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Title: Roses: - or a Monograph on The Genus Rosa
Author: Andrews, Henry C.
Language: English
As this book started as an ASCII text book there are no pictures available.
Copyright Status: Not copyrighted in the United States. If you live elsewhere check the laws of your country before downloading this ebook. See comments about copyright issues at end of book.

*** Start of this Doctrine Publishing Corporation Digital Book "Roses: - or a Monograph on The Genus Rosa" ***


                                ROSES:


                              A MONOGRAPH

                                  OF

                            THE GENUS ROSA:

                              CONTAINING

                          _COLOURED FIGURES_

                                  OF

             ALL THE KNOWN SPECIES AND BEAUTIFUL VARIETIES

               DRAWN, ENGRAVED, DESCRIBED, AND COLOURED,

                        from the Living Plants.


                          _By H. C. ANDREWS_,
                               AUTHOR OF
    THE BOTANIST’S REPOSITORY, COLOURED ENGRAVINGS OF HEATHS, ETC.

    Hail, lovely ROSE, of flowers the blushing queen!
    Burst, burst, ye numerous Nondescripts, with spleen!
    Ye wondrous Nothings, from a foreign soil
    Brought with such labour, care, and anxious toil,--
    Say, can your utmost charms, combined, disclose
    Beauty and fragrance equal to the ROSE?

                                London:
             PRINTED BY R. TAYLOR AND CO., 38, SHOE LANE;
                                  AND
              PUBLISHED BY THE AUTHOR, 5, KNIGHTSBRIDGE.



INTRODUCTION.


The Rose, for matchless beauty famed, (although by botanists so
disregarded) has been the Painter’s study and the Poet’s theme, for ages
past, and will no doubt for ages yet to come; long after many a curious
Nondescript shall in a dusty hortus siccus sleep, unnoticed and unknown.

The intention of the author in the delineation of this unrivalled tribe,
is to arrange as accurately as possible the numerous beautiful
varieties, with their species--an arduous task, considering the neglect
they have experienced, and the wild and indiscriminate manner in which
they have been profusely mixed. This, aided by an heterogeneous mode of
culture, has produced many varieties, the lineal descent of which is
very difficult to ascertain.

The extent of the genus has been most vaguely estimated; by some
enumerated at two hundred and forty; an estimate that must certainly
include many very slight varieties, which, if allowed, might swell the
genus to ten times its real extent. But we think a rational computation
would confine them within a hundred, including every distinct variety.
The author’s intention is to figure only those to which a separate
character can be affixed, regarding a superfluous repetition, even of
beauty, inadmissible. As the merits of the present undertaking may
easily be appreciated by a free access to all its beautiful originals,
the author hopes a candid allowance will be made, upon a comparison with
the living plant, when it is considered that the most elaborate efforts
of art have never yet been able to do justice to its superior beauty.



ROSA muscosa, _Provincialis_.

_Moss Province Rose._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     ROSA, germinibus ovatis; calycibus et pedunculis muscosis; petiolis
     ramulisque hispidis et glanduloso-viscosis; spinis ramorum
     numerosis, rectis.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     ROSE, with egg-shaped seed-buds; empalements and peduncles mossy;
     petioles and younger branches hispid, and glandulously viscous;
     spines of the branches numerous, and straight.


The origin of this beautiful Rose, has ever been considered as enveloped
in obscurity; but we have no hesitation in assigning it to the Province,
to which it assimilates in every particular,--with the addition of a
rich luxuriant moss, that gives it a decided superiority, and at the
same time a specific distinction. In proof of our opinion, we have
recently seen both the Moss and Province Rose at one time, in high
perfection, on the same plant; and to remove all doubt, the plant was
dug up, to show that it was but one individual root. We have since seen
three more plants of the same description. Two of them had been
propagated by layers from the mossy shoots. The major part of them
returned to their origin, the Province. In the examination of a number
of Moss Roses, we have perceived a considerable difference in the
quantity of moss attached to them,--in many instances so slight, as
evidently to proclaim their original. There can be little if any doubt,
that this beautiful variety is the spontaneous effusion of Nature in
this country, of which we shall ever regard it as indigenous, since we
have never heard of any importations of this species, but of frequent
exportations. The most luxuriant specimens of this plant are the dwarf
growth in the open ground, from which our figure was taken.

[Illustration]



ROSA muscosa, _alba_.

_White Moss Rose._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     ROSA, germinibus ovatis; calycibus, pedunculis, et petiolis
     glanduloso-viscosis; foliolis ovatis, subtus villosis, ad margines
     glandulis viscosis; spinis ramorum numerosis, rectis.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     ROSE, with egg-shaped seed-buds; empalement, peduncles, and
     petioles, glandulously viscous; leaflets of an oval shape, villose
     beneath, with small viscous glands on their edges; spines of the
     branches numerous, and straight.


To the industry of Mr. Shailler, Nurseryman, of Little Chelsea, we are
indebted for this delicate new Moss Rose; an acknowledged production
between the Moss and White Province, or Rose Unique, and which is
certainly a valuable addition to this lovely tribe. It evidently bears
the compound characters of both plants, with a foliage very distinct
from either of them; yet it cannot be deemed perfectly a white flower,
since a delicate pale blush pervades the centre of the blossom: this,
however, we regard as no diminution of its beauty, and probably not a
permanent character, but owing to a tender habit, which time and culture
may remove, when it becomes more abundant.

At present it is a very scarce Rose, and requires a sheltered situation.
The soil in which most Roses thrive best is a light, sandy soil. Some
grow very luxuriant in a stony or gravelly situation. This succeeds
better with a considerable portion of rich bog earth.

[Illustration]



ROSA muscosa, _variegata_.

_Striped Moss Rose._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     ROSA, germinibus ovatis; calycibus, pedunculis, et petiolis
     glanduloso-viscosis; foliolis ovatis, subtus villosis, marginibus
     glandulosis; spinis ramorum sparsis, rectis.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     ROSE, with egg-shaped seed-buds; empalements, peduncles, and
     petioles glandulously viscous; leaflets egg-shaped, softly haired
     beneath, with glandular margins; spines of the branches scattered,
     and straight.

       *       *       *       *       *

This charming Striped Variety is another acquisition to the Mossy tribe,
and, we think, of equal value with the White; and though very distinct
in its character from that plant, it yet betrays a powerful affinity in
many particulars, so as to leave but little doubt of its origin being
nearly the same. In flower it approaches nearest to the York and
Lancaster Rose, which in size and colour it much resembles.

This is likewise the production of Mr. Shailler, who propagated it at
the same time as the White variety, and is equally scarce; principally
owing to its being treated with too little care before it was
sufficiently established. We have no doubt, however, that in time it
will be equally as hardy as any other.

[Illustration]



ROSA Provincialis.

_Province Rose._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     ROSA, germinibus subrotundis; pedunculis petiolisque hispidis et
     glandulosis; aculeis ramorum sparsis, rectis, sub-reflexis;
     foliolis ovatis, subtus villosis; serratulis glandulosis.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     ROSE, with roundish seed-buds; peduncles and petioles hispid and
     glandular. The prickles of the branches are scattered, straight,
     and slightly bent back. The leaflets are villous beneath, with
     glandulose serratures.

       *       *       *       *       *

The species of Rose denominated Province, a native of Spain and Italy,
is by far the most extended. The varieties are so numerous, that they
apparently comprise one third of the genus. Our present figure
represents the Single Province, a very scarce rose; and as the incipient
ground of so many beautiful varieties, we regard it as peculiarly
valuable. It is a singular circumstance, that from Spain and Italy,
where the Province is supposed to be indigenous, and thence imported to
us, we should never have heard of the Single Province, much less
received the plant; which we can in no way account for, unless the
superior beauty of the Common Province, joined to its great abundance,
may have rendered the idea of importing those with single flowers
superfluous.

Our figure was taken from the only plant we have ever seen, at the
nursery of Mr. Shailer, of Little Chelsea.

[Illustration]



ROSA Provincialis, _alba_.

_White Province, or Rose Unique._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     ROSA, germinibus subrotundis; pedunculis petiolisque hispidis et
     glandulosis; caule et ramis aculeatis, sparsis, rectis,
     sub-reflexis; foliolis ovatis, subtus villosis, marginibus
     glandulosis.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     ROSE, with seed-buds nearly round; peduncles and petioles hispid
     and glandular: the stem and branches are prickly, scattered,
     straight, and slightly bent back: the leaflets are villous beneath,
     with slightly glandular margins.

       *       *       *       *       *

Among the recent additions to this genus, the White Province, or Rose
Unique, is indisputably the most valuable. Its introduction in 1777 was
entirely accidental, through the medium of the late Mr. Grimwood,
nurseryman, a great admirer and collector of roses, who, in an excursion
which he usually made every summer, in passing the front garden of Mr.
Richmond, a baker near Needham in Suffolk, there perceived the present
charming plant, where it had been placed by a carpenter who found it
near a hedge on the contiguous premises of a Dutch merchant, whose old
mansion he was repairing. Mr. Grimwood, requesting a little cutting of
it, received from Mr. Richmond the whole plant; when Mr. G., in return
for a plant so valuable, presented him with an elegant silver cup with
the Rose engraved upon it; and which in commemoration has furnished food
for many a convivial hour. It is of a dwarf growth, and remains in
flower near six weeks longer than the other Province Roses; which
renders it still the more estimable. We wish it had been in our power to
have accounted for its having been till so lately a stranger to us, and
whence indigenous; but at present our information is entirely confined
to the knowledge of its casual introduction; and until some further
light is thrown upon the subject, to elucidate its genealogy, we shall
regard it as a native.

Our drawing was taken from a plant in the nursery of Messrs. Colville,
King’s Road.

[Illustration]



ROSA parviflora, _Provincialis_.

_Small-flowered Province or Blandford Rose._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     Rosa parviflora, germinibus sub-globosis; pedunculis glandulosis;
     caule et petiolis aculeatis; aculeis ramorum sparsis, rectis,
     sub-reflexis; foliolis ovatis, subtus villosis, marginibus
     glandulosis.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     ROSE, with small flowers, and nearly round seed-buds: the
     footstalks are glandular; the stem and petioles prickly; the spines
     of the branches are scattered, straight, and slightly reflexed; the
     leaflets egg-shaped, villous or hairy beneath, with glandular
     margins.

       *       *       *       *       *

The Kingston, or Blandford Rose as it is most generally called, was
introduced by Mr. Kingston, nurseryman at Blandford near Dorset, in the
year 1791. In its character it has every thing in common with the
Province Rose, with a specifically distinct small flower (whence our
name); which contrasted with the largeness of its leaves, gives a
singularity to its appearance. In its blossom it approaches nearest to
the Roses of Burgundy and de Meaux; in shape like the former, but in
colour more resembling the latter: but no affinity whatever to the
leaves of either. It is certainly a very desirable Rose, as the number
of those with very small flowers is very circumscribed, and therefore
renders every addition particularly valuable. Like most of the Roses, it
continues to bloom during the months of June, July, and August, and
makes a handsome bushy appearance.

Our drawing was made from a fine plant in the nursery of Messrs. Whitley
and Brames, Old Brompton.

[Illustration]



ROSA Eglanteria, _Var. flore pleno._

_Double Sweet Briar or Eglantine Rose._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     ROSA, foliis odoratis; germinibus ovatis, pedunculisque hispidis;
     caule et petiolis aculeatis; aculeis magnis, recurvis; foliolis
     ovatis, subtus rubiginosis, glanduloso-pilosis.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     ROSE, with sweet-scented leaves and egg-shaped seed-buds; peduncles
     hispid; stem and petioles prickly; prickles large and recurved; the
     leaflets are ovate, rusty beneath, and glandulosely hairy.

       *       *       *       *       *

This fine semi-double variety of the Sweet Briar is an acquisition
highly esteemed; and so we think will be every addition to this charming
species, whose leaves diffuse such aromatic fragrance. In its
semi-double flowers only, it is particularly distinct from the Single,
and certainly makes a much handsomer appearance. Its flowers are
gracefully crowded together, but rarely more than two flowers expand at
one time; but the succession of buds approaching maturity gives it a
very picturesque appearance. We observed but a slight proportion of the
rusty character so powerfully attached to the wild species. Its fruit,
when ripening, acquires a beautiful orange red, which is an addition to
the plant when out of bloom. There is a paler-coloured variety of this
plant, of stouter growth, but which we have not as yet examined with
sufficient accuracy, to ascertain whether it is distinct enough to
require a separate figure.

Our drawing was made from a fine plant in the nursery of Messrs.
Loddige, Hackney.

[Illustration]



ROSA Gallica, _officinalis_.

_Officinal or French Red Rose._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     ROSA, germinibus globosis; floribus magnis, rubris, stypticis,
     pedunculisque hispidis; caule petiolisque hispido-aculeatis;
     foliolis sub-ovatis, subtus villosis.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     ROSE, with globular seed-buds; the flowers are large, red, and
     astringent; peduncles hispid; the stem and petioles hispidly
     prickly; the leaflets are nearly egg-shaped, and villous beneath.

       *       *       *       *       *

This large grand Rose is both useful as well as ornamental. The flowers
are used in medicine (whence its term _officinal_) in preference to many
other restoratives. By the Arabian physicians they were in great
estimation for their mild astringent and corroborant virtues, most
particularly in phthisical cases. The flowers cannot be too quickly
dried, as slowly drying of them impairs both their colour and quality.
They are prepared as a conserve, by an infusion of honey. The bloom is
but of short duration, but the succession is rapid. It is of a
semi-double character, and of a fine red colour; from three to four feet
high, and very bushy. It is in great perfection during the months of
June, July, and August, and is extremely beautiful. Its foliage is
rather rough and coarse, and when out of bloom in the autumn it is very
subject to mildew.

Our drawing was made from the nursery of Messrs. Whitley and Brames, Old
Brompton.

[Illustration]



ROSA Provincialis, _multiplex_.

_Double or Cabbage Province Rose._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     ROSA, multiplex, germinibus sub-globosis; pedunculis petiolisque
     hispidis et glandulosis; aculeis ramorum sparsis, rectis,
     sub-reflexis; foliolis ovatis, subtus villosis, marginibus
     glandulosis.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     ROSE, with many folds, and nearly round seed-buds; the peduncles
     and petioles are hispid and glandular; the prickles of the branches
     are scattered, straight, and slightly reflexed; leaflets
     egg-shaped, villous beneath, with glandular margins.

       *       *       *       *       *

This variety of the Common Province is the most fragrant of all the
Roses, and therefore particularly desirable; for, although it cannot be
ranked among the rare, it is nevertheless one of the most beautiful. Its
sweetness, joined to the abundance of its blossoms, has rendered it an
object of culture, for the purpose of distillation; as it yields a much
greater quantity of scented water than any other rose. It is generally
denominated the Cabbage Province, from the extreme complexity of its
petals, which sometimes adhere so closely together, as to prevent
entirely their expansion without bursting:--a circumstance that
frequently occurs in the vegetable from which its specific distinction
is derived, and which we regard to be unequivocally good, as we should
every similitude of equally easy reference. By the closeness and
superabundance of its petals only, is it distinguished from the Common
Province, of which it is certainly an interesting variety.

[Illustration]



ROSA moschata.

_Musk Rose._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     ROSA, paniculis multifloris, redolens quasi moschum; germinibus
     ovatis; pedunculisque villosis; petiolis aculeatis; foliolis
     oblongis, acuminatis, glabris; spinis ramorum majoribus, sparsis,
     rectisque.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     ROSE, with many-flowered panicles, scented like musk; seed-bud
     egg-shaped; peduncles villose; petioles prickly; the leaflets are
     oblong, acuminated, and smooth; the spines of the branches are
     large, scattered, and straight.

       *       *       *       *       *

As a perfectly distinct species, the present figure is well deserving of
notice. Its flowers are numerous, of a soft creamy white, and which are
supposed to emit an odour resembling the perfume called musk. A specific
name thus derived, we should not hold in much estimation were the plant
ever so deficient in descriptive character; but as the reverse is
obvious in the present instance, it is still the more objectionable.
Were it, therefore, a name of recent introduction, we should certainly
take the liberty of altering it; but, as it has been long known under
the title of Musk Rose, however vague and imperfect the reference, we do
not think ourselves authorized to change it.

It is a native of the island of Madeira, and a very desirable rose,
although by no means splendid; but as one of the latter blowing it is a
considerable addition, as it illumines that part of autumn, when the
major part of this luxuriant tribe have ceased to bloom.

Our figure was made from a fine plant in the nursery of Messrs. Whitley
and Brames, Old Brompton.

[Illustration]



ROSA moschata, _Var. flore pleno._

_Double Musk Rose._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     ROSA, paniculis multifloris, redolens quasi moschum; pedunculis
     villosis, petiolis aculeatis; foliolis oblongis, acuminatis,
     glabris; spinis ramorum latis, sparsis, rectis.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     ROSE, with many-flowered panicles, scented like musk; peduncles
     villose, petioles prickly; the leaflets are oblong, pointed, and
     smooth; the spines of the branches are broad, scattered, and
     straight.

       *       *       *       *       *

This variety of the Musk Rose differs but little, if at all, from the
single, except in its semi-double flowers, which in that particular give
to the plant a very distinct appearance; but in every other respect it
is so closely allied, that it may justly be called the prototype of the
former; more especially as upon the single plant double flowers have
sometimes been found, but not frequent; and careful cultivation has now
rendered it a circumstance of very rare occurrence. Its blossoms
certainly form a richer appearance than the single; their fragrance is
by some thought stronger, by others weaker; on the propriety of which we
shall make no further comment, than merely to observe that we regard an
appeal to the olfactory organs of all references the most imperfect.

This plant, as well as the former, is frequently on the upper part of
the branches free from spines, but on the lower part of the stems they
are extremely large and strong.

Our figure was made from plants in the nursery of Messrs. Colville,
King’s Road.

[Illustration]



ROSA indica.

_Indian Rose._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     ROSA, germinibus subrotundis, pedunculisque læviter hispidis;
     glabra, et nitida, semper florens; petiolis aculeatis; foliolis
     oblongis, acuminatis, nitidissimis; caule viridi, nitido, ad basin
     spinoso.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     ROSE, with roundish seed-buds, and peduncles slightly hispid;
     smooth and shining, ever blooming; the petioles are prickly; the
     leaflets are oblong, sharp-pointed, and very shining; stem green,
     shining, and thorny towards the base.

       *       *       *       *       *

This most elegant rose is justly considered as one of the greatest
ornaments ever introduced to this country. The light delicacy of its
pinky flowers, and its bright shining green leaves, aided by its
unceasing and abundant bloom, render it so attractive that very few
roses can compare with it; in fragrance it is inferior to most; for
although at times we have found it slightly scented, we must confess to
have found it sometimes so deficient in this particular as to be almost
induced to regard it as a scentless rose.

All the information that we have been able to acquire respecting its
introduction is, that it was first seen in the garden of the late Mr.
Parsons of Rickmansworth in Hertfordshire, in the year 1793, soon after
which period Messrs. Colville procuring a plant, cultivated it, and it
has been ever since increasing in estimation. In the cold season of the
year its blossoms are very pale; too great an exposure to the sun
likewise produces the same effect. We have frequently seen it of a rich
flesh-colour, but never deep.

It is commonly called Pale China Rose; but we have preferred the literal
English name, to avoid confusion, by an appearance of two names for one
plant, which can never be desirable.

Our figure was made from a plant in the Hibbertian collection, Clapham
Common.

[Illustration]



ROSA Belgica, _blanda_.

_Blush Belgic Rose._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     Rosa germinibus globosis, ad basin glandulosis, pedunculis
     hispido-glandulosis, floribus confertis, pallide carneis; foliolis
     ovatis, acuminatis; caule et petiolis aculeatis.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     ROSE, with globose seed-buds, slightly glandular; peduncles
     hispidly glandular, flowers crowded, and of a pale flesh-colour,
     leaflets are ovate, and pointed; the stem and petioles prickly.

       *       *       *       *       *

This fine pale variety of the Belgic Rose is much esteemed. Its flowers
are in succession abundant, but rarely more than two are in perfection
at one time. A considerable degree of sameness certainly pervades the
Dutch species, to which a judicious curtailment will be very
serviceable, by excluding those very trivial florescent varieties from a
figurative description; by which abbreviation, a much greater degree of
interest will be attached to those, that actually possess a character
sufficiently distinct, to require a separate figure, and at the same
time it will get rid of an heterogeneous mass of superlative phrases
made use of occasionally by way of discrimination. The Author will
nevertheless give as satisfactory a reason as possible for the apparent
expulsion of any of this attractive genus.

Our figure was made from a fine plant in the nursery of Messrs.
Colville, King’s Road, in the month of July, from which period till
September it is in constant bloom.

[Illustration]



ROSA menstrua, _Var. flore racemoso_.

_Monthly Rose, Cluster-flowered Variety._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     ROSA, germinibus oblongis, sæpeflorens, racemosa, fragrans;
     pedunculis petiolisque hispidis, et glandulosis; aculeis ramorum
     sparsis, rectis; foliolis oblongis, subtus villosis.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     ROSE, with oblong seed-buds, often flowering, clustered,
     sweet-scented; the peduncles and petioles are hispid and glandular;
     the prickles of the branches are scattered and straight; the
     leaflets are of an oblong form, and villous beneath.

       *       *       *       *       *

This cluster-flowered Variety is undoubtedly the most attractive of that
species of Rose denominated Monthly. To its fine abundant and frequent
bloom is attached a fragrance of unequivocal sweetness, for which it is
much esteemed. It bears so great a resemblance to the Damask Rose, that
we are strongly induced to regard it as a continuation of that species,
and have but little doubt, if the flowers were dried and analysed, they
would be found to contain the same medicinal virtues. The title of
Monthly is certainly a term of latitude with regard to its flowering;
for, in the literal sense, it should imply a perpetually blooming Rose;
which undoubtedly a Rose must be that blossoms every month; but this is
by no means the case with the present species, although in mild seasons
it may be found in bloom in December or January; which gives it a
decided superiority over many of the summer species.

Our figure was taken from a fine blooming specimen in the month of
September, at the nursery of Messrs. Whitley and Brames, Old Brompton.

[Illustration]



ROSA racemosa.

_Clustered Rose, or Rose of the four Seasons._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     ROSA, germinibus sub-rotundis, læviter glandulosa, pedunculis
     hispido-glandulosis, sæpe florentibus, racemosis, læte
     rubro-purpureis; foliolis ovatis, subtus villosis; aculeis ramorum
     sparsis, rectis.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     ROSE, with roundish seed-buds, slightly glandular, peduncles
     hispidly glandular, often blooming, clustered, and of a bright red
     purple; leaflets are ovate, and villous beneath; the prickles of
     the branches are scattered and straight.

       *       *       *       *       *

This very desirable Rose was introduced from France under the title of
La Rose de quatre Saisons, and which we conceive to be an appropriate
term, as it refers with some degree of accuracy to the frequency of its
flowering. For although it is not in flower all the year, yet it is
found blooming in every season; a circumstance of rare occurrence, and
(the Chinese or Indian Rose excepted) only to be found in the species
called the Monthly Rose, from which analogy alone, the Rose of the four
Seasons has been by many supposed to be only the Clustered-flowered
Monthly under a new name; but to this it has not the slightest affinity
except in its foliage, being in every other respect most particularly
distinct. It is also a scarcer rose, and by no means so well known as it
deserves to be.

The figure was taken from a fine plant in the nursery of Messrs.
Loddiges, Hackney.

[Illustration]



ROSA Provincialis, _blanda_.

_Blush Province Rose._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     ROSA, germinibus sub-globosis, incarnatis; pedunculis petiolisque
     hispidis et glandulosis; aculeis ramorum sparsis, rectis; foliolis
     ovatis, subtus villosis.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     ROSE, with nearly round seed-buds, flesh-coloured; the peduncles
     and petioles are hispid and glandular; the prickles of the branches
     are scattered, and straight; the leaflets are egg-shaped, and
     villose beneath.

       *       *       *       *       *

Of all the numerous variations in the Province Rose, this is the most
delicate variety; and as a well-known and much-admired (although only a
slight) variety of the Red, it is highly deserving of a separate
figure.--This specimen represents the most general character of the
Blush Province. As we have two florescent varieties of this pale
delicate character, from the same species, whose slight distinctions
have no doubt lent their aid to swell the train of superfluous
novelty,--the Author is in hopes, by the observations he has already
made on the variations of the same Rose by different modes of culture,
joined with the further inspection he shall be enabled to make in the
course of the ensuing summer, that it will be in his power to ascertain
with accuracy the difference between the mere florescent varieties of
growth, and those actually distinct in their character, independent of
that circumstance.

[Illustration]



ROSA Gallica variegata; _vel Rosa Mundi_.

_Striped French Rose; or Rose of the World._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     ROSA, germinibus globosis; floribus magnis, et eleganter
     variegatis; pedunculis hispidis; caule et petiolis hispidis et
     aculeatis; foliolis sub-ovatis, subtus villosis.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     ROSE, with globular seed-buds; flowers large, and elegantly
     striped; peduncles hispid; the stem and petioles are hispid and
     prickly; the leaflets are nearly egg-shaped, and villose beneath.

       *       *       *       *       *

This elegant Striped variety of the _Rosa Gallica_ is certainly more
attractive than its original, the _officinalis_. Its fine red stripes
acquire a comparatively superior brilliance, by their contrast with the
white; from which analogous circumstance we believe the name of _Rosa
Mundi_ has been originally derived from a collateral reference to that
celebrated lady in the reign of Henry the Second, commonly called Fair
Rosamund (signifying Rose-mouth). Thus, like the Rose, the colour of her
lips was heightened by the comparative delicacy of her fair complexion;
and which the Author has no doubt will be considered as a fair excuse,
however remote or questionable the etymology. Like all other variegated
Roses, an exactitude of character is never to be expected; we having
sometimes seen it more divided than our figure represents, and at others
so much less so as to be nearly one half white, and the other red.

The drawing was made from fine plants in the nursery of Messrs. Whitley
and Brames, Old Brompton.

[Illustration]



ROSA Gallica; _Var. flore marmoreo_.

_French Rose; Marbled-flowered Variety._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     ROSA, germinibus globosis; floribus magnis, marmoreis; pedunculis
     hispidis; caule petiolisque hispido-aculeatis; foliolis sub-ovatis,
     subtus villosis.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     ROSE, with globular seed-buds; the flowers are large, and of a
     marbled character; peduncles hispid; the stem and petioles are
     hispidly prickly; the leaflets are nearly egg-shaped, and villous
     beneath.

       *       *       *       *       *

This Marbled Variety of the _officinalis_, or French Red Rose, is, like
the Striped, a variety of colour only: for although all the three Roses
appear distinct from each other when in flower; yet, when out of bloom,
it is scarcely possible to distinguish the one from the other. We have
sometimes observed the foliage of this variety more undulated or waved
than the others; a trifling difference, if it is even a constant
character;--but most likely a mere casualty of growth. It is exactly of
the same bushy habit as the other two; and, like them, equally subject
to mildew in the autumn.

Our drawing was made from a fine plant, in luxuriant bloom, at the
nursery of Mr. Shailer, King’s Road, Chelsea.

[Illustration]



ROSA Provincialis, _semi-duplex_.

_Semi-double Province Rose._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     Rosa germinibus subrotundis; pedunculis petiolisque hispidis et
     glandulosis; floribus semi-duplicibus; aculeis ramorum sparsis,
     rectis, sub-reflexis; foliolis ovatis, subtus villosis, serraturis
     glandulosis.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     Rose with roundish seed-buds; peduncles and petioles hispid and
     glandular; flowers semi-double. The prickles of the branches are
     scattered, straight, and slightly bent back. The leaflets are
     ovate, villous beneath, with glandular serratures.

       *       *       *       *       *

This fine Semi-double Province Rose is at present but little known,
being nearly of as recent a date as the Single, although not quite so
rare--but in beauty by no means inferior; and when regarded as a
connecting link in the symmetrical arrangement of this very numerous
species, it will doubtless be considered as a valuable acquisition.
Amidst their numerous variations of flower, very little if any
difference is observable in the foliage, except what is incident to the
health or age of the plant. The leaves are invariably composed of
leaflets of from one to three pairs, with a terminating or end one: but
those having three pairs are mostly confined to the lower part of the
plant; and frequently those leaves at the base of the footstalks of the
flowers have only the abortive rudiments of what would have been one
pair of leaflets, had not the luxuriance of its blossoms absorbed the
nourishment that would otherwise have brought them to maturity.

The figure was made from a plant at the nursery of Mr. Shailer, King’s
Road.

[Illustration]



ROSA nana, _minor_.

_Small Dwarf, or Pompone Rose._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     Rosa germinibus subrotundis, parvifloris, incarnatis, in medio
     profunde rubris; foliolis ovatis, acutis, et parvis; subtus
     villosis, marginibus serrulatis, glandulosis; caule et petiolis
     aculeatis; aculeis ramorum sparsis, rectis.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     Rose with roundish seed-buds, small-flowered, flesh-coloured, and
     of a deep red in the centre. The leaflets are ovate, sharp-pointed,
     and small; downy beneath, with small sawed glandular margins. The
     stem and petioles are prickly: the prickles of the branches are
     scattered, and straight.

       *       *       *       *       *

This elegant minor variety of the Dwarf Rose has been, and still
continues to be, regarded as superior to most, equal to any, and
surpassed by no one, of this enchanting genus at present known. It is an
evident variety of the Rose de Meaux, an equally beautiful Rose, but
whose flowers are larger, and deficient in the fine deep red eye;--the
principal specific distinction, in the present plant, and which is
thought to give it a decided superiority. But whether this distinction
be a permanent character, is certainly at present a matter of doubt; for
in several instances we have seen it lose this central distinction, and
attain the full height of its original. Yet against this observation we
are acquainted with two exceptions: one of them, a plant in the nursery
of Mr. Shailer; the other, a plant in the nursery of Messrs. Loddige;
neither of these plants having for years grown beyond a foot in height,
nor have the proprietors ever been able to propagate them. It is
therefore not improbable, that upon comparing them with the present
figure when in fine bloom, there may be found a sufficient distinction
to enable us to subjoin another figure of it, under the title of
_minima_, or smallest variety.

The drawing was made from a plant at the nursery of Messrs. Whitley and
Brames, Old Brompton.

[Illustration]



ROSA nana, _minor_; _Var. æqualiflora_.

_Small Dwarf Rose; Equal-flowered Variety._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     Rosa germinibus subrotundis, parvifloris, incarnatis, æqualibus;
     foliolis ovatis, subtus villosis; marginibus serrulatis,
     glandulosis; caule et petiolis aculeatis; aculeis ramorum sparsis,
     rectis.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     Rose with roundish seed-buds, small-flowered, flesh-coloured, and
     equal. The leaflets are egg-shaped, villose beneath, with sawed
     glandular margins. The stem and petioles are prickly: the prickles
     of the branches are scattered and straight.

       *       *       *       *       *

This variety was introduced from France by Mr. Williams, a nurseryman
residing near Paris. It is of a compound character; the leaves and the
colour of the flowers resembling the _Rosa nana_, but in point of size
much more like the _nana minor_, or Pompone Rose; yet differing again
from that, in the great regularity of the petals--(whence the name
_æqualiflora_)--a trivial distinction, and yet the most prominent
feature allowed us by way of discrimination. Nor should we have adopted
it, had we not seen at the nursery of Messrs. Colville a number of
plants of exactly the same uniform description; which induced us to
regard it as a permanent character. If it should prove so (which time
alone can ascertain), the name will be sufficiently discriminative: but
in case the flowers should enlarge, that circumstance might probably
disorganize the symmetry of the petals, and it would then have no
distinguishing mark to separate it from the de Meaux; between which and
the Pompone Rose it is certainly a variety. But whilst so many
variations are allowed among the larger Roses, the lesser ones (but not
less estimated) may with propriety claim an equal right to be admitted,
particularly as they are so few, compared with those of larger
magnitude.

[Illustration]



ROSA Carolina, _pimpinellæfolia_.

_Great Burnet-leaved Carolina Rose._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     ROSA, germinibus globosis, pedunculisque hispidis; petiolis
     aculeatis; foliolis oblongis, acutis, serratis; caule glabro;
     spinis ramorum sparsis, et oppositis.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     ROSE, with round seed-buds and hispid peduncles; petioles prickly;
     leaflets oblong, sharp-pointed, and sawed; stem smooth; spines of
     the branches are scattered, and opposite.

       *       *       *       *       *

This Rose, so well known by the appellation of the Great Burnet-leaved,
is estimated as a variety of the Carolina; but in our opinion the
resemblance is not very powerful. Probably a more minute investigation
of some of the intermediate varieties at some future period may enable
us to throw some further light on the subject. It is a very shrubby and
rather dwarfish-growing plant, inclinable to spread; and although not
particularly attractive, is by no means deficient in beauty. It
continues a long time in successive bloom, and is possessed of a very
handsome double-flowered variety.

Our drawing was made from a plant at the nursery of Messrs. Colville.

[Illustration]



ROSA Pennsylvanica.

_Pennsylvanian Rose._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     ROSA, germinibus globosis, pedunculisque hispidis; foliolis ovatis,
     acuminatis, serratis, glabris; spinis ramorum oppositis, rectis,
     rubris.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     ROSE, with round seed-buds, and hispid peduncles; the leaflets are
     of an ovate form, sharp-pointed, sawed, and smooth; the thorns of
     the branches are opposite, straight, and red.

       *       *       *       *       *

This handsome Single Rose is supposed to be one of the varieties of the
Carolina, and for that reason, we believe, called the Pennsylvanian
Rose, and perfectly well known under that title; although we think the
plant bears very little affinity to the Carolina Rose, and is perhaps
nearer allied to the Austrian than any other. It certainly bears a
considerable resemblance to the Burnet-leaved variety of the Carolina;
but has much more of the character of a brier attached to it, and is
generally estimated as the most desirable variety.

It is in fine bloom from the middle of June to the end of August. There
is a delicate variety of it with double flowers.

Our figure was made from the nursery of Messrs. Colville.

[Illustration]



ROSA parvifolia.

_Small-leaved, or Burgundy Rose._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     ROSA, germinibus globosis; pedunculis et petiolis hispidis;
     floribus multiplicibus, equalibus; foliolis ovatis, acutis, parvis,
     subtus villosis, marginibus serrulatis; caule fruticoso; aculeis
     ramorum sparsis, rectis.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     ROSE, with round seed-buds; peduncles and petioles hispid; flowers
     with many folds, and equal; leaflets ovate, sharp-pointed and
     small, hairy beneath, with finely sawed edges; stem shrubby; the
     spines of the branches are scattered and straight.

       *       *       *       *       *

This beautiful Dwarf Rose is certainly a very distinct species, and
generally known by the appellation of Burgundy Rose. It is an
early-blooming Rose, and makes a brilliant appearance. The flowers are
very double, of a rich red purple when in perfection, but of a paler or
bluer colour when retiring. It is very easily distinguished from any
other dwarf Rose, by the striking resemblance which it bears to the
Ranunculus, and from which a good specific name might have been derived,
had not the leaves (ever the most appropriate characteristic) furnished
an unexceptionable title, recently adopted by professor Willdenow in his
Species Plantarum.

Our drawing was made from fine plants at the nursery of Messrs. Whitley
and Brames.

[Illustration]



ROSA spinosissima.

_Thorny Rose._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     ROSA, germinibus globosis, glabris; pedunculis et petiolis glabris;
     foliolis ovatis, crenatis, glabris; floribus albis; caule et ramis
     aculeatissimis; aculeis rectis, sub-albidis.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     ROSE, with smooth round seed-buds; peduncles and petioles of the
     leaf smooth; the leaflets are egg-shaped, notched, and smooth;
     flowers white; the stem and branches are very prickly; the prickles
     straight, and nearly white.

       *       *       *       *       *

Various are the opinions of cultivators with regard to what part of the
world this Rose is in reality indigenous. Its general appellation with
us is Common Scotch Rose; but Professor Afzelius, in his Observations on
Swedish Roses, claims it as a native of Sweden, finding great fault with
Linnæus for the inaccuracy of his description in confounding the
_pimpinellæfolia_ with the _spinosissima_; an error, we have little
doubt, originating merely from having two names for one individual
plant. There are two slight variations from this plant: the one rather a
taller plant, whose flowers and leaves are of a more luxuriant growth;
the other and most material is one, said to be of recent importation
from Holland, whose leaves are narrower, nor are the spines quite so
numerous or perfectly straight as on the true _spinosissima_, but yet it
is evidently the same plant. This slight variation of clime and culture,
it is not at all improbable, might be the cause of the above confusion:
we have so frequently seen it growing wild on the waste lands within ten
miles of London, that, although it may be a native of Sweden, it
nevertheless seems quite at home in Britain. The single flower beneath
represents what is called a Striped Variety; but it is often so nearly
white, that, until its character is more determined, we shall decline a
separate figure. It is very hardy, of a lively appearance, but no great
beauty. It is an early Rose, and possessed of several very handsome
varieties.

Our figure was made from the nursery of Mr. Williams, Turnham Green.

[Illustration]



ROSA spinosissima; _Var. flore marmoreo_.

_Thorny Rose; Marbled-flowered Variety._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     ROSA, germinibus globosis, glabris; pedunculis et petiolis glabris;
     foliolis ovatis, crenatis, glabris; floribus marmoreis, purpureis;
     caule et ramis aculeatissimis; aculeis rectis, albicantibus.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     ROSE, with round seed-buds, and smooth; peduncles and petioles
     smooth; the leaflets are ovate, notched, and smooth; the flowers
     are marbled, and of a purple colour; the stem and branches are very
     prickly; the prickles straight out, and of a whitish colour.

       *       *       *       *       *

This fine Marbled Variety of the _spinosissima_ is certainly much more
desirable than its original, but is by no means so abundant; and we
think it is a smaller or more dwarf-growing plant: but not having seen
more than two plants of it in bloom, we cannot be quite certain of its
character in that particular. The flowers are somewhat smaller than in
the White, and one of the specimens in bloom at the nursery of Malcolm
and Co., Kensington, still smaller than our figure of it, but fully
equal in beauty and richness of colour to the plant from which our
figure was made at the nursery of Messrs. Loddige, Hackney; but so
variable are the Striped and Marbled Roses, that we cannot expect them
often to stand the test of comparison. It is an early blooming Rose, but
not of long duration; beginning to flower the latter end of May, and
seldom lasting more than three weeks.

[Illustration]



ROSA nana, _minima_.

_Smallest Dwarf, or True Pompone Rose._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     ROSA, germinibus subrotundis; floribus minutis, incarnatis, in
     medio profunde rubris; foliolis ovatis, acutis, et parvis, subtus
     villosis, marginibus serrulatis, glandulosis. Frutex pygmæus; caule
     et petiolis aculeatis; aculeis ramorum sparsis, rectis.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     ROSE, with roundish seed-buds; flowers very small, flesh-coloured,
     and of a deep red in the centre; leaflets egg-shaped,
     sharp-pointed, and small, hairy beneath, with finely sawed
     glandular margins. It is a dwarf shrub; stem and petioles prickly;
     the spines of the branches are scattered and straight.

       *       *       *       *       *

This elegant little plant proves, as we imagined it would, distinct from
the minor variety, whose flower and leaves we find subject to vary both
in size and colour, but in the present true original species they are
not. At present it is a very scarce Rose, and likely so to continue,
from the difficulty annexed to its cultivation.

Our figure represents one-third of the entire and only plant in the
collection of Messrs. Loddige, Hackney, the whole plant exhibiting an
equal degree of luxuriant bloom. It very rarely attains the height of
one foot; but this year it had not exceeded five inches, which gave an
addition of singularity to its appearance. It begins to flower nearly at
the same time as the Rose de Meaux, but does not remain quite so long in
bloom.

[Illustration]



ROSA semperflorens.

_Ever-blowing Rose._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     ROSA, germinibus subrotundis, pedunculisque læviter hispidis;
     floribus profunde rubris, semperflorentibus; petiolis aculeatis;
     foliolis oblongis, acuminatis, glabris; caule viridi, glabro, ad
     basin spinoso.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     ROSE, with roundish seed-buds, and slightly hispid peduncles;
     flowers of a deep rich red colour, ever-blooming; petioles prickly;
     leaflets oblong, sharp-pointed, and smooth; stem green, smooth, and
     thorny towards the base.

       *       *       *       *       *

This most beautiful species is perhaps the only one that could with any
degree of propriety be termed an Ever-blooming Rose, the _indica_
excepted, and which is by some supposed to be only a variety of the
present plant; an idea probably resulting from the congeniality of their
continual bloom: but admitting it to be only a pale variety of this dark
Rose, there must be at least one or two intermediate varieties not yet
imported, to smooth the gradual descent from its original; or otherwise
the China Roses must be as distinct in their varieties as the generality
of other Roses are in their species. It is a Rose of extreme latitude,
particularly in the growth of its foliage. When cultivated in a pot, it
is frequently not a fourth part of the size our figure represents;
whilst on the contrary in the conservatory of G. Hibbert, esq. from
whence our figure was made from a plant ten feet high, some of the
foliage on the lower part of the plant was full three times the size we
have delineated.

To the late G. Slater, esq. of Knots Green near Laytonstone, we are
indebted for the introduction of this fine plant, in the year 1792.

[Illustration]



ROSA muscosa _Provincialis_; _Var. flore pallido_.

_Moss Province Rose; Pale-flowered Variety._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     ROSA, germinibus ovatis; calycibus et pedunculis muscosis; petiolis
     ramulisque hispidis, et glanduloso-viscosis; floribus incarnatis;
     spinis ramorum numerosis, rectis.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     ROSE, with egg-shaped seed-buds; empalements and peduncles mossy;
     petioles and younger branches hispid, and glandularly viscous;
     flowers of a flesh-colour; the spines of the branches are scattered
     and straight.

       *       *       *       *       *

Our figure represents a delicate Pale Variety, of the common, old, (but
ever favourite) species, taken from the nursery of Mr. Shailer of Little
Chelsea, and at present considered as a rare plant; but which we regard
as only a variety of colour, considering the latitude of growth to which
Roses in general are subject, and the present species in particular,
whose beautiful original when cultivated in a pot instead of the open
ground experiences a diminution both in its mossy character and the
brilliance of its colour, but frequently acquires a much more graceful
habit from the confinement of its situation: and as the Rose is as much
noticed under this treatment as in any other mode of culture, the Author
has carefully selected from a number of fine specimens one of luxuriant
but rapid growth; that, aided by its rich and higher coloured original,
may serve as a criterion to ascertain the variety of form and character
with which it may at different times meet the eye.

[Illustration]



ROSA Bella Donna.

_Maiden’s-blush Rose._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     Rosa germinibus ovatis, pedunculisque hispidis: floribus confertis,
     pallide carneis: foliis patentibus: foliolis lato-ovatis,
     acuminatis: caule et petiolis aculeatis.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     Rose with egg-shaped seed-buds, and hispid peduncles. Flowers
     crowded, of a pale flesh colour. Leaves spreading. Leaflets broadly
     egg-shaped and sharp-pointed. Stem and petioles prickly.

       *       *       *       *       *

There cannot be a Rose better known than this delicate species, under
the title of The Maiden’s Blush. It is considered, among the Garden
Roses, as the second in progressive routine from the wild species, but
must certainly be ranked among the first in beauty. Our figure
represents what is called the Clustered variety; an appellation we have
not adopted, as it would have compelled us to have given two other
nominal varieties; the one, whose flowers are rather smaller; the other,
with flowers less crowded. But when the latitude of growth that
appertains to this luxuriant tribe is considered, they may with
propriety be regarded as the variations of culture only.

During the months of July and August this Rose is in the greatest
perfection. We have frequently remarked the foliage of this Rose, upon
most old plants, to be of a very dark or blackish green; but, on the
younger ones, to be nearly the same in colour as the minor variety.

[Illustration]



ROSA Bella Donna; _Var. flore minore_.

_Maidens-blush Rose; Small-flowered Variety._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     Rosa germinibus ovatis, pedunculisque hispidis: floribus numerosis
     parvulis, pallide carneis: foliis patentibus: foliolis ovatis,
     acuminatis: caule et petiolis aculeatis.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     Rose with egg-shaped seed-buds, and hispid peduncles. Flowers
     numerous, smallish, and of a pale flesh colour. Leaves spreading.
     Leaflets egg-shaped and pointed. Stem and petioles prickly.

       *       *       *       *       *

This minor Variety of the Maiden’s Blush, like the larger one, is said
to possess two equally trivial variations. The only observable
distinction in this variety is the very small size of its flowers,
compared with the preceding figure. Yet, as it delineates the latitude
of growth annexed to this species, it stands in no great need of an
apology. But how we could have apologized, in a satisfactory manner, for
the introduction of four more intermediate varieties, we know not; but
rather think we must have borrowed the specific character of the present
species, and blushed for their intrusion. The specific we have adopted
is only retained among cultivators for this minor Variety, doubtless
with the intention of preserving an appearance of greater distinction.

From fine plants in the nursery of Messrs. Whitley, this species has
been delineated.

[Illustration]



ROSA inermis.

_Rose without Thorns._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     Rosa inermis, germinibus oblongis: pedunculis petiolisque hispidis:
     corollis saturate rubropurpureis: foliis glabris: foliolis ovatis,
     acutis, serratis: caule ramisque glabris: fructibus pendulis.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     Rose unarmed, with oblong seed-buds, and hispid petioles and
     peduncles. Blossoms of a deep red purple. Leaves smooth. Leaflets
     ovate, sharp-pointed, and sawed at the edges. Stem and branches
     smooth. Fruit pendulous.

       *       *       *       *       *

This thornless Rose may be almost considered as the exception to an
otherwise general rule. A specific so unequivocally good seldom occurs;
and yet this Rose, in the Hortus Kewensis, bears the name of
_pendulina_, from its pendulous fruit; a character common to several
other species. But had we not found this Rose to be as well known under
the name of _inermis_, as by the title of _pendulina_, we should not
(although for the better) have thought ourselves so well justified in
altering it; regarding names of no further value than as they give us
the most immediate direction to any object we may be in search of. It is
an early-blooming Rose with single-flowers of the finest purple colour;
and frequently blooms a second time in the autumn; but its flowers then
are not so large as in the early part of the season.

Our figure was drawn from a large plant in the nursery of Mr. Shailer.

[Illustration]



ROSA lucida.

_Shining-leaved or Macartney Rose._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     Rosa germinibus globosis, lucidis, et sericeis, ad basin bracteis
     sericeis dentatis instructis: floribus albis: foliis buxeis:
     foliolis sub-ovatis, serrulatis, lucidis: pedunculis et petiolis
     aculeatissimis: caule aculeatissimo, tomentoso: ramis flexuosis,
     patentibus.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     Rose with round seed-buds, shining, and silky, furnished at the
     base with silky toothed floral leaves. Flowers white. Leaves
     resembling box. Leaflets nearly egg-shaped, finely sawed, and
     shining. Peduncles and petioles very prickly. Stem very prickly and
     downy. Branches flexuose and spreading.

       *       *       *       *       *

This perfectly distinct species of Rose was introduced from China to
this country by Lord Macartney, on his return from his embassy to that
court. It is perfectly known under the title of Macartney Rose, and also
by the name of _lucida_, which we have retained: not that we think it is
the best name that might have been applied; for _lucida_ is by no means
the exclusive character of the present species, and the appellative of
_buxifolia_ or _bracteata_ would have been more appropriate, as they
could not have been well applied to any other Rose at present known.
But, probably, at a future period, some variety of this species, either
imported or cultivated in this country, may enable us to make use of
these specifics.

Our figure was taken from a luxuriant specimen of this fine training
Rose, communicated by the Hon. W. Irby.

[Illustration]



ROSA canina; _Var. flore pleno_.

_Dog-Rose; Double-flowered Variety._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     Rosa germinibus rotundatis, pedunculisque glabris: floribus
     semi-duplicibus: petalis exteriorbus albicantibus, patentibus:
     interioribus pallide incarnatis, et apertis: caule et petiolis
     aculeatis: ramis gracilibus, flexuosis.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     Rose with roundish seed-buds, and smooth peduncles. Flowers
     semi-double: the outer petals are whitish, and spreading: the inner
     are of a pale flesh colour, and unclosed. The stem and petioles are
     prickly. Branches slender, and flexuose.

       *       *       *       *       *

This elegant little Rose is a most desirable variety of the wild
species, and would be extremely ornamental if trained against a wall. We
have not been able to learn for certain by whom it was first cultivated,
but are inclined to think it the spontaneous effusion of nature
unassisted by art; and are rather surprised that it should not have
become long before now an object of general culture: but, as we
understand it is rather shy of flowering, that in some measure accounts
for an otherwise apparent neglect of beauty. We have no doubt, however,
when it becomes abundantly cultivated, it may also prove a plant of
freer bloom. From the light, airy, graceful character of its flowers, we
are convinced that to be sought after it need but to be seen.

Our figure was made from the only plant we have ever seen in bloom, at
the nursery of Messrs. Whitley and Brames.

[Illustration]



ROSA canina, _variegata_.

_Variegated-leaved Dog-Rose_.


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     Rosa germinibus globosis, glabris: pedunculis leviter hispidis:
     floribus albis, tenuibus: foliis variegatis: foliolis ovatis,
     acutis, serratis: ramis patentibus: caule humili vel repente.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     Rose with round seed-buds, smooth. Peduncles slightly hispid.
     Flowers white, and thin. Leaves variegated. Leaflets ovate,
     sharp-pointed, and sawed. Branches spreading. Stem low or creeping.

       *       *       *       *       *

This little Rose is an evident variety of the wild species, and
certainly no great beauty; yet, as a perfectly distinct Rose, it has a
greater claim to notice than half the supposed novelties of the present
day (combined) could boast. Its variegated leaves give a singularity to
its appearance: from its extreme low growth and very spreading branches
it may literally be said to creep upon the ground; and which may be
rather considered as an addition to the appearance of the plant, by the
relief its small white blossoms experience, contrasted with the sombre
earth on which they are spread. The duration of the bloom is much longer
than might be expected from their extremely thin delicate texture; there
is a pretty good succession of flowers: and during the months of July
and August they make a lively appearance.

From a plant in the nursery of Messrs. Colville, our figure was taken.

[Illustration]



ROSA Portlandia.

_Portland Rose._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     Rosa germinibus ovatis: pedunculis petiolisque hispidis: floribus
     coccineis: aculeis ramorum sparsis, rectis: foliolis ovatis,
     luteolo-virentibus, subtus villosis; serratulis glandulosis. Rami
     patentes, albo-virescentes.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     Rose with egg-shaped seed-buds. Peduncles and petioles hispid.
     Flowers scarlet-coloured; prickles of the branches scattered and
     straight. Leaflets ovate, of a yellowish green, villose beneath,
     with glandular serratures. Branches spreading, of a whitish green.

       *       *       *       *       *

This Rose is perfectly well known under the appellation of the Portland
Rose; a title it is said to have received in compliment to the late
Duchess of Portland, a great admirer of this charming tribe of plants,
and in whose collection at Bulstrode they were cultivated in great
luxuriance. It is a fine scarlet Rose, of a most brilliant appearance,
far above comparison with any effort of art. It appears to have the
compound character of three different plants: in growth and flower, like
the _Gallica officinalis_; in foliage, like the Province; with seed-buds
and peduncles more resembling the Damask species. Yet with all these
affinities it seems to possess a perfectly distinct character, and may
be easily distinguished from most other Roses by the fiery colour of its
flowers: the stalks are of a whiter green, and the foliage of a yellower
green, than Roses in general. It continues in successive bloom from the
middle of summer till late in autumn.

Our figure was made from a plant in the nursery of Messrs. Colville.

[Illustration]



ROSA Pennsylvanica; _Var. flore pleno_.

_Pennsylvanian Rose; Double-flowered Variety._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     Rosa germinibus globosis, pedunculisque hispidis: foliis
     patentibus: foliolis ovatis, acuminatis, serratis, glabris: spinis
     ramorum oppositis, rectis, rubris. Caulis humilis.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     Rose with round seed-buds, and hispid peduncles. Leaves spreading.
     Leaflets of an ovate form, sharp-pointed, sawed, and smooth. The
     thorns of the branches opposite, straight, and red. Stem low.

       *       *       *       *       *

This delicate little Rose is a most desirable variety, as it continues
in bloom all the summer, and is amongst those few that do not retire
till late in autumn. It is of a dwarf growth, inclinable to spread, and
sometimes almost creep upon the ground. In dry weather, the sun
frequently extracts so much of the colour from the outer petals as to
leave them almost bleached; which gives a comparatively richer
appearance to the centre. It then bears some resemblance, in its
flowers, to the larger Pompone Rose.

The powerful transition it has experienced, from single to completely
double flowers, gives it a very different aspect from its original; but
in every other particular it is closely allied. Its bloom is durable,
and succession abundant. We however rather think it is of a tender
habit, not having seen any large plants of it.

Our figure was taken from a luxuriant plant at the nursery of Mr.
Williams, at Turnham Green.

[Illustration]



ROSA alba, _semi-duplex_.

_Semi-double White Rose._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     Rosa germinibus ovatis, glabris: pedunculis hispidis: floribus
     albis, semi-duplicibus: foliis sub-glaucis: foliolis ovatis,
     acutis, ad margines serratis: caulis erecto-patens, superne
     sub-glaber, ad basin aculeis rigidis instructus.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     Rose with smooth, egg-shaped seed-buds, and hispid peduncles.
     Flowers white, and semi-double. Leaves nearly of a glaucous green.
     Leaflets broadly egg-shaped, sharp-pointed, with serrated margins.
     Stem between erect and spreading, nearly smooth on the upper part,
     but furnished with strong spines towards the base.

       *       *       *       *       *

This semi-double Rose so nearly resembles the single in its habit and
foliage, that it can only be regarded as a florescent variety; for, when
the plant is not in bloom, it is scarcely possible to distinguish the
one from the other: but when in flower it certainly forms a very
distinct appearance from its original, and is by far the more desirable
plant: not that its beauty is by any means considerable; but as it
preserves a regular progressive approach to completely double flowers,
(generally regarded as the perfection of the plant,) it is on that
account particularly estimable. Like its original, it is only retained
by those who wish to have every distinct Rose, to form a complete
collection. Its flowers are of a fine white, but not of long
continuance. The foliage is of a blueish or glaucous green. In habit,
its native origin (the wild species) is very discernible. It is at
present rather a scarce plant, from not possessing attraction sufficient
to recommend it as an object of general culture.

[Illustration]



ROSA spinosissima, _rubra_; _Var. flore pleno_.

_Red Thorny Rose; Double-flowered Variety._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     Rosa germinibus sub-globosis, glabris: pedunculis hispidis:
     floribus semi-duplicibus, incarnatis: foliis patentibus: foliolis
     ovatis, costatis, crenatis: caule et petiolis aculeatissimis.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     Rose with nearly round seed-buds, smooth. Peduncles hispid. Flowers
     semi-double, and flesh-coloured. Leaves spreading. Leaflets ovate,
     ribbed, and notched at the edges. Stem and petioles very prickly.

       *       *       *       *       *

This fine semi-double Rose is generally known by the appellation of the
Double Red Scotch. It is evidently a thorny Rose, and powerfully
resembles the _spinosissima_ in most particulars except the flowers,
whose pale delicate character reminds us so much of the _Indica_, that,
were a flower detached from the plant, and compared with that
ever-blooming species in a confined mode of culture, the resemblance
would be found considerable. How or by whom it was first cultivated, we
have not been able to learn with any degree of certainty: it must,
therefore, with several other unavoidable deficiencies of the same
description, pass on till the conclusion of the work, when we shall be
better enabled to fill up these little chasms--at the same time that we
give a Dissertation on the Genus.

Our figure was made from fine plants in the nursery of Messrs. Whitley
and Brames.

[Illustration]



ROSA Indica rubra.

_Red Indian Rose._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     Rosa germinibus subrotundis, pedunculisque leviter hispidis,
     glabris, et nitidis: floribus rubris, magnis, odoratis: foliis
     glabris, nitidis, et atro-purpureo-viridibus: petiolis aculeatis:
     foliolis oblongis, et margine serratis: caule viridi, glabro, ad
     basin spinis rubris.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     Rose with roundish seed-buds, and peduncles slightly hispid,
     smooth, and shining: flowers red, large, and sweet-scented: leaves
     smooth, shining, and of a dark purply green colour: petioles
     prickly: leaflets oblong, and sawed at the edges: stem green,
     smooth, with red thorns on the lower part.

       *       *       *       *       *

The Indica rubra is regarded as the finest of the ever-blooming China
Roses. By some it is thought to be a distinct species, from the dark
colour and smaller size of its foliage: but this is most likely the
effect of its recent importation; and, when it becomes more familiarised
to our climate, may in part if not totally disappear. As a variety of
the Indica we think it may with propriety be considered, from the
flowers being sometimes found as pale as that species: a circumstance
that has not as yet occurred in the semperflorens already figured,
although it has been so many years in cultivation with us; and which
would doubtless have sometimes been the case, had it not been a distinct
species, as permanence of character, either in shape or colour, can
never be expected to characterize mere varieties.

It was introduced last summer from China by T. Evans, esq. of Stepney,
and flowered first at the nursery of Messrs. Colville.

[Illustration]



ROSA Indica, _minor_.

_Small Indian Rose._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     Rosa germinibus subrotundis, pedunculisque leviter hispidis,
     glabris: floribus parvis, carneis, semperflorentibus: foliis
     glabris: petiolis aculeatis: foliolis oblongis, acutis, margine
     serrulatis, glabris: caule viridi, ad basin spinis rubris.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     Rose with roundish seed-buds, and peduncles slightly hispid and
     smooth: flowers small, flesh-coloured, and ever-blooming: leaves
     smooth, and petioles prickly: leaflets oblong, pointed, with finely
     serrated edges, and smooth: stem green, with red thorns on the
     lower part.

       *       *       *       *       *

This delicate little Rose was raised from seed of the Rosa Indica by Mr.
Colville, and can only be regarded as a variety of that favourite
species: but every material variation of a Rose that is in continual
bloom, will most probably be considered equally as interesting, as the
more specific distinction of any other whose beauty is lost to us above
half the year. The very short time this variety has been in cultivation
with us, precludes at present the possibility of ascertaining with
accuracy the latitude of its growth: as yet we have not seen any plant
above twice the size our figure represents, and never with larger
flowers; but frequently in very small plants the blossoms have scarcely
been an inch in diameter.

[Illustration]



ROSA Provincialis; _Var. flore pleno_.

_Province Rose; Double-flowered Variety._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     Rosa geriminibus subglobosis, pedunculisque hispidis et
     glandulosis: floribus saturate carneis, odoratissimis: foliolis
     ovatis, acutis, serratis, et subtus villosis.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     Rose with nearly round seed-buds, and peduncles hispid and
     glandular: flowers of a deep flesh-colour, and very sweet-scented:
     leaflets egg-shaped, pointed, sawed, and villose beneath.

       *       *       *       *       *

This Rose is one of the most abundant, and, from being extremely common,
is perhaps best known, but the least valued. Yet, if fragrance and
beauty were instead of scarcity to fix a price, very few would be
deserving of a higher sum.

We have sometimes seen this fine Rose, in well cultivated luxuriant
plants, acquire the height of nearly fifteen feet, adorning the front of
a house in a most elegant manner during the summer months.

[Illustration]



Rosa Provincialis, _nana_.

_Dwarf Province Rose._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     Rosa germinibus sub-globosis, pedunculisque hispidis et
     glandulosis: foliolis ovatis, margine serratis, subtus villosis:
     floribus læte rubris, odoratis: caulis humilis, aculeis ramorum
     sparsis.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     Rose with nearly round seed-buds, and peduncles hispid and
     glandular: leaflets egg-shaped, sawed at the edges, and villous
     beneath: flowers of a fine red colour, and sweet-scented: stem low:
     the prickles of the branches are scattered.

       *       *       *       *       *

This Province Rose, of humble stature, is very sweetly scented. The
flowers are rather small, but very compact, and of a fine colour. We
have observed it for three successive summers, and have not perceived
any very material alteration in its character: but such is the latitude
in growth of this fine tribe, that it would not be possible to prescribe
exact bounds to the size, or limits to the height, of some luxuriant
plants in a rich congenial soil; and if under such circumstances this
Rose should be found to exceed our present delineation of it, there is
little doubt but amongst all the other varieties it would still be found
(comparatively) a dwarf plant.

[Illustration]



ROSA alba.

_White Rose._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     Rosa germinibus ovatis, glabris: pedunculis hispidis: floribus
     albis: foliolis ovatis, acutis, ad margines serratis, subtus
     leviter tomentosis: caulis erecto-patens, superne sub-glaber, ad
     basin aculeis rigidis instructus.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     Rose with smooth egg-shaped seed-buds and hispid peduncles: flowers
     white: leaflets ovate and pointed, with serrated margins, slightly
     downy on the under side: stem between erect and spreading, nearly
     smooth on the upper part, but furnished with strong spines towards
     the base.

       *       *       *       *       *

This Rose is a native of Britain, and considered as the first on the
list of Garden Roses removed from the common Hedge or Dog Rose, its
charming wild original. The flowers are very fugitive, so soon falling
off that a specimen in fine bloom is not easily procured. It is the
source of several fine varieties, and flowers during the summer months,
but is in very few collections.

[Illustration]



ROSA Caroliniana; _Var. flore pleno_.

_Great Burnet-leaved Carolina Rose; Double-flowered Variety._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     Rosa germinibus globosis pedunculisque hispidis: petiolis
     aculeatis: foliolis oblongis, acutis, serratis, nitidis: floribus
     carneis, in centro inapertis: caule glabro: spinis ramorum sparsis
     et oppositis.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     Rose with round seed-buds and hispid peduncles: petioles prickly:
     the leaflets are oblong, sharp-pointed, sawed, and shining: flowers
     flesh-coloured, and unopened in the middle: stem smooth: the spines
     of the branches are scattered and opposite.

       *       *       *       *       *

In this double-flowered variety of the Great Burnet-leaved Carolina Rose
there is a variation much more powerful than many of the new species of
the present day could lay claim to, as nearly one half of the plant from
which our figure was made, in the garden of the Hon. W. Irby, was so
different both in shape and size, that they might easily pass for
distinct species; and had we not found them both on one plant, we should
have been inclined to consider them as such. A separate figure will
therefore be given of such a strong-marked difference of character, that
will probably illustrate the distinction actually existing between
varieties and species.

[Illustration]



ROSA semperflorens, _simplex_.

_Single Ever-blooming Rose._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     Rosa germinibus subrotundis, pedunculisque leviter hispidis,
     glabris et nitidis: floribus simplicibus et rubris: foliolis
     oblongis, acutis, glabris et nitidis, margine serrulatis: caule
     viridi, glabro, ad basin spinis rubris.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     Rose with roundish seed-buds, and peduncles slightly hispid,
     smooth, and shining: flowers single and red: leaflets oblong,
     pointed, smooth and shining, with finely sawed margins: stem green,
     smooth, with red thorns on the lower part.

       *       *       *       *       *

This Rose is known by the appellation of diversifolia, a title equally
applicable to any other Rose. But were this the only objection, we are
not so much attached to novelty as to think the adoption of a more
appropriate term a sufficient compensation for the confusion which
alteration invariably produces. As the present subject, however, (of
recent introduction) is unquestionably the original or single of that
line semi-double ever-blooming Rose so well characterized by the title
of semperflorens, the species must therefore undoubtedly retain the
appropriate title which its fine variety has so long enjoyed.

Our figure was made from a plant in the nursery of Messrs. Whitley.

[Illustration]



ROSA multiflora.

_Many-flowered Rose._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     Rosa germinibus subrotundis et pedunculis villosis: floribus
     numerosis, confertis, parvis, multiplicatis, carneis, odoratis:
     foliolis sub-ovatis, villosis: petiolis villosis et aculeatis:
     caule viridi, glabro, cum aculeis sparsis.

     Habitat in Sinensi.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     Rose with roundish seed-buds and villous peduncles: flowers
     numerous, crowded together, small, of many folds, flesh-coloured,
     and sweet-scented: leaflets nearly egg-shaped, and hairy: petioles
     villous and prickly: stem green, smooth, with scattered prickles.

     Native of China.

       *       *       *       *       *

This beautiful plant was introduced by T. Evans, esq. amongst many
others, from China, that delightful region, where Flora reigns
unrivalled. Previous to its flowering it was regarded as a yellow Rose;
and although it has proved to be a very different plant, it has
exceeded, we believe, what was expected from it under its former
appellation. It is equally as hardy as any other Rose we are acquainted
with. The flowers are very fragrant; and its growth is so rapid, that a
small cutting rooted in the spring will in the course of the summer
become a fine large plant. The luxuriance of its crowded flowers
immediately pointed out the specific title of multiflora, by which
appellation we find it already described by Thunberg, and enumerated by
Willdenow. Our figure was made, from the only plant that has as yet
flowered in this country, at the nursery of Messrs. Colville in the
month of July; and from what we can at present judge of it, the three
summer months appeared to be the utmost period of its inflorescence.

[Illustration]



ROSA sulphurea.

_Double Yellow Rose._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     Rosa germinibus glabris, rotundato-planis: foliis ovalibus,
     marginibus serratis, sub-glaucis: petiolis aculeatis: floribus
     ramulos terminantibus: corollis flavis: petalis numerosis,
     confertis: caule ramoso, spinis curvatis armato.

     Habitat in Oriente.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     Rose with smooth seed-buds flatly rounded: leaves oval, sawed at
     the edges, and nearly glaucous: petioles prickly: flowers terminate
     the smaller branches: blossom yellow: petals numerous, and crowded
     together: stem branching, and armed with crooked spines.

     Native of the Levant.

       *       *       *       *       *

This fine yellow Rose is a native of the Levant, and not to be met with
in flower in any of the nursery-grounds very near London. We have not
seen it even in a budding state nearer than Brentford, in the collection
of the Duke of Northumberland at Sion House, whence our drawing was
begun last year from a fine plant with numerous buds, not one of which
expanded sufficiently perfect for us to represent. To complete our
figure, we this year received some fine specimens communicated by the
Hon. W. Irby, collected from a gentleman’s garden in the neighbourhood
of Farnham, a distance of between twenty and thirty miles, and we
believe the nearest approximation to the metropolis in which it can be
found in perfect bloom. Even in the most congenial situations it is
subject to an irregularity of inflorescence, from the extreme complexity
of its petals, occasionally bursting at the sides, and destroying the
symmetry of its appearance. We have never seen it lighter in colour than
we have represented, certainly much too deep a yellow to exemplify the
pallid hue of sulphur. It flowers in the month of June, and was
introduced to this country in the year 1629.

[Illustration]



ROSA Cinnamomea, _multiplex_.

_Double Cinnamon Rose._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     Rosa germinibus globosis, glabris, et saturatè purpureis: floribus
     petalis confertis: pedunculis glabris, ad basin bracteâ magnâ
     instructis: foliis saturatè viridibus, rugosis, subtùs glaucis:
     petiolis aculeatis: caule aculeato, cum spinis sparsis geminis.

     Habitat in Europâ Meridionali.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     Rose with round seed-buds, smooth, and of a dark purple colour:
     flowers with crowded petals: footstalks smooth, and furnished at
     the base with a large bract or floral leaf: leaves of a deep green,
     and wrinkled, glaucous on the under side: footstalks prickly: stem
     prickly, with scattered spines in pairs.

     Native of the South of Europe.

       *       *       *       *       *

The odour of Cinnamon, which this early blooming Rose is supposed to
possess, has furnished it with a specific title by which it is well
known. It is a very old species, and said to have been introduced from
the south of Europe as long ago as the year 1569. Like all those roses
whose flowers are very double, the petals are subject to be disorganised
by the prevalence of easterly winds, to which its early bloom is liable.
It is only increased by layers, as the abundance of the petals absorbing
all the stamina precludes the fruit’s increase.

[Illustration]



ROSA Provincialis regalis.

_Royal or Queen’s Province Rose._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     Rosa germinibus sub-globosis: pedunculis et petiolis hispidè
     glandulosis: foliis pinnatis: foliolis ovatis, acutis, subtùs
     villosis: floribus semi-duplicibus, incarnatis, magnis.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     Rose with nearly round seed-buds: peduncles and petioles hispidly
     glandular: leaves winged: leaflets ovate, pointed, and villose
     beneath: flowers semi-double, flesh-coloured, and large.

       *       *       *       *       *

This fine semi-double Rose is known amongst cultivators by the
appellation of Royal or Queen’s Province, and considered as an excellent
forcing Rose, and much esteemed by those nurserymen who with the
assistance of the hot-stove bring flowers into a premature state of
inflorescence. Like all the other Province species, its natural period
of blooming is during the months of June and July.

[Illustration]



ROSA sempervirens.

_Evergreen Rose._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     Rosa germinibus ovatis: calycibus pedunculisque hispidis: petiolis
     aculeatis: caule spinis curvatis rubris armato: floribus in sparsis
     umbellis, bracteis lanceolatis, reflexis: corollis albis.

     Habitat in Germaniâ.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     Rose with egg-shaped seed-buds: empalements and peduncles hispid:
     petioles prickly: stem armed with crooked red spines: flowers grow
     in scattered umbels, with lance-shaped, reflexed floral leaves:
     blossoms white.

     Native of Germany.

       *       *       *       *       *

As a training Rose, this species is particularly estimable from the
rapidity of its growth. It also retains its leaves longer than most
roses, but is certainly, strictly speaking, not an evergreen. It so much
resembles the Rosa arvensis, that at first sight they might easily be
taken one for the other. It is a native of Germany, and was introduced
about the year 1629. Our drawing was made from a fine plant in the
collection of Isaac Swainson, esq. at Twickenham.

[Illustration]



ROSA Eglanteria Americana.

_American Eglantine Rose._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     Rosa germinibus sub-globosis, hispidis: pedunculis et petiolis
     hispidè glandulosis: caule fruticoso, spinis sparsis, parvis,
     rectis armato: ramis numerosis: floribus ramos singulariter
     terminantibus: corollis semi-duplicibus, saturatè incarnatis:
     foliis glabris, odoratis: foliolis ovatis.

     Habitat in Americâ Boreali.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     Rose with nearly round seed-buds, hispid: peduncles and petioles
     hispidly glandular: stem shrubby, armed with small, straight,
     scattered spines: branches numerous: flowers terminate the branches
     singly: blossom semi-double, and of a deep flesh colour: leaves
     smooth, and scented: leaflets egg-shaped.

     Native of North America.

       *       *       *       *       *

This new species of Sweetbriar, we are informed, was introduced from
North America, about the year 1801, by Mr. Pope, a nurseryman near
Birmingham. The foliage is small, neat, and regular, but not so fragrant
as the leaves of the common Eglantine. The flowers are abundant, and of
a fine pinky colour whilst in perfection, but grow paler when going out
of bloom; in which state its size enlarges just before the petals fall
off. It is increased by seed and layers; but as it does not at present
seed freely, nor are the layers rapid in forming a root, it will most
probably continue for some time as a scarce rose. Our drawing was made
in the month of June, from a luxuriant plant in the nursery of Mr.
Williams, at Turnham Green.

[Illustration]



ROSA blanda.

_Hudson’s Bay or Labradore Rose._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     Rosa germinibus globosis: calycibus pedunculisque hispidis: caule
     et ramis numerosis aculeis, rectis, rubris, horizontaliter sitis,
     armatis: foliis pinnatis: foliolis oblongis, æqualiter serratis, et
     lucidis: petiolis rubris, glabris, leviter armatis: floribus
     sparsis: corollis rubris.

     Habitat in Americâ.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     Rose with globose seed-buds: empalements and peduncles hispid: stem
     and branches armed with numerous prickles, straight, red, and
     horizontally situated: leaves winged: leaflets oblong, equally
     sawed, and shining: petioles red, smooth, and slightly armed:
     flowers scattered: blossoms red.

     Native of America.

       *       *       *       *       *

In the Hortus Kewensis we find this Rose described as having smooth
seed-buds and an unarmed stem; and the very reverse character being the
leading features by which our plant may at all times be discriminated,
induced us at first to imagine it might be a different species: but
finding upon inquiry amongst cultivators, that this Rose and no other is
perfectly known by the appellations of Rosa blanda, Hudson’s Bay or
Labradore Rose, we have therefore retained the name, but altered the
description. It is a very lively-looking little rose, whose bloom is
rather short in duration, but of quick succession, introduced to this
country in the year 1773. Our drawing was made from plants in the
nursery of Messrs. Loddige.

[Illustration]



ROSA centifolia, _holosericea_.

_Velvet-flowered Hundred-leaved Rose._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     Rosa germinibus sub-globosis, pedunculisque hispidis: caule et
     petiolis hispidis, aculeatis: foliis pinnatis: foliolis ovatis,
     subtùs villosis: floribus saturatè purpureis: corollis simplicibus,
     semi-duplicibus, vel petalis plenis.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     Rose with nearly round seed-buds, and peduncles hispid: stem and
     petioles hispid and prickly: leaves winged: leaflets ovate, and
     villose beneath: flowers of a deep purple colour: blossom single,
     semi-double, or full of petals.

       *       *       *       *       *

This species of Rose forms part of a section known by the appellation of
Centifolia, in which may be included many of the French and Dutch Roses,
whose general appearance is so nearly alike, that when out of bloom it
would be very difficult to distinguish one from the other. For what
reason it has acquired the specific title of centifolia we are at a loss
to guess, as it would be utterly impossible to find out a species by any
given number of leaves, which must ever depend on the size of the plant.
But as a very old species long usage has given it such a sanction, that
a more appropriate title would not be used in preference.

Our drawing represents the single, semi-double, and completely
double-flowered velvet Roses, easily distinguished when in flower, but
when out of bloom not the slightest difference is discernible.

[Illustration]



ROSA Eglanteria, _major_.

_Large Eglantine Rose, or Tree Sweetbriar._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     Rosa germinibus sub-globosis, pedunculisque hispidis: floribus
     magnis, semi-duplicibus: foliis patentibus: foliolis ovatis,
     magnis, marginibus glandulosis: caule et petiolis aculeis rubris
     recurvis instructis.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     Rose with nearly round seed-buds and hispid peduncles: flowers
     large, and semi-double: leaves spreading: leaflets ovate, large,
     and glandular on the edges: the stem and petioles are furnished
     with prickles recurved and red.

       *       *       *       *       *

This Eglantine Rose is the spontaneous effusion of nature in the
nursery-ground of Mr. Williams of Turnham Green, who informs me that he
found it on his premises in the year 1786, growing luxuriantly in the
midst of a hedge of single Sweetbriars. Its growth is so rapid, that it
will form shoots of seven and eight feet in one season; which joined to
the largeness of its flowers and foliage, induced us to adopt the
specific appellation of major, a title by which we think it may (at
present) be distinguished from any other, as the largest Sweetbriar we
have as yet seen is certainly altogether in size a minor, when compared
with this fine plant. Seeds, but not freely, and is propagated (slowly)
by layers.

[Illustration]



ROSA Eglanteria, _multiplex_.

_Double Eglantine Rose, or Williams’s Sweetbriar._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     Rosa germinibus sub-globosis, pedunculisque hispidis et
     glandulosis: floribus multipetalis: foliolis ovatis, glandulosis,
     et pilosis: caule et petiolis aculeatis.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     Rose with nearly round seed-buds, and peduncles hispid and
     glandular: flowers of many petals: leaflets ovate, glandular, and
     hairy: stem and petioles prickly.

       *       *       *       *       *

Of all the fragrant-leaved Roses, this is certainly the finest, and for
which we are indebted to Mr. Williams, who discovered it in his nursery
about 23 years ago, growing promiscuously in the same Sweetbriar-bush
with the Eglanteria major; and although found vegetating at the same
time, and under the same auspices, yet is its character altogether very
different; this being as slow in growth as the other is quick. It is the
only Eglantine Rose at present known with perfectly double flowers, and
is with difficulty increased by layers, which are a long time in forming
a root; and the seeds, which it very rarely ripens, remain in the ground
a long time dormant.

[Illustration]



ROSA gracilis.

_Slender Rose._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     Rosa germinibus sub-globosis: pedunculis leviter hispidis,
     gracilibus: floribus multipetalis, imbricatis, equalibus,
     incarnatis. Caulis glaber, flexibilis: aculeis sparsis.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     Rose with nearly round seed-buds, and peduncles slightly hispid and
     slender: flowers of many petals, imbricated, equal, and
     flesh-coloured. Stem smooth and flexible: spines scattered.

       *       *       *       *       *

This delicate Rose was raised about the year 1796 by Mr. Shailer,
nurseryman, of Little Chelsea. It is as yet so little known, that a
dwarf variety of the Province is frequently sold for it; a mistake most
probably owing to its being commonly called amongst cultivators
Shailer’s Province Rose: but it certainly bears most resemblance to the
Rosa Indica, and is, as far as we can understand, a hybrid production
between the two species; and if so, it might come under the description
of variety only. But, whilst nature produces such distinct and beautiful
varieties, specific titles can only be regarded as a variation of terms.
It makes a most graceful appearance, from the drooping of its branches
and nodding of its flowers, whose close and numerous petals are too
heavy for its weak and slender stem to support. It appears to be a Rose
calculated to train against a trellis to great advantage. It is as hardy
as most Roses, and is increased (but not easily) by layers. Flowers
during the months of June and July.

[Illustration]



ROSA ferox.

_Fierce or Hedge-Hog Rose._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     Rosa germinibus globosis, pedunculisque glabris: foliis
     quadrijugis, cum folio terminali: foliolis ovatis, rugosis,
     serratis: petiolis aculeatis: caule aculeis numerosis rectis
     albicantibus armato.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     Rose with round seed-buds and smooth peduncles: leaves composed of
     four pairs, with a terminal leaf: leaflets ovate, wrinkled, and
     serrate: footstalks prickly: stem armed with numerous straight
     whitish thorns.

       *       *       *       *       *

Of this distinct species of Rose we can gain but little information, as
it is not enumerated in Willdenow, at least not under our specific
title; but we are inclined to think his Rosa rugosa is meant for it, as
the description accords exactly with our figure. It is well known to
cultivators by the specific appellation of ferox,--we have therefore
retained it; although hystrix would have been a much better specific
title, as it seems by nature formed to be admired at a distance, from
the numerous large thorns with which the stem is surrounded, that appear
calculated to express the old adage of ‘Noli me tangere.’

Our drawing was made from a plant in the nursery of Messrs. Whitley and
Brame, in the month of June.

[Illustration]



ROSA glabra.

_Smooth Rose._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     Rosa germinibus ovatis: pedunculis et petiolis hispidis: floribus
     multipetalis, equalibus: foliis glabris: foliolis oblongis,
     acuminatis, serratis: caule glabro, sub-inermi.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     Rose with egg-shaped seed-buds: peduncles and footstalks hispid:
     flowers with many petals and equal: leaves smooth: leaflets oblong,
     pointed, and sawed: stem smooth, nearly without thorns.

       *       *       *       *       *

This Rose was introduced to this country from Holland about the year
1802. The only title we have heard given to it by cultivators is Double
Thornless White Rose,--an appellation certainly not very descriptive of
the plant; for, although it is thornless on the upper part, yet at the
base of the stem it is thorny. The flowers are sometimes white, but we
have oftener seen them tinged with a pale pinky colour. In size and
shape they are like the Burgundy Rose, and in the foliage they resemble
the Rosa moschata, but are very distinct from either, and altogether
very different from any species with which we are at present acquainted.
It is slow of increase, as are all the distinctly new Roses we have
hitherto met with, which probably is (for a time) a genuine trait of
their originality. Our figure is from a plant in the nursery of Messrs.
Whitley and Brames, in the month of June 1808.

[Illustration]



ROSA lurida.

_Lurid Rose._


CHARACTER SPECIFICUS.

     Rosa paniculis multifloris: germinibus globosis: foliis patentibus:
     foliolis sub-glaucis, ovato-acuminatis, serratis: caule glabro
     purpureo, pulvere violaceo tecto: aculeis paucis et recurvis.


SPECIFIC CHARACTER.

     Rose with many-flowered panicles: seed-buds globular: leaves
     spreading: leaflets nearly glaucous, ovate-pointed, and sawed: stem
     smooth and purple, covered with a violet-coloured powder: prickles
     few and recurved.

       *       *       *       *       *

This elegant Rose is said to be a native of Switzerland, and sent from
thence by Dr. Messear, about the year 1803, to the gardens of Isaac
Swainson, esq. at Twickenham; whence our figure was taken. It is not, we
believe, at present in any other collection in this kingdom. It has so
perfect an air of novelty, that amongst the numerous Roses daily ycleped
new, this is one of the very very few to which a separate and distinct
character may justly be applied. Flowers during the months of June and
July, is of rapid growth, and forms a tall and bushy shrub.

[Illustration]



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