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Title: Index of the Project Gutenberg Works of Maturin Murray Ballou
Author: Ballou, Maturin Murray
Language: English
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WORKS OF

MATURIN MURRAY BALLOU


CONTENTS

##  THE SEA-WITCH

##  THE CIRCASSIAN SLAVE

##  THE DUKE'S PRIZE

##  THE HEART'S SECRET

##  FOOT-PRINTS OF TRAVEL

##  DUE WEST

##  HISTORY OF CUBA

##  SCANDINAVIA AND RUSSIA

##  THE STORY OF MALTA

##  THE SOUTHERN CROSS

##  BIOGRAPHY OF REV. HOSEA BALLOU

##  EQUATORIAL AMERICA

##  FANNY CAMPBELL

##  THE NEW ELDORADO

GENIUS IN SUNSHINE AND SHADOW

PEARLS OF THOUGHT



TABLES OF CONTENTS OF VOLUMES



THE SEA-WITCH
Or, The African Quadroon A Story Of The Slave Coast.
By Lieutenant Murray Ballou


CONTENTS
I.  	OUTWARD BOUND.
II.  	CAPTAIN WILL RATLIN.
III.  	THE GALE.
IV.  	BRAMBLE PARK.
V.  	THE NAVAL OFFICER.
VI.  	THE WRECK.
VII.  	THE SEA WITCH.
VIII.  	THE QUADROON.
IX.  	THE ATTACK.
X.  	THE DUEL.
XI.  	THE HUES OF LOVE.
XII.  	THE CONFLICT.
XIII.  	THE TRIAL.
XIV.  	THE BROTHERS.
XV.  	THE ESCAPE.
XVI.  	THE CANNIBALS.
XVII.  	THE POISONED BARB.
XVIII.  	THE DENOUEMENT.



THE CIRCASSIAN SLAVE
Or, The Sultan's Favorite
A Story of Constantinople and the Caucasus
By Lieutenant Murray Ballou


CONTENTS
I.  	THE SLAVE MARKET.
II.  	THE SULTAN'S HAREM.
III.  	THE BEDOUIN ARABS.
IV.  	VALES OF CIRCASSIA.
V.  	THE SLAVE SHIP.
VI.  	A SINGULAR MEETING.
VII.  	THE SULTAN'S PRISONER.
VIII.  	PUNISHMENT OF THE SACK.
IX.  	THE LOVER'S STRATAGEM.
X.  	THE SERENADE.
XI.  	THE ELOPEMENT.
XII.  	THE STRUGGLE FOR LIFE.
XIII.  	THE ESCAPE FROM THE HAREM.
XIV.  	THE CHASE.
XV.  	HAPPY CONCLUSION.



THE DUKE'S PRIZE.
A Story Of Art And Heart In Florence
By Lieutenant Maturin Murray Ballou


CONTENTS
PREFACE.
CHAPTER I.	FLORENCE.
CHAPTER II.	OUR HERO AND HEROINE.
CHAPTER III.	A RHINE LEGEND.
CHAPTER IV.	THE DUKE'S PRIZE.
CHAPTER V.	AWARDING THE PRIZE.
CHAPTER VI.	THE MASQUERADE BALL.
CHAPTER VII.	THE RHINE LEGEND COMPLETED.
CHAPTER VIII.	A RIVAL.
CHAPTER IX.	THE DUEL.
CHAPTER X.	THE ELOPEMENT.
CHAPTER XI.	THE INTERCEPTED LETTER.
CHAPTER XII.	NEPHEW AND UNCLE.
CHAPTER XIII.	THE ROADSIDE INN.
CHAPTER XIV.	THE FINALE.



THE HEART'S SECRET
Or, The Fortunes Of A Soldier.
By Lieutenant Murray Ballou


CONTENTS
PREFACE.
THE HEART'S SECRET
CHAPTER I.	THE ACCIDENT.
CHAPTER II.	THE BELLE AND THE SOLDIER.
CHAPTER III.	A SUDDEN INTRODUCTION.
CHAPTER IV.	CUBAN BANDITTI.
CHAPTER V.	THE WOUNDED SOLDIER.
CHAPTER VI.	THE CHALLENGE.
CHAPTER VII.	THE PRISONER.
CHAPTER VIII.	THE FAREWELL.
CHAPTER IX.	THE EXECUTION SCENE.
CHAPTER X.	THE BANISHMENT.
CHAPTER XI.	THE PROMOTION.
CHAPTER XII.	THE QUEEN AND THE SOLDIER.
CHAPTER XIII.	UNREQUITED LOVE.
CHAPTER XIV.	THE SURPRISE.
CHAPTER XV.	THE SERENAPE.
CHAPTER XVI.	A DISCOVERY.
CHAPTER XVII.	THE ASSASSIN.
CHAPTER XVIII.	THE DISGUISE.
CHAPTER XIX.	THE AVOWAL.
CHAPTER XX.	HAPPY FINALE.



FOOT-PRINTS OF TRAVEL;
Or Journeyings In Many Lands
By Maturin M. Ballou


CONTENTS.
PREFACE
CHAPTER I.
Crossing the American Continent.—Niagara Falls.—Utah.—Representatives of Native Indian Tribes.—City of San Francisco.—Sea Lions.—The Yosemite Valley.—An Indian Hiding-Place.—The Mariposa Grove of Big Trees.—Chinatown in San Francisco.—Through the Golden Gate.—Navigating the Pacific.—Products of the Ocean.—Sea Gulls.—Harbor and City of Honolulu.

CHAPTER II.
Discoveries of Captain Cook.—Vegetation.—Hawaiian Women on Horse-back.—The Nuuanu Valley.—The Native Staff of Life.—The Several Islands of the Group.—Resident Chinamen.—Raising Sugar-Cane.—On the Ocean.—Yokohama, Japan.—Habits of the People.—A Remarkable Idol.—Tokio, the Political Capital.—The Famous Inland Sea of Japan.—Nagasaki.—Products and Progress of Japan.

CHAPTER III.
Through the Yellow and Chinese Seas.—Hong Kong.—Peculiarities of the Chinese at Home.—Native Women.—City of Canton.—Charitable Organizations.—Chinese Culture.—National Characteristics.—Sail for Singapore.—A Water-spout.—A Tropical Island.—Loca Pen-Pictures.—The Island of Penang.—An Indolent Native Race.—The Cocoanut Tree.—Palm Wine.—Tropical Fruits.

CHAPTER IV.
Crossing the Indian Ocean.—The Island of Ceylon.—Harbor of Colombo.—The Equatorial Forest.—Native Costumes.—Vegetation of [Pg vi]Ceylon.—Prehistoric Monuments.—Departure for Australia.—The Stars at Sea.—The Great Island-Continent.—The Gold Product—Divisions of the Country.—City of Adelaide.—Public Garden.—West Australia.—Melbourne, Capital of Victoria.—Street Scenes.—Chinese Quarter.

CHAPTER V.
Gold-fields of Australia.—Kangaroos.—Big Gum Trees.—Largest Trees in the World.—Wild Bird Life.—Gold-seeking.—City of Sydney.—Botanical Garden.—Public Institutions.—Sheep-raising.—Brisbane, Capital of Queensland.—The Aboriginal Race.—Native Legends.—The Boomerang.—Island of Tasmania.—How named.—Launceston.—Hobart, the Capital.—Local Scenes.—A Prosperous Country.

CHAPTER VI.
Embark for New Zealand.—The Albatross.—Experiments with Sea Water.—Oil upon the Waves.—Geography of New Zealand.—Mineral Wealth.—City of Dunedin.—Public Schools.—Native Cannibals.—Christchurch.—A Wonderful Bird.—Wellington, Capital of New Zealand.—Habits of the Natives.—The Race of Maori Indians.—Liability to Earthquakes.—A Submerged Volcano in Cook's Strait.

CHAPTER VII.
City of Auckland, New Zealand.—A Land of Volcanoes.—Suburbs of the Northern Metropolis.—The Kauri-Tree.—Native Flowers.—The Hot Lake District.—A New Zealand Forest.—A Vegetable Boa-constrictor.—Sulphurous Hot Springs.—Fiery Caldrons.—Indian town of Ohinemutu.—Typical Home of the Natives.—Maori Manners and Customs.—The Favorable Position of New Zealand.—Its Probable Future.

CHAPTER VIII.
Arrival in India.—Insect and Reptile Life.—Madura.—City of Trichinopoly.—Car of Juggernaut.—Temple of Tanjore.—Travelling in India.—Madras.—Street Dancing Girls.—Arrival at Calcutta.—Cremating [Pg vii]the Dead.—A Fashionable Driveway.—The Himalayan Mountains.—Apex of the Globe.—Tea Gardens of India.—A Wretched Peasantry.—Ancient Ruins.—City of Benares.—Worship of Animals.—Cawnpore.—Delhi.—Agra.—A Splendid Tomb.

CHAPTER IX.
Native City of Jeypore.—Poppy and Opium-raising.—Bombay.—The Parsees.—The Towers of Silence.—Historical View of India.—Voyage to the Red Sea.—Cairo, Capital of Egypt.—Local Scenes.—The Turkish Bazaars.—Pyramids of Gizeh.—The Sphinx.—The Desert.—Egypt, Past and Present.—Voyage to Malta.—City of Valetta.—Church of St. John.—Gibraltar.—View from the Signal Station.—English Outposts.

CHAPTER X.
Tangier, Capital of Morocco.—An Oriental City.—Slave Market.—Characteristic Street Scenes.—Malaga, Spain.—A Neglected Country.—Grenada.—The Alhambra.—The Banished Moors.—Cordova and its Cathedral-Mosque.—Madrid, Capital of Spain.—Museo Art Gallery.—Sunday in the Metropolis.—Toledo.—The Escurial.—Burgos.—San Sebastian.—Bayonne.—Spain, Past and Present.—Bordeaux.—Rural Scenery in France.

CHAPTER XI.
City of Paris.—Sunday in the French Capital.—The Flower Market.—Notre Dame.—The Morgue.—Père la Chaise.—The Story of Joan of Arc.—Educational Advantages.—City of Lyons.—Marseilles.—Nice.—Cimies.—Mentone.—The Principality of Monaco.—A Gambling Resort.—Mediterranean Scenes.—Over the Corniche Road.—City of Genoa.—Marble Palaces.—Italian Navigation.—The Campo Santo or Burial Ground.

CHAPTER XII.
Port of Leghorn.—Ancient City of Pisa.—Remarkable Monuments.—The Bay of Naples.—Neapolitan Beggars.—A Favorite Drive.—Out-of-door Life.—Vesuvius.—Art Treasures of the Museum.—Pompeii.—Environs [Pg viii]of Naples.—Rome, the "Eternal City."—Local Scenes.—Artists' Models.—Favorite Promenade.—The Coliseum.—St. Peter's.—Florence and its Environs.—Art Treasures.—Home of Dante and Michael Angelo.

CHAPTER XIII.
Venice.—The Gondola.—On the Grand Canal.—Venetian History.—Piazza of St. Mark.—Cathedral of San Marco.—The Campanile.—Academy of Fine Arts.—Doge's Palace.—Tombs of Titian and Canova.—Milan.—The Wonderful Cathedral.—Original Picture of the Last Supper.—Olden City of Pavia.—Innspruck, Capital of the Tyrol.—Among the Alps.—Salzburg, Birthplace of Mozart.—Industries of German Women.

CHAPTER XIV.
Vienna, the Northern Paris.—Art Galleries and Museum.—Prague, Capital of Bohemia.—Ancient Dungeons.—Historic Mention.—Dresden, Capital of Saxony.—The Green Vaults.—Berlin, Capital of Prussia.—Hamburg.—Copenhagen, Capital of Denmark.—The Baltic Sea.—Danish Progress.—Thorwaldsen.—Educational.—Palace of Rosenborg.—The Round Tower.—Elsinore and Shakespeare's Hamlet.

CHAPTER XV.
Gottenburg, Sweden.—Intelligence of the People.—The Gotha Canal.—Tröllhatta Falls.—Christiania, Capital of Norway.—Legal Code.—Public Buildings.—Ancient Viking Ship.—Brief Summers.—Swedish Women in the Field.—Flowers in Arctic Regions.—Norwegian Lakes.—Animals of the North.—Mountains and Glaciers.—A Land of Fjords, Cascades, and Lakes.—Dwellings situated like Eagles' Nests.

CHAPTER XVI.
Bergen, Norway.—Local Products and Scenes.—Environs of Bergen.—The Angler's Paradise.—Tröndhjem.—Story of King Olaf.—A Cruel Imprisonment.—Journey Northward.—Night turned into [Pg ix]Day.—Coast of Norway.—Education.—The Arctic Circle.—Bodöe.—The Lofoden Islands.—The Maelström.—Hardy Arctic Fishermen.—The Polar Sea.—Varied Attractions of Norway to Travellers and Artists.

CHAPTER XVII.
Peculiar Sleeplessness.—Tromsöe.—The Aurora Borealis.—Short-lived Summer.—Flowers.—Trees.—Laplanders and their Possessions.—Reindeers.—Customs of the Lapps.—Search for Whales.—Arctic Birds.—Influence of the Gulf Stream.—Hammerfest.—The Far North Cape and the Polar Ocean.—The Midnight Sun.—Stockholm, Capital of Sweden.—Royal Palace.—Historic Upsala.—Linnæus, the Naturalist.—Crossing the Baltic and Gulf of Finland.

CHAPTER XVIII.
Åbo.—Helsingfors, Capital of Finland.—Remarkable Fortress of Sweaborg.—Fortifications of Cronstadt.—Up the Neva to St. Petersburg.—Grandest City of Northern Europe.—Street Scenes in Russia.—Occupations of the Sabbath.—The Drosky.—Royal Palaces of the Tzar.—Noble Art Gallery.—Celebrated Library.—Public Monuments.—Winter Season.

CHAPTER XIX.
Palace of Petershoff.—Peter the Great.—Religious Denominations.—On the Way to Moscow.—Through the Forests.—City of Tver.—The Volga.—Water-ways of Russia.—Picturesque Moscow.—The Kremlin.—Churches.—Cathedral of St. Basil.—Treasury of the Kremlin.—Royal Robes and Crowns.—A Page from History.—University of Moscow.—Sacred Pigeons.—Prevalence of Beggary in the Oriental Capital.

CHAPTER XX.
Nijni-Novgorod.—Valley of the Volga.—One of the Great Rivers of the World.—Famous Annual Fair-Ground.—Variety of Merchandise.—A Conglomerate of Races.—A Large Temporary City.—From Moscow to Warsaw.—Wolves.—The Granary of Europe.—Polish Peasants.—City of Warsaw.—Topography of the Capital.—Royal Residences.—Botanical Gardens.—Political Condition of Poland.—Commercial Prosperity.—Shameful Despotism.

[Pg x]
CHAPTER XXI.
Munich, Capital of Bavaria.—Trying Employments of the Women.—A Beer-Drinking Community.—Frankfort-on-the-Main.—Luther's Home.—Goethe's Birthplace.—Cologne on the Rhine.—The Grand Cathedral.—Antwerp, Belgium.—Rubens' Burial Place.—Art Treasures in the Cathedral.—Switzerland.—Bâle.—Lausanne.—Geneva.—Lake Leman.—Vevay.—Berne, Capital of Switzerland.—Lucerne.—Zurich.—Schaffhausen.

CHAPTER XXII.
London, the Metropolis of the World.—Some of its Institutions.—The Tower of London.—Statistics of the Great City.—Ancient Chester.—Rural England.—Stratford-on-Avon.—Edinburgh, Scotland.—Remarkable Monuments.—Abbotsford.—Rural Scotland.—Glasgow.—Greenock.—Across the Irish Sea to Belfast.—Queen's College.—Dublin, the Capital of Ireland.—Grand Public Buildings.

CHAPTER XXIII.
Nassau, New Providence.—Trees, Flowers, and Fruits.—Curious Sea Gardens.—The Finny Tribes.—Fresh Water Supply.—Tropical Skies.—The Gulf Stream.—Santiago de Cuba.—Cienfuegos.—Sugar Plantations.—Cuban Fruits.—Peculiarities of the Banana.—A Journey across the Island to Matanzas.—Inland Experiences.—Characteristic Scenes.—The Royal Palm.

CHAPTER XXIV.
Discovery of Cuba by Columbus.—The Native Race.—Historical Matters.—Headquarters of Spanish Military Operations in the West.—Invasion of Mexico by Cortez.—African Slave Trade.—Peculiarities of the Caribbean Sea.—Geography of the Island of Cuba.—City of Matanzas.—Havana, the Capital.—The Alameda.—The Cathedral.—Military Mass.—A Wonderfully Fertile Island.—Reflections.

ILLUSTRATIONS
CAPTAIN COOK, THE DISCOVERER.     FRONTISPIECE.
MIRROR LAKE, YOSEMITE VALLEY.
HAWAIIANS EATING POI.
MODE OF TRAVELLING IN JAPAN. A JINRIKSHA.
A CHINESE CART.
A SINGHALESE DANCER.
BOTANICAL GARDENS AT ADELAIDE, AUSTRALIA.
A KANGAROO HUNT IN AUSTRALIA.
EMU HUNTING IN AUSTRALIA.
SCENE ON THE SOUTH ESK RIVER, TASMANIA.
A GREAT BANYAN TREE AT CALCUTTA.
MOSQUE AT DELHI, INDIA.
A WELL IN THE DESERT BETWEEN SUEZ AND CAIRO.
A LADY OF CAIRO AS SEEN IN PUBLIC.
GENERAL VIEW OF THE ALHAMBRA.
A RECEPTION HALL IN THE ALHAMBRA.
LEANING TOWER OF PISA, CATHEDRAL AND BAPTISTERY.
A STREET IN POMPEII.
THE COLISEUM AT ROME.
SCENE ON THE GRAND CANAL, VENICE.
BRIDGE CROSSING THE MOLDAU.
THE CATHEDRAL OF ST. ISAACS AT ST. PETERSBURG.
TOWER OF THE HOUSE OF PARLIAMENT.
THE TOWER OF LONDON.
EDINBURGH CASTLE.



DUE WEST
Or, Round The World In Ten Months
By Maturin M. Ballou
CONTENTS.
CHAPTER I.
Synopsis of the Journey.—Crossing the Continent.—A Great Midland City.—Utah and the Mormons.—The Sierra Nevada.—San Francisco.—A Herd of Sea-Lions.—Possibilities of California.—The Love of Flowers.—Public School System.—Excursion to the Yosemite.—An Indian Stronghold.—Description of the Valley.—Passage of the Mountains.—Caught in a Snow-Storm.—A Forest of Feathers.—The Mammoth Trees of California.—Passing the Golden Gate.—Voyage across the Pacific.—A Lost Day

CHAPTER II.
Landing in Japan.—Characteristic Street Scenes.—Native Bazars.—Women of Yokohama.—Excursion into the Country.—Visit to Kamakura.—Peculiar Scenes on the Road.—A Wonderful Bronze Statue.—Popular Religions of the Country.—The Hakone Pass.—A Youthful Mother.—Native Jugglers.—Temple of Shiba.—Review of the Soldiery.—Ludicrous Sights.—A Native Fair at Tokio.—A Poor Japanese Woman's Prayer

CHAPTER III.
Foreign Influence in Japan.—Progress of the People.—Traveling Inland.—Fertility of the Soil.—Grand Temples and Shrines at Nikko.—The Left-Handed Artist.—Japanese Art.—City of Kobé.—Kioto and its Temples.—Idol Worship.—Native Amusements.—Morals in Japan.—Lake Biwa.—Osaka on a Gala Day.—The Inland Sea.—Island of Pappenburg.—The Tarpeian Rock of Japan.—Nagasaki.—Girls Coaling a Ship.—National Products

[Pg x]
CHAPTER IV.
Sail for Hong Kong.—Ocean Storms.—Sunset at Sea.—A Water-Spout.—Arrival in China.—Typhoon Bay.—Manners and Customs.—In and about Hong Kong.—Public Buildings.—Voyage up the Pearl River.—City of Canton.—Strangest of Strange Cities.—Opium Dens.—Temple of Honan.—The Worship of Swine.—Praying with a Fan.—Local Peculiarities.—Half Round the World.—Singapore.—A Tiger Hunt.—Burial at Sea.—Penang.—The Wonderful Palm

CHAPTER V.
Sailing Due West.—The Indian Ocean.—Strange Sights at Sea.—Island of Ceylon.—Singhalese Canoes.—Colombo.—A Land of Slaves.—Native Town.—Singhalese Women.—Fantastic Nurses.—Local Pictures.—Cinnamon Gardens.—Wild Elephants.—Lavishness of Tropical Nature.—Curious Birds and their Nests.—Ancient Kandy.—Temple of Maligawan.—Religious Ceremonies.—Life of the Natives.—Inland Scenery.—Fruits.—Precious Stones.—Coffee Plantations.—Great Antiquity of Ceylon

CHAPTER VI.
Arrival in India.—Tuticorin.—Madura.—Bungalows.—Reptiles and Insects.—Wonderful Pagoda.—Sacred Elephants.—Trichinopoly and its Temples.—Bishop Heber.—Native Silversmiths.—Tanjore.—The Rajah's Palace.—Pagoda and an Immense Stone Idol.—Southern India.—City of Madras.—Want of a Harbor.—In and about the Capital.—Voyage through the Bay of Bengal.—The Hoogly River.—Political Capital of India.—A Crazy King.—The Himalayas.—Sunset and Sunrise at Darjeeling

CHAPTER VII.
From Calcutta to Benares.—Miles of Poppy Fields.—Ruined Temples.—The Mecca of Hindostan.—Banks of the Sacred Ganges.—Idolatry at its Height.—Monkey Temple.—The Famous River Front of the Holy City.—Fanaticism.—Cremating [Pg xi]the Dead.—A Pestilential City.—Visit to a Native Palace.—From Benares to Cawnpore.—A Beautiful Statue.—English Rule in India.—Delhi.—The Mogul Dynasty.—Lahore.—Umritsar.—Agra.—The Taj Mahal.—Royal Palace and Fort.—The Famous Pearl Mosque

CHAPTER VIII.
From Agra to Jeypore.—An Independent Province.—A Unique Indian City.—Wild Animals.—Elephant Traveling.—Trapping Tigers.—A Royal Palace.—The Harem.—Native Rule.—Wild Monkeys and Peacocks.—Long Journey across Country.—Bombay.—The Rival of Calcutta.—The Parsees.—Towers of Silence.—Feeding the Vultures.—A Remarkable Institution.—Island of Elephanta.—Street Jugglers.—Crossing the Sea of Arabia.—The Southern Cross.—Aden.—Passage up the Red Sea.—Landing at Suez.—Traveling in Egypt

CHAPTER IX.
Cairo and the Arabian Nights.—Street Scenes and Cries.—Camels and Donkeys.—Turkish Bazars in Old Cairo.—Water-Carriers.—The Pyramids of Gizeh.—The Sphinx.—Interesting Visit to a Native House.—Mosque of Mehemet Ali.—The Rotten Row of Cairo.—The Khedive's Palace.—Egyptian Museum.—Mosque of Amer.—Whirling and Howling Dervishes.—Suez Canal.—Ismailia and Port Said.—Island of Malta.—City of Valetta.—Palace of the Knights.—Bird's-eye View

CHAPTER X.
Voyage through the Mediterranean.—Gibraltar on Sunday.—Beautiful Alameda.—Visit to the Famous Fortress.—Wild Monkeys.—Cannon and Flowers.—Tangier.—Morocco.—Straits of Gibraltar.—A Moorish City of To-day.—Local Scenes.—A Private Museum.—The Governor's Palace.—Rusty Keys.—The Typical Moor.—The Slave Market.—Oriental Tableaux.—Visit to Washington Mount.—A Cup of Moorish Coffee.—From Gibraltar to Malaga.—Spain.—The City of Raisins and Sweet Wine

[Pg xii]
CHAPTER XI.
From Malaga to Granada.—Military Escort—A Beautiful Valley.—A Dream Realized in the Alhambra.—The Moor in his Glory.—Tangible Poetry.—A Brief Legend.—The Generalife.—The Moor's Seat.—The Home of the Gypsies.—A Gold Bearing River.—A Beautiful Residence.—Early Home of the Ex-Empress Eugénie.—City of Granada.—Spanish Beggars.—The Remarkable Tomb of Ferdinand and Isabella.—French Vandals.—The Cathedral.—Precious Relic.—The Cartuja.—Love of Music

CHAPTER XII.
Granada to Cordova.—An Antique City.—The Guadalquivir.—Old Roman Bridge.—The Grand Mosque-Cathedral of Cordova.—Court of Orange-Trees.—Army of Beggars.—From Cordova to Madrid.—Local Characteristics of the Capital.—The Gate of the Sun.—The King and Queen in Public.—The Royal Palace.—Spanish Ladies and Gentlemen.—The Fan.—The Picture-Gallery of Madrid.—National Sport of the Bull-Fight.—Cowardice!—Interesting Visit to the City of Toledo.—The Escurial

CHAPTER XIII.
From Madrid to Burgos.—Through a Barren Country.—The Cathedral of Burgos.—Monastery of Miraflores.—Local Pictures.—A Spanish Inn.—Convent of Las Huelgas.—From Burgos to San Sebastian.—Northern Spain.—A Spanish Watering Place.—Bayonne.—Lower Pyrenees.—Biarritz.—A Basque Postilion.—A Pleasant Drive.—On Leaving Spain.—Sunday and Balloons at Bordeaux.—On to Paris.—Antwerp and its Art Treasures.—Embarking for America.—End of the Long Journey



HISTORY OF CUBA
Notes of a Traveller in the Tropics.
Maturin M. Ballou


CONTENTS
CHAPTER I.
The Island of Cuba—Early colonists—Island aborigines—First importation of slaves—Cortez and his followers—Aztecs—The law of races—Mexican aborigines—Valley of Mexico—Pizarro—The end of heroes—Retributive justice—Decadence of Spanish power—History of Cuba—The rovers of the gulf—Havana fortified—The tyrant Velasquez—Office of Captain-general—Loyalty of the Cubans—Power of the captain-general—Cupidity of the government—The slave-trade—The British take Havana—General Don Luis de las Casas—Don Francisco de Arranjo—Improvement, moral and physical, of Cuba,	9
CHAPTER II.
The constitution of 1812—Revolution of La Granja—Political aspect of the island—Discontent among the Cubans—The example before them—Simon Bolivar, the Liberator—Revolutions of 1823 and 1826—General Lorenzo and the constitution—The assumption of extraordinary power by Tacon—Civil war threatened—Tacon sustained by royal authority—Despair of the Cubans—Military rule—A foreign press established—Programme of the liberal party—General O'Donnell—The spoils—Influence of the climate,	25
CHAPTER III.
Armed intervention—Conspiracy of Cienfuegos and Trinidad—General Narciso Lopez—The author's views on the subject—Inducements to revolt—Enormous taxation—Scheme of the patriots—Lopez's first landing, in 1850—Taking of Cardinas—Return of the invaders—Effect upon the Cuban authorities—Roncali recalled—New captain-general—Lopez's second expedition—Condition of the Invaders—Vicissitudes—Col. Crittenden—Battle of Las Pozas—Superiority of courage—Battle of Las Frias—Death of Gen. Enna—The fearful finale of the expedition,	38
CHAPTER IV.
Present condition of Cuba—Secret treaty with France and England—British plan for the Africanization of the island—Sale of Cuba—Measures of General Pezuela—Registration of slaves—Intermarriage of blacks and whites—Contradictory proclamations—Spanish duplicity—A Creole's view of the crisis and the prospect,	54
CHAPTER V.[Pg vii]
Geographical position of the island—Its size—The climate—Advice to invalids—Glance at the principal cities—Matanzas—Puerto Principe—Santiago de Cuba—Trinidad—The writer's first view of Havana—Importance of the capital—Its literary institutions—Restriction on Cuban youths and education—Glance at the city streets—Style of architecture—Domestic arrangements of town houses—A word about Cuban ladies—Small feet—Grace of manners and general characteristics,	66
CHAPTER VI.
Contrast between Protestant and Catholic communities—Catholic churches—Sabbath scenes in Havana—Devotion of the common people—The Plaza de Armas—City squares—The poor man's opera—Influence of music—La Dominica—The Tacon Paseo—The Tacon Theatre—The Cathedral—Tomb of Columbus over the altar—Story of the great Genoese pilot—His death—Removal of remains—The former great wealth of the church in Cuba—Influence of the priests,	80
CHAPTER VII.
Nudity of children and slaves—The street of the merchants—The currency of Cuba—The Spanish army in the island—Enrolment of blacks—Courage of Spanish troops—Treatment by the government—The garrote—A military execution—The market-men and their wares—The milk-man and his mode of supply—Glass windows—Curtains for doors—The Campo Santo, or burial-place of Havana—Treatment of the dead—The prison—The fish-market of the capital,	95
CHAPTER VIII.
The story of Marti, the smuggler,	108
CHAPTER IX.
The lottery at Havana—Hospitality of the Spaniards—Flattery—Cuban ladies—Castilian, Parisian and American politeness—The bonnet in Cuba—Ladies' dresses—The fan—Jewelry and its wear—Culture of flowers—Reflections—A most peculiar narcotic—Cost of living on the island—Guines—The cock-pit—Training of the birds—The garden of the world—Birds of the tropics—Condition of agriculture—Night-time—The Southern Cross—Natural resources of Cuba—Her wrongs and oppressions,	116
CHAPTER X.
The volante and its belongings—The ancient town of Regla—The arena for the bull-fights at Havana—A bull-fight as witnessed by the author at Regla—A national passion with the Spanish people—Compared with old Roman sports—Famous bull-fighters—Personal description of Cuban ladies—Description of the men—Romance and the tropics—The nobility of Cuba—Sugar noblemen—The grades of society—The yeomanry of the island—Their social position—What they might be—Love of gambling,	131
CHAPTER XI.[Pg viii]
A sugar plantation—Americans employed—Slaves on the plantations—A coffee plantation—Culture of coffee, sugar and tobacco—Statistics of agriculture—The cucullos, or Cuban fire-fly—Novel ornaments worn by the ladies—The Cuban mode of harnessing oxen—The montero and his horse—Curious style of out-door painting—Petty annoyances to travellers—Jealousy of the authorities—Japan-like watchfulness—Questionable policy—Political condition of Cuba,	145
CHAPTER XII.
Tacon's summary mode of justice,	161
CHAPTER XIII.
Consumption of tobacco—The universal cigar—Lady smokers—The fruits of Cuba—Flour a prohibited article—The royal palm—West Indian trees—Snakes, animals, etc.—The Cuban blood-hound—Mode of training him—Remarkable instinct—Importation of slaves—Their cost—Various African tribes—Superstitious belief—Tattooing—Health of the negroes—Slave laws of the island—Food of the negroes—Spanish law of emancipation—General treatment of the slaves,	171
CHAPTER XIV.
Pecuniary value of the slave-trade to Havana—The slave clippers—First introduction of slaves into Cuba—Monopoly of the traffic by England—Spain's disregard of treaty stipulations—Spanish perfidy—Present condition of Spain—Her decadence—Influence upon her American possessions—Slaves upon the plantations—The soil of Cuba—Mineral wealth of the island—The present condition of the people—The influences of American progress—What Cuba might be,	186
CHAPTER XV.
Area of Cuba—Extent of cultivated and uncultivated lands—Population—Proportion between the sexes—Ratio of legitimate to illegitimate births—Ratio between births and deaths—Agricultural statistics—Commerce and commercial regulations—Custom-house and port charges—Exports and imports—Trade with the United States—Universities and schools—Education—Charitable institutions—Railroads—Temperature,	201
CHAPTER XVI.
Retrospective thoughts—The bright side and dark side of the picture—Cuban institutions contrasted with our own—Political sentiments of the Creoles—War footing—Loyalty of the colony—Native men of genius—The Cubans not willing slaves—Our own revolution—Apostles of rebellion—Moral of the Lopez expedition—Jealousy of Spain—Honorable position of our government—Spanish aggressions on our flag—Purchase of the island—Distinguished conservative opinion—The end	214



DUE NORTH
Glimpses Of Scandinavia And Russia
By Maturin M. Ballou


CONTENTS
CHAPTER I.
Copenhagen.—First Stroll in a Strange City.—Danish Children.—Antiquity of Copenhagen.—English Arrogance.—The Baltic Sea.—Danish Possessions.—Descendants of the Vikings.—Covetous Germany.—The Denmark of To-day.—Thorwaldsen's Remarkable Museum.—The Ethnological Museum.—Educational Matters.—Eminent Natives.—Charitable Institutions.—Antique Churches.—Royal Palaces.—Historical Memories.—City Architecture.—Zoölogical Gardens 1–23

CHAPTER II.
Public Amusements in Copenhagen.—Danish Sovereigns.—The Fashionable Promenade.—Danish Women.—Palace of Rosenborg.—A Golconda of Gems.—A Poet's Monument.—A Famous Astronomer.—Our Lady's Church.—The King's Square.—The Curious Old Round Tower.—The Peasantry.—A Famous Deer Park.—Röskilde.—Elsinore.—Gypsies.—Kronborg Castle.—The Queen's Prison.—Hamlet and Ophelia's Grave.—A Danish Legend 24–40

CHAPTER III.
Gottenburg.—Ruins of Elfsborg.—Gustavus Adolphus.—A Wrecked Monument.—The Girdle-Duellists.—Emigration to America.—Public and Private Gardens.—A Kindly People.—The Götha Canal.—Falls of Trollhätta.—Dainty Wild-Flowers.—Water-Ways.—Stockholm and Lake Maelaren.—Prehistoric Tokens.—Iron Mines of Sweden.—Pleasing Episode with Children.—The Liquor Traffic Systematized.—A Great Practical Charity.—A Domestic Habit 41–56

[Pg viii]
CHAPTER IV.
Capital of Norway.—A Grand Fjord.—A Free and Independent State.—The Legal Code.—Royal Palace and Gardens.—Oscar's Hall.—The University.—Public Amusements.—The Ice Trade.—Ancient Viking Ships.—Heathen Tombs.—An Interesting Hostelry.—A Steam Kitchen.—Environs of Christiania.—Horses and their Treatment.—Harvest Time.—Women's Work.—The Sæter.—A Remarkable Lake.—Wild Birds.—Inland Travel.—Scandinavian Wild Flowers.—Lonely Habitations.—A Land of Alpine Heights 57–85

CHAPTER V.
Ancient Capital of Norway.—Routes of Travel.—Rain!—Peasant Costumes.—Commerce of Bergen.—Shark's vs. Cod Liver Oil.—Ship-Building.—Public Edifices.—Quaint Shops.—Borgund Church.—Leprosy in Norway.—Sporting Country.—Inland Experiences.—Hay-Making.—Pine-Forest Experiences.—National Constitution.—People's Schools.—Girls' Industrial School.—Celebrated Citizens of Bergen.—Two Grand Norwegian Fjords.—Remarkable Glaciers 86–101

CHAPTER VI.
Ancient and Modern Trondhjem.—Runic Inscriptions.—A Famous Old Cathedral.—Local Characteristics.—Romantic Story of King Olaf.—Curious Local Productions.—An Island Prison.—Lafoss Falls.—Corn Magazines.—Land-owners.—Wood-cutters.—Forests.—A Tumble Overboard.—A Genuine Cockney.—Comparative Length of Days.—Characteristics of Boreal Regions.—Arctic Winter Fisheries.—The Ancient Town of Lund; the Oxford of Sweden.—Pagan Times 102–115

CHAPTER VII.
Along the Coast of Norway.—Education at the Far North.—An Interesting Character.—A Botanical Enthusiast.—Remarkable Mountain Tunnel.—A Hard Climb.—The Seven [Pg ix] Sisters.—Young England.—An Amateur Photographer.—Horseman's Island.—Ancient Town of Bodöe.—Arctic Flowers.—The Famous Maelström.—Illusions!—The Wonderful Lofoden Islands.—Grand and Unique Scenery.—Glaciers.—Nature's Architecture.—Mysterious Effects.—Attraction for Artists 116–135

CHAPTER VIII.
Birds of the Arctic Regions.—Effect of Continuous Daylight.—Town of Tromsöe.—The Aurora Borealis.—Love of Flowers.—The Growth of Trees.—Butterflies.—Home Flowers.—Trees.—Shooting Whales with Cannon.—Prehistoric Relics.—About Laplanders.—Eider Ducks.—A Norsk Wedding Present.—Gypsies of the North.—Pagan Rites.—The Use of the Reindeer.—Domestic Life of the Lapps.—Marriage Ceremony.—A Gypsy Queen.—Lapp Babies.—Graceful Acknowledgment 136–155

CHAPTER IX.
Experiences Sailing Northward.—Arctic Whaling.—The Feathered Tribe.—Caught in a Trap.—Domestic Animals.—The Marvellous Gulf Stream.—Town of Hammerfest.—Commerce.—Arctic Mosquitoes.—The Public Crier.—Norwegian Marriages.—Peculiar Bird Habits.—A Hint to Naturalists.—Bird Island.—A Lonely Habitation.—High Latitude.—Final Landing at the North Cape.—A Hard Climb.—View of the Wonderful Midnight Sun 156–168

CHAPTER X.
Journey Across Country.—Capital of Sweden.—Old and New.—Swedish History.—Local Attractions.—King Oscar II.—The Royal Palace.—The Westminster Abbey of Stockholm.—A Splendid Deer Park.—Public Amusements.—The Sabbath.—An Official Dude.—An Awkward Statue.—Swedish Nightingales.—Linnæus and Swedenborg.—Dalecarlia Girls.—A Remarkable Group in Bronze.—Rosedale Royal Cottage.—Ancient Oaks.—Upsala and its Surroundings.—Ancient Mounds at old Upsala.—Swedenborg's Study 169–192

[Pg x]
CHAPTER XI.
The Northern Mediterranean.—Depth of the Sea.—Where Amber Comes From.—A Thousand Isles.—City of Åbo.—Departed Glory.—Capital of Finland.—Local Scenes.—Russian Government.—Finland's Dependency.—Billingsgate.—A Woman Sailor in an Exigency.—Fortress of Sweaborg.—Fortifications of Cronstadt.—Russia's Great Naval Station.—The Emperor's Steam Yacht.—A Sail up the Neva.—St. Petersburg in the Distance.—First Russian Dinner 193–205

CHAPTER XII.
St. Petersburg.—Churches.—The Alexander Column.—Principal Street.—Cathedral of Peter and Paul.—Nevsky Monastery.—Russian Priesthood.—The Canals.—Public Library.—Cruelty of an Empress.—Religious Devotion of the People.—A Dangerous Locality.—Population.—The Neva and Lake Ladoga.—The Nicholas Bridge.—Winter Season.—Begging Nuns.—Nihilism.—Scandal Touching the Emperor.—The Fashionable Drive.—St. Isaac's Church.—Russian Bells.—Famous Equestrian Statue.—The Admiralty.—Architecture 206–240

CHAPTER XIII.
The Winter Palace.—The Hermitage and its Riches.—An Empress and her Fancies.—A Royal Retreat.—Russian Culture.—Public Library.—The Summer Garden.—Temperature of the City.—Choosing of the Brides.—Peter's Cottage.—Champ de Mars.—Academy of Fine Arts.—School of Mines.—Precious Stones.—The Imperial Home at Peterhoff.—Curious and Interesting Buildings.—Catherine's Oak.—Alexander III. at Parade.—Description of the Royal Family.—Horse-Racing.—The Empress's Companions 241–264

CHAPTER XIV.
Power of the Greek Church.—Freeing the Serfs.—Education Needed.—Mammoth Russia.—Religion and Superstition.—Memorial Structures.—Church Fasts.—Theatres and [Pg xi] Public Amusements.—Night Revels.—A Russian Bazaar.—Children's Nurses in Costume.—The one Vehicle of Russia.—Dress of the People.—Fire Brigade.—Red Tape.—Personal Surveillance.—Passports.—Annoyances.—Spying Upon Strangers.—The Author's Experience.—Censorship of the Press 265–279

CHAPTER XV.
On the Road to Moscow.—Russian Peasantry.—Military Station Masters.—Peat Fuel for the War-Ships.—Farm Products.—Scenery.—Wild-Flowers.—City of Tver.—Inland Navigation.—The Great River Volga.—The Ancient Muscovite Capital.—Spires and Minarets.—A Russian Mecca.—Pictorial Signs.—The Kremlin.—The Royal Palace.—King of Bells.—Cathedral of St. Basil.—The Royal Treasury.—Church of Our Saviour.—Chinese City.—Rag Fair.—Manufactures 280–305

CHAPTER XVI.
Domestic Life in Moscow.—Oriental Seclusion of Women.—The Foundling Hospital.—A Christian Charity.—A Metropolitan Centre.—City Museum.—The University.—Tea-Drinking.—Pleasure Gardens.—Drosky Drivers.—Riding-School.—Theatres.—Universal Bribery.—Love of Country.—Russians as Linguists.—Sparrow Hill.—Petrofski Park.—Muscovite Gypsies.—Fast Life.—Intemperance.—A Famous Monastery.—City Highways.—Sacred Pigeons.—Beggars 306–332

CHAPTER XVII.
Nijni-Novgorod.—Hot Weather.—The River Volga.—Hundreds of Steamers.—Great Annual Fair.—Peculiar Character of the Trade.—Motley Collection of Humanity.—An Army of Beggars.—Rare and Precious Stones.—The Famous Brick Tea.—A Costly Beverage.—Sanitary Measures.—Disgraceful Dance Halls.—Fatal Beauty.—A Sad History.—Light-Fingered Gentry.—Convicts.—Facts about Siberia.—Local Customs.—Russian Punishment 333–352

[Pg xii]
CHAPTER XVIII.
On the Road to Poland.—Extensive Grain-Fields.—Polish Peasantry.—A Russian General.—No Evidence of Oppression.—Warsaw and its Surroundings.—Mingled Squalor and Elegance.—Monuments of the City.—Polish Nobility.—Circassian Troops.—Polish Language.—The Jews of Warsaw.—Political Condition of Poland.—Public Parks.—The Famous Saxony Gardens.—Present Commercial Prosperity.—Local Sentiment.—Concerning Polish Ladies and Jewish Beauties 353–373



THE STORY OF MALTA
By Maturin M. Ballou


CONTENTS
CHAPTER I.
Geographical Position of Malta.—A Pivotal Location.—Warden of the Great Inland Sea.—First Sight of the Group.—How to reach the Island.—Early Inhabitants.—Language of the People.—Phœnician Colonists.—Arabian Dynasty.—A Piratical Rendezvous.—Suez Canal.—Two Sorts of Travelers.—Gibraltar.—Harbor of Valletta.—A Place of Arms.—Various Bays of the Group.—Dimensions.—Extensive Commerce of the Port.	1
CHAPTER II.
Island of Hyperia.—Where St. Paul was Wrecked.—An Historical Bay. —Rock-Cut Tombs.—Curious and Unique Antiquities.—Sovereignty of the Knights of St. John.—An Anomalous Brotherhood.—Sailor-Monks.—Ancient Galleys.—A Famous Barbary Corsair.—Antique Norwegian Vessel.—Navy of the Knights.—Barbaric Warfare.—About the Maltese Nobility.—Romantic History.—"Arabian Nights."—Valletta the Beautiful.	21
CHAPTER III.
The Maltese Group.—Comino.—Cave Life.—Verdant Gozo.—Isle of Filfla.—Curious Lizards.—Loss of an Ironclad.—Mysterious Wheel-Tracks.—Earthquakes.—Population.—Military Dépôt.—Youthful Soldiers.—Quarantine.—Arrival of the Knights.—Immorality.—Harbor Defenses.—Land Fortifications.—Charming Photographic View.—The Stars and Stripes Abroad.—The Eight-Pointed Maltese Cross.— Peculiar Sunset Scene.	41
[Pg vi]CHAPTER IV.
The Soil of Malta.—Imports and Exports.—Absence of Trees.—Equable Climate.—Three Crops Annually.—Use of Fertilizers.—Ignorant and Pious Peasantry.—Food of the People.—Maltese Women.—Oriental Customs.—Roman Catholic Influence.—Improvisation.—Early Marriages.—A Resort for the Pope.—Low Wages.—Beggars.—Wind Storms.—Blood Oranges.—The Carob-Tree.—Maltese Lace.—Sailing along the Shore.	64
CHAPTER V.
The Climate of Malta.—The Furious Grégalé.—Liability to Sunstroke.—The African Sirocco.—Cloudless Days.—A Health Resort.—English Church.—View of Ætna.—Volcanic Disturbances.—Will Malta Eventually Disappear?—Native Flora.—Flower-Girls of Valletta.— Absence of Lakes and Rivers.—The Moon-Flower.—Grand Stone Aqueduct.—After the Roman Plan of Building.—Fountains.—Results of Irrigation.	86
CHAPTER VI.
Homer's Fabled Siren.—Singular Topographical Formation in Gozo.—Beautiful Island Groves.—Fertile Grain-Fields.—Flowering Hedges.—Aromatic Honey.—Herds of Goats.—A Favorite Domestic Product. —Milk Supply.—Prolific Sheep.—A Maltese Market.—Quail Shooting.—Rabbato, Capital of Gozo.—The Old Citadel.—Lace Manufacture.—Prehistoric Ruins.—The Giant's Tower.—Attractive Summer Resort.—Pagan Worship.	101
CHAPTER VII.
A Maltese Fishing Hamlet.—Old Fort Chambray.—A Grotto shorn of Poetic Adornment.—The "Azure Window."—Bay of Scilendi.—Pirates' Caves.—Prehistoric Bones and Skeletons.—The Vast Changes of Land and Sea.—Suez Canal.—Geological Matters.—Native Race of Arabic Descent.—Curious Stone Mortars.—Primitive Artillery.—Maltese Fungus.—Springtime.—Riches of the Harvest.—Origin of the Island of Gozo.	115
[Pg vii] CHAPTER VIII.
Valletta, Capital of Malta.—A Unique City.—Bright Faces, Flowers, and Sunshine.—Architecture.—L'Isle Adam and La Vallette, Grand Masters.—Mount Sceberris.—Stone Dwelling-Houses.—Streets of the Capital.—A Specialty.—Fancy Goods Merchants.—The Yacht Sunbeam.—Main Street of the City.—A Grand Opera House.—A St. Giles in Malta.—Strada Santa Lucia.—Street of Stairs.— Thoroughfares.—The Military Hospital.—Characteristic Street Scenes.—Emigration.	129
CHAPTER IX.
Ophthalmia.—Profusion of Flowers.—Inland Villages.—Educational Matters.—Public Amusements.—Maltese Carnival.—Italian Carnival.—Under English Rule.—No Direct Taxation.—Code of Laws.—A Summer Palace.—Governor-General Smyth.—San Antonio Gardens.—Wages.—Oranges.—Life's Contrasts.—Swarming Beggars.—Social Problem.—Churches crowded with Riches.—Starving Population.—A Mexican Experience.	152
CHAPTER X.
Broadway of Valletta.—Panoramic Street View.—A Bogus Nobility.—Former Grand Palace of the Knights.—Telegraphic Station.—About Soldier-Priests.—Interior of the Palace.—Ancient Tapestry.—Old Paintings.—Antique Armory.—An American with a Fad.—Ancient Battle-Flags.—Armor worn by the Knights.—Days of the Crusaders.—Bonaparte as a Petty Thief.—There are no Saints on Earth!—Dueling Ground.—Desecrating Good Friday.	172
CHAPTER XI.
The Famous Church of St. John.—By What Means it was Decorated.—Grand Mosaic Floor.—Roman Catholic Ceremonials.—Remarkable Relics.—Chapels of the Languages.—A Devout Artist.—Church Treasures.—Thieving French Soldiers.—Poetical Justice.—The Hateful Inquisition.—Churches of Valletta.—A Forlorn Hope.—Heroic Conduct.—A Maltese Pantheon.—A Rival Dome to St. Paul's, London.—Some Fine Paintings.	193
[Pg viii]CHAPTER XII.
Public Library of Malta.—British Museum, London.—City Circulating Library.—Museum of Valletta.—Interesting Curiosities.—Birthplace of Hannibal.—Pawnbroker's Establishment.—Savings Bank of the Monte di Pietà.—The Baraccas.—A Superb View.—An Excursion Inland.—Ancient Capital of Malta.—Città Vecchia.—Toy Railway.—About the Vatican at Rome.—An Ancient Cathedral.—Dungeons of the Middle Ages.	214
CHAPTER XIII.
Ancient Catacombs.—A Subterranean City.—Phœnician Tombs.—Grotto of St. Paul.—A Crumbling Old Capital.—Dreary and Deserted.—Bingemma Hills.—Ancient Coins and Antique Utensils.—Ruins of a Pagan Temple.—A Former Fane to Hercules.—A Garden of Delights.—Druidical Circles.—Beautiful Grotto.—Crude Native Dances.—Unique Musical Instrument.—Nasciar.—Suburb of Floriana.—A Capuchin Convent.—Grim Skeletons.	231
CHAPTER XIV.
The Chivalric Order of St. John.—Humble Beginning of the Organization.—Hospitallers.—Days of the Crusades.—Motto of the Brotherhood.—Peter Gerard.—The Monk lost in the Soldier.—At Acre, Cyprus, and Rhodes.—Naval Operations.—Siege of Rhodes.—Garden of the Levant.—Piratical Days.—Six Months of Bloodshed.—Awful Destruction of Human Life.—A Famous Fighting Knight.—Final Evacuation of Rhodes by the Order.	254
CHAPTER XV.
Settlement of the Order at Malta.—A Barren Waste.—A New Era for the Natives.—Foundling Hospitals.—Grand Master La Vallette.—Sailors and Soldiers.—Capture of Prisoners at Mondon.—A Slave Story in Brief.—Christian Corsairs!—The Ottomans attack the Knights in their New Home.—Defeat of the Turks.—Terrible Slaughter of Human Beings.—Civil War.—Summary Punishment.—Some Details of a Famous Siege.	274
[Pg ix]CHAPTER XVI.
Result of the Siege.—Native Women serving as Soldiers.—The Maltese Militia.—The Knights gain World-Wide Applause.—Rage of Sultan Solyman.—Agents of the Grand Master become Incendiaries.—La Vallette, Hero of the Siege.—The Order still Piratical.—The Turks and Knights Affiliate.—Decadence of the Chivalric Brotherhood.—Momentary Revival of the Old Spirit.—Treacherous Surrender.—French Sovereignty.—End of the Order.	297
CHAPTER XVII.
Conclusion.—A Picture of Sunrise at Malta.—The Upper Baracca of Valletta.—A Favorite and Sightly Promenade.—Retrospective Flight of Fancy.—Conflict between the Soldiers of the Cross and the Crescent. —A Background Wanting.—Historical and Legendary Malta.—The Secret of Appreciation.—Last View of the Romantic Group.—Farewell.	314



DUE NORTH.
By Maturin M. Ballou


CONTENTS
 	Page
CHAPTER I.
Journey across the American Continent.—The Giant City of the West.—A Chinese Community.—Embarking for a Long Sea-voyage.—About Ocean Birds.—Navigating the Pacific.—Peculiarities of Life at Sea.—Curiosities of the Deep.—Ambergris.—City of Honolulu.—An Island Paradise.—Early Paganism at Hawaii.—Wholesale Human Sacrifices.—Royalty at the Race-course.— Not a Kingly Monarch	1-25
CHAPTER II.
Ladies Riding Astride.—Passion for Flower Decorations.—A Sailor on a Bucking Horse.—A Weekly Gala-day.—Hawaiian Ladies' Costume.—A Famous Battle-ground.—The Native's Staff of Life.—Ubiquitous John Chinaman.—Largest Apple-orchard in the World.—Hawaiians as Cannibals.—An Active Volcano.—Colony of Lepers.—Unwelcome Visitors.—Our Political Relations with the Sandwich Islands	26-49
CHAPTER III.
The Samoan Islands.—A Unique Race of Savages.—Diving for Money.—A Genuine Samoan Mermaid.—German Aggressiveness.—A South-Sea Nunnery.—A Terrible Disease.—Christianity vs. Paganism.—Under the Southern Cross.—Grandeur of the Heavens at Sea.—Landing at Auckland.—A Stormy Ocean.—The Famous Harbor of Sydney.—England and her Australian Colony.—The Modern Eldorado.—Early Settlers	50-75
[Pg viii]CHAPTER IV.
Interesting Statistical Facts.—Emigration.—Heavy Indebtedness.—Curious Contrasts.—New South Wales.—A Populous City.—A Splendid Harbor.—The Yacht "Sunbeam."—Street Scenes.—Gin Palaces.—Public Gardens of Sydney.—A Noble Institution of Learning.—Art Gallery.—Public Libraries.—Pleasure Trip to Parametta.—Attractive Drives.—A Sad Catastrophe in Sydney Harbor	76-98
CHAPTER V.
A Zigzag Railway.—Wonderful Series of Caves.—Immense Sheep-Runs.—Sheep-Shearing.—Central Australia.—City Characteristics.—Fine Architectural Development.—Steam Tramways.—Labor Unions.—Colonial Federation.—The Tariff.—Loyalty to England.—Spirit of Local Rivalry.—The St. Giles of Sydney.—City Clubs.—The Laughing Jackass.—Public Parks.—Gold Mines	99-125
CHAPTER VI.
The Capital of Queensland.—Public Gardens.—Gold Mines and Gold Mining.—Pleasant Excursion.—Inducements to Emigrants.—Coolie Principle of Labor.—Agricultural Products.—Sugar Plantations.—Australian Aborigines.—Cannibalism.—Civil Wars.—Indian Legends.—Fire-arms and Fire-water.—Missionary Efforts.—A Brief Romance.—The Boomerang.—The Various Tribes.—Antiquity of these Lands	126-151
CHAPTER VII.
Morning in the Forest.—Flying Foxes.—A Startling Snake-story.— Geographical.—Want of Irrigation.—Droughts.—Immense Sheep-Runs.—Seeking a Shepherd Life.—Wonderful Gold Nuggets.—A "Welcome" Discovery.—Wool is King in Queensland.—The Chinese Population.—Education in Australia.—Peculiar Banking Business.— Waging War upon Kangaroos.—Journalism in Australia.—Proposed New Colony	152-176
[Pg ix]CHAPTER VIII.
An Inland Journey.—The Capital of Victoria.—Grand Public Buildings.—Water-Supply of the City.—Public Parks and Gardens.—Street Scenes.—Dashing Liveries.—Tramways.— Extremes.—Melbourne Ladies.—Street Beggars.—Saturday Half-Holiday.—Public Arcades.—The City Free Library.—The Public Markets.—China-Town, Melbourne.—Victims of the Opium Habit	177-201
CHAPTER IX.
A Melbourne Half-Holiday.—Inconsistency of Laborers.—Vice-Royal Residence.—Special Gold-Fields of Victoria.—Ballarat.—Great Depths in Mines.—Agricultural Interests.—Sandhurst.—The Giant Trees of Australia.—The Kangaroo.—In Victorian Forests.—Peculiar Salt Lakes.—The Bower-bird's Retreat.—The Wild Dog.—Desirable and Undesirable Emigrants.—No Place for the Intemperate	202-222
CHAPTER X.
From Melbourne to Adelaide.—Capital of South Australia.—New Gold- Fields.—Agricultural Interests.—City Institutions.—Inducements to Immigrants.—Public Buildings.—A City of Churches.—Australian Ladies.—Interior of the Country.—Irrigation.—German Settlers.—The Botanical Gardens.—West Australia.—Perth the Capital.—The Pearl Fisheries.—Commercial Advantages Considered	223-245
CHAPTER XI.
From Australia to Tasmania.—The River Tamar.—Bird Life.—City of Launceston.—Aborigines of the Island.—Tattooing.—Van Diemen's Land.—A Beautiful Country.—Rich Mines.—Mount Bischoff.—Down in a Gold Mine.—From Launceston to Hobart.—Rural Aspects.—Capital of Tasmania.—Street Scenes.—A Former Penal Depot.—Mount Wellington.—Personal Beauty.—An Unbecoming Fashion	246-268
[Pg x]CHAPTER XII.
Lake District of Tasmania.—Mount Wellington.—Kangaroos.—The Big Trees.—A Serenade.—The Albatross.—Marksmanship at Sea.—Dust of the Ocean.—A Storm.—Franklin's Proposition.—A Feathered Captive.—Bluff Oysters.—Most Southerly Hotel in the World.— Invercargill.—Historical Matters.—Geographical.—The Climate of
New Zealand.—Colonial Hospitality	269-298
CHAPTER XIII.
The City of Dunedin.—Scotch Residents.—The Enchanter's Wand.—Chain-Cable Tramways.—Volcanic Effects.—The Salvation Army.—Local Gold-Fields.—Enormous Aggregate Product.—Trees and Flowers.—The Rabbit Pest.—Port Littleton.—Market Day in Christchurch.—An Interesting City.—Wonderful Extinct Bird.—
Strange Record of an Unknown Race.—The New Zealand Forests	299-321
CHAPTER XIV.
Capital of New Zealand.—About the Native Race.—A City of Shops.— Local Earthquakes.—Large Glaciers.—McNab's Gardens.—A Public Nuisance.—Napier.—Maori Peculiarities.—Native Language.— Mythology.—Christianizing Savages.—Gisborne.— Cruelty to Dumb Animals.—Shag Island.—Sir George Gray's Pleasant Home.—Oysters Growing on New Zealand Trees!	322-343
CHAPTER XV.
Historical Glance at Auckland.—A Remarkable Volcanic Region.—City Institutions.—Queen Street and Its Belongings.—Mount Eden.—Comprehensive View.—Labor Unions.—The Public Debt.— Kauri Forests.—Production of Kauri Gum.—Environs of Auckland.—The Native Flora.—An Admirable Climate.—A Rich Mineral District.—Agricultural Development	344-364
[Pg xi]CHAPTER XVI.
A Journey to the King's Country.—An Experienced "Whip."—Volcanic Hills.—A New Zealand Forest.—A Strangely Afflicted Boy.—Lake Rotorua.—Ohinemutu.—Funeral of a Maori Chief.—Wailing and Weeping.—Moonlight on the Lake.—Wonderland.—Spouting Geysers and Boiling Pools.—Savage Mode of Slaughter.—Maori Houses.— Chivalry and Cannibalism.—Savage and Civilized Life	365-385
CHAPTER XVII.
The Maori Dog.—A Romantic Island.—Sinking of a Maori Fort.—Volcanic Destruction.—A Country of Boiling Springs.— Idleness.—A Lazy Race of Savages.—Native Religion.—A Fitful Geyser.—Sophia, the Famous Guide.—A Funeral Dance.—The "Haka" Performance.—Maori Improvidence.—Rubbing Noses.—Native Babies.—Church-Going and Card-Playing.—The King's Country.—Eloquent Aborigines.—A Sanitarium.—Sulphur Point.—Future of New Zealand	386-405



BIOGRAPHY OF REV. HOSEA BALLOU.
By His Youngest Son
Maturin M. Ballou


CONTENTS.
CHAPTER I	INTRODUCTORY	9
CHAPTER II	BIRTH AND PARENTAGE	14
CHAPTER III	EARLY LIFE	22
CHAPTER IV	BECOMES A PROFESSOR OF RELIGION	38
CHAPTER V	COMMENCES TO PREACH	52
CHAPTER VI	BECOMES A SETTLED MINISTER	64
CHAPTER VII	REMOVES TO PORTSMOUTH, N. H.	89
CHAPTER VIII	SETTLES IN BOSTON	103
CHAPTER IX	COMMENCES THE UNIVERSALIST MAGAZINE	120
CHAPTER X	COMMENCES THE UNIVERSALIST EXPOSITOR	136
CHAPTER XI	DOMESTIC AND PERSONAL CHARACTERISTICS	173
CHAPTER XII	MR BALLOU AS A CONTROVERSIALIST	231
CHAPTER XIII	SPIRIT OF HIS DOCTRINE	258
CHAPTER XIV	SENTIMENTS RELATIVE TO DEATH	322
CHAPTER XV	END OF HIS EARTHLY MISSION	366
CHAPTER XVI	CONCLUSION	392



EQUATORIAL AMERICA
Descriptive Of A Visit To St. Thomas Martinique, Barbadoes, And The Principal Capitals Of South America
By Maturin M. Ballou
CONTENTS
page
CHAPTER I.

Commencement of a Long Journey.—The Gulf Stream.—Hayti.—Sighting St. Thomas.—Ship Rock.—Expert Divers.—Fidgety Old Lady.—An Important Island.—The Old Slaver.—Aborigines.—St. Thomas Cigars.—Population.—Tri-Mountain.—The Negro Paradise.—Hurricanes.—Variety of Fish.—Coaling Ship.—The Firefly Dance.—A Weird Scene.—An Antique Anchor	1
CHAPTER II.

Curious Seaweed.—Professor Agassiz.—Myth of a Lost Continent.—Island of Martinique.—An Attractive Place.—Statue of the Empress Josephine.—Birthplace of Madame de Maintenon.—City of St. Pierre.—Mont Pelée.—High Flavored Specialty.—Grisettes of Maritinque.—A Botanical Garden.—Defective Drainage.—A Fatal Enemy.—A Cannibal Snake.—The Climate	33
CHAPTER III.

English Island of Barbadoes.—Bridgetown the Capital.—The Manufacture of Rum.—A Geographical Expert.—Very English.—A Pest of Ants.—Exports.—The Ice House.—A Dense Population.—Educational.—Marine Hotel.—Habits of Gambling.—Hurricanes.—Curious Antiquities.—The Barbadoes Leg.—Wakeful Dreams.—Absence of Twilight.—Departure from the Island	51
CHAPTER IV.

Curious Ocean Experiences.—The Delicate Nautilus.—Flying-Fish.—The Southern Cross.—Speaking a Ship at Sea.—Scientific Navigation.—South America as a Whole.—Fauna and Flora.—Natural Resources of a Wonderful Land.—Rivers, Plains, and Mountain Ranges.—Aboriginal Tribes.—Population.—Political Divisions.—Civil Wars.—Weakness of South American States	68
CHAPTER V.

City of Pará.—The Equatorial Line.—Spanish History.—The King of Waters.—Private Gardens.—Domestic Life in Northern Brazil.—Delicious Pineapples.—Family Pets.—Opera House.—Mendicants.—A Grand Avenue.—Botanical Garden.—India-Rubber Tree.—Gathering the Raw Material.—Monkeys.—The Royal Palm.—Splendor of Equatorial Nights	94
CHAPTER VI.

Island of Marajo.—Rare and Beautiful Birds.—Original Mode of Securing Humming-Birds.—Maranhão.—Educational.—Value of Native Forests.—Pernambuco.—Difficulty of Landing.—An Ill-Chosen Name.—Local Scenes.—Uncleanly Habits of the People.—Great Sugar Mart.—Native Houses.—A Quaint Hostelry.—Catamarans.—A Natural Breakwater.—Sailing down the Coast	115
CHAPTER VII.

Port of Bahia.—A Quaint Old City.—Former Capital of Brazil.—Whaling Interests.—Beautiful Panorama.—Tramways.—No Color Line Here.—The Sedan Chair.—Feather Flowers.—A Great Orange Mart.—Passion Flower Fruit.—Coffee, Sugar, and Tobacco.—A Coffee Plantation.—Something about Diamonds.—Health of the City.—Curious Tropical Street Scenes	138
CHAPTER VIII.

Cape Frio.—Rio Janeiro.—A Splendid Harbor.—Various Mountains.—Botafogo Bay.—The Hunchback.—Farewell to the Vigilancia.—Tijuca.—Italian Emigrants.—City Institutions.—Public Amusements.—Street Musicians.—Churches.—Narrow Thoroughfares.—Merchants' Clerks.—Railroads in Brazil.—Natural Advantages of the City.—The Public Plazas.—Exports	155
CHAPTER IX.

Outdoor Scenes in Rio Janeiro.—The Little Marmoset.—The Fish Market.—Secluded Women.—The Romish Church.—Botanical Garden.—Various Species of Trees.—Grand Avenue of Royal Palms.—About Humming-Birds.—Climate of Rio.—Surrounded by Yellow Fever.—The Country Inland.—Begging on the Streets.—Flowers.—"Portuguese Joe."—Social Distinctions	180
CHAPTER X.

Petropolis.—Summer Residence of the Citizens of Rio.—Brief Sketch of the late Royal Family.—Dom Pedro's Palace.—A Delightful Mountain Sanitarium.—A Successful but Bloodless Revolution.—Floral Delights.—Mountain Scenery.—Heavy Gambling.—A German Settlement.—Cascatinha.—Remarkable Orchids.—Local Types.—A Brazilian Forest.—Compensation	201
CHAPTER XI.

Port of Santos.—Yellow Fever Scourge.—Down the Coast to Montevideo.—The Cathedral.—Pamperos.—Domestic Architecture.—A Grand Thoroughfare.—City Institutions.—Commercial Advantages.—The Opera House.—The Bull-Fight.—Beggars on Horseback.—City Shops.—A Typical Character.—Intoxication.—The Campo Santo.—Exports.—Rivers and Railways	217
CHAPTER XII.

Buenos Ayres.—Extent of the Argentine Republic.—Population.—Narrow Streets.—Large Public Squares.—Basques.—Poor Harbor.—Railway System.—River Navigation.—Tramways.—The Cathedral.—Normal Schools.—Newspapers.—Public Buildings.—Calle Florida.—A Busy City.—Mode of furnishing Milk.—Environs.—Commercial and Political Growth.—The New Capital	244
CHAPTER XIII.

City of Rosario.—Its Population.—A Pretentious Church.—Ocean Experiences.—Morbid Fancies.—Strait of Magellan.—A Great Discoverer.—Local Characteristics.—Patagonians and Fuegians.—Giant Kelp.—Unique Mail Box.—Punta Arenas.—An Ex-Penal Colony.—The Albatross.—Natives.—A Naked People.—Whales.—Sea-Birds.—Glaciers.—Mount Sarmiento.—A Singular Story	271
CHAPTER XIV.

The Land of Fire.—Cape Horn.—In the Open Pacific.—Fellow Passengers.—Large Sea-Bird.—An Interesting Invalid.—A Weary Captive.—A Broken-Hearted Mother.—Study of the Heavens.—The Moon.—Chilian Civil War.—Concepcion.—A Growing City.—Commercial Importance.—Cultivating City Gardens on a New Plan.—Important Coal Mines.—Delicious Fruits	297
CHAPTER XV.

Valparaiso.—Principal South American Port of the Pacific.—A Good Harbor.—Tallest Mountain on this Continent.—The Newspaper Press.—Warlike Aspect.—Girls as Car Conductors.—Chilian Exports.—Foreign Merchants.—Effects of Civil War.—Gambling in Private Houses.—Immigration.—Culture of the Grape.—Agriculture.—Island of Juan Fernandez	315
CHAPTER XVI.

The Port of Callao.—A Submerged City.—Peruvian Exports.—A Dirty and Unwholesome Town.—Cinchona Bark.—The Andes.—The Llama.—A National Dance.—City of Lima.—An Old and Interesting Capital.—Want of Rain.—Pizarro and His Crimes.—A Grand Cathedral.—Chilian Soldiers.—Costly Churches of Peru.—Roman Catholic Influence.—Desecration of the Sabbath	334
CHAPTER XVII.

A Grand Plaza.—Retribution.—The University of Lima.—Significance of Ancient Pottery.—Architecture.—Picturesque Dwelling.—Domestic Scene.—Destructive Earthquakes.—Spanish Sway.—Women of Lima.—Street Costumes.—Ancient Bridge of Lima.—Newspapers.—Pawnbrokers' Shops.—Exports.—An Ancient Mecca.—Home by Way of Europe.	355



FANNY CAMPBELL, THE FEMALE PIRATE CAPTAIN
A Tale Of The Revolution
By Maturin Murray Ballou
1844


CONTENTS
PREFACE.
FANNY CAMPBELL.
CHAPTER I.	LYNN IN OLDEN TIMES. HIGH ROCK. THE FISHING HAMLET. THE STIRRING EVENTS THAT PRECEDED THE REVOLUTION. SOME OF OUR CHARACTERS. WILLIAM LOVELL. FANNY CAMPBELL. THE HEROINE. CAPTAIN RALPH BURNET OF THE ROYAL NAVY. A LOVER'S JEALOUSY.
CHAPTER II.	THE FAREWELL. THE ROYAL KENT. PIRATES. THE FIGHT. ENLISTING IN A NEW SERVICE. THE HAUNTS OF THE BUCCANIERS. ESCAPE FROM ONE PRISON AND CONFINEMENT IN ANOTHER. BURNET AND FANNY CAMPBELL. ARRIVAL OF AN IMPORTANT MESSENGER. MYSTERY. A PROPOSITION. A NEW FRIEND AND A NEW CHARACTER. A CAPTAIN'S SPEECH. WHO WAS THE MASTER.
CHAPTER III.	THE RUSE OF THE CAPTAIN, MUTINY! A NEW COMMANDER. ATTEMPTED ASSASSINATION. A FATAL AND BLOODY SCENE. SAIL HO! AN ENEMY. THE PINE TREE FLAG. THE SEA FIGHT AND THE VICTORY.
CHAPTER IV.	STATE OF HOSTILITIES, DISPOSITION OF THE PRIZE, ANOTHER MUTINY. FATE OF THE LEADER. PLAN FOR LIBERATING THE PRISONERS. THE EXPEDITION. HAVANA. THE RESULT. THE MEETING OF FRIENDS. A NEW OFFICER.
CHAPTER V.	A FAITHFUL GUARD. A PROPOSITION. A RUSE. A DENOUEMENT. SAIL HO! THE LONG TOM HOLDS ANOTHER CONVERSATION. A VALUABLE PRIZE. MORE PRISONERS THAN VICTORS. CHAGRIN OF THE ENEMY.
CHAPTER VI.	A FIERCE CHARACTER. ATTEMPT TO BURN THE BRIG. THE CONSULTATION. THE SENTENCE. THE YARD ARM! A DREAM. THE TRIAL. A STUBBORN SPIRIT BROKEN. A NOBLE ACT OF JUSTICE! WORTHY OF EMULATION!
CHAPTER VII.	FORECASTLE TALK, A NEW ENEMY, A CHASE, THE STORM. THE ACTION. THE FORTUNES OF THE FIGHT. SCENE ON BOARD THE ENEMY. THE TRICK. FEARFUL ENCOUNTER. SINGULAR DISCOVERY. FANNY A PRISONER. A PEEP AT THE CAMPBELLS' FIRE-SIDE. THE PARENTS AT HOME.
CHAPTER VIII.	HIGH HOCK. MOLL PITCHER THE FORTUNE-TELLER. ARRIVAL OF THE PRIZES. FANNY AND THE CAPTAIN OF THE DOLPHIN. A DECLARATION. AN INSULT. THE DEFENCE. THE FORTUNATE ESCAPE. ARRIVAL AT HOME. MEETING OF FRIENDS.
CHAPTER IX.	PEACE, YACHTING FOR PLEASURE, THE FAIRY BARQUE VISION ITS APPOINTMENTS AND FURNITURE. VISITING PLACES OF OLD REMEMBRANCES. THE ISLE OF MAN AND THE IRISH SEA. FANNY AND LOVELL LISTEN TO FORECASTLE YARNS THAT WILL INTEREST THE READER, ABOUT THIS RENDEZVOUS FOR THE RENOWNED FREEBOOTERS OF ENGLAND AND THE CONTINENT. AN EXCURSION PLANNED UPON THE LAND.
CHAPTER X.
CONCLUSION.



THE NEW ELDORADO
A Summer Journey To Alaska
By Maturin M. Ballou


CONTENTS
CHAPTER I.
 	Page
Itinerary.-St. Paul.-The Northern Pacific Railroad.-Progress.-Luxurious Traveling.-Riding on a Locomotive.-Night Experiences.-Prairie Scenes.-Immense Grain-Fields.-The Badlands.-Climbing the Rocky Mountains.-Cinnabar.-The Yellowstone Park.-An Accumulation of Wonders.-The Famous Hot Springs Terrace.-How Formed.-As seen by Moonlight	1

CHAPTER II.
Nature in Poetic Moods.-Is there Lurking Danger?-A Sanitarium.-The Liberty Cap.-The Giant's Thumb.-Singular Caves.-Falls of the Gardiner River.-In the Saddle.-Grand Cañon of the Yellowstone.-Far-Reaching Antiquity.-Obsidian Cliffs.-A Road of Glass.-Beaver Lake.-Animal Builders.-Aborigines of the Park.-The Sheep-Eaters.-The Shoshones and other Tribes	20

CHAPTER III.
Norris Geyser Basin.-Fire beneath the Surface.-A Guide's Ideas.-The Curious Paint Pot Basin.-Lower Geyser Basin.-Boiling Springs of Many Colors.-Mountain Lions at Play.-Midway Geyser Basin.-"Hell's Half Acre."-In the Midst of Wonderland.-"Old Faithful."-Other Active Geysers.-Erratic Nature of these Remarkable Fountains	34

viCHAPTER IV.
The Great Yellowstone Lake.-Myriads of Birds.-Solitary Beauty of the Lake.-The Flora of the Park.-Devastating Fires.-Wild Animals.-Grand Volcanic Centre.-Mountain Climbing and Wonderful Views.-A Story of Discovery.-Government Exploration of the Reservation.-Governor Washburn's Expedition.-"For the Benefit of the People at Large Forever"	47

CHAPTER V.
Westward Journey resumed.-Queen City of the Mountains.-Crossing the Rockies.-Butte City, the Great Mining Centre.-Montana.-The Red Men.-About the Aborigines.-The Cowboys of the West.-A Successful Hunter.-Emigrant Teams on the Prairies.-Immense Forests.-Puget Sound.-The Famous Stampede Tunnel.-Immigration	57

CHAPTER VI.
Mount Tacoma.-Terminus of the Northern Pacific Railroad.-Great Inland Sea.-City of Tacoma and its Marvelous Growth.-Coal Measures.-The Modoc Indians.-Embarking for Alaska.-The Rapidly Growing City of Seattle.-Tacoma with its Fifteen Glaciers.-Something about Port Townsend.-A Chance for Members of Alpine Clubs	73

CHAPTER VII.
Victoria, Vancouver's Island.-Esquimalt.-Chinamen.-Remarkable Flora.-Suburbs of the Town.-Native Tribes.-Cossacks of the Sea.-Manners and Customs.-The Early Discoverer.-Sailing in the Inland Sea.-Excursionists.-Mount St. Elias.-Mount Fairweather.-A Mount Olympus.-Seymour Narrows.-Night on the Waters.-A Touch of the Pacific	84

viiCHAPTER VIII.
Steamship Corona and her Passengers.-The New Eldorado.-The Greed for Gold.-Alaska the Synonym of Glacier Fields.-Vegetation of the Islands.-Aleutian Islands.-Attoo our most Westerly Possession.-Native Whalers.-Life on the Island of Attoo.-Unalaska.-Kodiak, former Capital of Russian America.-The Greek Church.-Whence the Natives originally came	109

CHAPTER IX.
Cook's Inlet.-Manufacture of Quass.-Native Piety.-Mummies.-The North Coast.-Geographical Position.-Shallowness of Behring Sea.-Alaskan Peninsula.-Size of Alaska.-A "Terra Incognita."-Reasons why Russia sold it to our Government.-The Price comparatively Nothing.-Rental of the Seal Islands.-Mr. Seward's Purchase turns out to be a Bonanza	127

CHAPTER X.
Territorial Acquisitions.-Population of Alaska.-Steady Commercial Growth.-Primeval Forests.-The Country teems with Animal Life.-A Mighty Reserve of Codfish.-Native Food.-Fur-Bearing Animals.-Islands of St. George and St. Paul.-Interesting Habits of the Fur-Seal.-The Breeding Season.-Their Natural Food.-Mammoth Size of the Bull Seals	143

CHAPTER XI.
Enormous Slaughter of Seals.-Manner of Killing.-Battles between the Bulls.-A Mythical Island.-The Seal as Food.-The Sea-Otter.-A Rare and Valuable Fur.-The Baby Sea-Otter.-Great Breeding-Place of Birds.-Banks of the Yukon River.-Fur-Bearing Land Animals.-Aggregate Value of the Trade.-Character of the Native Race	159

viiiCHAPTER XII.
Climate of Alaska.-Ample Grass for Domestic Cattle.-Winter and Summer Seasons.-The Japanese Current.-Temperature in the Interior.-The Eskimos.-Their Customs.-Their Homes.-These Arctic Regions once Tropical.-The Mississippi of Alaska.-Placer Mines.-The Natives.-Strong Inclination for Intoxicants	173

CHAPTER XIII.
Sailing Northward.-Chinese Labor.-Unexplored Islands.-The Alexander Archipelago.-Rich Virgin Soil.-Fish Cunning.-Myriads of Salmon.-Native Villages.-Reckless Habits.-Awkward Fashions and their Origin.-Tattooing Young Girls.-Peculiar Effect of Inland Passages.-Mountain Echoes.-Moonlight and Midnight on the Sea	186

CHAPTER XIV.
The Alaskan's Habit of Gambling.-Extraordinary Domestic Carvings.-Silver Bracelets.-Prevailing Superstitions.-Disposal of the Dead.-The Native "Potlatch."-Cannibalism.-Ambitions of Preferment.-Human Sacrifices.-The Tribes slowly decreasing in Numbers.-Influence of the Women.-Witchcraft.-Fetich Worship.-The Native Canoes.-Eskimo Skin Boats	199

CHAPTER XV.
Still sailing Northward.-Multitudes of Water-Fowls.-Native Graveyards.-Curious Totem-Poles.-Tribal and Family Emblems.-Division of the Tribes.-Whence the Race came.-A Clew to their Origin.-The Northern Eskimos.-A Remarkable Museum of Aleutian Antiquities.-Jade Mountain.-The Art of Carving.-Long Days.-Aborigines of the Yukon Valley.-Their Customs	212

ixCHAPTER XVI.
Fort Wrangel.-Plenty of Wild Game.-Natives do not care for Soldiers, but have a Wholesome Fear of Gunboats.-Mode of Trading.-Girls' School and Home.-A Deadly Tragedy.-Native Jewelry and Carving.-No Totem-Poles for Sale.-Missionary Enterprises.-Progress in Educating Natives.-Various Denominations engaged in the Missionary Work	222

CHAPTER XVII.
Schools in Alaska.-Natives Ambitious to learn.-Wild Flowers.-Native Grasses.-Boat Racing.-Avaricious Natives.-The Candle Fish.-Gold Mines Inland.-Chinese Gold-Diggers.-A Ledge of Garnets.-Belief in Omens.-More Schools required.-The Pestiferous Mosquito.-Mosquitoes and Bears.-Alaskan Fjords.-The Patterson Glacier	231

CHAPTER XVIII.
Norwegian Scenery.-Lonely Navigation.-The Marvels of Takou Inlet.-Hundreds of Icebergs.-Home of the Frost King.-More Gold Deposits.-Snowstorm among the Peaks.-Juneau the Metropolis of Alaska.-Auk and Takou Indians.-Manners and Customs.-Spartan Habits.-Disposal of Widows.-Duels.-Sacrificing Slaves.-Hideous Customs still prevail	246

CHAPTER XIX.
Aboriginal Dwellings.-Mastodons in Alaska.-Few Old People alive.-Abundance of Rain.-The Wonderful Treadwell Gold Mine.-Largest Quartz Crushing Mill in the World.-Inexhaustible Riches.-Other Gold Mines.-The Great Davidson Glacier.-Pyramid Harbor.-Native Frauds.-The Chilcats.-Mammoth Bear.-Salmon Canneries	258

xCHAPTER XX.
Glacier Bay.-More Ice Bays.-Majestic Front of the Muir Glacier.-The Bombardment of the Glacier.-One of the Grandest Sights in the World.-A Moving River of Ice.-The Natives.-Abundance of Fish.-Native Cooking.-Wild Berries.-Hoonish Tribe.-Copper Mines.-An Iron Mountain.-Coal Mines	275

CHAPTER XXI.
Sailing Southward.-Sitka, Capital of Alaska.-Transfer of the Territory from Russia to America.-Site of the City.-The Old Castle.-Russian Habits.-A Haunted Chamber.-Russian Elegance and Hospitality.-The Old Greek Church.-Rainfall at Sitka.-The Japanese Current.-Abundance of Food.-Plenty of Vegetables.-A Fine Harbor	293

CHAPTER XXII.
Contrast between American and Russian Sitka.-A Practical Missionary.-The Sitka Industrial School.-Gold Mines on the Island.-Environs of the Town.-Future Prosperity of the Country.-Hot Springs.-Native Religious Ideas.-A Natural Taste for Music.-A Native Brass Band.-Final View of the Capital	304

CHAPTER XXIII.
The Return Voyage.-Prince of Wales Island.-Peculiar Effects.-Island and Ocean Voyages contrasted.-Labyrinth of Verdant Islands.-Flora of the North.-Political Condition of Alaska.-Return to Victoria.-What Clothing to wear on the Journey North.-City of Vancouver.-Scenes in British Columbia.-Through the Mountain Ranges	321

xiCHAPTER XXIV.
In the Heart of the Rocky Mountains.-Struggle in a Thunder-Storm.-Grand Scenery.-Snow-Capped Mountains and Glaciers.-Banff Hot Springs.-The Canadian Park.-Eastern Gate of the Rockies.-Calgary.-Natural Gas.-Cree and Blackfeet Indians.-Regina.-Farming on a Big Scale.-Port Arthur.-North Side of Lake Superior.-A Midsummer Night's Dream	338





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