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Title: A Summer in Maryland and Virginia - Or Campaigning with the 149th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. A Sketch of Events Connected with the Service of the Regiment in Maryland and the Shenandoah Valley, Virginia
Author: Perkins, George
Language: English
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Transcriber’s note:

      Text enclosed by underscores is in italics (_italics_).

      The table of contents is unusual. Seven of the topics in the
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A SUMMER IN MARYLAND and VIRGINIA

Or Campaigning with the 149th Ohio Volunteer Infantry

A Sketch of Events Connected with the Service of the Regiment in
Maryland and the Shenandoah Valley, Virginia

Written by

GEORGE PERKINS, a member of Company A, at the earnest request of his
Comrades of the Regiment.

CHILLICOTHE,      OHIO



The Scholl Printing Company
Chillicothe, Ohio



                                FOREWORD


In preparing this sketch of the 149th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry,
the author has depended upon the memory of events that made a lasting
impression upon a young mind. He does not claim to have written a full
history of this service, that is stored in the memories and experiences
of the different members of the Regiment. He does claim, however, that
the main facts and movements of the Regiment and the other bodies of
troops associated with it in the field, are accurate.

The writer was fortunate in making a record of dates and incidents, soon
after his return, which record has been invaluable in the preparation of
this sketch.

If the little booklet will be interesting to my comrades, or of any
value in a historical way, I shall feel amply repaid for the labor in
preparing it.

                                                          GEORGE PERKINS



                               DEDICATION


This book is dedicated to the memory of our beloved Colonel Allison L.
Brown. A brave soldier, a Christian gentleman, and a good friend of
every member of his Regiment. He died as he had lived, in the good
esteem of the community, and the love of his comrades.

                         “Peace to his ashes.”

[Illustration:

  COL. ALLISON L. BROWN

  (from a war time photograph)

  Enlisted as a private in Co. C 73d O. V. I., promoted to Sergeant;
    resigned for promotion; recruited a company for the 89th O. V. I.;
    commissioned Captain of Co. D 89th O. V. I.; resigned on account of
    ill health. Elected Colonel of the 2d Ross County Militia Regiment,
    afterward the 27th Regiment, Ohio National Guard. Commissioned
    Colonel of the 149th O. V. I.; elected State Senator in 1875, served
    four years; re-elected in 1879. Died October 26th, 1879.

  Colonel Ally.]

[Illustration:

  CAPTAIN W. W. PEABODY

  Captain of Company A 149th O. V. I.; commander of the garrison of Fort
    No. 1, Baltimore, Md.; Major on the staff of Brigadier General John
    C. Kenley, commanding the Independent Brigade of the Eighth Army
    Corps.

  Our Captain “Billy”
  Died October 14th, 1910]



                                CONTENTS


                                                         Page

          Organization of the Hundred Days Service         13

          149th Ordered to Baltimore, Md.                  16

          At Fort No. 1                                    17

          Gen. Early’s Invasion of Maryland                18

          Battle of Monocacy                               19

          Edward’s Ferry                                   25

          Cattle in the Corn                               25

          Night March to Washington                        26

          Negro Cabin in Vale                              27

          The Negroes                                      28

          Wreck of the Sutler                              31

          Mosby’s Attack at Berryville, Va.                34

          Return to Camp Dennison                          38

          My Capture and Prison, Wm. McCommon              39

          Note by George Perkins                           45

          Memories of our Service, Major Rozell            46

          Incident in Unwritten History, Lt. McKee         48

          Personal Experiences in Prison, W. R. Browning   51

          Incidents                                        61

          Conclusion                                       65

          Roster                                           69



                Organization of the Hundred Days Service


The winter of 1863–4 on the banks of the Rapidan was passed in
preparation by both Grant and Lee’s armies for that wrestle of giants
that was to begin in May in the wilderness and end at Appomattox in the
following April.

In the southwest Sherman had won Missionary Ridge and Chicamauga and was
getting ready for his Atlanta campaign, and a great force was doing
garrison duty at various points. General Grant told the President that
if he could have thirty thousand new men to relieve the veterans, he
could capture Richmond and push the war to an end during the summer.
This was a difficult proposition on account of resistance to the draft,
and the vigorous activity of the Knights of the Golden Circle and the
copperheads in the North.

President Lincoln, however, acting on the suggestion, called to
Washington for conference the loyal Governors of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois
and Iowa. At this meeting Governor John Brough of Ohio said he would
furnish thirty thousand men to serve for one hundred days. Governor
Morton of Indiana promised twenty-five thousand. Governor Yates of
Illinois twenty thousand, and Stone of Iowa, ten thousand. Governor
Brough returned to Ohio, and at once began active work.

On April 23d he issued general order No. 12 calling the National Guard
of Ohio into active service for one hundred days, unless sooner
discharged, to rendezvous on Monday, May 2d, and to report on that day
the number of men present for duty. This call was responded to with
alacrity, reports coming in showing thirty-two thousand present. The
27th Regiment of Ross County reported five hundred and ninety-six men.

This Regiment had been organized under a law passed in 1863, forming the
Militia into volunteer Companies and Regiments. The 27th was enrolled
with the following roster of officers: Colonel, Allison L. Brown; Lt.
Col., James H. Haynes; Major, Ebenezer Rozelle; Adjutant, Robert
Larrimore; Quartermaster, D. C. Anderson.

The North had suffered an enormous drain upon her resources, had seen
her men sent home from the front, suffering from disease and wounds,
pitiful survivors of battles in which thousands had gone down to death.
The romance and glamor of war had gone, the horror of it remained. There
was scarcely a family in the North who did not suffer sorrow that cannot
be described, hardly a fireside that did not mourn for a husband or
lover, brother or friend, who went forth with pride, never to return.
Under such circumstances the men of the hundred days service, knowing
just what to expect, hastily arranged their affairs, and from the
stores, work-shops and farms, flocked to the defence of their country in
the hour of its direst need.

On Wednesday, May 4th, the 27th Regiment O. N. G. reported at Camp
Dennison. It was a cold, disagreeable day. Snow fell that afternoon, a
day on which men would rather have remained by their own fireside, but a
firm determination of duty urged them on.

It was found necessary now to have a reconstruction of the Regiments and
Battalions. The eight companies of the 27th were by consolidation
reduced to seven. Three companies of the 55th Battalion from Clinton
County were added, making ten companies. By orders, the Lieut. Colonel
and Adjutant were relieved, and returned to their homes. The Regiment
entered the United States service as the 149th Ohio Volunteer Infantry.

In the organization of the National Guard, it was generally understood
that it was for state service only. The call for active service came at
a time when to go entailed great personal sacrifice of business
interests on the part of its members. Farmers with scarcity of help,
turned over their work to their wives, who in this time of emergency
proved themselves helpmeets indeed, carrying the business of the season
thru. A few of the members of the Guard were discontented, and by the
help of Southern sympathizers, endeavored to fan this sentiment into a
flame, and to induce the men to refuse to enter the service. However, to
the credit of the men, after an address, delivered by Governor Brough at
Camp Dennison, only one Company of the Guard refused to go, and they
were promptly and dishonorably mustered out. The officers of the 149th
O. V. I. as re-organized were as follows: Colonel, Allison L. Brown;
Lieut. Colonel, Owen West; Major, E. Rozelle; Adjutant, T. Q.
Hildebrant; Q. M., D. C. Anderson; Surgeon, W. A. Brown; Assistant
Surgeon, B. F. Miesse; Chaplain, W. Morris. Non-commissioned staff: Sgt.
Major, George L. Wolfe; Quartermaster Sgt., Austin H. Brown; Commissary
Sgt., Edward F. Beall; Hospital Steward, James F. Sproat.

From May 4th until the 11th the Regiment remained at Camp Dennison,
during which time they were uniformed, armed and equipped, and mustered
into the United States service. On the night of May 11th orders came for
the Regiment to report to Gen. Lew Wallace at Baltimore, Md., going by
way of Columbus and Pittsburg. We started at midnight, being crowded
into box cars, without a seat or bed except the floor. We rode in this
manner for three days and four nights. Thursday noon found us still
south of Xenia, and did not reach Pittsburg until Friday evening. There
the Regiment was handsomely received. We marched to a hall where a
bountiful supper was provided for us by the loyal ladies of that city.
That supper to the tired, hungry soldiers was an event long to be
remembered. The good people of Pittsburg fed every Regiment that passed
through, going or returning. Early the next morning we passed Altoona,
Pa., and the great “Horse Shoe Bend.” At this point one of the brakes on
our car dropped to the track as we were descending the steep mountain
grade; we could hear it “bump, bump,” on the track, but luckily it held,
or the history of the 149th would have ended then and there. Nothing
could have prevented the train rolling over the mountain side.

However, the longest ride must have an end. Our train pulled into
Baltimore at 3 o’clock Sunday morning. As soon as possible Col. Brown
reported to General Wallace, and the Regiment was assigned to duty at
several points in the city, relieving the 8th N. Y. Heavy Artillery,
Col. Porter commanding. Col. Porter with his command, two thousand
strong, immediately left for the front, and after six weeks but seven
hundred remained, the Col. and all of his staff being killed.

Companies A and F 149th were assigned to Fort No. 1 on the outskirts of
Baltimore, Capt. Wm. W. Peabody of Co. A being appointed Garrison
Commander.

Between the days of May 4 and 16, 35,982 men, composing forty-one
Regiments and one Battalion, were consolidated, organized, mustered,
clothed, armed and turned over to the United States military authorities
for assignment. The Guard was composed of the most substantial men left
in the state, men of every department of trade, and of every profession.
Ohio had at that time sent ten per cent of her entire population into
the army. What a sacrifice on the altar of the country was this great
outburst of patriotism.

Companies A and F settled down to routine garrison duty at Fort No. 1.
Cooks were detailed and the men assigned to barracks, Co. A occupying
the first floor and Co. F the second. The duties of the day after roll
call consisted of dress parade and guard mounting. Guard duty, was by
detail, two hours on, and four hours off each being held for duty
twenty-four hours. Time was given the men for many trips into the city,
and this part of our service was very pleasant and safe. Many of our
friends from Ohio came to visit us while we were there and brought
money, and good things to eat for the boys. Four Companies of the
Regiment were assigned to Fort Federal Hill, and Cos. D, K and I at
Headquarters in Baltimore. On May 25th several companies were sent to
the eastern shore of Maryland, with Headquarters at Salisbury. They had
orders to quell the rebellion sympathizers, and to do Provost guard duty
at that point, to guard the telegraph lines and to patrol the Bay for
smugglers. The author’s service being with Company A, he is more
conversant with the movements of the Regiment in which that Company took
part. The memory of it all is dim. Like a dream in the night, it is
misty and seems to have occurred ages ago. We who were just boys of from
fifteen to eighteen years of age at that time, are now the aged and
broken veterans, and the youngsters of today look upon us, just as we
used to think of the old Revolutionary soldiers, when we were young. But
we were having too good a time in Baltimore for it to last. The last
opportunity we had to go down town was on the evening of the 4th of July
when there was a grand display of fireworks.

About this time we began to hear rumors of Gen. Early’s invasion of
Maryland and Pennsylvania, and it was reported that he was marching on
toward Baltimore. He came within four miles of the city and burned the
residence of Governor Bradford. In Baltimore the excitement was intense.
The bells of the city on that Sunday morning called the citizens to man
the Forts, to dig ditches, and throw up earthworks, instead of the
church service, and thousands responded to the all. Lieutenant Runkle of
the regulars assumed command at Fort No. 1 and began a rigid drill in
heavy artillery, our guns were manned, loaded with shell and sighted at
prominent houses, groves, etc., that might give shelter to the enemy.
This drill was kept up for two days and nights, the men sleeping at
their posts, expecting the ball to open at any moment. But Early
withdrew his forces and with haste, again entered the Shenandoah Valley.

On July 1st General Early received orders to invade Maryland and advance
on Washington. He began preparations by forcing General Siegel to
retreat to Maryland Heights where he was cooped up. Early moved by
flank, entered Maryland and advanced to Frederick City. On the 9th of
July the battle of Monocacy was fought. We at Fort No. 1 began to see
some of our soldiers come in from the battle field, among them being
Assistant Surgeon Miesse and Chaplain Morris, who stopped at the Fort
and gave us an account of the battle. Gen. Wallace had gathered a force
of twenty-eight hundred men, consisting of one Maryland Regiment and the
rest were hundred days men, among them being the 144th Ohio, and seven
companies of the 149th. On the 8th of July a brigade of Ricketts’
Division of the Sixth Corps came up on a train of cars bound for
Harper’s Ferry. Wallace informed the Commander “that if he wanted to get
to Harper’s Ferry he would have to get the consent of Jubal Early.” He
stopped the Brigade and put it in position. During the night Ricketts
came up with his other Brigade. He wanted to know what Wallace proposed
to do, and was informed that he proposed to fight. Ricketts laughed and
said, “with my division and your hundred day men you have only about
6,000. Do you expect to whip Early?” “No,” replied Wallace, “but I
propose to make him do two things, develop his strength and whither he
is bound.”

If bound for Washington he thought he could delay him at least
twenty-four hours, and it would take him two more days to get to
Washington, and in that time Grant could get troops from City Point in
time to save the Capitol, but without that Early would be in Washington
when there was not a man in the entrenchments. Gen. Ricketts agreed with
him, and his division was placed. Colonel Brown was ordered to the Stone
Bridge over the Monocacy where the Frederick and Baltimore turnpike
crosses. His orders were to hold the bridge at all hazards, but if
pressed too hard the men were to scatter and save themselves the best
they could. The forces under Wallace numbered 5,500, while those of
Early were 23,000 of the pick of the Confederate Armies.

Long before daylight on July 9th the 149th was in position at the
bridge. They did not have to wait long until Early’s troops were seen
passing through Frederick, bound for Washington. Then came the tug of
war. Gen. Wallace deployed his men as skirmishers and attracted the
attention of the enemy, the object being to deceive him as to the
numbers opposing him. They held him in check from daylight until late in
the afternoon. During the last hour the only force opposing this veteran
army of Earlys was the 149th Ohio. At four o’clock in the afternoon
Wallace seeing that his army would be either captured or annihilated,
ordered a retreat of all but the 149th. This Regiment was to cover the
retreat, and to be sacrificed to save the rest of the army. This was
shown by the orders sent to Col. Brown, which were as follows:

                                         4:30 P. M., July 9th, 1864.

    Colonel:

    Major General Wallace directs me to say that he directs that you
    hold your position to the very last extremity, and, when nothing
    more can be done, that you fall back, and if pressed, direct
    your men to disperse and take care of themselves. This is to be
    done when nothing more can be done to retard the enemy’s
    progress.

                                          Respectfully,
                                                  E. B. Tyler,
                                                          Brig. Gen.

Col. Brown was unaware of the retreat of the rest of the army and was
left alone in advance of the stone bridge, beating back the repeated
attacks of the enemy until 5:30. At that time a farmer living near
informed him of the retreat of the whole Union army except his Regiment,
and that they were a mile and a half away. So he gave the order to
retreat. Adjutant Hildebrand was sent with three companies and deployed
as skirmishers on the left. They showed such steadiness that Early
stopped to reform his lines, and behind this thin curtain of skirmishers
the Regiment cut its way through and escaped to the north and toward
Baltimore.

When Col. Brown and his brave little army overtook General Wallace, the
latter was much affected. He embraced him, the tears starting from his
eyes, and said, “Colonel, I never expected to see you again.”

General Grant in his report says “they saved Washington.” The 149th in
this engagement lost 130 men in killed, wounded and prisoners. The
performance of the hundred days men was a revelation to the old
soldiers, and a surprise to the enemy. They did not know when they were
whipped. Everywhere their duty was well performed. On the long forced
marches, sometimes hundreds of miles with insufficient rations,
suffering from thirst, tramping the dusty roads with blistered feet, it
was all done and suffered by the men cheerfully, and as well as by the
veterans of long service. I heard one of the men of the 19th Corps say,
“We have served for three years but have never seen campaigning like
this.” Gen. Tyler in his official report of the battle of Monocacy says:

    “It seldom falls to the lot of veterans to be more tried than
    was the Ohio National Guard at the stone bridge, and none ever
    carried out trying and hazardous orders better, or with more
    determined spirit than did the 149th Ohio, and the men
    associated with it.”

The enemy had seized the time when Grant had depleted the defensive
forces of the Capitol, to endeavor to capture Washington. Early charged
up to the very boundary of the city expecting to find the rich prize an
easy prey, but the stubborn resistance of the Guard at Monocacy and
their vigilance in the forts at Washington were more than a match for
all the vaunted dash and daring of his veterans, and he was compelled to
retire before the raw Militia of the Buckeye State. This was a source of
deep humiliation to the dashing Rebel General which he never got over to
the day of his death. Whether the hundred days man was on the alert in
the entrenchments of the capital, battling at the front with the veteran
forces of the Confederacy or skirmishing on the lines of supply with the
wary foe in the rugged passes of the Alleghanies, they were each in his
place doing their duty manfully toward the great and final victory which
came a few months later.

Lincoln and Grant both said that the services of the hundred days men
shortened the war, and, that the President appreciated their service was
shown by his issuing a special card of thanks, a copy of which was sent
to every man in this service. This was a special favor from the hand of
our great war President, that no other troops received, and one of which
we can well be proud. It was a tribute to bravery from the great, noble
heart of the kindest soul that ever lived on earth.

Gen. J. B. Gordon of the Confederate army whose division was with Early
in the fight at Monocacy, says:

“The battle of Monocacy was short, decisive and bloody. While the two
armies were contemplating each other from the opposite banks, my
division was selected, not to prevent Wallace from driving us out of
Maryland, but to drive him from our front. My movement was down the
right bank of the Monocacy to a fording place below, the object being to
cross the river, and then turn upon the Federal stronghold. My hope and
effort were to conceal the movement from Wallace’s watchful eye, until
my troops were over, and then to apprise him of my presence on his side
of the river, by a sudden rush upon his left flank. But Gen.
McClausland’s Cavalry had already attacked a portion of his troops, and
he discovered the movement of my division before it could drag itself
through the water and up the slippery banks. He at once changed front,
and drew up his lines in strong position to meet the assault. This
movement presented new difficulties. Instead of finding the Union forces
still facing Early’s other divisions beyond the river, giving my
isolated command the immense advantage of a flank attack, I found myself
separated from all the Confederate infantry, with the bristling front of
Wallace’s army before me.

“In addition to this I found other troubles which mitigated against the
success of my movement. Across the fields through which we were to
advance, there were strong and high farm fences which my men must climb
while under fire. Worse still these fields were full of grain stacks so
high and close together that no line of battle could be maintained while
advancing through them. The movement began, and as my men reached the
first line of high fencing and began climbing over, they were met by a
tempest of bullets, and many fell at the first volley. They pressed on
and around the grain stacks, with no possibility of forming allignment
or returning effective fire. The men, deprived of the support and
strength of a compact line, pushed forward and drove the Federals back
to their second line. The Union troops stood firmly in this second
position, bravely defending the railroad and highway to Washington.
Between the two hostile lines there was a narrow ravine, down which ran
a stream of limpid water. In this ravine the fighting was desperate and
at close quarters. To and fro the battle swayed across the little
stream, the dead and wounded on both sides mingling their blood in its
waters, and when the struggle was ended a crimson current ran toward the
river. Nearly one-half of my men fell there. Wallace’s army, after the
most stubborn resistance, was driven in the direction of Baltimore. The
Confederate victory was won at fearful cost, but it was complete, and
the way was opened for Gen. Early’s march to Washington.”

On the 12th day of July Companies A and F under marching orders, left
Fort No. 1 and Baltimore for Washington City, where we arrived early the
next morning. We lay at the depot until ten o’clock, when we were
ordered to “fall in” and with the balance of the Regiment marched up
Pennsylvania Ave., greeted by the cheers of the crowds who lined the
sidewalks and filled the windows of the buildings. We marched past the
White House and the Treasury buildings. At the latter we saw President
Lincoln on the steps waving his high hat as we marched by. We went over
into Georgetown, where, after a short rest, we joined the 19th Corps in
the chase of Early, who, after being repulsed at Fort Stephens retreated
to the Shenandoah Valley. We marched to Edwards Ferry, on the Potomac,
which we forded about five o’clock in the evening. Disrobing, we tied
our clothes around our guns, and at “right shoulder shift arms” entered
the water. It was an amusing sight to look up and across the river, at
the boys struggling through the water. It was about waist deep and some
current. The rocks on the river bottom were slippery, and every little
while a boy would go down, gun, clothes and all under water, to struggle
on again amid the cheers and laughter of his comrades. But we finally
all crossed over and we were told not to dress until we had forded Goose
Creek which entered the Potomac a short distance ahead. Early in his
haste to get away had burned some of his wagons on the road, and we, in
our bare feet had to pick our way carefully through the ashes, which
were still glowing. It was amusing. We camped that night on the banks of
Goose Creek. The next morning early the march was resumed and we went
into camp at Leesburg, Va., where we rested the balance of the day and
night. We were ordered to guard the wagon train, and by easy marches
reached Snickers Gap on July 17. Our train was halted about a mile back
of the Gap and our Regiment camped on a mountain side.



                          CATTLE IN THE CORN.


While resting in the camp on this mountain slope, from which the corn
fields stretched away for miles, the army cattle were driven up, the
fence bars were let down and the cattle turned in to a large field,
beautiful in its waving green product. In one hour’s time that field
looked like new ploughed ground, not a green blade was left. The army
advanced to the Gap, and in crossing the ford the enemy opened fire upon
them, and a brisk engagement followed. From our position we could hear
the cannon and see the smoke of the battle. This continued until sunset.
We were ordered out on picket, and took our posts in the woods, being
cautioned to keep a sharp outlook. Our troops began to fall back, and
our second sergeant brought in the pickets exclaiming in breathless
haste “The army is cut to pieces and in full retreat.”

Of course we hurried back into ranks, drew forty rounds of cartridges,
and, guarding the wagon train started on the “double quick” for
Washington. This was at nine o’clock at night. We marched without a stop
until eight o’clock the next morning, when we halted at Leesburg. That
night in passing through burning pine woods the train was fired upon
from ambush and some were wounded. During this hard night march the men
walked along nearly asleep on their feet, and if there was a temporary
halt they dropped in the dusty road, asleep instantly. After a short
rest at Leesburg we pushed on and went into camp near “Chain Bridge” at
Washington. We arrived at night, completely worn out from our long
forced march. The Regiment stacked arms, spread blankets on the ground
and lay down to sleep. We lay upon our gum blankets and covered with the
woolen ones. During the night it turned quite cool and rained hard. We
were soaked through when we awoke in the morning. We started fires, made
coffee, ate some hard tack, then wrapping our blankets around us, sat
down in the mud to silent meditation. It rained hard until about noon,
then began to break away. By night it was clear and we had a good sleep.

The next morning, July 21st, we drew new shoes, formed ranks, crossed
the bridge and followed the Sixth Corps who were just breaking camp as
we came up. We marched through Maryland via Rockville to the battle
field of Monocacy, which we passed over. We saw there the signs of the
fierce fighting, the high fences full of bullet holes, and the grain
stacks that obstructed Gordon’s advance. We forded the river and marched
on through Frederick city. Some of the boys of Company A at this point
“straggled” and slept in the fields just beyond the town. They came up
with the regiment the next day in time to draw rations, and resumed the
march until we reached Harper’s Ferry. Somewhere on this march an
incident occurred that made an impression upon my mind that I will never
forget. I call it



                      THE NEGRO CABIN IN THE VALE


The army had halted at noon for a little rest and dinner. Four of us,
comrades, went into the woods in search of berries. Pushing along
through the pines we came to a deep valley in which was a little
clearing and a small log cabin. A tiny brook flowed down the vale, and
the dark pine woods shut in a scene of beauty. It was the home of a
negro family, who were all out in front, listening to the banjo played
by one of our colored teamsters. He was a fat, oily, good natured
fellow, black as ink. Seated on a stump with his eyes rolling in ecstacy
and a broad grin showing his ivory teeth, he was an example of the
happy, carefree contraband of those days. After listening awhile we
passed on and after getting some blackberries we returned the same way.
The family were seated at dinner and when we looked in, saw the white
table cloth and the dishes, with the family and the banjo player seated
around the table, eating, our mouths watered and we wished we could sit
with them. Thoughts of home and of our friends, at their tables in the
distant north, filled our minds as we made our way back to the dusty
turnpike and again took up the weary march. This scene was an oasis in
our desert of dust, and its memory is pleasant.



                              THE NEGROES


While marching one hot, dusty day, a little negro boy, about ten years
of age, came out from a farm house and walked along with us, on his road
to freedom. After marching awhile he became very thirsty and appealed
from one soldier to another for a drink of water. He was refused by
several but his thirst increased and he became desperate. Rolling his
eyes in agony, with the tears streaming down his cheeks, he exclaimed,
“Please sir! for the love of God, Massa, give dis heah poor nigga a
drink of water.” We could not withstand such an appeal so we gave him a
drink from our canteen. I suppose he became tired and went back home
where there was plenty of water, at least we heard no more of him.

We did not see many negroes during our service. They hid away when the
army passed. Occasionally we would catch a glimpse of a colored woman
peeping from a door or window grinning at us. Two boys came back with us
from Virginia. By passing as body servants we brought them through to
Chillicothe. One was a black, ignorant fellow, by the name of Henry. He
was about town for several years, employed as a hosler. The other was a
bright mulatto, intelligent in conversation, but unable to read or
write. He was anxious to get an education. We afterward heard of him as
a school teacher near Chillicothe.

The negro could always be depended upon to assist Union soldiers in
their efforts to escape from prison, and they approached their cabins
with confidence, knowing that they would give them shelter and share
their last morsel of food with him, and guide him along his way. Many a
weary, hungry soldier has blessed the memory of his kind benefactors,
with black faces and white hearts. This was the experience of our two
boys, Cook and Martin, who escaped from Mosby, and has been the
experience of hundreds of others, who, escaping from the prison pens of
the south with the north star as a guide made their way through rugged
mountains and trackless forests, back to “God’s country.”

From Frederick, the army marched on to Harper’s Ferry. Crossing the
“Pontoon bridge” we passed through the town and went into camp at
Halltown. We reached this camp on July 23d and remained there two days.
The Sixth and Nineteenth Corps having passed up the Shenandoah Valley in
pursuit of Early. Gen. Crook’s forces engaged Early at Kernstown, but
losing heavily, had been forced back to the Potomac. This reverse caused
our forces to fall back to Maryland Heights. On July 25th our Regiment
“fell in” on the left and began what is known as the terrific “hot
march” The sun was blistering, the heat seemed concentrated in the
valley, while the dust rising in clouds was suffocating. As we plodded
along on this short march of four miles, men could be seen dropping from
sunstroke. I saw an officer throw up his hands and fall backward off his
horse. Comrades pulled them to the roadside and did what they could for
them. It was reported that thirty-five men had suffered sunstroke on
that hot afternoon.

We crossed the Potomac and began the ascent of Maryland Heights,
arriving at the summit about sunset. The view from the top of the
mountain was grand. Tier after tier of blue mountains fading away in the
distance, while a rebel wagon train moved slowly up the valley, shrouded
in a cloud of dust that looked like it was a mile high. That night there
came a welcome shower. The next morning we were ordered down and again
took up the march back to Monocacy junction. Our Commanding General
Kenley made the remark, “the boys were taken to the top of the mountain
to see the sun set.” We arrived at the junction in the evening and
rested. In the mean time our officers heard of the second invasion of
Pennsylvania. General McClausland with a body of Confederate Horse
crossed the river and pushed on to Chambersburg where he made a demand
upon the citizens for the sum of $500,000, threatening that if it was
not paid to burn the place. It was impossible for them to raise this
amount of money so he fired the city, reducing it to ashes. This was one
of the most cruel, wanton acts of the war, perpetrated upon defenceless
citizens. While we were rushing frantically up and down the valley of
the Shenandoah trying to find Early, his forces were marching through
Pennsylvania marauding at their leisure. At this time Gen. Grant came
over from Washington to consult with his Generals in regard to the
situation. While standing on the station platform I heard the following
conversation between Generals Grant and Hunter. Grant said, “General
Hunter, where is the enemy?” Hunter replied, with a tremor in his voice,
“I don’t know, General.” At this Grant in anger, exclaimed, “Move your
troops back to Harper’s Ferry, cut off his line of retreat and you will
find out.”

Orders were immediately given to return to the Ferry and the infantry
boarded a freight train and were rushed back to Harper’s Ferry.
McClausland in the meantime retired from his raid and escaped to the
south. We marched to our old camp ground at Halltown, arriving there
July 28th. We remained quietly here for two weeks. During this time our
boys, taking advantage of a well earned rest, engaged in all kinds of
pranks and amusements. We were paid off while here so we had some money.
The most striking event occurring here was



                        THE WRECK OF THE SUTLER


Sutlers, driving out from Baltimore, followed in the wake of the
paymasters, striking the camps when the boys had money, would sell their
wares at very high prices. A sutler drove up to the camp and had a
lively trade all day. He was finally ordered to move on by our officers
and toward dusk drove off. He was followed in the dark by a squad from
the Sixth Corps and three boys of Company A. His outfit was new, with a
fine team of horses. He drove along unconscious of danger. As he began
to pull up a hill with a high bank of a creek on one side, the soldiers
quietly unscrewed the nuts of the axletrees on that side, and horses,
wagon and driver rolled over into the creek. That night the camp was
full of delicacies, hams, cheeses, cakes, cans of condensed milk, etc.,
all hidden in convenient bushes. The sutler made a great ado about it
but the soldiers were all so innocent when brought before the officers
that the sutler could not fix the blame upon any particular ones, so he
was advised to return to Baltimore as quickly as possible. He went.

At this time dissatisfaction with Hunter’s policies became acute, and he
tendered his resignation. Gen. Grant had for some time been
contemplating organizing a new department to be known as the Army of the
Shenandoah with Gen. Phil. Sheridan at its head. Fears had been felt
that Sheridan was too young for such an important position. Grant,
however, had confidence that the right man had been found for the place.
Accordingly Sheridan was placed in command on August 7th and at once
began organizing his army. General Sheridan’s force consisted of the
Sixth Corps, one division of the Nineteenth Corps and two divisions from
W. Virginia under Crook, with Averell’s and Torbett’s divisions of
Cavalry. The Sixth Corps was commanded by Major Gen. Horatio G. Wright,
an engineer of high reputation but one of the few engineers who had
shown marked competency for a high command in the field. The divisions
of this Corps were commanded by those splendid officers, Gens. Geo. W.
Getty, David A. Russell and James B. Ricketts. Gen. William H. Emory was
in command of the Nineteenth Corps. Brigadier Gen. George Crook
commanded the two small divisions which represented the army of West
Virginia. Brigadier John C. Kenley’s independent brigade consisted of
the 144th and 149th Ohio, the 3d Maryland Infantry, and Alexander’s
battery of Light Artillery. It was an imposing army of young men,
numbering 30,000 Infantry and 10,000 Cavalry. On the 12th of August
Sheridan moved up the valley, passing along the road near our camp. The
General and his staff rode at the head of the column. The cavalry came
next riding in columns of four, followed by the Sixth and Nineteenth
Corps, the army of West Virginia and the Artillery. Our brigade was
detailed to guard the wagon train.

The mere statement gives no idea of the magnitude of this force, but
when I say that it took an entire day to pass our camp, the Cavalry and
Infantry in column of fours, some idea may be had of the grandeur of
this army. They were moving against Early, for the authorities at
Washington had become tired of the harassing raids of the rebels into
the north through the Shenandoah, which had almost become “the valley of
humiliation” to them. Our brigade was distributed through the length of
the train, each company in charge of thirty wagons. The day was pleasant
when we started. We marched through Charlestown where they had hung John
Brown. The place seemed deserted, the only sign of life being a negro
woman peeping at us from a half closed door. We pushed on, we had orders
to make Winchester by the next morning, for the army needed supplies.

Soon after dark, in spite of warning from the officers, the men began to
straggle, dropping out of ranks; some were getting into wagons, others
climbing the fences and sleeping in the fields, expecting to overtake
their command by morning. My chum, James Ghormley, and myself, after
marching until eleven o’clock at night, concluded that we were too tired
to go any longer that night, and that a good sleep was just what we
needed. We were within two miles of Berryville when this notion entered
our heads. When we awoke daylight was just visible, and we hurried on to
overtake our Regiment, expecting to boil coffee at the first fire we
came to. We walked on and soon came to where the train had “parked,”
that is, had encamped for the night, and were just pulling out. It has
been said that this stop was made without orders from our officers, but
that the rebels, riding along during the night dressed in our uniform,
saying they were aids, had given these orders, their object being to cut
off the train and attack it for plunder. Our little squad soon came to
where a company of the 144th Ohio were cooking breakfast. We asked
permission to boil coffee at their fire. This was readily given. We
stacked arms, and our coffee had just come to a boil when “bang! bang!”
came two artillery shots at us, scattering the limbs of the trees above
our heads. These shots were followed by a volley from a clump of woods.
Then they charged, yelling as they came. They were Mosby’s Guerrillas,
400 strong, made up of raiders, who disbanded when too hardly pressed
and became the innocent farmers of the valley. We grasped our guns,
leveled them over the stone wall, gave them one volley, when the Captain
in command gave the order to scatter and save ourselves. Well, we ran.
In the confusion Ghormley and I became separated and I saw him no more.
I was with the most of the company going up a steep lane toward a farm
house, about half a mile from the road, passed through a patch of corn
and an orchard, and came to the house. A man was sitting on the porch,
and he told me to run to the barn. I took his advice. The barn was a mow
on stilts, open on every side, and stood on high ground. I stopped for a
moment and looked over the field. The raiders were shooting our men down
in every direction. I climbed into the hay mow. If I hadn’t this story
would never have been written. Like the Irishman who was asked if he run
at the battle of Bull Run. “Shure I did, them that didn’t run are there
yet.” The fight was hot for a little while, but Mosby hurried for fear
of the army ahead. He captured 200 prisoners, 600 head of cattle and
burned 70 wagons. He expected to get the paymaster, who was with us,
with money for the army. The paymaster was shrewd; he had packed the
money in a cracker box and placed it in a wagon, keeping his strong box
in his own vehicle. During the fight this cracker box was tumbled down
the banks of a little creek that ran through the field. I saw it lying
there and after the skirmish the paymaster came back and got it. This
attack was a complete surprise and was a great loss to Sheridan’s army.
I joined our boys who were gathering together on the field. As I passed
through the house lot I saw lying on his face the body of a handsome
young lieutenant, who was shot by one of our company. The ball entered
his forehead and scattered his brains. He was Lieut. Eddy of Mosby’s
men, a member of one of the good families in Richmond, Va. Gen. Mosby
lamented his loss greatly, he being one of his most trusted men. Our
Colonel and Adjutant came riding back in full gallop and hastily
reformed the men, formed a skirmish line and scoured the field, picking
up discarded arms and compelling an old man who had come to the field
with a mule and cart, to pick up what he could and to haul them on to
Winchester. We guarded the wagons that were left on to Winchester, where
we found the Regiment. That night we slept on the stone pavements of the
town and on the next day were sent out on picket, south of the town. We
remained there two nights and a day. On the 15th of August we started on
our return early in the morning. Before starting Col. Brown made a
speech to the Regiment in which he berated them for straggling in the
enemy’s country, said “he would punish severely any disobedience of his
orders.” We reached Berryville at noon and camped at the farm where the
fight had taken place. Two wounded men of the 144th were lying on the
porch of the house. They informed us that almost every man of their
company had been captured. The 144th lost 130 men in this engagement.
Lieut. Eddy had been buried in a shallow grave in one corner of the
house lot. We kept a sharp outlook for our missing comrades, hoping that
they had made their way back to Harper’s Ferry.

On this return march occurred one of those events that made an
impression never to be forgotten.



                           JOHN BROWN’S BODY


It was nine o’clock at night on a beautiful summer night. The moon shone
brightly through the dark pines on the mountains, and glistened across
the guns of the great army that marched down the turnpike into old
Charlestown. The men were weary and foot sore from their long marches
and were swinging along carelessly. Suddenly someone started singing
“John Brown’s body lies a moldering in the tomb.” Companies, Regiments
and Corps took up the refrain, tired bodies straightened up, and took
step to the music. The grand chorus rang out “Glory, glory hallelujah”
until the mountains gave back the echo “Glory, glory hallelujah” as
though the hosts of Heaven were joining in the refrain “His soul is
marching on.” It was the song of triumph, and if the spirits of the
departed know of things on earth surely the shade of old John Brown was
gratified. Here he was hung, and in the graveyard his body was lying
“Moldering in the tomb,” but his soul was marching on in the ranks of
the thirty thousand soldiers who on that night marched through
Charlestown keeping step to the grand chorus, “Glory, glory hallelujah.”

We marched on and went into camp on Bolivar Heights, near Harper’s
Perry. Here we were joined by John Cook and Jeff Martin of Co. A, who
had been captured by Mosby but escaped the same day. They told us the
story of the capture, how the others had been taken south and they had
escaped. Mosby’s men after gaining the shelter of the mountains began to
examine their plunder and stopped to array themselves in new Union
officers’ uniforms. They were marching over a steep mountain road,
guarding prisoners, when a portion of them stopped, while those in front
passed on out of sight. This left the road clear without a guard in
sight. The two boys took advantage of the opportunity and made a break
for liberty. Down the mountain side they ran, stumbling and falling, but
straining every nerve for freedom. They were not missed apparently, for
the rebels did not pursue them. For three days they wandered through the
mountains, only approaching the negro cabins by night, where they always
found friends ready to feed them and help them on their way. Finally
they reached Harper’s Ferry and waited until we came up.

The two Regiments lay in Camp on Bolivar Heights for five days. The time
of our enlistment had expired ten days before and now we were a waiting
orders for returning to Ohio. We had served nearly four months and were
anxious to get back home. When Gen. Sheridan read the application for
our discharge he paid us the greatest compliment we had in our
experience. He said “I did not know that I had any hundred days men in
my army, they are all veterans.”

It rained hard all the time we remained on Bolivar Heights, but we did
not care, we were going home. At last orders came from headquarters for
our discharge. We were to report at Camp Dennison for final muster out.
Giving three cheers we started for Harper’s Ferry on a dark, rainy day.
Here we found a train awaiting us, which we boarded and at night pulled
out for Baltimore, getting there the next morning. We formed ranks and
marched to the Northern Central depot, and took a train for home. We
returned over the same route over which we came, with the same
accommodations. We had another good supper at Pittsburg and reached
Columbus, Ohio, at noon. We left our train, marched to Todd Barracks and
remained over night. The next day we rode to Camp Dennison, were
assigned to the same barracks that we had left four months previously.
Cooks were detailed and we remained there a week, until Aug. 30th, the
officers making out payrolls, discharges, etc. While there several
citizens of Chillicothe came to see us and we received many boxes of
good things to eat from home. Several of the boys left camp, walked to
the next station and came up home, returning to camp the next day. To
say that we were happy but faintly expresses it. We were finally
discharged from the United States service and paid off.

A special train was furnished, cars with seats in them, and we sped
homeward. When we arrived at Chillicothe we were met by a large
outpouring of the citizens, who, to music furnished by the German Brass
Band, escorted us up town. We marched up Main street, and we stepped
proudly, but were saddened as we passed the homes of James Ghormley and
Edward Armstrong. We were coming home, but these, our friends and
comrades, never returned. They starved to death in Salisbury, N. C.
prison pen.

The good people of Chillicothe had prepared a dinner for us in the
market house, and we did justice to it. After dinner we “fell in” for
the last time, marched up Paint street and drew up in front of the Court
House, where after a few remarks by the Colonel we broke ranks, each
went to his home, and the 149th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry,
became a memory.



                       MY CAPTURE AND PRISON LIFE

              _By William McCommon, Co. A, 149th O. V. I._


I was taken prisoner at Berryville, Va., on August 13th, 1864, at 4 A.
M., together with James Ghormley, Edward Armstrong, Eldridge Whipple and
George Fix, with one man by the name of Sayre of Co. P. These are all
that I can recall now. We were cooking coffee by the roadside when all
at once we heard the report of a cannon and the shell burst just over
our heads and came down through the branches of the trees we were under.
At that moment four hundred of Mosby’s mounted guerrillas came down on
us demanding our money, watches, jewelry or anything else of value we
had on our person. I had one dollar and forty cents. They told me to
give them the dollar and I could keep the forty cents, as I would need
that before we got back, which I found was the gospel truth. That rebel
was honest, anyhow.

They ordered us each to mount a mule and carry a six pound shell in each
hand until we crossed the Shenandoah river and then they would provide
some other way to carry them. I was riding a small mule and when about
the middle of the stream myself, mule and shells dropped into a hole,
and the shells are now lying on the bottom of the Shenandoah river. When
we got across a rebel sergeant asked me where my shells were. I told him
I did not know. He replied “I will report you to Col. Mosby and you will
have to pay for them.” That would be the first whack at my lone forty
cents. I heard no more about it until noon, when they drew us up in line
to count us. The sergeant asked “who is you all men that lost the shells
in the river?” Nobody knew anything about any shells and he did not
recognize me. He said to me, “You look like the man” but of course I did
not know anything about his old shells. That is the last I heard of
them.

Our dinner the first day was one loaf of bread cut in four pieces for
four men. I can say that none of us had to let out our trouser straps.
We marched thirty miles the first day and were pretty well tired out by
night, when they issued to each of us one pint of flour. This we mixed
with water and slapped it on a flat stone, which we propped up opposite
the fire and baked it. This tasted good to us but I am afraid it would
not pass muster at the Waldorf Astoria. Armstrong said he could not eat
his without butter, but we told him his complexion would be better if he
would abstain from butter. Finally he concluded that we were right and
let it go at that. A Lieutenant came along and asked how we were making
out. We told him that we were perfectly delighted with the menu. He said
“I am glad you have nothing to complain of.” The next day’s ride took us
to Culpepper C. H., the bracing air of Virginia still keeping our
appetites in fine shape. No breakfast this morning but had a bounteous
feast at noon. They cut a loaf in two for two men. It tasted good while
it lasted but the time seemed so short.

That afternoon Ghormley said he was going to make a break into the
bushes and get away. He jumped off his mule and had not gone more than
ten feet from the road when a guard spied him and fired six shots into
the bushes, when Ghormley came back in a hurry. He told the guard that
he only wanted to get some blackberries. He watched him closely after
that and told him “the next berries _you_ get will be lead berries.” At
the end of the third day we reached Lynchburg, Va., where we were put
into an old tobacco warehouse. There were three hundred prisoners there
when we arrived. We were quartered on the dirty floor, covered with
tobacco dust. You could hear the men sneeze in all languages. Our fare
was still one loaf of bread for two men. At this place our largest and
strongest man, Henry Benner, a wagon maker from Chillicothe, said “Boys,
we will never get out of this alive.” He began to weaken right there,
and in three weeks from that time he died of home sickness. We tried to
shame him out of it, saying, “You are the healthiest man in the bunch
and you will live through it if any one will.” One morning I found him
lying dead on the ground, the first one of our little party to go. They
kept us at this place for four weeks and then moved us to Richmond, Va.
As we marched past Libbey Prison we heard some one calling from an upper
window, “Hey! there! old 149th.” It was Major Rozell who had been
captured the same morning that we were. In the fight at Berryville the
Major was wounded in the elbow and had been taken direct to Libbey. We
were not allowed to speak to him and I have never seen him since. I hear
that he is still living in Missouri, having received a letter from him
some time ago.

We remained in Richmond one night, when they took us across the river to
Belle Island, where the hardest part of our prison life began. It was a
bleak spot, bare of trees. Some few of the prisoners had tattered tents,
the majority had none. It rained every day while we were there and the
fog was so thick you could almost cut it until about noon, when it would
fix for another rain. We had no protection whatever from this weather,
and we would walk around in the night in the rain until we fell asleep
on the muddy ground. We would lie there until awakened by the intense
cold, to get up and walk again. Here they fed us on wild pea soup,
flavored with ox tail, without dressing. No napkins went with this
course, and the meals were never on time, as it took the cooks an hour
or more to skim the maggots off the soup, as they wanted our meals to
come to us perfectly clean, so we could not tell our folks at home that
they did not understand their business.

Here is where Armstrong told us “Boys we are never going to make it.” We
answered “Now you commence and you will go like Benner.” All the sick
men at Belle Isle were to be transferred to City Point, an order having
been issued to that effect. Whipple was not feeling well so I told him
that I would try to get him off on the boat. I told him as we neared the
boat for him to fall down and I would call the officers attention to
him. As we had not rehearsed the part, he fell down too soon. I said
“You fell down too soon. Wait until I give the word and then fall.” We
came near making a mess of it, as it was. He began to laugh about the
time for him to fall, but the officers did not see him laugh. The doctor
asked me “what is the matter with that man?” I told him “I did not know
but he was awful sick.” He finally passed him to City Point. I heard
after getting home that he got as far as Annapolis, Md., and had died
there. I fully expected to see him when I got home, as I knew the others
were dead. He was a baker by trade and worked in Chillicothe before his
enlistment. We remained for seven weeks on Belle Isle, when we were sent
to Salisbury, N. C. We thought Belle Island was awful, but this place,
no man can describe it, only an ex-prisoner of war. The stockade, I
think, contained twenty acres and was fenced with trees split in half,
with several large gates. A large brick building occupied part of the
ground, which was formerly the North Carolina Penitentiary. It had three
stories, the upper story, when we were there, being used as a jail for
rebel deserters and other outlaws from the rebel army. If there ever was
a more villainous looking set of men, I never saw them. The first night
I was there I went up to this third story to sleep, as it was raining
hard, not knowing anything about the place. A man came to me and asked
me if I knew what kind of a place I was in? I told him I did not. He
said “get out of here as quietly as possible or they would throw me out
of the window.” I went instanter.

Within a month Ghormley and Armstrong both died. I was going around the
grounds one morning (we had long lost all dates) when I saw Edward
Armstrong lying dead on the ground. I scarcely recognized him, he was so
black from stooping over the little pine knot fires. The dead wagon
carried him away.

About a week later James Ghormley died. I was talking with him the night
before. He said “I cannot last but a day or two.” I tried to cheer him
up but it was of no use. This left me the only one of our boys alive
that I knew of. The last I saw of Armstrong and Ghormley they were piled
on the dead wagon that came in twice a day to collect the dead. The
corpses were piled in, one on top of another like so many logs, taken
out and buried in trenches. I remained there three months longer and was
just about ready to give up when one morning a rebel lieutenant came to
me and said, “Here, you cussed Yank, get up to the gate, you are to be
exchanged.” I told him that was an old story. He said “stay there then.”
I told him I could not walk so he had me carried to the gate. There were
a thousand loaves of corn bread lying on the ground. They told each man
to take a loaf, as that would have to last us until we got into our
lines. We were three days getting to the Union lines and our loaves
looked very small when we arrived at Wilmington, N. C., where we were
exchanged.

We ran in on a foggy morning. One of our boys cried out “there is our
flag.” You cannot realize how we felt, how we tried to raise a feeble
cheer, when we knew that we were in God’s country once more. We were
ordered to “pile off” which we did in short order. There were piles of
broken crackers and scraps of meat lying on the ground, which had been
tramped upon by men and horses, and we began to eat it greedily until we
were stopped by our officers putting a guard around us. They told us not
to eat that garbage, as Uncle Sam’s rations would be ready in a few
minutes. It seemed like a dream to us, we were in a heaven of happiness.
We were kept in a hospital at Wilmington for about a week, and then we
were sent to Annapolis, Md., by transport. At Annapolis we were put in
tent hospital after burning all our clothes and the “varmints” that went
with them. They then cut our hair close, turned the hose on us, gave
each man a good scrubbing and clothed us in _night gowns_ as our
uniforms had not arrived from New York. We remained in hospital for two
weeks, when we were sent to general hospital at Baltimore, Md., where
our record was taken. My weight at that time being 85 lbs., having lost
75 lbs. in rebel prisons, I could not well spare any more. I remained in
hospital at Baltimore three months longer, when I was discharged and
sent home. My own mother did not know me until I told her who I was.



                        _Note by George Perkins_


Comrade McCommon in his wonderful record states that he does not know
the dates on which his comrades died. The records show that James
Ghormley died December 24th, 1864, so counting back, Armstrong must have
died about December 17th.

Our boys are sleeping in unknown graves, but the government for which
they died is not unmindful of them. Among the most noteworthy mementoes
of the war is the memorial obelisk erected at Salisbury, N. C. to mark
the burial place of the Union soldiers who perished in the adjacent
prison pen. It has been estimated that eighteen trenches contain no
fewer than 11,700 men, buried promiscuously, without the possibility of
identification, from which circumstance this ground is known as the
cemetery of the unknown dead. It lies about a half mile from the town of
Salisbury on a sloping ground, and has an extent of about seven acres,
surrounded by a massive stone wall. The cemetery proper contains about
two acres, the other five being a lawn covered with trees. A neat lodge
has been erected at the entrance over which our flag floats continually.
The monument itself, a plain obelisk of New Hampshire granite,
thirty-six feet in height, was erected at a cost of ten thousand
dollars. The unknown names of the dead are poetically symbolized by a
veiled shield. A sword and helmet typify the conflict, and a pair of
broken fetters the bursting of prison bonds by death. Over all,
surrounded by a laurel wreath is the inscription “Pro Patria.” The
monument, standing on the highest point of the slope, forms a
picturesque feature of the local landscape.



                        MEMORIES OF OUR SERVICE

                           _By Major Rozell_


                                                Maitland, Mo., 2–23–’11.

 Dear Comrade:

As promised will write a few thoughts for your book, but as I will have
to depend entirely upon memory, it may be imperfect.

As a regiment, we have reason to be proud of our record, for there were
regiments of one, two and even three years that did less real service
than did the 149th O. V. I. one hundred day men. Our day’s work on right
of Wallace’s little army on the 9th of July, ’64, at Monocacy, guarding
the right flank of the army at Stone Bridge on Baltimore pike, resulted
in more good than many other victories, as we helped to hold Early’s
thirty thousand men one day, and this enabled Wright and Emery to reach
Washington and save the city.

The regiment on that May morning in 1864 left their business and farms
at great sacrifices financially and otherwise, and went at call of
Governor to Camp Dennison as O. N. G’s. and there volunteered for one
hundred days as O. V. I. How proud I was of those noble boys, as we
marched out that sunny May morning in front of Governor Brough in our
blue uniforms, and arms glistening in the sun, keeping step to the
music—listened to a short speech from the Governor—then heard the words
“All who will volunteer in U. S. service for one hundred days step four
paces to the front;” every man in the regiment stepped proudly to the
front and was mustered in as 149th O. V. I. Grant in his history gives
the author of “Ben Hur” great credit for his work at Monocacy, and
Wallace complimented Col. Brown for work of his regiment. Well we had a
weary tramp back to Baltimore—those of us who got back. From there we
immediately took the train for Washington, and then it was tramp, tramp,
tramp, up and down, back and forth, until “Little Phil,” (as he was
affectionately called) came up and things began to move.

Those were trying times and many a brave and patriotic boy became
discouraged—but Gen. Sheridan soon cleaned up things in the “Valley,”
although in doing so many brave boys lost their lives, and among the
number were quite a good many of the 149th.

Some of us remember a little “scrap” with Mosby at Berryville on an
early morning (the 13th of Aug., ’64); I have only to look at my left
arm to remind me that a rebel bullet went crashing through that arm and
paralyzed it for the time, and had to grab rein of bridle with sword
hand, but was soon surrounded by “Johnnies” and started for the “sunny”
south. I might mention many incidents that would interest some of the
boys, had I time and space, but as comrade McCommon is giving a paper on
prison life, and was along, will leave that to him, but will add only
that I was separated from the “boys” at Lynchburg, and never saw them
more, except as they passed “Libby” a few days later.

I was in luck to get out about a month later and home about a month
after the regiment got back. I had, while in three year service, been
shot through left lung, in right shoulder and face, and was discharged
in the summer of 1863. The wound received at Berryville was enough to
place me in what was called the hospital in Libby, and an order was made
to examine inmates of hospital, and all who were considered permanently
disabled were ordered paroled; I “fell back” on old wounds, and got out
on that order; a very happy man I was, when at Aiken’s landing, I passed
from under the rebel flag into our lines and under the “stars and
stripes.”

Long years have passed since those trying times—many of the dear boys
never lived to get back—some sleep on field of battle at Monocacy—some
at Berryville, and some at southern prisons; many have answered the last
“Roll Call” since their return home; but a few weeks since I witnessed
the burial of a member of Co. F, a dear and only brother; soon all of us
will have to answer the final call. I am, with one exception, Lt. Col.
West, the only Regimental officer left and almost all of the Company
officers are gone, and a large per cent of the boys in the ranks are
gone; Taps to all will come soon, and Lights out forever. Let us be
ready, boys, for the “Grand Review” on the other shore.

                                                      EB. ROZELL,
                                                  _Major 149th O. V. I._



         AN INCIDENT IN THE UNWRITTEN HISTORY OF THE REBELLION


In that portion of the Civil War history pertaining to the events in and
around the city of Washington D. C. which occurred during the month of
July, 1864, it will be shown that the Capitol was besieged as it were,
by a rebel force under the command of the Confederate General Early, and
known as “Early’s raid on Washington.”

A true account of the prominent part taken by the 149th Regiment O. V.
I. in the defence of the Capitol will be found in the foregoing pages of
this book, written by a comrade and member of Company A of said
Regiment.

The writer of the following incident and a witness to the same, had the
honor to hold a Commission, and in command of a company in the Regiment,
and having been detailed by the General to store the surplus baggage of
the Brigade of which our Regiment was a part (this preparatory to forced
marches incident to the aforenamed campaign of defense) was on duty in
the city when martial law was declared and was placed in charge of a
company of Treasury Department Employees, and reported with the company
out on Arlington Heights, and were assigned to a position behind the
breast works previously thrown up, every sort of fighting force having
been pressed into service for the city’s defense.

The necessity demanding it, for be it understood that the Confederate
army under General Early was encamped uncomfortably near the city, and
plainly in view from the U. S. signal station on the Heights.

The anxiety of the great president (Mr. Lincoln) for the safety of the
Capitol was evidenced when he insisted in being taken to the very out
post of the army in defense, giving a word of cheer to the soldiery as
he passed along from one post to another, the president himself being
actually under fire, as occasionally a bullet from the enemy’s
sharpshooters would whiz past.

General Ord in command urged his retirement to a place of safety, and
finally under protest was about to enter his carriage, (his military
escort in waiting) his attention was attracted to a young calf tied to a
tree near a farm house seemingly in great distress. This earth work be
it remembered at this time was built through a lawn surrounding a
farmer’s house, and after the close of the war bought by the Government
and is now the National “Arlington Cemetery.” Mr. Lincoln’s great heart
was touched at the distress of the young animal, and stepping from the
carriage he was about to enter, went to examine the cause, when it was
found that a small bullet had been imbedded in the tail of the calf and
bleeding from the fresh wound. Mr. Lincoln taking out his pocket knife
cut the ball out, and with a gentle pat on the back of the calf placed
the ball in his pocket. Being again advised to retire to safer quarters
he reluctantly boarded his carriage and was driven back to the city amid
the shouts of the army.

This incident, a piece of unwritten history, proves the great
sympathetic heart of the man. That while under the excitement and
anxiety consequent on the danger of the besieged Capitol of the Nation,
and his own life endangered, yet his sympathy and relief was extended to
a poor dumb animal. ’Twas this spirit manifested and the ready relief
extended to the boys in blue that entitled him to be called so
affectionately “Father Abraham” by not only the boys of the army but the
whole loyal North.

Through all dangers and discomforts consequent in “War’s Alarms” ’twas
the manifestation of this kindness of heart, courage and sympathy that
won the hearts of his countrymen, and made him the greatest American.

                                               EDWARD R. MCKEE,
                                             _1st Lieut. Commander_,
                                         _Co. A 149th Regiment O. V. I._



 PERSONAL EXPERIENCE OF WM. R. BROWNING OF COMPANY I, 149TH O. V. I. AT
                   MONOCACY AND AS A PRISONER OF WAR


I was captured July 9th, 1864 at the battle of Monocacy, after fighting
from early morn until 4:30 P. M., when, being hard pressed and nearly
surrounded by the enemy, we received orders for every man to save
himself. This order scattered our organization, and we broke for the
rear. The rebels were fast closing in on us, leaving only one road open
for our retreat. I took that route to escape, and went through all
right, but many of the boys were captured before getting through. I
followed the main body of the troops who were in full retreat toward
Baltimore.

I will not go into detail in regard to the capture of Philip Frank of my
company, and myself, by a body of rebel cavalry, and taken back to
Frederick, but will relate one incident. The cavalry who had captured
us, met the infantry, who demanded of them, that they turn over the
prisoners to them because they had done all of the fighting, and were
entitled to take charge of the prisoners. A fierce quarrel arose, they
drew guns on each other, and a fight was about to take place, when a
cavalry officer rode up, ordered the infantry to march on, and the
cavalry to take us to the rear. After marching a short distance they
halted us and said that they would have to give us up soon, and that we
would be searched when they turned us over, and that as they had
captured us, we were their prisoners, it was their first search. They
began, and took away what we had, that they wanted, combs, knives and
some silver money that I happened to have, but they did not get rich,
for we did not have much for them to get. We marched back to Frederick
City, and were halted in the main street, where we were turned over to
the infantry. While there, some of the loyal ladies of the town came
with a basket of food, and gave some to us, which tasted very good, as I
had only two hard tack and a pint of coffee that day. They would not
give our guard any of it so they became angry and drove them away.

While here, more prisoners were brought in, and we marched through the
town, and went into camp for the night in a field outside the limits.
The next morning we marched back through the town, and on about four
miles to Monocacy Junction. We passed through the battle field, where
the dead and wounded were still lying on the ground, where they had
fallen. At the junction we were joined by five hundred prisoners, who
had been captured and brought there the night before. These men had
drawn two days’ rations from the rebels, but we did not get anything.
However, there was no help for it, and we started on the Rockville road
toward Washington, passing through part of the field of Monocacys battle
of the day before. Some of the wounded were lying by the road side, and
begged us piteously for water. My canteen was filled with water, and I
stepped out of ranks to give the poor fellows a drink, but a rebel guard
drew his gun on me and swore he would shoot if I did not get back into
line. I told him I only wanted to give the wounded men a drink, when he
said let some of the Yankee citizens round here give them water. At
that, I took off my canteen and threw it over to the wounded men. My
guard at that said, “I was a fool, and that I would need a canteen
before I got one.” This was true for I never had another, but often
needed one.

We marched on to Rockville where dead horses were lying in the street.
There had just been a fight here. We went into an orchard surrounding a
house, and got water from the well. A lady came out and said, “If any of
you boys want to write home, I will mail your letters for you. The
rebels will soon retreat, and then I will send the letters.” Comrade W.
W. McCracken wrote a letter telling our folks at home all the
particulars of our capture. He left the letter with the lady, and it
reached its destination.

I told her I had no rations and that I was very hungry, and wanted
something to eat. She gave me a big slice of home made bread and butter.
I will never forget that loyal lady, and have often wished that I could
go to Rockville to repay the kindness done to a poor boy, only fifteen
years old, and a prisoner of war. We were then taken out to another road
on our way toward Washington, and camped in a field for the night.

The next morning we resumed the march toward Washington. About noon we
began to hear heavy firing in front, and the rebel stragglers began
passing us hurrying to the front so that they might be among the first
to enter Washington and loot the city. One of the guards told me that
the roar of the cannons was the sweetest music on earth to the rebels. I
answered, “I think before you take Washington you will be accommodated
with plenty of sweet music.” We marched on for three hours under heavy
fire from siege guns. The stragglers who had rushed to the front in
order to be the first to enter the city began to come back. We taunted
them, asking, “Why didn’t you go on into Washington?” They replied, “We
would, only the cursed Yankees are throwing flour barrels at us.” We
were marched up until in full view of Fort Stephens, where we could see
the stars and stripes floating above the fort.

They placed us in an orchard so close to the fort that the shells would
crash through the tree tops above our heads. This was not of long
duration, until a rebel line of infantry came out of the woods and
charged the fort. The fort reserved their fire until the rebels got
close up to it, and I began to fear that it would be taken, when all at
once it let loose with artillery, and a galling infantry fire from a
line of troops that we had not seen. Such a noise I never heard. The
smoke and the gathering twilight hid all the combatants from view, but
we could tell from the sound of the guns that the rebels were falling
back, and that the Union infantry was following them up. Directly all
firing ceased, and we knew that the enemy had been repulsed. At this
time we drew two days’ rations of beef and flour, but before we had time
to cook it we were ordered to fall in, and under a heavy guard began
marching to the rear. The whole rebel army came pell mell, almost a
stampede. The cavalry and artillery filled the road, the infantry going
through the fields. The cattle they had stolen in Maryland were also
driven through the fields, the drivers yelling and swearing, making the
air hideous with the din. A fine residence of a United States Senator
was burned to the ground.

All this made an impression upon my mind that I will never forget. I
learned afterward that after their repulse at Washington, the word was
passed that General Hunter was advancing from Harper’s Ferry to attack
them in the rear. We marched all night and forded the Potomac at Edwards
Ferry early the next morning. We waded the river, which came up to my
arm pits. I being small. We camped near a big spring not far from the
river, where we rested and cooked what little we had. The next morning
two days rations were issued, and cooked, and we again took up the march
passing through Leesburg, Va., and on through Snickers Gap, getting to
the Shenandoah river after dark. Here we camped for the night. The next
morning they allowed us to bathe in the river. We resumed the tiresome
march and pressed on to Winchester where we halted in the edge of the
town. While here we drank from a spring the coldest water I ever saw. We
then marched to Kernstown where we encamped for two days. Here Joseph
Rowland and Joseph Hays of my company made their escape. This left
eleven of our squad still prisoners. Sergeants James Nichols and Rees
McCall; Corporals James and William Harrison, brothers and Privates W.
W. McCracken, Thomas Broaders, Philip Frank, Wm. Houser, James Cruit,
Peter Garratt and myself. The stop here gave us a much needed rest, and
we again drew our two days’ rations of beef and flour. Two days’ rations
may sound big, but a hearty man could eat it all at one meal without
discomfort. I do not remember the exact amount, but know that it was not
near enough to satisfy our hunger.

We again resumed our march bound for Staunton up through the beautiful
Shenandoah valley, passing through New Market, Mt. Jackson and Willow
Springs. At Staunton we boarded the cars and rode to Charlotte. Here we
went into camp and drew what they called rye bread and tainted salt
beef. The bread was the worst I ever saw. It was dough inside with a
thick hard crust, that could hardly be broken, when it was broken the
dough rolled out. The next morning we were again taken by the cars to
Lynchburg. Here we were placed in a tobacco warehouse. The floor was
covered with dried tobacco juice and licorice, at least that was what
the boys said it was. I did not use the weed. We remained here a few
days, I don’t remember how long, I only recollect the stinking meat
issued to us.

While here I passed my sixteenth birthday, the 26th of July. On the
27th, we went on to Petersburg and Richmond Junction, thence to
Danville, arriving there on the 28th. We were assigned to Prison No. 7,
an old tobacco warehouse. The first floor was used as a hospital, the
second, third and fourth stories for prisoners quarters. I was put in
squad No. 7 on the second floor. We were fifty men to a squad in charge
of a sergeant whose duty it was to draw rations for the men and to
detail two comrades each day to carry water from the Dan river, about
200 yards from the prison. Here the hard prison life began. There was a
cook house near the prison, the cooks being Union soldiers. The rations
were corn bread made of corn and cob ground together, sometimes with
salt, often without. Once in a while we had bean soup made from black or
nigger peas, as they called them. A little bacon in the soup full of
skippers. I could not eat it, it was so filthy, I only ate a small piece
of the corn bread each day.

I cannot go into detail, each day was like another and very monotonous.
We suffered from the heat when we first went into this prison. There
were five squads of 50 on our floor, and when we all lay down at night,
there was no room to spare, we were packed like sardines in a box. To
economize space we would lie in rows across the building and when we
turned over all would turn. On a hot night the stench was fearful. We
remained here during July and August using water from the Dan river.
This was stagnant, in pools, for the river had almost dried up in the
summer. The rebels would march us past as nice a spring of good cold
water as ever flowed and would not allow us to get it, but take us to
the river, where we skimmed the green scum from the surface with our
buckets and dip water from the hot, stinking pool. The hot weather
created thirst, and the prisoners drank it as fast as it was carried to
them and cried for more. If our guards were not in the humor we would
have to wait until they were ready, consequently there was great
suffering from thirst. About the last of August, Smith Miller of Company
E of our regiment became suddenly insane, and was taken to the hospital
where he afterward died. Philip Frank of my company was also sent to the
hospital where he died. Many of the men became sick and we were all
growing weaker day by day. In September an order came to exchange a
certain number of the sick. When the doctor came to examine them, I took
Samuel Jones to him, Jones could not walk, so Joe Shepard and I carried
him down. The doctor passed him and then asked me, “Now what is the
matter with you?” I told him, “Nothing, only I want something to eat.”
The doctor replied, “If you would say so, I will pass you.” I said, “No,
take some poor fellow that was sick, I am not sick, and I do not intend
to die in prison.” The boys of my company that were released at this
time were James Nichols, Reeves McCall, James and William Harrison and
Peter Garrett. The two Harrison boys died at Annapolis, Maryland, on
their way home. Disease and exchange now cut our number down, but our
condition did not improve, we were growing weaker every day for want of
food. In October I was sick with diarrhoea and went to the hospital. The
sick were better cared for, and the nurses were detailed Union soldiers.
The doctors were Rebels, and did not have much regard for the prisoners.
I remained in the hospital but did not get any better. In October Thomas
Broades was brought into the hospital, paroled on sick leave, and
afterward died at Annapolis. Later in the year William Houser was
brought over to the hospital, but only lived a few days.

Between Christmas and New Years Day I took the pneumonia and the doctor
told me, “Well, little Yank, you will have to die,” I told him, “I will
never leave my bones in the southern confederacy.” He put a fly blister
on my chest and the next morning I was better. Then I had inflammation
of the bowels, and he swore I would die. He had no medicine to give me,
but put another fly blister on my stomach. The blisters broke in the
night and the water run all over me. In the morning I again felt better
but soon erysipelas set in, where the blisters had been. He then said I
must be painted with iodine. This the nurses refused to do, saying that
I would die, and did not see the use of torturing me, but let the boy
die in peace. The doctor said it must be done. They asked me about it, I
told them if they would let Edgar Hulbert of the Twenty-third O. V. I.
who was a nurse, paint me I would never say a word. He did the job and I
kept my promise. About a week later I was up and walking around. I
improved rapidly, and on the 25th of January I was returned to the
prison. About this time the United States sent some clothing to us, but
not enough to go round. I drew a blouse and my comrade McCracken a
blanket.

It was now very cold in the prison, some would sleep under blankets
while others marched around to keep warm. We kept this up until becoming
exhausted, we would rouse the sleepers and take their places. This was
kept up continually day and night, as long as we remained at Danville.
About the 10th of February we were placed in the cars and carried to
Richmond, Va., and put in Libbey prison. We suffered terribly from the
cold on this trip. We were weak and our clothes were worn out. I was
dressed in the blouse spoken of, remnants of a pair of trousers and a
pair of socks that I had taken off a dead man. My pants were so badly
worn that I would not be presentable in good society. But comrade
McCracken had his blanket and we snuggled under it in one corner of the
car and done the best we could until we landed in Libbey.

There has been a great deal said about Libbey prison, and truly too, but
it was the best one I was in, we had a warmer place to stay and a
greater variety of food, although the rations were extremely small. Here
we talked about being exchanged, we thought we had been brought here for
that purpose. On the morning of February 20th, a Rebel officer came to
the prison and told us to get ready for parole. There was a glad lot of
poor boys, all was excitement. The officer went away and did not return
until afternoon when he returned with other officers and clerks and
called us up in line. We took the oath of parole to do no duty for the
United States Government until regularly exchanged. This we gladly took.
That night we had a big time, nobody slept, in the morning we were going
back to God’s country and home. Comrade McCracken sold his blanket for
fifty dollars (confederate) and bought six pounds of flour with it. We
made flap jacks and baked them on a stone, ate and talked about what we
would eat when we got home.

In the morning we were taken on board the rebel flag of truce boat, I
was very weak, but Joe Shepard the good Samaritan of our regiment helped
me aboard, and we started down the James river to Harrison Landing. Some
one shouted “there is the old flag.” In an instant everybody was alert,
and on looking down the river we caught a glimpse of “Old Glory” through
the tree tops on one of the boats of our fleet. Such a time I never saw,
we were the happiest boys on earth. We cheered, we shouted, we cried, we
prayed, we were so happy. Many were going back to die, but they were
glad to get where they could die under the dear old flag. We landed at
Harrison Landing where the 25th Corps (colored) was stationed. It looked
queer to me to see them on the skirmish line opposing the Rebels. Each
fellow had his “gopher hole” to dodge in, one big black fellow picked me
up like a baby and carried me back through the lines. They all came
running to us with something to eat, those great black fellows with
white hearts. My man carried me as far as he could go, and I walked a
short distance to the river, where the transport “New York” was waiting
for us. We went aboard and had a good meal of soft wheat bread, pickle
pork, coffee with sugar and condensed milk, I thought I had never tasted
anything so good. We arrived at Annapolis on Washington’s birthday,
February 22, 1865.

I have tried in my own feeble way to tell something about my prison
life. I have written it from memory and there may be some errors of
dates, and etc. An old man’s memory is sometimes faulty. I have not told
of all the horrors that I have witnessed, no tongue can tell nor pen
describe what I have seen in these hells. To tell all would make a book,
what I have told is true. I was discharged March 29th, 1865, at Todd
Barracks in Columbus, Ohio.

                                          WILLIAM R. BROWNING
                              _Private, Company I. 149th O. V. I._
                                                    _Chillicothe, Ohio._



                               INCIDENTS


While we were in camp at Chain Bridge we occupied the crest of a hill or
ridge that sloped gradually to the south, making an ideal camping ground
for the army. As night drew on camp fires were kindled and twinkled by
thousands over the slope while the soldiers prepared their supper.
Stories of their adventures and songs served to pass the evening. When
the time came for “lights out,” a drum corps on the right began playing
“The girl I left behind me.” A brass band in the centre struck up “Home
Sweet Home.” These were all the tunes we recognized, for every band and
drum corps in camp began playing. Pandemonium seemed to have broken
loose, as the great volume of sound came up. Tunes could not be
distinguished, the discord was terrific. It gradually died away as band
after band ceased playing. A deep silence came over the plain, the stars
blinked in the summer sky. The army was asleep.



                       OBSERVATION ON THE MARCH.


Once on our march toward Snickers Gap I saw a squad of soldiers taking a
cow from a farm lot, they had tied a rope around her horns two were
tugging at the rope, and others were pushing. The woman of the house and
her children were crying and begging them to let her alone. The argument
was still on as we marched along.

On this same march we passed a field where a fight had taken place a day
or two before. The dead had been buried and the wounded removed, but the
field was full of dead horses. The stench from the swollen carcasses
lying under the sweltering rays of the hot July sun was terrific. We
hurried past as fast as possible, breathing a sigh of relief when we
came again into the pure air of the mountains.



                            HARPER’S FERRY.


Harper’s Ferry was the gateway to the south. It was captured and retaken
many times during the war by both Union and Confederate armies. Situated
at the confluence of the Shenandoah and Potomac rivers, with Loudon and
Maryland Heights surrounding it, it was a natural fortress. The town was
the target for both sides, and many of its homes carried the marks of
shot and shell. The United States Arsenal which was burned early in the
war, stood with roofless walls and tottering chimneys a silent monument
of the ravages of the conflict.

A pontoon bridge spanned the Potomac river a short distance above the
railroad bridge, over which the armies passed. When we marched across
the pontoon, orders were given to “break step,” least the swing of the
time step would break the bridge. This bridge was laid on boats that
were lashed together side by side, and anchored in the river, on these
stringers were laid and a floor on the stringers, rails were placed on
the edge to keep the wagons from slipping over. This, however did not
prevent some from going over, for I saw two wagons with their teams
lying overturned on the bottom of the river.

While in the town we went into the old engine house called “John Brown’s
Fort” where he put up his stubborn fight against the Virginia militia.
The loop holes through which he fired were still there. Every time we
passed through this town was on a Saturday, so we nick-named it
“Harper’s Weekly.”



                          SHOOTING DESERTERS.


A chain of forts encircled Baltimore, Maryland, from Fort No. 1 on
Baltimore street to Fort No. 12 in Druid Hill Park. Details were made
from the men at our fort for guard duty at these outposts. One guard at
each fort to remain all day, his duty being to keep a strict watch. One
day, (I being on duty at Fort 11), a squad of twelve cavalrymen came on
a full gallop down the road past the fort. Just as they came opposite to
where I was standing guard, the officer in command shouted, “There they
are, fire.” A volley from their carbines followed and two men who were
in a field running through the high wheat threw up their hands and
tumbled over dead. I heard afterward that they were deserters trying to
escape from Lafayette Barracks. The discipline was severe, some may
think too much so, but it was necessary in order to control the great
variety of characters that made up the army. When our company first came
to Fort No. 1 we found the guard house full of rough men of the New York
Artillery, and we were detailed to guard them. Of all low, rough New
York toughs, these were surely the worst. They took great pleasure in
guying the boys fresh from home, and their actions were disgusting.
Luckily they went away in a short time. One night two of them attempted
to break guard and escape. Our boys who were on guard fired at them, and
alarmed the garrison. A search squad was at once formed and the two men
were found lying on their faces in the ditch surrounding the fort,
nearly frightened to death. They were taken back to the guard house
saying, “they did not think the century plants would shoot,” but they
did. These fellows had a better opinion of us after that episode.

During our first march the boys began to pick up from the fields various
articles that they considered valuable as relics, intending to carry
them home. Bayonets and cannon balls seemed to be favorite articles for
collection. After carrying them for a few miles they began dropping them
one by one. We found out in a very short time that the less we had to
carry the better we could march.

I was fortunate in bringing home, and still have my cap box, eagle
plate, visor of my cap a tin flask and testament and hymn book. A
testament and hymn book was given to every soldier. But the most prized
is the engraved and engrossed card of thanks given by the president of
the United States, under seal of the Government, and signed by the
martyred friend of every Union soldier, Abraham Lincoln. A captain in
our regiment brought home a beautiful sword that belonged to one of
Mosbys’ men, and was found on the field after the fight at Berryville,
Va. It was a beautiful piece of work, ivory hilt, gold mounted, with a
scabbard inlaid with gold and silver designs. It was highly prized by
the captain, and no doubt would be more highly prized by the man who
lost it at Berryville.



                              CONCLUSION.


The hundred days service was hard, but it had a humorous side. Many were
the pranks played by the boys. Many pleasant hours we spent together,
and our experiences are told and laughed over today. At Fort No. 1 we
had our own string band, and every evening we had dancing or singing led
by Captain Peabody or Lieutenant McKee, some played cards, others went
down into the city taking in the markets, theatres, etc. At one time
down town a gentleman asked some of us, “Boys, what regiment do you
belong to?” We answered, “The 149th Ohio.” He mused awhile and said,
“One hundred and forty nine, that means a hundred and forty nine
thousand, my goodness boys do men grow on trees in Ohio?”

When we left Baltimore our hardships began, the first day’s march nearly
used us up, starting from Washington at noon, we crossed the Potomac at
Edwards Ferry at 5 o’clock, our feet were blistered as we hobbled along,
the first night we sank to rest, a tired, discouraged body of men. Our
accoutrements were heavy, our guns a burden, but a canteen filled with
water seemed heaviest of all, the string over the shoulder felt like it
would cut clear through. Our appearance after two or three marches would
have made Rip Van Winkle on awakening look like a dude in comparison.

We were ragged, tattered and torn, our shoes worn out, and the sacred
soil of old Virginia was ground into our system, from the dust that we
continually lived in. We thought the turnpikes of the Shenandoah valley
were the hardest in the world. But they were not too hard to sleep on,
when the weary soldier dropped in his tracks, the moment a halt was
made. I have seen the men marching sound asleep only awakened when their
heads came in contact with the tail board of the wagon in front.

This was the common experience of all soldiers and we did not complain,
we often said we would rather meet the enemy than to endure the fatigue
of the march.

The events I have tried to describe happened forty-seven years ago. Many
who were with us then have answered the last roll call and passed over
the majority. We who remain keep their memory green by strewing their
graves with flowers on each recurring Memorial day, while those of our
comrades who are sleeping in unknown graves in the south are not
forgotten in our annual tribute of flowers. Soon the last old soldier
will have gone to his rest, but his work will endure in a restored
Union, a nation that commands the respect of the world. We did what we
could, man or angels can do no more, we did not realize at the time in
what a great work we were engaged. I am glad that I was permitted to
live in those days, and take a little part in the great events that
resulted in a reunited country, whose flag is honored wherever it flies.



                             “OUR COMRADES”


                Where are the boys we marched with?
                Where is my old bunk mate?
                The majority crossed the river,
                The few on its margin wait,
                We will soon hear the call of the bugle,
                There is another river to cross,
                The boatman will ferry us over,
                May we all meet again without loss.

[Illustration:

  GEORGE PERKINS

  _Adjutant A. L. Brown Post No. 162 Grand Army of the Republic._

  _Past Commander A. L. Brown Post No. 162 Grand Army of the Republic._

  _Past Chief Mustering Officer, Department of Ohio, G. A. R._]



    149TH REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY ONE HUNDRED DAYS’ SERVICE


This regiment was organized at Camp Dennison, O., from the 8th to the
11th of May, 1864, to serve one hundred days. It was composed of the
Twenty-seventh Regiment, Ohio National Guard, from Ross county, and the
Fifty-fifth Battalion, Ohio National Guard, from Clinton county. On the
11th of May the regiment left the state of Baltimore, Md. Upon arrival
it was assigned to duty at various forts in and around the city, and
remained there until the 29th of May, when it was ordered to the eastern
shore of Maryland, and distributed at different points. About the 4th of
July the regiment was ordered to Monocacy Junction, and on the 9th took
part in an engagement with the enemy. The regiment lost in killed and
wounded about thirty, and in prisoners over one hundred. After the
battle of Monocacy it took part with the Sixth and Nineteenth Corps in
the marches in Maryland and Virginia. Portions of the regiment were with
the One Hundred and Forty-fourth when it was attacked by Mosby’s
guerrillas, at Berryville, Va., August 13. The regiment returned to Ohio
August 20, 1864, and was mustered out on the 30th, on expiration of its
term of service.


                            FIELD AND STAFF.

   Mustered in May 11, 1864, at Camp Dennison, O., by Robert S. Smith,
    Captain 2d Cavalry, U. S. A. Mustered out Aug. 30, 1864, at Camp
 Dennison, O., by William Stanley, 2d Lieutenant 10th Infantry, U. S. A.

 ═════════════╤════════╤═══╤════════╤════════╤══════════════════════════
     Names    │  Rank  │Age│Date of │ Period │         Remarks
              │        │   │Entering│   of   │
              │        │   │  the   │Service │
              │        │   │Service │        │
 ─────────────┼────────┼───┼────────┼────────┼──────────────────────────
 Allison L.   │Colonel │.. │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with regiment
   Brown      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Owen West    │Lt. Col.│.. │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with regiment
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Ebenezer     │ Major  │.. │ May 2, │100 dys.│Prisoner of war; mustered
   Rozelle    │        │   │  1864  │        │  out Sept. 15, 1864, at
              │        │   │        │        │  Washington, D. C, by
              │        │   │        │        │  order of War Department.
 William A.   │Surgeon │.. │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with regiment
   Brown      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Benj. F.     │  Ast.  │.. │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with regiment
   Miesse     │ Surg.  │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 T. Q.        │Adjutant│.. │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with regiment
   Hilderbrant│        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 David C.     │R. Q. M.│.. │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with regiment
   Anderson   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 William      │Chaplain│36 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Promoted from private Co.
   Morris     │        │   │  1864  │        │  C May 18. 1864; mustered
              │        │   │        │        │  out with regiment Aug.
              │        │   │        │        │  30, 1864.
 George L.    │  Ser.  │31 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Promoted from private Co.
   Wolfe      │  Maj.  │   │  1864  │        │  H May 8, 1864; mustered
              │        │   │        │        │  out with regiment Aug.
              │        │   │        │        │  30, 1864.
 Austin H.    │Q. M. S.│30 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Promoted from private Co.
   Brown      │        │   │  1864  │        │  C May 9, 1864; mustered
              │        │   │        │        │  out with regiment Aug.
              │        │   │        │        │  30, 1864.
 Edward F.    │  Com.  │23 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Promoted from Corporal Co.
   Beall      │  Ser.  │   │  1864  │        │  A——; mustered out with
              │        │   │        │        │  regiment Aug. 30, 1864.
 James F.     │  Hos.  │32 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Promoted from private Co.
   Sproat     │ St’d.  │   │  1864  │        │  F May 11, 1864; mustered
              │        │   │        │        │  out with regiment Aug.
              │        │   │        │        │  30, 1864.
 ═════════════╧════════╧═══╧════════╧════════╧══════════════════════════


                               COMPANY A.

   Mustered in May 8, 1864, at Camp Dennison, O., by Robert S. Smith,
    Captain 2d Cavalry, U. S. A. Mustered out Aug. 30, 1864, at Camp
 Dennison, O., by William Stanley, 2d Lieutenant 10th Infantry, U. S. A.

 ═════════════╤════════╤═══╤════════╤════════╤══════════════════════════
     Names    │  Rank  │Age│Date of │ Period │         Remarks
              │        │   │Entering│   of   │
              │        │   │  the   │Service │
              │        │   │Service │        │
 ─────────────┼────────┼───┼────────┼────────┼──────────────────────────
 Wm. W.       │Captain │27 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Peabody    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Edw. R. McKee│  1st   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │ Lieut. │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 John W.      │   2d   │26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Purdum     │ Lieut. │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Leonidas H.  │  1st   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Ewing      │ Sergt. │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Frederick K. │Sergeant│26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Focke      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Edw. W.      │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Pearson    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 E. P.        │   do   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Died July 7, 1864, at
   Robinson   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Jarvis Hospital,
              │        │   │        │        │  Baltimore, Md.
 Jacob Wibly  │   do   │33 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 T. W.        │Corporal│18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Zimmerman  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Theodore Doty│   do   │23 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 John H. Ryan │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Felix Renick │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Ferdinand    │   do   │23 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Marzluff   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 John T.      │   do   │23 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Bratten    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Fred. F.     │   do   │26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Bradley    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Benj. C.     │   do   │29 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Appointed——; mustered out
   Follett    │        │   │  1864  │        │  with company Aug. 30,
              │        │   │        │        │  1864.
 Edw. F. Beall│   do   │23 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Promoted to Com.
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Sergeant——.
 Anderson,    │Private │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Thom.      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Armstrong, E.│   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured Aug. 13, 1864. in
   F.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  action near Berryville,
              │        │   │        │        │  Va.; died Jan. 9, 1865,
              │        │   │        │        │  in Rebel Prison at
              │        │   │        │        │  Salisbury, N. C.
 Armstrong,   │Private │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Jas.       │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Austill,     │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Newton     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Bailey,      │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred from Co. D May
   Sherm. H.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864; mustered out
              │        │   │        │        │  with company Aug. 30,
              │        │   │        │        │  1864.
 Baker, John  │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   A.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Baker, Wm. F.│   do   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Bangs, Harry │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   S.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Barman, Wm.  │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   F.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Benner, Henry│   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured Aug. 13, 1864, in
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  action near Berryville,
              │        │   │        │        │  Va.; died Nov. 1, 1864,
              │        │   │        │        │  in Rebel Prison at
              │        │   │        │        │  Salisbury, N. C.
 Berry,       │   do   │28 │ May 2, │100 dys.│No further record found.
   Harwood    │        │   │  1864  │        │
 Bivins, John │   do   │34 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Bonner, Henry│   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Bonner,      │   do   │25 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Matthias   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Callendine,  │   do   │26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Geo.       │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Campbell,    │   do   │29 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out to date Aug.
   Chas.      │        │   │  1864  │        │  30, 1864, at Camp
              │        │   │        │        │  Dennison, O., by order
              │        │   │        │        │  of War Department.
 Campbell,    │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Sam’l.     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Casad, Simeon│   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   D.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Clark, John  │   do   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   M.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Cook, John F.│   do   │25 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Decamp,      │   do   │27 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Andrew     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Doyle, Wm. E.│   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Evans, Wm. E.│   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Fernald, John│   do   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Franklin,    │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   James      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Gates, Geo.  │   do   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│On muster-in roll. No
   B.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  further record found.
 Gerteisen,   │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred from Co. D May
   Augustus   │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864; mustered out
              │        │   │        │        │  with company Aug. 30,
              │        │   │        │        │  1864.
 Gerteisen,   │   do   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred from Co. C May
   Philip     │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864; mustered out
              │        │   │        │        │  with company Aug. 30,
              │        │   │        │        │  1864.
 Ghormley,    │Private │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured Aug. 13, 1864, in
   James      │        │   │  1864  │        │  action near Berryville,
              │        │   │        │        │  Va.; died Dec. 24, 1864,
              │        │   │        │        │  in Rebel Prison at
              │        │   │        │        │  Salisbury, N. C.
 Gorsuch,     │Private │17 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Frank      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Gorsuch, Jas.│   do   │25 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   H.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Grow, John H.│   do   │23 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hamilton,    │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Sam’l. A.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hanley,      │   do   │.. │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   William    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Harmon,      │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Fletch. D. │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Heskett, John│   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   M.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Higley,      │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Charles    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hill, Charles│   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hiss,        │   do   │33 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Ferdinand  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hunt, Jabez  │   do   │28 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred from Co. D May
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864; mustered out
              │        │   │        │        │  with company Aug. 30,
              │        │   │        │        │  1864.
 Hutchinson,  │   do   │36 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Wm.        │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Kates, George│   do   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   B.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Keezer,      │   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   George C.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Keller,      │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Valentine  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Kellhofer,   │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Jacob      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Kennedy, Wm. │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   W.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Lawhorn, John│   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Sick——, in hospital. No
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  further record found.
 Limley, Henry│   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Limley, John │   do   │28 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Lunbeck, Wm. │   do   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   B.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 McCommon, Wm.│   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred from Co. H——;
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  captured Aug. 13, 1864,
              │        │   │        │        │  in action near
              │        │   │        │        │  Berryville, Va.;
              │        │   │        │        │  mustered out May 15,
              │        │   │        │        │  1865, at Cincinnati, O.,
              │        │   │        │        │  by order of War
              │        │   │        │        │  Department.
 McMasters,   │Private │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Hugh       │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 March, Joseph│   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred from Co. E May
   C.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864; mustered out
              │        │   │        │        │  with company Aug. 30,
              │        │   │        │        │  1864.
 Martin,      │Private │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Jefferson  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Mick, John E.│   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Miesse, Benj.│   do   │22 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Promoted Assistant
   F.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Surgeon.
 Miller, Moses│   do   │30 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Mitchell,    │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   James      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Orr, Presley │   do   │31 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Perkins,     │   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   George     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Peterman, J. │   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   H.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Phillips,    │   do   │26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Alonzo C.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Phillips,    │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Charles    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Phillips,    │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   John       │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Reid, Henry  │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Absent, sick——. No further
   N.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  record found.
 Rice, Val.   │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Rittenour,   │   do   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred from Co. E May
   Geo.       │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864; mustered out
              │        │   │        │        │  with company Aug. 30,
              │        │   │        │        │  1864.
 Rupel, Alfred│   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred from Co. D May
   A.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864; mustered out
              │        │   │        │        │  with company Aug. 30,
              │        │   │        │        │  1864.
 Schleyer, Wm.│   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Seeney,      │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Warren L.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Selby, Thomas│   do   │28 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Shepherd,    │   do   │27 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   John H.    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Spencer, Edw.│   do   │29 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   F.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Snyder, Henry│   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Sosman,      │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred from Co. C May
   Joseph S.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864; mustered out
              │        │   │        │        │  with company Aug. 30,
              │        │   │        │        │  1864.
 Steel, James │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   R.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Stout, Elijah│   do   │39 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   B.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Straus, David│   do   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Stricker, Wm.│   do   │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Thomas, Benj.│   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred from Co. E May
   E.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864; mustered out
              │        │   │        │        │  with company Aug. 30,
              │        │   │        │        │  1864.
 West, Henry  │   do   │22 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   T.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Whipple,     │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured Aug. 13, 1864, in
   Eld’ge G.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  action near Berryville,
              │        │   │        │        │  Va.; died Oct. 23, 1864,
              │        │   │        │        │  at Annapolis, Maryland.
 Wibley,      │Private │36 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Absent——. No further
   William    │        │   │  1864  │        │  record found.
 Wiltshire,   │   do   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Wm.        │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Young,       │   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred from Co. E May
   Frederick  │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864; mustered out
              │        │   │        │        │  with company Aug. 30,
              │        │   │        │        │  1864.
 Zimmerman,   │   do   │30 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Jos.       │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 ═════════════╧════════╧═══╧════════╧════════╧══════════════════════════


                               COMPANY B.

   Mustered in May 9, 1864, at Camp Dennison, O., by Robert S. Smith,
    Captain 2d Cavalry, U. S. A. Mustered out Aug. 30, 1864, at Camp
 Dennison, O., by William Stanley, 2d Lieutenant 10th Infantry, U. S. A.

 ─────────────┬────────┬───┬────────┬────────┬──────────────────────────
 John Talbert │Captain │22 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Colvin,      │  1st   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Genethan   │ Lieut. │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 James        │   2d   │36 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Gallaher   │ Lieut. │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Benj. J.     │  1st   │40 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Darbyshire │ Sergt. │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Geo. H.      │Sergeant│38 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
   Washington │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  mustered out March 29,
              │        │   │        │        │  1865, at Columbus, O.,
              │        │   │        │        │  by order of War
              │        │   │        │        │  Department.
 George       │   do   │43 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Leverton   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Isham W. West│   do   │42 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Allen Evans  │   do   │32 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Genia Sutton │Corporal│33 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864. at
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  mustered out with
              │        │   │        │        │  company Aug. 30, 1864.
 Thom. V.     │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Wilson     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Martin       │   do   │38 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Plymire    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 David Taylor │   do   │42 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Wollas,      │Corporal│33 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Nicholas   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Gilbert      │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Bentley    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Wm. A. Wooley│   do   │23 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Fletcher     │   do   │31 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Johnson    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Joseph Fields│   do   │33 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Appointed——; mustered out
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  with company Aug. 30,
              │        │   │        │        │  1864.
 David White  │Musician│15 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Arnold,      │Private │33 │ May 2, │100 dys.│On muster-in roll. No
   Edward     │        │   │  1864  │        │  further record found.
 Ayers, Elkena│   do   │33 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred from Co. H May
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864; captured July
              │        │   │        │        │  9, 1864, at battle of
              │        │   │        │        │  Monocacy, Md.; mustered
              │        │   │        │        │  out April 6, 1865, at
              │        │   │        │        │  Columbus, O., by order
              │        │   │        │        │  of War Department.
 Barlow,      │   do   │38 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Israel     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Barlow, Wm.  │   do   │26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   J.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Becket,      │   do   │25 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   William    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Brewer, Bolen│   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   B.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Bryant, James│   do   │35 │ May 2, │100 dys.│On muster-in roll. No
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  further record found.
 Cadwalader,  │   do   │32 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   George     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Chance, David│   do   │56 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Discharged——, on Surgeon’s
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  certificate of
              │        │   │        │        │  disability.
 Childers,    │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Geo. W.    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Clay, Henry  │   do   │26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  mustered out April 6,
              │        │   │        │        │  1865, at Columbus, O.,
              │        │   │        │        │  by order of War
              │        │   │        │        │  Department.
 Cline, Simon │   do   │26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   L.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Darbyshire,  │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Morris     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Deffebaugh,  │   do   │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   John       │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Douglas,     │   do   │22 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Milton     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Drake, Daniel│   do   │27 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Eickelberger,│   do   │25 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
   J. T.      │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  mustered out May 22,
              │        │   │        │        │  1865, at Columbus, O.,
              │        │   │        │        │  by order of War
              │        │   │        │        │  Department.
 Ellis, James │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   H.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Ellis, John  │   do   │22 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   W.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Ferguson,    │   do   │43 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Everett    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Fristo,      │Private │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│On muster-in roll. No
   Richard C. │        │   │  1864  │        │  further record found.
 Giffin,      │   do   │23 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   George     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Goodson,     │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Madison    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Green, Enoch │   do   │23 │ May 2, │100 dys.│On muster-in roll. No
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  further record found.
 Green, John  │   do   │33 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   W.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Grubbs,      │   do   │35 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
   George F.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  mustered out April 6,
              │        │   │        │        │  1865, at Columbus, O.,
              │        │   │        │        │  by order of War
              │        │   │        │        │  Department.
 Haines,      │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Stephen P. │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hankins,     │   do   │.. │ May 2, │100 dys.│On muster-in roll.  No
   Musto      │        │   │  1864  │        │  further record found.
 Harlan,      │   do   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Charles B. │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hartley,     │   do   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Samuel     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Henderson,   │   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Jas. L.    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Henry, Cyrus │   do   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Henry, Samuel│   do   │33 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Killed July 9, 1864. in
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.
 Hickman,     │   do   │41 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred from Co. H——;
   Zach. D.   │        │   │  1864  │        │  captured July 9, 1864,
              │        │   │        │        │  at battle of Monocacy.
              │        │   │        │        │  Md.; mustered out with
              │        │   │        │        │  company Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hill, A. A.  │   do   │47 │ May 2, │100 dys.│On muster-in roll. No
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  further record found.
 Hodson, John │   do   │27 │ May 2, │100 dys.│On muster-in roll. No
   H.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  further record found.
 Holmes, Zach.│   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   H.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Howe, Thomas │   do   │.. │ May 2, │100 dys.│On muster-in roll. No
   D.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  further record found.
 Hubbard,     │   do   │16 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   James      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hubble,      │   do   │47 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Stineman   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hurley,      │   do   │32 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Creighton  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hurley, Henry│   do   │44 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Discharged——, by Surgeon.
   J.         │        │   │  1864  │        │
 Hurley, Isaac│   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   H.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hutchinson,  │   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Absent——.  No further
   Sam’l.     │        │   │  1864  │        │  record found.
 Jeffries,    │   do   │25 │ May 2, │100 dys.│On muster-in roll. No
   Jeremiah   │        │   │  1864  │        │  further record found.
 Jordan,      │Private │33 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   George W.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Kennedy,     │   do   │.. │ May 2, │100 dys.│On muster-in roll. No
   William    │        │   │  1864  │        │  further record found.
 Lafetra,     │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Albert     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Lamb, Jehu   │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  mustered out March 11,
              │        │   │        │        │  1865, at Columbus, O.,
              │        │   │        │        │  by order of War
              │        │   │        │        │  Department.
 Lewis, Isaiah│   do   │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Wounded July 8, 1864, in
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  discharged Feb. 2, 1865,
              │        │   │        │        │  at U. S. General
              │        │   │        │        │  Hospital, Frederick,
              │        │   │        │        │  Md., on Surgeon’s
              │        │   │        │        │  certificate of
              │        │   │        │        │  disability.
 Lindsey,     │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Isaiah     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Madden, Moses│   do   │26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   G.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Madden,      │   do   │32 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Solomon    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Martin, Robt.│   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   H.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Miller,      │   do   │44 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
   Dickinson  │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  mustered out March 29,
              │        │   │        │        │  1865, at Columbus O., by
              │        │   │        │        │  order of War Department.
 Mills, Daniel│   do   │29 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   H.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Mills,       │   do   │31 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
   Richard H. │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  died Sept. 19, 1864, in
              │        │   │        │        │  Rebel Prison at
              │        │   │        │        │  Danville, Va.
 Murrel, James│   do   │34 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 O’Donnell,   │   do   │30 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Absent——. No further
   Peter      │        │   │  1864  │        │  record found.
 Oliver,      │   do   │34 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Hezekiah   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Oliver,      │   do   │.. │ May 2, │100 dys.│On muster-in roll. No
   Samuel     │        │   │  1864  │        │  further record found.
 Parker, John │   do   │50 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
   K.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  died Feb. 17, 1865, in
              │        │   │        │        │  Rebel Prison at
              │        │   │        │        │  Danville, Va.
 Patterson,   │   do   │22 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   John       │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Plymire,     │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   William    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Reed, David  │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Reynonds,    │   do   │41 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   David      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Rockhil,     │   do   │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred from Co. K——;
   Jonathan   │        │   │  1864  │        │  mustered out with
              │        │   │        │        │  company Aug. 30, 1864.
 Rooks, Amos  │   do   │23 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Rowe, John   │Private │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Died Aug. 17, 1864, in
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  hospital at Baltimore,
              │        │   │        │        │  Md.
 Runnells,    │   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
   Isaac      │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  mustered out April 6,
              │        │   │        │        │  1865, at Columbus, O.,
              │        │   │        │        │  by order of War
              │        │   │        │        │  Department.
 Smith, Isaac │   do   │27 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   N.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 States, Ab.  │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
   H., Jr.    │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  mustered out April 6,
              │        │   │        │        │  1865, at Columbus, O.,
              │        │   │        │        │  by order of War
              │        │   │        │        │  Department.
 States, Ab.  │   do   │30 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   H., Sr.    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Surface, John│   do   │26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   S.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Sutton, James│   do   │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   H.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Sutton, Wm.  │   do   │29 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   G.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Vantress,    │   do   │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Fran. M.   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Wade, George │   do   │30 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   W.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Wall,        │   do   │17 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Killed July 9, 1864, in
   Clarence   │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.
 Whinnery,    │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│On muster-in roll. No
   Calvin     │        │   │  1864  │        │  further record found.
 Whitson,     │   do   │17 │ May 2, │100 dys.│On muster-in roll. No
   Oliver     │        │   │  1864  │        │  further record found.
 Wilson,      │   do   │27 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
   Thomas C.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  mustered out April 6,
              │        │   │        │        │  1865, at Columbus.
 Woodmansee,  │   do   │27 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
   Amos       │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  died Jan. 15, 1865, in
              │        │   │        │        │  Rebel Prison at
              │        │   │        │        │  Danville, Va.
 Woodmansee,  │   do   │26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   J. M.      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Woodmansee,  │   do   │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   W. S.      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 ═════════════╧════════╧═══╧════════╧════════╧══════════════════════════


                               COMPANY C.

   Mustered in May 8, 1864, at Camp Dennison, O., by Robert S. Smith,
    Captain 2d Cavalry, U. S. A. Mustered out Aug. 30, 1864, at Camp
 Dennison, O., by William Stanley, 2d Lieutenant 10th Infantry, U. S. A.

 ─────────────┬────────┬───┬────────┬────────┬──────────────────────────
 Chas. W.     │Captain │25 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   McGinnis   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Adam G.      │  1st   │28 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Mallow     │ Lieut. │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Wm. P.       │   2d   │35 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Gossard    │ Lieut. │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 John M.      │  1st   │25 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Wisehart   │ Sergt. │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Lewis C.     │Sergeant│24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Mallow     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Thomas A.    │   do   │34 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Ware       │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Audred J.    │   do   │35 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out to date Aug.
   Timmons    │        │   │  1864  │        │  30, 1864, by order of
              │        │   │        │        │  War Department.
 William Young│   do   │39 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Appointed from Corporal
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  June 1, 1864; mustered
              │        │   │        │        │  out with company Aug.
              │        │   │        │        │  30, 1864.
 Geo. A. Hause│Corporal│41 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 George C.    │   do   │31 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Rine       │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Milton Lucas │   do   │28 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Adam Pearce  │   do   │26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Isaac Rowe   │   do   │26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Casper Nauman│   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Jacob Light  │   do   │33 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Cyrus Patch  │   do   │28 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Appointed June 1, 1864;
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  mustered out with
              │        │   │        │        │  company Aug. 30, 1864.
 Jos. B.      │   do   │23 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Appointed June 1, 1864;
   Hannewalt  │        │   │  1864  │        │  mustered out with
              │        │   │        │        │  company Aug. 30, 1864.
 Acton, Henry │Private │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Allemang, Wm.│   do   │26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   A.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Anderson, Wm.│   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   E.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Ault, Ambrose│   do   │27 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Baker,       │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Horatio    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Briggs,      │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Sam’l. J.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Brittenham,  │   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Wm.        │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Brown, Austin│   do   │30 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Promoted to Q. M. Sergeant
   H.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  May 9, 1864.
 Cline, Samuel│   do   │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Collier,     │Private │.. │ May 2, │100 dys.│Absent, sick——. No further
   Joseph J.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  record found.
 Cormean,     │   do   │26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Wilson     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Cory, William│   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   N.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Cory William │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   W.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Crawford.    │   do   │43 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   William    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Daily, Alonzo│   do   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Davis, Daniel│   do   │33 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Day, Joseph  │   do   │43 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Dickison,    │   do   │26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred to Co. F May
   Alexander  │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864.
 Estle, Thom. │   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   R.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Fisher, Adam │   do   │44 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   C.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Fox, William │   do   │22 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred to Co. F May
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864.
 Gerteisen,   │   do   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred to Co. A May
   Philip     │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864.
 Gibson, James│   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   K.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Goldsbury,   │   do   │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Wesley     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Gossard,     │   do   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Morris P.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Grimes, Henry│   do   │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Harper,      │   do   │28 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Martin     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hause, Job   │   do   │42 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hilbrecht,   │   do   │22 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred to Co. F May
   Fred       │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864.
 Hoback, John │   do   │22 │ May 2, │100 dys.│No further record found.
              │        │   │  1864  │        │
 Jones, Samuel│   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
   O.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.
              │        │   │        │        │  No further record found.
 Junck, Milton│   do   │.. │ May 2, │100 dys.│Died May 16 1864, in
   P.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  hospital at Pittsburg,
              │        │   │        │        │  Pa.
 Kramer, Adam │   do   │26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred to Co. F May
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864.
 Lane, William│   do   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Latta,       │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Alcetas    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Lawrence,    │   do   │34 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Daniel S.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Lease, Tedy  │   do   │22 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Lightel,     │Private │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Nelson     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Long, Elijah │   do   │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Long, James  │   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Lucas,       │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   William B. │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Ludwic,      │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Andrew     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 McAdams,     │   do   │44 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   William    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 McNeill,     │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Arthur G.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 McNeill,     │   do   │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Felix      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Maddux, Wm.  │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   R.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Mahanan,     │   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Florah     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Mallow,      │   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   William L. │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Miller, John │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   W.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Morris,      │   do   │36 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Promoted to Chaplain May
   William    │        │   │  1864  │        │  18, 1864.
 Mowbray,     │   do   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Elijah     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Nauman,      │   do   │26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Charles    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Negley,      │   do   │39 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Stanton    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Peck, Henry  │   do   │28 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Plyley,      │   do   │33 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Johnson    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Ratcliffe,   │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Isaac      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Rine, William│   do   │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   W.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Rittenhouse, │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Reduced from Sergeant——;
   Jno S.     │        │   │  1864  │        │  mustered out with
              │        │   │        │        │  company Aug. 30, 1864.
 Rose, John   │   do   │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Roseboom,    │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Abr. F.    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Shepherd,    │   do   │30 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Daniel     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Smithers,    │   do   │23 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Isaac P.   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Sosman,      │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred to Co. A May
   Joseph S.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864.
 Stelle, John │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   W.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Sutherland,  │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Dav. L.    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Whetstone,   │   do   │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Henry      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 White, John  │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Wilkins,     │   do   │22 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Allen      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Wilkins, Owen│   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 ═════════════╧════════╧═══╧════════╧════════╧══════════════════════════


                               COMPANY D.

   Mustered in May 8, 1864, at Camp Dennison, O., by Robert S. Smith,
    Captain 2d Cavalry, U. S. A. Mustered out Aug. 30, 1864, at Camp
 Dennison, O., by William Stanley, 2d Lieutenant 10th Infantry, U. S. A.

 ─────────────┬────────┬───┬────────┬────────┬──────────────────────────
 Raymond      │Captain │42 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
   Allston    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Austin Purdum│  1st   │26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
              │ Lieut. │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Robert Hanson│   2d   │26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
              │ Lieut. │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Charles A.   │  1st   │28 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
   Shrader    │ Sergt. │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Jeremiah Orr │Sergeant│36 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Luke Douglas │   do   │45 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 John G.      │   do   │26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
   Cornwell   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Henry R.     │   do   │23 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
   Caldwell   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Mahlon L.    │Corporal│24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
   Dixon      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 George Day   │   do   │34 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 John A.      │   do   │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
   Walker     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Jeremiah     │   do   │36 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
   Hanks      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Samuel W.    │   do   │27 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
   Moore      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 William V.   │   do   │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
   Dennon     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 John Ortman  │   do   │42 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  mustered out Dec. 3,
              │        │   │        │        │  1864 at Columbus O., by
              │        │   │        │        │  order of War Department.
 Moses L.     │   do   │37 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Killed July 9, 1864, at
   Sutton     │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.
 Boblett, John│Private │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
   S.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Bailey,      │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred to Co. A May
   Sherman H. │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864.
 Barclay,     │   do   │27 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
   James      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Bryant,      │   do   │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
   Arthur     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Byers,       │   do   │48 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
   Abraham    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Calver, Jacob│Private │37 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
   T.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Calver,      │   do   │41 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
   Marion     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Carroll, John│   do   │17 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Clark, Perry │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Climer, David│   do   │39 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Cole, George │   do   │28 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
   W.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1884.
 Cutright,    │   do   │43 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
   Amaziah    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Cutright,    │   do   │37 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
   Elijah     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Cutright,    │   do   │27 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
   Jeremiah   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Cutright,    │   do   │17 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Died Aug. 12, 1864, at
   John L.    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Camp Parole, near
              │        │   │        │        │  Annapolis, Md.
 Cutright,    │   do   │32 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
   Rufus      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Cutright,    │   do   │30 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
   Simon B.   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Dennin, Geo. │   do   │38 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
   W.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Dennin, Hiram│   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
   L.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Dixon, George│   do   │28 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
   A.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Drummond,    │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
   Wesley     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Farabee, Wm. │   do   │22 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
   S.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Fletcher,    │   do   │28 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
   Harrison   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Gatwood,     │   do   │16 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
   James A.   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Gerteisen,   │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred to Co. A May
   Augustus   │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864.
 Goodchild,   │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
   John       │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Goss, James  │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
   M.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hanna, Robert│   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hanson, Benj.│   do   │25 │ May 8, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
   E.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hanson, John │   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hough, George│   do   │35 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
   W.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Huff, Thomas │   do   │17 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Wounded July 9, 1864, in
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  mustered out with
              │        │   │        │        │  company Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hunt, Jabez  │   do   │28 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred to Co. A May
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864.
 Jones,       │   do   │36 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
   Abraham    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Jones, James │   do   │22 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
   W.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Jones, John  │Private │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
   W.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Jones, Thomas│   do   │37 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Kleine, Adam │   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company,
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Krick, Jacob │Private │34 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Liston, Ezra │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 McGee, Jesse │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Masters,     │   do   │26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Leonard    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Masters,     │   do   │37 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Moses      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Minear, Adam │   do   │28 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   C.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Moats, James │   do   │27 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Orr, Presley │   do   │34 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Orr, Zebulon │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Phillips,    │   do   │36 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
   Thomas     │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  mustered out March 16,
              │        │   │        │        │  1865, at Columbus, O.,
              │        │   │        │        │  by order of War
              │        │   │        │        │  Department.
 Pyle, John   │   do   │25 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Pyle, William│   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   H.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Quick, James │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Ray, James H.│   do   │26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  died Nov. 15, 1864, in
              │        │   │        │        │  Rebel Prison at
              │        │   │        │        │  Danville, Va.
 Ross, Adam   │   do   │28 │ May 8, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Ross, Conrad │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Ross, Jesse  │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Ruple, Alfred│   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred to Co. A May
   A.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864.
 Sands, James │   do   │37 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  died March 5, 1865, in
              │        │   │        │        │  General Hospital No. 12,
              │        │   │        │        │  Richmond, Va., while a
              │        │   │        │        │  prisoner of war.
 Shepherd,    │   do   │22 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
   Joseph     │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  mustered out to date
              │        │   │        │        │  Oct. 20, 1864, by order
              │        │   │        │        │  of War Department.
 Smallwood,   │   do   │26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Truman     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Smith, Austin│Private │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Smith,       │   do   │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   William W. │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Somers, John │   do   │17 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   A.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Sowers,      │   do   │27 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Laurence   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Stanhope,    │   do   │27 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   George     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Stauffer,    │   do   │27 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Henry      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Stauffer,    │   do   │33 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
   Samuel     │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  mustered out to date
              │        │   │        │        │  Oct. 20, 1864, by order
              │        │   │        │        │  of War Department.
 Stauffer,    │   do   │30 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Solomon    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Taylor,      │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Charles    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Vangundy,    │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Austin     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Vangundy,    │   do   │.. │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Chas. M.   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Walker,      │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Christian  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Woodrow,     │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Robert     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Zimmerman,   │   do   │23 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
   Antony     │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  mustered out March 11,
              │        │   │        │        │  1865, at Columbus, O.,
              │        │   │        │        │  by order of War
              │        │   │        │        │  Department.
 ═════════════╧════════╧═══╧════════╧════════╧══════════════════════════


                               COMPANY E.

   Mustered in May 8, 1864, at Camp Dennison, O., by Robert S. Smith,
    Captain 2d Cavalry. U. S. A. Mustered out Aug. 30, 1864, at Camp
 Dennison, O., by William Stanley, 2d Lieutenant 10th Infantry, U. S. A.

 ─────────────┬────────┬───┬────────┬────────┬──────────────────────────
 Thomas B.    │Captain │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Jenkins    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Henry Grubb  │  1st   │28 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │ Lieut. │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Daniel M.    │   2d   │25 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Beard      │ Lieut. │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Wm. H. Beard │  1st   │29 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │ Sergt. │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 James Henness│Sergeant│42 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 William G.   │   do   │30 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Died Aug. 15, 1864, in U.
   Stitt      │        │   │  1864  │        │  S. Hospital in
              │        │   │        │        │  Washington, D. C.
 Hamilton     │   do   │36 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Robinson   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Robert W.    │   do   │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Snyder     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Robert J.    │Corporal│32 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Banks      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Daniel Grubb │   do   │33 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 John E. Mills│   do   │22 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Tho. W.      │   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   McFarland  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Robert W.    │   do   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Earl       │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Augustus Earl│   do   │34 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Wm. H.       │   do   │29 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Michael    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Samuel B.    │   do   │29 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Appointed——; mustered out
   Egleson    │        │   │  1864  │        │  with company Aug. 30,
              │        │   │        │        │  1864.
 Acton, Lot   │Private │40 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Died Aug. 14, 1864, in U.
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  S. Hospital at
              │        │   │        │        │  Baltimore, Md.
 Arnett,      │   do   │25 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Jonathan P.│        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Augustus,    │   do   │23 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Reduced from Corporal Aug.
   John P.    │        │   │  1864  │        │  25, 1864; mustered out
              │        │   │        │        │  with company Aug. 30,
              │        │   │        │        │  1864.
 Augustus,    │   do   │26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Pres. T.   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Augustus,    │   do   │28 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Thom. E.   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Barrett,     │   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Franklin   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Binns,       │   do   │43 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Charles    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Blozer, Noah │   do   │29 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Bostwick,    │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Clin. W.   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Bowdle John  │   do   │29 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   W.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Bowdle, Wm.  │   do   │33 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   F.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Bullock, Geo.│   do   │25 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   W.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Butler, John │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   D.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Daniels,     │   do   │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Abner W.   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Dorn, Peter  │   do   │25 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Absent, sick——. No further
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  record found.
 Doty, William│   do   │36 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   C.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Earl, John   │   do   │30 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Earl, Thomas │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Evans, John  │Private │25 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Absent——. No further
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  record found.
 Fenimore,    │   do   │26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Chas. W.   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Fenimore,    │   do   │36 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Ebe. B.    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Fenimore,    │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Hen. W.    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Finly, Moses │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Freeman,     │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Charles    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Freese, Isaac│   do   │31 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   M.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Gaib, John E.│   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Gill, Lewis  │   do   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Glass, George│   do   │27 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   W.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Grubb, Andrew│   do   │27 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Grubb, Jacob │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hankins,     │   do   │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Alex.      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hankins,     │   do   │30 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   James W.   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hardy, David │   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   A.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Henness,     │   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   George     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Henness,     │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   James A.   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Henness, Jas.│   do   │38 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   A. Sr.     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hodsden,     │   do   │38 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Alex. L.   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hurt, Milton │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   L.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Jenkins,     │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Roland Z.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Johnson,     │   do   │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Alexander  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Keller, Lucas│   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   C.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Kilgore,     │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   George W.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Kinnamon,    │   do   │25 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   George     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Kinnamon,    │   do   │27 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
   Jere.      │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  died Sept. 25, 1864, in
              │        │   │        │        │  Rebel Prison at
              │        │   │        │        │  Danville, Va.
 Lockwood,    │   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Hen. C.    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Mallow, Owen │   do   │31 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   T.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 March, Joseph│   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred to Co. A May
   C.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864.
 Michael,     │   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Albert J.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Miller, Smith│   do   │22 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  died March 24, 1865, at
              │        │   │        │        │  Annapolis, Md.
 Ogden, Edw.  │Private │22 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
   P.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  mustered out June 17,
              │        │   │        │        │  1865, at Columbus, O.,
              │        │   │        │        │  by order of War
              │        │   │        │        │  Department.
 Ogden, Levi  │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Organ,       │   do   │39 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Stephen S. │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Plyley,      │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Leonidas T.│        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Plyley,      │   do   │30 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Morris J.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Pursel,      │   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Oregon C.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Pursel,      │   do   │38 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Presley    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Rittenour,   │   do   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred to Co. A May
   George     │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864.
 Rittenhouse, │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   J. G.      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Rodgers, John│   do   │30 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Absent——. No further
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  record found.
 Rose, Lewis  │   do   │22 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   L.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Rout,        │   do   │22 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Nathaniel  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
   W.         │        │   │        │        │
 Sanders,     │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Milton     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Slay, James  │   do   │39 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   E.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Thomas, Benj.│   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred to Co. A May
   E.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  11. 1864.
 Ulm, Benj. E.│   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Whitten,     │   do   │26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
   Solo. I.   │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  mustered out March 27,
              │        │   │        │        │  1865, at Columbus, O.,
              │        │   │        │        │  by order of War
              │        │   │        │        │  Department.
 Wilkins, John│   do   │31 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Withgott,    │   do   │33 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Jesse L.   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Withgott,    │   do   │22 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Thom. M.   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Young,       │   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred to Co. A May
   Frederick  │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864.
 ═════════════╧════════╧═══╧════════╧════════╧══════════════════════════


                               COMPANY F.

   Mustered in May 8, 1864, at Camp Dennison, O., by Robert S. Smith,
    Captain 2d Cavalry, U. S. A. Mustered out Aug. 30, 1864, at Camp
 Dennison, O., by William Stanley, 2d Lieutenant 10th Infantry, U. S. A.

 ─────────────┬────────┬───┬────────┬────────┬──────────────────────────
 John Ross    │Captain │25 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Louis C.     │  1st   │29 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Amberg     │ Lieut. │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Howard A.    │   2d   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Haynes     │ Lieut. │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Delay J.     │  1st   │30 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Bishop     │ Sergt. │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 George W.    │Sergeant│22 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Shott      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Joseph       │   do   │25 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Gorrell    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Barzilla     │   do   │37 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Rosell     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 James McNeal │   do   │38 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 James Loops  │Corporal│40 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Henry Amen   │   do   │33 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 William      │   do   │44 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Chestnut   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Joseph B.    │   do   │29 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Nelson     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 James Elliott│   do   │41 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Martin       │   do   │22 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Lighttle   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 William R.   │   do   │32 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Ross       │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Wm. G. Nelson│   do   │31 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Barks, George│Private │43 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Bell, Edgar  │   do   │29 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Absent——; sick; mustered
   R.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  out with company.
 Bishop, David│   do   │30 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Died June 15, 1864, in
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  McKims’ Hospital,
              │        │   │        │        │  Baltimore, Md.
 Bishop, Jacob│   do   │35 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   G.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Bishop, Jonas│   do   │36 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   S.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Bishop,      │   do   │35 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Robert     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Boutz, Jacob │   do   │28 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Boutz, Peter │   do   │39 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Boyer,       │   do   │42 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Died Aug. 31, 1864, in U.
   Richard H. │        │   │  1864  │        │  S. General Hospital at
              │        │   │        │        │  Columbus, O.
 Chadwell,    │   do   │34 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   James      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Cockerel,    │   do   │30 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Dennis     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Cockerel,    │Private │38 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   George     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Cockerel,    │   do   │26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   James      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Cutright,    │   do   │17 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   John H.    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Cutright,    │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Simeon     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Davis,       │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Greenberry │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Dickson,     │   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred from Co. C May
   Alexander  │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864; mustered out
              │        │   │        │        │  with company Aug. 30,
              │        │   │        │        │  1864.
 Drummond, Rod│   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Eberly, John │   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   J.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Edgington,   │   do   │42 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   James      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Edwards,     │   do   │44 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   George     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Elsass,      │   do   │33 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Michael    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 England,     │   do   │29 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Aaron      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 England,     │   do   │30 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Absent, sick——. No further
   Enoch      │        │   │  1864  │        │  record found.
 Fox, William │   do   │22 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred from Co. C May
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864; mustered out
              │        │   │        │        │  with company Aug. 30,
              │        │   │        │        │  1864.
 Ham,         │   do   │41 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Valentine  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Haynes, Henry│   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   W.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Heskett,     │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Stanton    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hilbrecht,   │   do   │22 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred from Co. C May
   Fred’ck    │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864; mustered out
              │        │   │        │        │  with company Aug. 30,
              │        │   │        │        │  1864.
 Hinkleman,   │   do   │35 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Adolph     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hollis,      │   do   │32 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   William N. │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Kadel, Philip│   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  mustered out with
              │        │   │        │        │  company Aug. 30, 1864.
 Klein, Henry │   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  mustered out with
              │        │   │        │        │  company Aug. 30, 1864.
 Klutz,       │   do   │22 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   William    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Kramer, Adam │Private │26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred from Co. C May
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864; mustered out
              │        │   │        │        │  with company Aug. 30,
              │        │   │        │        │  1864.
 Lautenclas,  │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Adam       │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Lebeau,      │   do   │39 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Charles    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Lebeau,      │   do   │32 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Michael    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 McGinnis,    │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   William    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Miller,      │   do   │44 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Discharged June 9, 1864,
   William    │        │   │  1864  │        │  at Baltimore, Md., on
              │        │   │        │        │  Surgeon’s certificate of
              │        │   │        │        │  disability.
 Morgan,      │   do   │29 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Vincent    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Murphy, John │   do   │44 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Park, William│   do   │36 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Died June 26, 1864, at
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Jarvis Hospital,
              │        │   │        │        │  Baltimore, Md.
 Purdum, John │   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   S.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Ravencroft,  │   do   │30 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Aug. M.    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Redman,      │   do   │30 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   August     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Rief, John   │   do   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Riley, Joseph│   do   │37 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Rinehart,    │   do   │38 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   David G.   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Rinehart,    │   do   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Silas      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Rood, Stephen│   do   │35 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   C.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Ruey, Samuel │   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Sayre,       │   do   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
   Preston H. │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  died Dec. 2, 1864, in
              │        │   │        │        │  Rebel Prison at
              │        │   │        │        │  Salisbury, N. C.
 Scholl,      │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Nicholas   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Sproat, James│   do   │32 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Promoted to Hospital
   F.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Steward May 11, 1864.
 Stadler, John│   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Died July 1, 1864, at
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  McKims’ Hospital,
              │        │   │        │        │  Baltimore, Md.
 Stall, Wilson│   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Stickroth,   │   do   │33 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Conrad     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Thoma,       │   do   │39 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Sebastian  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Thompson,    │   do   │47 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   James      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Toops, Henry │   do   │39 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Toops, James │   do   │23 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   W.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Trochler,    │   do   │29 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Died Aug. 6, 1864, at
   George     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Sandy Hook Hospital,
              │        │   │        │        │  Maryland.
 Troub, George│Private │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Vanscoy,     │   do   │44 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   George     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Vanscoy, Noah│   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Wentworth,   │   do   │43 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Ben’ng     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Wilt, George │   do   │31 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Wilt, Samuel │   do   │36 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Wilson,      │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Martin     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Wilson,      │   do   │25 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   William    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Wyatt,       │   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Augustus   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 ═════════════╧════════╧═══╧════════╧════════╧══════════════════════════


                               COMPANY G.

   Mustered in May 8, 1864, at Camp Dennison, O., by Robert S. Smith,
    Captain 2d Cavalry, U. S. A. Mustered out Aug. 30, 1864, at Camp
 Dennison, O., by William Stanley, 2d Lieutenant 10th Infantry, U. S. A.

 ─────────────┬────────┬───┬────────┬────────┬──────────────────────────
 Joshua Hussey│Captain │31 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 George F.    │  1st   │.. │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Bowers     │ Lieut. │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Sinclair L.  │   2d   │34 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Pitzer     │ Lieut. │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Amos B. Beard│  1st   │33 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │ Sergt. │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Charles S.   │Sergeant│22 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Drake      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 John W. Cline│   do   │26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 John C. Routh│   do   │28 │ May 2. │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Calvin R.    │   do   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Vantress   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Samuel Mower │Corporal│30 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 John Newby   │   do   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.:
              │        │   │        │        │  mustered out April 5,
              │        │   │        │        │  1865, at Columbus, O.,
              │        │   │        │        │  by order of War
              │        │   │        │        │  Department.
 Cornelius    │Corporal│33 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Robison    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug 30, 1864.
 Benjamin     │   do   │32 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Stout      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug 30, 1864.
 Savetus,     │   do   │28 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Swartz     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug 30, 1864.
 Christ,      │   do   │29 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Underwood  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug 30, 1864.
 Edward       │   do   │26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Williams   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug 30, 1864.
 John Hodson  │   do   │36 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug 30, 1864.
 Austin,      │Private │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   George W.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug 30, 1864.
 Austin, James│   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   A.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug 30, 1864.
 Barnes,      │   do   │13 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   George D.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug 30, 1864.
 Barnes, John │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   W.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Belford,     │   do   │28 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
   Jonathan   │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  mustered out April 5,
              │        │   │        │        │  1865, at Columbus, O.,
              │        │   │        │        │  by order of War
              │        │   │        │        │  Department.
 Bohar, David │   do   │28 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug 30, 1864.
 Brewer, Joel │   do   │42 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug 30, 1864.
 Brown, Wm. A.│   do   │36 │ May 2, │100 dys.│No record subsequent to
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  muster-in.
 Burnes,      │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
   Robert     │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md;
              │        │   │        │        │  died Nov. 23, 1864, in
              │        │   │        │        │  Rebel Prison at
              │        │   │        │        │  Danville, Va.
 Chamberlain, │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Wm.        │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug 30, 1864.
 Clabaugh, M. │   do   │29 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
   F.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  mustered out April 6,
              │        │   │        │        │  1865, at Columbus, O.,
              │        │   │        │        │  by order of War
              │        │   │        │        │  Department.
 Clark,       │   do   │26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
   William    │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  mustered out April 5,
              │        │   │        │        │  1865, at Columbus, O.,
              │        │   │        │        │  by order of War
              │        │   │        │        │  Department.
 Cline, Samuel│   do   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug 30, 1864.
 Cluxton,     │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Carey      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug 30, 1864.
 Cox, David   │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug 30, 1864.
 Davis, Thomas│   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Wounded July 9, 1864, in
   L.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  mustered out with
              │        │   │        │        │  company Aug 30, 1864.
 Devore, Levi │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug 30, 1864.
 Dove, B. G.  │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug 30, 1864.
 Dove, Mark   │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  mustered out April 5,
              │        │   │        │        │  1865, at Columbus, O.,
              │        │   │        │        │  by order of War
              │        │   │        │        │  Department.
 Drake, Lewis │Private │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   C.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Eaton, James │   do   │22 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   H.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Flora, Isaac │   do   │26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Green, Jesse │   do   │28 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hensel,      │   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Francis    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hildebrandt, │   do   │40 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Heze.      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hildebrandt, │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
   Jno. B.    │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  mustered out April 5,
              │        │   │        │        │  1865, at Columbus, O.,
              │        │   │        │        │  by order of War
              │        │   │        │        │  Department.
 Hildebrant,  │   do   │35 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   P. A.      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hildebrant,  │   do   │23 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Sam. C.    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hildebrant,  │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Theo.      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hixson,      │   do   │22 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Alonzo F.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hodson, Cyrus│   do   │39 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Died June 8, 1864, at Fort
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Marshall, Baltimore, Md.
 Hodson, Isaac│   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Died Jan. 23, 1865, in
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Rebel Prison at
              │        │   │        │        │  Danville, Va.
 Holmes, David│   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hopkins,     │   do   │44 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
   Samuel     │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  mustered out April 5,
              │        │   │        │        │  1865, at Columbus, O.,
              │        │   │        │        │  by order of War
              │        │   │        │        │  Department.
 Hoskins,     │   do   │40 │ May 2, │100 dys.│No further record found.
   George     │        │   │  1864  │        │
 Hussey,      │   do   │29 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Died Feb. 24, 1865, in
   Elijah     │        │   │  1864  │        │  hospital at Annapolis,
              │        │   │        │        │  Md., while a paroled
              │        │   │        │        │  prisoner.
 Kohler,      │   do   │36 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   George     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Leeker, Henry│   do   │33 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 McNamay,     │   do   │39 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Abram      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Mackifee,    │   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   John       │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Mendenhall,  │   do   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Nathan     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Miller,      │Private │30 │ May 2, │100 dys.│No record subsequent to
   Zadock     │        │   │  1864  │        │  muster-in.
 Milliner,    │   do   │25 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Joseph H.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Mitchell,    │   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Robert R.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Moon, Alvin  │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Died July 13, 1864, at
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Fort Marshall,
              │        │   │        │        │  Baltimore, Md.
 Moore, Thomas│   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   C.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Mower, Peyton│   do   │36 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Pitzer,      │   do   │26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   William B. │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Price, John  │   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
   W.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  mustered out March 31,
              │        │   │        │        │  1865, at Columbus, O.,
              │        │   │        │        │  by order of War
              │        │   │        │        │  Department.
 Quigley, John│   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Sick——, at Camp Parole,
   W.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Md. No further record
              │        │   │        │        │  found.
 Russel,      │   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Mahlon     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Ryan, James  │   do   │23 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Died Nov. 20, 1864, in
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Rebel Prison, at
              │        │   │        │        │  Danville, Va.
 Severs,      │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Henley L.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Severs,      │   do   │41 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred from Co. H——;
   Israel T.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  mustered out with
              │        │   │        │        │  company Aug. 30, 1864.
 Severs, James│   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Smith,       │   do   │38 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
   Benjamin   │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  mustered out Nov. 23,
              │        │   │        │        │  1864, at Columbus, O.,
              │        │   │        │        │  by order of War
              │        │   │        │        │  Department.
 Trenary,     │   do   │29 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out May 22, 1865,
   Jefferson  │        │   │  1864  │        │  at Columbus, O., by
              │        │   │        │        │  order of War Department.
 Trenary,     │   do   │22 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Samuel     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Trenary,     │   do   │30 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Samuel G.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 West, George │   do   │33 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Died Oct. 20, 1864, in
   W.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Rebel Prison, at
              │        │   │        │        │  Danville, Va.
 Williams,    │   do   │26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   James      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Williams,    │   do   │34 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   James L.   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Woodruff, Wm.│   do   │34 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   P.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Wright, Henry│   do   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred from Co. H——;
   C.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  mustered out with
              │        │   │        │        │  company Aug. 30, 1864.
 Young, Milton│   do   │44 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  mustered out March 31,
              │        │   │        │        │  1865, at Columbus, O.,
              │        │   │        │        │  by order of War
              │        │   │        │        │  Department.
 ═════════════╧════════╧═══╧════════╧════════╧══════════════════════════


                               COMPANY H.

   Mustered in May 8, 1864, at Camp Dennison, O., by Robert S. Smith,
    Captain 2d Cavalry, U. S. A. Mustered out Aug. 30, 1864, at Camp
 Dennison, O., by William Stanley, 2d Lieutenant 10th Infantry, U. S. A.

 ─────────────┬────────┬───┬────────┬────────┬──────────────────────────
 William R.   │Captain │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Farlow     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 James Brown  │  1st   │37 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │ Lieut. │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 John F.      │   2d   │32 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Burris     │ Lieut. │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 William F.   │  1st   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Smith      │ Sergt. │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 William H.   │Sergeant│33 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Smith      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Joseph       │   do   │28 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Carmean    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 William Jones│   do   │31 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Charles D.   │   do   │30 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Parker     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Thomas M.    │Corporal│26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Junk       │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Jno G. W.    │   do   │33 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Donohoe    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 John N.      │   do   │25 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Timmons    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Nelson L.    │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Hurtt      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 William Darby│   do   │39 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Anson H.     │   do   │27 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Mallow     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Strawder G.  │   do   │25 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Nier       │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Ewing W.     │   do   │22 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Templin    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Adams, Samuel│Private │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Ayers, Elkena│   do   │33 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred to Co. B May
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864.
 Barton,      │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   George L.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Bowers,      │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   George A.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Campbell,    │   do   │32 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Michael    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Castle,      │   do   │25 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   William R. │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Collins,     │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Elias      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Collins,     │Private │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Jonas      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Crabb, George│   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   D.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Cupp, John H.│   do   │22 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Deerexson,   │   do   │30 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Hen. A.    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Dennis,      │   do   │34 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Daniel     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Dennis,      │   do   │27 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   George     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Dennis, Henry│   do   │35 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Dennis,      │   do   │35 │ May 2, │100 dys.│No record subsequent to
   William    │        │   │  1864  │        │  muster-in.
 Donohoe,     │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Alfred S.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Donohoe, Owen│   do   │31 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Donohoe,     │   do   │26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   William    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Downing,     │   do   │28 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Melvin     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Downing,     │   do   │34 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   William    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Fix, Andrew  │   do   │28 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Died Feb. 13, 1865, in
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Rebel Prison at
              │        │   │        │        │  Salisbury, N. C.
 Grove,       │   do   │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   William    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Handcher,    │   do   │22 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Geo. W.    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Handcher,    │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   And’w J.   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Harmount,    │   do   │28 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Robt. S.   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hickman,     │   do   │41 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred to Co. B——.
   Zach. D.   │        │   │  1864  │        │
 Hill,        │   do   │27 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Benjamin A.│        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hill, John C.│   do   │33 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hitch,       │   do   │38 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Clement    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Holloway,    │   do   │36 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Joseph     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Horsey,      │   do   │40 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Stephen G. │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hughes,      │   do   │27 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Charles    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Junk, John C.│   do   │28 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Junk, Robt.  │   do   │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   W.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Kearney,     │   do   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   William    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Kimmey,      │   do   │40 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Solomon    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Kiser, Eli   │   do   │38 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Lambert,     │   do   │38 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Zachariah  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 McCammon, Wm.│   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred to Co. A——, as
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  William McCommon.
 McCollister, │   do   │33 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   James      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 McKee, Harry,│   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Maddox, John │Private │27 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   H.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Miller,      │   do   │43 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   William    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Nier, John   │   do   │22 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Norris, David│   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Richards,    │   do   │28 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Benj.      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Severs,      │   do   │41 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred to Co. G——.
   Israel T.  │        │   │  1864  │        │
 Timmons,     │   do   │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Jason L.   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Timmons, John│   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   W.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Timmons,     │   do   │28 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   William    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Tomlinson, M.│   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Tootle, Owen │   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   B.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Waggaman, T. │   do   │27 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   H.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Watt, Cyrus  │   do   │23 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   A.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Whitten, John│   do   │28 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Whitten,     │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Ransom     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Wilkins,     │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Spencer    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Wilkins,     │   do   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Wesley R.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Willis,      │   do   │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Franklin   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Willis, James│   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Wolfe, George│   do   │31 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Promoted to Sergt. Major
   L.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  May 8, 1864.
 Wright, Henry│   do   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred to Co. G——.
   C.         │        │   │  1864  │        │
 ═════════════╧════════╧═══╧════════╧════════╧══════════════════════════


                               COMPANY I.

   Mustered in May 8, 1864, at Camp Dennison, O., by Robert S. Smith,
    Captain 2d Cavalry, U. S. A. Mustered out Aug. 30, 1864, at Camp
 Dennison, O., by William Stanley, 2d Lieutenant 10th Infantry, U. S. A.

 ─────────────┬────────┬───┬────────┬────────┬──────────────────────────
 Philip A.    │Captain │34 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Rodes      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Henry C. Roby│  1st   │28 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │ Lieut. │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 James Q.     │   2d   │37 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Clark      │ Lieut. │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Rufus P.     │  1st   │27 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   March      │ Sergt. │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Joseph H.    │Sergeant│20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Rowland    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 James T.     │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
   Nicholds   │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  mustered out Sept. 30,
              │        │   │        │        │  1864, at Cincinnati, O.,
              │        │   │        │        │  by order of War
              │        │   │        │        │  Department.
 Reeves R.    │   do   │44 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
   McCall     │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  mustered out Oct. 3,
              │        │   │        │        │  1864, at Columbus, O.,
              │        │   │        │        │  by order of War
              │        │   │        │        │  Department.
 John S. Steel│   do   │25 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Wm. H.       │Corporal│21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
   Harrison   │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  died Sept. 25, 1864, in
              │        │   │        │        │  hospital at Annapolis,
              │        │   │        │        │  Md.
 Marquis L.   │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   March      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Albert Noble │   do   │30 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 James H.     │   do   │25 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
   Harrison   │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  died Sept. 13, 1864, in
              │        │   │        │        │  hospital at Annapolis,
              │        │   │        │        │  Md.
 Robert Clark │   do   │33 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 John M.      │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Wounded July 9, 1864, in
   Browning   │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  discharged March 4,
              │        │   │        │        │  1865, at U. S. General
              │        │   │        │        │  Hospital at Frederick,
              │        │   │        │        │  Md., on Surgeon’s
              │        │   │        │        │  certificate of
              │        │   │        │        │  disability.
 Gideon S.    │   do   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Coover     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Peter        │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Gharrett   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Acord, David │Private │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Acton, Andrew│   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Acton, James │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   D.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Barnett, John│   do   │37 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Beath,       │   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Died Aug. 21, 1864, at U.
   Granville  │        │   │  1864  │        │  S. General Hospital at
              │        │   │        │        │  Frederick, Md.
 Berringer,   │   do   │22 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   William    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Biggs, Isaac │   do   │22 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   N.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Blosser, John│   do   │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Brake,       │   do   │37 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   William J. │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Brodess,     │Private │34 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
   Thom. W.   │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  died Oct. 20, 1864, at
              │        │   │        │        │  Annapolis, Md.
 Browning,    │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Jas. F.    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Browning,    │   do   │41 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Joseph     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Browning, Wm.│   do   │16 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
   R.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  mustered out March 29,
              │        │   │        │        │  1865, at Columbus, O.,
              │        │   │        │        │  by order of War
              │        │   │        │        │  Department.
 Burner, David│   do   │40 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Burner,      │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   George W.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Chalfin,     │   do   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Phile. C.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Cooper, Jacob│   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Sick, in hospital at
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Baltimore, Md., since
              │        │   │        │        │  Aug. 13, 1864. No
              │        │   │        │        │  further record found.
 Crute, James │   do   │34 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
   L.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  mustered out April 4,
              │        │   │        │        │  1865, at Columbus, O.,
              │        │   │        │        │  by order of War
              │        │   │        │        │  Department.
 Curry, George│   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Diviney,     │   do   │42 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   George W.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Dolohan, Edw.│   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   B.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Farquhar,    │   do   │37 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred to Co. K May
   Amos       │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864.
 Frank, Philip│   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  died Oct. 2, 1864, in
              │        │   │        │        │  Rebel Prison at
              │        │   │        │        │  Danville, Va.
 Fultz, Henry │   do   │34 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Galoway, John│   do   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   H.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hamilton,    │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred to Co. K May
   James F.   │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864.
 Harlan,      │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred to Co. K May
   Carter B.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864.
 Harmell,     │   do   │35 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred to Co. K May
   Milton J.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864.
 Haynes,      │   do   │16 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred to Co. K May
   Monroe     │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864.
 Hays, George │   do   │17 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   W.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hays, Josiah │Private │33 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hays, Samuel │   do   │34 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hester,      │   do   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Jackson    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hollis,      │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Thomas B.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Howser,      │   do   │26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
   William    │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  died Jan. 27, 1865, in
              │        │   │        │        │  Rebel Prison at
              │        │   │        │        │  Danville, Va.
 Hunt, Harvey │   do   │16 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred to Co. K May
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864.
 Hunt, Uriah  │   do   │36 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred to Co. K May
   W.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864.
 Jeffries,    │   do   │25 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred to Co. K May
   Jeremiah   │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864.
 Jump, George │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Kammerar,    │   do   │29 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Joseph     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Kanish,      │   do   │25 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Conrad     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Kirk, Jesse  │   do   │27 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred to Co. K May
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864.
 Lightle,     │   do   │23 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   James      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Long, Samuel │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   T.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 McCrackin, W.│   do   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
   W.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  mustered out March 29,
              │        │   │        │        │  1865, at Columbus, O.,
              │        │   │        │        │  by order of War
              │        │   │        │        │  Department.
 McDonald,    │   do   │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Samuel     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 McKenzie, Wm.│   do   │23 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Discharged Sept. 2, 1864,
   H.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  at U. S. General
              │        │   │        │        │  Hospital at Baltimore,
              │        │   │        │        │  Md., on Surgeon’s
              │        │   │        │        │  certificate of
              │        │   │        │        │  disability.
 Morris, John │   do   │39 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Morter,      │   do   │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   William I. │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Null, John W.│   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Orr, John L. │   do   │35 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Poole, John  │   do   │26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   W.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Recob, George│   do   │39 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Reed, Moses  │   do   │43 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   D.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Rowe, George │   do   │25 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Rowe, James  │   do   │37 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Sick, in hospital at
   F.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Baltimore, Md., since
              │        │   │        │        │  July ——, 1864. No
              │        │   │        │        │  further record found.
 Sailer, Wm.  │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   H.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Samson, David│   do   │35 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   I.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Sealock,     │Private │33 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Robert W.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Shela, Alfred│   do   │30 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Smart, Joshua│   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   E.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Sturgess, Wm.│   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   H.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Tuvell, James│   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   B.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Vanderburg,  │   do   │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred to Co. K May
   P. D.      │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864.
 Watson,      │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Marion     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Westbrook,   │   do   │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Wm. A.     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Wilcox, Isaac│   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   N.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Wilcox,      │   do   │46 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Robert     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Wood, William│   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 ═════════════╧════════╧═══╧════════╧════════╧══════════════════════════


                               COMPANY K.

   Mustered in May 8, 1864, at Camp Dennison, O., by Robert S. Smith,
    Captain 2d Cavalry, U. S. A. Mustered out Aug. 30, 1864, at Camp
 Dennison, O., by William Stanley, 2d Lieutenant 10th Infantry, U. S. A.

 ─────────────┬────────┬───┬────────┬────────┬──────────────────────────
 William C.   │Captain │42 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Wilson     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 James V.     │  1st   │29 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Rannels    │ Lieut. │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Newton       │   2d   │28 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Shoemaker  │ Lieut. │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Edwin        │  1st   │27 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Shockley   │ Sergt. │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 John M.      │Sergeant│30 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Johnson    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 James J.     │   do   │44 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Gregory    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Edward P.    │   do   │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Bond       │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 George       │Corporal│26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Lawhead    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Henry        │   do   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Lieuellen  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 John Eachus  │   do   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out to date Aug.
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  30, 1864, by order of
              │        │   │        │        │  War Department.
 John Boring  │Corporal│21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Jos.         │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Woodmansee │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Daniel Fenner│   do   │25 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Mahlon,      │   do   │23 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Russell    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Robert B.    │   do   │22 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Mitchell   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Aithy, Henry │Private │35 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Discharged——. No further
   C.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  record found.
 Baker,       │   do   │30 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Griffin    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Bloom, Alfred│   do   │31 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Bloom, George│   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Boring, Henry│   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Boring,      │   do   │.. │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Joseph     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Brewer,      │   do   │30 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   George     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Campbell,    │   do   │25 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Jas. W.    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Canny, George│   do   │38 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   W.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Clement, John│   do   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   D.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Clevenger,   │   do   │26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Martin     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Cook, Nathan │   do   │25 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Cottrell,    │   do   │42 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Joseph     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Craig,       │   do   │32 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Killed July 9, 1864, in
   Franklin   │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.
 Curtis, James│   do   │25 │ May 2, │100 dys.│No further record found.
              │        │   │  1864  │        │
 Dabe, James  │   do   │25 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Darby, Thomas│   do   │33 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Dennis,      │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
   Seneca     │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  mustered out April 6,
              │        │   │        │        │  1865, at Columbus, O.,
              │        │   │        │        │  by order of War
              │        │   │        │        │  Department.
 Devers,      │   do   │27 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Thomas     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Dillon, James│   do   │39 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Eachus,      │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
   Squire     │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  died July 14, 1865, at
              │        │   │        │        │  Wilmington, O.
 Ellis, James │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   V.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Faquhar, Amos│   do   │37 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred from Co. I May
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864; mustered out
              │        │   │        │        │  with company Aug. 30,
              │        │   │        │        │  1864.
 Fenner, James│   do   │36 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   H.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Fenner,      │   do   │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   William    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Fisher,      │   do   │36 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   George     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Fisher, James│Private │35 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Fisher,      │   do   │42 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   William    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Freed,       │   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Maybury    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Gregory,     │   do   │45 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Robt. W.   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Haynes,      │   do   │16 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred from Co. I May
   Monroe     │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864; mustered out
              │        │   │        │        │  with company Aug. 30,
              │        │   │        │        │  1864.
 Hallam,      │   do   │30 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   William    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hamilton,    │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred from Co. I May
   Jas. F.    │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864; mustered out
              │        │   │        │        │  with company Aug. 30,
              │        │   │        │        │  1864.
 Hamilton,    │   do   │23 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   John W.    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hamilton,    │   do   │25 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Tobias     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hansell,     │   do   │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Howard     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Harlan,      │   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred from Co. I May
   Carter B.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864; mustered out
              │        │   │        │        │  with company Aug. 30,
              │        │   │        │        │  1864.
 Harmell,     │   do   │35 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred from Co. I May
   Milton J.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864; mustered out
              │        │   │        │        │  with company Aug. 30,
              │        │   │        │        │  1864.
 Hendee,      │   do   │27 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   William    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hooton,      │   do   │27 │ May 2, │100 dys.│On muster-in roll. No
   Thomas     │        │   │  1864  │        │  further record found.
 Hoover,      │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Oliver F.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hubbell,     │   do   │29 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
   Edward     │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  died March 10, 1865, in
              │        │   │        │        │  hospital at Annapolis,
              │        │   │        │        │  Md.
 Hull, George │   do   │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Hunt, Harvey │   do   │16 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred from Co. I May
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864; died June 4,
              │        │   │        │        │  1864, at Easton, Md.
 Hunt, Uriah  │   do   │36 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred from Co. I May
   W.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864; mustered out
              │        │   │        │        │  with company Aug. 30,
              │        │   │        │        │  1864.
 Jeffries,    │   do   │25 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred from Co. I May
   Jeremiah   │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864; mustered out
              │        │   │        │        │  with company Aug. 30,
              │        │   │        │        │  1864.
 Johnson,     │Private │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Henry C.   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Kirk, Jesse  │   do   │27 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred from Co. I May
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864; mustered out
              │        │   │        │        │  with company Aug. 30,
              │        │   │        │        │  1864.
 Lafetra,     │   do   │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Milton     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Lawhead, John│   do   │30 │ May 2, │100 dys.│On muster-in roll. No
   W.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  further record found.
 Lieurance,   │   do   │27 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   David      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Lieurance,   │   do   │26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   George     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Lieurance,   │   do   │28 │ May 2, │100 dys.│On muster-in roll. No
   John       │        │   │  1864  │        │  further record found.
 Lyon, David  │   do   │30 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 McDonald,    │   do   │36 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Elphonz    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 McKenzie,    │   do   │26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Absent——. No further
   Harvey     │        │   │  1864  │        │  record found.
 McKenzie,    │   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   James      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 McMillen     │   do   │28 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Judiah H.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 McVeyh, James│   do   │25 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Absent——. No further
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  record found.
 Mann, William│   do   │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   H.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Matthews, Eli│   do   │33 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Middleton,   │   do   │28 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Jehu       │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Miller,      │   do   │25 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Lemuel S.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Mitchell,    │   do   │23 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Arthur L.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Moore, Thomas│   do   │22 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   A.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Morton,      │   do   │46 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Richard    │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30. 1864.
 Noftsgher,   │   do   │37 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Naaman     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Pierson, Levi│   do   │27 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Pond, Jesse  │   do   │26 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Discharged——. No further
   W.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  record found.
 Pond, William│   do   │31 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Absent——. No further
   J.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  record found.
 Rannels,     │   do   │23 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Captured July 9, 1864, at
   Thom. G.   │        │   │  1864  │        │  battle of Monocacy, Md.;
              │        │   │        │        │  mustered out May 3,
              │        │   │        │        │  1865, at Columbus, O.,
              │        │   │        │        │  by order of War
              │        │   │        │        │  Department.
 Rees, James  │   do   │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Roberts,     │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Thad. H.   │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Rockhill,    │   do   │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred to Co. B——.
   Jonathan   │        │   │  1864  │        │
 Sabin, Curtis│   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Sherbick,    │   do   │30 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Samuel     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Slate, Daniel│   do   │22 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   P.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Smith, Isaac │   do   │27 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred to Co. B——.
   N.         │        │   │  1864  │        │
 Spencer,     │Private │22 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Absent——. No further
   Alfred     │        │   │  1864  │        │  record found.
 Spencer,     │   do   │25 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Harvey     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Stackhouse,  │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Albert     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Stackhouse,  │   do   │21 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Jesse      │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Stackhouse,  │   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Joshua     │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Thorn, Elbert│   do   │30 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Tupes,       │   do   │40 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Absent——. No further
   William    │        │   │  1864  │        │  record found.
 Vanderburg,  │   do   │24 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Transferred from Co. I May
   P. D.      │        │   │  1864  │        │  11, 1864; mustered out
              │        │   │        │        │  with company Aug. 30,
              │        │   │        │        │  1864.
 Walker, Asa  │   do   │18 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
              │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Walker,      │   do   │20 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Elijah T.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Walker,      │   do   │25 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   Robert B.  │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 Wilson, Henry│   do   │19 │ May 2, │100 dys.│Mustered out with company
   H.         │        │   │  1864  │        │  Aug. 30, 1864.
 ═════════════╧════════╧═══╧════════╧════════╧══════════════════════════



------------------------------------------------------------------------



Transcriber’s note:

 1. P. 13, added missing “Organization of the Hundred Days Service”
      heading.

 2. Silently corrected typographical errors and variations in spelling.

 3. Anachronistic, non-standard, and uncertain spellings retained as
      printed.





*** End of this Doctrine Publishing Corporation Digital Book "A Summer in Maryland and Virginia - Or Campaigning with the 149th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. A Sketch of Events Connected with the Service of the Regiment in Maryland and the Shenandoah Valley, Virginia" ***

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