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Title: Weather Crops and Markets - Vol. 2, No. 6
Author: Anonymous
Language: English
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                                WEATHER
                          CROPS ^{AND} MARKETS

                        Published Weekly by the
                United States Department of Agriculture

  CERTIFICATE: By direction of the Secretary of Agriculture the matter
    contained herein is published as statistical information and is
    required for the proper transaction of the public business. Free
    distribution is limited to copies “necessary in the transaction of
    public business required by law.” Subscription price $1 per year
    (foreign rate $2) payable in cash or money order to the
    Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington,
    D. C.

 ═══════════════════════════════════════════════════════════════════════
 WASHINGTON, D. C.           AUGUST 5, 1922.               VOL. 2, NO. 6
 ═══════════════════════════════════════════════════════════════════════



               EXPORT BUTTER DEMAND CAUSES MUCH INTEREST
   Sales to United Kingdom Strengthened Early Summer Market—Shift in
                       England’s Supply Sources.


A demand for American butter by English buyers had a materially
strengthening effect on the early summer market in the United States.
This generally unexpected export demand has called forth various
explanations in the attempt to determine the probability of continued
demand from that source.

An analysis of the international butter trade of the past 10 years
indicates that a change not yet generally realized has taken place in
the seasonal trend of imports of butter into the United Kingdom, which
largely accounts for this demand in anticipation of an autumn shortage.
This change is due to the shift that took place during the war in the
sources of supply of that greatest of all butter-importing countries.


                          SUPPLY WAS UNIFORM.

Prior to the war the United Kingdom obtained its butter supply from such
widely scattered sources in both the Northern and the Southern
Hemispheres that the supply was remarkably uniform from month to month
throughout the year. During the war, when supplies available from
continental Europe and Russia were reduced, Australia, New Zealand, and
Argentina were encouraged to expand their dairy industry, and have
together since that time continued as the most important sources of
supply of butter on the British markets.

As the flush of production in Australia, New Zealand, and Argentina
occurs during the fall and winter months when production is lightest in
North America and Europe, England now receives an average of two-thirds
of the total supply of foreign butter during the winter and spring,
whereas formerly but one-half was received during this period.

Although consumption does not necessarily follow the same seasonal trend
as the imports, it is a fact, according to reports of London dealers,
that butter stocks are now lower than at the same time last year, when
at least 50,000,000 lbs. of Government stocks still remained unsold in
England. With comparatively light stocks and the certainty that imports
into England after July can not be as heavy as during the first six
months, a speculative demand has been stimulated in that country in
anticipation of an expected autumn shortage.

Although butter production since the war has recovered rapidly in
practically all of the important dairy countries, Russia is still out of
the world’s market. The cutting off of the Russian exports to England,
which amounted to 150,000,000 lbs. annually from 1909 to 1913, was the
greatest single factor in bringing about, this change in the seasonal
supply of the latter country.

The present statistical position of the United States is, therefore,
somewhat misleading, unless due consideration is given to

                   (Concluded on page 111, column 2.)



                             IN THIS ISSUE.


 ╔═════════════════════════════════════════════════════════════════════╗
 ║                                                                Page.║
 ║=Crop Reports=                                                    106║
 ║  Condition of cotton crop on July 25. Truck crop reports.           ║
 ║                                                                     ║
 ║=Live Stock and Meats=                                            107║
 ║  Nearly all classes sold at lower levels. Fresh meat markets        ║
 ║  were slow.                                                         ║
 ║                                                                     ║
 ║=Dairy and Poultry=                                               110║
 ║  Butter markets weakened under heavy supplies. Cheese prices        ║
 ║  were lower. Monthly report on condensed and evaporated, and        ║
 ║  powdered milk markets.                                             ║
 ║                                                                     ║
 ║=Fruits and Vegetables=                                           112║
 ║  Shipments continued liberal. White potato prices slumped.          ║
 ║  Most other lines steady to firm.                                   ║
 ║                                                                     ║
 ║=Grain=                                                           114║
 ║  Wheat prices continued downward trend. Cash corn fairly            ║
 ║  steady.                                                            ║
 ║                                                                     ║
 ║=Hay and Feed=                                                    115║
 ║  Hay demand was dull. Feed prices were easier for most kinds.       ║
 ║                                                                     ║
 ║=Seeds=                                                           116║
 ║  Reports on Kentucky bluegrass, orchard grass, and meadow           ║
 ║  fescue seed crops.                                                 ║
 ║                                                                     ║
 ║=Cotton=                                                          117║
 ║  Prices declined slightly. Weather reports a factor.                ║
 ║                                                                     ║
 ║=Weather=                                                         118║
 ║  Weather favored growth of most crops.                              ║
 ╚═════════════════════════════════════════════════════════════════════╝



               COTTON CROP CONDITION 70.8 PER CENT NORMAL
 Loss Amounts to 0.4 Per Cent During Past Months—Total Output Estimated
                          at 11,449,000 Bales.


The condition of the cotton crop on July 25 was 70.8% of normal,
according to the estimate made by the U. S. Department of Agriculture on
Aug. 1. Compared with the condition of 71.2% on June 25, this shows a
decrease in condition of 0.4% for the month. The average condition of
the cotton crop on July 25 for the past 10 years stands at 73% of
normal.

A condition of 70.8% of normal on July 25 this year forecasts a yield
per acre of about 157.2 lbs. and a total production of about 11,449,000
bales of 500 lbs. gross weight each. The final outturn may be larger or
smaller than this amount, of course, depending upon whether or not the
conditions that develop during the remainder of the season prove more or
less favorable to the crop than such conditions ordinarily prove.


       Condition of the Cotton Crop on July 25, with Comparisons.

                             [100 = normal.]

 ───────────────┬───────────────────────┬───────┬───────┬───────────────
     State.     │                       │ June  │ July  │
                │                       │  25,  │  25,  │Change, June 25
                │       July 25.        │ 1922. │ 1922. │  to July 25.
 ───────────────┼───────┬───────┬───────┼───────┼───────┼───────┬───────
                │10‒yr. │       │       │       │       │10 yr. │
                │  av.  │ 1920  │ 1921  │       │       │  av.  │ 1922
 ───────────────┼───────┼───────┼───────┼───────┼───────┼───────┼───────
 Virginia       │     81│     74│     82│     85│     80│      0│     ‒5
 North Carolina │     77│     77│     75│     76│     78│     ‒1│     +2
 South Carolina │     73│     77│     62│     60│     60│     ‒2│      0
 Georgia        │     71│     68│     59│     58│     54│     ‒3│     ‒4
                │       │       │       │       │       │       │
 Florida        │     71│     64│     60│     75│     65│     ‒5│    ‒10
 Alabama        │     69│     67│     58│     68│     70│     ‒5│     +2
 Mississippi    │     72│     71│     68│     76│     74│     ‒4│     ‒2
 Louisiana      │     70│     71│     59│     69│     70│     ‒7│     +1
                │       │       │       │       │       │       │
 Texas          │     72│     74│     62│     72│     72│     ‒6│      0
 Arkansas       │     76│     78│     76│     80│     81│     ‒3│     +1
 Tennessee      │     78│     76│     75│     83│     85│      0│     +2
 Missouri       │     80│     81│     80│     92│     90│      0│     ‒2
                │       │       │       │       │       │       │
 Oklahoma       │     77│     85│     68│     76│     75│     ‒2│     ‒1
 California     │     95│     85│     83│     91│     95│     +2│     +4
 Arizona        │  [1]90│     85│     89│     85│     86│  [1]+1│     +1
 New Mexico     │       │     85│     88│     85│     85│       │      0
 ───────────────┼───────┼───────┼───────┼───────┼───────┼───────┼───────
 United States  │   73.0│   74.1│   64.7│   71.2│   70.8│   ‒3.9│   ‒0.4
 ───────────────┴───────┴───────┴───────┴───────┴───────┴───────┴───────

Last year the production was 7,953,641 bales, two years ago 13,439,603
bales, three years ago 11,420,763 bales, four years ago 12,040,532
bales, and five years ago 11,302,375 bales.

The 1922 acreage of Egyptian type cotton is estimated at 80,000 acres in
Arizona and less than 1,000 acres in California. In 1921 Arizona had
75,000 acres and California 9,000 acres, while in 1920 the estimate for
Arizona was 200,000 acres and for California 45,000 acres.

The department’s estimate of cotton acreage in cultivation on June 25,
which was made public on July 3, remains unchanged at 34,852,000 acres
because the acreage abandoned before that date was excluded. A great
decrease in cotton acreage followed the high acreage of 1920, which was
37,043,000 acres, because of the disastrous break in prices to growers
in that year.

The accompanying table gives detailed information on the condition of
the cotton crop on July 25, by States, together with comparisons.


 Paradox in Forecast Yield of Crop per Acre as Indicated by Condition.

A crop may deteriorate in condition during a growing month and yet its
yield per acre as forecast by a computation based on the lowered
condition may increase. In the average of crop experiences during the
growing period a certain crop declines in condition during a certain
month by a certain percentage of a normal condition.

For instance, the cotton crop has a record of a deterioration of 3.9% of
a normal condition from June 25 to July 25 in the average of the last 10
years. As a matter of fact, however, during this period in 1922 the
deterioration in the condition of the cotton crop was only 0.4%. This is
clearly a relative improvement because it is less than the usual
deterioration of 3.9%. Hence the yield per acre in the forecast for July
25 must be greater than in the forecast made a month earlier,
notwithstanding the absolute decline in condition.

                  *       *       *       *       *

=Apple-tree tent caterpillars= are very numerous in New England and New
York this year. Farther south these pests are noticeably less numerous
than usual.


           Report on Cabbage, Celery, and Onions in Michigan.

Reports from the field service of the U. S. Department of Agriculture
for the date of July 25 concerning commercial cabbage, celery, and
onions in Michigan contain the following information:

_Cabbage._—Five counties in southern Michigan have about 1,285 acres of
commercial cabbage compared with last year’s area of 590 acres, or an
increase of 118%. The counties and their cabbage areas are: Ingham 160
acres, Eaton 225 acres, Jackson 67 acres, Hillsdale 233 acres, and
Branch 600 acres. The principal increases over 1921 are in Hillsdale and
Branch Counties. The crop is generally in excellent condition.

In Hillsdale County, Jonesville has 200 acres, of which 130 acres are
under contract; Mosherville has 13 acres for kraut; and Litchfield has
20 acres. In Branch County, Quincy has approximately 250 acres of
commercial cabbage, of which 170 acres are under contract: and Coldwater
has about 350 acres, with 60% under contract. The kraut plant in
Coldwater will be in operation this year. Baroda, in Berrien County, has
60 acres of cabbage and Niles, in the same county, 40 acres for kraut.

In northern Michigan, Saginaw County has 1,400 acres of commercial
cabbage, 300 acres of which are under contract.

_Celery._—The combined area of commercial celery in Lenawee, Cass,
Allegan, and Kent counties is 1,005 acres, an increase of 450 acres over
1921. Lenawee County has 117 acres, Cass 118 acres, Allegan 170 acres,
and Kent 600 acres. The crop is in excellent condition.

_Onions._—Allegan County has about 603 acres of commercial onions, or
88% more than in 1921. The Gull Swamp section (Martin, Gull Plain,
Shelbyville, Hooper) has approximately 550 acres. Other acreages are:
Wayland 8 acres, Dorr 25 acres, Herps 20 acres. The condition of the
crop in Allegan County is above average. Kent County has an onion
acreage about the same as last year’s.

                  *       *       *       *       *

=Florida watermelons= were widely distributed this season. Some
shipments went as far as San Francisco, Portland, Seattle, Vancouver, B.
C., and other Canadian points.

[Illustration: CONDITION OF THE COTTON CROP, JULY 25, 1922]


            INTERMEDIATE ONION CROP ESTIMATED AT 6,753 CARS
 Early and Intermediate Crops Forecast at 13,605 Cars—Acreage Increased
                            in Late States.

The production of commercial onions in the seven intermediate shipping
States is forecast at 6,753 cars of 500 bus. each, compared with a
production in 1921 of 4,472 cars, according to estimates of the U. S.
Department of Agriculture for July 15. These intermediate States are:
New Jersey, Maryland, Virginia, Kentucky, Iowa, Texas, and Washington.

New Jersey leads the intermediate States with an indicated production of
1.613 cars, and following in order are Washington with 1,566 cars, Texas
with 1,092 cars, Iowa with 1,062 cars, Kentucky with 600 cars, Virginia,
with 560 cars, and Maryland with 260 cars.

The commercial onion crop in the intermediate and early States combined
is forecast at 13,605 cars, each car of the early crop containing 530
bus. and of the intermediate crop 500 bus. In 1921 the harvest of early
and intermediate onions totaled 10,287 cars.

About 38,000 acres have been planted to late commercial onions, compared
with about 35,000 acres in 1921, according to the department’s
estimates. The condition of the late commercial onion crop was 83% of
normal on July 15. This condition is about average.

The accompanying tables give detailed information, by States, on the
early and intermediate crops and the late crop.


 Acreage and Forecast of Production of Commercial Onions in Intermediate and
                                Early States.

 ──────────────┬───────────────────┬───────────────────┬─────────────────────
     State.    │     Acreage.      │  Yield per acre.  │     Production.
 ──────────────┼──────────┬────────┼────────┬──────────┼──────────┬──────────
               │Harvested,│Planted,│Average,│Indicated,│Harvested,│Forecast,
               │   1921   │  1922  │  1921  │   1922   │   1921   │   1922
 ──────────────┼──────────┼────────┼────────┼──────────┼──────────┼──────────
               │ _Acres._ │_Acres._│ _Bu._  │  _Bu._   │_Cars._[2]│_Cars._[2]
 Iowa          │     1,200│   1,600│     202│       332│       485│     1,082
 Ky.           │     1,000│   1,000│     324│       300│       648│       600
 Md.           │       500│     500│     250│       260│       250│       260
 N.J.          │     2,400│   2,400│     239│       336│     1,147│     1,613
 Tex.          │     1,000│   1,500│     275│       304│       550│     1,092
 Va.           │       800│   1,000│     280│       280│       448│       560
 Wash.         │     1,300│   1,500│     363│       522│       944│     1,566
 ──────────────┼──────────┼────────┼────────┼──────────┼──────────┼──────────
 Total         │          │        │        │          │          │
   intermediate│          │        │        │          │          │
   States      │     8,200│   9,500│     273│       355│     4,472│     6,733
 Early States  │          │        │        │          │          │
   previously  │          │        │        │          │          │
   reported[3] │    13,500│  16,000│     228│       227│     5,815│     6,852
 ──────────────┼──────────┼────────┼────────┼──────────┼──────────┼──────────
 Total,        │          │        │        │          │          │
   intermediate│          │        │        │          │          │
   and early   │          │        │        │          │          │
   States      │    21,700│  25,500│     245│       275│    10,287│    13,605
 ──────────────┴──────────┴────────┴────────┴──────────┴──────────┴──────────


       Acreage and Condition of Commercial Onions in Late States.

 ───────────┬───────────────────┬───────────────────────────────────────
   State.   │     Acreage.      │        Condition (100=normal).
 ───────────┼──────────┬────────┼───────┬───────┬───────┬───────┬───────
            │          │        │July 1,│       │       │       │ July
            │Harvested,│Planted,│ 7‒yr. │July 1,│June 1,│July 1,│  15,
            │  1921.   │ 1922.  │  av.  │ 1921. │ 1922. │ 1922. │ 1922.
 ───────────┼──────────┼────────┼───────┼───────┼───────┼───────┼───────
            │  _Acres._│_Acres._│_P.ct._│_P.ct._│_P.ct._│_P.ct._│_P.ct._
 Calif.,    │          │        │       │       │       │       │
   central  │          │        │       │       │       │       │
   dist.    │     7,800│   6,500│     90│     89│    100│     90│     95
 Colo.      │       800│   1,500│     80│     91│     90│     88│     91
 Idaho.     │       100│     300│     89│     94│     88│     94│     98
 Ill.       │     1,100│   1,300│     89│     79│     75│     82│     79
 Ind.       │     3,698│   1,600│     78│     73│     77│     73│     83
 Mass.      │     4,500│   4,600│     83│     73│     78│     79│     75
 Mich.      │     1,300│   1,700│     79│     65│     86│     89│     88
 Minn.      │     1,300│   1,300│     88│     89│     85│     95│     90
 N. Y.      │     7,300│   8,300│     75│     78│     86│     74│     68
 Ohio       │     5,100│   5,800│     79│     73│     98│     88│     88
 Oreg.      │       900│     900│     78│     80│    100│     73│     79
 Pa.        │       300│     400│     81│     93│    100│     95│     95
 Utah       │       100│     100│     93│     94│     96│     91│     90
 Wis.       │     1,000│   1,000│     81│     82│     96│     90│     86
 ───────────┼──────────┼────────┼───────┼───────┼───────┼───────┼───────
    Total   │    35,200│  38,300│     82│     80│     89│     82│     83
 ───────────┴──────────┴────────┴───────┴───────┴───────┴───────┴───────



                       _Live Stock ^{and} Meats_
         NEARLY ALL CLASSES OF LIVE STOCK SELL AT LOWER LEVELS
Price Ranges on Beef Steers Widen—Heavy Hogs Break Sharply—Sheep Prices
                               Irregular.


Practically all classes of live stock sold lower during the week ending
July 29. In beef steer trade the general decline was assisted materially
by the heaviest run of native, western, and Canadian grassers of the
season. Downturns of mostly 25¢ at Chicago and of 50¢-$l at some
Missouri River markets were apparent on the more common descriptions. As
supplies of western grassers increased, the supply of long-fed bullocks
decreased and as the latter were sought by all interests, the widest
price range of the season on beef steers was created at all markets.

Hog prices fluctuated sharply, closing Chicago values being 25¢‒50¢
lower on mixed grades and heavy packers, and 40¢‒55¢ on good butcher
hogs compared with the close of the previous week. Much of the supply at
Omaha and a good percentage of the run at Chicago and some other markets
consisted of heavy sows and mixed packing grades, and these pulled the
general average down to the lowest levels since early in February.


                          SHEEP TRADE ERRATIC.

Trade in fat sheep and feeding lambs was erratic, with closing prices
highest of the week but showing an irregular basis compared with the
previous week’s close.

Receipts at 10 large markets for the week were approximately 199,000
cattle, 502,000 hogs and 195,000 sheep, compared with 215,357 cattle,
452,902 hogs, and 244,517 sheep the previous week, and 166,112 cattle,
398,424 hogs, and 199,137 sheep the corresponding week last year.

_Cattle._—Receipts of grassers from native territory, range States, and
Canada, assumed the largest proportions of the season. Short-feds also
were numerous, and long-fed matured beef steers and yearlings
correspondingly scarce. Canadians were unusually numerous at St. Paul
and Chicago for so early in the season, the July supply at the former
market up to July 27 standing at 5,800 as compared with 988 for the
corresponding period a year ago. The collapse of cattle values in
Canadian provinces was an incentive for shipping across the border.

Canadians and Dakotas were generally in poor flesh and turned at
$4.75‒$6.50, killers taking a few at the latter price. Oklahoma and
Texas grass steers invaded Kansas City and St. Louis in liberal numbers,
and sold largely within a spread of $4.25‒$7, many quarantine steers,
grading as cutters, selling around $4.25‒$4.75. Kansas pasture cattle
were well represented at Kansas City, and winter grass steers of good
weight and condition sold there upward to $8.75 or slightly higher. A
few lots of Utah and California steers arrived at Omaha. Bulk of grass
steers sold there at $6‒$7.25, a large proportion of the far western
steers being in feeder flesh. One lot of Montana steers showing breeding
quality and good killing flesh brought $8.75 at that market from a
producer. This lot met good packer competition, and the relatively high
sale price indicated the plainness of the early run of grassers in
general.

Long-fed matured bullocks, averaging 1,443 lbs. reached $10.80 at
Chicago and best long yearlings topped at $10.50, the premium of heavy
steers over yearlings continuing in evidence. Sales above $10.25 were
comparatively scarce, bulk of beef steers at Chicago being of quality
and flesh to sell at $8.50‒$10. At that point few bullocks that had
received even a sparse corn ration on grass sold under $8, but common
native and western grassers cashed well below that figure.


                          PRODUCERS IN MARKET.

The influx of westerns augmented the stocker and feeder supply and
producers took more notice of their pasture and feed lot needs than
recently, insisting, however, on lower prices except on kinds of high
quality. A spread of $5.50‒$6.50 absorbed the majority of stockers and
light feeders at Chicago, a few heavy feeders reaching $7.50, while good
feeders commanded $7.25‒$7.75 at Kansas City, most of the desirable
stockers bringing $6.50‒$7 at that market. Common light stock steers
descended to $4.50 and lower in instances there and at St. Louis.

She stock offerings were comparatively scarce, and flesh condition for
the most part was plain to medium. Highly finished kosher cows
maintained $8‒$8.50 levels and above at Chicago, corn-fed yearling
heifers selling in line with steers of a similar finish. In-between
grades of beef cows and heifers lacked dependable outlet, generous runs
of low grade grass steers at river markets being a weakening influence.
Bulk of fat cows and heifers at Chicago brought $5‒$7.25. Canners
displayed strength, few healthy descriptions selling there below $3.

Bulls closed largely 25¢ lower; desirable heavy bolognas cashed upward
to $4.75‒$4.85 early at Chicago, but descended to around $4.50, heavy
beef bulls sharing the decline. Reduced arrivals of veal calves at
Chicago somewhat counteracted the effect of slump conditions in the
dressed market and values advanced 25¢‒50¢, packers taking desirable
vealers at the close at Chicago at $9.50‒$10, these interests as well as
small killers paying upward to $10.50 for specialties.

_Hogs._—Although receipts at Chicago were moderate, being about the same
as in the preceding week, those at western points

                   (Concluded on page 109, column 1.)


          MODERATE RECEIPTS OF MOST MEATS IN EXCESS OF DEMAND
Prices Generally Lower on Beef, Veal, Lamb, and Mutton—Heavy Pork Loins
                              Also Lower.

             (Boston, New York, Philadelphia, and Chicago.)

Moderate receipts of beef, veal, lamb, and mutton were in excess of the
limited demand and prices were generally lower for the week ending July
28. Heavy pork loins were weak to lower with other classes steady to
higher, except at New York, where all averages shared in the decline.

_Beef._—Moderate receipts of beef at eastern markets found a limited
outlet. Good and choice grades of steers were not plentiful, but were
neglected in favor of poorer grades as prices were given more
consideration than quality. The demand for chucks and rattles showed
some improvement, and prices on these were relatively firmer than on
other cuts. Cows were mostly of medium and common grades and were hard
to move. At Chicago the assortment of steer beef was good, but prices
weakened under a narrow demand. Few desirable cows were available, most
of the supply having consisted of the poorer grades.


                        PRICES UNEVEN AT CLOSE.

Compared with the close of the preceding week. Boston was about steady,
New York unevenly 50¢-$3 lower, Philadelphia $1‒$2 lower, and Chicago $1
lower. Cows were weak to $1 lower at Boston, $l-$2 lower at New York and
Philadelphia, and 50¢ lower at Chicago. Receipts of bulls were light,
and prices closed steady to $1 higher at Boston, steady to $1 lower at
New York, and 25¢‒50¢ lower at Chicago, with very few on sale at
Philadelphia. Kosher beef trade was slow, and prices closed around $1
lower at New York and unchanged elsewhere.

_Veal._—Except at Boston the demand for veal at eastern markets was poor
after the early part of the week, and prices declined daily. At that
market western dressed receipts and local slaughter were light and
demand fair. At Chicago the fairly liberal offerings were too great for
the slow demand, and the market had a weak undertone. Compared with the
close of the preceding week, Boston was steady to $1 lower. New York
$2‒$3 lower, Philadelphia $2‒$4 lower, and Chicago $1 lower.


   DAILY AVERAGE WEIGHT AND COST OF HOGS, WEEK ENDING JULY 29, 1922.

                        [Price per 100 pounds.]

 ────────────┬──────────┬──────────┬──────────┬──────────┬──────────
   Market.   │   Mon.   │  Tues.   │   Wed.   │  Thurs.  │   Fri.
 ────────────┼────┬─────┼────┬─────┼────┬─────┼────┬─────┼────┬─────
             │Wt. │Cost.│Wt. │Cost.│Wt. │Cost.│Wt. │Cost.│Wt. │Cost.
 ────────────┼────┼─────┼────┼─────┼────┼─────┼────┼─────┼────┼─────
 Chicago     │ 259│$9.73│ 269│$9.52│ 252│$9.45│ 267│$9.25│ 266│$9.24
 E. St. Louis│ 200│10.70│ 198│10.71│ 218│10.36│ 203│ 9.96│ 205│10.03
 Kansas City │ 212│10.24│ 217│ 9.96│ 217│ 9.76│ 219│ 9.49│ 200│ 9.55
 Omaha       │ 261│ 9.06│ 273│ 8.81│ 280│ 8.46│ 273│ 8.20│ 273│ 8.32
 St. Joseph  │ 233│ 9.71│ 233│ 9.75│ 233│ 9.50│ 246│ 9.16│ 250│ 9.04
 S. St. Paul │ 277│ 8.45│ 282│ 8.62│ 281│ 8.30│ 269│ 8.10│ 279│ 8.14
 ────────────┴────┴─────┴────┴─────┴────┴─────┴────┴─────┴────┴─────

 ────────────┬──────────┬──────────┬──────────┬───────────
   Market.   │   Sat.   │ This wk. │ Last wk. │1 yr. ago.
 ────────────┼────┬─────┼────┬─────┼────┬─────┼────┬──────
             │Wt. │Cost.│Wt. │Cost.│Wt. │Cost.│Wt. │Cost.
 ────────────┼────┼─────┼────┼─────┼────┼─────┼────┼──────
 Chicago     │ 277│$9.24│ 263│$9.44│ 261│$9.53│ 252│$10.35
 E. St. Louis│ 199│10.22│ 202│10.33│ 199│10.66│ 201│ 11.33
 Kansas City │ 216│ 9.36│ 217│ 9.85│ 217│ 9.95│ 228│ 10.47
 Omaha       │ 281│ 8.43│ 274│ 8.54│ 265│ 9.00│ 265│  9.54
 St. Joseph  │ 234│ 9.32│ 238│ 9.45│ 238│ 9.67│    │
 S. St. Paul │ 256│ 8.25│ 277│ 8.32│ 271│ 8.50│ 257│  9.32
 ────────────┴────┴─────┴────┴─────┴────┴─────┴────┴──────

     The above prices are computed on packer and shipper purchases.


  RECEIPTS, SHIPMENTS, AND LOCAL SLAUGHTER, WEEK ENDING JULY 29, 1922.

 ───────────────┬───────────────────────────────
    Markets.    │      Cattle and calves.
 ───────────────┼─────────┬──────────┬──────────
                │         │          │  Local
                │Receipts.│Shipments.│slaughter.
 ───────────────┼─────────┼──────────┼──────────
 Chicago        │   61,949│    14,367│    47,582
 Denver[4]      │    6,041│     4,923│     1,937
 East St. Louis │   26,146│    13,103│    14,721
 Fort Worth[4]  │   21,089│     7,681│    10,727
 Indianapolis[4]│    8,341│     4,727│     4,194
 Kansas City    │   58,679│    26,973│    29,574
 Oklahoma City  │   10,258│     5,108│     4,902
 Omaha          │   25,524│    10,795│    14,060
 St. Joseph[4]  │    8,388│     2,344│     5,548
 St. Paul[4]    │   35,933│    19,472│    15,369
 Sioux City     │   12,746│     7,336│     4,314
 Wichita[4]     │    7,415│     3,739│     2,614
 ───────────────┼─────────┼──────────┼──────────
      Total     │  282,509│   120,568│   155,542
 Previous week  │  298,028│   106,244│   182,957
 ───────────────┴─────────┴──────────┴──────────

 ───────────────┬───────────────────────────────
    Markets.    │             Hogs.
 ───────────────┼─────────┬──────────┬──────────
                │         │          │  Local
                │Receipts.│Shipments.│slaughter.
 ───────────────┼─────────┼──────────┼──────────
 Chicago        │  141,033│    30,301│   110,732
 Denver[4]      │    6,151│        60│     5,885
 East St. Louis │   54,947│    25,404│    25,941
 Fort Worth[4]  │    5,472│       746│     3,926
 Indianapolis[4]│   44,242│    15,360│    28,561
 Kansas City    │   39,383│    10,627│    27,387
 Oklahoma City  │    7,835│       695│     8,028
 Omaha          │   72,894│    18,668│    54,144
 St. Joseph[4]  │   40,712│     6,822│    31,942
 St. Paul[4]    │   30,560│     3,616│    24,224
 Sioux City     │   45,910│    17,483│    27,478
 Wichita[4]     │    9,915│       136│     9,271
 ───────────────┼─────────┼──────────┼──────────
      Total     │  499,054│   129,918│   357,519
 Previous week  │  443,027│   112,557│   330,482
 ───────────────┴─────────┴──────────┴──────────

 ───────────────┬───────────────────────────────
    Markets.    │            Sheep.
 ───────────────┼─────────┬──────────┬──────────
                │         │          │  Local
                │Receipts.│Shipments.│slaughter.
 ───────────────┼─────────┼──────────┼──────────
 Chicago        │   69,291│    19,002│    50,289
 Denver[4]      │   10,743│     1,958│     1,698
 East St. Louis │   21,991│     4,597│    13,814
 Fort Worth[4]  │    5,055│     3,871│       997
 Indianapolis[4]│    4,400│     1,693│     2,202
 Kansas City    │   17,871│     4,067│    12,453
 Oklahoma City  │      407│        80│       295
 Omaha          │   57,645│    26,612│    27,353
 St. Joseph[4]  │    9,264│     2,908│     6,396
 St. Paul[4]    │    5,982│       883│     5,048
 Sioux City     │    1,060│       333│       544
 Wichita[4]     │      544│          │       373
 ───────────────┼─────────┼──────────┼──────────
      Total     │  204,253│    66,004│   121,462
 Previous week  │  239,860│    52,840│   172,547
 ───────────────┴─────────┴──────────┴──────────

_Lamb._—The lamb market showed daily declines at eastern markets and
Chicago after opening firm to higher on Monday. Receipts were fairly
liberal and demand poor. Supplies accumulated, although some lamb was
put in the freezers. Compared with the close of the preceding week,
Boston and New York were $1‒$3 lower, Philadelphia $2‒$3 lower, and
Chicago $1‒$2 lower.

_Mutton._—The bulk of the moderate receipts of mutton at eastern markets
was undesirable because of weight and excessive finish. Prices were also
influenced by the drop in lamb values, and daily declines were the rule.
At Chicago offerings consisted largely of heavy ewes and bucks, but
prices showed little change. Compared with the close of the preceding
week, Boston, New York, and Philadelphia were $2‒$4 lower, with Chicago
unchanged.

_Pork._—Fresh light loins were seasonally scarce and relatively firmer
in price than heavier averages. Receipts of fresh loins were light, but
there was an ample supply of the frozen product on sale. Compared with
the close of the preceding week, Boston and Philadelphia were steady to
$1 higher except on heavy loins, which were weak to $1 lower with some
sales off more. New York closed unevenly $2‒$5 lower, and Chicago steady
to $1 higher.


                       Wool Imports at Two Ports.

Imports of wool through the port of Philadelphia during the week ending
July 29 amounted to 417,226 lbs., valued at $77,165. Imports through the
port of Boston during the same week amounted to 2,774,745 lbs., having a
valuation of $878,563, and in addition there was received through the
port of Boston 48,776 lbs. of camels’ hair, valued at $11,986 and
244,767 lbs. of mohair having a valuation of $56,581.


        CHICAGO WHOLESALE PRICES OF CURED PORK AND PORK PRODUCTS.

                            [Per 100 pounds.]

 ────────────────────────────────┬────────────┬────────────┬────────────
                                 │    July 28.│    July 21.│    June 30.
 ────────────────────────────────┼────────────┼────────────┼────────────
 Hams, smoked, 14‒16 average     │$26.00‒28.50│$27.00‒29.50│$28.00‒29.50
 Hams, fancy, 14‒16 average      │ 29.50‒31.50│ 30.00‒32.00│ 31.00‒33.00
 Picnics, smoked, 4‒8 average    │ 17.00‒19.00│ 17.00‒19.00│ 17.00‒19.50
 Bacon, breakfast, 6‒8 average   │ 25.00‒28.00│ 24.00‒28.00│ 25.00‒27.50
 Bacon, fancy, 6‒8 average       │ 32.00‒36.00│ 32.00‒35.50│ 32.00‒35.00
 Bellies, D. S., 14‒16 average   │ 15.50‒16.00│ 15.50‒16.00│ 16.00‒17.00
 Backs, D. S., 14‒16 average     │ 12.00‒13.50│ 12.00‒13.50│ 12.00‒13.00
 Pure lard, tierces              │ 13.00‒14.25│ 12.00‒13.25│ 12.50‒14.00
 Compound lard, tierces          │ 12.75‒14.00│ 12.50‒14.00│ 12.75‒14.00
 ────────────────────────────────┴────────────┴────────────┴────────────


  New Zealand’s Production of Butter and Cheese for Export Increases.

The production of butter for export in New Zealand during the nine
months ending Apr. 30 amounted to 102,637,920 lbs., compared with
71,412,650 lbs. during the corresponding period ending Apr. 30, 1921.
The production of cheese for export during the nine months ending Apr.
30, was 133,579,600 lbs., compared with 118,628,490 lbs. for the same
period of 1920‒21.

These figures show an increase of 44% in the production of butter and
12.6% in the production of cheese. The above figures relate only to the
quantities produced and graded for export and do not include the amounts
intended for local consumption.


              LIVE STOCK PRICES, TUESDAY, AUGUST 1, 1922.

                           [Per 100 pounds.]

 ─────────────────────────────────┬────────────┬────────────┬───────────
                                  │            │  East St.  │  Kansas
                                  │    Chicago.│   Louis.   │   City.
 ─────────────────────────────────┼────────────┼────────────┼───────────
              CATTLE.             │            │            │
 Beef steers:                     │            │            │
    Medium and heavy (1,101 lbs.  │            │            │
      up)—                        │            │            │
       Choice and prime           │$10.00‒10.75│$10.00‒10.50│$9.85‒10.50
       Good                       │  9.10‒10.00│  9.25‒10.00│ 8.90‒ 9.85
       Medium                     │  8.15‒ 9.10│  7.50‒ 9.25│ 7.60‒ 8.90
       Common                     │  6.65‒ 8.15│  5.50‒ 7.50│ 6.40‒ 7.60
    Light weight (1,100 lbs.      │            │            │
      down)—                      │            │            │
       Choice and prime           │  9.85‒10.65│  9.75‒10.50│ 9.65‒10.25
       Good                       │  9.00‒ 9.85│  9.00‒ 9.75│ 8.65‒ 9.65
       Medium                     │  8.00‒ 9.00│  7.50‒ 9.00│ 7.25‒ 8.65
       Common                     │  6.50‒ 8.00│  4.75‒ 7.50│ 5.50‒ 7.25
 Butcher cattle:                  │            │            │
    Heifers, common-choice        │  5.15‒ 9.00│  6.00‒10.00│ 4.75‒ 8.85
       Cows, common-choice        │  4.10‒ 8.15│  4.00‒ 6.25│ 3.85‒ 6.75
       Bulls, bologna and beef    │  4.00‒ 6.50│  3.75‒ 6.25│ 3.50‒ 5.50
 Canners and cutters:             │            │            │
    Cows and heifers              │  2.85‒ 4.10│  2.50‒ 4.00│ 2.35‒ 3.85
    Canner steers                 │  3.50‒ 5.25│  3.25‒ 4.00│ 3.00‒ 4.25
 Veal calves:                     │            │            │
    Light and med. wt.,           │            │            │
      med.-choice                 │  9.00‒10.50│  6.50‒10.00│ 6.25‒ 9.25
    Heavy weight, common-choice   │  4.00‒ 8.00│  3.50‒ 7.50│ 4.00‒ 8.25
 Feeder steers:                   │            │            │
    1,001 lbs. up, common-choice  │  5.50‒ 7.65│  5.75‒ 7.50│ 6.15‒ 8.40
    750‒1,000 lbs., common-choice │  5.50‒ 7.65│  4.75‒ 7.50│ 6.10‒ 8.35
 Stocker cattle:                  │            │            │
    Steers, common-choice         │  4.75‒ 7.65│  3.50‒ 7.50│ 4.60‒ 8.10
    Cows and heifers,             │            │            │
      common-choice               │  3.50‒ 5.75│  3.00‒ 5.50│ 3.25‒ 5.85
    Calves—                       │            │            │
       Good and choice            │            │            │ 6.75‒ 7.75
       Common and medium          │            │            │ 4.00‒ 6.50
               HOGS.              │            │            │
 Top                              │       10.75│       10.75│      10.20
 Bulk of sales                    │  8.10‒10.65│ 10.25‒10.65│ 9.00‒10.10
 Heavy wt. (251 lbs. up),         │            │            │
   common-choice                  │  9.80‒10.30│  9.25‒10.25│ 9.00‒ 9.75
 Med. wt. (201‒250 lbs.),         │            │            │
   common-choice                  │ 10.20‒10.65│ 10.15‒10.70│ 9.75‒10.05
 Light wt. (151‒200 lbs.),        │            │            │
   common-choice                  │ 10.50‒10.70│ 10.60‒10.75│ 9.70‒10.20
 Light lts. (131‒150 lbs.),       │            │            │
   common-choice                  │ 10.25‒10.65│ 10.50‒10.75│ 9.60‒10.10
 Packing sows (250 lbs. up),      │            │            │
   smooth                         │  8.00‒ 8.65│  7.75‒ 8.00│ 7.50‒ 7.85
 Packing sows (200 lbs. up), rough│  7.25‒ 8.00│  7.60‒ 7.75│ 7.25‒ 7.50
 Pigs (150 lbs. down),            │            │            │
   common-choice                  │  9.75‒10.40│ 10.00‒10.60│
 Stock pigs (130 lbs. down)       │            │  9.75‒10.25│ 9.75‒10.50
              SHEEP.              │            │            │
 Lambs:                           │            │            │
    84 lbs. down, medium-choice   │ 11.50‒12.75│ 11.00‒12.25│10.25‒13.00
    Culls and common              │  7.50‒11.25│  5.50‒11.00│ 6.00‒10.00
    Feeding lambs                 │ 11.50‒12.50│            │
 Yearlings, wethers, medium-prime │  8.50‒11.00│  8.00‒10.75│ 7.00‒10.50
 Wethers, medium-prime            │  6.00‒ 8.75│  5.50‒ 8.25│ 6.25‒ 8.25
 Ewes:                            │            │            │
    Medium, good, and choice      │  3.25‒ 7.60│  3.00‒ 6.00│ 5.00‒ 7.00
    Culls and common              │  2.00‒ 3.75│  1.50‒ 3.00│ 2.00‒ 5.00
    Breeding ewes (full mouths to │            │            │
      yearlings)                  │  5.00‒11.50│  5.50‒ 8.50│ 5.75‒ 9.00
 ─────────────────────────────────┴────────────┴────────────┴───────────

 ─────────────────────────────────┬────────────┬───────────┬───────────
                                  │            │ South St. │
                                  │   Omaha.   │  Joseph.  │ St. Paul.
 ─────────────────────────────────┼────────────┼───────────┼───────────
              CATTLE.             │            │           │
 Beef steers:                     │            │           │
    Medium and heavy (1,101 lbs.  │            │           │
      up)—                        │            │           │
       Choice and prime           │$10.00‒10.50│$9.75‒10.35│
       Good                       │  9.25‒10.00│ 8.70‒ 9.75│$8.75‒ 9.50
       Medium                     │  8.00‒ 9.25│ 7.00‒ 8.70│ 7.50‒ 8.75
       Common                     │  6.00‒ 8.00│ 5.50‒ 7.00│ 5.75‒ 7.50
    Light weight (1,100 lbs.      │            │           │
      down)—                      │            │           │
       Choice and prime           │  9.75‒10.50│ 9.65‒10.25│
       Good                       │  9.00‒ 9.75│ 8.60‒ 9.65│ 8.75‒ 9.50
       Medium                     │  7.50‒ 9.00│ 6.85‒ 8.60│ 7.50‒ 8.75
       Common                     │  5.75‒ 7.50│ 5.25‒ 6.85│ 5.50‒ 7.50
 Butcher cattle:                  │            │           │
    Heifers, common-choice        │  5.00‒ 9.25│ 5.00‒ 9.00│ 4.00‒ 8.50
       Cows, common-choice        │  4.25‒ 7.50│ 3.75‒ 7.50│ 3.75‒ 7.25
       Bulls, bologna and beef    │  3.75‒ 6.75│ 3.25‒ 5.75│ 3.25‒ 6.00
 Canners and cutters:             │            │           │
    Cows and heifers              │  2.75‒ 4.25│ 2.25‒ 3.75│ 2.25‒ 3.75
    Canner steers                 │  3.00‒ 4.25│           │ 2.75‒ 4.00
 Veal calves:                     │            │           │
    Light and med. wt.,           │            │           │
      med.-choice                 │  7.50‒ 9.50│ 6.25‒ 9.25│ 4.00‒ 9.00
    Heavy weight, common-choice   │  5.25‒ 7.75│ 5.00‒ 7.00│ 3.59‒ 7.00
 Feeder steers:                   │            │           │
    1,001 lbs. up, common-choice  │  5.75‒ 8.25│ 5.25‒ 8.00│ 4.25‒ 7.25
    750‒1,000 lbs., common-choice │  5.25‒ 8.00│ 5.25‒ 8.00│ 3.75‒ 7.25
 Stocker cattle:                  │            │           │
    Steers, common-choice         │  5.00‒ 7.75│ 4.50‒ 7.50│ 3.50‒ 7.00
    Cows and heifers,             │            │           │
      common-choice               │  3.50‒ 5.75│ 3.25‒ 5.50│ 2.75‒ 5.50
    Calves—                       │            │           │
       Good and choice            │  7.00‒ 8.00│           │
       Common and medium          │  5.00‒ 7.00│           │
               HOGS.              │            │           │
 Top                              │       10.30│      10.10│      10.25
 Bulk of sales                    │  7.75‒10.25│ 9.50‒10.10│ 7.50‒10.00
 Heavy wt. (251 lbs. up),         │            │           │
   common-choice                  │  9.00‒10.00│  9.00‒9.90│ 8.25‒10.00
 Med. wt. (201‒250 lbs.),         │            │           │
   common-choice                  │  9.65‒10.25│ 9.85‒10.10│ 8.75‒10.00
 Light wt. (151‒200 lbs.),        │            │           │
   common-choice                  │ 10.00‒10.25│ 9.90‒10.10│ 9.75‒10.25
 Light lts. (131‒150 lbs.),       │            │           │
   common-choice                  │            │           │
 Packing sows (250 lbs. up),      │            │           │
   smooth                         │  7.75‒ 8.50│ 7.65‒ 8.00│ 7.25‒ 8.25
 Packing sows (200 lbs. up), rough│  7.25‒ 7.75│ 7.25‒ 7.60│ 6.75‒ 7.25
 Pigs (150 lbs. down),            │            │           │
   common-choice                  │            │           │
 Stock pigs (130 lbs. down)       │  9.00‒10.00│           │10.00‒10.50
              SHEEP.              │            │           │
 Lambs:                           │            │           │
    84 lbs. down, medium-choice   │ 11.50‒12.25│11.50‒13.00│11.00‒12.25
    Culls and common              │  7.25‒11.50│ 7.00‒11.25│
    Feeding lambs                 │  9.25‒12.00│           │
 Yearlings, wethers, medium-prime │  8.25‒10.50│ 7.50‒11.00│ 6.50‒10.50
 Wethers, medium-prime            │  6.25‒ 8.75│ 6.00‒ 8.00│ 7.50‒10.25
 Ewes:                            │            │           │
    Medium, good, and choice      │  4.00‒ 7.00│ 4.00‒ 7.00│ 4.00‒ 8.25
    Culls and common              │  2.00‒ 4.00│ 1.50‒ 4.00│ 3.00‒ 6.75
    Breeding ewes (full mouths to │            │           │
      yearlings)                  │            │           │ 2.00‒ 3.50
 ─────────────────────────────────┴────────────┴───────────┴───────────


  WHOLESALE PRICES OF WESTERN DRESSED MEATS, TUESDAY, AUGUST 1, 1922.

                           [Per 100 pounds.]

 ────────────────────────────────┬──────────────────────────────────────
                                 │               Chicago.
 ────────────────────────────────┼────────────┬────────────┬────────────
                                 │  Aug. 1.   │  July 25.  │  July 3.
 ────────────────────────────────┼────────────┼────────────┼────────────
 Fresh beef:                     │            │            │
    Steers—                      │            │            │
       Choice                    │$15.50‒16.00│$16.50‒17.00│$15.00‒16.00
       Good                      │ 14.50‒15.00│ 15.50‒16.00│ 14.50‒15.00
       Medium                    │ 13.00‒14.00│ 14.00‒15.00│ 13.00‒14.00
       Common                    │ 10.00‒12.00│ 11.00‒13.00│ 12.00‒13.00
    Cows—                        │            │            │
       Good                      │ 11.50‒12.50│ 12.00‒13.00│ 12.00‒12.50
       Medium                    │ 10.50‒11.50│ 11.00‒12.00│ 11.00‒11.50
       Common                    │  8.50‒ 9.50│  9.00‒10.00│  9.00‒10.00
    Bulls—                       │            │            │
       Good                      │            │            │
       Medium                    │            │            │
       Common                    │  7.50‒ 7.75│  7.75‒ 8.25│  7.00‒ 7.25
 Fresh veal:                     │            │            │
    Choice                       │ 16.00‒17.00│ 16.00‒17.00│ 15.00‒17.00
    Good                         │ 14.00‒15.00│ 15.00‒16.00│ 14.00‒15.00
    Medium                       │ 12.00‒13.00│ 12.00‒14.00│ 13.00‒14.00
    Common                       │ 10.00‒11.00│ 10.00‒11.00│  8.00‒12.00
 Fresh pork cuts:                │            │            │
    Loins—                       │            │            │
       8‒10 lbs. average         │ 23.00‒25.00│ 23.00‒24.00│ 22.00‒23.00
       10‒12 lbs. average        │ 20.00‒22.00│ 20.00‒22.00│ 21.00‒22.00
       12‒14 lbs. average        │ 17.00‒19.00│ 17.00‒19.00│ 19.00‒20.00
       14‒16 lbs. average        │ 14.00‒16.00│ 15.00‒16.00│ 18.00‒19.00
       16 lbs. and over          │ 12.00‒14.00│ 13.00‒14.00│ 16.00‒18.00
    Shoulders—                   │            │            │
       Skinned                   │ 13.50‒14.50│ 13.50‒14.50│ 14.00‒15.00
    Picnics—                     │            │            │
       4‒6 lbs. average          │ 14.00‒15.00│ 15.00‒16.00│ 15.00‒15.50
       6‒8 lbs. average          │ 13.00‒14.00│ 14.00‒15.00│ 14.50‒15.00
    Butts—                       │            │            │
       Boston style              │ 16.00‒17.50│ 16.00‒17.50│ 16.00‒17.00
 Fresh lamb and mutton:          │            │            │
    Lamb—                        │            │            │
       Choice                    │ 26.00‒27.00│ 27.00‒28.00│ 26.00‒28.00
       Good                      │ 24.00‒25.00│ 26.00‒27.00│ 24.00‒26.00
       Medium                    │ 21.00‒23.00│ 23.00‒25.00│ 21.00‒23.00
       Common                    │ 16.00‒20.00│ 16.00‒21.00│ 15.00‒20.00
    Mutton—                      │            │            │
       Good                      │ 14.00‒15.00│ 14.00‒15.00│ 13.00‒14.50
       Medium                    │ 10.00‒12.00│ 10.00‒12.00│ 10.00‒12.00
       Common                    │  6.00‒ 8.00│  6.00‒ 8.00│  6.00‒ 8.00
 ────────────────────────────────┴────────────┴────────────┴────────────

 ────────────────────────────────┬──────────────────────────────────────
                                 │              New York.
 ────────────────────────────────┼────────────┬────────────┬────────────
                                 │  Aug. 1.   │  July 25.  │  July 3.
 ────────────────────────────────┼────────────┼────────────┼────────────
 Fresh beef:                     │            │            │
    Steers—                      │            │            │
       Choice                    │$16.50‒17.00│$16.00‒17.00│$17.00‒17.50
       Good                      │ 14.00‒16.00│ 15.50‒16.00│ 16.00‒17.00
       Medium                    │ 11.00‒13.00│ 13.00‒15.00│ 15.00‒16.00
       Common                    │  8.00‒10.00│ 10.00‒12.50│ 12.00‒15.00
    Cows—                        │            │            │
       Good                      │ 11.00‒12.00│       13.00│ 13.00‒14.00
       Medium                    │  9.00‒11.00│ 11.00‒12.50│ 12.00‒13.00
       Common                    │  8.00‒ 9.00│ 10.00‒11.00│ 11.00‒12.00
    Bulls—                       │            │            │
       Good                      │       10.00│       11.00│ 12.00‒12.50
       Medium                    │  9.00‒10.00│  9.00‒10.50│ 10.00‒12.00
       Common                    │  7.00‒ 8.00│  8.00‒ 9.00│  9.00‒10.00
 Fresh veal:                     │            │            │
    Choice                       │ 16.00‒18.00│ 17.00‒18.00│ 15.00‒16.00
    Good                         │ 13.00‒15.00│ 15.00‒17.00│ 12.00‒14.00
    Medium                       │ 11.00‒12.00│ 12.00‒15.00│ 10.00‒12.00
    Common                       │ 10.00‒11.00│  9.00‒11.00│  8.00‒10.00
 Fresh pork cuts:                │            │            │
    Loins—                       │            │            │
       8‒10 lbs. average         │ 23.00‒24.00│ 23.00‒24.00│ 22.00‒23.00
       10‒12 lbs. average        │ 22.00‒23.00│ 22.00‒23.00│ 21.00‒22.00
       12‒14 lbs. average        │ 21.00‒22.00│ 21.00‒22.00│ 20.00‒21.00
       14‒16 lbs. average        │ 18.00‒20.00│ 20.00‒21.00│ 19.00‒20.00
       16 lbs. and over          │ 16.00‒18.00│ 18.00‒20.00│ 18.00‒19.00
    Shoulders—                   │            │            │
       Skinned                   │ 15.00‒16.00│ 15.00‒16.00│ 15.00‒16.00
    Picnics—                     │            │            │
       4‒6 lbs. average          │            │            │
       6‒8 lbs. average          │ 15.00‒16.00│ 14.00‒16.00│ 16.00‒17.00
    Butts—                       │            │            │
       Boston style              │ 18.00‒19.00│ 16.00‒18.00│ 17.00‒19.00
 Fresh lamb and mutton:          │            │            │
    Lamb—                        │            │            │
       Choice                    │ 25.00‒20.00│ 26.00‒21.00│ 24.00‒27.00
       Good                      │ 22.00‒23.00│ 24.00‒25.00│ 18.00‒20.00
       Medium                    │ 21.00‒22.00│ 22.00‒23.00│ 16.00‒18.00
       Common                    │ 19.00‒21.00│ 16.00‒20.00│ 12.00‒14.00
    Mutton—                      │            │            │
       Good                      │ 13.00‒16.00│ 15.00‒17.00│ 14.00‒16.00
       Medium                    │ 10.00‒12.50│ 13.00‒14.00│ 10.00‒12.00
       Common                    │  7.00‒10.00│ 10.00‒13.00│  8.00‒10.00
 ────────────────────────────────┴────────────┴────────────┴────────────


                       WEEKLY LIVE STOCK REVIEW.

                       (Concluded from page 107.)

were considerably heavier. Chicago quality was the best for several
weeks, a generous proportion of the supply consisting of good light and
medium weight butchers. This, coupled with the narrowest shipping outlet
for hogs in weeks, attributed to an extent to unsettled railway labor
conditions, was partially responsible for sharp declines, especially on
the better grades. Closing prices Were 40¢‒55¢ under those of the week
previous on bulk of good lights and butchers and 25¢‒50¢ lower on mixed
and packing grades. A slight reaction was noticed toward the week end,
with small advances scored on some of the in-between butchers and better
packing grades.

Big packers were bearish and very indifferent buyers, even at the sharp
decline, leaving liberal holdovers each day. The week’s top at Chicago
was $11, secured on early sessions for good lights and light butchers,
but best sold at the close at $10.60, and bulk of good lights and light
butchers sold at the week end from $10.30‒$10.50. Bulk of good 220
lb.‒300 lb. butchers closed at $9.75‒$10.25. Such shipping orders as
were filled called largely for the better grades of mixed packing, good,
smooth, light weight sows and these failed to show the extreme decline
apparent on other grades.


                          GOOD PIGS IN DEMAND.

Demand for good pigs at Chicago was broad and such sold readily all
week, with bulk of good 100‒130 lb. averages clearing from $9.50‒$10.50.
Saturday’s closing values on pigs were around 25¢ lower for the week.
Stock pig prices, both at St. Paul and Missouri River markets declined
25¢‒35¢, best strong weights selling at $10.25‒$10.50 at St. Paul and
Kansas City, respectively. Several shipments of good quality thin sows
went to the country from St. Paul and Chicago for feeding purposes,
costing $8‒$9. The trade generally displayed considerable anxiety on
account of the railway and coal strikes.

_Sheep._—An oversupply of sheep at Jersey City at the week’s opening was
the chief factor in further declines in prices following the declines
late last week at Chicago and other western markets, but with aggregate
slaughter falling considerably short of the week previous, the market
made good recovery as the week’s trading progressed. Closing Chicago
prices, compared with the week previous, were strong to 25¢ higher on
fat native lambs, mostly 50¢ higher on cull natives, steady to 15¢ lower
on fat western lambs, 35¢‒50¢ lower on western feeding lambs, generally
steady on light sheep and 25¢‒50¢ lower on heavy sheep.

Subsequent to Monday when Jersey City had a full supply, the run of
southeastern lambs was light and natives from other sections were in
smaller supply than during the preceding week. The market-ward movement
of range stock from the Northwest was of fair volume, although hampered
to a certain extent by conditions arising from the strike of railway
shopmen. Feeder demand was narrow at the week’s opening but declines
then enforced attracted buyers subsequently and both fat and feeder
lambs closed about 25¢ above the week’s low spot.

At the week end, choice western lambs were safely quotable up to $13 at
Chicago, good Oregons, rather lightly sorted, selling up to $12.85, and
best natives up to $12.75 straight, with bulk of natives at $12.50$12.60
and native culls mostly at $8‒$8.50. Feeder buyers paid up to $12.50 for
light and tidy weight Western feeder lambs, but a number of loads of
heavy feeders sold during the week at $11.50‒$11.75. Fat heavy ewes sold
downward to $3, a few below $3.50 at the close, while fat light native
and Western ewes reached $7‒$7.25. Wethers and yearlings were virtually
lacking. There was call for western yearling breeding ewes, with none
offered and choice quotable to $11.50. Native yearling ewes were taken
on breeder account up to $9.50‒$9.75, twos to fours mixed up to
$8‒$8.75, with heavies and less desirable kinds on down to $6 and below,
depending on age, weight, and quality.

_Opening, July 31._—Beef steers, yearlings, butcher cows, and heifers at
Chicago sold actively at strong to 25¢ higher prices, mostly 10¢‒15¢
higher. Eleven loads of matured beef steers averaging 1,283 lbs.‒1,694
lbs. topped at $10.60. Best long yearlings brought $10.50, bulk of beef
steers $8.50‒$10.15. Twelve loads of Canadian steers arrived, five loads
going to stocker and feeder dealers at $5.75. Stockers and feeders
displayed some strength.

Good butcher weight hogs gained 10¢‒15¢ and closed firm at the advance.
Top was $10.70 with bulk of desirable butchers at $9.90‒$10.60. Activity
of shippers, who absorbed around 10,000 head, lent zest and higher
prices to the better grades. Mixed and packing grades opened higher, but
lacking good competition closed steady to 150 lower, bulk of packing
sows turning at $7.75‒$8.60.

Fat lambs closed weak to 15¢ lower after a steady to strong start.
Natives and westerns topped at $12.75, bulk of the natives bringing
$12.25‒$12.60 and bulk of the rangers $12.65. Feeding lambs at $12.35
downward were lower. Sheep held firm. Choice handy Montana ewes reached
$7.50.


                     STOCKER AND FEEDER SHIPMENTS.

                  Week Ending Friday, July 28, 1922.

     ─────────────────────────┬───────────┬───────────┬───────────
                              │Cattle and │           │
                              │  calves.  │   Hogs.   │  Sheep.
     ─────────────────────────┼───────────┼───────────┼───────────
     Market origin:           │           │           │
       Chicago                │      4,077│           │     17,432
       Denver                 │      4,368│        286│        241
       East St. Louis         │      3,317│        836│        492
       Fort Worth             │      1,406│        170│      1,369
       Indianapolis           │        908│        192│        772
       Kansas City            │     18,483│        917│      1,919
       Oklahoma City          │      2,996│        120│
       Omaha                  │      8,591│         75│     19,861
       St. Joseph             │      2,098│        298│      2,798
       St. Paul               │     13,441│      1,169│        883
       Sioux City             │      5,786│        353│        333
       Wichita                │      1,512│        136│
     ─────────────────────────┼───────────┼───────────┼───────────
               Total          │     66,983│      4,552│     46,100
       Previous week          │     47,627│      5,140│     34,919
       Same week last year[5] │     28,747│      2,161│     41,592
     ═════════════════════════╪═══════════╪═══════════╪═══════════
     State destination:       │           │           │
       California             │           │        170│
       Colorado               │      1,374│        286│
       Illinois               │      8,458│        826│      3,681
       Indiana                │      2,105│        192│      3,521
       Iowa                   │     17,302│      1,266│      8,695
       Kansas                 │      6,716│        266│      1,380
       Kentucky               │        487│        366│      1,202
       Maryland               │        101│           │        310
       Michigan               │        308│           │     11,445
       Minnesota              │      1,014│        397│        513
       Missouri               │      5,654│        588│      4,159
       Montana                │        493│           │
       Nebraska               │     14,942│         75│      9,417
       New York               │         48│           │
       Ohio                   │      1,009│           │        801
       Oklahoma               │        735│        120│
       Pennsylvania           │      3,894│           │
       South Dakota           │        837│           │
       Tennessee              │         36│           │
       Texas                  │        901│           │        270
       Virginia               │        129│           │        411
       West Virginia          │         59│           │        121
       Wisconsin              │        323│           │        174
       Wyoming                │         58│           │
     ─────────────────────────┼───────────┼───────────┼───────────
               Total          │     66,983│      4,552│     46,100
     ─────────────────────────┴───────────┴───────────┴───────────


                        New Publications Issued.

The following publications were issued by the U. S. Department of
Agriculture during the week ending Aug. 1, 1922. A copy of any of them,
except those otherwise noted, may be obtained free upon application to
the Chief of the Division of Publications, U. S. Department of
Agriculture, as long as the department’s supply lasts.

After the department’s supply is exhausted, publications can be
purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing
Office, Washington, D. C. Purchase order and remittance should be
addressed to the Superintendent of Documents direct and not to the
Department of Agriculture.

  =Sugar Beet Growing Under Irrigation.= By C. O. Townsend, Pathologist
    in Charge of Sugar-Plant Investigations. Pp. 32, figs. 17.
    Contribution from the Bureau of Plant Industry. Revised June, 1922.
    (=Farmers’ Bulletin 567.=)

  =The Insulating Value of Commercial Double-Walled Beehives.= By E. F.
    Phillips, Apiculturist in Charge, Bee-Culture Investigations. Pp. 9.
    Contribution from the Bureau of Entomology. May, 1922. (=Department
    Circular 222.=) Price, 5¢.

  =A Handbook of Dairy Statistics.= By T. R. Pirtle, Dairy Division. Pp.
    72, fig. 1. Contribution from the Bureau of Animal Industry. June,
    1922. (=A. I. 37.=) Price, 15¢.

  =Vegetable Growing in Guam.= By Glen Briggs, Agronomist and
    Horticulturist. Pp. 60, pls. 17. June, 1922. (=Bulletin 2, Guam
    Agricultural Experiment Station.=)


     COLD STORAGE HOLDINGS OF FROZEN AND CURED FISH, JULY 15, 1922.

               [Thousands of pounds; i. e., 000 omitted.]

 ──────────────────────────┬────────┬────────┬────────┬────────┬────────
          Species.         │ Total  │ Total  │ Total  │ Frozen │ Total
                           │holdings│holdings│holdings│ since  │holdings
                           │June 15,│July 15,│June 15,│June 15,│July 15,
                           │ 1921.  │ 1921.  │ 1922.  │ 1922.  │1922.[6]
 ──────────────────────────┼────────┼────────┼────────┼────────┼────────
        FROZEN FISH.       │        │        │        │        │
 Bluefish                  │     128│     114│      65│      97│     147
 Butterfish                │     153│     154│      46│      83│     139
 Catfish                   │     [7]│     [7]│     [7]│      33│      93
 Ciscoes                   │   2,525│   2,605│   1,080│     167│     987
 Ciscoes (tullibees)       │     [8]│     [8]│   1,136│       2│   1,068
 Cod, haddock, hake,       │        │        │        │        │
   pollack                 │   1,955│   1,916│     391│      26│     339
 Croakers                  │     187│     277│      24│      65│      75
 Flounders                 │     [7]│     [7]│     [7]│      23│     233
 Halibut                   │   4,375│   6,213│   3,878│     742│   4,380
 Herring, sea              │   2,889│   3,775│   1,121│     127│   1,085
 Lake trout                │     944│   1,032│     498│     109│     562
 Mackerel                  │   1,695│   1,670│   1,929│     624│   2,422
 Pike perches and pike or  │        │        │        │        │
   pickerel                │     [7]│     [7]│     [7]│      28│     294
 Sablefish                 │     270│     456│     580│      56│     492
 Salmon, silver and fall   │     658│     905│     344│     346│     656
 Salmon, steelhead trout   │     [9]│     [9]│     118│     103│     209
 Salmon, all other         │     963│   2,182│     719│     785│   1,138
 Scup (porgies)            │     [7]│     [7]│     [7]│     913│   1,043
 Shad and shad roe         │     250│     324│     273│      22│     299
 Shellfish                 │     [7]│     [7]│     [7]│      32│     235
 Smelts, eulachon, etc.    │     248│     268│     351│       1│     333
 Squeteagues, or “seatrout”│     263│   1,405│     283│      40│     260
 Squid                     │   3,026│   3,170│   1,036│      92│   1,039
 Sturgeon  or spoonbill cat│     [7]│     [7]│     [7]│      88│     257
 Suckers                   │     [7]│     [7]│     [7]│        │      16
 Whitefish                 │     985│   1,278│   1,427│      50│   1,439
 Whiting                   │   2,690│   4,499│   1,445│   1,857│   3,048
 Miscellaneous             │   8,107│   7,917│   4,074│     865│   3,313
 ──────────────────────────┼────────┼────────┼────────┼────────┼────────
           Total           │  32,311│  40,160│  20,818│   7,376│  25,601
                           │        │        │        │        │
        CURED FISH.        │        │        │        │        │
 Herring                   │   9,210│   8,389│  12,991│        │  13,425
 Mild cured salmon         │   1,672│   3,140│   2,358│        │   3,849
 ──────────────────────────┴────────┴────────┴────────┴────────┴────────



                         _Dairy ^{and} Poultry_
          BUTTER MARKETS DROP UNDER ACCUMULATIONS OF RECEIPTS
Prices Fluctuate During Week—Large Increase in Consumption Over 1921 So
                             Far This Year.


Increasing accumulations of butter and lack of confidence among members
of the trade were the principal factors in bringing about extremely weak
conditions and radical declines in all markets during the early part of
the week ending July 29. The resulting lower prices attracted a
speculative demand which was largely instrumental in causing equally
radical advances during the latter part of the week. The prices at the
close of the week, however, hovered near the same levels as at the
opening, and conditions, although not so extremely weak because of
lighter stocks, were equally unsettled.

Since early in July receivers have been burdened with heavy
accumulations of receipts because of the curtailed storing demand, and
the strength of the market has been maintained by the hope that
consuming outlets would become larger, that receipts would decrease more
rapidly, or that exporters would take considerable quantities. When
there appeared to be no immediate outlet for the accumulating stocks,
dealers slashed prices and cleared away a large part of the
accumulations.


                     SPECULATIVE INTEREST DEVELOPS.

The lower prices, however, brought forth a speculative interest which
was so keen that prices reacted practically to the level on Monday. But
with the higher prices buyers again disappeared, the market became very
unsettled, and some price reductions ensued.

The strengthening factors are an excellent consumptive demand,
possibilities of export and the improbability of any considerable
imports. A shortage in stocks of butter in foreign markets makes it
probable that considerable butter will be exported and improbable that
the imports will be large. Aside from the possibility of exports and
imports, the enormous quantity of butter going into consumption is a
major factor in the possible trend of the markets.

Receipts at the four markets since Jan. 1 show a surplus of some
58,000,000 lbs. over the same period a year ago. Of these receipts,
nearly 11,000,000 lbs. in excess of last year was stored. Import and
export figures for the first six months of the year show an excess of
exports over imports of 2,365,000 lbs. During the corresponding period
in 1921 there was an excess of imports amounting to 6,139,000 lbs.
Deducting the 11,000,000 lbs. which was stored in excess of last year
and the decrease of 8,000,000 lbs. due to foreign trade, the apparent
increase in consumption since Jan. 1, 1922, amounts to some 39,000,000
lbs.

On the other hand, while larger quantities have gone into consumption
there are some operators who are bearish and claim that prices will have
to rule higher next winter than last winter in order to allow a fair
profit on present storage stocks, and that this condition naturally
would reduce consumption. It is claimed also that production may
continue comparatively heavy, making large outlets necessary. Some also
point out that during our winter months the countries in the Southern
Hemisphere have their season of flush production and that imports from
those countries are a possibility.

Notwithstanding the fact that the markets at present are weak and
unsettled, and receivers generally desire to keep current receipts
moving, most of those owning storage butter have confidence in holding
it at its present cost.


    WHOLESALE PRICES OF BUTTER AND CHEESE, WEEK ENDING JULY 29, 1922.

                           [Cents per pound.]

 ──────────────┬───────┬────────┬─────────────┬──────────────┬──────────
    CREAMERY   │       │        │             │              │
   BUTTER (92  │  New  │        │             │              │   San
    score).    │ York. │Chicago.│Philadelphia.│   Boston.    │Francisco.
 ──────────────┼───────┼────────┼─────────────┼──────────────┼──────────
 Monday        │35     │33      │36           │36            │37¼
 Tuesday       │34     │32½     │35           │35½           │37
 Wednesday     │34½    │32½     │35           │35½           │37
 Thursday      │35½    │34      │36           │36            │37¼
 Friday        │34½    │33½     │35½          │35½           │37
 Saturday      │34     │33½     │35½          │35½           │37
 ──────────────┼───────┼────────┼─────────────┼──────────────┼──────────
 Average for   │       │        │             │              │
   week        │34.68  │33.17   │35.50        │35.67         │37.08
 Previous week │36.08  │34.08   │36.67        │36.67         │39.37
 Corresponding │       │        │             │              │
   week last   │       │        │             │              │
   year        │42.67  │41.42   │43.08        │43.50         │39.62
 ══════════════╪═══════╪════════╪═════════════╪══════════════╪══════════
    AMERICAN   │       │        │             │              │
 CHEESE (No. 1 │  New  │        │             │     San      │
  fresh twins) │ York. │Chicago.│   Boston.   │Francisco.[10]│Wisconsin.
 ──────────────┼───────┼────────┼─────────────┼──────────────┼──────────
 Monday        │20½‒21¼│18½‒19  │21½‒22½      │19¼           │18¼
 Tuesday       │20¼‒21 │18½‒19  │21½‒22¼      │19¼           │18½
 Wednesday     │20¼‒21 │18½‒19  │21½‒22¼      │20            │18½
 Thursday      │20¼‒21 │18½‒19  │21½‒22       │19¾           │18¼
 Friday        │20¼‒21 │18½‒19  │21½‒22       │19¾           │18
 Saturday      │20¼‒21 │18½‒19  │21    ‒21½   │19¾           │18
 ──────────────┼───────┼────────┼─────────────┼──────────────┼──────────
 Average for   │       │        │             │              │
   week        │20.67  │18.75   │21.68        │19.62         │18.26
 Previous week │21.13  │18.83   │22.00        │19.21         │18.71
 Corresponding │       │        │             │              │
   week last   │       │        │             │              │
   year        │21.00  │20.44   │21.42        │22.08         │21.04
 ──────────────┴───────┴────────┴─────────────┴──────────────┴──────────


                          Wholesale Prices of
                          Centralized Butter
                             (90 score) at
                               Chicago.

                          [Cents per pound.]

                         Monday     32¼
                         Tuesday    31¾
                         Wednesday  32¼
                         Thursday   33
                         Friday     32¾
                         Saturday   32¾
                                    —————
                         Average    32.46


                       MOVEMENT AT FIVE MARKETS.

     [New York, Chicago, Philadelphia, Boston, and San Francisco.]

  ────────────────────────────┬────────────┬────────────┬────────────
                              │Week ending │  Previous  │
                              │  July 29.  │   week.    │ Last year.
  ────────────────────────────┼────────────┼────────────┼────────────
            BUTTER.           │ _Pounds._  │ _Pounds._  │ _Pounds._
  Receipts for week           │  16,406,388│  17,848,858│  13,737,695
  Receipts since Jan. 1       │ 406,421,998│ 390,015,610│ 333,511,550
  Put into cold storage       │   5,763,120│   6,227,574│   4,363,777
  Withdrawn from cold storage │   1,196,527│   1,090,911│   2,391,506
  Change during week          │  +4,566,593│  +5,136,663│  +1,972,271
  Total holdings              │  58,529,169│  53,962,576│  49,378,903
  ────────────────────────────┼────────────┼────────────┼────────────
            CHEESE.           │            │            │
  Receipts for week           │   4,760,350│   4,368,795│   4,034,423
  Receipts since Jan. 1       │ 113,423,195│ 108,662,845│ 109,844,370
  Put into cold storage       │   2,212,808│   2,824,638│   2,780,994
  Withdrawn from cold storage │   1,297,907│   1,185,107│   1,753,219
  Change during week          │    +914,901│  +1,639,531│  +1,027,775
  Total holdings              │  17,542,277│  16,627,376│  15,250,616
  ────────────────────────────┼────────────┼────────────┼────────────
        DRESSED POULTRY.      │            │            │
  Receipts for week           │   3,039,791│   3,237,754│   2,455,183
  Receipts since Jan. 1       │ 107,262,094│ 104,222,303│  91,359,363
  Put into cold storage       │   1,039,930│   1,211,646│     745,099
  Withdrawn from cold storage │   2,114,313│   2,144,566│   1,518,844
  Change during week          │  ‒1,074,383│    ‒932,920│    ‒773,745
  Total holdings              │  23,316,211│  24,390,594│  15,513,172
  ────────────────────────────┼────────────┼────────────┼────────────
             EGGS.            │  _Cases._  │  _Cases._  │  _Cases._
  Receipts for week           │     273,535│     293,498│     236,614
  Receipts since Jan. 1       │  12,471,456│  12,197,921│  11,265,592
  Put into cold storage       │      76,188│      74,222│      45,631
  Withdrawn from cold storage │      34,863│      29,352│      70,151
  Change during week          │     +41,325│     +44,870│     ‒24,520
  Total holdings              │   4,995,153│   4,953,828│   3,645,439
  ────────────────────────────┴────────────┴────────────┴────────────


           CHEESE PRICES LOWER UNDER LIGHT CONSUMPTIVE DEMAND
  Speculative Demand Also Lacking—Prices Down a Full Cent at Wisconsin
                            Primary Markets.

The light summer consumptive demand without the support of speculative
storage activity has been insufficient to clear the current make of
cheese during the past few weeks, and as a consequence a weaker feeling
developed. During the week ending July 29 this weakness became more
pronounced, and prices at the Wisconsin primary markets were lowered as
much as a full cent in an effort to stimulate trading.

Buyers, however, were not eager to take on any more goods than could be
readily used to meet daily requirements. Although a few cars of fine
cheese were purchased early in the week for storage, the majority of
buyers felt that the market was on too high a plane for speculation.


                       SPECULATIVE DEMAND ABSENT.

The absence of speculative support has probably been the largest factor
in the weaker country markets, and the reflection of this weakness in
the distributing markets. Moreover, movement into consumptive channels
has not been active for some time. As storage demand has been lacking
and the primary markets have been showing signs of weakening, most
buyers at distributing points adopted the policy of hand-to-mouth buying
in anticipation of lower prices. Advices at the end of the week
indicated that some dealers do not look for a revival of trade until
prices at country points reach 16¢, about 2¢ below present prices.
However, this sentiment is not universal, and many dealers think that
present prices may not be far from bottom.

Embargoes on railroad shipments of perishable foodstuffs in the southern
and southwestern sections of the country have reduced shipments below
normal requirements, and until the rail strike is ended but little
support is expected from those sections. In fact, many in the trade
believe that while the strike may cause higher prices in certain
consuming centers where supplies are exhausted, embargoes on shipments
will tend to weaken the primary markets because of curtailed outlets.

At the close of the week the tone of the market was barely steady.
Holders were free sellers, and in many instances were inclined to make
concessions in order to keep stocks as low as possible. Little export or
import business was reported, although small shipments of Split Twins
were imported from Canada. However, both the export and import business
was of small consequence and did not affect the market. With production
in excess of consumption and speculators off the market, many in the
trade expect an unsettled market accompanied by lower prices.


                   IMPORTS OF EGGS DURING JUNE, 1922.

                [Data from the Department of Commerce.]

          ───────────────────┬──────────┬──────────┬──────────
          Imported from—     │          │Dried and │
                             │ Eggs in  │  frozen  │   Egg
                             │the shell │  eggs.   │ albumen.
          ───────────────────┼──────────┼──────────┼──────────
                             │ _Dozen._ │_Pounds._ │_Pounds._
          Denmark            │     2,100│          │
          Canada             │    16,957│    12,800│
          China              │        72│   865,000│   374,140
          Hongkong           │    24,319│     7,636│       300
          Other countries    │         6│          │
          ───────────────────┼──────────┼──────────┼──────────
                Total:       │          │          │
              June, 1922     │    43,454│   885,436│   374,440
              June, 1921     │    44,941│   726,596│   293,948
          Jan. to June, 1922 │   632,189│ 4,840,377│ 4,072,171
          Jan. to June, 1921 │ 2,471,167│ 6,198,562│ 1,322,519
          ───────────────────┴──────────┴──────────┴──────────


            CONDENSED AND EVAPORATED MILK MARKETS STILL SLOW
     Domestic Products Meeting With More Competition From European
                        Goods—Exports Decrease.

The same relative inactivity which has featured condensed and evaporated
milk markets for several months continued during July, and prospects for
any materially improved demand are so slight that many of the trade who
have held a more or less confident attitude are beginning to lose some
of their optimism.

Export demand, upon which canned milk manufacturers have come to depend
to a large extent as an outlet for surplus domestic production, has
become less of a factor each month. Buying for relief purposes, which
constituted such a support to the evaporated milk market especially, has
practically ceased, and no additional orders seem to be in sight.


                    LITTLE FOREIGN DEMAND EXPECTED.

Domestic demand in England is reported as somewhat heavier, but American
manufacturers have as competitors an increasing number of European
factories which are able to lay down the goods at a lower cost. In fact,
foreign demand is not expected to absorb very large quantities of
American-made goods in the very near future. Latest export figures are
for the month of June and indicate a slight decrease under May and a
very large decrease under June, 1921.

Condenseries, however, have had at least one favorable condition during
the past few months which has helped considerably to offset the dull
demand for canned milk. Prices of both butter and cheese have been at
levels that made it possible to divert surplus milk into one or the
other of these products, and as a result the production of condensed and
evaporated goods has been held as low as was consistent with good
business practice. These outlets have been fortunate not only because of
the lighter demand which has featured both condensed and evaporated milk
markets, but because of the upward tendency of costs of manufacturing as
well. Seasonal advances in prices of raw milk are almost at hand, and in
the case of condensed milk, sugar is over one-third higher in cost than
it was in the spring. The latter has been of considerable influence in
diverting trade demand to evaporated milk on account of the lower prices
at which this class of goods could be sold.

The summer demand from the domestic trade for condensed and evaporated
milk has not been up to expectations. The icecream trade especially has
taken much smaller quantities of goods than condensing firms had
anticipated. This is explained partly by the fact that powdered milk is
being more widely used in the manufacture of ice cream, and partly by
the relatively cool weather in various consuming sections of the
country.

Summarized figures from manufacturers indicate that condensing
operations have been carried on conservatively and that due
consideration has been given to the anticipated and actual dull summer
demand from all classes of trade. Although total stocks on July 1, as
indicated in the accompanying tables, reveal a moderately heavy increase
over June 1, it must be borne in mind that the heavy producing season
has just passed. It is to be noted also that while total stocks on July
1 were heavier than on the first of the previous month unsold stocks
were lighter. Furthermore, a comparison of total stocks on July 1 this
year and last shows a decrease of approximately 26%. Therefore, from the
statistical standpoint, markets were, perhaps, in better shape on July 1
than they were June 1.


          Stocks and Exports of Condensed and Evaporated Milk.

              [In thousands of pounds; i. e., 000 omitted].

 ───────────────────────┬───────────────┬───────────────┬───────────────
         Stocks.        │               │    June 1,    │
                        │ July 1, 1922. │   1922.[11]   │ July 1, 1921.
 ───────────────────────┼───────┬───────┼───────┬───────┼───────┬───────
                        │ Case  │ Bulk  │ Case  │ Bulk  │ Case  │ Bulk
                        │goods. │goods. │goods. │goods. │goods. │goods.
 ───────────────────────┼───────┼───────┼───────┼───────┼───────┼───────
       CONDENSED.       │       │       │       │       │       │
 Total stocks           │ 21,706│ 22,078│ 25,032│ 12,520│ 33,670│ 27,981
 Total unsold stocks    │ 16,325│ 16,215│ 21,775│  9,360│ 28,577│ 21,567
 Total unfilled orders  │    183│    229│       │    422│    460│
                        │       │       │       │       │       │
       EVAPORATED.      │       │       │       │       │       │
 Total stocks           │141,380│    499│135,895│    370│169,576│  1,331
 Total unsold stocks    │ 84,234│    351│109,238│    362│142,215│  1,318
 Total unfilled orders  │  1,196│       │  1,315│       │  2,342│
 ═══════════════════════╪═══════╧═══════╪═══════╧═══════╪═══════╧═══════
        Exports.        │  June, 1922.  │  May, 1922.   │  June, 1921.
 ───────────────────────┼───────────────┼───────────────┼───────────────
 Condensed milk         │          4,817│          6,678│          8,060
 Evaporated milk        │         10,890│          9,032│         13,640
 ───────────────────────┼───────────────┼───────────────┼───────────────
          Total         │         15,707│         15,710│         21,700
 ───────────────────────┴───────────────┴───────────────┴───────────────


           Prices to Producers at Condenseries for 3.5% Milk.

                            [Per 100 pounds.]

 ───────────────────┬─────────────────────────┬─────────────────────────
 Geographic section.│By manufacturers of case │By manufacturers of bulk
                    │     and bulk goods.     │       goods only.
 ───────────────────┼────────────┬────────────┼────────────┬────────────
                    │   July.    │   June.    │   July.    │   June.
 ───────────────────┼────────────┼────────────┼────────────┼────────────
 New England        │       $1.73│       $1.53│            │
 Middle Atlantic    │        1.83│        1.85│       $1.76│       $1.62
 South Atlantic     │        1.69│        1.64│        1.45│        1.45
 East North Central │        1.58│        1.42│        1.71│        1.62
 West North Central │        1.59│        1.53│        1.56│        1.56
 Western (North)    │        1.65│        1.56│        1.71│        1.54
 Western (South)    │        4.61│        1.42│            │
 ───────────────────┼────────────┼────────────┼────────────┼────────────
    United States   │        1.60│        1.45│        1.72│        1.61
 ───────────────────┴────────────┴────────────┴────────────┴────────────


           Wholesale Prices of Condensed and Evaporated Milk.

                          [To domestic trade.]

 ───────────────────┬─────────────────────────┬─────────────────────────
 Geographic section.│Sweetened condensed. Case│ Unsweetened evaporated.
                    │     of 14‒oz. cans.     │  Case of 16‒oz. cans.
 ───────────────────┼────────────┬────────────┼────────────┬────────────
                    │   June.    │    May.    │   June.    │    May.
 ───────────────────┼────────────┼────────────┼────────────┼────────────
 New England        │       $5.12│       $5.10│       $3.91│       $3.89
 Middle Atlantic    │        5.18│        5.03│        3.87│        3.87
 South Atlantic     │        5.27│        5.25│        3.91│        3.95
 East North Central │        5.34│        5.26│        3.75│        3.73
 West North Central │        5.20│        5.13│        3.79│        3.76
 South Central      │        5.45│        5.41│        3.95│        3.95
 Western (North     │            │        4.70│        4.03│        3.89
 Western (South     │            │            │        4.06│        4.00
 ───────────────────┼────────────┼────────────┼────────────┼────────────
 United States      │        5.24│        5.17│        3.89│        3.86
 ═══════════════════╧════════════╧════════════╧════════════╧════════════


                    GREAT BRITAIN’S BUTTER IMPORTS.

                      (Concluded from front page.)

the shifted seasonal trend of England’s butter imports, for if the
imports follow the same seasonal trend in 1922 as during the period from
1917 to 1921 England had already received at the end of June two-thirds
of that country’s foreign supply for the present year.

During the first fire months of 1922 England received 60,000,000 lbs.
from Denmark, compared with 48,000,000 lbs. during the corresponding
period of 1921. Danish exporters in recent years have scattered their
exports to various other countries, and while not so dependent upon
England for a market as previously, could at any time take advantage of
any favorable offer from their long-established British trade. The flush
of the butter production in Denmark was reached this year by June 1 and
the competition met in the English market is now not so largely European
as formerly, which doubtless leaves Denmark with some seasonal
advantage.

The prospective demand for butter in England during the rest of this
year depends largely, of course, upon the consumer’s purchasing power.


                      MILK POWDER REPORT FOR JULY.

                 Manufacturers’ Stocks of Powdered Milk.

 ───────────────────┬─────────────────────────┬─────────────────────────
                    │       Whole milk powder.│     Skimmed milk powder.
 ───────────────────┼────────────┬────────────┼────────────┬────────────
                    │Case goods. │Bulk goods. │Case goods. │Bulk goods.
 ───────────────────┼────────────┼────────────┼────────────┼────────────
 Total stocks,[12]  │            │            │            │
   July 1:          │   _Pounds._│   _Pounds._│   _Pounds._│   _Pounds._
        1921        │     393,090│     854,980│     245,481│  11,039,889
        1922        │     110,434│   1,269,262│     194,479│   7,484,849
                    │            │            │            │
 Unsold stocks,[13] │            │            │            │
   July 1:          │            │            │            │
        1921        │     393,090│     128,980│     245,481│   8,016,419
        1922        │     110,434│     538,588│     133,101│   3,341,739
 ───────────────────┴────────────┴────────────┴────────────┴────────────


       Wholesale Prices of Skimmed Milk Powder During June, 1922.

                           [Cents per pound.]

 ───────────────────┬─────────────────────────┬─────────────────────────
                    │     Case goods.[14]     │     Barreled goods.
 ───────────────────┼────────────┬────────────┼────────────┬────────────
 Geographic section.│            │  Bulk of   │            │  Bulk of
                    │            │sales, fresh│            │sales, fresh
                    │ Range.[15] │ goods.[16] │ Range.[15] │ goods.[16]
 ───────────────────┼────────────┼────────────┼────────────┼────────────
     New England    │          33│          33│       7½‒11│       8 ‒11
   Middle Atlantic  │       15‒33│       15‒33│       7 ‒11│       7 ‒11
   South Atlantic   │          33│          33│       7¾‒11│       8½‒11
 East North Central │          33│          33│       6¾‒11│       7½‒11
 West North Central │          33│          33│       6 ‒11│       8 ‒11
    South Central   │          33│          33│       7¾‒11│       9 ‒11
    Northwestern    │          36│          36│       5 ‒12│       5 ‒12
    Southwestern    │       20‒36│       20‒36│       6½‒12│       6½‒12
 ───────────────────┴────────────┴────────────┴────────────┴────────────

Prices of other powdered milk products ranged as follows: Whole milk
powder, 30¢‒58¢ per 1‒lb. can for case goods, and 22¢‒28¢ for goods
packed in barrels; dried buttermilk 10½¢‒12¢ for case goods, and
3½¢‒11¼¢ for goods packed in barrels.

Skimmed milk powder for export trade was reported sold at 10¢‒11¼¢ per
lb. f. a. s. Atlantic seaboard, and 7½¢ per lb. f. a. s. Pacific
seaboard.


                    Exports of Powdered Milk During
                              June, 1922.

                  ─────────────────────────┬─────────
                  Destination.             │ Pounds.
                  ─────────────────────────┼─────────
                  France                   │   23,023
                  Germany                  │  361,110
                  Norway                   │    1,500
                  Netherlands              │  227,400
                  United Kingdom           │   86,200
                  Canada                   │    2,898
                  Newfoundland and Labrador│    1,974
                  Panama                   │    3,009
                  Mexico                   │   26,469
                  Cuba                     │    1,670
                  Peru                     │    4,442
                  Venezuela                │    4,010
                  China                    │   46,265
                  Hongkong                 │    5,000
                  Japan                    │   21,090
                  Philippine Islands       │      695
                  Other countries          │    5,870
                  Total:                   │—————————
                         June, 1922        │  822,625
                         June, 1921        │  733,577
                  Jan.-June, 1922          │4,610,082
                  Jan.-June, 1921          │2,735,869
                  ─────────────────────────┴─────────


      Canada’s Storage Stocks of Butter on July 1 Below last Year.

The quantity of creamery butter in storage throughout Canada on July 1
was 10,178,891 lbs., while that of dairy butter was only 426,671 lbs.
Comparative figures show this to be a decrease of 34% in the case of
creamery butter and 18.83% in the case of dairy butter from the amounts
held in storage on the corresponding date last year.

                  *       *       *       *       *

=The average quantity of peanuts= exported per annum from Senegal during
the five years 1916‒1920 was 190,512 metric tons, according to the
American Consul at Dakar, Senegal. Peanuts constitute the most important
export crop of Senegal, most of the exportable surplus going to England
and France.



                       _Fruits ^{and} Vegetables_
          SHIPMENTS CONTINUE HEAVY; WHITE POTATO PRICES SLUMP
  Car-lot Movement So Far This Season about 28,000 Cars Larger than to
                           Same Time in 1921.


Shipments of 14 lines of fruits and vegetables during the week ending
July 29 increased nearly 300 cars over the previous week, having filled
14,531 cars. This is about 930 cars less than during the corresponding
period last year, but the total movement of these 14 products this
season to July 29 is 28,000 cars ahead of last season to the same date.

With accumulated supplies in many cities, white potato markets were slow
and weak. A further decrease of 275 cars in last week’s shipments,
however, may tend to strengthen this line. Peaches also showed declines
of 50¢-$1 under a peak movement of 2,100 cars. Cantaloupe markets tended
to advance and watermelons were nearly steady, even though shipments of
the latter crop jumped nearly 500 cars over the preceding week. Movement
of grapes and pears continued to gain, especially from California. The
grape season is later than usual in central California, but probably
20,000 cars of grapes will come from that territory this year.


                       APPLE SHIPMENTS DECREASE.

With the cleaning up of early summer apples, there was a decrease of
nearly 120 cars in the shipments of that commodity. Further losses
occurred in the movement of lettuce and tomatoes; in fact, only 230 cars
of tomatoes were shipped from producing sections compared with 500 cars
the week before. The only marked increase in lettuce movement was from
Colorado. Onion shipments showed a reaction from the previous week and
decreased to about 300 cars. Movement of sweet potatoes is becoming more
active as the season advances, and jobbing sales of Alabama stock in
bushel hampers declined 25¢ in Chicago and Cincinnati, closing at
$1‒$1.25.

_Apples._—California apples are becoming a prominent feature of the
market, shipments from that State having been six times greater than the
week before. Northwestern stock is moving in a small way, Washington
growers having forwarded 14 cars and Oregon growers one car last week.
New York early varieties also started to roll to consuming centers, but
the season is somewhat later in that section than it was last year.
Michigan shipped more apples than any other State during the week.
Various varieties from producing districts near Chicago jobbed in that
market at 50¢-$l per bu., a decline of nearly $1 a basket. Eastern red
apples brought $1‒$1.25 in New York City.

_Peaches._—Most markets reported heavy arrivals of peaches. St. Louis
received 294 cars, Chicago 267 cars, New York 281 cars, and other large
eastern cities about 150 cars each. Liberal supplies, combined with much
stock in poor condition, caused the wholesale market for Georgia
Elbertas to fall to a level of $2‒$2.75 per crate or bushel basket. Best
Elbertas from North Carolina closed at $2.25‒$2.50. Arkansas stock held
firm in St. Louis at $2‒$2.25 but was weak in Chicago. Shipments from
North Carolina were twice as heavy as during the preceding week,
totaling more than 700 cars. Nearly 1,300 cars have already come from
that State this season. Arkansas sent almost 600 cars to market during
the week. Movement from Georgia decreased about 70%, but the season is
becoming very active in Illinois, Tennessee, and Oklahoma, as well as in
the Middle Atlantic sections. Early varieties from eastern States sold
in leading wholesale markets at $1.50‒$2 per bu. Tennessee Elbertas
ranged as high as $3‒$3.25 in Cincinnati and Cleveland, but were $1
lower in Chicago because of the oversupplied market.


                    PRICES OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLES.

                             Jobbing Range.


     POTATOES, Virginia Eastern Shore Irish Cobblers, No. 1—Barrels.

 ─────────────┬────────────┬─────────────────────────────┬──────────────
    Market.   │   Week’s   │                             │
              │   carlot   │                             │
              │ arrivals.  │        This season.         │One year ago.
 ─────────────┼────────────┼──────────────┬──────────────┼──────────────
              │            │   July 31.   │   July 24.   │
 ─────────────┼────────────┼──────────────┼──────────────┼──────────────
 New York     │         447│    $1.50‒1.75│    $2.75‒3.00│    $4.25‒4.50
 Boston       │         168│     2.75‒3.00│     3.75‒4.00│     5.25‒5.50
 Philadelphia │         160│     1.50‒1.75│     2.50‒2.65│     4.00‒4.50
 Baltimore    │          41│     1.75‒2.00│     2.75‒3.25│          4.50
 Pittsburgh   │         210│          2.65│     3.40‒3.50│     5.10‒5.25
 Cincinnati   │          40│     3.00‒3.25│          4.00│ [17]3.00‒3.15
 Chicago      │         378│ [18]2.75‒3.00│ [18]3.75‒3.80│      [18]5.50
 St. Louis    │          72│          3.50│          4.00│
 Kansas City  │          93│  [19].75‒1.00│ [19]1.25‒1.50│ [19]1.00‒1.25
 ─────────────┴────────────┴──────────────┴──────────────┴──────────────


  WATERMELONS, Georgia and Carolina Tom Watsons, medium sizes—Bulk per
                                  car.

 ─────────────┬────────────┬──────────────┬──────────────┬──────────────
 New York     │         169│      $200‒350│      $200‒350│      $200‒250
 Boston       │          45│   [20].35‒.45│   [20].20‒.40│   [20].30‒.50
 Philadelphia │         142│       175‒375│       150‒275│       200‒300
 Baltimore    │         204│       250‒350│       275‒425│
 Pittsburgh   │          82│       200‒350│           500│       225‒350
 Cincinnati   │          65│     [21]15‒40│     [21]20‒45│     [21]20‒25
 Chicago      │         170│       240‒425│       215‒450│   [22]325‒375
 St. Louis    │         122│       [22]220│       140‒175│       250‒300
 Kansas City  │         102│ [23]1.50‒2.00│ [23]2.00‒2.50│
 ─────────────┴────────────┴──────────────┴──────────────┴──────────────


    CANTALOUPES, California and Arizona Salmon Tints—Standards 45’s.

 ─────────────┬────────────┬──────────────┬──────────────┬──────────────
 New York     │         420│    $2.75‒3.00│    $2.50‒2.75│    $3.50‒3.75
 Boston       │          99│     2.75‒3.00│     2.75‒3.00│     4.00‒4.25
 Philadelphia │          88│     2.75‒3.00│    1.7.5‒2.25│          3.00
 Baltimore    │           8│              │     1.75‒2.00│          2.50
 Pittsburgh   │         108│     2.75‒3.00│     2.00‒2.25│     3.50‒4.00
 Cincinnati   │          41│     2.00‒2.25│     2.25‒2.50│          3.00
 Chicago      │         267│     2.50‒2.75│     2.00‒2.25│     2.75‒3.00
 St. Louis    │          65│ [24]1.00‒1.50│     2.25‒2.50│      [24]2.00
 Kansas City  │          82│      [24]2.00│     1.50‒1.75│      [24]3.00
 ─────────────┴────────────┴──────────────┴──────────────┴──────────────


           PEACHES, Georgia Elbertas—Sixes and bushel baskets.

 ─────────────┬────────────┬──────────────┬──────────────┬──────────────
 New York     │         281│    $2.50‒2.75│    $2.75‒3.00│    $4.00‒4.25
 Boston       │         159│     2.00‒2.50│     3.25‒4.50│     5.00‒5.25
 Philadelphia │         125│     2.00‒2.25│     2.75‒3.25│     3.75‒4.25
 Baltimore    │          65│          2.50│     2.75‒3.25│     4.00‒4.25
 Pittsburgh   │         127│     2.25‒2.50│     2.75‒3.25│     3.50‒4.00
 Cincinnati   │          43│     2.50‒2.75│          3.00│          4.00
 Chicago      │         267│     2.00‒2.25│     3.00‒3.50│     3.75‒4.00
 St. Louis    │         294│ [25]2.00‒2.25│     2.00‒2.25│     4.50‒5.00
 Kansas City  │         110│ [26]1.50‒1.75│     2.75‒3.00│      [25]4.50
 ─────────────┴────────────┴──────────────┴──────────────┴──────────────


           APPLES, various Early Red varieties—Bushel baskets.

 ─────────────┬────────────┬──────────────┬──────────────┬──────────────
 New York     │          88│    $1.00‒1.25│    $1.25‒1.50│
 Boston       │          22│     1.50‒1.75│     1.50‒1.75│    $3.50‒4.00
 Baltimore    │           3│     1.25‒1.50│     1.25‒1.50│
 Pittsburgh   │          67│     1.25‒1.35│          1.50│
 Chicago      │         107│  [26].50‒1.00│ [26]1.50‒1.75│     2.00‒3.00
 ─────────────┴────────────┴──────────────┴──────────────┴──────────────


                    Prices f. o. b. Shipping Points.

 ──────────────────────────┬──────────────┬──────────────┬──────────────
    POTATOES (100 lbs.)    │              │              │
 Minneapolis, Minn.        │    $0.85‒0.95│    $1.00‒1.10│    $1.10‒1.25
 Kaw Valley, Kans.         │           .85│       .65‒.85│
 South Jersey Points       │     1.00‒1.05│          1.50│          2.60
 North Jersey Points       │      .95‒1.00│          1.35│     2.50‒2.60
 Kearney, Nebr.            │              │          1.55│          1.95
 Onley, Va.                │     1.75‒1.90│     2.25‒2.50│     4.40‒4.50
                           │              │              │
    WATERMELONS (cars).    │              │              │
 Macon, Ga.                │       100‒200│        75‒175│        40‒100
 Sulphur Springs, Tex.     │   [11].40‒.60│   [27].45‒.85│
 Kennett, Mo.              │       100‒160│              │       200‒390
 ──────────────────────────┴──────────────┴──────────────┴──────────────

_Cantaloupes._—Sales of cantaloupes were made at advances over the
previous week in most consuming centers, far western Salmon Tints
ranging $2.50‒$3 per standard crate except in Cincinnati, where low mark
of $2 was reached. Arizona shipped only 60 cars and Imperial Valley 25,
compared with their combined total of 300 cars the week before. The
Turlock section, however, showed an increase of 100% in movement,
supplying more cantaloupes than any other producing district.
Cantaloupes moved more freely from Indiana, Illinois, and Missouri.
Arkansas shipments fell below 100 cars and supplies from the Carolinas
are about cleaned up. In the West, the Las Cruces section of New Mexico
has become active. Pink Meats from that territory, flats 12’s and 15’s,
brought $1.15 in Chicago. On the Atlantic coast, Delaware started with a
weekly movement of 60 cars. Maryland furnished almost 400 cars of
cantaloupes, and standard crates of Green Meats from that State jobbed
in Baltimore at $1.25‒$1.50. New York reported sales at a like figure.
Indiana Salmon Tints closed at $1.50‒$2 in Middle Western cities.


                        POTATO SHIPMENTS HEAVY.

_White Potatoes._—Wholesale prices of potatoes slumped considerably
during the week, probably as a result of liberal supplies. Although the
week’s shipments showed a decrease, arrivals on the New York market were
nearly 550 cars. Chicago received about 400 cars. No. 1 Irish Cobblers
from the Eastern Shore of Virginia reached a low point of $1.50 per bbl.
in nearby cities, a loss of $1 or more. At the same time last year the
jobbing price was $4‒$4.50. Car-lot sales in Chicago averaged about $3
last week. Kansas sacked Cobblers, many dirty, closed at $1.15‒$1.25 per
100 lbs. The Chicago range on partly graded Early Ohios was 85¢ for Kaw
Valley stock, $1‒$1.15 for Minnesota stock, and $1.25 for Nebraska
stock. New Jersey Cobblers, in 150‒lb. sacks, jobbed at $1.25‒$2 per
sack in important eastern markets.

Jersey shipping points were reported dull and slow at the close of the
week, although shipments from that section exceeded those from any other
State, having amounted to almost 1,400 cars, compared with 530 the
previous week. Eastern Shore of Virginia shipments filled only 1,100
cars, a decline of 400, and the Eastern Shore of Maryland marketed less
than 500 cars of potatoes last week. Movement from Kaw Valley declined
sharply. The season in the Kearney district of Nebraska was not yet in
full swing.

_Watermelons._—There was little change in the jobbing price of
watermelons. Georgia shippers handled 50% more business than during the
week ending July 22, but the season in that section will not last long.
As the movement waned in South Carolina it became more active in North
Carolina, about 275 cars having come from the latter State. Southeast
Missouri is coming along fast. From the Sulphur-Springs-Omaha district
of Texas about 1,000 cars of watermelons are expected, and the
Weatherford district may ship 600 cars. Texas melons will be most
abundant the first week of August, rainy weather having delayed the
season in north Texas.

_Cabbage._—New York shipped its first car of cabbage last week, as did
Michigan, also. About 80% of the week’s supply, however, came from Iowa
and the Roanoke section of Virginia, each of those sections having
furnished about 60 cars. Colorado cabbage also is becoming plentiful. In
five counties of southern Michigan the cabbage acreage is estimated at
1,285 acres, compared with 590 acres in 1921. About 1,400 acres are
reported from Saginaw County in northern Michigan.


           Special Fruit Trains Bring Berries from Northwest.

Berries grown in the Puget Sound region of the Northwest are served on
breakfast tables in Chicago 80 hours after being picked as a result of
the establishment of a special express refrigerator train service
operating on passenger schedule between the Pacific Northwest and
Chicago.

Previously these fresh fruits were marketed in the locality in which
they were grown or they were shipped in single cars by express to
eastern markets; but in the last few years the development of the berry
industry has been so rapid in the Northwest that additional outlets had
to be found. The special train service which has been inaugurated is
meeting this situation very successfully. Berries of various kinds are
arriving daily in Chicago from the White Salmon, Yakima, Puyallup, and
Walla Walla valleys, from Vashon Island, Puget Sound, and from Lewiston,
Idaho.

In the production centers the berries are rushed by motor truck and
interurban car to the refrigerator cars on the railroad sidings every
afternoon. The cars are loaded, iced, and hurried on passenger schedule
to Spokane where they are united into a special fruit train. Early in
the morning the train pulls out from Spokane for the East. These trains
are iced five times between the Pacific coast and Chicago and make no
other stops. Recently train loads of red raspberries have been arriving
in Chicago every day. Loganberries also have been abundant, but the
larger part of the supply has been raspberries. Arrivals were at the
rate of two cars per day during the latter part of July.

Most shipments have carried through in fine condition, with only a few
packages showing decay or mold. The berries are all packed in 24‒pt.
crates which are only a single layer deep, instead of three layers deep
as are the Michigan red raspberries. The quality of the raspberries has
been fine, the berries being large and of a desirable red color. A few
black raspberries, blackberries, and red currants have also come from
the Northwest, but only as parts of cars. These have likewise been
attractively packed and were of good quality, having shown but little
decay.


               CARLOAD SHIPMENTS OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLES.

 ─────────────────┬────────┬────────┬────────┬────────┬────────┬────────
    Commodity.    │        │  Same  │Previous│  This  │  Last  │
                  │  Week  │  week  │  week  │ season │ season │ Total
                  │ ending │  last  │  this  │to July │to July │  last
                  │July 29.│season. │season. │  29.   │  29.   │season.
 ─────────────────┼────────┼────────┼────────┼────────┼────────┼────────
 Apples           │     521│     542│     639│   3,091│   1,176│  88,544
 Cabbage          │     151│     161│     126│  17,208│  12,843│  31,222
 Cantaloupes      │   1,801│   1,704│   1,830│  19,268│  16,868│  25,572
 Celery           │      55│      35│      65│   5,030│   4,344│  11,642
 Grapes           │     108│     167│      62│     207│     337│  37,203
 Lettuce          │     302│     334│     329│  16,926│  14,385│  18,300
 Onion            │     323│     423│     388│   7,597│   6,669│  20,784
 Peaches          │   2,101│   1,600│   1,771│  10,813│  14,353│  27,222
 Pears            │     648│     612│     455│   1,216│   1,367│  12,823
 Potatoes:        │        │        │        │        │        │
       Sweet      │     139│     135│      84│     347│     165│  19,266
       White      │   3,873│   3,604│   4,147│  46,672│  39,081│ 238,138
 Tomatoes         │     230│     339│     498│  17,846│  11,883│  17,204
 Vegetables, mixed│     626│     427│     663│  11,013│   9,346│  15,566
 Watermelons      │   3,653│   5,377│   3,184│  34,596│  31,106│  46,463
 ─────────────────┼────────┼────────┼────────┼────────┼────────┼────────
       Total      │  14,531│  15,460│  14,241│ 191,830│ 163,923│ 609,949
 ─────────────────┴────────┴────────┴────────┴────────┴────────┴────────


     Chicago an Important Market for Raspberries and Small Fruits.

Large supplies of raspberries and loganberries have recently been
arriving on the Chicago market from the Pacific Northwest. Special train
service has been provided by one of the leading railroads, so that these
highly perishable fruits come through in record time and in good
condition.

According to reports of a Chicago representative of the U. S. Department
of Agriculture, prices of Northwestern red raspberries have ranged from
$3 per 24‒pt. crate to as high as $4.50 per crate for the best stock at
the beginning of the season. The average price has been around $3.50‒$4
for good stock, with a fairly steady market.

At this season of the year in Chicago most of the small fruit
competition is from Michigan. Heavy supplies of Michigan blackberries,
red raspberries, black raspberries, and blueberries have been coming in
during July. There has also been a liberal supply of red currants and
gooseberries. The following table shows the jobbing prices of these
fruits in comparison with berries from the Northwest and from New York:


      ────────────────────────────┬───────────────┬───────────────
       Source and kind of fruit.  │Size of crate. │    Price.
      ────────────────────────────┼───────────────┼───────────────
      Northwest red raspberries   │24‒pint        │     $3.50‒4.00
      S. Michigan red raspberries │24‒pint        │      2.50‒3.50
      N. Michigan red raspberries │24‒pint        │      3.00‒3.75
      Michigan black raspberries  │24‒pint        │      1.50‒2.25
      Michigan black raspberries  │16‒quart       │      2.00‒2.50
      Michigan blackberries       │16‒quart       │      1.75‒2.50
      Michigan gooseberries       │16‒quart       │      2.00‒2.50
      Michigan currants (large)   │16‒quart       │      2.75‒3.25
      Michigan currants (small)   │16‒quart       │      2.00‒2.50
      Michigan blueberries        │16‒quart       │      3.00‒4.50
      New York currants (red)     │32‒quart       │      4.00‒6.00
      New York red raspberries    │48‒pint        │           3.25
      Michigan sweet cherries     │16‒quart       │      1.00‒3.50
      ────────────────────────────┴───────────────┴───────────────

Black raspberries from Michigan have not sold as high as reds this
season, although in many seasons they sell at the same levels. Currants
and gooseberries have varied widely in price. Blueberries have been in
good demand.

New York has shipped a large volume of red currants to Chicago in 32‒qt.
crates and these have ranged $4‒$6, depending on the quality, condition,
and the market. One car of New York State Columbia red raspberries,
shipped from Clyde, Wayne County, has arrived to date and sold at $3.25
per 48‒pt. crate. This stock was of fine quality but in rather poor
condition.

Practically all of the sour cherry supply comes from Michigan, packed in
16‒qt. crates and, after the first few Early Richmonds, consists
principally of Montmorency and a few English Morello. Wisconsin also
ships a few cars of Montmorency in the same package. Odd lots of sweet
cherries in 16‒qt. boxes come from Michigan. These for the most part
vary widely in quality and condition and are not graded well enough or
handled carefully enough to compete with the well-packed sweet cherries,
principally Royal Annes and Bings, from Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and
Utah. Most of them are Black Tartarians, Windsors, Bings, and Napoleons
(same cherry as the western Royal Anne). The price has had the
exceedingly wide range of $1‒$3.50 per 16‒qt. crate.


               Report on Cabbage and Onions in New York.

Reports from the field service of the U. S. Department of Agriculture
for the date of July 25 contain the following information concerning
commercial cabbage and onions in New York:

_Cabbage._—The acreage planted to cabbage in the eastern portion of the
cabbage belt in Cortland, Chenango, Madison, and eastern Onondaga
Counties and in some sections of the western counties has increased
greatly over 1921, but for the State as a whole the acreage is probably
not far from average. The percentage of the acreage in late cabbage is
larger than usual. Rain has delayed planting and damaged cabbage on low
ground but has prevented aphis damage, so that the average condition of
the crop is good throughout the State.

New York ranks first among the States in production of commercial
cabbage and Ontario County first among the counties of the State. This
county will begin to ship cabbage by Aug. 15, but most of the crop is
late.

_Onions._—Harvesting of early onions in Orange County began July 15, but
the main crop will move between Aug. 10 and Sept. 1. Best yields may
reach 400 to 500 bus. per acre but rains have reduced the probable
average for the county to 275 bus. and perhaps to 250 bus.


       Growers and Dealers Expect Good Potato Crop in New Jersey.

Growers and dealers in the northern and southern potato sections of New
Jersey are optimistic over the prospects of this season’s potato crop,
according to a report from the Philadelphia representative of the market
news service conducted by the U. S. Department of Agriculture.

The weather has been almost ideal from the growing standpoint and
prospects are for the best crop in respect to both quality and quantity
that New Jersey has had in several years. This is true of all varieties,
but especially of the Irish Cobblers and the Giants. Thus far the crop
has been yielding 60‒80 bbls. per acre, mostly around 70 bbls., which is
a good yield for so early in the season.

Although some fields, especially in north Jersey (Burlington, Mercer,
and Monmouth Counties), show signs of late blight, this disease does not
appear nearly so prevalent as during the past few years. In south Jersey
(Salem and Cumberland Counties) very little of this disease has
appeared.

The potato deal in all sections of the State opened generally about July
17. Contrary to custom, it looked as if the northern district would ship
early potatoes more freely than the southern section. Very little of the
stock seems to have been contracted.

There probably will be keen competition this season, especially in north
Jersey, because three or four growers’ exchanges besides several large
individual dealers are interested in the deal. In the southern district
there is only the one exchange, but there are several large shippers.

Increasing quantities of potatoes are moving by truck from producing
sections to New York City, Jersey City, Newark, and especially to the
seashore cities. Many trucks are also being used for shipping to
Pennsylvania cities, and the total truck movement probably will affect
the season’s carlot shipments by several hundred cars. To July 29 about
2,060 cars of potatoes had been reported shipped from New Jersey,
compared with 1,850 cars to the same date last year. Total shipments
last season were almost 10,500 cars.

                  *       *       *       *       *

=The close-of-the-season movement= of Maine potatoes was twice as heavy
as in June, 1921. Total shipments from that State have broken all
records, amounting to approximately 40,000 carloads, or one-fifth of the
entire late potato shipments of the United States.



                                _Grain_
                        WHEAT CONTINUED DOWNWARD
TREND; CORN FAIRLY STEADY Receipts of Wheat Increased—Heavy Export Sales
                   Continued—Oats Prices Dropped Off.


The steady decline which has prevailed in the wheat market for some time
continued during the week ending July 29 when September wheat at Chicago
closed at $1.08, 1⅜¢ lower than at the close of the previous week. The
heaviest decline occurred on Monday, when September wheat closed at
$1.07⅜. The market rallied somewhat toward the close of the week but did
not regain the loss sustained during the early part of the week.

The principal bearish factors were the heavy primary receipts, estimated
at 15,902,000 bus., which caused large hedging sales; lower foreign
markets; and the weakness in foreign exchange. Opposed to these
influences were the bullish reports of heavy export sales and the
reports that more wheat would be needed by foreign buyers than had been
generally anticipated.


                      STRIKE SETTLEMENT A FACTOR.

The possibility of an early settlement of the railroad and coal strikes
and a freer movement of grain were also considered by the trade as
factors that would tend to lower wheat prices.

Although corn and oats prices held fairly firm, the tone of the market
for these two grains appeared weaker as favorable weather improved the
crop prospects. The September corn future at Chicago closed at 62½¢ on
July 29, compared with 63¼¢ on July 22.

Receipts of wheat at Chicago were more than 1,000 cars larger than the
previous week, totaling 3,177 cars, of which 2,583 were winter wheat.
The movement appears to be about normal, however, as 3,973 cars were
received during the corresponding week last year. The quality of the
wheat received was good, about 71% grading Nos. 1 and 2, and 21% grading
No. 3, leaving only about 8% grading below No. 3.

Milling demand was slow during the first part of the week but improved
later. Export demand was active and sales totaling 2,600,000 bus. were
reported made from Chicago to exporters during the week. Premiums of
from 24¢ to 47¢ over the September future prices were still being paid
for cash wheat at Minneapolis. This is a reduction, however, of 1¢ from
the top and 3¢ from the bottom of the range quoted at the close of the
previous week. Receipts, especially of good quality, continued light.

The danger of rust damage had about passed in the spring wheat territory
as harvesting was well under way. The first car of new spring wheat
arrived during the week. Local mills and buyers were not inclined to put
out bids for wheat to arrive. Straight-to-arrive bids for 20‒day
delivery were being made at the close of the week at 15¢ over the
September price, and for 10‒day delivery at 25¢ over the September.
Northwestern mills are reported to be operating at about 60% of their
capacity.

In the Soft Winter wheat section the embargoes placed by the railroads
against shipments to the South and Southeast restricted shipments to
mills in that territory. This caused a lighter milling demand at St.
Louis and Cincinnati. At the former market, however, good buying by
elevator interests to cover sales for July and August shipments, and by
exporters for direct shipment to the Gulf, kept the market firm.
Receipts were 1,161 cars, most of which were Soft Winter.

About 82% of the 177 cars of Soft Winter wheat received at Cincinnati
graded No. 3 or better, principally because of test weight, and was of
good milling quality. Prices were firm notwithstanding the curtailment
of outbound shipments.


                    EXPORTERS ACTIVE AT KANSAS CITY.

Receipts at Kansas City totaled 3,443 cars. The movement from the
country was large and is expected to continue in good volume for some
time. Milling demand was only fair. Eastern mills took only small lots
and Northwestern mills also bought on a small scale because of the
promising outlook for Spring wheat. There was an excellent export
demand, however, and very active bidding was indulged in by exporters to
the Gulf who were eager to obtain wheat to fill sales for shipment. Bids
for wheat for August delivery were made as high as 17¢ per bu. over the
Chicago September future price but later were reduced to 15¢ premium.
Bids for September loading at the Gulf were made at 13¢ over the Chicago
September price.

The activity in the export market was especially noticeable at the
Atlantic seaboard markets, as the failure of shippers to make delivery
on July contracts compelled many exporters to buy in the open market to
fill the ocean tonnage already engaged. A number of boats were loaded at
two or more ports in order to get sufficient wheat for the cargoes.
There was a good demand for Hard Winter for various continental markets,
for Red Winter for France, and for Hard Winter and Durum wheat for
Italy.


                       CORN PRICES FAIRLY STEADY.

Although future prices were slightly lower and crop prospects were good,
cash corn prices held fairly steady to firm. Receipts were about normal.
Shipping orders and export sales absorbed the offerings readily at the
principal markets. Primary receipts were estimated at 5,474,000 bus.
compared with 4,464,000 bus. last year. Primary shipments were 8,510,000
bus. compared with 5,251,000 bus. a year ago, thus indicating a
relatively better demand at present than at the corresponding time last
year.

Lake shipments to American ports from Chicago during the week were
2,072,000 bus.

                   (Concluded on page 116, column 3.)


 ═══════════════════════════════════════════════════════════════════════
                             GRAIN EXPORTS.

   Wheat Inspected Out under American Grades Only. Flour Not Included.

               [Thousands of bushels; i. e., 000 omitted.]

 ───────────────────────────────┬───────┬───────┬───────┬───────┬───────
                                │Wheat. │ Corn. │ Oats. │Barley.│ Rye.
 ───────────────────────────────┼───────┼───────┼───────┼───────┼───────
 Week  ending July 29, 1922:    │       │       │       │       │
 Atlantic ports[28]             │  1,430│  1,788│    758│    296│    319
 Gulf ports[29]                 │  1,068│     19│     12│       │
 Pacific ports[30]              │    130│       │       │    823│
 ───────────────────────────────┼───────┼───────┼───────┼───────┼───────
              Total             │  2,628│  1,807│    770│  1,119│    319
 Previous week                  │  2,727│  2,065│    940│    319│    690
 Corresponding week last year   │  8,515│    566│     93│     66│    471
 Total July 1 to 29, 1922       │ 11,125│  6,066│  2,544│  2,269│  2,154
 Corresponding period last year │ 19,993│  3,236│    233│  1,445│    862
 ───────────────────────────────┴───────┴───────┴───────┴───────┴───────


                             GRAIN PRICES.

  Daily Average of Cash Sales at Certain Markets, Week ending Friday,
                            July 28, 1922.

                          [Cents per bushel.]

                                WHEAT.

  ─────────────────────────┬──────┬──────┬──────┬──────┬──────┬──────
                           │ Sat. │ Mon. │ Tue. │ Wed  │ Thr. │ Fri.
  ─────────────────────────┼──────┼──────┼──────┼──────┼──────┼──────
       CHICAGO.            │      │      │      │      │      │
  Hard Winter        No. 1 │  114¼│  111¾│  112¾│  114¼│   113│  114¼
                     No. 2 │  114¼│  111½│   112│  113¼│   112│  113½
                     No. 3 │      │  109½│  110½│   112│  111¾│  112¾
  Yel. Hrd. Win.     No. 1 │      │  109½│  112¼│      │  111¾│  112¾
                     No. 2 │  113¼│   111│   111│  112¼│   111│  112¼
                     No. 3 │      │  110½│      │   111│   110│  111¾
  Red Winter         No. 2 │  113½│  110½│   110│  110¼│  110¼│  111¼
                     No. 3 │  112¼│  108¾│  108¾│   108│  107¾│  108½
     MINNEAPOLIS.          │      │      │      │      │      │
  Dark. Nor. Spg.    No. 1 │   161│   158│   157│   160│   155│   157
                     No. 2 │   158│   153│   152│   153│   150│   156
                     No. 3 │   156│   152│   151│   151│   149│   152
  Nor. Spring        No. 2 │   152│   153│      │   154│      │
                     No. 3 │   149│   131│   143│   140│   128│
     KANSAS CITY.          │      │      │      │      │      │
  Drk. Hrd. Win.     No. 1 │   115│  116½│   110│  117¼│   115│  114¾
                     No. 2 │   126│  121⅜│  119⅜│   117│  115⅜│   122
                     No. 3 │  129⅝│  121⅞│  120⅜│  119⅝│  122⅝│  122¼
  Hard Winter        No. 1 │  108¾│  107⅝│  109⅜│   107│   107│   109
                     No. 2 │  108⅜│  106½│  106⅛│   106│ 106 ⅜│  107¾
                     No. 3 │  107½│  104½│  105¼│  107⅜│  106⅝│  108¾
  Yel. Hrd. Win.     No. 2 │   104│   102│  102¼│      │   101│   104
                     No. 3 │  103⅝│   101│  101⅛│  101½│  105⅝│  103⅜
  Red Winter         No. 2 │  104⅝│  103¼│  103⅞│  104¾│  105⅛│  106⅜
                     No. 3 │  101⅜│   99⅛│  100⅜│  101⅝│  101⅝│  103⅜
        OMAHA.             │      │      │      │      │      │
  Drk. Hrd. Win.     No. 1 │      │   117│      │      │   118│  118½
                     No. 2 │   119│   114│   118│   120│   118│   117
                     No. 3 │  118¾│  112¾│  115⅛│  115½│      │
  Hard Winter        No. 1 │  104½│  101⅛│  102⅞│  102½│  102½│   104
                     No. 2 │  103½│  100⅜│  101⅞│  102⅜│  104¾│   106
                     No. 3 │  104¼│   99⅜│  102¼│  101⅜│  101½│   103
  Yel. Hrd. Win.     No. 1 │      │      │      │   103│  102½│   104
                     No. 2 │   103│   99½│  101⅞│   102│  101½│
      ST. LOUIS.           │      │      │      │      │      │
  Red Winter         No. 2 │  111½│  109¾│  111½│  110¾│  110½│  111¾
                     No. 3 │  106½│   106│  107½│  107½│  107½│  109¼
  ─────────────────────────┴──────┴──────┴──────┴──────┴──────┴──────
                                 CORN.
  ─────────────────────────┬──────┬──────┬──────┬──────┬──────┬──────
       CHICAGO.            │      │      │      │      │      │
  White              No. 1 │      │   64¼│   64½│   64¾│      │   65¾
                     No. 2 │    65│    64│   64¼│   64¾│   64¼│    65
                     No. 3 │   64¼│   63¾│      │   64¼│   63¼│    65
  Yellow             No. 1 │   65¼│   64½│   64½│      │   64¼│   65¾
                     No. 2 │   65¼│   64¼│   64⅓│   64¾│    64│   64¼
                     No. 3 │   63¾│   63¾│    64│    64│   63½│   65¼
  Mixed              No. 1 │      │   64½│   64¼│   64½│      │
                     No. 2 │    65│   64¼│   64¼│   64½│    64│   65¼
                     No. 3 │    65│   63¾│   63¾│    64│   63¾│
     MINNEAPOLIS.          │      │      │      │      │      │
  Yellow             No. 1 │   59¾│    59│   58¾│   58¾│   58¾│   59¾
                     No. 2 │    59│   59¼│   58½│      │   58½│   60¼
     KANSAS CITY.          │      │      │      │      │      │
  White              No. 2 │    57│    56│    56│   56½│   56½│
  Yellow             No. 2 │    61│    60│    60│   59½│    61│   62½
  Mixed              No. 2 │   57½│   55¾│   57⅛│   57⅛│      │   58½
        OMAHA.             │      │      │      │      │      │
  White              No. 2 │   56⅜│   55½│      │    56│    55│   55⅞
  Yellow             No. 1 │   58½│   57⅓│      │      │   57½│   58½
                     No. 2 │   58½│   57¾│   57⅞│    58│   57¾│   58¼
                     No. 3 │      │      │    58│   57¾│      │   58¼
  Mixed              No. 2 │   56¾│   55⅜│    56│   56⅜│    55│   56⅛
      ST. LOUIS.           │      │      │      │      │      │
  White              No. 1 │   63¾│    63│      │   63½│      │
                     No. 2 │   63½│   62¾│    63│    63│   62¼│    64
  Yellow             No. 1 │      │    65│   65¾│      │   65½│   66½
                     No. 2 │    66│    65│   65½│   65½│    65│   66½
                     No. 3 │   65½│      │    65│      │    64│
  ─────────────────────────┴──────┴──────┴──────┴──────┴──────┴──────
                                 OATS.
  ─────────────────────────┬──────┬──────┬──────┬──────┬──────┬──────
       CHICAGO.            │      │      │      │      │      │
  White              No. 1 │   37¼│   36½│    37│      │   37½│   39¼
                     No. 2 │   36¼│   35¼│   34½│   35¾│   35¾│   37¼
                     No. 3 │   34¼│    33│   33¼│   34½│    34│   34¾
     MINNEAPOLIS.          │      │      │      │      │      │
  White              No. 2 │   31¾│    30│    31│   31¼│      │   32½
                     No. 3 │    31│    30│    30│   30¾│   30½│    31
        OMAHA.             │      │      │      │      │      │
  White              No. 2 │      │    32│    32│    32│   32½│    33
                     No. 3 │   33½│   31½│   31¾│    32│   31⅞│   32⅜
      ST. LOUIS.           │      │      │      │      │      │
  White              No. 2 │   37¾│   36¾│   36½│   35¾│    36│    36
                     No. 3 │   36¾│    36│   35¾│   35¼│   35¼│   35¾
  ─────────────────────────┴──────┴──────┴──────┴──────┴──────┴──────
                                 RYE.
  ─────────────────────────┬──────┬──────┬──────┬──────┬──────┬──────
       CHICAGO.            │      │      │      │      │      │
  Rye                No. 2 │   85½│   83½│   81¼│    81│    80│   80½
     MINNEAPOLIS.          │      │      │      │      │      │
  Western            No. 2 │    77│    75│   73¾│    73│   72½│    74
  ─────────────────────────┴──────┴──────┴──────┴──────┴──────┴──────
                   Daily Closing Prices of Futures.
  ─────────────────────────┬──────┬──────┬──────┬──────┬──────┬──────
       CHICAGO.            │      │      │      │      │      │
  Wheat              July  │  111¾│   108│   110│  109¾│  110⅜│  111½
                     Sept  │  109¼│  107¼│  107⅜│  107⅛│  108⅛│  108¼
  Corn               July  │   62⅛│   61⅞│   61¾│   61⅜│   62½│   64½
                     Sept  │   63⅜│   62⅞│   62⅜│   61¾│   62⅜│   63½
  Oats               July  │   32¼│   31½│   31⅜│    32│   32⅛│   32⅜
                     Sept  │    34│   33⅝│   33⅝│   33⅞│   34¼│   34⅜
     KANSAS CITY.          │      │      │      │      │      │
  Wheat              July  │  102¼│   100│  100⅝│  100¼│  101½│   102
                     Sept  │  100¾│   99⅜│   99½│   99¼│  100¼│  100½
  Corn               July  │   53⅞│   52½│    52│   52¼│   52¼│    55
                     Sept  │   55⅞│   54⅞│   54½│   53¾│   54⅜│   56⅜
  Oats               July  │    34│    34│    31│    31│   31½│   31½
                     Sept  │   33¾│   32⅞│   32⅞│   33⅜│   33⅜│   33⅞
  ─────────────────────────┴──────┴──────┴──────┴──────┴──────┴──────



                           _Hay ^{and} Feed_
         HAY MARKETS GENERALLY DULL AND LOWER DURING PAST WEEK
 Local Conditions Were Ruling Factors—Quality of New Hay Shipments Only
                              Fair So Far.


Local conditions were again the principal factors in the hay market
situation for the week ending July 29. Eastern markets were experiencing
the mid-season dullness, while central western markets were having some
difficulty in disposing of the increasing receipts of new hay, much of
which was not of desirable quality for shipment. The railroad strike was
reported as curtailing shipments in some sections, but generally the
effects of the strike were not noticeable in the markets. The average
price of hay was lowered slightly during the week, but the larger
declines were in the eastern markets, where prices were being worked to
a new hay basis.

Receipts were lighter in the East but heavier in the West, as is shown
in the following table, which gives receipts in carloads at several
important markets for the weeks ending July 22 and July 29, 1922 and
July 30, 1921:


          ─────────────────────┬───────────────────┬─────────
                  City.        │       1922        │  1921
          ─────────────────────┼─────────┬─────────┼─────────
                               │July 29. │July 22. │July 30.
          ─────────────────────┼─────────┼─────────┼─────────
          Boston               │       39│       30│
          New York             │      173│      280│      192
          Philadelphia         │       69│       41│
          Pittsburgh           │       44│       29│
          Cincinnati           │      188│      113│      146
          Chicago              │      258│      191│      228
          Minneapolis-St. Paul │      208│      141│       54
          St. Louis            │      121│       88│
          Kansas City          │      360│      330│
          Los Angeles          │       48│       84│      224
          San Francisco        │      138│         │      253
          ─────────────────────┴─────────┴─────────┴─────────


                         TIMOTHY LOWER IN EAST.

_Timothy._—Notwithstanding the light receipts, prices declined
$1.50‒$2.50 per ton on No. 1 timothy hay at New York and Boston during
the week. Very little good hay was offered and the poorer grades were
not wanted. Buyers appeared to prefer to await larger receipts of new
hay. The few cars of new hay arriving were mostly No. 3 or lower and
some were heating. Light receipts caused firm prices most of the week at
Philadelphia and good old hay was in demand at Pittsburgh. New hay, most
of which graded No. 2, sold at $5 discount under old No. 1 prices at the
latter market.

Good quality old hay and new cool, sweet hay sold readily at Chicago,
but the poorer grades, of which there was an oversupply, sold at heavy
discounts. Southside yards were congested with off-grade hay. Nearly all
the new hay was reported to be overripe and of poor color. Many cars
were heating, also.

The timothy market developed an easier tone at both Cincinnati and St.
Louis. The local demand was limited and prices were said to be too high
to stimulate a shipping demand to the South and Southeast. There was,
however, very little inquiry from the southern markets, as Johnson grass
and other local hays were on the market in good supply.


                        ALFALFA MOVEMENT LIGHT.

_Alfalfa._—The movement of alfalfa from Kansas and other Southwestern
States was comparatively light, as the second crop of alfalfa was much
smaller than the first because of the hot, dry weather which recently
prevailed in that territory. The shortage of water in some sections will
also probably cause a lighter yield of the third crop so that producers
are not inclined to sell their stocks at prices unsatisfactory to them.
Kansas City reported a more active demand from the cotton belt as well
as from the local dairy trade.

Advances in prices for all grades were reported from Los Angeles where
receipts were light. Choice rabbit hay sold as high as $25 per ton.
Receipts at San Francisco were heavier and prices were much lower than
at the southern market.

_Prairie._—Prairie hay constituted the bulk of the receipts at
Minneapolis and Kansas City. Dealers and consumers who had accumulated
large stocks of hay in expectation of a curtailed supply because of the
rail strike were not interested and the market ruled dull. The
stockyards offered the principal outlet at Minneapolis. Country supplies
of prairie were reported heavy and little improvement in the market was
expected.

_Straw._—Receipts of straw were light but equal to the demand in most
markets. Some old rye straw was wanted in eastern markets. There was an
oversupply of wheat straw at Chicago. Current quotations were as
follows: No. 1 wheat—Boston (old) $19, Baltimore $12, Pittsburgh $13.50,
Chicago $9, Cincinnati $10.50, Richmond $12; No. 1 oat—Boston (old) $20,
Baltimore $12.50, Pittsburgh $13.50, Chicago $11.50, Cincinnati $10.50;
No. 1 rye (straight)—Boston (new) $30, New York (new) $22, Baltimore
$30; No. 1 rye (tangled)—Pittsburgh $13.50, Chicago $13, Cincinnati $11.


         MILL FEED MARKETS DISPLAYED WEAK TENDENCY DURING WEEK
         Heavy Production of Wheat Feeds Cause of Rather Large
                    Accumulations—Alfalfa Meal Firm.

The mill feed market was in a weak position during the week ending July
29. Increased production and offerings of the more important feedstuffs
with no material improvement in the demand from principal feeding
sections resulted in an easier feeling and lower quotations, especially
for bran and cottonseed meal.

During the early part of the week the market held steady, but as soon as
production figures became more generally known buyers turned resellers
and endeavored to realize profits on their long contracts. During the
last few days of the week trading was practically at a standstill, with
sellers anxious to dispose of nearby shipment stuff. Stocks in hands of
interior dealers were thought to be fairly good for this season of the
year and advices indicate that they are being disposed of only slowly.
The movement was fair.

_Wheat mill feeds._—Bran was easily the weakest of the wheat mill feeds
and on heavy offerings declined to $14 in the Minneapolis market.
Standard middlings and the heavy wheat feeds held slightly better, flour
middlings and reddog of ordinary quality commanding $24.50 and $29.50,
respectively, in that market. Production in southwestern and
northwestern mills increased substantially and an easier market
prevailed. Most of the markets quoted bran $1‒$2 lower than last week.
The movement

                   (Concluded on page 116, column 2.)


  CARLOAD PRICES OF HAY AND FEED AT IMPORTANT MARKETS, JULY 29, 1922.

                         [In dollars per ton.]

 ──────────────┬───────────┬─────────┬─────────────────┬───────────────
               │           │   New   │                 │
               │Boston.[31]│York.[31]│Philadelphia.[31]│Pittsburgh.[31]
 ──────────────┼───────────┼─────────┼─────────────────┼───────────────
      HAY.     │           │         │                 │
 Timothy and   │           │         │                 │
   clover:     │           │         │                 │
   No. 1       │           │         │                 │
     timothy   │      30.00│    30.00│            25.00│      [32]24.00
   Standard    │           │         │                 │
     timothy   │           │    29.00│            24.00│          22.00
   No. 2       │           │         │                 │
     timothy   │      26.00│    27.50│            23.50│          19.00
   No. 1 light │           │         │                 │
     clover,   │           │         │                 │
     mixed     │           │    28.00│            23.50│          19.50
   No. 1       │           │         │                 │
     clover,   │           │         │                 │
     mixed     │      23.00│    24.00│                 │          17.00
   No. 1 clover│           │         │                 │      [32]16.00
 Alfalfa:      │           │         │                 │
   No. 1       │           │         │                 │
     alfalfa   │           │         │                 │
   Standard    │           │         │                 │
     alfalfa   │           │         │                 │
   No. 2       │           │         │                 │
     alfalfa   │           │         │                 │
 Prairie:      │           │         │                 │
   No. 1 upland│           │         │                 │
   No. 2 upland│           │         │                 │
   No. 1       │           │         │                 │
     midland   │           │         │                 │
 Grain:        │           │         │                 │
   No. 1 wheat │           │         │                 │
   No. 1 oat   │           │         │                 │
   FEED        │           │         │                 │
     (bagged). │           │         │                 │
 Wheat bran:   │           │         │                 │
   Spring      │      23.25│    23.25│            22.25│          22.00
   Soft winter │      25.00│    23.25│            24.00│          23.50
   Hard winter │           │         │            22.50│          22.50
 Wheat         │           │         │                 │
   middlings:  │           │         │                 │
   Spring      │           │         │                 │
     (standard)│      26.50│    25.50│            25.50│          24.50
   Soft winter │           │         │            32.00│          29.50
   Hard winter │           │         │                 │          30.50
   Hard winter │           │         │                 │
     wheat     │           │         │                 │
     shorts    │           │         │            29.00│
 Wheat millrun │           │         │            26.00│
 Rye middlings │      26.00│         │            25.00│          23.00
 High protein  │           │         │                 │
   meals:      │           │         │                 │
   Linseed     │      49.00│    48.00│            48.00│      [32]48.50
   Cottonseed  │           │         │                 │
     (41%)     │      44.50│    43.50│            43.00│
   Cottonseed  │           │         │                 │
     (36%)     │      42.50│    41.50│            41.00│          42.00
   Peanut (36%)│           │         │                 │
 No. 1 alfalfa │           │         │                 │
   meal        │           │         │                 │
   (medium)    │           │         │                 │
 Velvet-bean   │           │         │                 │
   meal        │           │         │                 │
 Gluten feed   │      35.20│    35.35│            34.95│          33.75
 White hominy  │           │         │                 │
   feed        │      32.00│    31.00│            30.50│
 Yellow hominy │           │         │                 │
   feed        │      31.50│    30.50│            30.00│
 Ground barley │           │         │                 │
 Dried beet    │           │         │                 │
   pulp        │           │    51.00│                 │
 ──────────────┴───────────┴─────────┴─────────────────┴───────────────

 ──────────────┬───────────────┬────────┬─────────────┬────────────
               │               │        │             │
               │Cincinnati.[31]│Atlanta.│Jacksonville.│Memphis.[31]
 ──────────────┼───────────────┼────────┼─────────────┼────────────
      HAY.     │               │        │             │
 Timothy and   │               │        │             │
   clover:     │               │        │             │
   No. 1       │               │        │             │
     timothy   │          17.00│   24.00│        24.00│       21.00
   Standard    │               │        │             │
     timothy   │               │        │             │
   No. 2       │               │        │             │
     timothy   │          16.00│   22.50│        20.00│       18.50
   No. 1 light │               │        │             │
     clover,   │               │        │             │
     mixed     │          15.50│   22.50│        23.00│
   No. 1       │               │        │             │
     clover,   │               │        │             │
     mixed     │          14.50│        │        22.00│
   No. 1 clover│          14.00│        │             │
 Alfalfa:      │               │        │             │
   No. 1       │               │        │             │
     alfalfa   │          17.00│   25.00│        24.00│       22.50
   Standard    │               │        │             │
     alfalfa   │          16.00│   23.50│             │       19.50
   No. 2       │               │        │             │
     alfalfa   │          14.00│   22.00│             │       17.00
 Prairie:      │               │        │             │
   No. 1 upland│               │        │             │
   No. 2 upland│               │        │             │
   No. 1       │               │        │             │
     midland   │               │        │             │
 Grain:        │               │        │             │
   No. 1 wheat │               │        │             │
   No. 1 oat   │               │        │             │
   FEED        │               │        │             │
     (bagged). │               │        │             │
 Wheat bran:   │               │        │             │
   Spring      │          21.00│   24.00│        24.00│       18.50
   Soft winter │          21.50│   24.00│             │
   Hard winter │          21.00│   24.00│             │
 Wheat         │               │        │             │
   middlings:  │               │        │             │
   Spring      │               │        │             │
     (standard)│          24.50│   29.00│             │       26.00
   Soft winter │          28.00│   32.50│        30.00│
   Hard winter │          28.00│        │             │
   Hard winter │               │        │             │
     wheat     │               │        │             │
     shorts    │               │        │        28.00│       25.00
 Wheat millrun │               │        │             │
 Rye middlings │               │        │             │
 High protein  │               │        │             │
   meals:      │               │        │             │
   Linseed     │          47.10│        │        54.50│
   Cottonseed  │               │        │             │
     (41%)     │          44.00│        │             │
   Cottonseed  │               │        │             │
     (36%)     │          41.00│   38.00│        42.00│       36.00
   Peanut (36%)│               │        │        31.00│
 No. 1 alfalfa │               │        │             │
   meal        │               │        │             │
   (medium)    │          25.00│        │        30.00│       22.50
 Velvet-bean   │               │        │             │
   meal        │               │        │        32.00│
 Gluten feed   │          32.00│        │        38.55│
 White hominy  │               │        │             │
   feed        │          28.50│   29.00│        29.00│
 Yellow hominy │               │        │             │
   feed        │          28.50│   28.50│             │
 Ground barley │          33.00│        │             │
 Dried beet    │               │        │             │
   pulp        │          33.00│        │        53.00│
 ──────────────┴───────────────┴────────┴─────────────┴────────────

 ──────────────┬────────┬────────────┬────────────────┬──────────
               │        │            │                │   St.
               │Buffalo.│Chicago.[31]│Minneapolis.[31]│Louis.[31]
 ──────────────┼────────┼────────────┼────────────────┼──────────
      HAY.     │        │            │                │
 Timothy and   │        │            │                │
   clover:     │        │            │                │
   No. 1       │        │            │                │
     timothy   │   19.00│       21.00│           17.50│
   Standard    │        │            │                │
     timothy   │        │       19.00│           16.50│     16.50
   No. 2       │        │            │                │
     timothy   │   17.50│       16.00│           16.00│     15.00
   No. 1 light │        │            │                │
     clover,   │        │            │                │
     mixed     │        │       18.50│       [32]16.00│
   No. 1       │        │            │                │
     clover,   │        │            │                │
     mixed     │        │       12.00│       [32]15.50│
   No. 1 clover│        │       12.00│       [32]15.00│
 Alfalfa:      │        │            │                │
   No. 1       │        │            │                │
     alfalfa   │        │       20.00│       [32]18.00│
   Standard    │        │            │                │
     alfalfa   │        │       17.00│       [32]16.00│
   No. 2       │        │            │                │
     alfalfa   │        │       15.00│       [32]13.00│
 Prairie:      │        │            │                │
   No. 1 upland│        │       19.00│           16.00│
   No. 2 upland│        │       17.00│           15.00│
   No. 1       │        │            │                │
     midland   │        │       16.00│           12.50│
 Grain:        │        │            │                │
   No. 1 wheat │        │            │                │
   No. 1 oat   │        │            │                │
   FEED        │        │            │                │
     (bagged). │        │            │                │
 Wheat bran:   │        │            │                │
   Spring      │   20.50│       17.25│           14.00│
   Soft winter │   21.50│            │                │
   Hard winter │   20.50│       17.00│                │     16.75
 Wheat         │        │            │                │
   middlings:  │        │            │                │
   Spring      │        │            │                │
     (standard)│   21.50│       20.00│           17.00│
   Soft winter │   24.00│            │                │
   Hard winter │   23.00│            │                │
   Hard winter │        │            │                │
     wheat     │        │            │                │
     shorts    │   23.00│            │                │     23.50
 Wheat millrun │        │            │                │
 Rye middlings │   20.50│            │           15.50│
 High protein  │        │            │                │
   meals:      │        │            │                │
   Linseed     │   44.50│       46.50│           45.00│
   Cottonseed  │        │            │                │
     (41%)     │   44.50│       50.00│           47.00│
   Cottonseed  │        │            │                │
     (36%)     │   41.50│       46.50│                │
   Peanut (36%)│        │            │                │
 No. 1 alfalfa │        │            │                │
   meal        │        │            │                │
   (medium)    │        │       23.25│                │     22.00
 Velvet-bean   │        │            │                │
   meal        │        │            │                │
 Gluten feed   │   33.75│       28.85│                │
 White hominy  │        │            │                │
   feed        │   29.50│       26.00│                │     25.00
 Yellow hominy │        │            │                │
   feed        │   29.00│       25.00│                │
 Ground barley │        │       31.50│                │
 Dried beet    │        │            │                │
   pulp        │   48.00│            │                │
 ──────────────┴────────┴────────────┴────────────────┴──────────

 ──────────────┬─────────┬────────────┬──────────────
               │ Kansas  │    Los     │     San
               │City.[31]│Angeles.[31]│Francisco.[31]
 ──────────────┼─────────┼────────────┼──────────────
      HAY.     │         │            │
 Timothy and   │         │            │
   clover:     │         │            │
   No. 1       │         │            │
     timothy   │    14.50│            │
   Standard    │         │            │
     timothy   │    13.00│            │
   No. 2       │         │            │
     timothy   │    11.00│            │
   No. 1 light │         │            │
     clover,   │         │            │
     mixed     │    14.25│            │
   No. 1       │         │            │
     clover,   │         │            │
     mixed     │    12.00│            │
   No. 1 clover│    11.00│            │
 Alfalfa:      │         │            │
   No. 1       │         │            │
     alfalfa   │    16.00│       19.00│         16.00
   Standard    │         │            │
     alfalfa   │    14.00│            │         15.00
   No. 2       │         │            │
     alfalfa   │    12.00│            │         12.00
 Prairie:      │         │            │
   No. 1 upland│    11.25│            │
   No. 2 upland│     9.50│            │
   No. 1       │         │            │
     midland   │         │            │
 Grain:        │         │            │
   No. 1 wheat │         │            │         19.00
   No. 1 oat   │         │       21.00│         18.00
   FEED        │         │            │
     (bagged). │         │            │
 Wheat bran:   │         │            │
   Spring      │         │            │
   Soft winter │    14.50│       40.00│         37.00
   Hard winter │    14.25│       36.00│
 Wheat         │         │            │
   middlings:  │         │            │
   Spring      │         │            │
     (standard)│         │            │
   Soft winter │    22.00│            │         46.00
   Hard winter │    21.50│            │
   Hard winter │         │            │
     wheat     │         │            │
     shorts    │    19.50│            │
 Wheat millrun │    18.00│            │         36.00
 Rye middlings │         │            │
 High protein  │         │            │
   meals:      │         │            │
   Linseed     │    50.00│            │         58.00
   Cottonseed  │         │            │
     (41%)     │    44.50│       48.00│         49.00
   Cottonseed  │         │            │
     (36%)     │    43.00│            │
   Peanut (36%)│         │            │         49.00
 No. 1 alfalfa │         │            │
   meal        │         │            │
   (medium)    │    18.50│       26.00│
 Velvet-bean   │         │            │
   meal        │         │            │
 Gluten feed   │         │            │
 White hominy  │         │            │
   feed        │    22.00│            │
 Yellow hominy │         │            │
   feed        │    21.00│            │
 Ground barley │         │            │
 Dried beet    │         │            │
   pulp        │         │       36.00│
 ──────────────┴─────────┴────────────┴──────────────



                                _Seeds_
           MOVEMENT OF ORCHARD GRASS SEED SLOWER THAN IN 1921
 Thrashing Not Yet Completed in Many Sections—Quality This Year Better
                               than Last

The movement of orchard grass seed is even more belated than last year
despite the fact that it was harvested earlier. In some sections but
little seed had been thrashed up to July 25 and in other sections
thrashing operations were in full swing or nearly completed.

As was pointed out in the June 24 issue of WEATHER, CROPS, AND MARKETS,
the 1922 crop is much larger than that of last year and sales were
somewhat disappointing this spring. These factors along with others have
tended to cause dealers to take a passive interest in the crop and
refrain from making any but nominal bids for seed held by growers.


                          MARKET NOT YET MADE.

The market had not become established by July 25, although prices for
country-run seed ranging from 75¢ to $1.25 per 100 lbs. were being
offered occasionally to growers in the Kentucky, Ohio, and Missouri
districts. Thrashing had not progressed sufficiently in Virginia for
buyers to become interested in the seed that was harvested in that
State.

The quality of the 1922 crop in practically all districts is considered
to be better than last year. The carryover of old seed by growers,
particularly in the Ohio and Virginia districts, seems to be somewhat
larger than usual. No orchard grass seed was permitted entry under the
seed importation act during June and July.

                  *       *       *       *       *

Meadow Fescue Seed Prices Decline During Past Two Weeks.

A normal movement of the 1922 crop of meadow fescue seed has occurred
since thrashing began about June 30, and it is estimated that
approximately 55% of the crop has already been sold by growers. In the
opinion of country buyers and others this year’s crop of recleaned seed
will be about twice as large as that of last year.

The quality is considered to be much better not only because of
favorable weather during the growing season and at harvest time but also
because growers exercised more care in the selection of their seed for
sowing. During recent years the shrinkage in recleaning the crop has
been unusually heavy, resulting in considerable loss to the growers.

Prices to growers declined 2¢ or 3¢ during the two weeks prior to July
25. Only about 4¢ per lb. for recleaned seed was being paid on that
date, and there were not many buyers even at that price.

                  *       *       *       *       *

=A new variety of the Rose potato=, called the Early Norther Rose, was
planted in the Charleston section of South Carolina this spring. It
resembles the Spaulding Rose, but is a little longer and thicker than
that variety. The average yield was 80‒90 bbls. per acre.


           MOVEMENT OF KENTUCKY BLUE GRASS SEED BELOW NORMAL
Growers in Kentucky Have Pooled Much of Their Seed——Quality Better than
                               Last Year.

The 1922 crop of Kentucky blue grass seed is not being sold so freely by
growers in Kentucky and Missouri as was the crop last year. In some
important stripping areas in Kentucky where the crop is large, less than
5% had moved from growers’ hands by July 25. In other sections of
Kentucky approximately 25% had been sold but the bulk of the crop has
been pooled in the expectancy of higher prices later. Although in the
vicinity of one or two important shipping points in Missouri 60% or more
of the crop is reported to have been sold by growers, in most of the
other sections only 10%‒15% has been sold.

Prices prevailing about July 25 were much lower than last year, being
mostly $1.25‒$1.50 per bu. for rough, cured seed compared with $2‒$2.50
last year. Little or no change occurred in prices offered to growers
during the last two weeks of July.

The quality of the seed in Kentucky and Missouri is much better than it
was last year and undoubtedly will shrink less in cleaning.

The production of the 1922 crop was covered fully in the June 17 issue
of this publication.


                     IMPORTS OF FORAGE PLANT SEEDS.

                     Permitted Entry Under the Seed
                            Importation Act.

                ──────────────────┬─────────────────────
                  Kind of seed.   │        July.
                ──────────────────┼──────────┬──────────
                                  │  1922.   │  1921.
                ──────────────────┼──────────┼──────────
                                  │ Pounds.  │ Pounds.
                Alfalfa           │ 1,553,100│    89,200
                Canada bluegrass  │          │     1,000
                Alsike clover     │    44,300│    17,800
                Crimson clover    │    11,000│   198,200
                Red clover        │   185,800│   744,500
                White clover      │    79,000│   133,600
                Grass mixtures    │          │    40,100
                Broom corn millet │   153,400│
                Rape              │   366,700│    38,500
                Redtop            │     2,200│
                English rye grass │    84,000│    16,300
                Italian rye grass │          │    13,800
                Timothy           │          │    89,200
                Hairy vetch       │    91,900│   108,400
                Spring vetch      │    10,800│
                ══════════════════╧══════════╧══════════


                       WEEKLY FEED TRADE REVIEW.

                       (Concluded from page 115.)

was fair: Embargoes against outbound shipping in a few western markets
kept business within narrow limits. Stocks generally were in excess of
the demand.

Southwestern markets reported a good demand for shorts from the South
and Southeast and an improved inquiry for bran was noted from Pacific
coast markets. Large stocks of wheat feeds, mostly bought at higher
levels, are being carried at western lake ports, and railroads are not
accepting any more shipments to be held at lake ports, claiming that all
available space is occupied.

_Cottonseed meal and cake._—Increased offerings of new crop cottonseed
cake and meal gave the market an unsettled tone and although a fair
demand was noted in the East the premiums of old crop over the new crop
cake and meal were sharply lowered. Prices for October shipment stuff
ruled about $5 per ton lower than spot offerings in most markets.
Pressure of new crop offers for deferred shipment tended to check
buying. A small volume of business on the basis of $40 at Kansas City
for 43% stock was noted, but buyers generally were hesitant in taking
hold. Old crop stocks at mills continue in excess of what they were last
year. The export inquiry was light. The movement was small.

_Linseed meal and cake._—Production of linseed meal and cake was light.
Prices held steady, but showed a rather wide range, mill offerings being
at 50¢-$1 per ton less than was asked by jobbers. Stocks were fair. The
demand both for export and domestic consumption was poor. Crushers
expect increased production during September and October but little
improvement in the output is expected during August. Receipts and
movement were light.


                       GLUTEN FEED DEMAND QUIET.

_Gluten feed._—The demand for gluten feed was quiet. Dealers reported
sales as slow, and as a result a few mills experienced difficulty in
obtaining shipping instructions for goods bought for July shipment.
Although corn prices were lower and No. 2 Yellow was quoted on the basis
of about $22 Chicago, gluten feed for August shipment was advanced $1
per ton over the July price to $29.85 per ton Chicago. Production was
normal and the movement was good. Supplies were rather large in the
Northeast, and moderate in other sections.

_Hominy feed._—Hominy feed prices showed little change from last week.
Eastern mills shaded prices to effect sales. The demand was scattered
and mostly from single car buyers. Production was good, particularly by
mills having orders for grits for the Russian Relief. Offerings by
western mills increased because of the limited sales during the past
month and the accumulation of stocks. Supplies in dealers’ hands
continued fair. The movement was light.

_Alfalfa meal._—The supply of alfalfa meal was about equal to the
demand, which was normal for this time of the year, inquiries having
been received from all over the country. Prices for meal are governed
largely by trend of hay prices, and as the yield of second cutting in
many instances was less than was expected, with poor prospects for the
third cutting, the alfalfa meal situation was quite firm. The supplies
of hay available for milling have been reduced considerably through
extensive purchases by sheep feeders. Millers, therefore, do not expect
to make heavy offerings in the near future. In fact, many mills were
unable to accept business for immediate, quick, or prompt shipment. The
movement was fair.


                      WEEKLY GRAIN MARKET REVIEW.

                       (Concluded from page 114.)

and to Canadian ports 1,431,000 bus. Total shipments for the season to
Canadian ports stand at 11,757,000 bus.

Increased offerings of oats caused prices to decline 1¢ to 2¢ per bu.
during the week. The demand was light because buyers were expecting new
crop prices to be lower. The general movement was not large, however, as
total primary receipts were only 4,775,000 bus., or not quite one-half
of the amount reported received during the corresponding week last year.

The visible supply of grain at the close of the week was given as
follows: Oats, 36,667,000 bus.; corn, 19,509,000 bus.; and wheat,
19,667,000 bus. Wheat and flour on ocean passage totaled 48,936,000
bus., compared with 57,960,000 bus. one year ago.



                                _Cotton_
            PRICES SAG DURING WEEK; SPOT SALES SHOW INCREASE
 Reports of More Favorable Weather in the Main Cotton States Was Factor
                               in Market.

The week ending July 29 witnessed sagging prices in cotton, due
primarily to reports of more favorable weather for the growing crop.
Both the railroad and coal strikes had their effect, and the unsettled
condition in foreign exchange was also a factor.

The average price of Middling as determined from the quotations of the
10 designated spot markets closed at 21.69¢ per lb. on July 29, compared
with 22.10¢ at the close of the previous week and 10.81¢ for the
corresponding day last year. The decline in October future contracts on
the New York Cotton Exchange amounted to 38 points, and on the New
Orleans Cotton Exchange to 39 points. October future contracts on the
Liverpool Cotton Association closed at 12.24d. per lb. on July 28,
compared with 12.59d. at the close of the previous week and 8.39d. for
the corresponding day last year.

The volume of spot sales as reported by the cotton exchanges in the 10
designated markets was somewhat larger than the previous week, amounting
to 29,057 bales, compared with 26,939 bales the previous week and 29,715
bales for the corresponding period in 1921. The total sales reported by
the exchanges in the 10 designated spot markets from Aug. 1 to July 29
amounted to 3,361,605 bales, compared with 3,303,552 bales for the
corresponding period last season.

Dullness was reported to have developed in the dry goods trade, but with
little change in the price levels as compared with those of the previous
week.


  Closing Future Prices for July 29 and for the Corresponding Days in
                            1921 and 1920.

 ─────────┬─────────────────────────────┬─────────────────────────────
  Month.  │          New York.          │        New Orleans.
 ─────────┼─────────┬─────────┬─────────┼─────────┬─────────┬─────────
          │  1922   │  1921   │  1920   │  1922   │  1921   │  1920
 ─────────┼─────────┼─────────┼─────────┼─────────┼─────────┼─────────
          │_Cents._ │_Cents._ │_Cents._ │_Cents._ │_Cents._ │_Cents._
 October  │    21.42│    12.14│    31.27│    20.96│    11.66│    30.31
 December │    21.35│    12.65│    30.00│    20.85│    12.00│    29.35
 January  │    21.21│    12.60│    29.18│    20.81│    12.08│    28.90
 March    │    21.18│    12.95│    28.90│    20.71│    12.40│    28.50
 May      │    21.05│    13.08│    28.50│    20.60│    12.47│    27.90
 ─────────┴─────────┴─────────┴─────────┴─────────┴─────────┴─────────


                                 Spot
                              Quotations
                                  for
                               Middling
                                Upland
                               Cotton at
                              New York on
                               July 29,
                              for Each of
                              the Past 32
                                Years.

                              ───────────
                                   Cents.
                              1891   8.00
                              1892   7.50
                              1893   8.12
                              1894   7.00
                              1895   7.00
                              1896   7.31
                              1897   7.94
                              1898   6.06
                              1899   6.12
                              1900  10.06
                              1901   8.12
                              1902   9.06
                              1903  13.25
                              1904  10.70
                              1905  11.05
                              1906  10.90
                              1907  12.90
                              1908  10.70
                              1909  12.75
                              1910  16.05
                              1911  13.50
                              1912  13.25
                              1913  11.95
                              1914  12.75
                              1915   9.35
                              1916  13.30
                              1917  25.20
                              1918  28.55
                              1919  35.15
                              1920  40.00
                              1921  11.95
                              1922  21.75
                              ───────────


               Cotton Movement from August 1 to July 28.

                 [Information from commercial sources.]

   ──────────────────────────────────────────┬───────────┬───────────
                                             │  1921‒22  │  1920‒21
   ──────────────────────────────────────────┼───────────┼───────────
                                             │ _Bales._  │ _Bales._
   Port receipts                             │  6,084,471│  6,713,411
   Port stocks                               │    499,345│  1,347,936
   Interior receipts                         │  7,224,067│  7,546,577
   Interior stocks                           │    388,830│  1,129,231
   Into sight                                │           │ 11,565,262
   Northern spinners’ takings                │           │  2,088,516
   Southern spinners’ takings                │  4,126,522│  2,874,678
   World’s visible supply of American cotton │  2,021,888│  4,108,428
   ──────────────────────────────────────────┴───────────┴───────────


                        SPOT COTTON QUOTATIONS.

  Price of Middling spot cotton for July 29 and the commercial
    differences in price between Middling and other grades of American
    Upland cotton at each of the 10 markets named, together with the
    total number of bales sold during the week ending July 29, as
    reported to the U. S. Department of Agriculture by the cotton
    exchanges in these markets.

 ────────────────┬──────────┬────────┬─────────┬───────────┬────────
                 │          │        │         │           │
                 │ Norfolk. │Augusta.│Savannah.│Montgomery.│Memphis.
 ────────────────┼──────────┼────────┼─────────┼───────────┼────────
 White Standards:│_On._[33] │ _On._  │  _On._  │   _On._   │ _On._
   Middling Fair │       200│     125│      125│        163│     225
   Strict Good   │          │        │         │           │
     Middling    │       150│     100│      100│        125│     150
   Good Middling │       100│      75│       75│         88│     100
   Strict        │          │        │         │           │
     Middling    │        50│      38│       50│         50│      50
 Middling        │     21.63│   21.63│    21.50│      21.38│   22.50
                 │_Off._[33]│ _Off._ │ _Off._  │  _Off._   │ _Off._
   Strict Low    │          │        │         │           │
     Middling    │        50│      37│       50│         50│      50
   Low Middling  │       100│     100│      100│        125│     125
   Strict Good   │          │        │         │           │
     Ordinary[34]│       175│     175│      150│        200│     225
   Good          │          │        │         │           │
     Ordinary[34]│       250│     275│      200│        275│     325
 Yellow Tinged:  │          │        │         │           │
   Good Middling │     Even.│   Even.│    Even.│      Even.│   Even.
   Strict        │          │        │         │           │
     Middling    │        50│      37│       50│         75│      50
   Middling[34]  │       100│     100│      150│        175│     150
   Strict Low    │          │        │         │           │
     Middling[34]│       175│     175│      225│        250│     225
   Low           │          │        │         │           │
     Middling[34]│       275│     275│      300│        325│     325
 Yellow Stained: │          │        │         │           │
   Good Middling │       100│     100│      100│        125│     125
   Strict        │          │        │         │           │
     Middling[34]│       200│     175│      200│        200│     225
   Middling[34]  │       275│     300│      300│        275│     275
 Blue Stained:   │          │        │         │           │
   Good          │          │        │         │           │
     Middling[34]│       150│     100│      150│        150│     100
   Strict        │          │        │         │           │
     Middling[34]│       225│     200│      225│        225│     150
   Middling[34]  │       300│     300│      300│        300│     200
 Sales for week, │          │        │         │           │
   bales         │       531│     233│      169│        472│   1,200
 ────────────────┴──────────┴────────┴─────────┴───────────┴────────

 ────────────────┬──────┬───────┬────────┬──────────┬────────┬──────────
                 │Little│       │        │          │  New   │
                 │Rock. │Dallas.│Houston.│Galveston.│Orleans.│ Average.
 ────────────────┼──────┼───────┼────────┼──────────┼────────┼──────────
 White Standards:│_On._ │ _On._ │ _On._  │  _On._   │ _On._  │  _On._
   Middling Fair │   200│    200│     150│       250│     175│       181
   Strict Good   │      │       │        │          │        │
     Middling    │   150│    150│     125│       175│     150│       138
   Good Middling │   100│    100│     100│       100│     100│        94
   Strict        │      │       │        │          │        │
     Middling    │    75│     75│      50│        50│      50│        54
 Middling        │ 21.50│  21.45│   21.90│     21.95│   21.50│     21.69
                 │_Off._│_Off._ │ _Off._ │  _Off._  │ _Off._ │  _Off._
   Strict Low    │      │       │        │          │        │
     Middling    │    50│     75│      75│        75│      50│        56
   Low Middling  │   125│    150│     150│       150│     125│       125
   Strict Good   │      │       │        │          │        │
     Ordinary[34]│   225│    250│     250│       250│     225│       213
   Good          │      │       │        │          │        │
     Ordinary[34]│   325│    350│     350│       350│     325│       303
 Yellow Tinged:  │      │       │        │          │        │
   Good Middling │[35]25│  Even.│   Even.│     Even.│   Even.│     [35]3
   Strict        │      │       │        │          │        │
     Middling    │    50│     75│      50│        50│      50│        54
   Middling[34]  │   150│    175│     175│       175│     200│       155
   Strict Low    │      │       │        │          │        │
     Middling[34]│   225│    250│     250│       250│     250│       228
   Low           │      │       │        │          │        │
     Middling[34]│   300│    325│     325│       325│     325│       310
 Yellow Stained: │      │       │        │          │        │
   Good Middling │   125│    150│     150│       150│     125│       125
   Strict        │      │       │        │          │        │
     Middling[34]│   200│    250│     250│       225│     250│       218
   Middling[34]  │   275│    350│     350│       325│     300│       303
 Blue Stained:   │      │       │        │          │        │
   Good          │      │       │        │          │        │
     Middling[34]│   125│    175│     150│       150│     125│       138
   Strict        │      │       │        │          │        │
     Middling[34]│   225│    250│     225│       225│     175│       213
   Middling[34]  │   325│    325│     300│       300│     300│       295
 Sales for week, │      │       │        │          │        │
   bales         │    56│  7,113│   7,283│     6,739│   5,261│[36]29,057
 ────────────────┴──────┴───────┴────────┴──────────┴────────┴──────────


                 Exports of American Cotton from August
                             1 to July 28.

                 [Information from commercial sources.]

                       To—       │ 1921‒22  │ 1920‒21
                 ────────────────┼──────────┼──────────
                                 │ _Bales._ │ _Bales._
                 Great Britain   │ 1,755,531│ 1,753,072
                 France          │   763,220│   575,436
                 Germany         │ 1,421,822│ 1,326,405
                 Italy           │   488,710│   508,678
                 Japan           │   810,199│   629,599
                 China           │    90,666│    74,741
                 Spain           │   311,763│   253,899
                 Belgium         │   172,485│   195,473
                 Other countries │   219,597│   266,148
                 ────────────────┼──────────┼──────────
                      Total      │ 6,033,993│ 5,583,451
                 ────────────────┴──────────┴──────────

Exports for the week ending July 28 amounted to 48,449 bales, compared
with 96,434 bales the previous week and 157,465 bales for the
corresponding week in 1921.


             Stocks of Government Classed Cotton at Future

Markets.

Inspected cotton, Government classed, in warehouses at the ports of New
York and New Orleans on July 28, 1922, and on the corresponding day in
1921, of the grades tenderable on future contracts made on the exchanges
in these markets subject to section 5 of the United States cotton
futures act, as amended:


 ──────────────────────────────┬───────────────────┬───────────────────
             Grade.            │     New York.     │   New Orleans.
 ──────────────────────────────┼─────────┬─────────┼─────────┬─────────
                               │  1922   │  1921   │  1922   │  1921
 ──────────────────────────────┼─────────┼─────────┼─────────┼─────────
                               │_Bales._ │_Bales._ │_Bales._ │_Bales._
 Middling Fair                 │       10│         │         │        3
 Strict Good Middling          │      812│      239│       89│      290
 Good Middling                 │    9,155│    4,531│      295│    3,532
 Strict Middling               │   31,539│   20,766│    1,373│   21,618
 Middling                      │   46,874│   51,498│    4,418│   34,835
 Strict Low Middling           │   25,588│   43,045│    3,052│   19,408
 Low Middling                  │    4,475│   10,590│      368│    7,264
 Good Middling Yellow Tinged   │    3,941│    4,518│      665│    3,130
 Strict Middling Yellow Tinged │    2,134│    3,630│      596│    3,087
 Good Middling Yellow Stained  │       21│       35│        3│        4
 ──────────────────────────────┼─────────┼─────────┼─────────┼─────────
             Total             │  124,549│  138,852│   10,859│   93,171
 ──────────────────────────────┴─────────┴─────────┴─────────┴─────────

Total stocks of cotton, all kinds, on July 28 at the port of New York
were 150,889 bales, and for the corresponding day in 1921, 156,141
bales; at the port of New Orleans 98,090 bales, and for the
corresponding day in 1921, 421,349 bales.


                         Premium Staple Cotton.

A poor demand for premium staple cotton was reported at New Orleans and
a limited demand with light offerings at Memphis. Some of the sales
reported in these two markets during the week were as follows:


       New Orleans:                                       Cents.
         Middling to Strict Middling, 1 to 1–1/16 ins.       23⅜
         Low Middling, 1–1/16 ins.                           20½
         Middling to Strict Middling, 1–1/16 to 1⅛ ins.      24¾
       Memphis:
         Strict Middling, full, 1–3/16 to 1¼ ins.             32

The average premiums quoted in the New Orleans and Memphis markets for
the staple lengths specified are stated below for Middling cotton based
on Middling short-staple cotton at 21½¢ per lb. at New Orleans and 22½¢
at Memphis on July 29, 1922, and 11¢ per lb. at New Orleans and 10¾¢ at
Memphis on July 30, 1921.


        ────────────┬─────────────────────┬─────────────────────
          Length.   │    New Orleans.     │      Memphis.
        ────────────┼──────────┬──────────┼──────────┬──────────
                    │   1922   │   1921   │   1922   │   1921
        ────────────┼──────────┼──────────┼──────────┼──────────
                    │_Points._ │_Points._ │_Points._ │_Points._
        1–1/16 ins. │       150│        75│       100│       125
        1⅛ ins.     │       375│       500│       400│       625
        1–3/16 ins. │       550│       800│       700│       925
        1¼ ins.     │       800│     1,100│     1,000│     1,125
        ────────────┴──────────┴──────────┴──────────┴──────────

Quotations reported on July 28 for Pima American-Egyptian cotton f. o.
b. New England mill points were as follows: No. 1 grade, 38½¢ per lb.;
No. 2, 36½¢; No. 3, 34½¢. A year ago Pima cotton on the same terms was
quoted at 33¢ per lb. for No. 2 and No. 3 grades.


              British Wool Imports for First Half of 1922

Total 677,634,000 Pounds.

The total imports of sheep and lambs’ wool by the United Kingdom during
the first six months of 1922 amounted to 677,634,000 lbs., compared with
369,325,100 lbs. during the same period of 1921.

Most of the wool came from Australia, New Zealand, British South Africa,
and Argentina. The imports from Australia and New Zealand combined
amounted to 445,466,900 lbs., compared with only 251,225,300 lbs. during
the first six months of 1921, while the imports from British South
Africa increased from 56,904,600 lbs. in the first half of 1921 to
110,333,300 lbs. in the first half of 1922. The imports from Argentina
increased from 16,548,300 lbs. in the first half of 1921 to 23,545,000
lbs. in the corresponding half of 1922.



                               _Weather_
         RAINS BENEFITED VEGETATION IN MANY INTERIOR DISTRICTS
 Conditions Mostly Favorable for Cotton—Wheat Too Far Advanced for Much
                              Rust Damage.

Beneficial rains were received during the week ending Aug. 1 in many
Central Valley districts, but the rainfall was of rather local character
and many areas were still in need of moisture. The rainfall was
especially beneficial for growing crops in Iowa, much of South Dakota,
portions of Kansas, and parts of the Ohio Valley States. Vegetation was
improved also in the northwestern Plains area and in many sections of
the central Rocky Mountain States.

Showers brought some relief in the far Southwest, particularly in
portions of Arizona and northern New Mexico, but other localities in
that area were still in need of rain. Very little rain occurred from the
lower Great Plains southward and the high temperatures in that area were
accompanied in some localities by destructive hot winds. Late truck
needed rain also in some other Southern States. Farm work made good
progress generally, except for some delay, principally in north Central
States, caused by heavy rainfall. Roads were mostly in good condition.


                      THRASHING SOMEWHAT RETARDED.

_Small grains._—There was considerable rainfall during the week in many
localities of the North Central States, and thrashing of small grains
was retarded in this section. There was some injury to grain in shock
also in portions of the upper Mississippi Valley, particularly in Iowa.
East of the Mississippi River this work made generally good progress
under favorable weather conditions, while harvesting of late grain and
thrashing progressed rapidly in the far Northwestern States. Plowing for
fall seeding showed progress in the lower Missouri Valley, the north
central Great Plains States, and in some Ohio Valley districts, with the
soil mostly in good condition.

Reports of black rust in spring wheat continued from the central and
eastern portions of North Dakota, but the crop was too far advanced to
suffer serious damage. There was some local damage by hail in Minnesota,
and the condition of spring wheat is variable in that State, though on
the whole it is generally fair. The crop was largely harvested in South
Dakota and some thrashing was done with fair yields with the grain of
good to excellent quality.

Oat and barley harvests continued in the Northeastern States, and
thrashing progressed in the Ohio Valley region. The yields in the latter
area were mostly disappointing. Considerable oats in shock were damaged
in Iowa by molding, rotting, and sprouting due to wet weather. Oats were
benefited in many of the later western districts by the showers of the
week. Flax was reported in mostly good condition in South Dakota. Rice
did well in California and the condition and progress of this crop was
reported as good in Texas. Harvest of the early rice crop was in
progress in Louisiana.

_Corn._—The rainfall in the central and upper Mississippi Valley, much
of the Great Plains area, and in localities of the Ohio Valley was very
beneficial to corn. The late crop, however, in the lower Great Plains,
in Texas, and some other southern localities needed rain badly. The
condition and development of the crop were reported as excellent in all
sections of Missouri and fair to very good in Iowa. Moderately heavy
rains occurred in the last-named State, especially in the western
portion, where moisture had been badly needed. The progress of the crop
was very good in Illinois, fair to very good in Indiana generally,
although it needed rain in the eastern portion of the latter State. Corn
was in good condition in Ohio but needed rain in many places.

The crop was favorably affected by the weather in the Middle Atlantic
States and was doing well in northeastern districts. The nights
continued too cool for best development of this crop in the western
upper Lake region, where growth was backward. Fields were uneven but
generally fair and showed some improvement in Minnesota. Corn had mostly
tasseled out to the extreme north central portion of the country. Broom
corn was damaged by drought in the southern Great Plains, especially in
western Oklahoma.


                      MOSTLY FAVORABLE FOR COTTON.

_Cotton._—Cotton was favorably affected by the weather of the week
except where there was a lack of moisture in the more western portion of
the belt and where it was too wet in a few central and eastern
localities. Moderate rainfall was the rule from the Mississippi Valley
eastward, but to the westward little or no rain fell. Temperatures were
somewhat above normal in the central and eastern districts and were
unusually high in the northwestern portion of the belt. Sunshine was
generally ample except in northeastern localities.

The crop made favorable progress in North Carolina, except where it was
too wet in parts of the coastal plain. The weather was generally
favorable in South Carolina, although there was too much moisture in
some central counties and the plants were reported as sappy with some
shedding, but fruiting fairly well generally. The week was very
favorable for cotton in Georgia where very good to excellent progress
was reported, and generally fair advance was indicated from Alabama.

The progress was very good in the northern and southern portions of
Mississippi but less favorable where the rainfall was heavier in the
central portion. Cotton showed very good development in Louisiana and
most of Arkansas, the warm, dry weather being favorable in the latter
State. Conditions were less favorable, however, in Texas and Oklahoma.
Peanuts were shedding in the former State as a result of warm, dry
weather, although the early planted crop continued in fair to good
condition. The progress of the peanut crop in Texas was poor to only
fair, and progress and condition were fair in Oklahoma although the
plants needed rain badly in the western portion where wilting and
shedding were reported.

Weevils were generally less active, particularly in the western portion
of the belt, although they continued numerous in most sections and were
doing considerable damage in many localities. Bolls were reported as
opening rapidly in southern Georgia and picking progressed favorably.
The weather was very favorable for this work in the southern portion of
Texas.

_Potatoes._—White potatoes made generally good progress throughout the
country during the week. Showers were beneficial for the crop in many
portions of the Rocky Mountain and Plateau States, except in local areas
where unirrigated potatoes needed more moisture. Some damage from
disease and insects was reported from comparatively small areas in the
northwestern Lake region and the crop was injured in portions of the
lower Great Plains by heat and drought. In some sections of the middle
Atlantic coast area more moisture would have been beneficial. Digging
was in progress northward to the Lake region. Planting continued in
portions of the Southeast. Sweet potatoes did well generally and were
reported as making excellent growth, except in Florida where they needed
more rain.

_Truck and miscellaneous crops._—With sufficient moisture in most of the
interior Valley States, truck crops and gardens showed improvement,
although they were damaged in portions of the Ohio Valley States by lack
of moisture. They were unfavorably affected in a few localities of the
east Gulf area. Rain was badly needed in the Southwest and unirrigated
truck was suffering in the far Northwest.

Sugar beets improved in Colorado and were doing well in Utah, Wyoming,
and Nebraska. The weather was favorable for tobacco in the Northeast,
but this crop was injured by drought in portions of Kentucky and plants
were yellowing in places in Ohio because of insufficient moisture. The
weather was favorable for checking rust in the Ohio Valley localities.
Sugar cane was doing well in the lower Mississippi Valley, but cane and
peanuts were needing rain in Florida. In Virginia peanuts were reported
as small and the fields grassy.


                       RAINS HELP WESTERN RANGES.

_Meadows, pastures, and stock._—Alfalfa was benefited by local showers
in the Central Plateau area and meadows and pastures were improved in
many interior Valley States, although moisture was needed in some
sections. Considerable rain fell over the northern and northwestern
Great Plains and in the central Rocky Mountain districts, resulting in
material improvement to ranges. There were also local showers in the far
Southwest, which were beneficial, but only partial relief was brought to
New Mexico, where much of the range was still slowly deteriorating and
stock was thin. Ranges were further unfavorably affected by lack of
rainfall in Texas, and pastures were mostly burned dry in central
Oklahoma. More rain was needed in West Virginia and Pennsylvania, but
pastures continued very good in the Middle Atlantic States and the
Northeast. Pastures were reported short in Michigan, and while still
good in Wisconsin they needed rain in many localities. Ranges were in
poor condition in Minnesota.

_Fruit._—There was some damage to fruit by heat and lack of moisture in
Oklahoma, and some harm resulted locally from high winds in Missouri.
Apples and prunes would have been benefited by rain in some of the more
northwestern States. Otherwise the weather conditions were generally
favorable for fruit in practically all sections of the country. Prunes
and olives were sizing up nicely in California; oranges were fair to
good in that State; but lemons were less satisfactory because of last
winter’s freeze. Strawberry plants were favorably affected in Florida
and citrus fruits were in good condition.

                  *       *       *       *       *

=The Mexican bean beetle= was reported as a serious pest from several
counties in Tennessee.


                     Warm in Southwest during Week.

Moderate midsummer temperatures prevailed in most sections of the
country during the week, except for unusually warm weather in some south
central districts. Maximum temperatures were frequently above 100° in
Oklahoma, western Arkansas, and northern Texas, the highest reported in
this area being 104° at Oklahoma City on July 26. Chart 1, page 120,
shows that for the week as a whole the temperature averaged below normal
in the Northeast, some north central localities, and in most sections
west of the Rocky Mountains. Elsewhere the weekly averages were above
normal, being decidedly above normal in the lower Great Plains section.

Rainfall was generally of a local character during the week, with light
to moderate, and in a few instances heavy, showers reported generally
from the Mississippi Valley eastward, as shown by Chart 2, page 120.
Good rains occurred in the northwestern Great Plains, but little or none
was received from the southern Plains southward.


                        Average August Weather.

The last two columns of the table on this page show the normal
temperature and precipitation for the month of August at the various
Weather Bureau stations throughout the country. The average temperature
for August differs but little from that of July, although as a rule
August is slightly cooler except on the Pacific coast. East of the Rocky
Mountains the coolest August weather usually occurs in the upper Lake
region and the Northeastern States, where the monthly normals are about
62° to 65°. The normals are slightly above 80° in much of the Gulf coast
section.

Rainfall in August is frequently of a local character, resulting largely
from thunderstorms. The highest monthly averages for August vary from 6
ins. to more than 8 ins. and occur in the more southeastern States. The
dry season continues over the Pacific Coast States and little or no rain
is expected, except for occasional showers in the mountains and in the
more northern districts. Thunderstorms during August are usually more
frequent along the east Gulf coast than in any other section of the
country, occurring on the average on about 20 days during the month.
They are usually active also during this month in the far Southwest,
this being within the season of maximum rainfall in Arizona and New
Mexico and portions of the adjoining States.


                      Irish Flax Industry Failing.

The Irish flax industry is threatened with extinction, according to a
report from the American Consul at Belfast. The area under flax for the
present year amounts to only 25,000 acres, compared with 40,000 acres in
1921 and 127,193 acres in 1920.

The Irish Department of Agriculture has been urged to formulate and
adopt a scheme for the improvement and maintenance of this staple
industry of Northern Ireland.


                     Mississippi Tomato Shipments.

Mississippi’s tomato output has grown by leaps and bounds. In the spring
of 1920 there were 1,360 cars shipped from that State. The 1921 movement
was 1,960 cars, and this season the shipments filled approximately 3,450
cars.


 ════════════════════════════════════════════════════════════════════════════
            WEEKLY TEMPERATURE AND PRECIPITATION——AUGUST NORMALS.

 ────────────┬──────────────────┬────────────────┬───────────────────────────
  Districts  │                  │                │
     and     │                  │                │
  stations.  │   Temperature.   │ Precipitation. │      August normals.
 ────────────┼──────────────────┼────────────────┼────────────┬──────────────
             │ Week ending Aug. │Week ending Aug.│            │
             │        1.        │       1.       │Temperature.│Precipitation.
 ────────────┼────────┬─────────┼──────┬─────────┼────────────┼──────────────
             │        │Departure│      │Departure│            │
             │        │  from   │      │  from   │            │
             │Average.│ normal. │Total.│ normal. │            │
 ────────────┼────────┼─────────┼──────┼─────────┼────────────┼──────────────
 GULF STATES.│        │         │      │         │            │
             │   °    │    °    │_Ins._│ _Ins._  │     °      │    _Ins._
 Jacksonville│      84│       +3│   0.4│     ‒1.1│          80│           6.2
 Miami       │      82│        0│   1.6│     ‒0.1│          82│           7.6
 Key West    │      82│       ‒2│   1.5│     +0.5│          84│           4.7
 Tampa       │      84│       +2│    T.│     ‒2.2│          81│           8.6
 Pensacola   │      82│       +1│   0.1│     ‒1.8│          81│           7.2
 Mobile      │      82│       +1│   0.6│     ‒1.1│          80│           6.8
 Montgomery  │      84│       +3│   0.6│     ‒0.6│          80│           4.2
 Anniston    │      80│       +2│   0.7│     ‒0.7│          76│           4.5
 Birmingham  │      82│       +1│   1.5│     +0.1│          79│           4.5
 Meridian    │      82│       +2│   2.3│     +1.3│          78│           3.6
 Vicksburg   │      82│       +1│   0.7│     ‒0.3│          81│           3.5
 New Orleans │      84│       +2│   0.1│     ‒1.0│          82│           5.6
 Shreveport  │      84│       +1│   0.2│     ‒0.7│          81│           2.2
 Little Rock │      84│       +3│  T.  │     ‒1.2│          79│           3.6
 Fort Smith  │      88│       +7│  T.  │     ‒1.1│          79│           3.7
 Bentonville │      82│       +3│   0.2│     ‒0.9│          76│           4.0
 Oklahoma    │      88│       +8│     0│     ‒0.7│          78│           3.2
 Abilene     │      84│       +1│     0│     ‒0.5│          81│           2.0
 Fort Worth  │      88│       +4│  T.  │     ‒0.6│          83│           1.9
 Dallas      │      88│         │  T.  │         │            │
 Palestine   │      84│       +2│  T.  │     ‒0.9│          80│           2.2
 Taylor      │      86│       +3│  T.  │     ‒0.7│          82│           2.5
 Houston     │      84│         │   0.1│         │            │
 Galveston   │      82│       ‒1│   0.1│     ‒0.8│          83│           5.0
 Corpus      │        │         │      │         │            │
   Christi   │      84│       +1│  T.  │     ‒0.4│          82│           2.3
 San Antonio │      84│       +1│     0│     ‒0.5│          82│           2.7
 Del Rio     │      84│       ‒2│     0│     ‒0.5│          84│           2.6
 OHIO VALLEY │        │         │      │         │            │
     AND     │        │         │      │         │            │
  TENNESSEE. │        │         │      │         │            │
 Memphis     │      84│       +3│  T.  │     ‒0.9│          79│           3.2
 Nashville   │      82│       +3│   0.4│     ‒0.5│          78│           3.5
 Chattanooga │      82│       +4│   1.0│        0│          76│           3.8
 Knoxville   │      80│       +4│  T.  │     ‒1.0│          75│           4.0
 Lexington   │      78│       +2│   0.6│     ‒0.3│          75│           3.6
 Louisville  │      80│       +1│   1.7│     +0.9│          76│           3.5
 Evansville  │      82│       +3│   1.1│     +0.3│          77│           3.2
 Indianapolis│      76│        0│   0.2│     ‒0.7│          74│           3.3
 Cincinnati  │      76│        0│   0.5│     ‒0.3│          74│           3.3
 Dayton      │      76│        0│   0.6│        0│          73│           3.0
 Columbus    │      74│       ‒1│   0.2│     ‒0.6│          73│           3.2
 Parkersburg │      76│        0│   0.5│     ‒0.3│          73│           3.5
 Elkins      │      70│       ‒1│   0.9│        0│          68│           3.6
 Pittsburgh  │      74│       ‒1│   0.1│     ‒0.9│          73│           3.2
 LAKE REGION.│        │         │      │         │            │
 Canton      │      66│       ‒3│   0.1│     ‒0.6│          67│           2.7
 Syracuse    │      68│       ‒3│  T.  │     ‒0.9│          69│           3.3
 Oswego      │      68│       ‒2│  T.  │     ‒0.7│          69│           2.7
 Buffalo     │      70│        0│   0.2│     ‒0.5│          69│           3.0
 Erie        │      70│       ‒1│   1.3│     +0.5│          70│           3.3
 Cleveland   │      72│       ‒1│   0.6│     ‒0.2│          70│           3.2
 Toledo      │      74│       +1│   0.1│     ‒0.6│          71│           2.7
 Detroit     │      74│       +2│   0.2│     ‒0.6│          70│           2.8
 Saginaw     │      72│       +1│   0.8│     ‒0.1│          69│           2.9
 Alpena      │      66│        0│   0.3│     ‒0.3│          64│           3.3
 Grand Rapids│      72│       ‒1│   0.2│     ‒0.6│          70│           2.6
 Chicago     │      74│       ‒1│   0.1│     ‒0.8│          73│           2.9
 Fort Wayne  │      74│         │   0.9│         │            │
 Milwaukee   │      72│       +2│   0.1│     ‒0.5│          69│           2.8
 Green Bay   │      70│        0│   0.8│        0│          67│           3.1
 Escanaba    │      66│       ‒1│   2.2│     +1.4│          64│           3.6
 Ludington   │      68│         │   0.3│         │            │
 Sault Ste.  │        │         │      │         │            │
   Marie     │      62│        0│   0.5│     ‒0.2│          61│           3.1
 Marquette   │      66│       +1│   0.2│     ‒0.4│          64│           2.9
 Duluth      │      70│       +5│   0.2│     ‒0.6│          63│           3.5
    UPPER    │        │         │      │         │            │
 MISSISSIPPI │        │         │      │         │            │
   VALLEY.   │        │         │      │         │            │
 St. Paul    │      72│        0│     0│     ‒0.8│          69│           3.5
 La Crosse   │      72│       ‒1│     0│     ‒0.8│          70│           3.4
 Madison     │      72│       ‒1│     0│     ‒0.6│          70│           3.2
 Charles City│      70│       ‒4│   1.1│     +0.4│          71│           3.4
 Dubuque     │      72│       ‒3│   0.6│     ‒0.3│          72│           3.0
 Davenport   │      74│       ‒1│   0.8│     +0.1│          73│           3.6
 Des Moines  │      78│       +2│   1.2│     +0.4│          73│           3.6
 Keokuk      │      78│       +1│   0.7│     ‒0.3│          75│           3.2
 Peoria      │      76│       +1│   1.1│     +0.5│          72│           2.9
 Terre Haute │      78│         │   0.8│         │            │
 Springfield,│        │         │      │         │            │
   Ill.      │      78│       +2│   1.0│     +0.4│          74│           2.8
 Hannibal    │      80│       +3│   0.9│     +0.1│          75│           3.4
 St. Louis   │      82│       +2│   0.7│     ‒0.1│          77│           2.7
 Cairo       │      84│       +5│     0│     ‒0.9│          77│           2.9
   PACIFIC   │        │         │      │         │            │
    COAST.   │        │         │      │         │            │
 Tatoosh     │        │         │      │         │            │
   Island    │      52│       ‒4│     0│     ‒0.3│          55│           2.1
 Seattle     │      62│       ‒2│     0│     ‒0.1│          63│           0.5
 North Head  │      54│       ‒4│  T.  │     ‒0.1│          58│           0.6
 Portland,   │        │         │      │         │            │
   Oreg.     │      66│       ‒2│     0│     ‒0.1│          67│           0.6
 Roseburg    │      68│       ‒1│     0│        0│          68│           0.3
 Eureka      │      54│       ‒2│     0│        0│          56│           0.1
 Red Bluff   │      86│       +4│     0│        0│          80│      T.
 Sacramento  │      78│       +4│     0│        0│          73│      T.
 San         │        │         │      │         │            │
   Francisco │      58│        0│     0│        0│          58│             0
 Fresno      │      84│       +1│     0│        0│          81│             0
 San Luis    │        │         │      │         │            │
   Obispo    │      66│       +2│     0│        0│          64│      T.
 Los Angeles │      70│       ‒1│     0│        0│          71│             0
 San Diego   │      68│        0│  T.  │   +T.   │          69│             0
   ATLANTIC  │        │         │      │         │            │
    COAST.   │        │         │      │         │            │
 Eastport    │      58│       ‒4│   0.6│     ‒0.1│          61│           3.3
 Portland,   │        │         │      │         │            │
   Me.       │      66│       ‒3│   0.1│     ‒0.8│          66│           3.6
 Burlington  │      66│       ‒2│  T.  │     ‒0.9│          66│           4.0
 Northfield  │      64│       ‒2│  T.  │     ‒1.1│          63│           3.9
 Concord     │      66│       ‒4│  T.  │     ‒1.0│          67│           3.7
 Boston      │      70│       ‒2│   0.1│     ‒0.9│          70│           4.0
 Nantucket   │      66│       ‒3│   0.3│     ‒0.4│          68│           3.0
 New Haven   │      70│       ‒2│   0.2│     ‒1.2│          70│           5.0
 Albany      │      70│       ‒2│   0.5│     ‒0.4│          70│           4.0
 Ithaca      │      68│       ‒3│  T.  │     ‒0.9│          69│           3.2
 Binghamton  │      68│       ‒2│     0│     ‒0.9│          68│           3.4
 New York    │      70│       ‒5│   0.1│     ‒1.2│          73│           4.5
 Scranton    │      68│       ‒4│   2.0│     +0.8│          69│           4.2
 Harrisburg  │      72│       ‒3│   1.0│     ‒0.3│          72│           4.2
 Philadelphia│      74│       ‒2│  T.  │     ‒1.4│          74│           4.6
 Trenton     │      72│       ‒3│  T.  │     ‒1.2│          73│           5.4
 Atlantic    │        │         │      │         │            │
   City      │      72│       ‒1│   0.4│     ‒0.6│          72│           4.3
 Baltimore   │      74│       ‒4│   0.3│     ‒1.0│          76│           4.2
 Washington  │      74│       ‒3│   1.4│        0│          74│           4.4
 Norfolk     │      78│        0│   1.4│     ‒0.1│          77│           6.0
 Richmond    │      76│       ‒3│   0.2│     ‒0.9│          78│           4.4
 Lynchburg   │      76│       ‒2│   0.2│     ‒0.9│          76│           4.2
 Wytheville  │      74│       +1│   0.5│     ‒0.7│          70│           4.5
 Asheville   │      74│       +2│   0.2│     ‒1.0│          70│           4.8
 Charlotte   │      80│       +1│  T.  │     ‒1.5│          77│           5.6
 Raleigh     │      78│       ‒1│   0.5│     ‒1.2│          77│           5.9
 Hatteras    │      80│       +2│   0.9│     ‒0.5│          78│           5.8
 Wilmington  │      80│       +1│   2.4│     +0.7│          78│           6.5
 Charleston  │      84│       +2│   1.5│     ‒0.1│          81│           7.0
 Greenville  │      80│         │   0.1│         │            │
 Columbia, S.│        │         │      │         │            │
   C.        │      82│       +1│   3.0│     +1.2│          80│           6.8
 Augusta     │      84│       +3│  T.  │     ‒1.3│          80│           5.6
 Atlanta     │      82│       +4│   1.2│     ‒0.2│          77│           4.5
 Macon       │      84│       +4│  T.  │     ‒1.4│          78│           4.2
 Savannah    │      84│       +3│   1.8│     +0.3│          79│           7.5
 Thomasville │      84│       +2│   0.1│     ‒1.2│          81│           5.0
   MOUNTAIN  │        │         │      │         │            │
   REGION.   │        │         │      │         │            │
 Havre       │      68│       ‒1│   0.2│     ‒0.2│          65│           1.3
 Kalispell   │      66│       +1│  T.  │     ‒0.1│          63│           0.9
 Helena      │      68│        0│   0.1│     ‒0.1│          66│           0.7
 Sheridan    │      70│       +3│   0.1│         │          65│
 Lander      │      72│       +3│  T.  │     ‒0.1│          66│           0.5
 Cheyenne    │      68│        0│   0.6│     +0.2│          66│           1.5
 Grand       │        │         │      │         │            │
   Junction  │      76│       ‒3│   0.3│     +0.1│          76│           1.0
 Denver      │      74│       +1│   0.9│     +0.5│          71│           1.3
 Pueblo      │      74│       ‒1│   0.2│     ‒0.3│          72│           1.6
 Amarillo    │      80│       +4│     0│     ‒0.5│          75│           2.8
 El Paso     │      80│        0│  T.  │     ‒0.4│          79│           1.7
 Roswell     │      80│       +1│  T.  │     ‒0.6│          77│           1.5
 Santa Fe    │      68│        0│   0.6│        0│          67│           2.4
 Flagstaff   │      64│       ‒1│   0.9│     +0.4│          63│           3.3
 Phoenix     │      88│       ‒3│   0.1│     ‒0.2│          89│           1.0
 Yuma        │      90│       ‒2│  T.  │        0│          90│           0.4
 Independence│      76│       ‒3│  T.  │        0│          76│           0.1
 Tonopah     │      72│       ‒2│     0│     ‒0.1│          72│           0.4
 Modena      │      70│        0│   0.7│     +0.3│          69│           1.8
 Salt Lake   │        │         │      │         │            │
   City      │      78│       +1│     0│     ‒0.1│          74│           0.8
 Reno        │      72│       +3│  T.  │        0│          67│           0.2
 Winnemucca  │      70│       ‒3│  T.  │   +T.   │          71│           0.2
 Pocatello   │      74│       +2│  T.  │     ‒0.1│          70│           0.6
 Boise       │      76│       +2│  T.  │        0│          72│           0.2
 Lewiston    │      78│       +3│     0│     ‒0.1│          74│           0.4
 Baker       │      68│       +2│  T.  │     ‒0.1│          65│           0.4
 Walla Walla │      76│       +1│     0│   ‒T.   │          74│           0.4
 Spokane     │      72│       +2│  T.  │     ‒0.1│          68│           0.5
   MISSOURI  │        │         │      │         │            │
   VALLEY.   │        │         │      │         │            │
 Springfield,│        │         │      │         │            │
   Mo.       │      80│       +3│   2.4│     +1.4│          75│           4.3
 Columbia,   │        │         │      │         │            │
   Mo.       │      82│       +5│   1.2│     +0.6│          75│           3.0
 Kansas City │      80│       +2│  T.  │     ‒1.1│          76│           4.8
 St. Joseph  │      80│         │   0.1│         │            │
 Topeka      │      82│       +4│   0.6│     ‒0.5│          76│           4.3
 Iola        │      82│       +3│   0.1│     ‒0.7│          76│           3.5
 Wichita     │      82│       +2│  T.  │     ‒0.8│          78│           3.1
 Dodge City  │      82│       +4│     0│     ‒0.7│          76│           2.6
 Concordia   │      78│       ‒1│   0.2│     ‒0.6│          76│           2.8
 North Platte│      76│       +3│   0.7│        0│          71│           2.5
 Lincoln     │      76│       ‒1│   1.5│     +0.7│          74│           3.7
 Omaha       │      76│       ‒1│   2.1│     +1.2│          74│           3.6
 Sioux City  │      74│       ‒1│   4.7│     +3.9│          73│           3.0
 Valentine   │      74│        0│   1.6│     +0.8│          71│           2.8
 Rapid City  │      70│       ‒1│   1.2│     +0.6│          69│           2.1
 Pierre      │      74│       ‒2│   1.0│     +0.5│          73│           2.0
 Huron       │      72│        0│   0.4│     ‒0.2│          69│           2.6
 Moorhead    │      74│       +6│  T.  │     ‒0.6│          66│           3.1
 Devils Lake │      70│       +2│   0.2│     ‒0.5│          65│           2.8
 Bismarck    │      70│        0│   2.0│     +1.6│          67│           2.0
 Williston   │      70│        0│   0.9│     +0.5│          68│           1.3
 ────────────┴────────┴─────────┴──────┴─────────┴────────────┴──────────────

             NOTE.—T indicates amount too small for measurement.

[Illustration: CHART 1.—DEPARTURE OF TEMPERATURE FROM THE NORMAL, WEEK
ENDING 8 A. M., AUGUST 1, 1922.]

[Illustration: CHART 2.—PRECIPITATION, INCHES, WEEK ENDING 8 A. M.,
AUGUST 1, 1922.]

-----

Footnote 1:

  5‒year average.

Footnote 2:

  Cars of 500 bus. each in intermediate States and 530 bus. each in
  early States.

Footnote 3:

  California (southern district), Louisiana, and Texas (southern
  district).

Footnote 4:

  Week ending Friday, July 28.

Footnote 5:

  Denver not included.

Footnote 6:

  The quantities in this column include fish frozen when imported which
  do not appear in the fourth column.

Footnote 7:

  Catfish, flounders, pike perches, and pike or pickerel scup,
  shellfish, sturgeon or spoonbill cat, and suckers were included with
  miscellaneous frozen fish prior to July 15, 1922.

Footnote 8:

  Ciscoes were combined under one heading prior to Jan. 15, 1922.

Footnote 9:

  Steelhead trout were included with salmon (all other) prior to Jan.
  15, 1922.

Footnote 10:

  Flats.

Footnote 11:

  Revised figures, including late reports.

Footnote 12:

  Total stocks include all stocks held by manufacturers reporting.

Footnote 13:

  Unsold stocks include that portion of total stocks not covered by
  current sales or future delivery contracts.

Footnote 14:

  Prices reported per pound for case goods apply to milk powder packed
  in 1‒lb cans.

Footnote 15:

  Includes the highest and lowest prices reported.

Footnote 16:

  Includes the highest and lowest “Bulk of Sales” prices reported by
  different firms.

Footnote 17:

  Ky. Cobblers, 100 lbs.

Footnote 18:

  Car-lot sales.

Footnote 19:

  Kans. Early Ohios, sacked per 100 lbs.

Footnote 20:

  Unit basis.

Footnote 21:

  Per 100 melons.

Footnote 22:

  Mo. Tom Watsons.

Footnote 23:

  Tex., per 100 lbs.

Footnote 24:

  Ark. Salmon Tints.

Footnote 25:

  Ark. Elbertas.

Footnote 26:

  Ill. early varieties.

Footnote 27:

  Bulk per 100 lbs.

Footnote 28:

  Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Portland, Me., and Newport
  News.

Footnote 29:

  New Orleans, Galveston, Texas City, and Port Arthur, Texas.

Footnote 30:

  Seattle, Portland, Oreg., Tacoma, Astoria, and San Francisco.

Footnote 31:

  Hay quotations represent average of cash sales at these markets.

Footnote 32:

  Nominal.

Footnote 33:

  The differences are stated in terms of hundredths of a cent per pound.
  By “On” is meant that the stated number of points is to be added to
  the price of Middling and by “Off” is meant that the stated number of
  points is to be subtracted from the price of Middling.

Footnote 34:

  These grades are not tenderable on future contracts made subject to
  section 5 of the United States cotton futures act as amended, on the
  future exchanges at New York and New Orleans.

Footnote 35:

  On.

Footnote 36:

  Total sales.

------------------------------------------------------------------------



                          TRANSCRIBER’S NOTES


 1. Silently corrected typographical errors and variations in spelling.
 2. Retained anachronistic, non-standard, and uncertain spellings as
      printed.
 3. Footnotes have been re-indexed using numbers and collected together
      at the end of the last chapter.
 4. Enclosed italics font in _underscores_.
 5. Enclosed bold font in =equals=.
 6. Superscripts are denoted by a caret before a single superscript
      character or a series of superscripted characters enclosed in
      curly braces, e.g. M^r. or M^{ister}.





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