town
CHAPTER III.
In which the Commissary Passauf enters as noisily as unexpectedly
CHAPTER IV.
In which Doctor Ox reveals himself as a physiologist of the first rank, and as an audacious experimentalist
CHAPTER V.
In which the burgomaster and the counsellor pay a visit to Doctor Ox, and what follows
CHAPTER VI.
In which Frantz Niklausse and Suzel Van Tricasse form certain projects for the future
CHAPTER VII.
In which the Andantes become Allegros, and the Allegros Vivaces
CHAPTER VIII.
In which the ancient and solemn German waltz becomes a whirlwind
CHAPTER IX.
In which Doctor Ox and Ygène, his assistant, say a few words
CHAPTER X.
In which it will be seen that the epidemic invades the entire town, and what effect it produces
CHAPTER XI.
In which the Quiquendonians adopt a heroic resolution
CHAPTER XII.
In which Ygène, the assistant, gives a reasonable piece of advice, which is eagerly rejected by Doctor Ox
CHAPTER XIII.
In which it is once more proved that by taking high ground all human littlenesses may be overlooked
CHAPTER XIV.
In which matters go so far that the inhabitants of Quiquendone, the reader, and even the author, demand an immediate dénouement
CHAPTER XV.
In which the dénouement takes place
CHAPTER XVI.
In which the intelligent reader sees that he has guessed correctly, despite all the author's precautions
CHAPTER XVII.
In which Doctor Ox's theory is explained
MASTER ZACHARIUS.
CHAPTER I.
A winter night
CHAPTER II.
The pride of science
CHAPTER III.
A strange visit
CHAPTER IV.
The Church of St. Pierre
CHAPTER V.
The hour of death
A DRAMA IN THE AIR
A WINTER AMID THE ICE
CHAPTER I.
The black flag
CHAPTER II.
Jean Cornbutte's project
CHAPTER III.
A ray of hope
CHAPTER IV.
In the passes
CHAPTER V.
Liverpool Island
CHAPTER VI.
The quaking of the ice
CHAPTER VII.
Settling for the winter
CHAPTER VIII.
Plan of the explorations
CHAPTER IX.
The house of snow
CHAPTER X.
Buried alive
CHAPTER XI.
A cloud of smoke
CHAPTER XII.
The return to the ship
CHAPTER XIII.
The two rivals
CHAPTER XIV.
Distress
CHAPTER XV.
The white bears
CHAPTER XVI.
Conclusion
ASCENT OF MONT BLANC
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.
She handed her father a pipe
The worthy Madame Brigitte Van Tricasse had now her second husband
"I have just come from Dr. Ox's"
"It is in the interests of science"
"The workmen, whom we have had to choose in Quiquendone, are not very expeditious"
The young girl took the line
"Good-bye, Frantz," said Suzel
Fiovaranti had been achieving a brilliant success in "Les Huguenots"
They hustle each other to get out
It was no longer a waltz
It required two persons to eat a strawberry
"To Virgamen! to Virgamen!"
"A burgomaster's place is in the front rank"
The two friends, arm in arm
The whole army of Quiquendone fell to the earth
He would raise the trap-door constructed in the floor of his workshop
The young girl prayed
"Thou wilt see that I have discovered the secrets of existence".
"Father, what is the matter?"
Then he resumed, in an ironical tone
From morning till night discontented purchasers besieged the house
This proud old man remained motionless
"It is there--there!"
"See this man,--he is Time"
He was dead
"Monsieur, I salute you"
"Monsieur!" cried I, in a rage
"He continued his observations for seven or eight hours with General Morlot"
"The balloon became less and less inflated"
"Zambecarri fell, and was killed!"
The madman disappeared in space
"Monsieur the curè," said he, "stop a moment, if you please"
André Vasling, the mate, apprised Jean Cornbutte of the dreadful event
A soft voice said in his ear, "Have good courage, uncle"
André Vasling showed himself more attentive than ever
On the 12th September the sea consisted of one solid plain
They found themselves in a most perilous position, for an icequake had occurred
Map in hand, he clearly explained their situation
The caravan set out
"Thirty-two degrees below zero!"
Despair and determination were struggling in his rough features for the mastery
It was Louis Cornbutte
Penellan advanced towards the Norwegians
Marie begged Vasling on her knees to produce the lemons, but he did not reply
Marie rose with cries of despair, and hurried to the bed of old Jean Cornbutte
The bear, having descended from the mast, had fallen on the two men
The old curè received Louis Cornbutte and Marie
View of Mont Blanc from the Brevent
View of Bossons glacier, near the Grands-Mulets
Passage of the Bossons Glacier
Crevasse and bridge
View of the "Seracs"
View of "Seracs"
Passage of the "Junction"
Hut at the Grands-Mulets
View of Mont Blanc from Grands-Mulets
Crossing the plateau
Summit of Mont Blanc
Grands-Mulets:--Party descending from the hut



THE VOYAGES AND ADVENTURES OF CAPTAIN HATTERAS
By Jules Verne
Translated From The French
With Two Hundred And Fifty Illustrations By Riou
CONTENTS.
PART I. THE ENGLISH AT THE NORTH POLE.
CHAPTER
I. 	THE FORWARD
II. 	AN UNEXPECTED LETTER
III. 	DR. CLAWBONNY
IV. 	THE DOG-CAPTAIN
V. 	AT SEA
VI. 	THE GREAT POLAR CURRENT
VII. 	THE ENTRANCE OF DAVIS STRAIT
VIII. 	THE TALK OF THE CREW
IX. 	ANOTHER LETTER
X. 	DANGEROUS SAILING
XI. 	THE DEVIL'S THUMB
XII. 	CAPTAIN HATTERAS
XIII. 	THE CAPTAIN'S PLANS
XIV. 	THE EXPEDITIONS IN SEARCH OF FRANKLIN
XV. 	THE FORWARD DRIVEN SOUTHWARD
XVI. 	THE MAGNETIC POLE
XVII. 	THE FATE OF SIR JOHN FRANKLIN
XVIII. 	THE WAY NORTHWARD
XIX. 	A WHALE IN SIGHT
XX. 	BEECHEY ISLAND
XXI. 	THE DEATH OF BELLOT
XXII. 	THE FIRST SIGNS OF MUTINY
XXIII. 	ATTACKED BY THE ICE
XXIV. 	PREPARATIONS FOR WINTERING
XXV. 	ONE OF JAMES ROSS'S FOXES
XXVI. 	THE LAST PIECE OF COAL
XXVII. 	THE GREAT COLD AT CHRISTMAS
XXVIII. 	PREPARATIONS FOR DEPARTURE
XXIX. 	ACROSS THE ICE-FIELDS
XXX. 	THE CAIRN
XXXI. 	THE DEATH OF SIMPSON
XXXII. 	THE RETURN TO THE FORWARD
PART II. THE DESERT OF ICE.


I. 	THE DOCTOR'S INVENTORY
II. 	ALTAMONT'S FIRST WORDS
III. 	SEVENTEEN DAYS OF LAND JOURNEY
IV. 	THE LAST CHARGE OF POWDER
V. 	THE SEAL AND THE BEAR
VI. 	THE PORPOISE
VII. 	A DISCUSSION ABOUT CHARTS
VIII. 	EXCURSION TO THE NORTH OF VICTORIA BAY
IX. 	COLD AND HEAT
X. 	THE PLEASURES OF WINTER-QUARTERS
XI. 	DISQUIETING TRACES
XII. 	THE ICE PRISON
XIII. 	THE MINE
XIV. 	THE POLAR SPRING
XV. 	THE NORTHWEST PASSAGE
XVI. 	NORTHERN ARCADIA
XVII. 	ALTAMONT'S REVENGE
XVIII. 	THE LAST PREPARATIONS
XIX. 	THE JOURNEY NORTHWARD
XX. 	FOOTPRINTS ON THE SNOW
XXI. 	THE OPEN SEA
XXII. 	THE APPROACH TO THE POLE
XXIII. 	THE ENGLISH FLAG
XXIV. 	POLAR COSMOGRAPHY
XXV. 	MOUNT HATTERAS
XXVI. 	RETURN TO THE SOUTH
XXVII. 	CONCLUSION
LIST OF FULL-PAGE ILLUSTRATIONS.
* 	"JOHNSON KNEW ALL THE SAILORS IN LIVERPOOL, AND IMMEDIATELY SET ABOUT ENGAGING A CREW"
* 	"EVERYTHING WAS ENVELOPED IN ONE OF THE ORDINARY FOGS OF THAT REGION"
* 	"THIS SPACE OF SIX FEET SQUARE CONTAINED INCALCULABLE WEALTH"
* 	"THE NEWS SPEAD IMMEDIATELY THROUGHOUT THE CITY, AND A GREAT CONCOURSE OF SPECTATORS THRONGED THE PIERS"
* 	"TOWARDS EVENING THE BRIG DOUBLED THE CALF OF MAN"
* 	"WOULD ONE NOT SAY IT WAS A FOREIGN CITY, AN EASTERN CITY, WITH MINARETS AND MOSQUES IN THE MOONLIGHT"
* 	"FORTUNATELY THE OPENING OF THESE HUTS WAS TOO SMALL, AND THE ENTHUSIASTIC DOCTOR COULD NOT GET THROUGH"
* 	"A STRANGE ANIMAL WAS BOUNDING ALONG WITHIN A CABLE'S LENGTH FROM THE SHIP"
* 	"JOHN HATTERAS"
* 	"HE CAUGHT A LARGE NUMBER OF WHITE FOXES; HE HAD PUT ON THEIR NECKS COPPER COLLARS"
* 	"ALL THESE POOR FELLOWS HAD DIED OF MISERY, SUFFERING, AND STARVATION"
* 	"THE BRIG WAS TOSSED ABOUT LIKE A CHILD'S TOY" (Frontispiece)
* 	"THE WHALE SWAM AWAY FROM THE BRIG AND HASTENED TOWARDS THE MOVING ICEBERGS"
* 	"THE FORWARD IN WELLINGTON CHANNEL"
* 	HATTERAS MADE USE OF A DEVICE WHICH WHALERS EMPLOY
* 	"A CRASH WAS HEARD, AND AS IT CAME AGAINST THE STARBOARD-QUARTER, PART OF THE RAIL HAD GIVEN WAY"
* 	"THE MOON SHONE WITH INCOMPARABLE PURITY, GLISTENING ON THE LEAST ROUGHNESS IN THE ICE"
* 	"ALMOST EVERY NIGHT THE DOCTOR COULD OBSERVE THE MAGNIFICENT AURORAS"
* 	"HE WAS ARMED, AND HE KEPT CONSTANT GUARD, WITHOUT MINDING THE COLD, THE SNOW, OR THE ICE"
* 	"THE LITTLE BAND MADE THEIR WAY TOWARDS THE SOUTHEAST"
* 	"THE DOCTOR HAD ENERGY ENOUGH TO ASCEND AN ICE-MOUNTAIN WHILE THE SNOW-HUT WAS BUILDING"
* 	"'FIRE!' SHOUTED THE CAPTAIN, DISCHARGING HIS PIECE"
* 	"THEY COULD ONLY THINK OF THEIR PERILOUS POSITION"
* 	"SUDDENLY, WITH A LAST EFFORT, HE HALF ROSE"
* 	"THEN A TERRIBLE EXPLOSION WAS HEARD"
* 	"THE LARGE PIECES OF THE ENGINE LAY HERE AND THERE, TWISTED OUT OF SHAPE"
* 	"THEY HARNESSED THE TIRED DOGS"
* 	JOHNSON'S STORY
* 	"'YES!' SAID THE AMERICAN"
* 	"THE DOCTOR WAS FORTUNATE ENOUGH TO FIND A SEAL"
* 	"AT THE END OF TWO HOURS THEY FELL, EXHAUSTED"
* 	"HE PLUNGED HIS KNIFE INTO THE BEAST'S THROAT"
* 	"THESE CASTAWAYS LOOKED AT THEMSELVES AS COLONISTS WHO HAD REACHED THEIR DESTINATION"
* 	THE FORT WAS COMPLETED
* 	"I AM NOT AWARE THAT IT BEARS ANY NAME ON THE MOST RECENT MAPS"
* 	"THE DOCTOR REACHED THE SUMMIT WITH SOME LITTLE DIFFICULTY"
* 	"THEY ADVANCED IN FULL ILLUMINATION, AND THEIR SHARPLY CUT SHADOWS RAN OUT BEHIND THEM OVER THE SNOW"
* 	"HE DID HIS BEST TO INSTRUCT AND INTEREST HIS COMPANIONS"
* 	"HATTERAS COULD ONLY KEEP HIS DISTANCE FROM THE ANIMALS BY THROWING AWAY HIS CAP, HATCHET, AND EVEN HIS GUN"
* 	"THE BEARS HEAPED THE ICE IN SUCH A WAY AS TO RENDER FLIGHT IMPOSSIBLE"
* 	"AN ENORMOUS BLACK BODY APPEARED IN THE GLOOM OF THE ROOM. ALTAMONT RAISED HIS HAND TO STRIKE IT"
* 	"A LOUD EXPLOSION FOLLOWED"
* 	"THE CARPENTER SET TO WORK AT ONCE"
* 	"A HARD STRUGGLE WITH THE ICEBERGS"
* 	"MACCLURE SAW A MAN RUNNING AND GESTICULATING"
* 	"THE DOCTOR, JOHNSON, AND BELL INTERVENED. IT WAS TIME; THE TWO ENEMIES WERE GAZING AT ONE ANOTHER"
* 	"THEY WERE A CURIOUS AND TOUCHING SIGHT, FLYING ABOUT WITHOUT FEAR, RESTING ON CLAWBONNY'S SHOULDERS," ETC.
* 	"GAVE HIM A TERRIBLE BLOW WITH A HATCHET ON THE HEAD"
* 	"WELL, I'VE BROUGHT BACK TWO BROTHERS"
* 	"THE SEAL STRUGGLED FOR A FEW SECONDS, AND WAS THEN SUFFOCATED ON THE BREAST OF HIS ADVERSARY"
* 	"THEY LEFT AT SIX O'CLOCK IN THE MORNING"
* 	"ON THE 29TH BELL SHOT A FOX, AND ALTAMONT A MEDIUM-SIZED MUSK-OX"
* 	"THE MASSES OF ICE TOOK THE FORMS OF HUMMOCKS AND ICEBERGS"
* 	"ON ALL SIDES RESOUNDED THE CRACKING OF THE ICE AMID THE ROAR OF THE AVALANCHES"
* 	"'WE OUGHT,' ANSWERED BELL, 'TO LIGHT TORCHES, AS IS DONE AT LONDON AND LIVERPOOL'"
* 	THE HUT WAS PITCHED IN A RAVINE FOR SHELTER
* 	"THEY CLIMBED A HILL WHICH COMMANDED A WIDE VIEW"
* 	"THREE HOURS LATER THEY REACHED THE COAST. 'THE SEA! THE SEA!' THEY ALL SHOUTED"
* 	"THE LAUNCH WAS ROCKING GENTLY IN HER LITTLE HARBOR"
* 	"AQUATIC BIRDS OF ALL SORTS WERE THERE"
* 	"THEN THE EYE GLANCING DOWN INTO THE TRANSPARENT WATER, THE SIGHT WAS EQUALLY STRANGE"
* 	"'IT'S A VOLCANO!' HE CRIED"
* 	"THE LAUNCH TOSSED HELPLESSLY ABOUT"
* 	"THE FOG, WITHOUT LIFTING, WAS VERY BRIGHT"
* 	"THIS DRIFTING FLOE WAS COVERED WITH WHITE BEARS, CROWDED TOGETHER"
* 	"HER SAIL FLEW AWAY LIKE A HUGE WHITE BIRD; A WHIRLPOOL, A NEW MAELSTROM, FORMED AMONG THE WAVES"
* 	"THE MOUNTAIN WAS IN FULL ERUPTION"
* 	"THEY NOTICED A LITTLE FIORD"
* 	"ALTAMONT SOON FOUND A GROTTO IN THE ROCKS"
* 	"THEY WERE ALL READY TO LISTEN TO THE DOCTOR"
* 	"THEY SAW THE CAPTAIN STANDING ON A ROCK"
* 	"HATTERAS APPEARED TO WAKE FROM HIS REVERY"
* 	"BUT HATTERAS DID NOT LOOK BACK. HE HAD MADE USE OF HIS STAFF AS A POLE ON WHICH TO FASTEN THE ENGLISH FLAG"
* 	"THE DOCTOR PUT UP A CAIRN"
* 	"DEAD—FROZEN"
* 	"TWO HOURS LATER, AFTER UNHEARD-OF EFFORTS, THE LAST MEN OF THE FORWARD WERE TAKEN ABOARD THE DANISH WHALER HANS CHRISTIAN"
* 	"A STEAMBOAT CARRIED THEM TO KIEL"



ABANDONED
By Jules Verne
Fifty Illustrations



CONTENTS
  	PAGE
CHAPTER I
Conversation on the Subject of the Bullet—Construction of a Canoe—Hunting—At the Top of a Kauri—Nothing to attest the Presence of Man—Neb and Herbert's Prize—Turning a Turtle—The Turtle disappears—Cyrus Harding's Explanation 	1
CHAPTER II
First Trial of the Canoe—A Wreck on the Coast—Towing—Flotsam Point—Inventory of the Case: Tools, Weapons, Instruments, Clothes, Books, Utensils—What Pencroft misses—The Gospel—A Verse from the Sacred Book 	11
CHAPTER III
The Start—The rising Tide—Elms and different Plants—The Jacamar—Aspect of the Forest—Gigantic Eucalypti—The Reason they are called "Fever Trees"—Troops of Monkeys—A Waterfall—The Night Encampment 	23
CHAPTER IV
Journey to the Coast—Troops of Monkeys—A new River—The Reason the Tide was not felt—A woody Shore—ReptilePromontory—Herbert envies Gideon Spilett—Explosion of Bamboos 	34
CHAPTER V
Proposal to return by the Southern Shore—Configuration of the Coast—Searching for the supposed Wreck—A Wreck in the Air—Discovery of a small Natural Port—At Midnight on the Banks of the Mercy—The Canoe Adrift 	45
CHAPTER VI[Pg x]
Pencroft's Halloos—A Night in the Chimneys—Herbert's Arrows—The Captain's Project—An unexpected Explanation—What has happened in Granite House—How a new Servant enters the Service of the Colonists 	58
CHAPTER VII
Plans—A Bridge over the Mercy—Mode adopted for making an Island of Prospect Heights—The Drawbridge—Harvest—The Stream—The Poultry-yard—A Pigeon-house—The two Onagas—The Cart—Excursion to Port Balloon 	70
CHAPTER VIII
Linen—Shoes of Seal-leather—Manufacture of Pyroxyle—Gardening —Fishing—Turtle-eggs—Improvement of Master Jup—The Corral—Musmon Hunt—New Animal and Vegetable Possessions—Recollections of their Native Land 	81
CHAPTER IX
Bad Weather—The Hydraulic Lift—Manufacture of Glass-ware—The Bread-tree—Frequent Visits to the Corral—Increase of the Flock—The Reporter's Question—Exact Position of Lincoln Island—Pencroft's Proposal 	92
CHAPTER X
Boat-building—Second Crop of Corn—Hunting Koalas—A new Plant, more Pleasant than Useful—Whale in Sight—A Harpoon from the Vineyard—Cutting up the Whale—Use for the Bones—End of the Month of May—Pencroft has nothing left to wish for 	103
CHAPTER XI
Winter—Felling Wood—The Mill—Pencroft's fixed Idea—The Bones—To what Use an Albatross may be put—Fuel for the Future—Top and Jup—Storms—Damage to the Poultry-yard—Excursion to the Marsh—Cyrus Harding alone—Exploring the Well 	114
CHAPTER XII[Pg xi]
The Rigging of the Vessel—An Attack from Foxes—Jup wounded—Jup cured—Completion of the Boat—Pencroft's Triumph—The Bonadventure's trial Trip to the South of the Island—An unexpected Document 	127
CHAPTER XIII
Departure decided upon—Conjectures—Preparations—The three Passengers—First Night—Second Night—Tabor Island—Searching the Shore—Searching the Wood—No one—Animals—Plants—A Dwelling—Deserted 	142
CHAPTER XIV
The Inventory—Night—A few Letters—Continuation of the Search—Plants and Animals—Herbert in great Danger—On Board—The Departure—Bad Weather—A Gleam of Reason—Lost on the Sea—A timely Light 	154
CHAPTER XV
The Return—Discussion—Cyrus Harding and the Stranger—Port Balloon—The Engineer's Devotion—A touching Incident—Tears flow 	166
CHAPTER XVI
A Mystery to be cleared up—The Stranger's first Words—Twelve Years on the Islet—Avowal which escapes him—The Disappearance—Cyrus Harding's Confidence—Construction of a Mill—The first Bread—An Act of Devotion—Honest Hands 	176
CHAPTER XVII
Still alone—The Stranger's Request—The Farm established at the Corral—Twelve Years ago—The Boatswain's Mate of the Britannia—Left on Tabor Island—Cyrus Harding's Hand—The mysterious Document 	191
CHAPTER XVIII[Pg xii]
Conversation—Cyrus Harding and Gideon Spilett—An Idea of the Engineer's—The Electric Telegraph—The Wires—The Battery—The Alphabet—Fine Season—Prosperity of the Colony—Photography—An Appearance of Snow—Two Years on Lincoln Island 	203
CHAPTER XIX
Recollections of their Native Land—Probable Future—Project for surveying the Coasts of the Island—Departure on the 16th of April—Sea-view of Reptile End—The basaltic Rocks of the Western Coast—Bad Weather—Night comes on—New Incident 	216
CHAPTER XX
A Night at Sea—Shark Gulf—Confidences—Preparations for Winter—Forwardness of the Bad Season—Severe Cold—Work in the Interior—In Six Months—A Photographic Negative—Unexpected Incident 	226
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
Click on the page number to view the illustrations
TURNING A TURTLE 	9
FLOTSAM AND JETSAM 	15
UNPACKING THE MARVELLOUS CHEST 	17
PENCROFT'S SUPERSTITION 	21
IS IT TOBACCO? 	27
THE HALT FOR BREAKFAST 	29
DENIZENS OF THE FOREST 	37
THE SEA 	39
AT THAT MOMENT A SHOT STRUCK THE JAGUAR BETWEEN THE EYES AND IT FELL DEAD 	43
"NOW THERE'S SOMETHING TO EXPLAIN THE BULLET!" EXCLAIMED PENCROFT 	51
A WRECK IN THE AIR 	53
THERE WAS NO LONGER A LADDER! 	57
THE INVADERS OF GRANITE HOUSE 	63
CAPTURING THE ORANG 	67
ENGAGING THE NEW SERVANT 	69
BUILDING THE BRIDGE 	73
PENCROFT'S SCARECROWS 	77
THE SETTLERS' NEW SHIRTS 	83
JUP PASSED MOST OF HIS TIME IN THE KITCHEN, TRYING TO IMITATE NEB 	87
PENCROFT TO THE RESCUE 	93
THE GLASS-BLOWERS 	97
THE VERANDAH ON THE EDGE OF PROSPECT HEIGHTS 	101
THE DOCKYARD 	105
A VALUABLE PRIZE 	109
PENCROFT HAS NOTHING LEFT TO WISH FOR 	113
THE MESSENGER 	119
WINTER EVENINGS IN GRANITE HOUSE 	121
HE SAW NOTHING SUSPICIOUS 	125
TOP VISITING THE INVALID 	133
THE TRIAL TRIP 	137[Pg xiv]
"LUFF, PENCROFT, LUFF!" 	141
THE DEPARTURE 	145
NEARING THE ISLAND 	149
A HUT! 	153
HERBERT IN DANGER 	159
A LIGHT! A LIGHT! 	165
"POOR FELLOW," MURMURED THE ENGINEER 	169
THE EXPERIMENT 	175
"WHO ARE YOU?" HE ASKED IN A HOLLOW VOICE 	177
THE STRANGER 	179
NOW FOR A GOOD WIND 	187
HE SEIZED THE JAGUAR'S THROAT WITH ONE POWERFUL HAND 	189
THE STRANGER'S STORY 	195
"HERE IS MY HAND," SAID THE ENGINEER 	201
THE ENGINEER AT WORK 	209
JUP SITTING FOR HIS PORTRAIT 	213
THE SNOWY SHEET AROSE AND DISPERSED IN THE AIR 	215
ANOTHER MYSTERY 	225
RETURNING FROM A SPORTING EXCURSION 	233
THE PHOTOGRAPHIC NEGATIVE 	235



EARTH TO THE MOON, DIRECT IN NINETY-SEVEN HOURS
AND TWENTY MINUTES: AND A TRIP ROUND IT
By Jules Verne
Translated From The French By Louis Mercier, M.A., (Oxon,) And Eleanor E. King
WITH EIGHTY FULL PAGE ILLUSTRATIONS



CONTENTS
	FROM THE EARTH TO THE MOON.
	ROUND THE MOON.
	LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.
CHAPTER I. 	THE GUN CLUB
CHAPTER II. 	PRESIDENT BARBICANE'S COMMUNICATION
CHAPTER III. 	EFFECT OF THE PRESIDENT'S COMMUNICATION
CHAPTER IV. 	REPLY FROM THE OBSERVATORY OF CAMBRIDGE
CHAPTER V. 	THE ROMANCE OF THE MOON
CHAPTER VI. 	THE PERMISSIVE LIMITS OF IGNORANCE AND BELIEF IN THE UNITED STATES
CHAPTER VII. 	THE HYMN OF THE CANNON-BALL
CHAPTER VIII. 	HISTORY OF THE CANNON
CHAPTER IX. 	THE QUESTION OF THE POWDERS
CHAPTER X. 	ONE ENEMY v. TWENTY-FIVE MILLIONS OF FRIENDS
CHAPTER XI. 	FLORIDA AND TEXAS
CHAPTER XII. 	URBI ET ORBI
CHAPTER XIII. 	STONES HILL
CHAPTER XIV. 	PICKAXE AND TROWEL
CHAPTER XV. 	THE FÃSTE OF THE CASTING
CHAPTER XVI. 	THE COLUMBIAD
CHAPTER XVII. 	A TELEGRAPHIC DESPATCH
CHAPTER XVIII. 	THE PASSENGER OF THE "ATLANTA"
CHAPTER XIX. 	A MONSTER MEETING
CHAPTER XX. 	ATTACK AND RIPOSTE
CHAPTER XXI. 	HOW A FRENCHMAN MANAGES AN AFFAIR
CHAPTER XXII. 	THE NEW CITIZEN OF THE UNITED STATES
CHAPTER XXIII. 	THE PROJECTILE-VEHICLE
CHAPTER XXIV. 	THE TELESCOPE OF THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS
CHAPTER XXV. 	FINAL DETAILS
CHAPTER XXVI. 	FIRE!
CHAPTER XXVII. 	FOUL WEATHER
CHAPTER XXVIII. 	A NEW STAR
	ROUND THE MOON
	PRELIMINARY CHAPTER
CHAPTER I. 	FROM TWENTY MINUTES PAST TEN TO FORTY-SEVEN MINUTES PAST TEN P.M.
CHAPTER II. 	THE FIRST HALF-HOUR
CHAPTER III. 	THEIR PLACE OF SHELTER
CHAPTER IV. 	A LITTLE ALGEBRA
CHAPTER V. 	THE COLD OF SPACE
CHAPTER VI. 	QUESTION AND ANSWER
CHAPTER VII. 	A MOMENT OF INTOXICATION
CHAPTER VIII. 	AT SEVENTY-EIGHT THOUSAND FIVE HUNDRED AND FOURTEEN LEAGUES
CHAPTER IX. 	THE CONSEQUENCES OF A DEVIATION
CHAPTER X. 	THE OBSERVERS OF THE MOON
CHAPTER XI. 	FANCY AND REALITY
CHAPTER XII. 	OROGRAPHIC DETAILS
CHAPTER XIII. 	LUNAR LANDSCAPES
CHAPTER XIV. 	THE NIGHT OF THREE HUNDRED AND FIFTY-FOUR HOURS AND A HALF
CHAPTER XV. 	HYPERBOLA OR PARABOLA
CHAPTER XVI. 	THE SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE
CHAPTER XVII. 	TYCHO
CHAPTER XVIII. 	GRAVE QUESTIONS
CHAPTER XIX. 	A STRUGGLE AGAINST THE IMPOSSIBLE
CHAPTER XX. 	THE SOUNDINGS OF THE "SUSQUEHANNA"
CHAPTER XXI. 	J. T. MASTON RECALLED
CHAPTER XXII. 	RECOVERED FROM THE SEA
CHAPTER XXIII. 	THE END
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
The Artillery-men of the Gun Club
President Barbicane
Meeting of the Gun Club
The Torchlight Procession
Cambridge Observatory
The Moon's Disc
Barbicane holds forth
The Rodman Columbiad
Cannon at Malta in the time of the Knights
Ideal Sketch of J. T. Maston's Gun
The invention of Gunpowder by the Monk Schwartz
Captain Nicholl
Nicholl published a number of Letters in the Newspapers
It became necessary to keep an eye upon the Deputies
The Subscription was opened
The Manufactory at Coldspring, near New York
Tampa Town, previous to the undertaking
They were compelled to ford several Rivers
The Work progressed regularly
The Casting
Tampa Town, after the undertaking
The Banquet in the Columbiad
President Barbicane at his Window
Michel Ardan
The Meeting
Projectile Trains for the Moon
Attack and Riposte
The Platform was suddenly carried away
Maston burst into the Room
In the midst of this Snare was a poor little Bird
"Go with me, and see whether we are stopped on our journey"
The Cat taken out of the Shell
The Arrival of the Projectile at Stones Hill
J. T. Maston had grown fat
The Telescope of the Rocky Mountains
The Interior of the Projectile
An innumerable Multitude covered the Prairie round Stones Hill
Fire!!
Effect of the Explosion
The Director at his Post
The Gas caught fire
Diana and Satellite
The courageous Frenchman
They raised Barbicane
It was an enormous Disc
They gave her a pie
The Sun chose to be of the party
Ardan plunged his hand rapidly into certain mysterious boxes
"Do I understand it?" cried Ardan; "my head is splitting with it".
Satellite was thrown out
It was the Body of Satellite
"I could have ventured out on the top of the Projectile"
They struck up a frantic dance
"The Oxygen!" he exclaimed
"Ah! if Raphael had seen us thus"
The Telescope at Parsonstown
How many people have heard speak of the Moon!
"This plain would then be nothing but an immense Cemetery"
"What Giant Oxen!"
He could distinguish nothing but Desert Beds
"It is the fault of the Moon"
Nothing could equal the splendour of this starry world
"The vapour of our breath will fall in snow around us"
A Discussion arose
A Prey to frightful Terror
What a sight!
"The Sun!"
"Light and Heat; all Life is contained in them"
He distinguished all this
Can you picture to yourselves
A violent Contraction of the Lunar Crust
Around the Projectile were the Objects which had been thrown out
"These practical people have sometimes most inopportune ideas"
Ardan applied the lighted Match
"I fancy I see them"
A few feet nearer
The unfortunate man had disappeared
The Descent began
"White all, Barbicane"
The Apotheosis was worthy of the three Heroes





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