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Title: Index of the Project Gutenberg Works of Gustave Doré
Author: Doré, Gustave
Language: English
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*** Start of this Doctrine Publishing Corporation Digital Book "Index of the Project Gutenberg Works of Gustave Doré" ***

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CONTENTS

##  GARGANTUA AND PANTAGRUEL

##  DON QUIXOTE, VOL. I.

##  DON QUIXOTE, VOL. II.

##  DORÉ GALLERY OF BIBLE ILLUSTRATIONS

##  DIVINE COMEDY--THE VISION OF HELL

##  DIVINE COMEDY--THE VISION OF PURGATORY

##  DIVINE COMEDY--THE VISION OF PARADISE

CONTES DE FÉES POUR

##  TWO HUNDRED SKETCHES HUMOROUS AND GROTESQUE

##  THE RAVEN

##  THE TALES OF MOTHER GOOSE

##  THE COCKAYNES IN PARIS

GÄNSEMÜTTERCHENS MÄRCHEN

##  RIVER LEGENDS

STORIES OF THE DAYS OF KING ARTHUR

ATALA

##  THE DAYS OF CHIVALRY

##  A TOUR THROUGH THE PYRENEES

##  MYTHS OF THE RHINE

##  JAUFRY THE KNIGHT

FAIRY REALM

ASK MAMMA

##  THE FABLES OF LA FONTAINE

AVENTURES DE BARON DE MÜNCHAUSEN

ELAINE

ENIDE

GENIÈVRE

VIVIANE



TABLES OF CONTENTS OF VOLUMES



MASTER FRANCIS RABELAIS
FIVE BOOKS OF THE LIVES, HEROIC DEEDS AND SAYINGS OF
GARGANTUA AND HIS SON PANTAGRUEL
CONTENTS.
BOOK I
Introduction.
FRANCIS RABELAIS.
Chapter 1.I. 	Of the Genealogy and Antiquity of Gargantua.
Chapter 1.II. 	-The Antidoted Fanfreluches: or, a Galimatia of extravagant Conceits found in an ancient Monument.
Chapter 1.III. 	How Gargantua was carried eleven months in his mother’s belly.
Chapter 1.IV. 	-How Gargamelle, being great with Gargantua, did eat a huge deal of tripes.
Chapter 1.V. 	The Discourse of the Drinkers.
Chapter 1.VI. 	How Gargantua was born in a strange manner.
Chapter 1.VII. 	After what manner Gargantua had his name given him, and how he tippled, bibbed, and curried the can.
Chapter 1.VIII. 	How they apparelled Gargantua.
Chapter 1.IX. 	The colours and liveries of Gargantua.
Chapter 1.X. 	Of that which is signified by the colours white and blue.
Chapter 1.XI. 	Of the youthful age of Gargantua.
Chapter 1.XII. 	Of Gargantua’s wooden horses.
Chapter 1.XIII. 	How Gargantua’s wonderful understanding became known to his father Grangousier, by the invention of a torchecul or wipebreech.
Chapter 1.XIV. 	How Gargantua was taught Latin by a Sophister.
Chapter 1.XV. 	How Gargantua was put under other schoolmasters.
Chapter 1.XVI. 	How Gargantua was sent to Paris, and of the huge great mare that he rode on; how she destroyed the oxflies of the Beauce.
Chapter 1.XVII. 	How Gargantua paid his welcome to the Parisians, and how he took away the great bells of Our Lady’s Church.
Chapter 1.XVIII. 	How Janotus de Bragmardo was sent to Gargantua to recover the great bells.
Chapter 1.XIX. 	The oration of Master Janotus de Bragmardo for recovery of the bells.
Chapter 1.XX. 	How the Sophister carried away his cloth, and how he had a suit in law against the other masters.
Chapter 1.XXI. 	The study of Gargantua, according to the discipline of his schoolmasters the Sophisters.
Chapter 1.XXII. 	The games of Gargantua.
Chapter 1.XXIII. 	How Gargantua was instructed by Ponocrates, and in such sort disciplinated, that he lost not one hour of the day.
Chapter 1.XXIV. 	How Gargantua spent his time in rainy weather.
Chapter 1.XXV. 	How there was great strife and debate raised betwixt the cake-bakers of Lerne, and those of Gargantua’s country, whereupon were waged great wars.
Chapter 1.XXVI. 	How the inhabitants of Lerne, by the commandment of Picrochole their king, assaulted the shepherds of Gargantua unexpectedly and on a sudden.
Chapter 1.XXVII. 	How a monk of Seville saved the close of the abbey from being ransacked by the enemy.
Chapter 1.XXVIII. 	How Picrochole stormed and took by assault the rock Clermond, and of Grangousier’s unwillingness and aversion from the undertaking of war.
Chapter 1.XXIX. 	The tenour of the letter which Grangousier wrote to his son Gargantua.
Chapter 1.XXX. 	How Ulric Gallet was sent unto Picrochole.
Chapter 1.XXXI. 	The speech made by Gallet to Picrochole.
Chapter 1.XXXII. 	How Grangousier, to buy peace, caused the cakes to be restored.
Chapter 1.XXXIII. 	How some statesmen of Picrochole, by hairbrained counsel, put him in extreme danger.
Chapter 1.XXXIV. 	How Gargantua left the city of Paris to succour his country, and how Gymnast encountered with the enemy.
Chapter 1.XXXV. 	How Gymnast very souply and cunningly killed Captain Tripet and others of Picrochole’s men.
Chapter 1.XXXVI. 	How Gargantua demolished the castle at the ford of Vede, and how they passed the ford.
Chapter 1.XXXVII. 	How Gargantua, in combing his head, made the great cannon-balls fall out of his hair.
Chapter 1.XXXVIII. 	How Gargantua did eat up six pilgrims in a salad.
Chapter 1.XXXIX. 	How the Monk was feasted by Gargantua, and of the jovial discourse they had at supper.
Chapter 1.XL. 	Why monks are the outcasts of the world; and wherefore some have bigger noses than others.
Chapter 1.XLI. 	How the Monk made Gargantua sleep, and of his hours and breviaries.
Chapter 1.XLII. 	How the Monk encouraged his fellow-champions, and how he hanged upon a tree.
Chapter 1.XLIII. 	How the scouts and fore-party of Picrochole were met with by Gargantua, and how the Monk slew Captain Drawforth (Tirevant.), and then was taken prisoner by his enemies.
Chapter 1.XLIV. 	How the Monk rid himself of his keepers, and how Picrochole’s forlorn hope was defeated.
Chapter 1.XLV. 	How the Monk carried along with him the Pilgrims, and of the good words that Grangousier gave them.
Chapter 1.XLVI. 	How Grangousier did very kindly entertain Touchfaucet his prisoner.
Chapter 1.XLVII. 	How Grangousier sent for his legions, and how Touchfaucet slew Rashcalf, and was afterwards executed by the command of Picrochole.
Chapter 1.XLVIII. 	How Gargantua set upon Picrochole within the rock Clermond, and utterly defeated the army of the said Picrochole.
Chapter 1.XLIX. 	How Picrochole in his flight fell into great misfortunes, and what Gargantua did after the battle.
Chapter 1.L. 	Gargantua’s speech to the vanquished.
Chapter 1.LI. 	How the victorious Gargantuists were recompensed after the battle.
Chapter 1.LII. 	How Gargantua caused to be built for the Monk the Abbey of Theleme.
Chapter 1.LIII. 	How the abbey of the Thelemites was built and endowed.
Chapter 1.LIV. 	The inscription set upon the great gate of Theleme.
Chapter 1.LV. 	What manner of dwelling the Thelemites had.
Chapter 1.LVI. 	How the men and women of the religious order of Theleme were apparelled.
Chapter 1.LVII. 	How the Thelemites were governed, and of their manner of living.
Chapter 1.LVIII. 	A prophetical Riddle.
BOOK II.
Chapter 2.I. 	Of the original and antiquity of the great Pantagruel.
Chapter 2.II. 	Of the nativity of the most dread and redoubted Pantagruel.
Chapter 2.III. 	Of the grief wherewith Gargantua was moved at the decease of his wife Badebec.
Chapter 2.IV. 	Of the infancy of Pantagruel.
Chapter 2.V. 	Of the acts of the noble Pantagruel in his youthful age.
Chapter 2.VI. 	How Pantagruel met with a Limousin, who too affectedly did counterfeit the French language.
Chapter 2.VII. 	How Pantagruel came to Paris, and of the choice books of the Library of St. Victor.
Chapter 2.VIII. 	How Pantagruel, being at Paris, received letters from his father Gargantua, and the copy of them.
Chapter 2.IX. 	How Pantagruel found Panurge, whom he loved all his lifetime.
Chapter 2.X. 	How Pantagruel judged so equitably of a controversy, which was wonderfully obscure and difficult, that, by reason of his just decree therein, he was reputed to have a most admirable judgment.
Chapter 2.XI. 	How the Lords of Kissbreech and Suckfist did plead before Pantagruel without and attorney.
Chapter 2.XII. 	How the Lord of Suckfist pleaded before Pantagruel.
Chapter 2.XIII. 	How Pantagruel gave judgment upon the difference of the two lords.
Chapter 2.XIV. 	How Panurge related the manner how he escaped out of the hands of the Turks.
Chapter 2.XV. 	How Panurge showed a very new way to build the walls of Paris.
Chapter 2.XVI. 	Of the qualities and conditions of Panurge.
Chapter 2.XVII. 	How Panurge gained the pardons, and married the old women, and of the suit in law which he had at Paris.
Chapter 2.XVIII. 	How a great scholar of England would have argued against Pantagruel, and was overcome by Panurge.
Chapter 2.XIX. 	How Panurge put to a nonplus the Englishman that argued by signs.
Chapter 2.XX. 	How Thaumast relateth the virtues and knowledge of Panurge.
Chapter 2.XXI. 	How Panurge was in love with a lady of Paris.
Chapter 2.XXII. 	How Panurge served a Parisian lady a trick that pleased her not very well.
Chapter 2.XXIII. 	How Pantagruel departed from Paris, hearing news that the Dipsodes had invaded the land of the Amaurots; and the cause wherefore the leagues are so short in France.
Chapter 2.XXIV. 	A letter which a messenger brought to Pantagruel from a lady of Paris, together with the exposition of a posy written in a gold ring.
Chapter 2.XXV. 	How Panurge, Carpalin, Eusthenes, and Epistemon, the gentlemen attendants of Pantagruel, vanquished and discomfited six hundred and threescore horsemen very cunningly.
Chapter 2.XXVI. 	How Pantagruel and his company were weary in eating still salt meats; and how Carpalin went a-hunting to have some venison.
Chapter 2.XXVII. 	How Pantagruel set up one trophy in memorial of their valour, and Panurge another in remembrance of the hares. How Pantagruel likewise with his farts begat little men, and with his fisgs little women; and how Panurge broke a great staff over two glasses.
Chapter 2.XXVIII. 	How Pantagruel got the victory very strangely over the Dipsodes and the Giants.
Chapter 2.XXIX. 	How Pantagruel discomfited the three hundred giants armed with free-stone, and Loupgarou their captain.
Chapter 2.XXX. 	How Epistemon, who had his head cut off, was finely healed by Panurge, and of the news which he brought from the devils, and of the damned people in hell.
Chapter 2.XXXI. 	How Pantagruel entered into the city of the Amaurots, and how Panurge married King Anarchus to an old lantern-carrying hag, and made him a crier of green sauce.
Chapter 2.XXXII. 	How Pantagruel with his tongue covered a whole army, and what the author saw in his mouth.
Chapter 2.XXXIII. 	How Pantagruel became sick, and the manner how he was recovered.
Chapter 2.XXXIV. 	The conclusion of this present book, and the excuse of the author.
BOOK III.
Chapter 3.I. 	How Pantagruel transported a colony of Utopians into Dipsody.
Chapter 3.II. 	How Panurge was made Laird of Salmigondin in Dipsody, and did waste his revenue before it came in.
Chapter 3.III. 	How Panurge praiseth the debtors and borrowers.
Chapter 3.IV. 	Panurge continueth his discourse in the praise of borrowers and lenders.
Chapter 3.V. 	How Pantagruel altogether abhorreth the debtors and borrowers.
Chapter 3.VI. 	Why new married men were privileged from going to the wars.
Chapter 3.VII. 	How Panurge had a flea in his ear, and forbore to wear any longer his magnificent codpiece.
Chapter 3.VIII. 	Why the codpiece is held to be the chief piece of armour amongst warriors.
Chapter 3.IX. 	How Panurge asketh counsel of Pantagruel whether he should marry, yea, or no.
Chapter 3.X. 	How Pantagruel representeth unto Panurge the difficulty of giving advice in the matter of marriage; and to that purpose mentioneth somewhat of the Homeric and Virgilian lotteries.
Chapter 3.XI. 	How Pantagruel showeth the trial of one’s fortune by the throwing of dice to be unlawful.
Chapter 3.XII. 	How Pantagruel doth explore by the Virgilian lottery what fortune Panurge shall have in his marriage.
Chapter 3.XIII. 	How Pantagruel adviseth Panurge to try the future good or bad luck of his marriage by dreams.
Chapter 3.XIV. 	Panurge’s dream, with the interpretation thereof.
Chapter 3.XV. 	Panurge’s excuse and exposition of the monastic mystery concerning powdered beef.
Chapter 3.XVI. 	How Pantagruel adviseth Panurge to consult with the Sibyl of Panzoust.
Chapter 3.XVII. 	How Panurge spoke to the Sibyl of Panzoust.
Chapter 3.XVIII. 	How Pantagruel and Panurge did diversely expound the verses of the Sibyl of Panzoust.
Chapter 3.XIX. 	How Pantagruel praiseth the counsel of dumb men.
Chapter 3.XX. 	How Goatsnose by signs maketh answer to Panurge.
Chapter 3.XXI. 	How Panurge consulteth with an old French poet, named Raminagrobis.
Chapter 3.XXII. 	How Panurge patrocinates and defendeth the Order of the Begging Friars.
Chapter 3.XXIII. 	How Panurge maketh the motion of a return to Raminagrobis.
Chapter 3.XXIV. 	How Panurge consulteth with Epistemon.
Chapter 3.XXV. 	How Panurge consulteth with Herr Trippa.
Chapter 3.XXVI. 	How Panurge consulteth with Friar John of the Funnels.
Chapter 3.XXVII. 	How Friar John merrily and sportingly counselleth Panurge.
Chapter 3.XXVIII. 	How Friar John comforteth Panurge in the doubtful matter of cuckoldry.
Chapter 3.XXIX. 	How Pantagruel convocated together a theologian, physician, lawyer, and philosopher, for extricating Panurge out of the perplexity wherein he was.
Chapter 3.XXX. 	How the theologue, Hippothadee, giveth counsel to Panurge in the matter and business of his nuptial enterprise.
Chapter 3.XXXI. 	How the physician Rondibilis counselleth Panurge.
Chapter 3.XXXII. 	How Rondibilis declareth cuckoldry to be naturally one of the appendances of marriage.
Chapter 3.XXXIII. 	Rondibilis the physician’s cure of cuckoldry.
Chapter 3.XXXIV. 	How women ordinarily have the greatest longing after things prohibited.
Chapter 3.XXXV. 	How the philosopher Trouillogan handleth the difficulty of marriage.
Chapter 3.XXXVI. 	A continuation of the answer of the Ephectic and Pyrrhonian philosopher Trouillogan.
Chapter 3.XXXVII. 	How Pantagruel persuaded Panurge to take counsel of a fool.
Chapter 3.XXXVIII. 	How Triboulet is set forth and blazed by Pantagruel and Panurge.
Chapter 3.XXXIX. 	How Pantagruel was present at the trial of Judge Bridlegoose, who decided causes and controversies in law by the chance and fortune of the dice.
Chapter 3.XL. 	How Bridlegoose giveth reasons why he looked upon those law-actions which he decided by the chance of the dice.
Chapter 3.XLI. 	How Bridlegoose relateth the history of the reconcilers of parties at variance in matters of law.
Chapter 3.XLII. 	How suits at law are bred at first, and how they come afterwards to their perfect growth.
Chapter 3.XLIII. 	How Pantagruel excuseth Bridlegoose in the matter of sentencing actions at law by the chance of the dice.
Chapter 3.XLIV. 	How Pantagruel relateth a strange history of the perplexity of human judgment.
Chapter 3.XLV. 	How Panurge taketh advice of Triboulet.
Chapter 3.XLVI. 	How Pantagruel and Panurge diversely interpret the words of Triboulet.
Chapter 3.XLVII. 	How Pantagruel and Panurge resolved to make a visit to the oracle of the holy bottle.
Chapter 3.XLVIII. 	How Gargantua showeth that the children ought not to marry without the special knowledge and advice of their fathers and mothers.
Chapter 3.XLIX. 	How Pantagruel did put himself in a readiness to go to sea; and of the herb named Pantagruelion.
Chapter 3.L. 	How the famous Pantagruelion ought to be prepared and wrought.
Chapter 3.LI. 	Why it is called Pantagruelion, and of the admirable virtues thereof.
Chapter 3.LII. 	How a certain kind of Pantagruelion is of that nature that the fire is not able to consume it.
BOOK IV.
Chapter 4.I. 	How Pantagruel went to sea to visit the oracle of Bacbuc, alias the Holy Bottle.
Chapter 4.II. 	How Pantagruel bought many rarities in the island of Medamothy.
Chapter 4.III. 	How Pantagruel received a letter from his father Gargantua, and of the strange way to have speedy news from far distant places.
Chapter 4.IV. 	How Pantagruel writ to his father Gargantua, and sent him several curiosities.
Chapter 4.V. 	How Pantagruel met a ship with passengers returning from Lanternland.
Chapter 4.VI. 	How, the fray being over, Panurge cheapened one of Dingdong’s sheep.
Chapter 4.VII. 	Which if you read you’ll find how Panurge bargained with Dingdong.
Chapter 4.VIII. 	How Panurge caused Dingdong and his sheep to be drowned in the sea.
Chapter 4.IX. 	How Pantagruel arrived at the island of Ennasin, and of the strange ways of being akin in that country.
Chapter 4.X. 	How Pantagruel went ashore at the island of Chely, where he saw King St. Panigon.
Chapter 4.XI. 	Why monks love to be in kitchens.
Chapter 4.XII. 	How Pantagruel passed by the land of Pettifogging, and of the strange way of living among the Catchpoles.
Chapter 4.XIII. 	How, like Master Francis Villon, the Lord of Basche commended his servants.
Chapter 4.XIV. 	A further account of catchpoles who were drubbed at Basche’s house.
Chapter 4.XV. 	How the ancient custom at nuptials is renewed by the catchpole.
Chapter 4.XVI. 	How Friar John made trial of the nature of the catchpoles.
Chapter 4.XVII. 	How Pantagruel came to the islands of Tohu and Bohu; and of the strange death of Wide-nostrils, the swallower of windmills.
Chapter 4.XVIII. 	How Pantagruel met with a great storm at sea.
Chapter 4.XIX. 	What countenances Panurge and Friar John kept during the storm.
Chapter 4.XX. 	How the pilots were forsaking their ships in the greatest stress of weather.
Chapter 4.XXI. 	A continuation of the storm, with a short discourse on the subject of making testaments at sea.
Chapter 4.XXII. 	An end of the storm.
Chapter 4.XXIII. 	How Panurge played the good fellow when the storm was over.
Chapter 4.XXIV. 	How Panurge was said to have been afraid without reason during the storm.
Chapter 4.XXV. 	How, after the storm, Pantagruel went on shore in the islands of the Macreons.
Chapter 4.XXVI. 	How the good Macrobius gave us an account of the mansion and decease of the heroes.
Chapter 4.XXVII. 	Pantagruel’s discourse of the decease of heroic souls; and of the dreadful prodigies that happened before the death of the late Lord de Langey.
Chapter 4.XXVIII. 	How Pantagruel related a very sad story of the death of the heroes.
Chapter 4.XXIX. 	How Pantagruel sailed by the Sneaking Island, where Shrovetide reigned.
Chapter 4.XXX. 	How Shrovetide is anatomized and described by Xenomanes.
Chapter 4.XXXI. 	Shrovetide’s outward parts anatomized.
Chapter 4.XXXII. 	A continuation of Shrovetide’s countenance.
Chapter 4.XXXIII. 	How Pantagruel discovered a monstrous physeter, or whirlpool, near the Wild Island.
Chapter 4.XXXIV. 	How the monstrous physeter was slain by Pantagruel.
Chapter 4.XXXV. 	How Pantagruel went on shore in the Wild Island, the ancient abode of the Chitterlings.
Chapter 4.XXXVI. 	How the wild Chitterlings laid an ambuscado for Pantagruel.
Chapter 4.XXXVII. 	How Pantagruel sent for Colonel Maul-chitterling and Colonel Cut-pudding; with a discourse well worth your hearing about the names of places and persons.
Chapter 4.XXXVIII. 	How Chitterlings are not to be slighted by men.
Chapter 4.XXXIX. 	How Friar John joined with the cooks to fight the Chitterlings.
Chapter 4.XL. 	How Friar John fitted up the sow; and of the valiant cooks that went into it.
Chapter 4.XLI. 	How Pantagruel broke the Chitterlings at the knees.
Chapter 4.XLII. 	How Pantagruel held a treaty with Niphleseth, Queen of the Chitterlings.
Chapter 4.XLIII. 	How Pantagruel went into the island of Ruach.
Chapter 4.XLIV. 	How small rain lays a high wind.
Chapter 4.XLV. 	How Pantagruel went ashore in the island of Pope-Figland.
Chapter 4.XLVI. 	How a junior devil was fooled by a husbandman of Pope-Figland.
Chapter 4.XLVII. 	How the devil was deceived by an old woman of Pope-Figland.
Chapter 4.XLVIII. 	How Pantagruel went ashore at the island of Papimany.
Chapter 4.XLIX. 	How Homenas, Bishop of Papimany, showed us the Uranopet decretals.
Chapter 4.L. 	How Homenas showed us the archetype, or representation of a pope.
Chapter 4.LI. 	Table-talk in praise of the decretals.
Chapter 4.LII. 	A continuation of the miracles caused by the decretals.
Chapter 4.LIII. 	How by the virtue of the decretals, gold is subtilely drawn out of France to Rome.
Chapter 4.LIV. 	How Homenas gave Pantagruel some bon-Christian pears.
Chapter 4.LV. 	How Pantagruel, being at sea, heard various unfrozen words.
Chapter 4.LVI. 	How among the frozen words Pantagruel found some odd ones.
Chapter 4.LVII. 	How Pantagruel went ashore at the dwelling of Gaster, the first master of arts in the world.
Chapter 4.LVIII. 	How, at the court of the master of ingenuity, Pantagruel detested the Engastrimythes and the Gastrolaters.
Chapter 4.LIX. 	Of the ridiculous statue Manduce; and how and what the Gastrolaters sacrifice to their ventripotent god.
Chapter 4.LX. 	What the Gastrolaters sacrificed to their god on interlarded fish-days.
Chapter 4.LXI. 	How Gaster invented means to get and preserve corn.
Chapter 4.LXII. 	How Gaster invented an art to avoid being hurt or touched by cannon-balls.
Chapter 4.LXIII. 	How Pantagruel fell asleep near the island of Chaneph, and of the problems proposed to be solved when he waked.
Chapter 4.LXIV. 	How Pantagruel gave no answer to the problems.
Chapter 4.LXV. 	How Pantagruel passed the time with his servants.
Chapter 4.LXVI. 	How, by Pantagruel’s order, the Muses were saluted near the isle of Ganabim.
Chapter 4.LXVII. 	How Panurge berayed himself for fear; and of the huge cat Rodilardus, which he took for a puny devil.
BOOK V.
Chapter 5.I. 	How Pantagruel arrived at the Ringing Island, and of the noise that we heard.
Chapter 5.II. 	How the Ringing Island had been inhabited by the Siticines, who were become birds.
Chapter 5.III. 	How there is but one pope-hawk in the Ringing Island.
Chapter 5.IV. 	How the birds of the Ringing Island were all passengers.
Chapter 5.V. 	Of the dumb Knight-hawks of the Ringing Island.
Chapter 5.VI. 	How the birds are crammed in the Ringing Island.
Chapter 5.VII. 	How Panurge related to Master Aedituus the fable of the horse and the ass.
Chapter 5.VIII. 	How with much ado we got a sight of the pope-hawk.
Chapter 5.IX. 	How we arrived at the island of Tools.
Chapter 5.X. 	How Pantagruel arrived at the island of Sharping.
Chapter 5.XI. 	How we passed through the wicket inhabited by Gripe-men-all, Archduke of the Furred Law-cats.
Chapter 5.XII. 	How Gripe-men-all propounded a riddle to us.
Chapter 5.XIII. 	How Panurge solved Gripe-men-all’s riddle.
Chapter 5.XIV. 	How the Furred Law-cats live on corruption.
Chapter 5.XV. 	How Friar John talks of rooting out the Furred Law-cats.
Chapter 5.XVI. 	How Pantagruel came to the island of the Apedefers, or Ignoramuses, with long claws and crooked paws, and of terrible adventures and monsters there.
Chapter 5.XVII. 	How we went forwards, and how Panurge had like to have been killed.
Chapter 5.XVIII. 	How our ships were stranded, and we were relieved by some people that were subject to Queen Whims (qui tenoient de la Quinte).
Chapter 5.XIX. 	How we arrived at the queendom of Whims or Entelechy.
Chapter 5.XX. 	How the Quintessence cured the sick with a song.
Chapter 5.XXI. 	How the Queen passed her time after dinner.
Chapter 5.XXII. 	How Queen Whims’ officers were employed; and how the said lady retained us among her abstractors.
Chapter 5.XXIII. 	How the Queen was served at dinner, and of her way of eating.
Chapter 5.XXIV. 	How there was a ball in the manner of a tournament, at which Queen Whims was present.
Chapter 5.XXV. 	How the thirty-two persons at the ball fought.
Chapter 5.XXVI. 	How we came to the island of Odes, where the ways go up and down.
Chapter 5.XXVII. 	How we came to the island of Sandals; and of the order of Semiquaver Friars.
Chapter 5.XXVIII. 	How Panurge asked a Semiquaver Friar many questions, and was only answered in monosyllables.
Chapter 5.XXIX. 	How Epistemon disliked the institution of Lent.
Chapter 5.XXX. 	How we came to the land of Satin.
Chapter 5.XXXI. 	How in the land of Satin we saw Hearsay, who kept a school of vouching.
Chapter 5.XXXII. 	How we came in sight of Lantern-land.
Chapter 5.XXXIII. 	How we landed at the port of the Lychnobii, and came to Lantern-land.
Chapter 5.XXXIV. 	How we arrived at the Oracle of the Bottle.
Chapter 5.XXXV. 	How we went underground to come to the Temple of the Holy Bottle, and how Chinon is the oldest city in the world.
Chapter 5.XXXVI. 	How we went down the tetradic steps, and of Panurge’s fear.
Chapter 5.XXXVII. 	How the temple gates in a wonderful manner opened of themselves.
Chapter 5.XXXVIII. 	Of the Temple’s admirable pavement.
Chapter 5.XXXIX. 	How we saw Bacchus’s army drawn up in battalia in mosaic work.
Chapter 5.XL. 	How the battle in which the good Bacchus overthrew the Indians was represented in mosaic work.
Chapter 5.XLI. 	How the temple was illuminated with a wonderful lamp.
Chapter 5.XLII 	How the Priestess Bacbuc showed us a fantastic fountain in the temple, and how the fountain-water had the taste of wine, according to the imagination of those who drank of it.
Chapter 5.XLIII. 	How the Priestess Bacbuc equipped Panurge in order to have the word of the Bottle.
Chapter 5.XLIV. 	How Bacbuc, the high-priestess, brought Panurge before the Holy Bottle.
Chapter 5.XLV. 	How Bacbuc explained the word of the Goddess-Bottle.
Chapter 5.XLVI. 	How Panurge and the rest rhymed with poetic fury.
Chapter 5.XLVII. 	How we took our leave of Bacbuc, and left the Oracle of the Holy Bottle.
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
He Did Cry Like a Cow 	frontispiece
Titlepage
Rabelais Dissecting Society 	portrait2
Francois Rabelais 	portrait
Prologue1
All Stiff Drinkers 	1-05-006
One of the Girls Brought Him Wine 	1-07-018
On the Road to The Castle 	1-11-026
Led Them up the Great Staircase 	1-12-028
He Went to See the City 	1-16-036
Gargantua Visiting the Shops 	1-17-038
He Did Swim in Deep Waters 	1-23-048
The Monks Knew Not 	1-27-060
How Gargantua Passed the Ford 	1-36-076
Valiant Champions on Their Adventure 	1-42-086
I Hear the Enemy, Let Us Rally 	1-43-088
BOOK II.
He Did Cry Like a Cow 	frontispiece
Titlepage
Rabelais Dissecting Society 	portrait2
Francois Rabelais 	portrait
With This I Ran Away 	2-13-159
When the Dogs Have You 	2-14-164
Laid a Train of Gunpowder 	2-16-168
After Dinner Panurge Went to See Her 	2-21-184
Horseman Very Cunningly Vanquished 	2-25-192
Striking Them Down As a Mason Does 	2-29-204
Epictetus There Making Good Cheer 	2-30-208
Seeking of Rusty Pins and Old Nails 	2-30-210
BOOK III.
He Did Cry Like a Cow 	frontispiece
Titlepage
Rabelais Dissecting Society 	portrait2
Francois Rabelais 	portrait
Panurge Seeks the Advice of Pantagruel 	3-08-240
Found the Old Woman Sitting Alone 	3-17-225
The Chamber is Already Full of Devils 	3-23-294
Rondibilus the Physician 	3-30-322
Altercation Waxed Hot in Words 	3-37-346
Bridlegoose 	3-39-352
Relateth the History of The Reconcilers 	3-41-356
Sucking Very Much at the Purses of The Pleading Parties 	3-42-360
Serving in the Place of a Cravat 	3-51-386
BOOK IV.
He Did Cry Like a Cow 	frontispiece
Titlepage
Rabelais Dissecting Society 	portrait2
Francois Rabelais 	portrait
Prologue4
My Hatchet, Lord Jupeter 	4-00-400
He Comes to Chinon 	4-00-406
Cost What They Will, Trade With Me 	4-07-420
All of Them Forced to Sea and Drowned 	4-08-422
Messire Oudart 	4-12-430
Friar John 	4-23-452
Two Old Women Were Weeping and Wailing 	4-19-446
Physetere Was Slain by Pantagruel 	4-35-472
Pantagruel Arose to Scour the Thicket 	4-36-474
Cut the Sausage in Twain 	4-41-482
The Devil Came to the Place 	4-48-496
Appointed Cows to Furnish Milk 	4-51-500
We Were All out of Sorts 	4-63-524
BOOK V.
He Did Cry Like a Cow 	frontispiece
Titlepage
Rabelais Dissecting Society 	portrait2
Francois Rabelais 	portrait
The Master of Ringing Island 	5-03-544
Furred Law Cats Scrambling After the Crowns 	5-13-564
Friar John and Panurge 	5-28-600
Humbly Beseech Your Lanternship 	5-35-618



DON QUIXOTE
by Miguel de Cervantes
Translated by John Ormsby
Volume I.
CONTENTS
CHAPTER I 	WHICH TREATS OF THE CHARACTER AND PURSUITS OF THE FAMOUS GENTLEMAN DON QUIXOTE OF LA MANCHA
CHAPTER II 	WHICH TREATS OF THE FIRST SALLY THE INGENIOUS DON QUIXOTE MADE FROM HOME
CHAPTER III 	WHEREIN IS RELATED THE DROLL WAY IN WHICH DON QUIXOTE HAD HIMSELF DUBBED A KNIGHT
CHAPTER IV 	OF WHAT HAPPENED TO OUR KNIGHT WHEN HE LEFT THE INN
CHAPTER V 	IN WHICH THE NARRATIVE OF OUR KNIGHT’S MISHAP IS CONTINUED
CHAPTER VI 	OF THE DIVERTING AND IMPORTANT SCRUTINY WHICH THE CURATE AND THE BARBER MADE IN THE LIBRARY OF OUR INGENIOUS GENTLEMAN
CHAPTER VII 	OF THE SECOND SALLY OF OUR WORTHY KNIGHT DON QUIXOTE OF LA MANCHA
CHAPTER VIII 	OF THE GOOD FORTUNE WHICH THE VALIANT DON QUIXOTE HAD IN THE TERRIBLE AND UNDREAMT-OF ADVENTURE OF THE WINDMILLS, WITH OTHER OCCURRENCES WORTHY TO BE FITLY RECORDED
CHAPTER IX 	IN WHICH IS CONCLUDED AND FINISHED THE TERRIFIC BATTLE BETWEEN THE GALLANT BISCAYAN AND THE VALIANT MANCHEGAN
CHAPTER X 	OF THE PLEASANT DISCOURSE THAT PASSED BETWEEN DON QUIXOTE AND HIS SQUIRE SANCHO PANZA
CHAPTER XI 	OF WHAT BEFELL DON QUIXOTE WITH CERTAIN GOATHERDS
CHAPTER XII 	OF WHAT A GOATHERD RELATED TO THOSE WITH DON QUIXOTE
CHAPTER XIII 	IN WHICH IS ENDED THE STORY OF THE SHEPHERDESS MARCELA, WITH OTHER INCIDENTS
CHAPTER XIV 	WHEREIN ARE INSERTED THE DESPAIRING VERSES OF THE DEAD SHEPHERD, TOGETHER WITH OTHER INCIDENTS NOT LOOKED FOR
CHAPTER XV 	IN WHICH IS RELATED THE UNFORTUNATE ADVENTURE THAT DON QUIXOTE FELL IN WITH WHEN HE FELL OUT WITH CERTAIN HEARTLESS YANGUESANS
CHAPTER XVI 	OF WHAT HAPPENED TO THE INGENIOUS GENTLEMAN IN THE INN WHICH HE TOOK TO BE A CASTLE
CHAPTER XVII 	IN WHICH ARE CONTAINED THE INNUMERABLE TROUBLES WHICH THE BRAVE DON QUIXOTE AND HIS GOOD SQUIRE SANCHO PANZA ENDURED IN THE INN, WHICH TO HIS MISFORTUNE HE TOOK TO BE A CASTLE
CHAPTER XVIII 	IN WHICH IS RELATED THE DISCOURSE SANCHO PANZA HELD WITH HIS MASTER, DON QUIXOTE, AND OTHER ADVENTURES WORTH RELATING
CHAPTER XIX 	OF THE SHREWD DISCOURSE WHICH SANCHO HELD WITH HIS MASTER, AND OF THE ADVENTURE THAT BEFELL HIM WITH A DEAD BODY, TOGETHER WITH OTHER NOTABLE OCCURRENCES
CHAPTER XX 	OF THE UNEXAMPLED AND UNHEARD-OF ADVENTURE WHICH WAS ACHIEVED BY THE VALIANT DON QUIXOTE OF LA MANCHA WITH LESS PERIL THAN ANY EVER ACHIEVED BY ANY FAMOUS KNIGHT IN THE WORLD
CHAPTER XXI 	WHICH TREATS OF THE EXALTED ADVENTURE AND RICH PRIZE OF MAMBRINO’S HELMET, TOGETHER WITH OTHER THINGS THAT HAPPENED TO OUR INVINCIBLE KNIGHT
CHAPTER XXII 	OF THE FREEDOM DON QUIXOTE CONFERRED ON SEVERAL UNFORTUNATES WHO AGAINST THEIR WILL WERE BEING CARRIED WHERE THEY HAD NO WISH TO GO
CHAPTER XXIII 	OF WHAT BEFELL DON QUIXOTE IN THE SIERRA MORENA, WHICH WAS ONE OF THE RAREST ADVENTURES RELATED IN THIS VERACIOUS HISTORY
CHAPTER XXIV 	IN WHICH IS CONTINUED THE ADVENTURE OF THE SIERRA MORENA
CHAPTER XXV 	WHICH TREATS OF THE STRANGE THINGS THAT HAPPENED TO THE STOUT KNIGHT OF LA MANCHA IN THE SIERRA MORENA, AND OF HIS IMITATION OF THE PENANCE OF BELTENEBROS
CHAPTER XXVI 	IN WHICH ARE CONTINUED THE REFINEMENTS WHEREWITH DON QUIXOTE PLAYED THE PART OF A LOVER IN THE SIERRA MORENA
CHAPTER XXVII 	OF HOW THE CURATE AND THE BARBER PROCEEDED WITH THEIR SCHEME; TOGETHER WITH OTHER MATTERS WORTHY OF RECORD IN THIS GREAT HISTORY
CHAPTER XXVIII 	WHICH TREATS OF THE STRANGE AND DELIGHTFUL ADVENTURE THAT BEFELL THE CURATE AND THE BARBER IN THE SAME SIERRA
CHAPTER XXIX 	WHICH TREATS OF THE DROLL DEVICE AND METHOD ADOPTED TO EXTRICATE OUR LOVE-STRICKEN KNIGHT FROM THE SEVERE PENANCE HE HAD IMPOSED UPON HIMSELF
CHAPTER XXX 	WHICH TREATS OF ADDRESS DISPLAYED BY THE FAIR DOROTHEA, WITH OTHER MATTERS PLEASANT AND AMUSING
CHAPTER XXXI 	OF THE DELECTABLE DISCUSSION BETWEEN DON QUIXOTE AND SANCHO PANZA, HIS SQUIRE, TOGETHER WITH OTHER INCIDENTS
CHAPTER XXXII 	WHICH TREATS OF WHAT BEFELL DON QUIXOTE’S PARTY AT THE INN
CHAPTER XXXIII 	IN WHICH IS RELATED THE NOVEL OF “THE ILL-ADVISED CURIOSITY”
CHAPTER XXXIV 	IN WHICH IS CONTINUED THE NOVEL OF “THE ILL-ADVISED CURIOSITY”
CHAPTER XXXV 	WHICH TREATS OF THE HEROIC AND PRODIGIOUS BATTLE DON QUIXOTE HAD WITH CERTAIN SKINS OF RED WINE, AND BRINGS THE NOVEL OF “THE ILL-ADVISED CURIOSITY” TO A CLOSE
CHAPTER XXXVI 	WHICH TREATS OF MORE CURIOUS INCIDENTS THAT OCCURRED AT THE INN
CHAPTER XXXVII 	IN WHICH IS CONTINUED THE STORY OF THE FAMOUS PRINCESS MICOMICONA, WITH OTHER DROLL ADVENTURES
CHAPTER XXXVIII 	WHICH TREATS OF THE CURIOUS DISCOURSE DON QUIXOTE DELIVERED ON ARMS AND LETTERS
CHAPTER XXXIX 	WHEREIN THE CAPTIVE RELATES HIS LIFE AND ADVENTURES
CHAPTER XL 	IN WHICH THE STORY OF THE CAPTIVE IS CONTINUED
CHAPTER XLI 	IN WHICH THE CAPTIVE STILL CONTINUES HIS ADVENTURES
CHAPTER XLII 	WHICH TREATS OF WHAT FURTHER TOOK PLACE IN THE INN, AND OF SEVERAL OTHER THINGS WORTH KNOWING
CHAPTER XLIII 	WHEREIN IS RELATED THE PLEASANT STORY OF THE MULETEER, TOGETHER WITH OTHER STRANGE THINGS THAT CAME TO PASS IN THE INN
CHAPTER XLIV 	IN WHICH ARE CONTINUED THE UNHEARD-OF ADVENTURES OF THE INN
CHAPTER XLV 	IN WHICH THE DOUBTFUL QUESTION OF MAMBRINO’S HELMET AND THE PACK-SADDLE IS FINALLY SETTLED, WITH OTHER ADVENTURES THAT OCCURRED IN TRUTH AND EARNEST
CHAPTER XLVI 	OF THE END OF THE NOTABLE ADVENTURE OF THE OFFICERS OF THE HOLY BROTHERHOOD; AND OF THE GREAT FEROCITY OF OUR WORTHY KNIGHT, DON QUIXOTE
CHAPTER XLVII 	OF THE STRANGE MANNER IN WHICH DON QUIXOTE OF LA MANCHA WAS CARRIED AWAY ENCHANTED, TOGETHER WITH OTHER REMARKABLE INCIDENTS
CHAPTER XLVIII 	IN WHICH THE CANON PURSUES THE SUBJECT OF THE BOOKS OF CHIVALRY, WITH OTHER MATTERS WORTHY OF HIS WIT
CHAPTER XLIX 	WHICH TREATS OF THE SHREWD CONVERSATION WHICH SANCHO PANZA HELD WITH HIS MASTER DON QUIXOTE
CHAPTER L 	OF THE SHREWD CONTROVERSY WHICH DON QUIXOTE AND THE CANON HELD, TOGETHER WITH OTHER INCIDENTS
CHAPTER LI 	WHICH DEALS WITH WHAT THE GOATHERD TOLD THOSE WHO WERE CARRYING OFF DON QUIXOTE
CHAPTER LII 	OF THE QUARREL THAT DON QUIXOTE HAD WITH THE GOATHERD, TOGETHER WITH THE RARE ADVENTURE OF THE PENITENTS, WHICH WITH AN EXPENDITURE OF SWEAT HE BROUGHT TO A HAPPY CONCLUSION



DON QUIXOTE
by Miguel de Cervantes
Volume II
Translated by John Ormsby



CONTENTS
CHAPTER I 	OF THE INTERVIEW THE CURATE AND THE BARBER HAD WITH DON QUIXOTE ABOUT HIS MALADY
CHAPTER II 	WHICH TREATS OF THE NOTABLE ALTERCATION WHICH SANCHO PANZA HAD WITH DON QUIXOTE’S NIECE, AND HOUSEKEEPER, TOGETHER WITH OTHER DROLLMATTERS
CHAPTER III 	OF THE LAUGHABLE CONVERSATION THAT PASSED BETWEEN DON QUIXOTE, SANCHO PANZA, AND THE BACHELOR SAMSON CARRASCO
CHAPTER IV 	IN WHICH SANCHO PANZA GIVES A SATISFACTORY REPLY TO THE DOUBTS AND QUESTIONS OF THE BACHELOR SAMSON CARRASCO, TOGETHER WITH OTHER MATTERS WORTH KNOWING AND TELLING
CHAPTER V 	OF THE SHREWD AND DROLL CONVERSATION THAT PASSED BETWEEN SANCHO PANZA AND HIS WIFE TERESA PANZA, AND OTHER MATTERS WORTHY OF BEING DULY RECORDED
CHAPTER VI 	OF WHAT TOOK PLACE BETWEEN DON QUIXOTE AND HIS NIECE AND HOUSEKEEPER; ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT CHAPTERS IN THE WHOLE HISTORY
CHAPTER VII 	OF WHAT PASSED BETWEEN DON QUIXOTE AND HIS SQUIRE, TOGETHER WITH OTHER VERY NOTABLE INCIDENTS
CHAPTER VIII 	WHEREIN IS RELATED WHAT BEFELL DON QUIXOTE ON HIS WAY TO SEE HIS LADY DULCINEA DEL TOBOSO
CHAPTER IX 	WHEREIN IS RELATED WHAT WILL BE SEEN THERE
CHAPTER X 	WHEREIN IS RELATED THE CRAFTY DEVICE SANCHO ADOPTED TO ENCHANT THE LADY DULCINEA, AND OTHER INCIDENTS AS LUDICROUS AS THEY ARE TRUE
CHAPTER XI 	OF THE STRANGE ADVENTURE WHICH THE VALIANT DON QUIXOTE HAD WITH THE CAR OR CART OF “THE CORTES OF DEATH”
CHAPTER XII 	OF THE STRANGE ADVENTURE WHICH BEFELL THE VALIANT DON QUIXOTE WITH THE BOLD KNIGHT OF THE MIRRORS
CHAPTER XIII 	IN WHICH IS CONTINUED THE ADVENTURE OF THE KNIGHT OF THE GROVE, TOGETHER WITH THE SENSIBLE, ORIGINAL, AND TRANQUIL COLLOQUY THAT PASSED BETWEEN THE TWO SQUIRES
CHAPTER XIV 	WHEREIN IS CONTINUED THE ADVENTURE OF THE KNIGHT OF THE GROVE
CHAPTER XV 	WHEREIN IT IS TOLD AND KNOWN WHO THE KNIGHT OF THE MIRRORS AND HIS SQUIRE WERE
CHAPTER XVI 	OF WHAT BEFELL DON QUIXOTE WITH A DISCREET GENTLEMAN OF LA MANCHA
CHAPTER XVII 	WHEREIN IS SHOWN THE FURTHEST AND HIGHEST POINT WHICH THE UNEXAMPLEDCOURAGE OF DON QUIXOTE REACHED OR COULD REACH; TOGETHER WITH THE HAPPILY ACHIEVED ADVENTURE OF THE LIONS
CHAPTER XVIII 	OF WHAT HAPPENED DON QUIXOTE IN THE CASTLE OR HOUSE OF THE KNIGHT OF THE GREEN GABAN, TOGETHER WITH OTHER MATTERS OUT OF THE COMMON
CHAPTER XIX 	IN WHICH IS RELATED THE ADVENTURE OF THE ENAMOURED SHEPHERD, TOGETHER WITH OTHER TRULY DROLL INCIDENTS
CHAPTER XX 	WHEREIN AN ACCOUNT IS GIVEN OF THE WEDDING OF CAMACHO THE RICH, TOGETHER WITH THE INCIDENT OF BASILIO THE POOR
CHAPTER XXI 	IN WHICH CAMACHO’S WEDDING IS CONTINUED, WITH OTHER DELIGHTFUL INCIDENTS
CHAPTER XXII 	WHEREIN IS RELATED THE GRAND ADVENTURE OF THE CAVE OF MONTESINOS IN THE HEART OF LA MANCHA, WHICH THE VALIANT DON QUIXOTE BROUGHT TO A HAPPY TERMINATION
CHAPTER XXIII 	OF THE WONDERFUL THINGS THE INCOMPARABLE DON QUIXOTE SAID HE SAW IN THE PROFOUND CAVE OF MONTESINOS, THE IMPOSSIBILITY AND MAGNITUDE OF WHICH CAUSE THIS ADVENTURE TO BE DEEMED APOCRYPHAL
CHAPTER XXIV 	WHEREIN ARE RELATED A THOUSAND TRIFLING MATTERS, AS TRIVIAL AS THEY ARE NECESSARY TO THE RIGHT UNDERSTANDING OF THIS GREAT HISTORY
CHAPTER XXV 	WHEREIN IS SET DOWN THE BRAYING ADVENTURE, AND THE DROLL ONE OF THE PUPPET-SHOWMAN, TOGETHER WITH THE MEMORABLE DIVINATIONS OF THE DIVINING APE
CHAPTER XXVI 	WHEREIN IS CONTINUED THE DROLL ADVENTURE OF THE PUPPET-SHOWMAN, TOGETHER WITH OTHER THINGS IN TRUTH RIGHT GOOD
CHAPTER XXVII 	WHEREIN IT IS SHOWN WHO MASTER PEDRO AND HIS APE WERE, TOGETHER WITH THE MISHAP DON QUIXOTE HAD IN THE BRAYING ADVENTURE, WHICH HE DID NOT CONCLUDE AS HE WOULD HAVE LIKED OR AS HE HAD EXPECTED
CHAPTER XXVIII 	OF MATTERS THAT BENENGELI SAYS HE WHO READS THEM WILL KNOW, IF HE READS THEM WITH ATTENTION
CHAPTER XXIX 	OF THE FAMOUS ADVENTURE OF THE ENCHANTED BARK
CHAPTER XXX 	OF DON QUIXOTE’S ADVENTURE WITH A FAIR HUNTRESS
CHAPTER XXXI 	WHICH TREATS OF MANY AND GREAT MATTERS
CHAPTER XXXII 	OF THE REPLY DON QUIXOTE GAVE HIS CENSURER, WITH OTHER INCIDENTS, GRAVE AND DROLL
CHAPTER XXXIII 	OF THE DELECTABLE DISCOURSE WHICH THE DUCHESS AND HER DAMSELS HELD WITH SANCHO PANZA, WELL WORTH READING AND NOTING
CHAPTER XXXIV 	WHICH RELATES HOW THEY LEARNED THE WAY IN WHICH THEY WERE TO DISENCHANT THE PEERLESS DULCINEA DEL TOBOSO, WHICH IS ONE OF THE RAREST ADVENTURES IN THIS BOOK
CHAPTER XXXV 	WHEREIN IS CONTINUED THE INSTRUCTION GIVEN TO DON QUIXOTE TOUCHING THE DISENCHANTMENT OF DULCINEA, TOGETHER WITH OTHER MARVELLOUS INCIDENTS
CHAPTER XXXVI 	WHEREIN IS RELATED THE STRANGE AND UNDREAMT-OF ADVENTURE OF THE DISTRESSED DUENNA, ALIAS THE COUNTESS TRIFALDI, TOGETHER WITH A LETTER WHICH SANCHO PANZA WROTE TO HIS WIFE, TERESA PANZA
CHAPTER XXXVII 	WHEREIN IS CONTINUED THE NOTABLE ADVENTURE OF THE DISTRESSED DUENNA
CHAPTER XXXVIII 	WHEREIN IS TOLD THE DISTRESSED DUENNA’S TALE OF HER MISFORTUNES
CHAPTER XXXIX 	IN WHICH THE TRIFALDI CONTINUES HER MARVELLOUS AND MEMORABLE STORY
CHAPTER XL 	OF MATTERS RELATING AND BELONGING TO THIS ADVENTURE AND TO THIS MEMORABLE HISTORY
CHAPTER XLI 	OF THE ARRIVAL OF CLAVILENO AND THE END OF THIS PROTRACTED ADVENTURE
CHAPTER XLII 	OF THE COUNSELS WHICH DON QUIXOTE GAVE SANCHO PANZA BEFORE HE SET OUT TO GOVERN THE ISLAND, TOGETHER WITH OTHER WELL-CONSIDERED MATTERS
CHAPTER XLIII 	OF THE SECOND SET OF COUNSELS DON QUIXOTE GAVE SANCHO PANZA
CHAPTER XLIV 	HOW SANCHO PANZA WAS CONDUCTED TO HIS GOVERNMENT, AND OF THE STRANGE ADVENTURE THAT BEFELL DON QUIXOTE IN THE CASTLE
CHAPTER XLV 	OF HOW THE GREAT SANCHO PANZA TOOK POSSESSION OF HIS ISLAND, AND OF HOW HE MADE A BEGINNING IN GOVERNING
CHAPTER XLVI 	OF THE TERRIBLE BELL AND CAT FRIGHT THAT DON QUIXOTE GOT IN THE COURSE OF THE ENAMOURED ALTISIDORA’S WOOING
CHAPTER XLVII 	WHEREIN IS CONTINUED THE ACCOUNT OF HOW SANCHO PANZA CONDUCTED HIMSELF IN HIS GOVERNMENT
CHAPTER XLVIII 	OF WHAT BEFELL DON QUIXOTE WITH DONA RODRIGUEZ, THE DUCHESS’S DUENNA, TOGETHER WITH OTHER OCCURRENCES WORTHY OF RECORD AND ETERNAL REMEMBRANCE
CHAPTER XLIX 	OF WHAT HAPPENED SANCHO IN MAKING THE ROUND OF HIS ISLAND
CHAPTER L 	WHEREIN IS SET FORTH WHO THE ENCHANTERS AND EXECUTIONERS WERE WHO FLOGGED THE DUENNA AND PINCHED DON QUIXOTE, AND ALSO WHAT BEFELL THE PAGE WHO CARRIED THE LETTER TO TERESA PANZA, SANCHO PANZA’S WIFE
CHAPTER LI 	OF THE PROGRESS OF SANCHO’S GOVERNMENT, AND OTHER SUCH ENTERTAINING MATTERS
CHAPTER LII 	WHEREIN IS RELATED THE ADVENTURE OF THE SECOND DISTRESSED OR AFFLICTED DUENNA, OTHERWISE CALLED DONA RODRIGUEZ
CHAPTER LIII 	OF THE TROUBLOUS END AND TERMINATION SANCHO PANZA’S GOVERNMENT CAME TO
CHAPTER LIV 	WHICH DEALS WITH MATTERS RELATING TO THIS HISTORY AND NO OTHER
CHAPTER LV 	OF WHAT BEFELL SANCHO ON THE ROAD, AND OTHER THINGS THAT CANNOT BE SURPASSED
CHAPTER LVI 	OF THE PRODIGIOUS AND UNPARALLELED BATTLE THAT TOOK PLACE BETWEEN DON QUIXOTE OF LA MANCHA AND THE LACQUEY TOSILOS IN DEFENCE OF THE DAUGHTER OF DONA RODRIGUEZ
CHAPTER LVII 	WHICH TREATS OF HOW DON QUIXOTE TOOK LEAVE OF THE DUKE, AND OF WHAT FOLLOWED WITH THE WITTY AND IMPUDENT ALTISIDORA, ONE OF THE DUCHESS’S DAMSELS
CHAPTER LVIII 	WHICH TELLS HOW ADVENTURES CAME CROWDING ON DON QUIXOTE IN SUCH NUMBERS THAT THEY GAVE ONE ANOTHER NO BREATHING-TIME
CHAPTER LIX 	WHEREIN IS RELATED THE STRANGE THING, WHICH MAY BE REGARDED AS AN ADVENTURE, THAT HAPPENED DON QUIXOTE
CHAPTER LX 	OF WHAT HAPPENED DON QUIXOTE ON HIS WAY TO BARCELONA
CHAPTER LXI 	OF WHAT HAPPENED DON QUIXOTE ON ENTERING BARCELONA, TOGETHER WITH OTHER MATTERS THAT PARTAKE OF THE TRUE RATHER THAN OF THE INGENIOUS
CHAPTER LXII 	WHICH DEALS WITH THE ADVENTURE OF THE ENCHANTED HEAD, TOGETHER WITH OTHER TRIVIAL MATTERS WHICH CANNOT BE LEFT UNTOLD
CHAPTER LXIII 	OF THE MISHAP THAT BEFELL SANCHO PANZA THROUGH THE VISIT TO THE GALLEYS, AND THE STRANGE ADVENTURE OF THE FAIR MORISCO
CHAPTER LXIV 	TREATING OF THE ADVENTURE WHICH GAVE DON QUIXOTE MORE UNHAPPINESS THAN ALL THAT HAD HITHERTO BEFALLEN HIM
CHAPTER LXV 	WHEREIN IS MADE KNOWN WHO THE KNIGHT OF THE WHITE MOON WAS; LIKEWISE DON GREGORIO’S RELEASE, AND OTHER EVENTS
CHAPTER LXVI 	WHICH TREATS OF WHAT HE WHO READS WILL SEE, OR WHAT HE WHO HAS IT READ TO HIM WILL HEAR
CHAPTER LXVII 	OF THE RESOLUTION DON QUIXOTE FORMED TO TURN SHEPHERD AND TAKE TO A LIFE IN THE FIELDS WHILE THE YEAR FOR WHICH HE HAD GIVEN HIS WORD WAS RUNNING ITS COURSE; WITH OTHER EVENTS TRULY DELECTABLE AND HAPPY
CHAPTER LXVIII 	OF THE BRISTLY ADVENTURE THAT BEFELL DON QUIXOTE
CHAPTER LXIX 	OF THE STRANGEST AND MOST EXTRAORDINARY ADVENTURE THAT BEFELL DON QUIXOTE IN THE WHOLE COURSE OF THIS GREAT HISTORY
CHAPTER LXX 	WHICH FOLLOWS SIXTY-NINE AND DEALS WITH MATTERS INDISPENSABLE FOR THE CLEAR COMPREHENSION OF THIS HISTORY
CHAPTER LXXI 	OF WHAT PASSED BETWEEN DON QUIXOTE AND HIS SQUIRE SANCHO ON THE WAY TO THEIR VILLAGE
CHAPTER LXXII 	OF HOW DON QUIXOTE AND SANCHO REACHED THEIR VILLAGE
CHAPTER LXXIII 	OF THE OMENS DON QUIXOTE HAD AS HE ENTERED HIS OWN VILLAGE, AND OTHER INCIDENTS THAT EMBELLISH AND GIVE A COLOUR TO THIS GREAT HISTORY
CHAPTER LXXIV 	OF HOW DON QUIXOTE FELL SICK, AND OF THE WILL HE MADE, AND HOW HE DIED



THE DORE GALLERY OF BIBLE ILLUSTRATIONS
By Gustave Dore



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
GUSTAVE DORE
THE CREATION OF EVE
THE EXPULSION FROM THE GARDEN
THE MURDER OF ABEL
THE DELUGE
NOAH CURSING HAM
THE TOWER OF BABEL
ABRAHAM ENTERTAINS THREE STRANGERS
THE DESTRUCTION OF SODOM
THE EXPULSION OF HAGAR
HAGAR IN THE WILDERESS
THE TRIAL OF THE FAITH OF ABRAHAM
THE BURIAL OF SARAH
ELIEZER AND REBEKAH
ISAAC BLESSING JACOB
JACOB TENDING THE FLOCKS
JOSEPH SOLD INTO EGYPT
JOSEPH INTERPRETING PHARAOH'S DREAM
JOSEPH MAKING HIMSELF KNOWN TO HIS BRETHREN
MOSES IN THE BULRUSHES
THE WAR AGAINST GIBEON
SISERA SLAIN BY JAEL
DEBORAH'S SONG OF TRIUMPH
JEPHTHAH MET BY HIS DAUGHTER
JEPHTHAH'S DAUGHTER AND HER COMPANIONS
SAMSON SLAYING THE LION
SAMSON AND DELILAH
THE DEATH OF SAMSON
NAOMI AND HER DAUGHTERS-IN-LAW
RUTH AND BOAZ
THE RETURN OF THE ARK
SAUL AND DAVID
DAVID SPARING SAUL
DEATH OF SAUL
THE DEATH OF ABSALOM
DAVID MOURNING OVER ABSALOM
SOLOMON
THE JUDGMENT OF SOLOMON
THE CEDARS DESTINED FOR THE TEMPLE
THE PROPHET SLAIN BY A LION
ELIJAH DESTROYING THE MESSENGERS OF AHAZIAH
ELIJAH'S ASCENT IN A CHARIOT OF FIRE
DEATH OF JEZEBEL
ESTHER CONFOUNDING HAMAN
ISAIAH
DESTRUCTION OF SENNACHERIB'S HOST
BARUCH
EZEKIEL PROPHESYING
THE VISION OF EZEKIEL
DANIEL
THE FIERY FURNACE
BELSHAZZAR'S FEAST
DANIEL IN THE LION'S DEN
THE PROPHET AMOS
JONAH CALLING NINEVEH TO REPENTANCE
DANIEL CONFOUNDING THE PRIESTS OF BEL
HELIODORUS PUNISHED IN THE TEMPLE
THE NATIVITY
THE STAR IN THE EAST
THE FLIGHT INTO EGYPT
THE MASSACRE OF THE INNOCENTS
JESUS QUESTIONING THE DOCTORS
JESUS HEALING THE SICK
SERMON ON THE MOUNT
CHRIST STILLING THE TEMPEST
THE DUMB MAN POSSESSED
CHRIST IN THE SYNAGOGUE
THE DISCIPLES PLUCKING CORN ON THE SABBATH
JESUS WALKING ON THE WATER
CHRIST'S ENTRY INTO JERUSALEM
JESUS AND THE TRIBUTE MONEY
THE WIDOW'S MITE
RAISING OF THE DAUGHTER OF JAIRUS
THE GOOD SAMARITAN
ARRIVAL OF THE SAMARITAN AT THE INN
THE PRODIGAL SON
LAZARUS AND THE RICH MAN
THE PHARISEE AND THE PUBLICAN
JESUS AND THE WOMAN OF SAMARIA
JESUS AND THE WOMAN TAKEN IN ADULTERY
THE RESURRECTION OF LAZARUS
MARY MAGDALENE
THE LAST SUPPER
THE AGONY IN THE GARDEN
PRAYER OF JESUS IN THE GARDEN OF OLIVES
THE BETRAYAL
CHRIST FAINTING UNDER THE CROSS
THE FLAGELLATION
THE CRUCIFIXION
CLOSE OF THE CRUCIFIXION
THE BURIAL OF JESUS
THE ANGEL AT THE SEPULCHER
THE JOURNEY TO EMMAUS
THE ASCENSION
THE MARTYRDOM OF ST. STEPHEN
SAUL'S CONVERSION
THE DELIVERANCE OF ST. PETER
PAUL AT EPHESUS
PAUL MENACED BY THE JEWS
PAUL'S SHIPWRECK
DEATH ON THE PALE HORSE



THE VISION OF HELL
By Dante Alighieri
Illustrated By Gustave Dore
LIST OF CANTOS
Canto 1
Canto 2
Canto 3
Canto 4
Canto 5
Canto 6
Canto 7
Canto 8
Canto 9
Canto 10
Canto 11
Canto 12
Canto 13
Canto 14
Canto 15
Canto 16

Canto 17
Canto 18
Canto 19
Canto 20
Canto 21
Canto 22
Canto 23
Canto 24
Canto 25
Canto 26
Canto 27
Canto 28
Canto 29
Canto 30
Canto 31
Canto 32
Canto 33
Canto 34



THE VISION OF PURGATORY
By Dante Alighieri



Illustrated By Gustave Dore



LIST OF CANTOS
Canto 1
Canto 2
Canto 3
Canto 4
Canto 5
Canto 6
Canto 7
Canto 8
Canto 9
Canto 10
Canto 11
Canto 12
Canto 13
Canto 14
Canto 15
Canto 16

Canto 17
Canto 18
Canto 19
Canto 20
Canto 21
Canto 22
Canto 23
Canto 24
Canto 25
Canto 26
Canto 27
Canto 28
Canto 29
Canto 30
Canto 31
Canto 32
Canto 33



THE VISION OF PARADISE
By Dante Alighieri
Illustrated By Gustave Dore



LIST OF CANTOS
Canto 1
Canto 2
Canto 3
Canto 4
Canto 5
Canto 6
Canto 7
Canto 8
Canto 9
Canto 10
Canto 11
Canto 12
Canto 13
Canto 14
Canto 15
Canto 16

Canto 17
Canto 18
Canto 19
Canto 20
Canto 21
Canto 22
Canto 23
Canto 24
Canto 25
Canto 26
Canto 27
Canto 28
Canto 29
Canto 30
Canto 31
Canto 32
Canto 33



GUSTAVE DORE CARICATURES
CONTENTS.
GROTESQUE SKETCHES
PICTURES OF LIFE IN THE COUNTRY
LIFE IN THE PROVINCES
LIFE IN A LITTLE PROVINCIAL TOWN
DAY SCHOOLS AND BOARDERS
NEW YEAR'S DAY
AT THE EXHIBITION OF PAINTINGS
PEOPLE WHO "GIVE THEMSELVES AIRS IN SOCIETY"
THE RACES
CONSEQUENCES OF THE LONDON EXHIBITION OF 1832
SKETCHES IN PARIS
PROPHECIES CONCERNING THE FUTURE OF THE FRENCH PEOPLE
PARIS OUT OF DOORS
SCENES IN THE CHAMPS ELYSEES
GROTESQUE SKETCHES
THE TUILERIES GARDENS
THE ENGLISH IN PARIS
EXTRACTS FROM CELEBRATED AUTHORS
A SALE BY AUCTION
SCRAPS
THINGS WE SEE AND HEAR
THINGS THAT ARE AGREEABLE
SAYINGS AND DOINGS
THE COLLEGIANS AGAIN
THE WATERS OF BADEN



THE RAVEN
By Edgar Allan Poe
Illustrated By Gustave Doré



ILLUSTRATIONS
With Names of Engravers
Title-page, designed by Elihu Vedder. 	Frederick Juengling.
"Nevermore." 	H. Claudius, G.J. Buechner.
ANANKE. 	H. Claudius.
"Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary,
Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore." 	R.A. Muller.
"Ah, distinctly I remember, it was in the bleak December,
And each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor." 	R.G. Tietze.
"Eagerly I wished the morrow; vainly I had sought to borrow
From my books surcease of sorrow—sorrow for the lost Lenore." 	H. Claudius.
"Sorrow for the lost Lenore." 	W. Zimmermann.
"For the rare and radiant maiden whom the angels name Lenore—
Nameless here for evermore." 	Frederick Juengling.
"''T is some visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door—
Some late visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door.'" 	W. Zimmermann.
—"Here I opened wide the door;—Darkness there, and nothing more." 	H. Claudius.
"Doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before." 	F.S. King.
"'Surely,' said I, 'surely that is something at my window lattice;
Let me see, then, what thereat is, and this mystery explore.'" 	Frederick Juengling.
"Open here I flung the shutter." 	T. Johnson.
[6]
—"A stately Raven of the saintly days of yore.Not the least obeisance made he; not a minute stopped or stayed he." 	R. Staudenbaur.
"Perched upon a bust of Pallas just above my chamber door—
Perched, and sat, and nothing more." 	R.G. Tietze.
"Wandering from the Nightly shore." 	Frederick Juengling.
"Till I scarcely more than muttered, 'Other friends have flown before—
On the morrow he will leave me, as my hopes have flown before.'" 	Frank French.
"Then, upon the velvet sinking, I betook myself to linking
Fancy unto fancy." 	R. Schelling.
"But whose velvet violet lining with the lamplight gloating o'er
She shall press, ah, nevermore!" 	George Kruell.
"'Wretch,' I cried, 'thy God hath lent thee—by these angels he hath sent thee
Respite—respite and nepenthe from thy memories of Lenore!'" 	Victor Bernstrom.
"On this home by Horror haunted." 	R. Staudenbaur.
"'Tell me truly, I implore—Is there—is there balm in Gilead?—tell me—tell me, I implore!'" 	W. Zimmermann.
"'Tell this soul with sorrow laden if, within the distant Aidenn,
It shall clasp a sainted maiden whom the angels name Lenore.'" 	F.S. King.
"'Be that word our sign of parting, bird or fiend!' I shrieked, upstarting." 	W. Zimmermann.
"'Get thee back into the tempest and the Night's Plutonian shore!'" 	Robert Hoskin.
"And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the floor
Shall be lifted—nevermore!" 	R.G. Tietze.
The secret of the Sphinx. 	R. Staudenbaur.



THE TALES OF MOTHER GOOSE
As First Collected By Charles Perrault In 1696
Illustrated By D.J. Munro After Drawings By Gustave DorÉ



ILLUSTRATIONS
"She met with Gaffer Wolf" Frontispiece
"It went on very easily"
"Let me see if I can do it"
"Slipped in under his father's seat"
"The Marquis of Carabas is drowning!"
"I am exact in keeping my word"
"If you open it, there's nothing you may not expect from my anger"
"With all my heart, Goody"
"He fell upon the good woman"



THE COCKAYNES IN PARIS
OR "GONE ABROAD."
By Blanchard Jerrold
WITH SKETCHES BY GUSTAVE DORÉ
AND OTHER ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE ENGLISH ABROAD FROM A FRENCH POINT OF VIEW.



ILLUSTRATIONS
MY LORD ANGLAIS AT MABILLE 	Frontispiece
CROSSING THE CHANNEL—A SMOOTH PASSAGE 	13
CROSSING THE CHANNEL—RATHER SQUALLY 	14
ROBINSON CRUSOE AND FRIDAY 	16
PAPA AND THE DEAR BOYS 	18
THE DOWAGER AND TALL FOOTMAN 	20
ON THE BOULEVARDS 	42
A GROUP OF MARBLE "INSULAIRES" 	46
BEAUTY AND THE B—— 	68
PALAIS DU LOUVRE.—THE ROAD TO THE BOIS 	72
MUSEE DU LUXEMBOURG 	77
THE INFLEXIBLE "MEESSES ANGLAISES" 	105
ENGLISH VISITORS TO THE CLOSERIE DE LILAS—SHOCKING!! 	109
SMITH BRINGS HIS ALPENSTOCK 	114
JONES ON THE PLACE DE LA CONCORDE 	118
FRENCH RECOLLECTION OF MEESS TAKING HER BATH 	125
THE BRAVE MEESS AMONG THE BILLOWS HOLDING ON
BY THE TAIL OF HER NEWFOUNDLAND 	125
COMPATRIOTS MEETING IN THE FRENCH EXHIBITION 	127
VARIETIES OF THE ENGLISH STOCK.—COMPATRIOTS
MEETING IN THE FRENCH EXHIBITION 	126
A PIC-NIC AT ENGHIEN 	147
EXCURSIONISTS AND EMIGRANTS 	152
BOIS DE BOULOGNE 	164



RIVER LEGENDS
or, FATHER THAMES AND FATHER RHINE
With Illustrations By Gustave Doré
1875



LIST OF ENGRAVINGS.
FULL-PAGE ILLUSTRATIONS.
The Baron’s Oath.To face page 	.107
The Father of all Giants. 	.140
Powle’s Advance on the Castle 	.242
TEXT ILLUSTRATIONS.
Father Thames and Father Rhine. 	.003
The Messenger 	.005
Father Thames after his Ale 	.006
The Boar. 	.008
The Boar’s Family 	.010
The Infant Smith. 	.013
The Sacrifice of Smith’s Father 	.015
Smith in Toad-land. 	.018
The Snakes. 	.022
Bertha the Druidess 	.027
The Road into the Forest. 	.035
The Last of the Boar. 	.046
The Baroness and her back hair. 	.056
Father Rhine and his Elves. 	.059
The River-Demon Thief 	.064
The Greedy Child. 	.067
The Devilet 	.072
Martha rousing the Peasants 	.078
Father Rhine and the three Baronesses 	.081
The Swan-sisters. 	.084
Crazy Timothy 	.092
The Old Harper. 	.097
She keeps the Pigs. 	.115
She watches the Battle. 	.132
Giants Mountain-building. 	.143
Bramble-buffer Storm-making 	.148
He uproots the Tree 	.153
Hans sent aloft 	.163
Hans in the Giant’s Mouth 	.166
The Mouth Fortified 	.167
The Giant weeps 	.170
The Giant’s Release 	.173
The Castle. 	.181
Mannikins at Play 	.187
Goody Tickleback’s Steed. 	.188
Flight of the Witches 	.202
The Sea-serpent 	.225
Father Rhine’s Retreat. 	.252



THE DAYS OF CHIVALRY
OR THE LEGEND OF CROQUEMITAINE
By Ernest Louis Victor Jules L’Epine
Freely Translated From The French of L’epine by Tom Hood.
Illustrated With 177 Designs on Wood
BY GUSTAVE DORÉ.



CONTENTS
PREFACE.
BOOK THE FIRST — THE TOURNEY AT FRONSAC — A.D. 769.
CHAPTER I. CHARLEMAGNE.
CHAPTER II. WHICH THE AUTHOR CONGRATULATES HIMSELF ON NOT HAVING TO READ.
CHAPTER III. CHARLEMAGNE’S CORTEGE.
CHAPTER IV. HOW GANELON, COUNT OF MAYENCE, WAS NEARLY SMOKED IN THE COMPANY OF TWO HOGS, AND WHAT FOLLOWED THEREAFTER.
CHAPTER V. ANGOULAFFRE OF THE BRAZEN TEETH, GOVERNOR OF JERUSALEM.
CHAPTER VI. MURAD’S THREE WHIMS.
CHAPTER VII. A FORMIDABLE FRIEND.
CHAPTER VIII. WHEREIN THE GOVERNOR OF JERUSALEM BEGINS TO SHOW HIS TEETH.
CHAPTER IX. WHEREIN THE EAGLE STOOPS, THE RAVEN CROAKS, THE WOLF HOWLS, AND THE LION ROARS.
CHAPTER X. ANGOULAFFRE THE MERCIFUL!
CHAPTER XI. HOW ANGOULAFFRE HAD AN ATTACK OF TOOTHACHE, WHICH WAS THE DEATH OF HIM.
CHAPTER XII. THE LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT OF ANGOULAFFRE.
CHAPTER XIII. THE TWO ROGUES RELEASED.
CHAPTER XIV. THE CORSELET OF CAMBRIC.
CHAPTER XV. MONTJOIE! MONTJOIE! ST. DENIS!
CHAPTER XVI. A FUNERAL MARCH.
BOOK THE SECOND — THE PROPHET’S PARADISE.
CHAPTER I. HOW CROQUEMITAINE WAS CHRISTENED.
CHAPTER II. THE KING OF BEAUTY,
CHAPTER III. HOW THE EMPEROR CHARLEMAGNE SAW A VISION.
CHAPTER IV. HOW KING MARSILLUS SAW A VISION.
CHAPTER V. THE TWO ALCALDES.
CHAPTER VI. CHARLEMAGNE IN SPAIN.
CHAPTER VII. THE TRAP.
CHAPTER VIII. HOW ROLAND UNDERTOOK TO CARRY SARAGOSSA BY STORM.
CHAPTER IX. A TRIP TO MAHOMET’S PARADISE.
CHAPTER X. WHEN ROLAND REMEMBERS HIS LATIN, AND THE DEVIL FORGETS HIS.
BOOK THE THIRD — THE FORTRESS OF FEAR.
CHAPTER I. THE FOUR FOES OF CROQUEMITAINE.
CHAPTER II. THE SIGN OF THE CROCODILE.
CHAPTER III. HOW ALLEGRIGNAC, MARAGOUGNIA, PORC-EN-TRUIE, AND MONT-ROGNON OPENED THE CAMPAIGN.
CHAPTER IV. ALI PÉPÉ’S LITTLE HARVEST.
CHAPTER V. HOW ALI PÉPÉ, HAVING DONE ALL THAT COULD BE EXPECTED OF AN HONEST MAN, WAS HANGED.
CHAPTER VI. SHOULDER TO SHOULDER, FACE TO FACE!
CHAPTER VII. MITAINE OPENS THE CAMPAIGN.
CHAPTER VIII. THROUGH THE FORESTS.
CHAPTER IX. A NIGHT IN THE FORTRESS OF FEAR.
EPILOGUE — RONCESVALLES — A. D. 778.



A TOUR THROUGH THE PYRENEES
By Hippolyte Adolphe Taine
With Illustrations by GUSTAVE DORÈ
ILLUSTRATIONS.
THE PINES. 	003
THE RIVER AFTER A STORM. 	004
THE PINES NEAR ROYAN 	007
THE BROAD RIVER. 	009
BORDEAUX 	010
TAIL-PIECE 	011
LES LANDES 	012
LES LANDES (SECOND VIEW) 	014
TAIL-PIECE 	016
A STREET IN BAYONNE. 	018
BAYONNE HARBOR 	019
PÉ DE PUYANE 	022
THE BURNING CASTLE 	025
HEAD-PIECE 	035
THE PIERCED ROCK 	036
TAIL-PIECE 	039
THE VILLA EUGENIE. 	040
CLIFFS NEAR SAINT-JEAN-DE-LUZ. 	042
COAST NEAR SAINT-JEAN-DE-LUZ 	045
TAIL-PIECE 	046
LOUIS XIV. AND ANNE OF AUSTRIA 	047
THE POLITENESS OF TO-DAY 	048
THE POLITENESS OF OTHER DAYS 	049
“JE VOUS LE RENDS.”. 	053
A SPLENDID CREATION. 	054
DAX. 	057
CASTLE OF ORTHEZ 	061
FROISSART. 	062
“THAT STOUT CORNIFIC DOCTOR” 	066
COUNT DE FOIX AT SUPPER. 	068
THE COUNT DE FOIX’S HOSPITALITY. 	071
A FRENCH “CONDUCTOR” 	072
“FOR HEAVEN’S SAKE DO NOT KILL GASTON” 	074
GASTON IN THE TOWER OF ORTHEZ. 	076
COUNT DE FOIX. 	077
TAILPIECE. 	078
CHAPTER-HEADING. 	079
THE VALLEY OF OSSAU. 	082
A DESTRUCTION OF SENTIMENT 	084
AVENUE OF THE CHATEAU AT PAU 	085
ARMS OF HENRY IV 	087
COURT OF THE CHATEAU AT PAU. 	088
PAU. 	090
JEANNE D’ALBRET. 	092
A MORNING’S SPORT. 	094
IN THE STREETS Of EAUSE. 	097
SULLY. 	100
MARGUERITE OK NAVARRE. 	104
ENTERTAINING THE LADIES. 	106
THE PARK AT PAU. 	108
PROTRACTING A REVERIE. 	109
PIC DU MIDI OSSAU. 	111
AN EXHORTATION 	113
NEAR GAN 	114
THE VALLEY OK OSSAU. 	115
ROAD TO EAUX BONNES. 	116
THE PROMENADE. 	117
NEAR EAUX BONNES 	118
A RAINY DAY AT EAUX BONNES 	119
TAKING THE WATERS. 	121
TAKING THE WATERS (SECOND VIEW). 	122
“MUSIC HAITI CHARMS” 	123
A NATIVE GENIUS. 	125
DOLCE FAR NIENTE. 	126
OUR AMATEURS 	127
THE BEECHES. 	128
THE SUMMIT OF THE GER. 	131
TAIL-PIECE 	133
THE ART OK PLEASURE. 	134
THE “JEU DU CANARD”. 	135
PLEASURE WITHOUT THE ART 	137
“A LANDSCAPE”. 	138
EXCELSIOR. 	139
THE VALENTIN FALLS AT DISCOO 	140
CASCADE OF THE VALENTIN. 	142
PATH TO THE GORGE OF THE SERPENT 	144
THE GAVE 	146
A DISTANT TALE 	148
SOLITUDE 	150
A WATER POWER. 	152
THE MIGHTY STREAM. 	155
'PAPI’ 	157
A TOO DISTANT LANDSCAPE. 	159
A VANTAGE-POINT. 	161
THE PEAKS. 	163
ABOVE GABAS. 	166
“TO HIM WHO, IN LOVE OF NATURE”. 	168
AMONG THE CLOUDS 	169
ROUTE TO EAUX CHAUDES. 	170
ON THE ROAD TO EAUX CHAUDES. 	171
“A WILD AND SUNNY NEST”. 	174
“COLD AND SAD” 	175
NEAR EAUX CHAUDES. 	177
“EGYPT BEFORE THE COMING OF WARRIORS”. 	182
SOMEBODY’S JOVE. 	185
THE INHABITANTS. 	186
FIDDLERS THREE 	187
“A SORT OF ROUNDELAY”. 	189
“THEY CLUMSILY BENT THE KNEE”. 	192
“FIVE OR SIX OLD WOMEN”. 	194
THE PEAK OF THE GER. 	196
MEETING A LADY 	200
A STOCK-DEALER 	200
YOUR OBEDIENT SERVANT. 	201
DISINTERESTED HOSPITALITY. 	201
AN AMATEUR SKETCH. 	203
THE DEATH OF ROLAND. 	206
“A WELL-TO-DO PEASANT” 	207
CHIVALRIC WAR. 	209
SCIENTIFIC WAR 	209
THE BATTLE OF RONCEVAUX. 	212
“WHEN FIGHTING IS TO BE DONE”. 	214
HENRY OF BEARN 	215
“AT THE HEAD OF THE ARMY”. 	217
“VERY DARING”. 	219
MLLE. DE SÉGUR 	220
GASSION’S BOB-TAIL 	222
ON THE WAY TO LUZ. 	225
A SMILING COUNTRY. 	226
“WHAT WE ALL HEARD THIS NIGHT”.- 	228
ORTHON’S TRANSFORMATION. 	234
LETTING THE DOGS LOOSE 	235
“THE RACE OF FAMILIARS AND FAIRIES”. 	237
A BROODING SUPERSTITION, 	238
CHAPEL OF LESTELLE 	240
NEAR LOURDES 	242
GORGE OF PIERREFITTE 	243
“HEAVY CLOUDS ROSE IN THE SKY” 	248
OLD HOUSE OF THE TEMPLARS AT LUZ 	250
RUIN OF A CHATEAU NEAR LUZ 	253
MAX GETS FROM THE DESERT AS MUCH AS HE CAN 	257
THE VALLEY OF LUZ. 	259
PROGRESS 	261
SAINT-PIERRE 	263
“THIS HEIGHT IS A DESERT”. 	264
“NO ONE COMES” 	265
SAINT-SAUVEUR. 	267
THE GAVE AT SUNSET 	272
RUNNING WATERS 	274
“THE POPLARS RISE ONE ABOVE ANOTHER” 	275
BAREGES. 	277
THE MILITARY HOSPITAL. 	278
TAIL-PIECE 	279
THE FIRS 	283
“OUT FROM THE CIVIL WARS”. 	287
“THESE OLD WASTED MOUNTAINS” 	288
MADAME DE MAINTENON. 	289
A FEW BLANDISHMENTS. 	290
THE PATIENTS OF THE OLDEN TIME 	291
THE LAKE OF GAUBE. 	293
DIANA. 	295
NEAR PONT D’ESPAGNE. 	299
STORM AT CAUTERETS 	302
VALLEY OF THE GAVE IN A STORM. 	304
NEAR THE LAKE OF GAUISE. 	307
CAUTERET’S 	311
THE FOAMING GAVE 	313
HENRY IV AND FRANCIS I 	314
A FRESHETT IN THE MOUNTAINS 	315
“A HORRIBLE WORLD” 	316
ABBEY OF SAINT-SAVIN 	318
CASCADE OF CERLSEY, NEAR PONT D’ESPAGNE. 	320
PRAYER 	325
ENJOYING HIE SCENERY 	326
A MOUNTAIN FUNERAL 	328
BRIDGE AT SCIA 	330
VILLAGE OF GEDRES. 	333
CHAOS. 	337
“THE TUMBLED ROCKS”. 	339
SIECHEUR 	342
THE MOUNTAIN SIDE. 	343
THE FRECHE DE ROLAND 	344
THE AMPHITHEATRE NEAR GAVARNIE 	346
“THE THIRTEENTH CASCADE ON THE LEFT” 	347
THE CASCADE AS SEEN FROM THE INN 	349
RECIPROCITY. 	351
THE APPRECIATIVE 	352
ASCENT OF THE BERGONZ. 	354
THE EAGLES 	355
MONT PERDU 	359
AN EARLY INHABITANT. 	362
SCENERY DURING AN ASCENT 	365
“ALLEZ DOUCEMENT; ALLEZ TOUJOURS”. 	366
A STIMULATING DREAM. 	367
THE PINES. 	369
A SHOWER IN A FOREST OF BRUSH-FIRS 	373
CONTEMPLATION. 	376
A POOR DANCER. 	377
“THE ISARD DWELLS ABOVE THE BEAR”. 	378
AN ARGUMENT. 	379
A HERD OF GOATS. 	381
“THE HAPPIEST ANIMAL IN CREATION”. 	383
DISTINGUISHED NATIVES. 	386
IN MOUNT CAMPANA 	389
DE BÉNAC IN EGYPT. 	390
“THEY TRAVERSED A WALL OF CLOUDS”. 	395
“MORNING DAWNED” 	396
“THE HALL WAS FULL”. 	398
“STRANGE IMAGES ROSE IN HIS BRAIN” 	399
BÉNAC A HERMIT 	403
BEYOND LOURDES 	404
CITY OF TORBES 	406
MEPHISTOPHELES 	411
BAGNÈRES DE-BIGORRE. 	412
ONE OF THE FIRST PATRONS 	419
SOCIETY. 	420
AN OLD CAMPAIGNER. 	422
A YOUNG CAMPAIGNER 	422
A MAN OF PEACE 	422
A MODEL MAN. 	423
IN DANGER.:. 	424
VARIOUS TOURISTS 	428
THE LAC D’OO 	431
TOURISTS COMME IL FAUT 	434
FAMILY TOURISTS. 	435
DINING TOURISTS. 	436
LEARNED TOURISTS 	438
A MAN OF ESPRIT. 	444
CONNOISSEURS 	446
BEETHOVEN. 	447
A SERENADER. 	454
A HISTORIAN. 	456
A PROFESSIONAL CHARACTER 	458
THE PLEASURES OF WINTER. 	461
A DISCUSSION WITHIN BOUNDS 	463
HEAVEN 	464
THE SOURCE OF THINGS 	466
GRACE AT MEAT. 	467
THE REST OF THE WEARY. 	468
AT THE HOTEL OF THE GREAT SUN. 	470
NEAR LUCHON. 	473
CHAPELLE AND LACHAUMONT. 	476
VALLEY OF LUCHON 	481
URBS IN REVRE. 	484
HEAD-PIECE 	485
A TALENTED FAMILY. 	487
LUCHON 	491
BAGNERES 	493
“ALL WAS IN HARMONY” 	495
NEAR CASTEL-VIEIL. 	497
RUINS OF CASTEL-VIEIL. 	499
THE MALADETTA. 	503
“THESE MOUNTAIN SKELETONS” 	505
“A CLEFT IN THE ETERNAL ROCK”. 	507
TAIL-PIECE 	508
HEAD-PIECE 	509
ST. BERTRAND DE COMINGES 	510
TOULOUSE 	512
SAINT SERININE AT TOULOUSE 	515
CHURCH OF ST. ETIENNE, TOULOUSE. 	519
THE MUSEUM AT TOULOUSE 	521



MYTHS OF THE RHINE
Illustrated by Gustave Doré



ILLUSTRATIONS
Father Rhine. 	.003
The impassive historian . 	.004
Vast forests as old as the world 	.005
The first pioneers. 	.007
The Celts were a people from India. 	.009
What happy people scholars are. 	.010
A horrible custom 	.019
Dead man’s trees. 	.022
The Druids now appear for the first time in Germany 	.023
The other chieftains were generally polygamists 	.031
Courts of justice were always held under an elm tree. 	.032
Attempt to murder the mayor . 	.033
Mistletoe an officinal and sacred plant 	.035
Gauls 	.037
Serpents’ knots 	.038
Prophetic trembling and neighing. 	.041
A Druid teacher . 	.044
The Germans were in full flight . 	.046
The bloody knife of the Druids 	.052
I turn my steps from the sacred precincts 	.055
Who are these other soldiers? 	.057
These laborers seem to suffer from some restraint 	.058
I look around for a resting-place . 	.059
A shepherd. 	.060
The guard of a sword, which had been driven into the ground 	.061
The shepherd,—as mournful as ever 	.063
Herds of swine are wallowing 	.066
A young wife bearing the burden of united household 	.067
Happiness consists in the fulfillment of duty . 	.068
Such were the ways of our fathers: rejoice in facing death. 	.069
The Druidical altars. 	.070
As there is no window I peep through the trap-door. 	.072
One of the chief men of the country . 	.075
She was a young Ionian girl, a country-woman of Aspasia 	.080
The boudoir of a Celtic lady. 	.082
The Druid-bard. 	.085
Death of Druids 	.091
A Druidess endowed with the gift of prophecy 	.093
The victorious march of the Romans 	.094
Her deities personified nothing but vices . 	.096
The Hercules—so called. 	.098
Mercury, the son of Jupiter . 	.099
“O Varus, Varus, bring me back my legions!” 	.103
Perhaps the old river remembered his grievances 	.105
They made him a king, the King of German rivers 	.106
He had already allowed Jupiter to cross 	.107
The vines began to adorn the banks of the river 	.108
Once more caresses had their hoped-for effect 	.109
He did his best to help everybody across. 	.110
Fnvolous and ill-mannered deities 	.110
The dauntless pirates will end by wearing white night-caps. 	.113
The great Northern Tempest 	.115
The German Druids gave way. 	.117
Iormungondur, the great sea serpent 	.118
The giant Ymer has been born. 	.123
The first men had been born with a telescope in their pocket? 	.127
Ymer was the first to succumb 	.128
After the giants came the turn of land and sea monsters 	.129
The new creation was assuming a more pleasing appearance. 	.132
Deer, eland, and aurochs were bounding in herds 	.133
Incessantly a tiny squirrel comes and goes. 	.136
A vulture perching upon the loftiest top of the sacred tree 	.137
Thor’s weighty hammer Mjoïner 	.139
The good Freyr seated at Odin’s table 	.141
Portrait of Freyr 	.142
Bragi and the beautiful Freya . 	.147
Return of the eagle with the three precious vessels 	.149
Balder, the bright god. 	.151
The wolf Fenris 	.156
Converse with each other by significative glances 	.159
They were the Norns 	.160
He took counsel with the Norns. 	.162
“To Egir, the seas and navigation”. 	.164
Gefione took her four sons and changed them into oxen 	.165
Jarl, the noble 	.171
The Valkyrias . 	.175
Beautiful nymphs of carnage 	.176
A very mammoth of a boar. 	.180
Feast in Scandinavian Paradise. 	.181
Hela, the pale goddess. 	.185
“Balder, fair Balder, is going to die”. 	.189
Loki succeeds in exhilarating even Odin himself 	.191
Balder is amused by the game. 	.192
When the mother told her pitiful tale the iron trees wept 	.197
The three sacred cocks announcing the Twilight of Greatness 	.202
The death of the gods 	.208
My VIIIth chapter is thus changed into a cenotaph 	.211
I like to glean a little where scholars have reaped 	.214
The two religions face to face. 	.217
Ovid reciting his “Metamorphoses” 	.219
Druidic worship suspended by the Romans 	.220
“Miserere mei, Jesu”. 	.222
Perkunos, Pikollos, and Potrympos 	.224
Puscatus,—a kind-hearted god 	.226
Monstrous reptiles accompany the gods to Germany. 	.227
He let his heavy mace fall upon a little town 	.238
The blacksmiths of Ilmarinnen 	.239
Marietta appeared in their midst. 	.245
“Do you think I am a man to be taken in ?”. 	.251
Horse-head, a la mode 	.253
The Undines mingled with the Tritons and the Naiads 	.258
Have transferred their Olympus to the Brocken 	.259
The Olympus of the North. 	.263
Able to see without being seen 	.266
Dance of the white fairies 	.269
The black fairies personify Nightmare . 	.271
An important personage with a will of his own . 	.272
Enormous toads are posted about.as watchmen 	.279
Elementary spirits of the water 	.283
Imaginary music . 	.288
The nix with the harp . 	.289
Schoolmaster’s son who had fallen in love with one of them. 	.291
He thought he saw a pale form arise from the waters 	.294
He rose suddenly and fled to another room . 	.295
The steward whispered some words in her ear . 	.297
Niord, the Scandinavian god . 	.299
This creature is Nixcobt. 	.300
The Vintner is hanged, and Nixcobt laughs heartily. 	.302
Four Prussian soldiers watching the water . 	.305
The Zotterais protected sheep . 	.309
The master has nothing to do. 	.315
Prefer to remember the Kobold a cheerful household companion. 	.317
The Zotterais as fond of stables as the Kobolds of kitchens 	.319
They are naturally easily tired . 	.321
The Killecroffs are children of the Devil . 	.322
His nurse has to be reinforced by two goats and a cow 	.324
The great Reformer, Dr. Martin Luther . 	.326
The fall of Killecroff 	.331
Giants and dwarfs 	.335
The last of the giants. 	.337
Grommelund and Ephesim 	.339
The humiliated giant. 	.340
Our good little dwarfs 	.341
He stood at first with his mouth wide open 	.346
A long and deep sigh of satisfaction. 	.348
Flight of the conspirators. 	.353
Kreiss slipped boldly into this vast and spacious cavity. 	.354
They fixed strong piles between the two rows of teeth 	.355
In his hand he held not a club but a lantern. 	.357
Kreiss compelled to leave his position by torrents of tears 	.359
The last two held each a long thorn in their hands. 	.361
Kreiss entering the great meeting hall. 	.363
Putskuchen was in love. 	.364
Ouadragant vanquished 	.367
The passing of the wizard . 	.371
Venus and Tannhàuser. 	.390
His ex-colleague Jupiter 	.396
The author pursues the subject 	.399
The conscientious collector of myths. 	.401
The Druidess transformed into an accursed witch 	.406
To return was as impossible as to proceed 	.409
She had rejoined her victims 	.413
He is the Lord Hackelberg 	.417
These ghosts can imitate all the motions of men 	.421
Farewell. 	.423



JAUFRY THE KNIGHT AND THE FAIR BRUNISSENDE
A TALE OF THE TIMES OF KING ARTHUR
By Mary Lafon
Illustrated With Twenty Engravings By GUSTAVE DORE



ILLUSTRATIONS.
.035 	"Knight,” said Sir Jaufry, “thou dost press me sore”.
.043 	The wood and iron, for a cubit's length, pierced through the shoulder. .
.053 	"Good friend,” he then apostrophised the knight, “the passage now may be considered safe”.
.054 	"Halt, knight,” he cried; “I'll have a word with thee”.
.060 	A fierce wind, in passing, swept away the last memorial of the magic work.
.082 	Knights and burghers, minstrels, jugglers from all countries, hither trooping came
.088 	His troop returned, bearing him faint and bleeding.
.094 	"Heaven!” Sir Jaufry cried, “in thee I trust; what figure have we here?”.
.110 	Back returned the sable knight, hissing and growling as the thunder doth when tempests vex the air.
.111 	Jaufry with Augier's daughter rode away
.117 	I leave you to surmise the games and joy which at the castle on that day were seen
.134 	They sat them down in the great hall of the castle.
.136 	He his efforts used to save her with the butt-end of his lance.
.140 	All the train which called Sir Melyan lord escorted back in triumph to Montbran that happy pair



THE FABLES LA FONTAINE.
TRANSLATED INTO ENGLISH VERSE BY WALTER THORNBURY,
With Illustrations By Gustave Doré
1886



LIST OF FULL-PAGE ILLUSTRATIONS
1 	The Two Mules
9 	The Swallow and the Little Birds
21 	The Town Rat and the Country Rat
25 	The Wolf and the Lamb
33 	The Robbers and the Ass (To face page)
38 	Death and the Woodcutter
41 	The Wolf Turned Shepherd
49 	The Oak and the Reed
60 	The Council Held by the Rats
68 	The Lion and the Gnat
77 	The Lion and the Rat
85 	The Hare and the Frogs
93 	The Peacock Complaining to Juno
100 	The Miller, His Son, and the Ass
109 	The Frogs Who Asked For a King
117 	The Fox and the Grapes
124 	The Wolves and the Sheep
133 	Philomel and Progne
140 	The Cat and the Old Rat
148 	The Lion in Love
157 	The Shepherd and the Sea
164 	The Monkey and the Dolphin
173 	The Miser Who Lost His Treasure
181 	The Eye of the Master
189 	The Wolf, the Mother, and the Child
201 	The Lark and Her Little Ones
213 	The Woodman and Mercury
225
[Pg x] 	The Little Fish and the Fisherman
236 	The Old Woman and Her Servants
249 	The Horse and the Wolf
261 	Fortune and the Little Child
273 	The Doctors
285 	The Hen With the Golden Eggs
293 	The Stag and the Vine
301 	The Eagle and the Owl
309 	The Bear and the Two Friends
321 	The Stag Viewing Himself in the Stream
329 	The Countryman and the Serpent
341 	The Sick Lion and the Fox
349 	The Carter Stuck in the Mud
357 	The Young Widow
369 	The Animals Sick of the Plague
377 	The Maiden
389 	The Vultures and the Pigeons
397 	The Milkmaid and the Milk-Pail
405 	The Two Fowls
417 	An Animal in the Moon
425 	An Animal in the Moon (2)
429 	The Fortune-Teller (illustration missing)
432 	The Cobbler and the Banker
437 	The Lion, the Wolf, and the Fox
445 	The Dog and His Master's Dinner
453 	The Bear and the Amateur of Gardening
465 	Tircis and Amaranth
473 	The Rat and the Elephant
489 	The Bashaw and the Merchant
497 	The Torrent and the River
509 	The Two Dogs and the Dead Ass
517 	The Wolf and the Hunter
525 	The Two Pigeons
537 	The Madman Who Sold Wisdom
545 	The Oyster and Its Claimants
557 	Jupiter and the Traveller
569 	The Cat and the Fox
581
[Pg xi] 	The Monkey and the Cat
593 	The Two Rats, the Fox, and the Egg
609 	The Cormorant and the Fishes
621 	The Shepherd and the King
629 	The Fish and the Shepherd Who Played on the Clarionet
641 	The Two Adventurers and the Talisman
653 	The Rabbits
665 	The Lion
677 	The Peasant of the Danube
689 	The Old Man and the Three Young Men
701 	The Owl and the Mice
709 	The Companions of Ulysses
717 	The Two Goats
729 	The Sick Stag
741 	The Eagle and the Magpie
757 	Love and Folly
765 	The Forest and the Woodman
777 	The Fox and the Turkeys
789 	The English Fox
801 	The League of the Rats
813 	Daphnis and Alcimadura
821 	The Arbitrator, Almoner, and Hermit





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